WorldWideScience

Sample records for buoyant density gradient

  1. Buoyant densities of phototrophic sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R.

    1985-01-01

    The buoyant densities of bacterial cells are greatly influenced by the accumulation of intracellular reserve material. The buoyant density of phototrophic bacteria that are planktonic is of particular interest, since these organisms must remain in the photic zone of the water column for optimal growth. Separation of cells by their buoyant density may also be of use in separating and identifying organisms from a natural population. The bacteria used were obtained from pure cultures, enrichments, or samples taken directly from the environment.

  2. Protoplast water content of bacterial spores determined by buoyant density sedimentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, J A; Beaman, T C; Gerhardt, P

    1985-01-01

    Protoplast wet densities (1.315 to 1.400 g/ml), determined by buoyant density sedimentation in Metrizamide gradients, were correlated inversely with the protoplast water contents (26.4 to 55.0 g of water/100 g of wet protoplast) of nine diverse types of pure lysozyme-sensitive dormant bacterial spores. The correlation equation provided a precise method for obtaining the protoplast water contents of other spore types with small impure samples and indicated that the average protoplast dry densi...

  3. Energy in density gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindric configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and in partic...

  4. Density Driven Removal of Sediment from a Buoyant Muddy Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhnia, M.; Strom, K.

    2014-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effect of settling driven instabilities on sediment removal from hypopycnal plumes. Traditional approaches scale removal rates with particle settling velocity however, it has been suggested that the removal from buoyant suspensions happens at higher rates. The enhancement of removal is likely due to gravitational instabilities, such as fingering, at two-fluid interface. Previous studies have all sought to suppress flocculation, and no simple model exists to predict the removal rates under the effect of such instabilities. This study examines whether or not flocculation hampers instability formation and presents a simple removal rate model accounting for gravitational instabilities. A buoyant suspension of flocculated Kaolinite overlying a base of clear saltwater was investigated in a laboratory tank. Concentration was continuously measured in both layers with a pair of OBS sensors, and interface was monitored with digital cameras. Snapshots from the video were used to measure finger velocity. Samples of flocculated particles at the interface were extracted to retrieve floc size data using a floc camera. Flocculation did not stop creation of settling-driven fingers. A simple cylinder-based force balance model was capable of predicting finger velocity. Analogy of fingering process of fine grained suspensions to thermal plume formation and the concept of Grashof number enabled us to model finger spacing as a function of initial concentration. Finally, from geometry, the effective cross-sectional area was correlated to finger spacing. Reformulating the outward flux expression was done by substitution of finger velocity, rather than particle settling velocity, and finger area instead of total area. A box model along with the proposed outward flux was used to predict the SSC in buoyant layer. The model quantifies removal flux based on the initial SSC and is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  5. A change in a single gene of Salmonella typhimurium can dramatically change its buoyant density.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, W W; Kirkish, M A; Koch, A L

    1994-01-01

    The growth rates and buoyant densities of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant, TL126 (proB74A+), with enhanced osmotolerance caused by proline overproduction were measured and compared with the growth rates and buoyant densities of an isogenic (wild-type) strain, TL128 (proB+ A+), with normal control of proline production. Growth rates were determined in a rich medium (Luria broth) with added NaCl to produce various osmotic strengths ranging from 300 to 2,000 mosM. At low concentrations of NaCl, ...

  6. Evidence for osmoregulation of cell growth and buoyant density in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, W W; Kubitschek, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The buoyant density of cells of Escherichia coli B/r NC32 increased with the osmolarity of the growth medium. Growth rate and its variability were also dependent upon the osmolarity of the medium. Maximum growth rates and minimum variability of these rates were obtained in Luria broth by addition of NaCl to a concentration of about 0.23 M.

  7. Physiological considerations in applying laboratory-determined buoyant densities to predictions of bacterial and protozoan transport in groundwater: Results of in-situ and laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Kinner, N.; Mayberry, N.

    1997-01-01

    Buoyant densities were determined for groundwater bacteria and microflagellates (protozoa) from a sandy aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) using two methods: (1) density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and (2) Stoke's law approximations using sedimentation rates observed during natural-gradient injection and recovery tests. The dwarf (average cell size, 0.3 ??m), unattached bacteria inhabiting a pristine zone just beneath the water table and a majority (~80%) of the morphologically diverse community of free- living bacteria inhabiting a 5-km-long plume of organically-contaminated groundwater had DGC-determined buoyant densities <1.019 g/cm3 before culturing. In the aquifer, sinking rates for the uncultured 2-??m size class of contaminant plume bacteria were comparable to that of the bromide tracer (1.9 x 10-3 M), also suggesting a low buoyant density. Culturing groundwater bacteria resulted in larger (0.8-1.3 ??m), less neutrally- buoyant (1.043-1.081 g/cm3) cells with potential sedimentation rates up to 64-fold higher than those predicted for the uncultured populations. Although sedimentation generally could be neglected in predicting subsurface transport for the community of free-living groundwater bacteria, it appeared to be important for the cultured isolates, at least until they readapt to aquifer conditions. Culturing-induced alterations in size of the contaminant-plume microflagellates (2-3 ??m) were ameliorated by using a lower nutrient, acidic (pH 5) porous growth medium. Buoyant densities of the cultured microflagellates were low, i.e., 1.024-1.034 g/cm3 (using the DGC assay) and 1.017-1.039 g/cm3 (estimated from in-situ sedimentation rates), suggesting good potential for subsurface transport under favorable conditions.

  8. Interpretation of the reduced density gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Boto, Roberto A.; Contreras-García, Julia; Tierny, Julien; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2015-01-01

    An interpretation of the reduced density gradient in terms of the bosonic kinetic energy density is presented. Contrary to other bonding indicators based on the kinetic energy density such as the localised orbital locator (LOL) or the electron localization function (ELF), the reduced density gradient is not only able to identify covalent bondings, but also ionic and non-covalent interactions. This study reveals that the critical points of the reduced density gradient are closely connected wit...

  9. Combining Step Gradients and Linear Gradients in Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok A; Walz, Jenna A; Gonidec, Mathieu; Mace, Charles R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-06-16

    Combining aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS) and magnetic levitation (MagLev) provides a method to produce hybrid gradients in apparent density. AMPS—solutions of different polymers, salts, or surfactants that spontaneously separate into immiscible but predominantly aqueous phases—offer thermodynamically stable steps in density that can be tuned by the concentration of solutes. MagLev—the levitation of diamagnetic objects in a paramagnetic fluid within a magnetic field gradient—can be arranged to provide a near-linear gradient in effective density where the height of a levitating object above the surface of the magnet corresponds to its density; the strength of the gradient in effective density can be tuned by the choice of paramagnetic salt and its concentrations and by the strength and gradient in the magnetic field. Including paramagnetic salts (e.g., MnSO4 or MnCl2) in AMPS, and placing them in a magnetic field gradient, enables their use as media for MagLev. The potential to create large steps in density with AMPS allows separations of objects across a range of densities. The gradients produced by MagLev provide resolution over a continuous range of densities. By combining these approaches, mixtures of objects with large differences in density can be separated and analyzed simultaneously. Using MagLev to add an effective gradient in density also enables tuning the range of densities captured at an interface of an AMPS by simply changing the position of the container in the magnetic field. Further, by creating AMPS in which phases have different concentrations of paramagnetic ions, the phases can provide different resolutions in density. These results suggest that combining steps in density with gradients in density can enable new classes of separations based on density. PMID:25978093

  10. Buoyant-thermocapillary instabilities in extended liquid layers subjected to a horizontal temperature gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Burguete, J; Mukolobwiez, N.; Daviaud, F.; Garnier, N.; Chiffaudel, A.

    2001-01-01

    We report experiments on buoyant-thermocapillary instabilities in differentially heated liquid layers. The results are obtained for a fluid of Prandtl number 10 in a rectangular geometry with different aspect ratios. Depending on the height of liquid and on the aspect ratios, the two-dimensional basic flow destabilizes into oblique traveling waves or longitudinal stationary rolls, respectively, for small and large fluid heights. Temperature measurements and space–time recordings r...

  11. Numerical study of a buoyant plume from a multi-flue stack into a variable temperature gradient atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velamati, Ratna Kishore; Vivek, M; Goutham, K; Sreekanth, G R; Dharmarajan, Santosh; Goel, Mukesh

    2015-11-01

    Air pollution is one of the major global hazards and industries have been one of its major contributors. This paper primarily focuses on analyzing the dispersion characteristics of buoyant plumes of the pollutant released from a multi-flue vertical stack into a variable temperature gradient atmosphere (α) in a constant-velocity cross wind using two stack configurations-inline and parallel. The study is conducted for different Froude numbers, Fr = 12.64, 9.55, and 8.27. The atmospheric temperature gradients considered for the study are 0, +1, +1.5, and +2 K/100 m. The numerical study is done using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. The effects of stack configuration, α, and Fr on the plume characteristics are presented. It is observed that the plume rises higher and disperses over a larger area with the inline configuration due to better mixing and shielding effect. With higher α, it is seen that the plume rises initially and then descends due to variation of the buoyant force. The plume rise initially is strongly influenced by the momentum of the jet, and as it moves downstream, it is influenced by the cooling rate of the plume. Furthermore, the plume rises higher and disperses over a larger area with a decrease in Fr. PMID:26099599

  12. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient

  13. Isotachophoresis of proteins in sucrose density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, F

    1993-10-01

    The separation of proteins from human serum by isotachophoresis in sucrose density gradients, with mixtures of discrete amphoteric substances as spacers, is described. Open columns and columns with a dialysis membrane to hold the sucrose gradients were used. A simple algorithm based on the Kohlrausch function was used to calculate the amount of each spacer. The pH gradients generated in open columns were found to be in agreement with the calculations. The load was up to two gram proteins. The analysis of the fractions obtained after the separation showed a distribution of components similar to as analytical isotachophoresis. It is concluded that sucrose density gradients are suitable as supporting media for the preparative separation of proteins by isotachophoresis. The high resolution attained and the possibility of scaling-up the separation systems are major advantages of this system. In addition, the sample is easily and completely recoverable. PMID:8125049

  14. Reconstructing global overturning from meridional density gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, E. D.; Oliver, K. I. C.; Hirschi, J. J.-M.; Mecking, J. V.

    2016-04-01

    Despite the complexity of the global ocean system, numerous attempts have been made to scale the strength of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC), principally in the North Atlantic, with large-scale, basin-wide hydrographic properties. In particular, various approaches to scaling the MOC with meridional density gradients have been proposed, but the success of these has only been demonstrated under limited conditions. Here we present a scaling relationship linking overturning to twice vertically-integrated meridional density gradients via the hydrostatic equation and a "rotated" form of the geostrophic equation. This provides a meridional overturning streamfunction as a function of depth for each basin. Using a series of periodically forced experiments in a global, coarse resolution configuration of the general circulation model NEMO, we explore the timescales over which this scaling is temporally valid. We find that the scaling holds well in the upper Atlantic cell (at 1000 m) for multi-decadal (and longer) timescales, accurately reconstructing the relative magnitude of the response for different frequencies and explaining over 85 % of overturning variance on timescales of 64-2048 years. Despite the highly nonlinear response of the Antarctic cell in the abyssal Atlantic, between 76 and 94 % of the observed variability at 4000 m is reconstructed on timescales of 32 years (and longer). The scaling law is also applied in the Indo-Pacific. This analysis is extended to a higher resolution, stochastically forced simulation for which correlations of between 0.79 and 0.99 are obtained with upper Atlantic MOC variability on timescales >25 years. These results indicate that meridional density gradients and overturning are linked via meridional pressure gradients, and that both the strength and structure of the MOC can be reconstructed from hydrography on multi-decadal and longer timescales provided that the link is made in this way.

  15. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k (perpendicular) ρs ∼< 10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  16. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  17. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions

  18. Determinants of Population Density Gradient in Tel Aviv Metropolitan Area

    OpenAIRE

    Gershon Alperovich

    1980-01-01

    Urban population density gradients have been traditionally estimated from cross-sectional data. The estimates obtained show a flattening of the gradients through time. Few works have attempted to empirically investigate the determinants of the parameters of the function. In this paper we have specified and estimated a simple model of density gradient which uses pooled cross-sectional and time-series data. The results show that income, size of metropolitan area and a time variable explain well...

  19. Non-axisymmetric wind-accretion simulations. II. Density gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a variant of classical Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion is investigated: a totally absorbing sphere moves at various Mach numbers (3 and 10) relative to a medium, which is taken to be an ideal gas having a density gradient (of 3%, 20% or 100% over one accretion radius) perpendicular to the relative motion. Similarly to the 3D models published previously, both with velocity gradients and without, the models with a density gradient presented here exhibit non-stationary flow ...

  20. Density gradient effects in the tokamak edge turbulence with temperature gradient driving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the magnetohydrodynamics, a new theoretical model is established. In this model the density gradient effects is added into the tokamak edge turbulence with temperature gradient driving. The physical mechanism and the density gradient effects in evolution of this turbulence are discussed. The fluctuation levels and the associated diffusion coefficients at the turbulent saturation are calculated. The theoretical results are in agreement with the experimental ones on TEXT

  1. Non-Boussinesq turbulent buoyant jet of a low-density gas leaks into high-density ambient

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-12-01

    In this article, we study the problem of low-density gas jet injected into high-density ambient numerically which is important in applications such as fuel injection and leaks. It is assumed that the local rate of entrainment is consisted of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. The integral models of the mass, momentum and concentration fluxes are obtained and transformed to a set of ordinary differential equations using some similarity transformations. The resulting system is solved to determine the centerline quantities which are used to get the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet. Therefore, the centerline and mean quantities are used together with the governing equation to determine some important turbulent quantities such as, cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity- concentration correlation, turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity. Throughout this paper the developed model is verified by comparing the present results with experimental results and jet/plume theory from the literature. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Density gradients in ceramic pellets measured by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density gradients are of fundamental importance in ceramic processing and computed tomography (CT) can provide accurate measurements of density profiles in sintered and unsintered ceramic parts. As a demonstration of this potential, the density gradients in an unsintered pellet pressed from an alumina powder were measured by CT scanning. To detect such small density gradients, the CT images must have good density resolution and be free from beam-hardening effects. This was achieved by measuring high-contrast (low-noise) images with the use of an Ir-192 isotopic source. A beam-hardening correction was applied. The resulting images are discussed relative to the transmission of forces through the powder mass during the pelletizing process

  3. Auroral E-region electron density gradients measured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hussey

    Full Text Available In the theory of E-region plasma instabilities, the ambient electric field and electron density gradient are both included in the same dispersion relation as the key parameters that provide the energy for the generation and growth of electrostatic plasma waves. While there exist numerous measurements of ionospheric electric fields, there are very few measurements and limited knowledge about the ambient electron density gradients, ∇Ne, in the E-region plasma. In this work, we took advantage of the EISCAT CP1 data base and studied statistically the vertical electron density gradient length, Lz=Ne/(dNe/dz, at auroral E-region heights during both eastward and westward electrojet conditions and different ambient electric field levels. Overall, the prevailing electron density gradients, with Lz ranging from 4 to 7 km, are found to be located below 100 km, but to move steadily up in altitude as the electric field level increases. The steepest density gradients, with Lz possibly less than 3 km, occur near 110 km mostly in the eastward electrojet during times of strong electric fields. The results and their implications are examined and discussed in the frame of the linear gradient drift instability theory. Finally, it would be interesting to test the implications of the present results with a vertical radar interferometer.Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities  

  4. A study on improvement of RANS analysis for erosion of density stratified layer of multicomponent gas by buoyant jet in a containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis on a density stratification layer consisting of multiple gases in the reactor containment vessel is important for the safety assessment of sever accidents. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the project on the containment thermal hydraulics. We carried out Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses in order to investigate the erosion of the density stratification layer by a vertical buoyant jet under this project. We used the Reynolds averaged numerical simulation (RANS) and Large eddy simulation (LES) models to analyze the erosion of a density stratification layer by a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel which represents a containment vessel. This numerical study calculates the turbulent mixing of a two-component (air and helium) gas mixture. The turbulence models used for the RANS analyses are two types of k-ε models. The first model is the low Reynolds number k-ε model developed by Launder and Sharma. The second model is revised from the first model in order to accurately consider the turbulent production and damping in a stratification layer. The results have indicated that both the RANS and LES models simulate almost the same behavior of the erosion of the density stratification layer. While the erosion rate calculated by the low-Re k-ε model was faster than that of the LES model, the modified k-ε model could calculate the erosion rate similar to the LES result. (author)

  5. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  6. Separation of colloidal two dimensional materials by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have been made through various approaches but obtaining monodispersed simply by synthesis optimization gained little success, which highlighted the need for introducing nanoseparation methods. Density gradient ultracentrifugation method has emerged as a versatile and scalable method for sorting colloidal 2D nanomaterials. Isopycnic separation was applied on thickness-dependent separation of graphene nanosheets. And rate-zonal separation, as a more versatile separation method, demonstrated its capability in sorting nanosheets of chemically modified single layered graphene, layered double hydroxide, and even metallic Ag. Establishing such density gradient ultracentrifugation method not only achieves monodispersed nanosheets and provides new opportunities for investigation on size dependent properties of 2D materials, but also makes the surface modification possible by introducing “reaction zones” during sedimentation of the colloids. - Graphical abstract: Two-dimensional (2D) materials have been made through various approaches but obtaining monodispersed simply by synthesis optimization gained little success, which highlighted the need for introducing nanoseparation methods. Density gradient ultracentrifugation method has emerged as a versatile and scalable method for sorting colloidal 2D nanomaterials according to their size of thickness difference. Establishing such density gradient ultracentrifugation method not only achieves monodispersed nanosheets and provides new opportunities for investigation on size dependent properties of 2D materials, but also makes the surface modification possible by introducing “reaction zones” during sedimentation of the colloids. - Highlights: • Density gradient ultracentrifugation was applied on size separation of 2D material. • Isopycnic separation was applied on separation of low density materials. • Rate-zonal separation was applied on separation of large density materials. • Size

  7. Fabrication and evaluation of uniform and gradient density epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domeier, L.A.; Skala, D.M.; Goods, S.H. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Filled epoxy materials which vary in density in a designed manner have been fabricated and their mechanical properties evaluated. Density variations were produced by incorporating different volume fractions of either glass microballoons (GMB) or alumina. Several different sample types were evaluated including uniform density (0.8 g/cm{sup 3} < {rho} < 2.0 g/cm{sup 3}) samples and gradient density samples (GMB only, 0.8 g/cm{sup 3} < {rho} < 1.2 g/cm{sup 3}). The uniform density specimens were evaluated for the effects of filler type and concentration on modulus and toughness. Results indicated that addition of alumina filler significantly increased the resulting modulus while addition of GMB had little measurable effect. These differences could be understood in terms of the differing moduli of the additives relative to that of the epoxy matrix. In the former case the alumina particulates had a modulus much greater than that of the epoxy while in the latter case, the modulus of the GMB additive was only slightly greater than that of the matrix. Addition of either filler significantly degraded the toughness of the composite specimens and precluded the use of gradients to enhance toughness performance. Discontinuous {open_quotes}block{close_quotes} gradients used for testing were fabricated by simple sequential pours of formulations with different GMB loadings and were evaluated for modulus, strength and ductility. Continuous gradients were fabricated in process studies by programmed shifts in the peristaltic pumping/mixing ratio of epoxies filled with either alumina or GMB. None of the continuous gradient materials were mechanically tested. These results suggest that applications utilizing gradient materials containing alumina and similar high modulus fillers to provide designed stiffness rather than improved toughness are the most appropriate targets for future investigation.

  8. Density gradients and the expansion-shrinkage transition during sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Peizhen K.; Li Wenxia; Lannutti, John J

    2004-04-19

    Links between density gradients, internal microstructure and in situ sintering shrinkage in compacts formed from spray-dried alumina powder are established using a laser dilatometer and X-ray computed tomography (CT). All samples initially have the same overall density but different internal structures. An expansion-shrinkage transition occurs between 1000 and 1100 deg. C. Forming conditions appear to play a role: the samples compacted at 25% RH (Relative Humidity) shrank more rapidly than those compacted at 98% RH below 1300 deg. C; above 1300 deg. C, however, the specimen formed at 98% RH shrank more rapidly. CT examination following sintering showed both preservation and exaggeration of the original density gradients. Microstructural connectivity apparently contributes to both the observed macroscopic expansion and the onset of shrinkage. Discrete element modeling clearly suggests that the effective 'transmission' of particle-level behavior to the macroscopic level is controlled both by internal agglomerate density and initial agglomerate bonding.

  9. Density gradient effect on waveguide launching of lower hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive numerical investigation of the waveguide-plasma coupling, in the lower hybrid range of frequencies, is presented. The role of a sharp density gradient at the plasma edge is investigated. It is found that, in the case of a very sharp gradient, the accessibility condition is violated and an appreciable fraction of the total energy is launched. The case of one, two and four waveguides is considered and it is found that the general pattern of the energy spectrum is very similar for the three antennas

  10. The latitudinal gradient of the NO peak density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latitudinal gradients of the maximum nitric oxide densities near 110 km are presented for solstice and equinox periods from 1982 through 1985 as observed by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite. The data indicate that the response of the maximum NO densities to the declining level of solar activity is latitudinally and seasonally dependent: the polar regions exhibit little sensitivity to solar activity, while the low latitude NO responds strongly. The data also reveal marked asymmetries in the latitudinal structure of the two hemispheres for each season. During June solstice periods, the latitudinal distribution is fairly flat, unlike December solstice periods which tend to show a definite minimum near 30 degree N. Similarly, March data show very little latitudinal variation in the NO peak density between about ± 40 degree, while the September data show marked gradients for the later years. The SME data further indicate that the nitric oxide densities vary considerably from day to day, even during very quiet geomagnetic periods, suggesting that the concept of an average distribution is of limited usefulness in understanding nitric oxide. A two-dimensional model is used to simualte the June solar cycle minimum data. The latitudinally averaged magnitudes of the observed NO peak densities are reproduced reasonably well by the model, but the shape of the latitudinal variation is not

  11. Interacting Eigenmodes of a plasma diode with a density gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of narrow high frequency electric field spikes in plasma density gradients is investigated using one-dimensional particle in cell simulations. It is found that the shape of the plasma density gradient is very important for the spike formation. The spike appears also in simulations with immobile ions showing that a coupling to the ion motion, as for example in wave interactions, is not necessary for the formation of HF spikes. However, the HF spike influences the ion motion, and ion waves are seen in the simulations. It has been found, in experiments and simulations, that the electron velocity distribution function deviates from the Maxwellian distribution. Dispersion relations are calculated using realistic distribution functions. The spike can be seen as a coupled system of two Eigenmodes of a plasma diode fed by the beam-plasma interaction. Based on a simplified fluid description of such Eigenmodes, explanations for the localization of the spike, spatially and in frequency, are given. The density amplitude is comparable with the DC density level close to the cathode. Space charge limits of waves in this region seem to determine the amplitude of the spike through the Poisson's equation

  12. Interacting Eigenmodes of a plasma diode with a density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, T.; Gunell, H.

    1997-08-01

    The formation of narrow high frequency electric field spikes in plasma density gradients is investigated using one-dimensional particle in cell simulations. It is found that the shape of the plasma density gradient is very important for the spike formation. The spike appears also in simulations with immobile ions showing that a coupling to the ion motion, as for example in wave interactions, is not necessary for the formation of HF spikes. However, the HF spike influences the ion motion, and ion waves are seen in the simulations. It has been found, in experiments and simulations, that the electron velocity distribution function deviates from the Maxwellian distribution. Dispersion relations are calculated using realistic distribution functions. The spike can be seen as a coupled system of two Eigenmodes of a plasma diode fed by the beam-plasma interaction. Based on a simplified fluid description of such Eigenmodes, explanations for the localization of the spike, spatially and in frequency, are given. The density amplitude is comparable with the DC density level close to the cathode. Space charge limits of waves in this region seem to determine the amplitude of the spike through the Poisson`s equation. 12 refs, 19 figs.

  13. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  14. Density gradients and internal dust in the Orion nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Binette, L; Mayya, Y D

    2002-01-01

    The ionization structure of the Orion nebula can be described as a skin-like ionization structure on the surface of a dense cloud. We propose that a steep density stratification, increasing as a powerlaw ($n \\propto x^{-2}$) function of distance x from the ionization front, exhibits properties which agree with our long-slit spectrum of the Orion nebula. For instance, there exist a unicity relation between both the Hbeta surface brightness or the ionization front [SII] density, and the scale L of the powerlaw, where L is the distance between the ionization front and the onset of the density near the exciting star. Internal dust is required to obtain a simultaneous acceptable fit of both the [SII] density and then Hbeta suface brightness observations. Nebular models containing small dust grains provide a better fit than large grains. The line ratio gradients observed along the slit are qualitatively reproduced by our density stratified models assuming a stellar temperature of 38000 K. Collisional deexcitation a...

  15. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabra I Djomehri

    Full Text Available Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca to phosphorus (P and Ca to zinc (Zn elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc. A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49, hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46, cementum (1.51, and bone (1.68 were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765 and in cementum (595-990, highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  16. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djomehri, Sabra I; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S H; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  17. Moho Density Contrast in Central Eurasia from GOCE Gravity Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Eshagh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth’s inner structure. Since large parts of the world are not yet sufficiently covered by seismic surveys, products from the Earth’s satellite observation systems have more often been used for this purpose in recent years. In this study we use the gravity-gradient data derived from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE, the elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and other global datasets to determine the Moho density contrast at the study area which comprises most of the Eurasian plate (including parts of surrounding continental and oceanic tectonic plates. A regional Moho recovery is realized by solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz’s (VMM inverse problem of isostasy and a seismic crustal model is applied to constrain the gravimetric solution. Our results reveal that the Moho density contrast reaches minima along the mid-oceanic rift zones and maxima under the continental crust. This spatial pattern closely agrees with that seen in the CRUST1.0 seismic crustal model as well as in the KTH1.0 gravimetric-seismic Moho model. However, these results differ considerably from some previously published gravimetric studies. In particular, we demonstrate that there is no significant spatial correlation between the Moho density contrast and Moho deepening under major orogens of Himalaya and Tibet. In fact, the Moho density contrast under most of the continental crustal structure is typically much more uniform.

  18. Stable smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics in very steep density gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Benjamin T; Monaghan, Joseph J; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The equations of smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD), even with the various corrections to instabilities so far proposed, have been observed to be unstable when a very steep density gradient is necessarily combined with a variable smoothing length formalism. Here we consider in more detail the modifications made to the SPMHD equations in LBP2015 that resolve this instability by replacing the smoothing length in the induction and anisotropic force equations with an average smoothing length term. We then explore the choice of average used and compare the effects on a test `cylinder-in-a-box' problem and the collapse of a magnetised molecular cloud core. We find that, aside from some benign numerical effects at low resolutions for the quadratic mean, the formalism is robust as to the choice of average but that in complicated models it is essential to apply the average to both equations; in particular, all four averages considered exhibit similar conservation properties. This improved formalism allows ...

  19. Turbulent Buoyant Jets in Flowing Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    1991-01-01

    The mean behaviour of horizontal turbulent buoyant jets in co-flowing currents is investigated experimentally and numerically, in terms of jet trajectory, dilution and centerline density deficit and velocity decay. It is demonstrated in the paper that the laboratory data on the jet trajectory...... of turbulent buoyant jet in the presence of arnbient current and provide a ready tool for the purpose of sea outfall design....

  20. Spatial DNS of flow transition of a rectangular buoyant reacting free-jet*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, X.; Luo, K. H.

    2001-10-01

    This paper describes a spatial direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the flow transition of a buoyant diffusion flame established on a rectangular nozzle with an aspect ratio of 2:1. Combustion is represented by a one-step finite-rate Arrhenius chemistry. Without applying external perturbations, large vortical structures develop naturally in the flow field due to buoyancy effects. The vortex dynamics of the rectangular buoyant reacting jet has been analysed. The interaction between density gradients and gravity initiates the flow vorticity in the cross-streamwise directions. The streamwise vorticity is mainly generated by the vortex stretching. Downstream of the reacting jet, a more disorganized flow regime characterized by small scales has been observed, following the breakdown of the large vortical structures due to three-dimensional vortex interactions. Analysis of the energy spectra shows that the spatially developing reacting jet has a tendency of transition to turbulence under the effects of combustion-induced buoyancy. Buoyancy effects are found to be very important to the formation, development, interaction and breakdown of vortices. In contrast with the relaminarization effects of chemical exothermicity on non-buoyant jet diffusion flames via volumetric expansion and viscous damping, the tendency towards transition to turbulence in buoyant reacting jets is greatly enhanced by the overwhelming buoyancy effects. Calculations of the mean flow property show that the rectangular buoyant reacting jet has a higher entrainment rate than its non-reacting counterpart.

  1. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  2. The influence of electron density gradient direction on gradient-drift instabilities in the E-layer of the ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Berngardt, O I

    2010-01-01

    We show that the dispersion relation for gradient-drift and Farley-Buneman instabilities within the approximation of the two-fluid MHD should contain the terms which are traditionally supposed to be small. These terms are caused by taking into account divergence of particles velocity and electron density gradient along the magnetic field direction. It is shown that at heights below 115km the solution of the dispersion relation transforms into standard one, except the situations, when the electron density gradient is parallel to magnetic field or wave-vector. In these cases the traditionally neglected summands to the growth rate of the irregularities becomes significant. The additional terms depend on relative directions of electron density gradient, magnetic field and mean velocities. This leads to the different instability growth conditions at equatorial and high-latitude regions of the ionosphere. The obtained results do not contradict with the experimental data.

  3. Stability of an oscillated fluid with a uniform density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqmin, David

    1990-01-01

    Instabilities in a fluid with a constant density gradient that is subject to arbitrarily oriented oscillatory accelerations are considered. With the Boussinesq approximation and for the case of an unbounded fluid, transformation to Lagrangian coordinates allows the reduction of the problem to an ordinary differential equation for each three-dimensional wavenumber. The problem has three parameters: the nondimensional amplitude R of the base-state oscillation, the nondimensional level of background steady acceleration, which for some cases can be represented in terms of a local (in time) Richardson number Ri, and the Prandtl number Pr. Some general bounds on stability are derived. For Pr = 1 closed-form solutions are found for impulse (delta function) accelerations and a general asymptotic solution is constructed for large R and general imposed accelerations. The asymptotic solution takes advantage of the fact that at large R wave growth is concentrated at 'zero points'. These are times when the effective vertical wavenumber passes through zero. Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities are found to dominate at low R, while Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities dominate at high R. At high R, the uniform shear of the Kelvin-Helmholtz case tends to distort and weaken instability waves. With unsteady flows, Ri = 1/4 is no longer an instability limit. Significant instabilities have been found for sinusoidal forcing for Ri up to 0.6.

  4. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  5. The error introduced into a water density measurement due to the presence of a water density gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multigroup diffusion code has been used to calculate the thermal neutron flux resulting from a neutron source in a homogeneous soil system in which there is a linear water density gradient. A relative neutron count rate is obtained by integrating the thermal flux over the volumes of different detectors in that flux. By repeating the calculation in the same soil system containing water at a constant density equal to that pertaining to the measuring point in the gradient system, the change in flux due to the gradient can be determined. The magnitude of the effect is mainly a function of the soil density, the slope of the water density gradient, the proximity of the gradient to the detector and the water density. The mass absorption coefficient and the mass scattering coefficient have very little influence on this effect

  6. NUMERICAL PREDICTION OF LINE BUOYANT JETS IN CROSS FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The k-ε turbulence model was used to establish the mathematicalmodel of two-dimensional line buoyant jets in crossflow. The hybrid finite analytic method and staggered grid were applied to the calculation of line buoyant jets. Only receiving water with uniform density is considered. The distribution of velocity, temperature and turbulent kinetic energy were analyzed, and the variation of the maximum velocity was given. The effect of velocity ratio and densimetric Froude number on line buoyant jets was considered.

  7. Gram-scale fractionation of nanodiamonds by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols-so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs)-are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly <10 nm and their aggregates (ca. 10-500 nm). Here, we introduce a large-scale approach to rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation to obtain monodispersed fractions of nanoparticles in high yields. We use this method to fractionate a highly concentrated and stable aqueous solution of DNDs and to investigate the size distribution of various fractions by dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. This fractionation method enabled us to separate gram-scale amounts of DNDs into several size ranges within a relatively short period of time. In addition, the high product yields obtained for each fraction allowed us to apply the fractionation method iteratively to a particular size range of particles and to collect various fractions of highly monodispersed primary particles. Our method paves the way for in-depth studies of the physical and optical properties, growth, and aggregation mechanism of DNDs. Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results.

  9. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results

  10. Calculate Electric Field Gradient of TiO2 Within Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>TiO2 electric field gradient has been calculated utilizing WIEN2K program, which is ab initio based on density function theory (DFT). DFT uses the charge density as a variable instead of electronic wave

  11. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k⊥ρe ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations

  12. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  13. Density-gradient--vorticity relation in perfect-fluid Robertson-Walker perturbations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous paper, a second-order propagation equation was derived for covariant and gauge-invariant vector fields characterizing density inhomogeneities in an almost-Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (-FLRW) perfect-fluid universe. However, an error there led to omission of a term representing an effect of vorticity on spatial density gradients at linear level. Here we determine this interaction (leading to an extra term in the second-order propagation equation for the spatial density gradient), and examine its geometrical and physical meaning. We define a new local decomposition of the observed density gradient and we show that the scalar variable defined in the decomposition naturally describes density clumping, and satisfies the standard Bardeen second-order equation. The physical meaning of the other variables defined in the decomposition is discussed, and their propagation equations are presented. Finally, the vorticity-induced time growth of the density gradient is derived in the long-wavelength limit

  14. Settling of almost neutrally buoyant particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Settling of particles in a turbulent flow occurs in various industrial and natural phenomena, examples are clouds and waste water treatment. It is well known that turbulence can enhance the settling velocity of particles. Many studies have been done, numerically and experimentally to investigate this behavior for the case of ``heavy'' particles, with particle to fluid density ratios above 100. Here we investigate the case of almost neutrally buoyant particles, i.e. density ratios between 1 and 100. In the case of light particles the Maxey-Riley equations cannot be simplified to only the Stokes drag and gravity force as pressure gradient, added mass and Basset history force are important as well. We investigate the influence of these forces on the settling velocity of particles and show that the extra forces can both increase or decrease the settling velocity, depending on the combination of the Stokes number and gravity applied.

  15. Thomson scattering in dense plasmas with density and temperature gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmann, C.; Thiele, R.; Fäustlin, R. R.; Bornath, Th.; Holst, B.; Kraeft, W.-D.; Schwarz, V.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, Th.; Redmer, R.

    2009-09-01

    Collective X-ray Thomson scattering has become a versatile tool for the diagnostics of dense plasmas. Assuming homogeneous density and temperature throughout the target sample, these parameters can be determined directly from the plasmon dispersion and the ratio of plasmon amplitudes via detailed balance. In inhomogeneous media, the scattering signal is an average of the density and temperature dependent scattering cross-section weighted with the density and temperature profiles. We analyse Thomson scattering spectra in the XUV range from near solid density hydrogen targets generated by free electron laser radiation. The influence of plasma inhomogeneities on the scattering spectrum is investigated by comparing density and temperature averaged scattering signals to calculations assuming homogeneous targets. We find discrepancies larger than 10% between the mean electron density and the effective density as well as between the mean temperature and the effective temperature.

  16. Thomson scattering in dense plasmas with density and temperature gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Fortmann, C; Fäustlin, R R; Bornath, Th; Holst, B; Kraeft, W -D; Schwarz, V; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, Th; Redmer, R

    2009-01-01

    Collective X-ray Thomson scattering has become a versatile tool for the diagnostics of dense plasmas. Assuming homogeneous density and temperature throughout the target sample, these parameters can be determined directly from the plasmon dispersion and the ratio of plasmon amplitudes via detailed balance. In inhomogeneous media, the scattering signal is an average of the density and temperature dependent scattering cross-section weighted with the density and temperature profiles. We analyse Thomson scattering spectra in the XUV range from near solid density hydrogen targets generated by free electron laser radiation.The influence of plasma inhomogeneities on the scattering spectrum is investigated by comparing density and temperature averaged scattering signals to calculations assuming homogeneous targets. We found discrepancies larger than 10% between the mean electron density and the effective density as well as between the mean temperature and the effective temperature.

  17. Effect of combined density gradient centrifugation on X- and Y- sperm separation and chromatin integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Tahereh Esmaeilpour; Leila Elyasi; Soghra Bahmanpour; Alireza Ghannadi; Ahmad Monabbati; Farzaneh Dehghani; Marjaneh Kazerooni

    2012-01-01

    Background: It has been claimed that by using different washing methods, the sperms can be separated according to size, motility, density, chromosomal content and surface markings and charge. These methods also reduce sperm chromatin deficiencies and screen the sperms before applying in assisted reproduction techniques. Objective: This study compared simple density gradient methods and a combined method with albumin density gradient and PureSperm separation (alb/PureSperm) for sex preselectio...

  18. Experimental investigations in turbulent buoyant jets of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axisymmetric, turbulent buoyant jets are investigated in the sodium test section TEFLU. The character of the flow is divided into three regimes depending on the densimetric Froude number: the pure jet, the buoyant jet in the transition regime and the pure plume. By means of a temperature compensated Miniature Permanentmagnet Flowmeter Probe the mean velocity, mean temperature and intensity of temperature fluctuations are measured simultaneously at axial distances between 3 and 40 initial jet diameters from the orifice. The functional principle of the Miniature Permanentmagnet Flowmeter Probe which allows velocity measurements to be made in the presence of a temperature gradient is described in detail. For all three regimes both the decay laws of the quantities measured along the axis of the containment pipe and the radial profiles are indicated and discussed. With the help of the radial profiles of the mean quantities the axial development of the half-width radii and the axial development of the momentum, buoyancy and volume fluxes are calculated. In addition, the time history of the temperature fluctuations is recorded at several radial positions. The data are analysed according to characteristic values of statistical signal analysis such as minimum value, maximum value, skewness, flatness and according to characteristic functions such as probability density function, autopower spectrum density and autocorrelation function. The experimental results for the axisymmetric, turbulent buoyant jets of sodium are compared with experimental results from the literature and with fluids of molecular Prandtl numbers greater than or equal to 0.7. The basic differences betwen the experimental results obtained for water and for sodium are outlined. Statements are formulated which allow thermo- and fluiddynamic diffusion processes to be transferred from water to sodium. (orig.)

  19. Efficient time-dependent density functional theory approximations for hybrid density functionals: Analytical gradients and parallelization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Taras; Kossmann, Simone; Neese, Frank

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we present the implementation of efficient approximations to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA) for hybrid density functionals. For the calculation of the TDDFT/TDA excitation energies and analytical gradients, we combine the resolution of identity (RI-J) algorithm for the computation of the Coulomb terms and the recently introduced "chain of spheres exchange" (COSX) algorithm for the calculation of the exchange terms. It is shown that for extended basis sets, the RIJCOSX approximation leads to speedups of up to 2 orders of magnitude compared to traditional methods, as demonstrated for hydrocarbon chains. The accuracy of the adiabatic transition energies, excited state structures, and vibrational frequencies is assessed on a set of 27 excited states for 25 molecules with the configuration interaction singles and hybrid TDDFT/TDA methods using various basis sets. Compared to the canonical values, the typical error in transition energies is of the order of 0.01 eV. Similar to the ground-state results, excited state equilibrium geometries differ by less than 0.3 pm in the bond distances and 0.5° in the bond angles from the canonical values. The typical error in the calculated excited state normal coordinate displacements is of the order of 0.01, and relative error in the calculated excited state vibrational frequencies is less than 1%. The errors introduced by the RIJCOSX approximation are, thus, insignificant compared to the errors related to the approximate nature of the TDDFT methods and basis set truncation. For TDDFT/TDA energy and gradient calculations on Ag-TB2-helicate (156 atoms, 2732 basis functions), it is demonstrated that the COSX algorithm parallelizes almost perfectly (speedup ˜26-29 for 30 processors). The exchange-correlation terms also parallelize well (speedup ˜27-29 for 30 processors). The solution of the Z-vector equations shows a speedup of ˜24 on 30 processors. The

  20. Three-dimensional flow structure in highly buoyant jet by scanning stereo PIV combined with POD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study flow structure in highly buoyant jet with inflow. • Three-dimensional velocity field is measured by scanning stereo PIV. • We examine flow structure by three-dimensional POD analysis. • Magnitude and scale of velocity fluctuation in POD mode is discussed. • Role of cross-flow across longitudinal structure is reported. - Abstract: The flow characteristics and the structure of highly buoyant jet of low density fluid issuing into a stagnant surrounding of high density fluid is studied by scanning stereo PIV combined with proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis. The experiment is carried out at Froude number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 200, which satisfies the inflow condition due to the unstable density gradient near the nozzle exit. An increase in the maximum mean velocity occurs and the vertical velocity fluctuation is highly amplified near the nozzle exit, which suggests the influence of inflow due to the unstable density gradient. The POD analysis indicates that the vertical velocity fluctuation is the major source of fluctuating energy contributing to the development of the highly buoyant jet. The examination of the POD modes show that the longitudinal structure of the vertical velocity fluctuation is generated along the jet axis having the opposite sign of velocity fluctuation on both sides of the jet axis. The vertical scale of the POD mode decreases with increasing the mode number and results in the frequent appearance of cross-flow across the buoyant jet. The reconstruction flow from the POD modes indicates that the vortex structure is caused by the highly sheared layer between the upward and downward velocity and the inflow is induced by the vortex structure. The magnitude of the vortex structure seems to be weakened with an increase in the distance from the nozzle and the buoyant jet approaches to an asymptotic state in the further downstream

  1. Anisotropy, radial gradients of SCR density and diagnostic of atmosphere optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation of N-S asymmetry of solar cosmic ray for 10 flares during 1997-2002 years was carried out. Calculation of N-S asymmetry was made on the base of neutron monitors data of world net stations. Research of behavior of radial gradients of SCR density in dependence on variations of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and N-S asymmetry was conducted. It was shown, that By component of IMF have definitive influence on radial gradients of SCR density. (author)

  2. X-ray tomography characterization of density gradient aerogel in laser targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenko, L.; Orekhov, A.; Musgrave, C.; Nazarov, W.; Merkuliev, Yu; Borisenko, N.

    2016-04-01

    The low-density solid laser target characterization studies begun with the SkyScan 1074 computer microtomograph (CMT) [1, 2] are now continued with higher resolution of SkyScan 1174. The research is particularly focused on the possibility to obtain, control and measure precisely the gradient density polymers for laser target production. Repeatability of the samples and possibility to obtain stable gradients are analysed. The measurements were performed on the mm-scale divinyl benzene (DVB) rods.

  3. Negatively buoyant starting jets

    OpenAIRE

    Marugán-Cruz, C.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; Martínez-Bazán, C.

    2009-01-01

    The initial development of negatively buoyant jets has been investigated experimentally and numerically, focusing on the role played by gravity in the evolution of the leading vortex ring. Under the experimental conditions considered in this work, the densimetric Froude number, Fr= ρjU²j/[(ρ₀ − ρj) gD] , which represents the ratio between the jet momentum and the buoyancy forces, emerges as the most relevant parameter characterizing the dynamics of the flow. Two different flow regimes h...

  4. Extending the Langevin model to variable-density pressure-gradient-driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bakosi, J

    2011-01-01

    We extend the generalized Langevin model, originally developed for the Lagrangian fluid particle velocity in constant-density shear-driven turbulence, to variable-density (VD) pressure-gradient-driven flows. VD effects due to non-uniform mass concentrations (e.g. mixing of different species) are considered. In the extended model large density fluctuations leading to large differential fluid accelerations are accounted for. This is an essential ingredient to represent the strong coupling between the density and velocity fields in VD hydrodynamics driven by active scalar mixing. The small scale anisotropy, a fundamentally "non-Kolmogorovian" feature of pressure-gradient-driven flows, is captured by a tensorial stochastic diffusion term. The extension is so constructed that it reduces to the original Langevin model in the limit of constant density. We show that coupling a Lagrangian mass-density particle model to the proposed extended velocity equation results in a statistical representation of VD turbulence tha...

  5. Dynamics of buoyant bubbles in clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovski, Georgi; Pope, Edward C D

    2007-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model of the dynamics of buoyant bubbles in the atmosphere of a cluster of galaxies. The derived equations describe velocity, size, mass, temperature and density of the buoyant bubbles as functions of time based on several simple approximations. The constructed model is then used to interpret results of a numerical experiment of heating of the cluster core with buoyant bubbles in a hydrodynamical approximation (i.e. in the absence of magnetic fields, viscosity, and thermal diffusion). Based on the model parameters we discuss possible limitations of the numerical treatment of the problem, and highlight the main physical processes that govern the dynamics of bubbles in the intracluster medium.

  6. Evaluation of gradient corrections in grid-free density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Almloef - Zheng approach to grid-free density functional theory (DFT) uses the resolution of the identity (RI) instead of a finite grid to evaluate the integrals. Application of the RI can lead to stability problems, particularly when gradients are involved. The focus of the current work is on choosing a stable method of evaluating the gradient correction using the RI. A stable method is compared to several unstable methods. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  7. Collisionless absorption of light waves incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collisionless absorption of laser light incident on overdense plasmas with steep density gradients is studied analytically and numerically. For the normal incidence case, it is shown that both sheath inverse bremsstrahlung and the anomalous skin effect are limiting cases of the same collisionless absorption mechanism. Using particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, the effects of finite sheath-transit time and finite density gradient are investigated. The analyses are extended to oblique incident cases. For p-polarized obliquely incident light, the results are significantly different from those for the normal incidence case. Most noticeable is the absorption enhancement for the p-polarized light due to the interaction of the electrons with the normal (parallel to the density gradient) component of the laser electric field in the sheath region

  8. On the propagation of a gravity current into a fluid with horizontal and vertical density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hieu; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2015-11-01

    Large-eddy simulations are used to investigate the dynamics of a rotating gravity current propagating in the ocean surface mixed layer on top of a pycnocline. Two simulations with different conditions in the surface mixed layer are performed: one with a homogenous mixed layer and one with a horizontal density gradient. In the latter case, the density in the mixed layer decreases with propagating distance. In both cases, a nonlinear bore forms at the front of the gravity current with Kelvin-Helmholtz billows that develop below and in the region behind the bore. In the case with a homogeneous mixed layer, the bore propagates at a constant speed which is proportional to √{g' H } where g' is the reduced gravity and H is the mixed layer depth. In the case with the horizontal gradient, the speed decreases in time. It is found that the horizontal density gradient influences the propagation of the bore in the following ways: (1) It reduces the buoyancy difference which drives the bore; (2) It generates a horizontal pressure gradient which drives a counter gravity current opposing the bore. The counter current creates a flow-converging zone ahead of the bore. The speed of the bore is found be dependent of the horizontal density gradient and the traveling distance of the bore.

  9. Neutron radiography of a static density gradient of 3He gas at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, G.; Antognini, A.; Eggenberger, A.; Kirch, K.; Piegsa, F. M.; Soler, U.; Stahn, J.; Taqqu, D.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a stationary helium gas density gradient which is needed for a proposed novel low-energy μ+ beam line. In a closed system with constant pressure the corresponding density gradient is only a function of the temperature. In a neutron radiography experiment two gas cells with different geometries were filled with 3He gas at constant pressures of about 10 mbar. Temperatures in the range from 6 K to 40 K were applied and density distributions with a maximum to minimum density ratio of larger than 3 were realized. The distribution was investigated employing the strongly neutron absorbing isotope 3He. A simple one-dimensional approach derived from Fourier's law describes the obtained gas density with a deviation < 2 %.

  10. Spectroscopic analysis of the density and temperature gradients in the laser-heated gas jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed an analysis of the x-ray spectra produced by a 1.0TW, lambda/sub L/-0.53μm laser-irradiated gas jet. Plasmas produced by ionization of neon, argon and N2 + SF6 gases were included in those measurements. Plasma electron density and temperature gradients were obtained by comparison of measured spectra with those produced by computer modeling. Density gradients were also obtained using laser interferometry. The limitations of this technique for plasma diagnosis will be discussed

  11. Correcting the error in neutron moisture probe measurements caused by a water density gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a neutron probe lies in or near a water density gradient, the probe may register a water density different to that at the measuring point. The effect of a thin stratum of soil containing an excess or depletion of water at various distances from a probe in an otherwise homogeneous system has been calculated, producing an 'importance' curve. The effect of these strata can be integrated over the soil region in close proximity to the probe resulting in the net effect of the presence of a water density gradient. In practice, the probe is scanned through the point of interest and the count rate at that point is corrected for the influence of the water density on each side of it. An example shows that the technique can reduce an error of 10 per cent to about 2 per cent

  12. Investigation of Vapor-Liquid Nucleation for Associating Fluids by Density Gradient Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Dong; LIU Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    An equation of state (EOS) applicable to both the uniform and non-uniform associating fluids was established by using the density-gradient expansion, in which the influence parameter κis formulated as a function of tempera-ture. The molecular parameters were regressed by fitting to the experimental data of vapor pressures and liquid den-sities. Within the framework of density gradient theory (DGT), the nucleation rates for water, heavy water, metha-nol, ethanol, 1-propanoi, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-hexanol were calculated. The results were satisfactory com-pared with the experimental data. Our study shows that DGT preserves all the advantages of density functional the-ory (DFT) in capturing the structure and properties of nucleus but gives much more accurate nucleation rates by adjusting the influence parameter.

  13. Stabilized density gradient theory algorithm for modeling interfacial properties of pure and mixed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mu, Xiaoqun; Alpak, Faruk O; Chapman, Walter G

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient theory (DGT) allows fast and accurate determination of surface tension and density profile through a phase interface. Several algorithms have been developed to apply this theory in practical calculations. While the conventional algorithm requires a reference substance of the system, a modified "stabilized density gradient theory" (SDGT) algorithm is introduced in our work to solve DGT equations for multiphase pure and mixed systems. This algorithm makes it possible to calculate interfacial properties accurately at any domain size larger than the interface thickness without choosing a reference substance or assuming the functional form of the density profile. As part of DGT inputs, the perturbed chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) equation of state (EoS) was employed for the first time with the SDGT algorithm. PC-SAFT has excellent performance in predicting liquid phase properties as well as phase behaviors. The SDGT algorithm with the PC-SAFT EoS was tested and compared with ...

  14. Vertical gradients of lung density in supine subjects with fibrosing alveolitis or pulmonary emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Millar, A B; Denison, D M

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography was used to determine the vertical gradient of density in the peripheral lung tissue of 12 patients with histologically proved fibrosing alveolitis and 12 patients with chronic bronchitis and evidence of pulmonary emphysema on the computed tomograms. Measurements were made at total lung capacity and at residual volume and compared with similar measurements from 12 normal subjects reported in a previous study. At residual volume the mean peripheral tissue density in the emp...

  15. Accuracy of generalized gradient approximation functionals for density functional perturbation theory calculations

    OpenAIRE

    He, Lianhua; Liu, Fang; Hautier, Geoffroy; Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, J. J.; Rignanese, G. -M.; Zhou, Aihui

    2013-01-01

    We assess the validity of various exchange-correlation functionals for computing the structural, vibrational, dielectric, and thermodynamical properties of materials in the framework of density-functional perturbation theory (DFPT). We consider five generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) functionals (PBE, PBEsol, WC, AM05, and HTBS) as well as the local density approximation (LDA) functional. We investigate a wide variety of materials including a semiconductor (silicon), a metal (copper), a...

  16. A collocation method for surface tension calculations with the density gradient theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Mahler; Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.

    2016-01-01

    Surface tension calculations are important in many industrial applications and over a wide range of temperatures, pressures and compositions. Empirical parachor methods are not suitable over a wide condition range and the combined use of density gradient theory with equations of state has been pr...

  17. Vertical density gradient in the eastern North Atlantic during the last 30,000 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogerson, M.; Ramirez, J. [University of Hull, Geography Department, Hull (United Kingdom); Bigg, G.R. [University of Sheffield, Department of Geography, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Rohling, E.J. [University of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre, School of Ocean and Earth Science, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Past changes in the density and momentum structure of oceanic circulation are an important aspect of changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and consequently climate. However, very little is known about past changes in the vertical density structure of the ocean, even very extensively studied systems such as the North Atlantic. Here we exploit the physical controls on the settling depth of the dense Mediterranean water plume derived from the Strait of Gibraltar to obtain the first robust, observations-based, probabilistic reconstruction of the vertical density gradient in the eastern North Atlantic during the last 30,000 years. We find that this gradient was weakened by more than 50%, relative to the present, during the last Glacial Maximum, and that changes in general are associated with reductions in AMOC intensity. However, we find only a small change during Heinrich Event 1 relative to the Last Glacial Maximum, despite strong evidence that overturning was substantially altered. This implies that millennial-scale changes may not be reflected in vertical density structure of the ocean, which may be limited to responses on an ocean-overturning timescale or longer. Regardless, our novel reconstruction of Atlantic density structure can be used as the basis for a dynamical measure for validation of model-based AMOC reconstructions. In addition, our general approach is transferrable to other marginal sea outflow plumes, to provide estimates of oceanic vertical density gradients in other locations. (orig.)

  18. Pitfalls of using the geometric-mean combining rule in the density gradient theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    gradient theory. It has been found that the solution profile passes a saddle point of the tangent plane distance, which is independent of the influence parameters. It has been shown that the numerical pitfalls could occur for both vapor liquid and liquid liquid equilibrium systems. Shape density change......It is popular and attractive to model the interfacial tension using the density gradient theory with the geometric-mean combining rule, in which the same equation of state is used for the interface and bulk phases. The computational efficiency is the most important advantage of this theory. In this...... work, it has been mathematically shown that the theory fails if the solution profile is not monotonic in the path function, which is defined as the summation of the density multiplied by the square root of the influence parameter over all components. A computational solution procedure is then presented...

  19. Current density functional theory using meta-generalized gradient exchange-correlation functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Furness, James W.; Verbeke, Joachim; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn--Sham current density-functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the non-perturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 a.u. (...

  20. Baroclinic pressure gradient difference schemes of subtracting the local averaged density stratification in sigma coordinates models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shouxian; ZHANG Wenjing

    2008-01-01

    Much has been written of the error in computing the baroclinic pressure gradient (BPG) with sigma coordinates in ocean or atmos- pheric numerical models. The usual way to reduce the error is to subtract area-averaged density stratification of the whole computa- tion region. But if there is great difference between the area-averaged and the local averaged density stratification, the error will be obvious. An example is given to show that the error from this method may be larger than that from no correction sometimes. The definition of local area is put forward. Then, four improved BPG difference schemes of subtracting the local averaged density strat- ification are designed to reduce the error. Two of them are for diagnostic calculation (density field is fixed), and the others are for prognostic calculation (density field is not fixed). The results show that the errors from these schemes all significantly decrease.

  1. Nonlinear Upshift of Trapped Electron Mode Critical Density Gradient: Simulation and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.

    2012-10-01

    A new nonlinear critical density gradient for pure trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence increases strongly with collisionality, saturating at several times the linear threshold. The nonlinear TEM threshold appears to limit the density gradient in new experiments subjecting Alcator C-Mod internal transport barriers to modulated radio-frequency heating. Gyrokinetic simulations show the nonlinear upshift of the TEM critical density gradient is associated with long-lived zonal flow dominated states [1]. This introduces a strong temperature dependence that allows external RF heating to control TEM turbulent transport. During pulsed on-axis heating of ITB discharges, core electron temperature modulations of 50% were produced. Bursts of line-integrated density fluctuations, observed on phase contrast imaging, closely follow modulations of core electron temperature inside the ITB foot. Multiple edge fluctuation measurements show the edge response to modulated heating is out of phase with the core response. A new limit cycle stability diagram shows the density gradient appears to be clamped during on-axis heating by the nonlinear TEM critical density gradient, rather than by the much lower linear threshold. Fluctuation wavelength spectra will be quantitatively compared with nonlinear TRINITY/GS2 gyrokinetic transport simulations, using an improved synthetic diagnostic. In related work, we are implementing the first gyrokinetic exact linearized Fokker Planck collision operator [2]. Initial results show short wavelength TEMs are fully stabilized by finite-gyroradius collisional effects for realistic collisionalities. The nonlinear TEM threshold and its collisionality dependence may impact predictions of density peaking based on quasilinear theory, which excludes zonal flows.[4pt] In collaboration with M. Churchill, A. Dominguez, C. L. Fiore, Y. Podpaly, M. L. Reinke, J. Rice, J. L. Terry, N. Tsujii, M. A. Barnes, I. Bespamyatnov, R. Granetz, M. Greenwald, A. Hubbard, J. W

  2. Conditions of hydrodynamic instability appearance in fluid thin layers with changes in time thickness and density gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzegorczyn, Slawomir; Slezak, Andrzej; Michalska-Malecka, Katarzyna; Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella

    2012-01-01

    The transport of NaCl and ethanol through the microbial cellulose membrane was used as a generator of layers with density gradients, parallel to gravity vector. Changes in NaCl concentrations connected with density gradients in these layers were monitored by means of Ag vertical bar AgCl electrodes

  3. Cosmological constraints from the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski test: galaxy density gradient field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Park, Changbom [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Heogiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Forero-Romero, J. E. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1 No. 18A-10, Edificio Ip, Bogotá (Colombia); Kim, Juhan, E-mail: xiaodongli@kias.re.kr, E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr, E-mail: je.forero@uniandes.edu.co, E-mail: kjhan@kias.re.kr [Center for Advanced Computation, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegi-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method based on the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to measure the expansion history of the universe. It uses the isotropy of the galaxy density gradient field to constrain cosmological parameters. If the density parameter Ω {sub m} or the dark energy equation of state w are incorrectly chosen, the gradient field appears to be anisotropic with the degree of anisotropy varying with redshift. We use this effect to constrain the cosmological parameters governing the expansion history of the universe. Although redshift-space distortions (RSD) induced by galaxy peculiar velocities also produce anisotropies in the gradient field, these effects are close to uniform in magnitude over a large range of redshift. This makes the redshift variation of the gradient field anisotropy relatively insensitive to the RSD. By testing the method on mock surveys drawn from the Horizon Run 3 cosmological N-body simulations, we demonstrate that the cosmological parameters can be estimated without bias. Our method is complementary to the baryon acoustic oscillation or topology methods as it depends on D{sub AH} , the product of the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter.

  4. Smooth-Particle Phase Stability with density and density-gradient potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G

    2005-01-01

    Stable fluid and solid particle phases are essential to the simulation of continuum fluids and solids using Smooth Particle Applied Mechanics. We show that density-dependent potentials, such as Phi=(1/2)Sum (rho-rho_0)^2, along with their corresponding constitutive relations, provide a simple means for characterizing fluids and that a special stabilization potential, Phi=(1/2)Sum (delrho)^2, not only stabilizes crystalline solid phases (or meshes) but also provides a surface tension which is ...

  5. Analytic calculations of hyper-Raman spectra from density functional theory hyperpolarizability gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first analytic calculations of the geometrical gradients of the first hyperpolarizability tensors at the density-functional theory (DFT) level. We use the analytically calculated hyperpolarizability gradients to explore the importance of electron correlation effects, as described by DFT, on hyper-Raman spectra. In particular, we calculate the hyper-Raman spectra of the all-trans and 11-cis isomers of retinal at the Hartree-Fock (HF) and density-functional levels of theory, also allowing us to explore the sensitivity of the hyper-Raman spectra on the geometrical characteristics of these structurally related molecules. We show that the HF results, using B3LYP-calculated vibrational frequencies and force fields, reproduce the experimental data for all-trans-retinal well, and that electron correlation effects are of minor importance for the hyper-Raman intensities

  6. Variable density sampling based on physically plausible gradient waveform. Application to 3D MRI angiography

    CERN Document Server

    Chauffert, Nicolas; Boucher, Marianne; Mériaux, Sébastien; CIUCIU, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Performing k-space variable density sampling is a popular way of reducing scanning time in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, given a sampling trajectory, it is not clear how to traverse it using gradient waveforms. In this paper, we actually show that existing methods [1, 2] can yield large traversal time if the trajectory contains high curvature areas. Therefore, we consider here a new method for gradient waveform design which is based on the projection of unrealistic initial trajectory onto the set of hardware constraints. Next, we show on realistic simulations that this algorithm allows implementing variable density trajectories resulting from the piecewise linear solution of the Travelling Salesman Problem in a reasonable time. Finally, we demonstrate the application of this approach to 2D MRI reconstruction and 3D angiography in the mouse brain.

  7. The influence of near-wall density and viscosity gradients on turbulence in channel flows

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Ashish; Pecnik, Rene

    2016-01-01

    The influence of near-wall density and viscosity gradients on near-wall turbulence in a channel are studied by means of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the low-Mach number approximation of the Navier--Stokes equations. Different constitutive relations for density and viscosity as a function of temperature are used in order to mimic a wide range of fluid behaviours and to develop a generalised framework for studying turbulence modulations in variable property flows. Instead of scaling the velocity solely based on local density, as done for the van Driest transformation, we derive an extension of the scaling that is based on gradients of the semi-local Reynolds number $Re_\\tau^*$. This extension of the van Driest transformation is able to collapse velocity profiles for flows with near-wall property gradients as a function of the semi-local wall coordinate. However, flow quantities like mixing length, turbulence anisotropy and turbulent vorticity fluctuations do not show a universal scaling very close to th...

  8. Landscape Patterns of Wood Density and Aboveground Biomass Along a Tropical Elevation Gradient in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    This research sought to understand how tree wood density and taxonomic diversity relate to topography and three-dimensional vegetation structure in the tropical montane forest of Braulio Carrillo National Park in Costa Rica. The study utilized forest inventory and botanical data from twenty 1-ha plots ranging from 55 m to 2800 m above sea level and remote sensing data from an airborne lidar sensor (NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor [LVIS]) to quantify variations in forest structure. There is growing evidence that ecosystem structure may help to control the functional variations across landscapes. This study relates patterns of tree functional wood density and alpha diversity to three-dimensional structure using remote sensing observations of forest structure. We were able to test the effect of the gradient on wood density measured from collected tree cores and on the subsequent aboveground biomass estimations. We sought to determine if there was a significant pattern of wood density across the altitudinal gradient, which has implications for conservation of both ecosystem services and biodiversity. We also wanted to determine how many random individuals could be sampled to accurately estimate aboveground biomass in a one-hectare plot. Our results indicate that there is a strong relationship between LVIS-derived forest 3D-structure and alpha diversity, likely controlled by variations in abiotic factors and topography along the elevation. Using spatial analysis with the aid of remote sensing data, we found patterns along the environmental gradients defining species composition and forest structure. Wood density values were found to vary significantly from database values for the same species. This variation in tree growth has repercussions on overall forest structure, and subsequent carbon estimates extrapolated from field measurements. Because these wood density values are directly tied to biomass estimates, it is possible that carbon storage has been

  9. The effect of longitudinal density gradient on electron plasma wake field acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, David

    2016-01-01

    3-, 2- and 1-dimensional, particle-in-cell, fully electromagnetic simulations of electron plasma wake field acceleration in the blow out regime are presented. Earlier results are extended by (i) studying the effect of longitudinal density gradient; (ii) avoiding use of co-moving simulation box; (iii) inclusion of ion motion; and (iv) studying fully electromagnetic plasma wake fields. It is established that injecting driving and trailing electron bunches into a positive density gradient of ten-fold increasing density over 10 cm long Lithium vapor plasma, results in spatially more compact and three times larger, compared to the uniform density case, electric fields (-6.4 x 10^{10} V/m), leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 24.4 GeV (starting from initial 20.4 GeV), with an energy transfer efficiencies from leading to trailing bunch of 75 percent. In the uniform density case -2.5 x 10^{10} V/m wake is created leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 22.4 GeV, with an energy transfer eff...

  10. Isolation of human salivary extracellular vesicles by iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation and their characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Iwai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic methods that focus on the extracellular vesicles (EVs present in saliva have been attracting great attention because of their non-invasiveness. EVs contain biomolecules such as proteins, messenger RNA (mRNA and microRNA (miRNA, which originate from cells that release EVs, making them an ideal source for liquid biopsy. Although there have been many reports on density-based fractionation of EVs from blood and urine, the number of reports on EVs from saliva has been limited, most probably because of the difficulties in separating EVs from viscous saliva using density gradient centrifugation. This article establishes a protocol for the isolation of EVs from human saliva using density gradient centrifugation. The fractionated salivary EVs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate that salivary EVs have a smaller diameter (47.8±12.3 nm and higher density (1.11 g/ml than EVs isolated from conditioned cell media (74.0±23.5 nm and 1.06 g/ml, respectively. Additionally, to improve the throughput of density-based fractionation of EVs, the original protocol was further modified by using a fixed angle rotor instead of a swinging rotor. It was also confirmed that several miRNAs were expressed strongly in the EV-marker-expressing fractions.

  11. Isolation of human salivary extracellular vesicles by iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation and their characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Kazuya; Minamisawa, Tamiko; Suga, Kanako; Yajima, Yasutomo; Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic methods that focus on the extracellular vesicles (EVs) present in saliva have been attracting great attention because of their non-invasiveness. EVs contain biomolecules such as proteins, messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA), which originate from cells that release EVs, making them an ideal source for liquid biopsy. Although there have been many reports on density-based fractionation of EVs from blood and urine, the number of reports on EVs from saliva has been limited, most probably because of the difficulties in separating EVs from viscous saliva using density gradient centrifugation. This article establishes a protocol for the isolation of EVs from human saliva using density gradient centrifugation. The fractionated salivary EVs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate that salivary EVs have a smaller diameter (47.8±12.3 nm) and higher density (1.11 g/ml) than EVs isolated from conditioned cell media (74.0±23.5 nm and 1.06 g/ml, respectively). Additionally, to improve the throughput of density-based fractionation of EVs, the original protocol was further modified by using a fixed angle rotor instead of a swinging rotor. It was also confirmed that several miRNAs were expressed strongly in the EV-marker-expressing fractions. PMID:27193612

  12. Numerical Study of Plasma Density Gradient Effects on Farley-Buneman Waves Traveling in the Equatorial E Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Lon Fern and Fu-Shong Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a two-dimensional numerical study of a plasma density gradient effect on Farley-Buneman waves (FB waves is per formed via a two-fluid code in which the electron inertia is neglected while the ion inertia is retained. We focused the simulations on the inter action between a single wave mode and the back ground E region where the vertical density gradient pro file and the weaker than FB thresh old ambient electric field were considered. From 2D density contour maps, it was found that the FB wave grows in the region of _ _ E > 0 (where _ is the electron density gradient and v E is the electric field, the initial growth rate was in reason able agreement with the prediction of the combined linear theory of Farley-Buneman and gradient drift in stabilities, and the propagation speed was modulated by the gradient strength. Ac cording to the phase velocity evaluated by the Fourier anal y sis and peak to peak estimation method, the density gradients were found to have an effect of lowering the phase velocity at saturation, which is smaller than ion-acoustic speed for large scale waves, and the results demonstrated that the reduction of phase velocity by a density gradient effect was larger for a longer wave length wave than shorter wave length curve. It was also found that the plausible density gradient effects seem to be related to the thickness of the density gradient region and vertical electric field where the FB wave was traveling. The thicker unstable layer would cause a greater phase velocity reduction than the thinner unstable layer might cause, and the large driving electric field would reduce the wavelength dependence of density gradient effect on the saturation phase velocity.

  13. Mixing by turbulent buoyant jets in slender containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voropayev, S.I., E-mail: s.voropayev@nd.edu [Environmental Fluid Dynamics Laboratories, Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 117851 (Russian Federation); Nath, C.; Fernando, H.J.S. [Environmental Fluid Dynamics Laboratories, Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    A turbulent buoyant jet injected vertically into a slender cylinder containing a stratified fluid is investigated experimentally. The working fluid is water, and salt is used to change its density to obtain either a positively or negatively buoyant jet. The interest is the vertical density distribution in container and its dependence on time and other parameters. For each case (lighter or heavier jet) the experimental data could be collapsed into a ‘universal’ time dependent behavior, when properly non-dimensionalized. A theoretical model is advanced to explain the results. Possible applications include refilling of crude oil into U.S. strategic petroleum reserves caverns. -- Highlights: ► We addresses a critical issue on refill of Strategic Petroleum Reserves. ► We conduct experiments on negatively/positively buoyant turbulent jets in long cavern. ► Basing on results of experiments we developed theoretical model for refill operations.

  14. Current Density Functional Theory Using Meta-Generalized Gradient Exchange-Correlation Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, James W; Verbeke, Joachim; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta-generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn-Sham current density functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the nonperturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 au (∼235 kT) in strength. CDFT functionals based on the TPSS and B98 forms are investigated, and their performance is assessed by comparison with accurate coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) data. In the weak field regime, magnetic properties such as magnetizabilities and nuclear magnetic resonance shielding constants show modest but systematic improvements over generalized gradient approximations (GGA). However, in the strong field regime, the mGGA-based forms lead to a significantly improved description of the recently proposed perpendicular paramagnetic bonding mechanism, comparing well with CCSD(T) data. In contrast to functionals based on the vorticity, these forms are found to be numerically stable, and their accuracy at high field suggests that the extension of mGGAs to CDFT via the generalized kinetic energy density should provide a useful starting point for further development of CDFT approximations. PMID:26575912

  15. Heterogeneity of renal brush border membrane (BBM) fractions isolated by differential and density gradient centrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To differentiate BBM from proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) and from pars recta (PR), the authors isolated separately membrane fractions from superficial cortex (SC-tissue) and from juxtamedullary cortex plus outer stripe of red medulla (JM-tissue) by centrifugation in Percoll gradient. BBM separated on Percoll gradient into the higher density zone (zone A), and lower density zone (zone B). The zone B from SC-tissue membranes showed a peak with high activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) and maltase but low activities of γ-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and leucineaminopeptidase (LAP). Membranes from JM-tissue separated into a major peak in zone A, with very high activities of GGT and LAP, markers for PR, along with lesser activity of AP. In addition, zone B showed a small peak of AP and very slight shoulder of GGT and LAP. In membranes from both SC-tissue and JM-tissue, either zone A or zone B, they found concentrative uptake of both 32Pi and L-[3H]-proline in the presence of Na+-gradient. They suggest, based on distribution of BBM marker enzymes, that membrane fraction in zone B from SC-tissue contains BBM vesicles predominantly from PCT of outer cortical nephrons. Further, BBM vesicles from JM-tissue in zone A are predominantly from PR segments and in zone B from PCT of deep nephrons

  16. Thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory with generalized-gradient approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Chai, Jeng-Da

    2014-01-01

    We extend the recently proposed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) [J.-D. Chai, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154104 (2012)] to generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation density functionals. Relative to our previous TAO-LDA (i.e., the local density approximation to TAO-DFT), the resulting TAO-GGAs are significantly superior for a wide range of applications, such as thermochemistry, kinetics, and reaction energies. For noncovalent interactions, TAO-GGAs with empirical dispersion corrections are shown to yield excellent performance. Due to their computational efficiency for systems with strong static correlation effects, TAO-LDA and TAO-GGAs are applied to study the electronic properties (e.g., the singlet-triplet energy gaps, vertical ionization potentials, vertical electron affinities, fundamental gaps, and symmetrized von Neumann entropy) of acenes with different number of linearly fused benzene rings (up to 100), which is very challenging for conventional electronic ...

  17. Chemical bond as a test of density-gradient expansions for kinetic and exchange energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errors in kinetic and exchange contributions to the molecular bonding energy are assessed for approximate density functionals by reference to near-exact Hartree-Fock values. From the molecular calculations of Allan et al. and of Lee and Ghosh, it is demonstrated that the density-gradient expansion does not accurately describe the noninteracting kinetic contribution to the bonding energy, even when this expansion is carried to fourth order and applied in its spin-density-functional form to accurate Hartree-Fock densities. In a related study, it is demonstrated that the overbinding of molecules such as N2 and F2, which occurs in the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation for the exchange-correlation energy, is not attributable to errors in the self-consistent LSD densities. Contrary to expectations based upon the Gunnarsson-Jones nodality argument, it is found that the LSD approximation for the exchange energy can seriously overbind a molecule even when bonding does not create additional nodes in the occupied valence orbitals. LSD and exact values for the exchange contribution to the bonding energy are displayed and discussed for several molecules

  18. Effects of gradients of the electron density on Earth-space communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kersley

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of the main results achieved in the framework of COST 271 Action Working Group 4, under the activities of the Work Package 4.4. The first topic treated deals with the influence of ionospheric space and time gradients in the slant to vertical and vertical to slant ionospheric delay conversion when the thin shell approximation of the ionosphere is assumed and with the effects of geomagnetic activity on the errors that this conversion introduces. The second topic is related to the comparison of ionospheric topside models with experimental electron density profiles to check the ability of the models to reproduce the observed topside shape and characteristics that determine the electron density gradients. The analysis that has been done allows pointing out the changes needed to improve the models. Finally a third topic covers a model simulation study of the total electron content that can be encountered in GPS-to-geostationary satellite ray paths. It takes into account that the propagation paths for such satellite-to-satellite links are very long and they have the potential to intersect regions of the ionised atmosphere where the electron density is high when the geometry is close to eclipse.

  19. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory a study on surface dispersion of buoyant plumes in open channel turbulence in made, where the buoyancy is due to both salinity and heat. The measured parameters are the downstream derivative of a plume width and height, which are integral-characteristics of the distributions of density......-differences. Other methods as infra-red sensing are used for visualizing purpose. The results are used to calibrate an integral model of the dispersion. Conclusions are that the dispersion of a buoyant surface plume can be treated the superposition of a buoyancy induced stretching and turbulent diffusion, reduced in...

  20. Laminar gas micro-flow convection characteristics due to steep density gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahulikar, S. P.; Herwig, H.; Hausner, O.; Kock, F.

    2004-12-01

    We report numerical simulation of pure continuum-based laminar gas micro-flow convection with steep density gradients, which cause, for the case of heated air, flattening and rate of flattening of axial velocity profile. This flattening is similar to the characteristics in constant-properties slip flow, and high rate of flattening can cause hydrodynamic undevelopment of flow—the reverse process of hydrodynamic development. By continuity, radially outward velocities and radial convection are induced, which degrades convection performance. The low densities near the wall reduce the axial mass flux near the wall, which also degrades convection performance. In heated-gas micro-flows, these negative effects dominate to dictate the net convection characteristics, which differ considerably from the known characteristics of conventional continuum models. The identification of such microscale effects also has implications in possibly extending the limits of applicability of continuum models to higher Knudsen numbers.

  1. Fermi surface in local-density-functional theory and in gradient expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearns, Daniel; Kohn, Walter

    1989-05-01

    It has recently been shown that the Kohn-Sham (KS) equations, even with the exact exchange-correlation potential, vxc(r), in general do not yield the exact physical Fermi surface (FS). The latter may be obtained either from the discontinuities of the momentum distribution in the exact ground state or, equally well, from the locus of singularities in q space of the exact density-density response function, χ(q,q) (Kohn effect). The present paper considers approximations in which the exact exchange-correlation energy functional is replaced by a gradient expansion of arbitrary finite order m [e.g., Exc(2)[n] =Fd3 [exc(n(r))n(r)+gxc (n(r))||∇n(r)||2

  2. Single or double sperm wash processing by density gradient centrifugation: effect on clomiphene citrate induced intrauterine insemination cycle outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Turhan, Nilgün; PEKEL, Aslıhan; Onaran, Yüksel; DUVAN, Zehra Candan İLTEMİR; Bayrak, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    To compare the motility yields of single or double wash after density gradient centrifugation of the ejaculate and their effects on pregnancy rates in clomiphene citrate induced intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles. Materials and methods: This prospective randomized controlled study included 341 IUI cycles. Sperm specimens processed by density gradient centrifugation either with single wash (the single wash group, n = 170) or double wash treatment (the double wash group, n = 171). Sperm p...

  3. Wave-function frozen-density embedding: Approximate analytical nuclear ground-state gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Johannes; Höfener, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    We report the derivation of approximate analytical nuclear ground-state uncoupled frozen density embedding (FDEu) gradients for the resolution of identity (RI) variant of the second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles (RICC2) as well as density functional theory (DFT), and an efficient implementation thereof in the KOALA program. In order to guarantee a computationally efficient treatment, those gradient terms are neglected which would require the exchange of orbital information. This approach allows for geometry optimizations of single molecules surrounded by numerous molecules with fixed nuclei at RICC2-in-RICC2, RICC2-in-DFT, and DFT-in-DFT FDE level of theory using a dispersion correction, required due to the DFT-based treatment of the interaction in FDE theory. Accuracy and applicability are assessed by the example of two case studies: (a) the Watson-Crick pair adenine-thymine, for which the optimized structures exhibit a maximum error of about 0.08 Å for our best scheme compared to supermolecular reference calculations, (b) carbon monoxide on a magnesium oxide surface model, for which the error amount up to 0.1 Å for our best scheme. Efficiency is demonstrated by successively including environment molecules and comparing to an optimized conventional supermolecular implementation, showing that the method is able to outperform conventional RICC2 schemes already with a rather small number of environment molecules, gaining significant speed up in computation time. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26804310

  4. Effects of population density and chemical environment on the behavior of Escherichia coli in shallow temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In shallow temperature gradients, changes in temperature that bacteria experience occur over long time scales. Therefore, slow processes such as adaptation, metabolism, chemical secretion and even gene expression become important. Since these are cellular processes, the cell density is an important parameter that affects the bacteria's response. We find that there are four density regimes with distinct behaviors. At low cell density, bacteria do not cause changes in their chemical environment; however, their response to the temperature gradient is strongly influenced by it. In the intermediate cell-density regime, the consumption of nutrients becomes significant and induces a gradient of nutrients opposing the temperature gradient due to higher consumption rate at the high temperature. This causes the bacteria to drift toward low temperature. In the high cell-density regime, interactions among bacteria due to secretion of an attractant lead to a strong local accumulation of bacteria. This together with the gradient of nutrients, resulted from the differential consumption rate, creates a fast propagating pulse of bacterial density. These observations are a result of classical nonlinear population dynamics. At extremely high cell density, a change in the physiological state of the bacteria is observed. The bacteria, at the individual level, become cold seeking. This appears initially as a result of a change in the methylation level of the two most abundant sensing receptors, Tsr and Tar. It is further enforced at an even higher cell density by a change in the expression level of these receptors. (perspective)

  5. In vitro and in vivo MR evaluation of internal gradient to assess trabecular bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Santis, S; Rebuzzi, M; Capuani, S [CNR IPCF UOS Roma, Department of Physics, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy); Di Pietro, G; Maraviglia, B [Department of Physics, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy); Fasano, F, E-mail: silvia.capuani@roma1.infn.i [Siemens Medical, Milan (Italy)

    2010-10-07

    Here we propose a new magnetic resonance (MR) strategy based on the evaluation of internal gradient (G{sub i}) to assess the trabecular bone (TB) density in spongy bone. Spongy bone is a porous system characterized by a solid trabecular network immersed in bone marrow and characterized by a different relative percentage of water and fats. Using a 9.4 T MR micro-imaging system, we first evaluated the relative water and fat G{sub i} as extracted from the Spin-Echo decay function in vitro of femoral head samples from calves. Indeed, the differential effects of fat and water diffusion result in different types of G{sub i} behavior. Using a clinical MR 3T scanner, we then investigated in vivo the calcanei of individuals characterized by different known TB densities. We demonstrate, on these samples, that water is more prevalent in the boundary zone, while fats are rearranged primarily in the central zone of each pore. In vitro experiments showed that water G{sub i} magnitude from the samples was directly proportional to their TB density. Similar behavior was also observed in the clinical measures. Conversely, fat G{sub i} did not provide any information on spongy-bone density. Our results suggest that water G{sub i} may be a reliable marker to assess the status of spongy bone.

  6. In vitro and in vivo MR evaluation of internal gradient to assess trabecular bone density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we propose a new magnetic resonance (MR) strategy based on the evaluation of internal gradient (Gi) to assess the trabecular bone (TB) density in spongy bone. Spongy bone is a porous system characterized by a solid trabecular network immersed in bone marrow and characterized by a different relative percentage of water and fats. Using a 9.4 T MR micro-imaging system, we first evaluated the relative water and fat Gi as extracted from the Spin-Echo decay function in vitro of femoral head samples from calves. Indeed, the differential effects of fat and water diffusion result in different types of Gi behavior. Using a clinical MR 3T scanner, we then investigated in vivo the calcanei of individuals characterized by different known TB densities. We demonstrate, on these samples, that water is more prevalent in the boundary zone, while fats are rearranged primarily in the central zone of each pore. In vitro experiments showed that water Gi magnitude from the samples was directly proportional to their TB density. Similar behavior was also observed in the clinical measures. Conversely, fat Gi did not provide any information on spongy-bone density. Our results suggest that water Gi may be a reliable marker to assess the status of spongy bone.

  7. Drag of buoyant vortex rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S-K; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015)], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers. PMID:26565349

  8. Drag of buoyant vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.126], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  9. Steep Electron Density Gradients in the Midlatitude Nighttime Ionosphere: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makela, J. J.; Kelley, M. C.; Mathews, J. D.; Kintner, P. M.; Aponte, N.; Ledvina, B. M.; Nicolls, M. J.; Seker, I.

    2004-12-01

    The midlatitude nighttime ionosphere is generally considered to be a fairly quiet system. Indeed, when compared to the highly active low- and high-latitudes, this seems to be a valid description. However, observations in the 1990s, notably those conducted as part of the multi-instrument Combined Ionospheric Campaigns (CICs) carried out periodically from 1997 to 1999, have shown that disturbances can indeed occur in this region. For example, a relatively common feature seen in allsky images taken at 630.0 nm are bands of depleted intensity aligned from the northwest to southeast that propagate to the southwest (in the northern hemisphere). The general characteristics of these bands are now fairly well documented, as is the basic understanding of their underlying physics. The effects of these medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances, or electrobouyancy waves, is to produce gradients in the electron density and F-layer height. During quiet magnetic periods, these gradients are fairly small, of the order of a few TEC units. However, these structures seem to be amplified by high geomagnetic activity at which times the gradients can be of the order of 10 to 20 TEC units over distances as small as several 10s of kilometers. Although much was learned about these structures during the CICs of the late 1990s, there are still several unexplained features that warrant further investigation, notably their genesis region, Kp dependence, and effects (if any) on trans-ionospheric radio signals. We suggest the need for a new set of campaigns in the Caribbean to address these questions, modeled on the CICs but extending their spatial coverage and including additional instrumentation not available during the initial campaigns. It is only through such a comprehensive, multi-technique investigation that we will make further headway on understanding these phenomena.

  10. Current Density-Functional Theory using meta-Generalized Gradient Exchange--Correlation Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Furness, James W; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn--Sham current density-functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the non-perturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 a.u. ($\\sim 235000$T) in strength. CDFT functionals based on the TPSS and B98 forms are investigated and their performance is assessed by comparison with accurate CCSD(T) data. In the weak field regime magnetic properties such as magnetizabilities and NMR shielding constants show modest but systematic improvements over GGA functionals. However, in strong field regime the mGGA based forms lead to a significantly improved description of the recently proposed perpendicular paramagnetic bonding mechanism, comparing well with CCSD(T...

  11. Buoyant Nanoparticles: Implications for Nano-Biointeractions in Cellular Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C Y; DeLoid, G M; Pal, A; Demokritou, P

    2016-06-01

    In the safety and efficacy assessment of novel nanomaterials, the role of nanoparticle (NP) kinetics in in vitro studies is often ignored although it has significant implications in dosimetry, hazard ranking, and nanomedicine efficacy. It is demonstrated here that certain nanoparticles are buoyant due to low effective densities of their formed agglomerates in culture media, which alters particle transport and deposition, dose-response relationships, and underestimates toxicity and bioactivity. To investigate this phenomenon, this study determines the size distribution, effective density, and assesses fate and transport for a test buoyant NP (polypropylene). To enable accurate dose-response assessment, an inverted 96-well cell culture platform is developed in which adherent cells are incubated above the buoyant particle suspension. The effect of buoyancy is assessed by comparing dose-toxicity responses in human macrophages after 24 h incubation in conventional and inverted culture systems. In the conventional culture system, no adverse effects are observed at any NP concentration tested (up to 250 μg mL(-1) ), whereas dose-dependent decreases in viability and increases in reactive oxygen species are observed in the inverted system. This work sheds light on an unknown issue that plays a significant role in vitro hazard screening and proposes a standardized methodology for buoyant NP assessments. PMID:27135209

  12. Synthetic schlieren: Determination of the density gradient generated by internal waves propagating in a stratified fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthetic schlieren technique and a convenient image processing are employed to attain a new insight into the visualization of internal waves and to make quantitative precise measurements of the bidimensional distributions of very small density gradient variations, harmonics distributions patterns, etc., in a stratified fluid. The laboratory implementation of this technique is much simpler than that of the optical methods as classical schlieren and interferometry, and makes possible to obtain useful information in situations in which shadowgraph gives only qualitative results. In addition, much greater domains than those with optical methods may be analyzed, and high optical quality windows are not required. Its application is illustrated by means of the visualization of the internal gravity waves generated by an oscillating body and thermals.

  13. Unified models of E-layer plasma turbulence from density gradients and Hall currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ehab; Litt, Sandeep; Horton, Wendell; Smolyakov, Andrei; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    The Earth's ionosphere is rich with plasma irregularities of scale-lengths extend from few centimeters to hundreds of kilometers. The combination of small-scale turbulence with large coherent structures is at the forefront of basic plasma turbulence theory. A new unified model for the small-scale plasma turbulence called Type-I and Type-II in the E-region ionosphere is presented. Simulations and a proposed laboratory experiment for these plasma waves in a weakly ionized plasma are reported. The ions [Argon in the lab and NO+ in the ionosphere] are collisional and the electrons ExB drifts produce Hall currents. The dispersion relations are analyzed for both density gradient and electron current driven instabilities. A basic understanding of the turbulence is important for forecasting disruptions in GNSS communication signals from RF signal scattering produced by the E-layer plasma turbulence on the 10cm to 10m scales lengths. NSF:AGS-0964692.

  14. Analytical Energy Gradients in Range-Separated Hybrid Density Functional Theory with Random Phase Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Mussard, Bastien; Ángyán, János G

    2015-01-01

    Analytical forces have been derived in the Lagrangian framework for several random phase approximation (RPA) correlated total energy methods based on the range separated hybrid (RSH) approach, which combines a short-range density functional approximation for the short-range exchange-correlation energy with a Hartree-Fock-type long-range exchange and RPA long-range correlation. The RPA correlation energy has been expressed as a ring coupled cluster doubles (rCCD) theory. The resulting analytical gradients have been implemented and tested for geometry optimization of simple molecules and intermolecular charge transfer complexes, where intermolecular interactions are expected to have a non-negligible effect even on geometrical parameters of the monomers.

  15. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF DENSITY GRADIENT CENTRIFUGATION FOR EXFOLIATIVE TUMOR CELLS IN MALIGNANT PLEURAL EFFUSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭胤仕; 朱任之

    2004-01-01

    Objective To find out a specific method for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions( MPEs )with higher sensitivity and practicality. Methods The diagnosis of MPEs were made using density gradient centrifugation ( DGC ) , smear cytologic examination (SCE) and pleural needle biopsy (PNB). Comparisons between these results and those of benign pleural effusions were also made. Results The positive rates of DGC,SCE and PNB for diagnosing MPEs were 94. 3% ,62.9% and 44.6% , respectively, and the positive rate of SCE combined with PNB for diagnosing MPEs was 73.2 %. The positive rate of the exfoliative tumor cells ( ETCs ) by DGC was much higher than that of SCE or/and PNB with no false-positive. Conclusion The ETCs isolated by DGC from the MPEs is quite specific for the diagnosis of malignant tumors with higher sensitivity and practicality in clinico-pathological practice.

  16. New density functional parameterizations to accurate calculations of electric field gradient variations among compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Régis Tadeu; Haiduke, Roberto Luiz Andrade

    2015-10-30

    This research provides a performance investigation of density functional theory and also proposes new functional parameterizations to deal with electric field gradient (EFG) calculations at nuclear positions. The entire procedure is conducted within the four-component formalism. First, we noticed that traditional hybrid and long-range corrected functionals are more efficient in the description of EFG variations for a set of elements (indium, antimony, iodine, lutetium, and hafnium) among linear molecules. Thus, we selected the PBE0, B3LYP, and CAM-B3LYP functionals and promoted a reoptimization of their parameters for a better description of these EFG changes. The PBE0q variant developed here showed an overall promising performance in a validation test conducted with potassium, iodine, copper, and gold. In general, the correlation coefficients found in linear regressions between experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants and calculated EFGs are improved while the systematic EFG errors also decrease as a result of this reparameterization. PMID:26284820

  17. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A;

    1997-01-01

    centrifugation and dual antibody labeling methods. The protocol was designed to compare the efficacy of antitransferrin receptor (CD71)/antiglycophorin A (GPA) antibodies with antithrom-bospondin receptor (CD36)/anti-GPA antibodies in identifying nucleated erythrocytes in maternal blood. Cytospin preparations...... of the isolated cells were subjected to in situ hybridization with specific DNA probes for the Y chromosome and chromosome 21 to confirm the fetal origin. RESULTS: After MiniMACS the enrichment factors for the CD71/GPA- and CD36/GPA-positive cells from maternal blood were similar, and the percentages of fetal...... cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. CONCLUSION: The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti-GPA...

  18. Development of gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals in the density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we have developed some gradient-corrected exchange-correlation functionals. This study is in keeping with the density functional theory (DFT) formalism. In the first part of this memory, a description of Hartree-Fock (HF), post-HF and density functional theories is given. The second part is devoted the study the different approximations of DFT exchange-correlation functionals which have been proposed in the last years. In particular, we have underlined the approximations used for the construction of these functionals. The third part of this memory consists in the development of new gradient-corrected functionals. In this study, we have established a new relation between exchange energy, correlation energy and kinetic energy. We have deduced two new possible forms of exchange or correlation functionals, respectively. In the fourth part, we have studied the exchange potential, for which the actual formulation does not satisfy some theoretical conditions, such as the asymptotic behavior -1/r. Our contribution lies in the development of an exchange potential with a correct asymptotic -1/r behavior for large values of r. In this chapter, we have proposed a model which permits the obtention of the exchange energy from the exchange potential, using the virial theorem. The fifth part of this memory is devoted the application of these different functionals to simple systems (H2O, CO, N2O, H3+ and H5+) in order to characterize the performance of DFT calculations in regards to those obtained with post-HF methods. (author). 215 refs., 8 figs., 28 tabs

  19. Buoyant currents arrested by convective dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMinn, Christopher W.; Juanes, Ruben

    2013-05-01

    When carbon dioxide (CO2) dissolves into water, the density of water increases. This seemingly insubstantial phenomenon has profound implications for geologic carbon sequestration. Here we show, by means of laboratory experiments with analog fluids, that the up-slope migration of a buoyant current of CO2 is arrested by the convective dissolution that ensues from a fingering instability at the moving CO2-groundwater interface. We consider the effectiveness of convective dissolution as a large-scale trapping mechanism in sloping aquifers, and we show that a small amount of slope is beneficial compared to the horizontal case. We study the development and coarsening of the fingering instability along the migrating current and predict the maximum migration distance of the current with a simple sharp-interface model. We show that convective dissolution exerts a powerful control on CO2 plume dynamics and, as a result, on the potential of geologic carbon sequestration.

  20. Self-injection by trapping of plasma electrons oscillating in rising density gradient at the vacuum-plasma interface

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Muggli, Patric

    2014-01-01

    We model the trapping of plasma $e^-$ within the density structures excited by a propagating energy source ($\\beta_{S}\\simeq1$) in a rising plasma density gradient. Rising density gradient leads to spatially contiguous coupled up-chirped plasmons ($d{\\omega^2_{pe}(x)}/{dx}>0$). Therefore phase mixing between plasmons can lead to trapping until the plasmon field is high enough such that $e^-$ trajectories returning towards a longer wavelength see a trapping potential. Rising plasma density gradients are ubiquitous for confining the plasma within sources at the vacuum-plasma interfaces. Therefore trapping of plasma-$e^-$ in a rising ramp is important for acceleration diagnostics and to understand the energy dissipation from the excited plasmon train \\cite{LTE-2013}. Down-ramp in density \\cite{density-transition-2001} has been used for plasma-$e^-$ trapping within the first bucket behind the driver. Here, in rising density gradient the trapping does not occur in the first plasmon bucket but in subsequent plasmon...

  1. The effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pechhacker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    1.5D Particle-In-Cell simulations of a hot, low density electron beam injected into magnetized, maxwellian plasma were used to further explore the alternative non-gyrotropic beam driven electromagnetic emission mechanism, first studied in Tsiklauri (2011). Variation of beam injection angle and background density gradient showed that the emission process is caused by the perpendicular component of the beam injection current, whereas the parallel component only produces Langmuir waves, which play no role in the generation of EM waves in our mechanism. Particular emphasis was put on the case, where the beam is injected perpendicularly to the background magnetic field, as this turned off any electrostatic wave generation along the field and left a purely electromagnetic signal in the perpendicular components. The simulations establish the following key findings: i) Initially waves at a few w_ce/gamma are excited, mode converted and emitted at w_pe ii) The emission intensity along the beam axis is proportional to ...

  2. Fabrication and characterization of high density silicon quantum dots in gradient Si-rich carbide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobo

    2014-10-01

    Gradient Si-rich carbide (GSRC) thin films were deposited on monocrystalline silicon wafers and quartz substrates by magnetron co-sputtering, with subsequent thermal annealing by rapid thermal processing. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, grazing incident X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, and Hall measurements were used to analyze the microstructure and conductivity of the films. It was observed that bonding configurations, microstructure and conductivity properties changes with the annealing temperature from 700°C to 1000°C. The experimental results demonstrate that Si QDs with crystal volume fraction of 72.5%, average size of 4.5 nm, and number density of 2 ×1012cm-2 embedded in the amorphous SiC matrix can be formed using a GSRC multilayer structure, with subsequent annealing at 1000°C. The 1000°C annealed thin film possesses a conductivity of 5 S ṡ cm-1, which can be attributed to high carrier transport efficiency caused by high Si QD density.

  3. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Goslvez; Stephen Johnston; Carmen Lpez-Fernndez; Altea Goslbez; Francisca Arroyo; Jose Lus Fernndez; Juan G lvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the DNA longevity characteristics associated with each resultant fraction following density gradient centrifugation (DGC) in comparison to that of the original neat ejaculated sample. Methods:An aliquot of neat semen (NSS) collected from 7 patients was processed using DGC resulting in 3 fractions;Fraction 1:seminal plasma/40%gradient interface (GI);Fraction 2:40%GI/80%GI;Fraction 3:80%GI/pellet. An aliquot of each fraction and NSS was cryopreserved, thawed and incubated at 37 ℃for 24h;the increase of sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the Dyn-Halosperm assay following 0, 3, 6 and 24h of incubation. Results:While there was a significant reduction in the incidence of baseline sperm DNA fragmentation following DGC in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity was shown to be higher in the NSS than in any other sub-population following incubation. The highest levels of baseline DNA damage were found in Fractions 1 and 2;these fractions also showed the highest rate DNA fragmentation following incubation, subsequently exhibiting the lowest DNA longevity. Conclusion:1) Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2) Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  4. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  5. Experiment on Density Gradient Driven Flow in Small Break Air Ingress Accident of VHTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study measures amount of air-ingress rates through a small hole in a circular pipe for various break conditions. The main parameters considered are break orientation, break size, main flow velocity, and density ratio. The main objectives are summarized below: □ Understanding on fundamental air-ingress phenomena in the small break accident □ Development of flow regime map for the small break air-ingress □ Development of air-ingress model for VHTR safety analysis code. A Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is one of the six Gen-IV reactor concepts which is adapting carbon layered TRISO-fuel, graphite-moderator, and helium-coolant. In spite of its inherent safety concept, the VHTR could be detrimental if a LOCA type accident occurs, which is followed by a pipe break. After the break, the air in the cavity starts to ingress into the reactor by either local density-gradient driven flow or molecular diffusion. The main concern of this accident is that it could eventually lead to structural degradation or release of the toxic and explosive gasses (CO) by oxidation of graphite. Previously, majority of the air-ingress studies have been focused on the large size break accident, which is called a double-ended-guillotine-break (DEGB). However, in this study, more focus in put on the small break (or leakage) accident, which is more realistic and probable in the VHTRs. According to the previous studies, the phenomena in the small break accident appear to be much more complicated than those in the DEGB, but little studies have been conducted and reported so far

  6. Influence of current density on nano-Al2O3/Ni+Co bionic gradient composite coatings by electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Liu; Luquan Ren; Sirong Yu; Zhuwu Han

    2008-01-01

    Metal and nano-ceramic nanocomposite coatings were prepared on the gray cast iron surface by the electredeposition method. The Ni-Co was used as the metal matrix, and nano-Al2O3 was chosen as the second-phase particulates. To avoid poor inter-face bonding and stress distribution, the gradient structure of biology materials was found as the model and therefore the gradient composite coating was prepared. The morphology of the composite coatings was flatter and the microstructure was denser than that of pure Ni-Co coatings. The composite coatings were prepared by different current densities, and the 2-D and 3-D morphologies of the surface coatings were observed. The result indicated that the 2-D structure became rougher and the 3-D surface density of apices became less when the current density was increased. The content of nanoparticulates reached a maximum value at the current density particles caused dispersive strengthening and grain refining.

  7. An Experimental Investigation on Inclined Negatively Buoyant Jets

    OpenAIRE

    Bashitialshaaer, Raed; Larson, Magnus; Persson, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets. Such jets arise when brine is discharged from desalination plants. A turbulent jet with a specific salinity was discharged through a circular nozzle at an angle to the horizontal into a tank with fresh water and the spatial evolution of the jet was recorded. Four different initial jet parameters were changed, namely the nozzle diameter, the initial jet inclination, the jet density and the flow...

  8. Hydrodynamic modeling of towed buoyant submarine antenna's in multidirectional seas.

    OpenAIRE

    Geiger, Sam R.

    2000-01-01

    A finite difference computer model is developed to simulate the exposure statistics of a radio frequency buoyant antenna as it is towed in a three-dimensional random seaway. The model allows the user to prescribe antenna properties (length, diameter, density, etc.), sea conditions (significant wave height, development of sea), tow angle, and tow speed. The model then simulates the antenna-sea interaction for the desired duration to collect statistics relating to antenna performance. The model...

  9. Changes in home range sizes and population densities of carnivore species along the natural to urban habitat gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šálek, Martin; Drahníková, L.; Tkadlec, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2015), s. 1-14. ISSN 0305-1838 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Carnivores * home range size * natural–urban gradient * population density * review Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 4.256, year: 2014

  10. EUROMECH colloquium 377. Stability and control of shear flows with strong temperature or density gradients. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics discussed comprise the onset of instability in heated free jets and jets with density gradients, flow past heated/cooled boundaries, atmospheric shear flow, and mathematical modeling of laminar-turbulent transition phenomena. Three contributions have been input to INIS. (P.A.)

  11. Theoretical design of gradient coils with minimum power dissipation: accounting for the discretization of current density into coil windings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    While, Peter T; Korvink, Jan G; Shah, N Jon; Poole, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Gradient coil windings are typically constructed from either variable width copper tracks or fixed width wires. Excessive power dissipation within these windings during gradient coil operation limits the maximum drive current or duty cycle of the coil. It is common to design gradient coils in terms of a continuous minimum power current density and to perform a discretization to obtain the locations of the coil tracks or wires. However, the existence of finite gaps between these conductors and a maximum conductor width leads to an underestimation of coil resistance when calculated using the continuous current density. Put equivalently, the actual current density within the tracks or wires is higher than that used in the optimization and this departure results in suboptimal coil designs. In this work, a mapping to an effective current density is proposed to account for these effects and provide the correct contribution to the power dissipation. This enables the design of gradient coils that are genuinely optimal in terms of power minimization, post-discretization. The method was applied to the theoretical design of a variety of small x- and z-gradient coils for use in small animal imaging and coils for human head imaging. Computer-driven comparisons were made between coils designed with and without the current density mapping, in terms of simulated power dissipation. For coils to be built using variable width tracks, the method provides slight reductions in power dissipation in most cases and substantial gains only in cases where the minimum separation between track centre-lines is less than twice the gap size. However, for coils to be built using fixed width wires, very considerable reductions in dissipated power are consistently attainable (up to 60%) when compared to standard approaches of coil optimization. PMID:23994605

  12. Single-step enrichment of basophils from human peripheral blood by a novel method using a Percoll density gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Takuya; Okada, Tadashi; Ito, Yoichiro

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a novel continuous flow-through cell separation method using a Percoll density gradient. This method can continuously separate a large number of cells into five fractions according to their densities. To apply this method to the separation of basophils, Percoll density gradients were modified to improve basophil enrichment. When a set of Percoll density gradients was prepared (1.071, 1.075, 1.080, 1.084, and 1.090 g/mL) the basophils in a healthy volunteer were enriched by an average of 23.1 and 63.5% at Percoll densities of 1.075 (fraction 3) and 1.080 g/mL (fraction 4), respectively. On average, the yield of basophils was 1.66 × 10(5) cells in fraction 3 and 1.61 × 10(5) cells in fraction 4 from 9 mL of peripheral blood. The expression of CD203c (cluster of differentiation 203c) on separated basophils was upregulated by anti-immunoglobulin E stimulation similar to basophils in whole blood. Histamine release induced by calcium ionophore was also observed in the separated basophils. The present method will be useful for basophil enrichment since it preserves their function without using counterflow elutriation and immunological reagents, and this method will be effective as a preparative separation for cell purification by flow cytometry. PMID:27293108

  13. Arrays of quasi-hexagonally ordered silica nanopillars with independently controlled areal density, diameter and height gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Burcin; Huang, Wenting; Plettl, Alfred; Ziemann, Paul

    2015-03-20

    A consecutive fabrication approach of independently tailored gradients of the topographical parameters distance, diameter and height in arrays of well-ordered nanopillars on smooth SiO2-Si-wafers is presented. For this purpose, previously reported preparation techniques are further developed and combined. First, self-assembly of Au-salt loaded micelles by dip-coating with computer-controlled pulling-out velocities and subsequent hydrogen plasma treatment produce quasi-hexagonally ordered, 2-dimensional arrays of Au nanoparticles (NPs) with unidirectional variations of the interparticle distances along the pulling direction between 50-120 nm. Second, the distance (or areal density) gradient profile received in this way is superimposed with a diameter-controlled gradient profile of the NPs applying a selective photochemical growth technique. For demonstration, a 1D shutter is used for locally defined UV exposure times to prepare Au NP size gradients varying between 12 and 30 nm. Third, these double-gradient NP arrangements serve as etching masks in a following reactive ion etching step delivering arrays of nanopillars. For height gradient generation, the etching time is locally controlled by applying a shutter made from Si wafer piece. Due to the high flexibility of the etching process, the preparation route works on various materials such as cover slips, silicon, silicon oxide, silicon nitride and silicon carbide. PMID:25707314

  14. Preparation of Mg-Ti System Alloy and FGM with Density Gradient by Spark Plasma Sintering Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Qiang; ZHANG Lian-meng; TAN Hua; JING Fu-qian

    2004-01-01

    A new kind of functionally graded materials (FGM) with density gradient has come to showgreat potentials as flier-plates for creating quasi- isotropic compression waves. In order to meet the demand of lowerdensity in the front face for sueh fiier-plate, Mg with a low density of 1.74g/cm3 is selected to make a Mg-TiFGM. Mg- Ti alloys with various weight ratios were sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique at relativelow temperatures, and the processing of densification is mainly investigated. It is found that, up to 75wt% Ti, theMg- Ti alloys can be fully deasified at 560℃ due to the conglutination of Mg and the formation of a small amountof Mg- Ti solid solution. Finally, the Mg- Ti FGM with a density gradient from 1.74g/cm3 to 3.23g/cm3 is suc-cessfully fabricated.

  15. Generation of multiple toroidal dust vortices by a non-monotonic density gradient in a direct current glow discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Manjit, E-mail: manjit@ipr.res.in; Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Sharma, D.; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Thomas, Edward [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Observation of two well-separated dust vortices in an unmagnetized parallel plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported in this paper. A non-monotonic radial density profile, achieved by an especially designed cathode structure using a concentric metallic disk and ring of different radii, is observed to produce double dust tori between cathode and anode. PIV analysis of the still images of the double tori shows oppositely rotating dust structures between the central disk and the ring. Langmuir probe measurements of background plasma shows a non-uniform plasma density profile between the disk and the ring. Location and sense of rotation of the dust vortices coincides with the location and direction of the radial gradient in the ion drag force caused by the radial density gradient. The experimentally observed dust vorticity matches well with the calculated one using hydrodynamic formulations with shear in ion drag dominating over the dust charge gradient. These results corroborate that a radial gradient in the ion drag force directed towards cathode is the principal cause of dust rotation.

  16. Generation of multiple toroidal dust vortices by a non-monotonic density gradient in a direct current glow discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observation of two well-separated dust vortices in an unmagnetized parallel plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported in this paper. A non-monotonic radial density profile, achieved by an especially designed cathode structure using a concentric metallic disk and ring of different radii, is observed to produce double dust tori between cathode and anode. PIV analysis of the still images of the double tori shows oppositely rotating dust structures between the central disk and the ring. Langmuir probe measurements of background plasma shows a non-uniform plasma density profile between the disk and the ring. Location and sense of rotation of the dust vortices coincides with the location and direction of the radial gradient in the ion drag force caused by the radial density gradient. The experimentally observed dust vorticity matches well with the calculated one using hydrodynamic formulations with shear in ion drag dominating over the dust charge gradient. These results corroborate that a radial gradient in the ion drag force directed towards cathode is the principal cause of dust rotation

  17. Analytical gradients of the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method with density fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delcey, Mickaël G. [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Pedersen, Thomas Bondo [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, 0315 Oslo (Norway); Aquilante, Francesco [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Dipartimento di chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, V. F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Lindh, Roland, E-mail: roland.lindh@kemi.uu.se [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala Center for Computational Chemistry - UC_3, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-07-28

    An efficient implementation of the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) gradients employing density fitting (DF) is presented. The DF allows a reduction both in scaling and prefactors of the different steps involved. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on a set of molecules ranging up to an iron-Heme b complex which with its 79 atoms and 811 basis functions is to our knowledge the largest SA-CASSCF gradient computed. For smaller systems where the conventional code could still be used as a reference, both the linear response calculation and the gradient formation showed a clear timing reduction and the overall cost of a geometry optimization is typically reduced by more than one order of magnitude while the accuracy loss is negligible.

  18. Analytical gradients of the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method with density fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient implementation of the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) gradients employing density fitting (DF) is presented. The DF allows a reduction both in scaling and prefactors of the different steps involved. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on a set of molecules ranging up to an iron-Heme b complex which with its 79 atoms and 811 basis functions is to our knowledge the largest SA-CASSCF gradient computed. For smaller systems where the conventional code could still be used as a reference, both the linear response calculation and the gradient formation showed a clear timing reduction and the overall cost of a geometry optimization is typically reduced by more than one order of magnitude while the accuracy loss is negligible

  19. Variation of DNA Fragmentation Levels During Density Gradient Sperm Selection for Assisted Reproduction Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Monica; Tarozzi, Nicoletta; Cambi, Marta; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Passaro, Claudia; Luppino, Benedetta; Nadalini, Marco; Marchiani, Sara; Tamburrino, Lara; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario; Baldi, Elisabetta; Borini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Predicting the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is one main goal of the present research on assisted reproduction. To understand whether density gradient centrifugation (DGC), used to select sperm, can affect sperm DNA integrity and impact pregnancy rate (PR), we prospectively evaluated sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF) by TUNEL/PI, before and after DGC. sDF was studied in a cohort of 90 infertile couples the same day of IVF/ICSI treatment. After DGC, sDF increased in 41 samples (Group A, median sDF value: 29.25% [interquartile range, IQR: 16.01–41.63] in pre- and 60.40% [IQR: 32.92–93.53] in post-DGC) and decreased in 49 (Group B, median sDF value: 18.84% [IQR: 13.70–35.47] in pre- and 8.98% [IQR: 6.24–15.58] in post-DGC). PR was 17.1% and 34.4% in Group A and B, respectively (odds ratio [OR]: 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95–7.04, P = 0.056). After adjustment for female factor, female and male age and female BMI, the estimated OR increased to 3.12 (95% CI: 1.05–9.27, P = 0.041). According to the subgroup analysis for presence/absence of female factor, heterogeneity in the association between the Group A and B and PR emerged (OR: 4.22, 95% CI: 1.16–15.30 and OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.23–10.40, respectively, for couples without, n = 59, and with, n = 31, female factor). This study provides the first evidence that the DGC procedure produces an increase in sDF in about half of the subjects undergoing IVF/ICSI, who then show a much lower probability of pregnancy, raising concerns about the safety of this selection procedure. Evaluation of sDF before and after DGC configures as a possible new prognostic parameter of pregnancy outcome in IVF/ICSI. Alternative sperm selection strategies are recommended for those subjects who undergo the damage after DGC. PMID:27196465

  20. Inducing the migration behavior of endothelial cells by tuning the ligand density on a density-gradient poly(ethylene glycol) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiantian; Xu, Kui; Fu, Ya; Cai, Kaiyong

    2016-07-01

    The migration of endothelial cells (ECs) is crucially important for many biological processes, including early embryonic vasculogenesis, wound healing and angiogenesis. To investigate the effect of the surface poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG-CHO) density on the migration of ECs, we developed a convenient and effective method to fabricate a series of silicon slides with graded PEG densities on their surfaces based on gradual treatment with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS), backfilling with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and subsequent conjugation of m-PEG. The PEG gradient was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), contact angle measurement and spectroscopic ellipsometry and determined to range from 0.56 to 0.75chains/nm(2). The impact of the PEG gradient on the EC migration was evaluated by real-time observation via a time-lapse phase-contrast microscope. ECs adhered to the silicon surfaces with high and modest PEG densities displayed a higher tendency of migration than those on corresponding non-graded samples. The results suggest that the motility of ECs could be modulated by the PEG gradient. This study would be helpful for understanding cell-substrate interactions. PMID:27058513

  1. Linear stability analysis of the Vlasov-Poisson equations in high density plasmas in the presence of crossed fields and density gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, D. J.; Hansen, P. J.; Choudhury, S. Roy; Thomas, Gary E.

    1986-01-01

    The equations for the single-particle orbits in a nonneutral high density plasma in the presence of inhomogeneous crossed fields are obtained. Using these orbits, the linearized Vlasov equation is solved as an expansion in the orbital radii in the presence of inhomogeneities and density gradients. A model distribution function is introduced whose cold-fluid limit is exactly the same as that used in many previous studies of the cold-fluid equations. This model function is used to reduce the linearized Vlasov-Poisson equations to a second-order ordinary differential equation for the linearized electrostatic potential whose eigenvalue is the perturbation frequency.

  2. Comparison of ultracentrifugation and density gradient separation methods for isolating Tca8113 human tongue cancer cell line-derived exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhuoyuan; Wang, Chenxing; Li, Tang; LIU, ZHE; LI, LONGJIANG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the method of ultracentrifugation and density gradient separation for isolating Tca8113 human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line-derived exosomes. The exosomes were obtained from the culture supernatant of cultured Tca8113 cells, respectively, followed by identification with transmission electron microscopy observation and western blot analysis. The two different methods were then compared by the morphology, the distribution range of the parti...

  3. Simulation of direct source-to-drain tunnelling using the density gradient formalism: Non-Equilibrium Greens Function calibration

    OpenAIRE

    J. R. Watling; Brown, A. R.; Asenov, A; Svizhenko, A.; Anantram, M. P.

    2002-01-01

    Quantum mechanical confinement effects, gate, hand-to-hand and source-to-drain tunnelling will dramatically affect the characteristics of future generation nanometre scaled devices. It has been demonstrated already that first-order quantum corrections, which satisfactorily describe quantum confinement effects, can be introduced into efficient TCAD orientated drift-diffusion simulators using the density gradient approach. In this paper we refer to Non-Equilibrium Green's Function simulations i...

  4. Wind influence on a coastal buoyant outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Michael M.; Garvine, Richard W.

    2005-03-01

    This paper investigates the interplay between river discharge and winds in forcing coastal buoyant outflows. During light winds a plume influenced by the Earth's rotation will flow down shelf (in the direction of Kelvin wave propagation) as a slender buoyancy-driven coastal current. Downwelling favorable winds augment this down-shelf flow, narrow the plume, and mix the water column. Upwelling favorable winds drive currents that counter the buoyancy-driven flow, spread plume waters offshore, and rapidly mix buoyant waters. Two criteria are developed to assess the wind influence on a buoyant outflow. The wind strength index (Ws) determines whether a plume's along-shelf flow is in a wind-driven or buoyancy-driven state. Ws is the ratio of the wind-driven and buoyancy-driven along-shelf velocities. Wind influence on across-shelf plume structure is rated with a timescale (ttilt) for the isopycnal tilting caused by wind-driven Ekman circulation. These criteria are used to characterize wind influence on the Delaware Coastal Current and can be applied to other coastal buoyant outflows. The Delaware buoyant outflow is simulated for springtime high-river discharge conditions. Simulation results and Ws values reveal that the coastal current is buoyancy-driven most of the time (∣Ws∣ 1) several times during the high-discharge period. Strong upwelling events reverse the buoyant outflow; they constitute an important mechanism for transporting fresh water up shelf. Across-shelf plume structure is more sensitive to wind influence than the along-shelf flow. Values of ttilt indicate that moderate or strong winds persisting throughout a day can modify plume width significantly. Plume widening during upwelling events is accompanied by mixing that can erase the buoyant outflow.

  5. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  6. Integral solutions for selected turbulent quantities of small-scale hydrogen leakage: A non-buoyant jet or momentum-dominated buoyant jet regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Amin, M.F.; Kanayama, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, the integral method is used to derive a complete set of results and expressions for selected physical turbulent properties of a non-buoyant jet or momentum-dominated buoyant jet regime of small-scale hydrogen leakage. Several quantities of interest, including the cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity-concentration correlation (radial flux), dominant turbulent kinetic energy production term, turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity are obtained. In addition, the turbulent Schmidt number is estimated and the normalized jet-feed material density and the normalized momentum flux density are correlated. Throughout this paper, experimental results from Schefer et al. [Schefer RW, Houf WG, Williams TC. Investigation of small-scale unintended releases of hydrogen: momentum-dominated regime. Int J Hydrogen Energy 2008;33(21):6373-84] and other works for the momentum-dominated jet resulting from small-scale hydrogen leakage are used in the integral method. For a non-buoyant jet or momentum-dominated regime of a buoyant jet, both the centerline velocity and centerline concentration are proportional with z{sup -1}. The effects of buoyancy-generated momentum are assumed to be small, and the Reynolds number is sufficient for fully developed turbulent flow. The hydrogen-air momentum-dominated regime or non-buoyant jet is compared with the air-air jet as an example of non-buoyant jets. Good agreement was found between the current results and experimental results from the literature. In addition, the turbulent Schmidt number was shown to depend solely on the ratio of the momentum spread rate to the material spread rate. (author)

  7. Dilution of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls.......The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls....

  8. Retained functional integrity of bull spermatozoa after double freezing and thawing using PureSperm density gradient centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, W M C; Parrilla, I; Caballero, I; Garcia, E; Roca, J; Martinez, E A; Vazquez, J M; Rath, D

    2007-10-01

    The main aim of this study was to compare the motility and functional integrity of bull spermatozoa after single and double freezing and thawing. The viability and morphological integrity of spermatozoa selected by PureSperm density gradient centrifugation after cryopreservation of bovine semen in two commercial extenders (Experiment 1) and the function of bull spermatozoa before and after a second freezing and thawing assisted by PureSperm selection (Experiment 2) were examined. On average, 35.8 +/- 12.1% of sperm loaded onto the PureSperm density gradient were recovered after centrifugation. In Experiment 1, post-thaw motility and acrosome integrity were higher for spermatozoa frozen in Tris-egg yolk extender than in AndroMed, whether the assessments were made immediately after thawing [80.4 +/- 12.7 vs 47.6 +/- 19.0% motile and 78.8 +/- 8.3 vs 50.1 +/- 19.5% normal apical ridge (NAR), p egg yolk extender, selection on the PureSperm gradient did not influence total motility but significantly improved the proportion of acrosome-intact spermatozoa. After the gradient, both the total motility and percentage of normal acrosomes increased for spermatozoa frozen in AndroMed (Minitüb Tiefenbach, Germany). In Experiment 2, there was no difference in sperm motility after the first and second freeze-thawing (82.9 +/- 12.7 vs 68.8 +/- 18.7%). However, the proportion of acrosome-intact spermatozoa was significantly improved by selection through the PureSperm gradient, whether measured by phase contrast microscopy (78.9 +/- 9.7 vs 90.4 +/- 4.0% NAR, p < 0.05) or flow cytometry (53.4 +/- 11.7 vs 76.3 +/- 6.0% viable acrosome-intact spermatozoa, p < 0.001). The improvement in the percentage of spermatozoa with normal acrosomes was maintained after resuspension in the cooling extender and cooling to 4 degrees C (88.2 +/- 6.2) and after re-freezing and thawing (83.6 +/- 6.56% NAR). However, flow cytometric assessment of the sperm membranes revealed a decline in the percentage of

  9. T2* and proton density measurement of normal human lung parenchyma using submillisecond echo time gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatabu, Hiroto; Alsop, David C.; Listerud, John; Bonnet, Mathieu; Gefter, Warren B

    1999-03-01

    Objective: To obtain T2* and proton density measurements of normal human lung parenchyma in vivo using submillisecond echo time (TE) gradient echo (GRE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and methods: Six normal volunteers were scanned using a 1.5-T system equipped with a prototype enhanced gradient (GE Signa, Waukausha, WI). Images were obtained during breath-holding with acquisition times of 7-16 s. Multiple TEs ranging from 0.7 to 2.5 ms were tested. Linear regression was performed on the logarithmic plots of signal intensity versus TE, yielding measurements of T2* and proton density relative to chest wall muscle. Measurements in supine and prone positions were compared, and effects of the level of lung inflation on lung signal were also evaluated. Results: The signal from the lung parenchyma diminished exponentially with prolongation of TE. The measured T2* in six normal volunteers ranged from 0.89 to 2.18 ms (1.43{+-}0.41 ms, mean{+-}S.D.). The measured relative proton density values ranged between 0.21 and 0.45 (0.29{+-}0.08, mean{+-}S.D.). Calculated T2* values of 1.46{+-}0.50, 1.01{+-}0.29 and 1.52{+-}0.18 ms, and calculated relative proton densities of 0.20{+-}0.03, 0.32{+-}0.13 and 0.35{+-}0.10 were obtained from the anterior, middle and posterior portions of the supine right lung, respectively. The anterior-posterior proton density gradient was reversed in the prone position. There was a pronounced increase in signal from lung parenchyma at maximum expiration compared with maximum inspiration. The ultrashort TE GRE technique yielded images demonstrating signal from lung parenchyma with minimal motion-induced noise. Conclusion: Quantitative in vivo measurements of lung T2* and relative proton density in conjunction with high-signal parenchymal images can be obtained using a set of very rapid breath-hold images with a recently developed ultrashort TE GRE sequence.

  10. Multiple-relaxation-time color-gradient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating two-phase flows with high density ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Yan; Liu, Haihu; Li, Qing; Kang, Qinjun; Sun, Jinju

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose a color-gradient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating two-phase flows with high density ratio and high Reynolds number. The model applies a multirelaxation-time (MRT) collision operator to enhance the stability of the simulation. A source term, which is derived by the Chapman-Enskog analysis, is added into the MRT LB equation so that the Navier-Stokes equations can be exactly recovered. Also, a form of the equilibrium density distribution function is used to simplify the source term. To validate the proposed model, steady flows of a static droplet and the layered channel flow are first simulated with density ratios up to 1000. Small values of spurious velocities and interfacial tension errors are found in the static droplet test, and improved profiles of velocity are obtained by the present model in simulating channel flows. Then, two cases of unsteady flows, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and droplet splashing on a thin film, are simulated. In the former case, the density ratio of 3 and Reynolds numbers of 256 and 2048 are considered. The interface shapes and spike and bubble positions are in good agreement with the results of previous studies. In the latter case, the droplet spreading radius is found to obey the power law proposed in previous studies for the density ratio of 100 and Reynolds number up to 500.

  11. Iodixanol Gradient Centrifugation to Separate Components of the Low-Density Membrane Fraction from 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Jessica B A; Lamb, Christopher A; Gould, Gwyn W; Bryant, Nia J

    2016-02-01

    We optimized a set of fractionation techniques to facilitate the isolation of subcellular compartments containing insulin-sensitive glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4), which is mobilized from GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) in fat and muscle cells in response to insulin. In the absence of insulin, GLUT4 undergoes a continuous cycle of GSV formation and fusion with other compartments. Full membrane fractionation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes produces a low-density membrane fraction that contains both the constitutive recycling pool (the endosomal recycling compartments) and the insulin-sensitive pool (the GSVs). These two pools can be separated based on density using iodixanol gradient centrifugation, described here. PMID:26832683

  12. Up-Hill Diffusion Creating Density Gradient - What is the Proper Entropy?

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    It is always some constraint that yields any nontrivial structure from statistical averages. As epitomized by the Boltzmann distribution, the energy conservation is often the principal constraint acting on mechanical systems. Here, we investigate a different type: the topological constraint imposed on `space'. Such constraint emerges from the null space of the Poisson operator linking energy gradient to phase space velocity, and appears as an adiabatic invariant altering the preserved phase space volume at the core of statistical mechanics. The correct measure of entropy, built on the distorted invariant measure, behaves consistently with the second law of thermodynamics. The opposite behavior (decreasing entropy and negative entropy production) arises in arbitrary coordinates. An ensamble of rotating rigid bodies is worked out. The theory is then applied to up-hill diffusion in a magnetosphere.

  13. Up-hill diffusion, creation of density gradients: Entropy measure for systems with topological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, N.; Yoshida, Z.

    2016-06-01

    It is always some constraint that yields any nontrivial structure from statistical averages. As epitomized by the Boltzmann distribution, the energy conservation is often the principal constraint acting on mechanical systems. Here we investigate a different type: the topological constraint imposed on "space." Such a constraint emerges from the null space of the Poisson operator linking an energy gradient to phase space velocity and appears as an adiabatic invariant altering the preserved phase space volume at the core of statistical mechanics. The correct measure of entropy, built on the distorted invariant measure, behaves consistently with the second law of thermodynamics. The opposite behavior (decreasing entropy and negative entropy production) arises in arbitrary coordinates. An ensemble of rotating rigid bodies is worked out. The theory is then applied to up-hill diffusion in a magnetosphere.

  14. Density and community structure of soil- and bark-dwelling microarthropods along an altitudinal gradient in a tropical montane rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, Jens; Norton, Roy A; Scheu, Stefan; Maraun, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Microarthropod communities in the soil and on the bark of trees were investigated along an elevation gradient (1,850, 2,000, 2,150, 2,300 m) in a tropical montane rain forest in southern Ecuador. We hypothesised that the density of microarthropods declines with depth in soil and increases with increasing altitude mainly due to the availability of resources, i.e. organic matter. In addition, we expected bark and soil communities to differ strongly, since the bark of trees is more exposed to harsher factors. In contrast to our hypothesis, the density of major microarthropod groups (Collembola, Oribatida, Gamasina, Uropodina) was generally low and decreased with altitude. However, as we predicted the density of each of the groups decreased with soil depth. Density of microarthropods on tree bark was lower than in soil. Overall, 43 species of oribatid mites were found, with the most abundant higher taxa being Poronota, pycnonotic Apheredermata, Mixonomata and Eupheredermata. The oribatid mite community on bark did not differ significantly from that in soil. The number of oribatid mite species declined with altitude (24, 23, 17 and 13 species at 1,850, 2,000, 2,150 and 2,300 m, respectively). Rarefaction curves indicate that overall about 50 oribatid mite species are to be expected along the studied altitudinal gradient. Results of this study indicate (1) that microarthropods may be limited by the quality of resources at high altitudes and by the amount of resources at deeper soil layers, and (2) that the bark of trees and the soil are habitats of similar quality for oribatid mites. PMID:20229099

  15. Gradients of Electron-Temperature and Density across M = 2 Magnetic Islands in Rtp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Milligen, B. P.; van Lammeren, A. C. A. P.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Schüller, F. C.; Verreck, M.

    1993-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of oscillations of the electron temperature, the electron density and the poloidal magnetic field in the Rijnhuizen tokamak RTP are combined to obtain an insight into the structure of MHD mode perturbations. The diagnostics used are a 20 channel heterodyne ECE radiometer, a

  16. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1...

  17. Infrared Sensing of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with laboratory experiments on buoyant surface plumes where heat is the source of buoyancy. Temperature distributions were measured at the water surface using infra-red sensing, and inside the waterbody a computer based measurement system was applied. The plume is described...

  18. Mapping the genome of meta-generalized gradient approximation density functionals: The search for B97M-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardirossian, Narbe [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-21

    A meta-generalized gradient approximation density functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional is presented. The functional form is selected from more than 10{sup 10} choices carved out of a functional space of almost 10{sup 40} possibilities. Raw data come from training a vast number of candidate functional forms on a comprehensive training set of 1095 data points and testing the resulting fits on a comprehensive primary test set of 1153 data points. Functional forms are ranked based on their ability to reproduce the data in both the training and primary test sets with minimum empiricism, and filtered based on a set of physical constraints and an often-overlooked condition of satisfactory numerical precision with medium-sized integration grids. The resulting optimal functional form has 4 linear exchange parameters, 4 linear same-spin correlation parameters, and 4 linear opposite-spin correlation parameters, for a total of 12 fitted parameters. The final density functional, B97M-V, is further assessed on a secondary test set of 212 data points, applied to several large systems including the coronene dimer and water clusters, tested for the accurate prediction of intramolecular and intermolecular geometries, verified to have a readily attainable basis set limit, and checked for grid sensitivity. Compared to existing density functionals, B97M-V is remarkably accurate for non-bonded interactions and very satisfactory for thermochemical quantities such as atomization energies, but inherits the demonstrable limitations of existing local density functionals for barrier heights.

  19. Mapping the genome of meta-generalized gradient approximation density functionals: The search for B97M-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A meta-generalized gradient approximation density functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional is presented. The functional form is selected from more than 1010 choices carved out of a functional space of almost 1040 possibilities. Raw data come from training a vast number of candidate functional forms on a comprehensive training set of 1095 data points and testing the resulting fits on a comprehensive primary test set of 1153 data points. Functional forms are ranked based on their ability to reproduce the data in both the training and primary test sets with minimum empiricism, and filtered based on a set of physical constraints and an often-overlooked condition of satisfactory numerical precision with medium-sized integration grids. The resulting optimal functional form has 4 linear exchange parameters, 4 linear same-spin correlation parameters, and 4 linear opposite-spin correlation parameters, for a total of 12 fitted parameters. The final density functional, B97M-V, is further assessed on a secondary test set of 212 data points, applied to several large systems including the coronene dimer and water clusters, tested for the accurate prediction of intramolecular and intermolecular geometries, verified to have a readily attainable basis set limit, and checked for grid sensitivity. Compared to existing density functionals, B97M-V is remarkably accurate for non-bonded interactions and very satisfactory for thermochemical quantities such as atomization energies, but inherits the demonstrable limitations of existing local density functionals for barrier heights

  20. Numerical Studies of Electron Acceleration Behind Self-Modulating Proton Beam in Plasma with a Density Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Petrenko, Alexey; Sosedkin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1e15 1/cm^3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project --- the proof-of-prin...

  1. Numerical studies of electron acceleration behind self-modulating proton beam in plasma with a density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, A.; Lotov, K.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-09-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1015cm-3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project-the proof-of-principle experiment on proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CERN.

  2. Species-specific gradients of juvenile fish density and size in pelagic areas of temperate reservoirs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jůza, Tomáš; Ricard, Daniel; Blabolil, Petr; Čech, Martin; Draštík, Vladislav; Frouzová, Jaroslava; Muška, Milan; Peterka, Jiří; Prchalová, Marie; Říha, Milan; Sajdlová, Zuzana; Šmejkal, Marek; Tušer, Michal; Vašek, Mojmír; Vejřík, Lukáš; Kubečka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 762, č. 1 (2015), s. 169-181. ISSN 0018-8158 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0204; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Grant ostatní: NFM(CZ) 7F4316 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : trawling * juvenile density * horizontal distribution * vertical distribution * tributary area Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.275, year: 2014

  3. 46 CFR 160.010-3 - Inflatable buoyant apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inflatable buoyant apparatus. 160.010-3 Section 160.010-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Buoyant Apparatus for Merchant Vessels § 160.010-3 Inflatable buoyant apparatus. (a)...

  4. 46 CFR 160.010-6 - Capacity of buoyant apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Capacity of buoyant apparatus. 160.010-6 Section 160.010-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Buoyant Apparatus for Merchant Vessels § 160.010-6 Capacity of buoyant apparatus. (a)...

  5. The role of density gradients on tidal asymmetries in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanev, Emil V.; Al-Nadhairi, Rahma; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the German Bight associated with river plumes and fresh water intrusions from tidal flats have been studied with numerical simulations. The horizontal and vertical patterns of the M2, M4 and M6 tides revealed complex distortions along the bathymetric channels connecting the coast and the open sea. A major focus was on the surface-to-bottom change in tidal asymmetries, which provides a major control on draining the tidal flats around the Elbe and Weser River mouths. Comparisons between baroclinic and barotropic experiments demonstrated that the estuarine gravitational circulation is responsible for pronounced differences in surface and bottom asymmetries. These differences could be considered as a basic control mechanism for sediment dynamics. The most prominent area of tidal distortions, manifested by a delay of the tidal wave, was located between the estuarine turbidity maximum and the estuarine mouth north of Cuxhaven. This area was characterized by the strongest periodic convergence and divergence of the flow and by the largest salinity gradients. The enhancement of the gravitational circulation occurred during the transition between spring and neap tides. The large-scale dynamics and small-scale topographic features could impact the sediment distribution as there was a marked interplay in the channels between stratification and turbulence. Also an explanation has been given for the mechanisms supporting the existence of a mud area ( Schlickgebiet) south of Helgoland Island, associated with trapping suspended particular matter.

  6. Weak turbulence theory of ion temperature gradient modes for inverted density plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Typical profiles measured in H-mode (''high confinement'') discharges from tokamaks such as JET and DIII-D suggest that the ion temperature gradient instability threshold parameter ηi (≡dlnTi/dlnni) could be negative in many cases. Previous linear theoretical calculations have established the onset conditions for these negative ηi-modes and the fact that their growth rate is much smaller than their real frequency over a wide range of negative ηi values. This has motivated the present nonlinear weak turbulence analysis to assess the relevance of such instabilities for confinement in H-mode plasmas. The nonlinear eigenmode equation indicates that the 3-wave coupling to shorter wavelength modes is the dominant nonlinear saturation mechanism. It is found that both the saturation level for these fluctuations and the magnitude of the associated ion thermal diffusivity are considerably smaller than the strong turbulence mixing length type estimates for the more conventional positive-ηi-instabilities. 19 refs., 3 figs

  7. High Density of Tree-Cavities and Snags in Tropical Dry Forest of Western Mexico Raises Questions for a Latitudinal Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Vázquez, Leopoldo; Renton, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that a latitudinal gradient exists of a low density of snags and high density of naturally-formed tree-cavities in tropical vs. temperate forests, though few cavities may have characteristics suitable for nesting by birds. We determined snag and cavity density, characteristics, and suitability for birds in a tropical dry forest biome of western Mexico, and evaluated whether our data fits the trend of snag and cavity density typically found in tropical moist and wet fores...

  8. Simulations of Buoyant Plumes in Solar Prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Hurlburt, Neal

    2012-01-01

    Observations of solar prominences reveal a complex, dynamic flow field within them. The flow field within quiescent prominences is characterized by long ``threads'' and dark ``bubbles'' that fall and rise (respectively) in a thin sheet. The flow field in active prominences display more helical motions that travel along the axis of the prominence. We explore the possible dynamics of both of these with the aid of 2.5D MHD simulations. Our model, compressible plasma possesses density and temperature gradients and resides in magnetic field configurations that mimc those of a solar prominence. We present results of various configurations and discuss the nonlinear behavior of the resulting dynamics.

  9. Simulations of Buoyant Plumes in Solar Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, N.; Berger, T.

    2012-08-01

    Observations of solar prominences reveal a complex, dynamic flow field within them. The flow field within quiescent prominences is characterized by long "threads" and dark "bubbles" that fall and rise (respectively) in a thin sheet. The flow field in active prominences display more helical motions that travel along the axis of the prominence. We explore the possible dynamics of both of these with the aid of 2.5D MHD simulations. Our model, compressible plasma possesses density and temperature gradients and resides in magnetic field configurations that mimc those of a solar prominence. We present results of various configurations and discuss the nonlinear behavior of the resulting dynamics.

  10. Measuring the electron density gradients of dense plasmas by deflectometry using short-wavelength probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nejdl, J.; Kozlová, Michaela; Mocek, Tomáš; Rus, Bedřich

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 12 (2010), 122705/1-122705/6. ISSN 1070-664X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08099; GA ČR GA202/08/1734; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092 Grant ostatní: AVČR(CZ) M100100911 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : plasma density * plasma diagnostics * plasma electromagnetic wave propagation * plasma production by laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.320, year: 2010 http://pop.aip.org/resource/1/phpaen/v17/i12/p122705_s1?isAuthorized=no

  11. Turbulence Statistics of a Buoyant Jet in a Stratified Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleney, Amy Brooke

    Using non-intrusive optical diagnostics, turbulence statistics for a round, incompressible, buoyant, and vertical jet discharging freely into a stably linear stratified environment is studied and compared to a reference case of a neutrally buoyant jet in a uniform environment. This is part of a validation campaign for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Buoyancy forces are known to significantly affect the jet evolution in a stratified environment. Despite their ubiquity in numerous natural and man-made flows, available data in these jets are limited, which constrain our understanding of the underlying physical processes. In particular, there is a dearth of velocity field data, which makes it challenging to validate numerical codes, currently used for modeling these important flows. Herein, jet near- and far-field behaviors are obtained with a combination of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and multi-scale time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) for Reynolds number up to 20,000. Deploying non-intrusive optical diagnostics in a variable density environment is challenging in liquids. The refractive index is strongly affected by the density, which introduces optical aberrations and occlusions that prevent the resolution of the flow. One solution consists of using index matched fluids with different densities. Here a pair of water solutions - isopropanol and NaCl - are identified that satisfy these requirements. In fact, they provide a density difference up to 5%, which is the largest reported for such fluid pairs. Additionally, by design, the kinematic viscosities of the solutions are identical. This greatly simplifies the analysis and subsequent simulations of the data. The spectral and temperature dependence of the solutions are fully characterized. In the near-field, shear layer roll-up is analyzed and characterized as a function of initial velocity profile. In the far-field, turbulence statistics are reported for two different scales, one

  12. A comparison of density functional theory and coupled cluster methods for the calculation of electric dipole polarizability gradients of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paidarová, Ivana; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have compared the performance of density functional theory (DFT) using five different exchange-correlation functionals with four coupled cluster theory based wave function methods in the calculation of geometrical derivatives of the polarizability tensor of methane. The polarizability gradients...... focus on DFT methods. The KT3, B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP, B97-2 and PBE0 DFT exchange-correlation functionals and the highly correlated wave function methods SOPPA(CCSD), CCSD-LR, CCSD and CCSD(T) were employed in combination with a series of eleven basis sets. Comparison of the DFT results with CCSD......(T)/daug-cc-pVQZ reference values reveals that none of the investigated DFT approaches reaches the accuracy of correlated wave function based methods and that the best DFT results are obtained with the PBE0 exchange-correlation functional and Sadlej's polarized valence triple zeta basis set. The SOPPA(CCSD) method, on the...

  13. Multi-Dimensional Quantum Effect Simulation Using a Density-Gradient Model and Script-Level Programming Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Connor S.; Biegel, Bryan A.; Yu, Zhi-Ping; Ancona, Mario G.; Bude, J.; Dutton, Robert W.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A density-gradient (DG) model is used to calculate quantum-mechanical corrections to classical carrier transport in MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductor) inversion/accumulation layers. The model is compared to measured data and to a fully self-consistent coupled Schrodinger and Poisson equation (SCSP) solver. Good agreement is demonstrated for MOS capacitors with gate oxide as thin as 21 A. It is then applied to study carrier distribution in ultra short MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) with surface roughness. This work represents the first implementation of the DG formulation on multidimensional unstructured meshes. It was enabled by a powerful scripting approach which provides an easy-to-use and flexible framework for solving the fourth-order PDEs (Partial Differential Equation) of the DG model.

  14. Thermocapillary migration of liquid droplets in a temperature gradient in a density matched system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidnia, N.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of thermocapillary flow in droplets of a vegetable oil (partially hydrogenated soybean oil) immersed in silicone oil was conducted in a test cell with a heated top wall and a cooled bottom wall. The liquids are nearly immiscible and have equal densities at a temperature below the room temperature, thus providing a simulation of low-gravity conditions by reducing the buoyancy forces. The interfacial tension between the two oils was measured in the temperature range 20 to 50 C using a capillary tube and (d sigma)/(d T) was determined to be negative. Droplets ranging in sizes from 3 mm to 1 cm diameter were injected into the silicone oil. The vertical temperature profile in the bulk liquid (silicone oil) produces temperature variations along the interface which induce variations in the interfacial tension. The flow inside the droplet driven by the resulting interfacial shear stresses was observed using a laser light-sheet flow visualization technique. The flow direction is consistent with the sign of (d sigma)/(d T). The observed maximum surface velocities are compared to the theoretical predictions of Young et al. (1959).

  15. Investigations of a turbulent buoyant sodium jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes an experimental investigation of a turbulent buoyant sodium jet which was discharging into a slowly moving ambient. Measurements of mean velocity, mean temperature and temperature fluctuations were made using a miniature permanent magnet flowmeter probe for a range of conditions encompassing forced convection jets, buoyant jets and plumes. The geometrical arrangement departed from that for a classical free jet in that the jet emerged into a confined co-flow but the essential characteristics of free jet behaviour were observed. The decay of axial velocity was broadly the same as for fluid of higher Prandtl number. The decay of mean temperature differences and temperature fluctuations were different from that for fluids of higher Prandtl number due to the importance of molecular diffusion in heat transport. (author)

  16. Mapping the genome of meta-generalized gradient approximation density functionals: the search for B97M-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirossian, Narbe; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-02-21

    A meta-generalized gradient approximation density functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional is presented. The functional form is selected from more than 10(10) choices carved out of a functional space of almost 10(40) possibilities. Raw data come from training a vast number of candidate functional forms on a comprehensive training set of 1095 data points and testing the resulting fits on a comprehensive primary test set of 1153 data points. Functional forms are ranked based on their ability to reproduce the data in both the training and primary test sets with minimum empiricism, and filtered based on a set of physical constraints and an often-overlooked condition of satisfactory numerical precision with medium-sized integration grids. The resulting optimal functional form has 4 linear exchange parameters, 4 linear same-spin correlation parameters, and 4 linear opposite-spin correlation parameters, for a total of 12 fitted parameters. The final density functional, B97M-V, is further assessed on a secondary test set of 212 data points, applied to several large systems including the coronene dimer and water clusters, tested for the accurate prediction of intramolecular and intermolecular geometries, verified to have a readily attainable basis set limit, and checked for grid sensitivity. Compared to existing density functionals, B97M-V is remarkably accurate for non-bonded interactions and very satisfactory for thermochemical quantities such as atomization energies, but inherits the demonstrable limitations of existing local density functionals for barrier heights. PMID:25702006

  17. ROUNDED FLOWING STATES OF OBSTRUCTED BUOYANT JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAI Wen-xin; FANG Shen-guang

    2006-01-01

    The mutual relationships of three effective factors, the diameter D/d (d is the diameter of exit) of obstructed plate, exit densimetric Froude number and the distance H/d of the plate from jet orifice for obstructed buoyant jet in static ambient, are analyzed to explain normal and abnormal rounded flowing (reverberated and bifurcated flowing).The critical Froude numbers for obstructed buoyant jets with H/d=2, 4, 6, 8 which distinguished normal and abnormal flowing pattern are obtained. Normal rounded flowing is found only for a plate under a special value of H/d. A fitted formula of critical Froude numbers with H/d and D/d is presented to distinguish rounded flowing types. The occurring of reverberated or bifurcated flowing in abnormal rounded flow is analyzed. Based on the results of obstructed buoyant jets with D/d=1, normal rounded flowing occurred only for all conditions and axial dilution behind the plate under different H/D is obtained.

  18. Spatial Distribution of Oxygen Chemical Potential under Potential Gradients and Theoretical Maximum Power Density with 8YSZ Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae-Kwang; Im, Ha-Ni; Song, Sun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The maximum power density of SOFC with 8YSZ electrolyte as the function of thickness was calculated by integrating partial conductivities of charge carriers under various DC bias conditions at a fixed oxygen chemical potential gradient at both sides of the electrolyte. The partial conductivities were successfully taken using the Hebb-Wagner polarization method as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, and the spatial distribution of oxygen partial pressure across the electrolyte was calculated based on Choudhury and Patterson’s model by considering zero electrode polarization. At positive voltage conditions corresponding to SOFC and SOEC, the high conductivity region was expanded, but at negative cell voltage condition, the low conductivity region near n-type to p-type transition was expanded. In addition, the maximum power density calculated from the current-voltage characteristic showed approximately 5.76 W/cm2 at 700 oC with 10 μm thick-8YSZ, while the oxygen partial pressure of the cathode and anode sides maintained ≈0.21 and 10-22 atm.

  19. Electron density and height at the F1 region minimum gradient at low solar activity for an equatorial station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a ledge of ionization between the E and F2 layer maximum electron density, either with a distinct critical frequency (foF1), or in the form of an inflexion point is found to be a persistent feature of the equatorial ionosphere from 0700 to 1800 local time, at low solar activity. The electron density (NF1), and the height (hF1), at the position of minimum gradient in ionospheric profiles for Ouagadougou, an equatorial station was investigated. NF1 was found to exhibit a clear diurnal variation, which depends on solar zenith angle(x). The cos(x) power was found to be 0.34. An obvious seasonal variation in NF1 was not found. hF1 shows neither a diurnal nor seasonal dependence, and has an average value of (166 ± 6) km. NF1 and hF1 at 1000, 1200 and 1400 local time, in the months of January and July, for Ouagadougou and Ibadan, another equatorial station were compared. The comparison shows that there is no significant difference in hF1 for both stations but some differences were found in NF1. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  20. Sampling and analysis of particles from buoyant hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottl, Michael J.

    The objective of our studies has been to identify the chemical processes that occur in the buoyant part of hydrothermal plumes and to evaluate their role in determining the ultimate fate of the hydrothermal input to the oceans. Our first such effort is described by Mottl and McConachy [1990]. Because the buoyant plume is a small feature that contains very large physical and chemical gradients, we have sampled it from manned submersibles. We have used two different samplers, both manufactured by General Oceanics in Miami: the Go-Flo bottle and the Chopstick sampler. Four Go-Flo bottles of 1.7 L capacity can readily be mounted on most submersibles, vertically and in a forward position in sight of the pilot's viewport and video cameras, without interfering with other operations on a dive. On Alvin they have typically been mounted on the outside starboard edge of the basket. On Turtle they were mounted on the outside edge of the port manipulator. We chose Go-Flo rather than Niskin bottles because the latter are prone to spillage when the rods attached to the end caps are bumped against an object such as the seafloor, as often happens on a submersible dive. Go-Flo bottles are also more easily rigged for pressure filtration than are Niskins. The main disadvantage of Go-Flo bottles vs. Niskins for this application is the internal silicone rubber ring that holds the ball valves in place on each end of the Go-Flo. This ring tends to trap large particles that are then difficult to dislodge and collect. The rings are also difficult to clean between dives.

  1. Comparative validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and conventional PCR of bovine semen centrifuged in continuous density gradient

    OpenAIRE

    M.V. Resende; A.C. Lucio; A.P. Perini; L.Z Oliveira; A.O. Almeida; B.C.A Alves; Moreira-Filho, C. A.; I. W. Santos; V.F.M. Hossepian de Lima

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the sperm enrichment with X-bearing spermatozoa, after one centrifugation in a Percoll or OptiPrep continuous density gradient, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) of sperm DNA and resultant in vitro-produced bovine embryos by PCR. Frozen/thawed sperm was layered on density gradients and the tubes were centrifuged. Supernatants were gently aspirated and the sperm recovered from the bottom of the tubes. Cleavage and ...

  2. The Melt Segregation During Ascent of Buoyant Diapirs in Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N.; Behn, M. D.; Parmentier, E. M.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    Cold, low-density diapirs arising from hydrated mantle and/or subducted sediments on the top of subducting slabs may transport key chemical signatures from the slab to the shallow source region for arc magmas. These chemical signatures are strongly influenced by melting of this buoyant material during its ascent. However, to date there have been relatively few quantitative models to constrain melting and melt segregation in an ascending diapir, as well as the induced geochemical signature. Here, we use a two-phase Darcy-Stokes-energy model to investigate thermal evolution, melting, and melt segregation in buoyant diapirs as they ascend through the mantle wedge. Using a simplified 2-D axi-symmetric circular geometry we investigate diapir evolution in three scenarios with increasing complexity. First, we consider a case without melting in which the thermal evolution of the diapir is controlled solely by thermal diffusion during ascent. Our results show that for most cases (e.g., diapir radius ≤ 3.7 km and diapir generation depths of ~ 75 km) thermal diffusion times are smaller than the ascent time—implying that the diapir will thermal equilibrate with the mantle wedge. Secondly, we parameterize melting within the diapir, but without melt segregation, and add the effect of latent heat to the thermal evolution of the diapir. Latent heat significantly buffers heating of the diapir. For the diapir with radius ~3.7 km, the heating from the outside is slowed down ~30%. Finally, we include melt segregation within the diapir in the model. Melting initiates at the boundaries of the diapir as the cold interior warms in response to thermal equilibration with the hot mantle wedge. This forms a high porosity, high permeability rim around the margin of the diapir. As the diapir continues to warm and ascend, new melts migrate into this rim and are focused upward, accumulating at the top of the diapir. The rim thus acts like an annulus melt channel isolating the central part of

  3. Control of colloids with gravity, temperature gradients, and electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, M; Harrison, C; Austin, R H; Megens, M; Hollingsworth, A; Russel, W B; Cheng Zhen; Mason, T; Chaikin, P M

    2003-01-01

    We have used a variety of different applied fields to control the density, growth, and structure of colloidal crystals. Gravity exerts a body force proportional to the buoyant mass and in equilibrium produces a height-dependent concentration profile. A similar body force can be obtained with electric fields on charged particles (electrophoresis), a temperature gradient on all particles, or an electric field gradient on uncharged particles (dielectrophoresis). The last is particularly interesting since its magnitude and sign can be changed by tuning the applied frequency. We study these effects in bulk (making 'dielectrophoretic bottles' or traps), to control concentration profiles during nucleation and growth and near surfaces. We also study control of non-spherical and optically anisotropic particles with the light field from laser tweezers.

  4. Density gradient centrifugation: Application to the separation of macerals of type I, II, and III sedimentary organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, B.A.; Kruge, M.A.; Crelling, J.C.; Salmon, G.L.

    1994-01-01

    Samples of organic matter from nine well-known geological units (Green River Fm., Tasmanian Tasmanite, Lower Toarcian Sh. of the Paris Basin, Duwi Fm., New Albany Sh., Monterey Fm., Herrin No. 6 coal, Eocene coal, and Miocene lignite from Kalimantan) were processed by density gradient centrifugation (DGC) to isolate the constituent macerals. Optimal separation, as well as the liberation of microcrystalline pyrite from the organic matter, was obtained by particle size minimization prior to DGC by treatment with liquid N2 and micronization in a fluid energy mill. The resulting small particle size limits the use of optical microscopy, thus microfluorimetry and analytical pyrolysis were also employed to assess the quality and purity of the fractions. Each of the samples exhibits one dominant DGC peak (corresponding to alginite in the Green River Fm., amorphinite in the Lower Toarcian Sh., vitrinite in the Herrin No. 6, etc.) which shifts from 1.05 g mL-1 for the Type I kerogens to between 1.18 and 1.23 g mL-1 for Type II and II-S. The characteristic densities for Type III organic matter are greater still, being 1.27 g mL-1 for the hydrogen-rich Eocene coal, 1.29 g mL-1 for the Carboniferous coal and 1.43 g mL-1 for the oxygen-rich Miocene lignite. Among Type II kerogens, the DGC profile represents a compositional continuum from undegraded alginite through (bacterial) degraded amorphinite; therefore chemical and optical properties change gradually with increasing density. The separation of useful quantities of macerals that occur in only minor amounts is difficult. Such separations require large amounts of starting material and require multiple processing steps. Complete maceral separation for some samples using present methods seems remote. Samples containing macerals with significant density differences due to heteroatom diversity (e.g., preferential sulfur or oxygen concentration in the one maceral), on the other hand, may be successfully separated (e.g., coals and

  5. 46 CFR 108.697 - Buoyant work vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buoyant work vests. 108.697 Section 108.697 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) A-MOBILE OFFSHORE DRILLING UNITS DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.697 Buoyant work vests. (a) Each buoyant work vest on a unit must be approved under Subpart 160.053 or...

  6. Space Electron Density Gradient Studies using a 3D Embedded Reconfigurable Sounder and ESA/NASA CLUSTER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a direct comparison between data captured by a new embedded reconfigurable digital sounder, different ground-based ionospheric sounders spread around Europe and the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The CLUSTER mission consists of four identical space probes flying in a formation that allows measurements of the electron density gradient in the local magnetic field. Both the ground-based and the spacecraft instrumentations assist in studying the motion, geometry and boundaries of the plasmasphere. The comparison results are in accordance to each other. Some slight deviations among the captured data were expected from the beginning of this investigation. These small discrepancies are reasonable and seriatim analyzed. The results of this research are significant, since the level of the plasma's ionization, which is related to the solar activity, dominates the propagation of electromagnetic waves through it. Similarly, unusually high solar activity presents serious hazards to orbiting satellites, spaceborne instrumentation, satellite communications and infrastructure located on the Earth's surface. Long-term collaborative study of the data is required to continue, in order to identify and determine the enhanced risk in advance. This would allow scientists to propose an immediate cure.

  7. Controllable Assembly and Separation of Colloidal Nanoparticles through a One-Tube Synthesis Based on Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaohan; Li, Minglin; Kuang, Yun; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Zhao; Zhang, Jin; You, Shusen; Yin, Meizhen; Wan, Pengbo; Luo, Liang; Sun, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with finite primary units was achieved by introducing a thin salt (NaCl) solution layer into density gradient before centrifugation. The electrostatic interactions between Au nanoparticles would be affected and cause 1D assembly upon passing through the salt layer. A negatively charged polymer such as poly(acrylic acid) was used as an encapsulation/stabilization layer to help the formation of 1D Au assemblies, which were subsequently sorted according to unit numbers at succeeding separation zones. A centrifugal field was introduced as the external field to overcome the random Brownian motion of NPs and benefit the assembly effect. Such a facile "one-tube synthesis" approach couples assembly and separation in one centrifuge tube by centrifuging once. The method can be tuned by changing the concentration of interference salt layer, encapsulation layer, and centrifugation rate. Furthermore, positively charged fluorescent polymers such as perylenediimide-poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) could encapsulate the assemblies to give tunable fluorescence properties. PMID:25809533

  8. The seasonal and solar cycle variations of electron density gradient scale length during magnetically disturbed days: implications for Spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, G.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.

    2009-07-01

    The behaviour of electron density gradient scale length, L, around post-sunset hours during the magnetically disturbed days of the summer, winter and equinox seasons of solar maximum (2002) and minimum years (1995) has been studied, using ionosonde data of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.5°E, dip = 0.5°N) in the Indian longitude sector. The results indicate a clear seasonal and solar cycle variation in L. Seasonal variations of the maximum vertical drift of the F layer were also examined on these days. In particular, the seasonal variation of the Equatorial Spread F (ESF) during this period is examined in terms of the relative roles of L and the vertical drift of the F layer in the triggering of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Our results on the clear-cut seasonal and solar cycle variation in L for disturbed days and its control of ESF occurrence are presented and discussed.

  9. First-principles local density approximation (LDA)+ U and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) + U studies of plutonium oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Bo; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    The electronic structures and properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 have been studied according to the first principles by using the all-electron projector-augmented-wave (PAW) method. The local density approximation (LDA)+U and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)+U formalisms have been used to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion among the localized Pu 5f electrons. We discuss how the properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 are affected by choosing the values of U and exchange-correlation potential. Also, the oxidation reaction of Pu2O3, leading to the formation of PuO2, and its dependence on U and exchange-correlation potential have been studied. Our results show that by choosing an appropriate U it is possible to consistently describe structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3, which enable the modelling of the redox process involving Pu-based materials.

  10. Assessment of swim-up and discontinuous density gradient in sperm sex preselection for bovine embryo production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C Lucio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to associate the modified swim-up method with centrifugation in density gradient for the separation of X-bearing spermatozoa. Sperm viability and integrity were evaluated through the Trypan Blue/Giemsa staining method. Quality control of centrifuged spermatozoa was performed in in vitro produced embryos. The results were validated by the sex ratio of in vitro produced embryos using PCR by Y- specific sequences present in bovine male genomic DNA. After determining genetic sex of in vitro produced embryos, the results showed difference (P<0.05 in deviation of sex ratio when comparing the control group (45.2% females with the other spermatozoa selection procedures (60.6% females (P<0.05. The sperm selection methods are capable of selecting X-bearing spermatozoa without compromising the spermatozoa fertility (cleavage and blastocyst rates, 70% and 26%, respectively and were considered relevant methods to be introduced in bovine in vitro produced embryo programs.

  11. First-principles local density approximation+U and generalized gradient approximation+U study of plutonium oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2008-02-01

    The electronic structure and properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 have been studied from first principles by the all-electron projector-augmented-wave method. The local density approximation+U and the generalized gradient approximation+U formalisms have been used to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion among the localized Pu 5f electrons. We discuss how the properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 are affected by the choice of U as well as the choice of exchange-correlation potential. Also, oxidation reaction of Pu2O3, leading to formation of PuO2, and its dependence on U and exchange-correlation potential have been studied. Our results show that by choosing an appropriate U, it is promising to correctly and consistently describe structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3, which enable the modeling of redox process involving Pu-based materials possible.

  12. Sexagem de espermatozoides bovinos por centrifugação em gradiente descontínuo de densidade de Percoll Sex selection in bovine spermatozoa by using Percoll discontinuos density gradient centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Fernanda Martins Hossepian de Lima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo neste trabalho foi desenvolver um método de seleção do sexo de espermatozoides bovinos por centrifugação em gradiente de densidade de Percoll. Utilizou-se sêmen congelado de touros mantidos em regime de colheita de sêmen. A fração de espermatozoides X ou Y foi separada por centrifugação em treze diferentes gradientes de densidade de Percoll formados por 1 a 12 camadas com densidades que variaram de 1,004 g/mL a 1,123 g/mL. As soluções com diferentes densidades foram preparadas misturando-se, em proporções diferentes, meio de cultura Hank's e uma solução estoque composta de NaCl 1,5 M e Percoll (1:9, v/v. Sobre cada gradiente foi colocado um total de 50 × 10(6 espermatozoides descongelados em 0,7 mL de meio Hank's e centrifugados a 250 X g por 30 minutos, em rotor horizontal, a 25°C. Os espermatozoides das frações superior e inferior foram tratados com Quinacrina Mustarda e analisados (200 deles quanto à presença do corpúsculo-F. Dos espermatozoides encontrados no sedimento de dois gradientes, compostos de 8 e 12 frações com densidades variando entre 1,050 a 1,120 g/mL e 1,044 a 1,123 g/mL, respectivamente, visualizaram-se 25% com corpúsculo-F e os 75% restantes prováveis portadores do cromossomo X. O aumento na porcentagem de espermatozoides X após a centrifugação em gradiente de densidade permitirá que esse método de sexagem seja usado em larga escala na produção comercial de carne e leite bem como no teste de progênie.The objective of this work was to develop a bovine spermatozoid sex selection method by using Percoll density gradient centrifugation. It was used frozen semen of bulls kept in semen collection regime. Fraction X or Y was separated by centrifugation in three different Percoll density gradient formed by 1 to 12 layers with densities varying from 1.004 g/mL to 1.123 g/mL. Solutions with different densities were prepared by mixing, at different proportions, Hank's culture medium and a

  13. Do finite size neutrally buoyant particles cluster?

    CERN Document Server

    Fiabane, Lionel; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Monchaux, Romain; Cartellier, Alain; Bourgoin, Mickael

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the preferential concentration of particles which are neutrally buoyant but with a diameter significantly larger than the dissipation scale of the carrier flow. Such particles are known not to behave as flow tracers (Qureshi et al., Phys. Re. Lett. 2007) but whether they do cluster or not remains an open question. For this purpose, we take advantage of a new turbulence generating apparatus, the Lagrangian Exploration Module which produces homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a closed water flow. The flow is seeded with neutrally buoyant particles with diameter 700\\mum, corresponding to 4.4 to 17 times the turbulent dissipation scale when the rotation frequency of the impellers driving the flow goes from 2 Hz to 12 Hz, and spanning a range of Stokes numbers from 1.6 to 24.2. The spatial structuration of these inclusions is then investigated by a Voronoi tesselation analysis, as recently proposed by Monchaux et al. (Phys. Fluids 2010), from images of particle concentration field taken in a las...

  14. 46 CFR 131.870 - Life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Life floats and buoyant apparatus. 131.870 Section 131.870 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.870 Life floats and buoyant apparatus. (a) The name of the vessel must be plainly...

  15. Similarity consideration of the buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Amin, M.F.; Kanayama, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, the similarity form is developed of a hydrogen-air buoyant jet 'forced plume' resulting from an unignited small-scale hydrogen leakage in the air. As the domain temperature is assumed to be constant and therefore the density of the mixture is a function of the concentration only, the hydrogen-air mixture is assumed to be of a linear mixing type. The rate of entrainment is assumed to be a function of the plume centerline velocity and the ratio of the mean plume and ambient densities. The local rate of entrainment may be considered to be consisted of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. Consequently, the entrainment coefficient is taken as a variable not constant. The density will be considered as a variable in all terms of the equations of continuity, momentum and concentration. The integral models of the mass, momentum and concentration fluxes are obtained. Non-dimensional transformations known as similarity transformations and used to transform the integral model to a set of ordinary differential equations called similarity equations which are solved numerically. Under various values of Froude number, the hydrogen centerline mass fraction, jet width and centerline velocity are introduced and compared with published experimental results for a slow leak vertical hydrogen jet. (author)

  16. Subgrid Scale Modeling for Large Eddy Simulation of Buoyant Turbulent Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaisas, Niranjan Shrinivas

    2013-01-01

    Buoyancy effects due to small density differences commonly exist in turbulent fluid flows occurring in nature and in engineering applications. The large eddy simulation (LES) technique, which is being increasingly used for simulating buoyant turbulent flows, requires accurate modeling of the subgrid sclae (SGS) momentum and buoyancy fluxes. This thesis presents a series of LES and direct numerical simulation (DNS) studies towards a priori and a posteriori evaluation of existing SGS models, an...

  17. Turbulence attenuation by large neutrally buoyant particles

    CERN Document Server

    Cisse, Mamadou; Gibert, Mathieu; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Bec, Jeremie

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence modulation by inertial-range-size, neutrally-buoyant particles is investigated experimentally in a von K\\'arm\\'an flow. Increasing the particle volume fraction $\\Phi_\\mathrm{v}$, maintaining constant impellers Reynolds number attenuates the fluid turbulence. The inertial-range energy transfer rate decreases as $\\propto\\Phi_\\mathrm{v}^{2/3}$, suggesting that only particles located on a surface affect the flow. Small-scale turbulent properties, such as structure functions or acceleration distribution, are unchanged. Finally, measurements hint at the existence of a transition between two different regimes occurring when the average distance between large particles is of the order of the thickness of their boundary layers.

  18. Simulations of Buoyant Bubbles in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggen, M

    2003-01-01

    It is generally argued that most clusters of galaxies host cooling flows in which radiative cooling in the centre causes a slow inflow. However, recent observations by Chandra and XMM conflict with the predicted cooling flow rates. Here we report highly resolved hydrodynamic simulations which show that buoyant bubbles can offset the cooling in the inner regions of clusters and can significantly delay the deposition of cold gas. The subsonic rise of bubbles uplifts colder material from the central regions of the cluster. This colder material appears as bright rims around the bubbles. The bubbles themselves appear as depressions in the X-ray surface brightness as observed in a growing number of clusters.

  19. Development of an explicit algebraic turbulence model for buoyant flows – Part 1: DNS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DNS analysis of channel flow for forced, mixed and natural convection regime. • Examination of algebraic turbulenc model main features with buoyancy. • Investigation of the weak equilibrium assumption for buoyant flows. • Assessment of the redistribution term model for EARSM with buoyancy effect. • Assessment of the pressure scrambling term model for EAHFM. -- Abstract: An analysis of DNS databases of vertical plane channel flow for forced, mixed and natural convection is proposed. This analysis aims to assess the main features needed to develop an algebraic model for buoyant flows. First, the weak equilibrium assumption, at the root of algebraic models, is investigated. This hypothesis is shown to fail near the velocity maximum and close to the walls but remains valid otherwise, whatever the convection regime. The models for the redistribution term and the pressure scrambling term are then analyzed on the same configurations. A linear form of the Speziale et al. (1991) model is retained for the redistribution term. No model for the pressure scrambling term is fully satisfactory; nevertheless some models are recommended. The buoyant contributions to the pressure term are investigated. Finally, the generalized gradient diffusion hypothesis, which could be used to model the turbulent heat fluxes in order to avoid the coupling with the Reynolds stresses, is shown to be inaccurate

  20. An analysis of the gradient-induced electric fields and current densities in human models when situated in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Limei; Trakic, Adnan; Sanchez-Lopez, Hector; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    MRI-LINAC is a new image-guided radiotherapy treatment system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a linear accelerator (LINAC) in a single unit. One drawback is that the pulsing of the split gradient coils of the system induces an electric field and currents in the patient which need to be predicted and evaluated for patient safety. In this novel numerical study the in situ electric fields and associated current densities were evaluated inside tissue-accurate male and female human voxel models when a number of different split-geometry gradient coils were operated. The body models were located in the MRI-LINAC system along the axial and radial directions in three different body positions. Each model had a region of interest (ROI) suitable for image-guided radiotherapy. The simulation results show that the amplitudes and distributions of the field and current density induced by different split x-gradient coils were similar with one another in the ROI of the body model, but varied outside of the region. The fields and current densities induced by a split classic coil with the surface unconnected showed the largest deviation from those given by the conventional non-split coils. Another finding indicated that the distributions of the peak current densities varied when the body position, orientation or gender changed, while the peak electric fields mainly occurred in the skin and fat tissues.

  1. An analysis of the gradient-induced electric fields and current densities in human models when situated in a hybrid MRI-LINAC system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI-LINAC is a new image-guided radiotherapy treatment system that combines magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a linear accelerator (LINAC) in a single unit. One drawback is that the pulsing of the split gradient coils of the system induces an electric field and currents in the patient which need to be predicted and evaluated for patient safety. In this novel numerical study the in situ electric fields and associated current densities were evaluated inside tissue-accurate male and female human voxel models when a number of different split-geometry gradient coils were operated. The body models were located in the MRI-LINAC system along the axial and radial directions in three different body positions. Each model had a region of interest (ROI) suitable for image-guided radiotherapy. The simulation results show that the amplitudes and distributions of the field and current density induced by different split x-gradient coils were similar with one another in the ROI of the body model, but varied outside of the region. The fields and current densities induced by a split classic coil with the surface unconnected showed the largest deviation from those given by the conventional non-split coils. Another finding indicated that the distributions of the peak current densities varied when the body position, orientation or gender changed, while the peak electric fields mainly occurred in the skin and fat tissues. (paper)

  2. Characterization of bone cells isolated on discontinuous Percoll gradients: distribution in sequentially derived populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, G L; Ng, M C; Calabrese, D W; Swartzendruber, D E

    1991-09-01

    Bone cell populations obtained by sequential digestion of newborn mouse calvariae remain morphologically heterogeneous despite well-documented biochemical differences. Fractionation of these populations on Percoll gradient reveal three major cell groups of low, intermediate, and high buoyant density (1.056, 1.070, and 1.095 g/ml) that are present in different ratios in early and late released populations. Cells of low and intermediate density dominate in early released populations. In contrast, late released populations contain mostly high-density cells. Basal levels of alkaline phosphatase are highest in cells of intermediate buoyant density. All cells respond to PTH with cAMP production and morphologic transformation, but biochemical responses to PTH, such as secretion of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and stimulation of alkaline phosphatase activity, occur mostly in cells of intermediate density. These data suggest that (1) subclasses of osteoblasts can be further separated by density and (2) PTH effects on alkaline phosphatase activity and IGF-I secretion are probably expressed by osteoblasts of a certain subclass and/or stage of development. PMID:1665004

  3. Comparative assessment of density functional methods for evaluating essential parameters to simulate SERS spectra within the excited state energy gradient approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh; Jamshidi, Zahra

    2016-05-21

    The prospect of challenges in reproducing and interpretation of resonance Raman properties of molecules interacting with metal clusters has prompted the present research initiative. Resonance Raman spectra based on the time-dependent gradient approximation are examined in the framework of density functional theory using different methods for representing the exchange-correlation functional. In this work the performance of different XC functionals in the prediction of ground state properties, excitation state energies, and gradients are compared and discussed. Resonance Raman properties based on time-dependent gradient approximation for the strongly low-lying charge transfer states are calculated and compared for different methods. We draw the following conclusions: (1) for calculating the binding energy and ground state geometry, dispersion-corrected functionals give the best performance in comparison to ab initio calculations, (2) GGA and meta GGA functionals give good accuracy in calculating vibrational frequencies, (3) excited state energies determined by hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are in good agreement with EOM-CCSD calculations, and (4) in calculating resonance Raman properties GGA functionals give good and reasonable performance in comparison to the experiment; however, calculating the excited state gradient by using the hybrid functional on the hessian of GGA improves the results of the hybrid functional significantly. Finally, we conclude that the agreement of charge-transfer surface enhanced resonance Raman spectra with experiment is improved significantly by using the excited state gradient approximation. PMID:27208944

  4. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.; Neuber, S.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M. [Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Haueisen, J. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Technische Universität Ilmenau, PF 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  5. Plane wave/pseudopotential implementation of excited state gradients in density functional linear response theory: a new route via implicit differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Kosov, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents the formalism and implementation of excited state nuclear forces within density functional linear response theory (TDDFT) using a plane wave basis set. An implicit differentiation technique is developed for computing nonadiabatic coupling between Kohn-Sham molecular orbital wavefunctions as well as gradients of orbital energies which are then used to calculate excited state nuclear forces. The algorithm has been implemented in a plane wave/pseudopotential code taking into a...

  6. A Breast Cell Atlas: Organelle analysis of the MDA-MB-231 cell line by density-gradient fractionation using isotopic marking and label-free analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sandin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein translocation between organelles in the cell is an important process that regulates many cellular functions. However, organelles can rarely be isolated to purity so several methods have been developed to analyse the fractions obtained by density gradient centrifugation. We present an analysis of the distribution of proteins amongst organelles in the human breast cell line, MDA-MB-231 using two approaches: an isotopic labelling and a label-free approach.

  7. The shape and behaviour of a horizontal buoyant jet adjacent to a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Henry; Hunt, Gary

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the incompressible turbulent buoyant jet formed when fluid is steadily ejected horizontally from a circular source into a quiescent environment of uniform density. As our primary focus, we introduce a horizontal boundary. For sufficiently large source-boundary separations, the buoyant jet is `free' to rise under the action of the buoyancy force. For smaller source-boundary separations, the jet attaches and `clings' to the boundary before, further downstream, pulling away from the boundary. Based on measurements of saline jets in freshwater we deduce the conditions required for a jet to cling. We present data for the variation in volume flux, flow envelope and centreline for both `clinging' and `free' jets. For source Froude numbers fr0 >= 12 the data collapses when scaled, identifying universal behaviours for both clinging jets and for free jets. The support and funding from Dyson Technology Ltd is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Wake-driven dynamics of finite-sized buoyant spheres in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, Varghese; Brons, Jon; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Particles suspended in turbulent flows are affected by the turbulence, and at the same time act back on the flow. The resulting coupling can give rise to rich variability in their dynamics. Here we report experimental results from an investigation on finite-sized buoyant spheres in turbulence. We find that even a marginal reduction in the particle's density from that of the fluid can result in strong modification of its dynamics. In contrast to classical spatial filtering arguments and predictions of particle models, we find that the particle acceleration variance increases with size. We trace this reversed trend back to the growing contribution from wake-induced forces, unaccounted for in current particle models in turbulence. Our findings highlight the need for improved multi-physics based models that account for particle wake effects for a faithful representation of buoyant sphere dynamics in turbulence.

  9. Wake-Driven Dynamics of Finite-Sized Buoyant Spheres in Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Varghese; Prakash, Vivek N; Brons, Jon; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-09-18

    Particles suspended in turbulent flows are affected by the turbulence and at the same time act back on the flow. The resulting coupling can give rise to rich variability in their dynamics. Here we report experimental results from an investigation of finite-sized buoyant spheres in turbulence. We find that even a marginal reduction in the particle's density from that of the fluid can result in strong modification of its dynamics. In contrast to classical spatial filtering arguments and predictions of particle models, we find that the particle acceleration variance increases with size. We trace this reversed trend back to the growing contribution from wake-induced forces, unaccounted for in current particle models in turbulence. Our findings highlight the need for improved multiphysics based models that account for particle wake effects for a faithful representation of buoyant-sphere dynamics in turbulence. PMID:26430995

  10. Buoyant Bubbles and the Disturbed Cool Core of Abell 133

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T.; Nulsen, P.; Owers, M.; Sarazin, C.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Murray, S.

    2010-03-01

    X-ray cavities, often filled with radio-emitting plasma, are routinely observed in the intracluster medium of clusters of galaxies. These cavities, or "bubbles", are evacuated by jets from central AGN and subsequently rise buoyantly, playing a vital role in the "AGN feedback" model now commonly evoked to explain the balance between heating and radiative cooling in cluster cores. As the bubbles rise, they can displace cool central gas, promoting mixing and the redistribution of metals. I will show a few examples of buoyant bubbles, then argue that the peculiar morphology of the Abell 133 is due to buoyant lifting of cool central gas by a radio-filled bubble.

  11. CONSEQUENCES OF NON-LINEAR DENSITY EFFECTS ON BUOYANCY AND PLUME BEHAVIOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic plumes, as turbulent streams, grow by entraining ambient water. Buoyant plumes rise and dense ones sink, but, non-linear kinetic effects can reverse the buoyant force in mid-phenomenon. The class of nascent-density plumes begin as buoyant, upwardly accelerating plumes tha...

  12. Compressibility effects in some buoyant flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, S; Lafay, M-A; Lombard, V; Boudesocque-Dubois, C; Clarisse, J-M; Le Creurer, B [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France)], E-mail: Serge.Gauthier@cea.fr

    2008-12-15

    Compressibility effects in buoyant flows are studied on three examples: the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) for compressible miscible flows, the ablation front instability and the thermal convection of Rayleigh-Benard. The linear analysis of the classical RTI for viscous flows is performed and the opposite effects of stratification and compressibility on the growth rate are pointed out. Some investigations in the nonlinear regime have also been carried out and show that the trend observed in the linear regime usually holds. On the other hand, a 2D simulation, started from rest and pursued until the return toward mechanical equilibrium of the mixing exhibits a typical compressibility effect, an acoustic wave, damped by the physical viscosity. The ablation front instability is detailed on the 'laser imprint' problem of direct drive irradiation. The linear stability analysis is performed on an unsteady mean flow given by the self-similar solutions of gas dynamics equations with nonlinear heat conduction. Compressibility effects are studied through the Kovasznay modes. It appears that maximum amplitudes are achieved for zero wave number, and complex wave-like structures are observed. Analogy with the large-scale instability, which occurs in compressible thermal convection, is suggested. These results have been obtained with an autoadaptive dynamical multidomain Chebyshev method.

  13. Brewster angle reflection measurements of Hg density and laser deflection (Schlieren) measurements of Hg density gradients in an ultra-high pressure arc lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Brewster angle reflection measurement is used to determine the Hg vapor density at the arc tube wall of an ultra-high pressure lamp. The density measurement in combination with the wall temperature yields a pressure of 201 ± 11 bar. This lamp pressure in combination with an arc core temperature measurement yields an arc core Hg vapor density of 1.78 x 1020 cm-3, which agrees with the density from resonance collisional line broadening measurements of the 1014 nm Hg line. These density results are combined with Abel inverted laser deflection or schlieren measurements to determine a density/temperature map of the Hg vapor in the lamp. The laser deflection technique is sensitive in the arc core and mantle, unlike emission techniques which are sensitive only in the arc core.

  14. Brewster angle reflection measurements of Hg density and laser deflection (Schlieren) measurements of Hg density gradients in an ultra-high pressure arc lamp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, J; Kato, M; Lawler, J E [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2009-05-01

    A Brewster angle reflection measurement is used to determine the Hg vapor density at the arc tube wall of an ultra-high pressure lamp. The density measurement in combination with the wall temperature yields a pressure of 201 {+-} 11 bar. This lamp pressure in combination with an arc core temperature measurement yields an arc core Hg vapor density of 1.78 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}, which agrees with the density from resonance collisional line broadening measurements of the 1014 nm Hg line. These density results are combined with Abel inverted laser deflection or schlieren measurements to determine a density/temperature map of the Hg vapor in the lamp. The laser deflection technique is sensitive in the arc core and mantle, unlike emission techniques which are sensitive only in the arc core.

  15. An Experimental Investigation on Inclined Negatively Buoyant Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Bashitialshaaer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was performed to investigate the behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets. Such jets arise when brine is discharged from desalination plants. A turbulent jet with a specific salinity was discharged through a circular nozzle at an angle to the horizontal into a tank with fresh water and the spatial evolution of the jet was recorded. Four different initial jet parameters were changed, namely the nozzle diameter, the initial jet inclination, the jet density and the flow rate. Five geometric quantities describing the jet trajectory that are useful in the design of brine discharge systems were determined. Dimensional analysis demonstrated that the geometric jet quantities studied, if normalized with the jet exit diameter, could be related to the densimetric Froude number. Analysis of the collected data showed that this was the case for a Froude number less than 100, whereas for larger values of the Froude number the scatter in the data increased significantly. As has been observed in some previous investigations, the slope of the best-fit straight line through the data points was a function of the initial jet angle (θ, where the slope increased with θ for the maximum levels (Ym studied, but had a more complex behavior for horizontal distances.

  16. The Centaurus A Northern Middle Lobe as a Buoyant Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Saxton, C J; Bicknell, G V; Saxton, Curtis J.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.

    2001-01-01

    We model the northern middle radio lobe of Centaurus A (NGC 5128) as a buoyant bubble of plasma deposited by an intermittently active jet. The extent of the rise of the bubble and its morphology imply that the ratio of its density to that of the surrounding ISM is less than 10^{-2}, consistent with our knowledge of extragalactic jets and minimal entrainment into the precursor radio lobe. Using the morphology of the lobe to date the beginning of its rise through the atmosphere of Centaurus A, we conclude that the bubble has been rising for approximately 140Myr. This time scale is consistent with that proposed by Quillen et al. (1993) for the settling of post-merger gas into the presently observed large scale disk in NGC 5128, suggesting a strong connection between the delayed re-establishment of radio emission and the merger of NGC 5128 with a small gas-rich galaxy. This suggests a connection, for radio galaxies in general, between mergers and the delayed onset of radio emission. In our model, the elongated X-...

  17. Mass transport by buoyant bubbles in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, Edward C D; Pavlovski, Georgi; Bower, Richard G; Dotter, Aaron; Victoria, University of; Southampton, University of; Durham, University of

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of three important processes by which AGN-blown bubbles transport material: drift, wake transport and entrainment. The first of these, drift, occurs because a buoyant bubble pushes aside the adjacent material, giving rise to a net upward displacement of the fluid behind the bubble. For a spherical bubble, the mass of upwardly displaced material is roughly equal to half the mass displaced by the bubble, and should be ~ 10^{7-9} solar masses depending on the local ICM and bubble parameters. We show that in classical cool core clusters, the upward displacement by drift may be a key process in explaining the presence of filaments behind bubbles. A bubble also carries a parcel of material in a region at its rear, known as the wake. The mass of the wake is comparable to the drift mass and increases the average density of the bubble, trapping it closer to the cluster centre and reducing the amount of heating it can do during its ascent. Moreover, material dropping out of the wake will also ...

  18. High density of tree-cavities and snags in tropical dry forest of western Mexico raises questions for a latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Vázquez

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that a latitudinal gradient exists of a low density of snags and high density of naturally-formed tree-cavities in tropical vs. temperate forests, though few cavities may have characteristics suitable for nesting by birds. We determined snag and cavity density, characteristics, and suitability for birds in a tropical dry forest biome of western Mexico, and evaluated whether our data fits the trend of snag and cavity density typically found in tropical moist and wet forests. We established five 0.25-ha transects to survey and measure tree-cavities and snags in each of three vegetation types of deciduous, semi-deciduous, and mono-dominant Piranhea mexicana forest, comprising a total of 3.75 ha. We found a high density of 77 cavities/ha, with 37 cavities suitable for birds/ha, where density, and characteristics of cavities varied significantly among vegetation types. Lowest abundance of cavities occurred in deciduous forest, and these were in smaller trees, at a lower height, and with a narrower entrance diameter. Only 8.6% of cavities were excavated by woodpeckers, and only 11% of cavities were occupied, mainly by arthropods, though 52% of all cavities were unsuitable for birds. We also found a high density of 56 snags/ha, with greatest density in deciduous forest (70 snags/ha, though these were of significantly smaller diameter, and snags of larger diameter were more likely to contain cavities. The Chamela-Cuixmala tropical dry forest had the highest density of snags recorded for any tropical or temperate forest, and while snag density was significantly correlated with mean snag dbh, neither latitude nor mean dbh predicted snag density in ten forest sites. The high spatial aggregation of snag and cavity resources in tropical dry forest may limit their availability, particularly for large-bodied cavity adopters, and highlights the importance of habitat heterogeneity in providing resources for primary and secondary cavity-nesters.

  19. High density of tree-cavities and snags in tropical dry forest of western Mexico raises questions for a latitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Leopoldo; Renton, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that a latitudinal gradient exists of a low density of snags and high density of naturally-formed tree-cavities in tropical vs. temperate forests, though few cavities may have characteristics suitable for nesting by birds. We determined snag and cavity density, characteristics, and suitability for birds in a tropical dry forest biome of western Mexico, and evaluated whether our data fits the trend of snag and cavity density typically found in tropical moist and wet forests. We established five 0.25-ha transects to survey and measure tree-cavities and snags in each of three vegetation types of deciduous, semi-deciduous, and mono-dominant Piranhea mexicana forest, comprising a total of 3.75 ha. We found a high density of 77 cavities/ha, with 37 cavities suitable for birds/ha, where density, and characteristics of cavities varied significantly among vegetation types. Lowest abundance of cavities occurred in deciduous forest, and these were in smaller trees, at a lower height, and with a narrower entrance diameter. Only 8.6% of cavities were excavated by woodpeckers, and only 11% of cavities were occupied, mainly by arthropods, though 52% of all cavities were unsuitable for birds. We also found a high density of 56 snags/ha, with greatest density in deciduous forest (70 snags/ha), though these were of significantly smaller diameter, and snags of larger diameter were more likely to contain cavities. The Chamela-Cuixmala tropical dry forest had the highest density of snags recorded for any tropical or temperate forest, and while snag density was significantly correlated with mean snag dbh, neither latitude nor mean dbh predicted snag density in ten forest sites. The high spatial aggregation of snag and cavity resources in tropical dry forest may limit their availability, particularly for large-bodied cavity adopters, and highlights the importance of habitat heterogeneity in providing resources for primary and secondary cavity-nesters. PMID:25615612

  20. Flow directions and hydraulic gradients in the variable density flow system at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site in the Texas panhandle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedded salt, welded tuff, and basalt are the three rock types proposed as possible host rock for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. Regional flow at the proposed bedded salt site in the Texas Panhandle is unique because it contains waters with highly variable fluid density. The site area is underlain by three regional hydrostratigraphic units: a shallow aquifer system developed in the Ogallala Formation and Dockum Group containing waters with less than 1500 mg/1 TDS, a shale and evaporite aquitard associated with the target salt horizon commonly containing waters with 300,000 mg/1 TDS, and a deep aquifer system developed in the Wolfcamp Series and Pennsylvanian System commonly containing waters with 50,000 to 200,000 mg/1 TDS. The associated fluid density variations can lead to miscalculation of flow directions, hydraulic gradients, and travel times. Pressure-depth diagrams based on shut-in pressure and specific-gravity data from drill-stem tests indicate that regionally the potential for downward flow exists in the shale and evaporite aquitard and the potential for horizontal flow exists in the deep aquifer system. Determination of the direction and magnitude of the vertical hydraulic gradient across the target salt horizon based on a method that solely uses pressure data and which incorporates the effects of variable fluid density indicates a downward-oriented hydraulic gradient at the proposed Texas Panhandle site. These methods do not require calculation of hydraulic head and, therefore, are a more realistic way of determining flow characteristics in variable density flow systems

  1. Density-dependent regulation of brook trout population dynamics along a core-periphery distribution gradient in a central Appalachian watershed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock M Huntsman

    Full Text Available Spatial population models predict strong density-dependence and relatively stable population dynamics near the core of a species' distribution with increasing variance and importance of density-independent processes operating towards the population periphery. Using a 10-year data set and an information-theoretic approach, we tested a series of candidate models considering density-dependent and density-independent controls on brook trout population dynamics across a core-periphery distribution gradient within a central Appalachian watershed. We sampled seven sub-populations with study sites ranging in drainage area from 1.3-60 km(2 and long-term average densities ranging from 0.335-0.006 trout/m. Modeled response variables included per capita population growth rate of young-of-the-year, adult, and total brook trout. We also quantified a stock-recruitment relationship for the headwater population and coefficients of variability in mean trout density for all sub-populations over time. Density-dependent regulation was prevalent throughout the study area regardless of stream size. However, density-independent temperature models carried substantial weight and likely reflect the effect of year-to-year variability in water temperature on trout dispersal between cold tributaries and warm main stems. Estimated adult carrying capacities decreased exponentially with increasing stream size from 0.24 trout/m in headwaters to 0.005 trout/m in the main stem. Finally, temporal variance in brook trout population size was lowest in the high-density headwater population, tended to peak in mid-sized streams and declined slightly in the largest streams with the lowest densities. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that local density-dependent processes have a strong control on brook trout dynamics across the entire distribution gradient. However, the mechanisms of regulation likely shift from competition for limited food and space in headwater streams to

  2. Density-dependent regulation of brook trout population dynamics along a core-periphery distribution gradient in a central Appalachian watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsman, Brock M; Petty, J Todd

    2014-01-01

    Spatial population models predict strong density-dependence and relatively stable population dynamics near the core of a species' distribution with increasing variance and importance of density-independent processes operating towards the population periphery. Using a 10-year data set and an information-theoretic approach, we tested a series of candidate models considering density-dependent and density-independent controls on brook trout population dynamics across a core-periphery distribution gradient within a central Appalachian watershed. We sampled seven sub-populations with study sites ranging in drainage area from 1.3-60 km(2) and long-term average densities ranging from 0.335-0.006 trout/m. Modeled response variables included per capita population growth rate of young-of-the-year, adult, and total brook trout. We also quantified a stock-recruitment relationship for the headwater population and coefficients of variability in mean trout density for all sub-populations over time. Density-dependent regulation was prevalent throughout the study area regardless of stream size. However, density-independent temperature models carried substantial weight and likely reflect the effect of year-to-year variability in water temperature on trout dispersal between cold tributaries and warm main stems. Estimated adult carrying capacities decreased exponentially with increasing stream size from 0.24 trout/m in headwaters to 0.005 trout/m in the main stem. Finally, temporal variance in brook trout population size was lowest in the high-density headwater population, tended to peak in mid-sized streams and declined slightly in the largest streams with the lowest densities. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that local density-dependent processes have a strong control on brook trout dynamics across the entire distribution gradient. However, the mechanisms of regulation likely shift from competition for limited food and space in headwater streams to competition for

  3. Deformation statistics of sub-Kolmogorov-scale ellipsoidal neutrally buoyant drops in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biferale, Luca; Verzicco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Small droplets in turbulent flows can undergo highly variable deformations and orientational dynamics. For neutrally buoyant droplets smaller than the Kolmogorov scale, the dominant effects from the surrounding turbulent flow arise through Lagrangian time histories of the velocity gradient tensor. Here we study the evolution of representative droplets using a model that includes rotation and stretching effects from the surrounding fluid, and restoration effects from surface tension including a constant droplet volume constraint, while assuming that the droplets maintain an ellipsoidal shape. The model is combined with Lagrangian time histories of the velocity gradient tensor extracted from DNS of turbulence to obtain simulated droplet evolutions. These are used to characterize the size, shape and orientation statistics of small droplets in turbulence. A critical capillary number, $Ca_c$ is identified associated with unbounded growth of one or two of the droplet's semi-axes. Exploiting analogies with dynamics ...

  4. Classification and prediction of buoyant surface discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on effluents that are often discharged into riverine, estuarine, and costal waters at or near the surface of the receiving water body. Although government regulations generally limit or prohibit surface discharges containing industrial or municipal pollutants, several exceptions exist, such as the discharge of heated water from power plants, and the discharge of effluent from combined sewer overflows. Past efforts to predict the dilution and geometric characteristics of buoyant surface flows have relied on integral modelling techniques involving the solution of a series of differential equations. Although these models have proven successful in predicting simple surface flows, they are extremely limited in applicability due to their inability to account for boundary interaction, strong buoyancy, and recirculating. The proposed method is a two step process involving: classification of the flow depending on the most significant discharge and ambient characteristics, and quantitative prediction of flow through use of simple analytical expressions applied to limited regions within the flow. Classification of the flow is used to distinguish between the great variety of flow patterns that exist under widely differing ambient and discharge conditions. Mathematical prediction of dilution and geometric parameters of the flow (width, depth and centerline trajectory) requires the use of length scales to delineate subregions within the flow. Analytical expressions based on perturbation solutions of the governing equations are applied to each subregion. Although the proposed methodology could be done in any of several frameworks, the authors have chose that of a computer expert system which provides a practical engineering tool for both design and regulatory use

  5. Laplacian-level kinetic energy approximations based on the fourth-order gradient expansion: Global assessment and application to the subsystem formulation of density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Laricchia, S; Fabiano, E; Della Sala, F

    2014-01-01

    We test Laplacian-level meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) non-interacting kinetic energy functionals based on the fourth-order gradient expansion (GE4). We consider several well known Laplacian-level meta-GGAs from literature (bare GE4, modified GE4, and the MGGA functional of Perdew and Constantin [Phys. Rev. B \\textbf{75},155109 (2007)]), as well as two newly designed Laplacian-level kinetic energy functionals (named L0.4 and L0.6). First, a general assessment of the different functionals is performed, testing them for model systems (one-electron densities, Hooke's atom and different jellium systems), atomic and molecular kinetic energies as well as for their behavior with respect to density-scaling transformations. Finally, we assess, for the first time, the performance of the different functionals for Subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on non-covalently interacting systems. We find that the different Laplacian-level meta-GGA kinetic functionals may improve the descript...

  6. Computation of the density profiles of nano-droplets using the gradient theory: numerical solution in transformed variables

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrubý, Jan

    Praha : ÚT AV ČR, v. v. i., 2007 - (Příhoda, J.; Kozel, K.), s. 69-72 ISBN 978-80-87012-04-8. [Conference TOPICAL PROBLEMS OF FLUID MECHANICS 2007. Praha (CZ), 28.02.2007-02.03.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/05/2214; GA MŠk 1P04LA214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : gradient theory * nucleation * nano-droplet Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics

  7. Mass transport by buoyant bubbles in galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Edward C. D.; Babul, Arif; Pavlovski, Georgi; Bower, Richard G.; Dotter, Aaron

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the effect of three important processes by which active galactic nuclei (AGN)-blown bubbles transport material: drift, wake transport and entrainment. The first of these, drift, occurs because a buoyant bubble pushes aside the adjacent material, giving rise to a net upward displacement of the fluid behind the bubble. For a spherical bubble, the mass of upwardly displaced material is roughly equal to half the mass displaced by the bubble and should be ~ 107-9 Msolar depending on the local intracluster medium (ICM) and bubble parameters. We show that in classical cool-core clusters, the upward displacement by drift may be a key process in explaining the presence of filaments behind bubbles. A bubble also carries a parcel of material in a region at its rear, known as the wake. The mass of the wake is comparable to the drift mass and increases the average density of the bubble, trapping it closer to the cluster centre and reducing the amount of heating it can do during its ascent. Moreover, material dropping out of the wake will also contribute to the trailing filaments. Mass transport by the bubble wake can effectively prevent the buildup of cool material in the central galaxy, even if AGN heating does not balance ICM cooling. Finally, we consider entrainment, the process by which ambient material is incorporated into the bubble. Studies of observed bubbles show that they subtend an opening angle much larger than predicted by simple adiabatic expansion. We show that bubbles that entrain ambient material as they rise will expand faster than the adiabatic prediction; however, the entrainment rate required to explain the observed opening angle is large enough that the density contrast between the bubble and its surroundings would disappear rapidly. We therefore conclude that entrainment is unlikely to be a dominant mass transport process. Additionally, this also suggests that the bubble surface is much more stable against instabilities that promote

  8. Derivation of general analytic gradient expressions for density-fitted post-Hartree-Fock methods: An efficient implementation for the density-fitted second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General analytic gradient expressions (with the frozen-core approximation) are presented for density-fitted post-HF methods. An efficient implementation of frozen-core analytic gradients for the second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the density-fitting (DF) approximation (applying to both reference and correlation energies), which is denoted as DF-MP2, is reported. The DF-MP2 method is applied to a set of alkanes, conjugated dienes, and noncovalent interaction complexes to compare the computational cost of single point analytic gradients with MP2 with the resolution of the identity approach (RI-MP2) [F. Weigend and M. Häser, Theor. Chem. Acc. 97, 331 (1997); R. A. Distasio, R. P. Steele, Y. M. Rhee, Y. Shao, and M. Head-Gordon, J. Comput. Chem. 28, 839 (2007)]. In the RI-MP2 method, the DF approach is used only for the correlation energy. Our results demonstrate that the DF-MP2 method substantially accelerate the RI-MP2 method for analytic gradient computations due to the reduced input/output (I/O) time. Because in the DF-MP2 method the DF approach is used for both reference and correlation energies, the storage of 4-index electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) are avoided, 3-index ERI tensors are employed instead. Further, as in case of integrals, our gradient equation is completely avoid construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), instead we use 2- and 3-index TPDMs. Hence, the I/O bottleneck of a gradient computation is significantly overcome. Therefore, the cost of the generalized-Fock matrix (GFM), TPDM, solution of Z-vector equations, the back transformation of TPDM, and integral derivatives are substantially reduced when the DF approach is used for the entire energy expression. Further application results show that the DF approach introduce negligible errors for closed-shell reaction energies and equilibrium bond lengths

  9. Convergent sum of gradient expansion of the kinetic-energy density functional up to the sixth order term using Padé approximant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, A.; Alharbi, F. H.; Jovanovic, R.; Kais, S.

    2016-04-01

    The gradient expansion of the kinetic energy density functional, when applied to atoms or finite systems, usually grossly overestimates the energy in the fourth order and generally diverges in the sixth order. We avoid the divergence of the integral by replacing the asymptotic series including the sixth order term in the integrand by a rational function. Padé approximants show moderate improvements in accuracy in comparison with partial sums of the series. The results are discussed for atoms and Hooke’s law model for two-electron atoms.

  10. The Population Density Gradient and the Spatial Structure of a Third World City: Nairobi, A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    J A Kahimbaara

    1986-01-01

    A generalized Newling function to the fourth degree is used as a regionalizing technique to analyze population density data from the 1969 national census of Kenya in order to identify the spatial structure of Nairobi, Kenya's primate city. On the premise that the colonial origins of Nairobi encouraged residential segregation, first, by race during the colonial period and, second, by socio-economic class during the period of political independence, it is hypothesized: (1) that the density grad...

  11. A combined scanning PTV/LIF technique to simultaneously measure the full velocity gradient tensor and the 3D density field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a newly developed combined scanning particle tracking velocimetry (SPTV) and scanning laser-induced fluorescence (SLIF) technique. The new method allows for the first time to measure the full velocity gradient tensor and the three-dimensional density field simultaneously in a refractive index matched environment. The data thus obtained will be valuable in investigating the interaction between turbulence, i.e. the dynamics of vorticity and strain, and the density field. In this study, we describe the implementation of the measurement system in detail. As a showcase, the new technique is applied to a gravity current flow and the measured data are validated by imposing various checks. Further results are presented that illustrate the capability of the SPTV/SLIF technique in the investigation of interface dynamics. (paper)

  12. Lagrangian Stochastic Modelling of Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer with Skewed Turbulence Conditions and a Vertical Density Gradient: Formulation and Implementation in the FLEXPART Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, Massimo; Stohl, Andreas; Brioude, Jerome

    2015-03-01

    A correction for the vertical gradient of air density has been incorporated into a skewed probability density function formulation for turbulence in the convective boundary layer. The related drift term for Lagrangian stochastic dispersion modelling has been derived based on the well-mixed condition. Furthermore, the formulation has been extended to include unsteady turbulence statistics and the related additional component of the drift term obtained. These formulations are an extension of the drift formulation reported by Luhar et al. (Atmos Environ 30:1407-1418, 1996) following the well-mixed condition proposed by Thomson (J Fluid Mech 180:529-556, 1987). Comprehensive tests were carried out to validate the formulations including consistency between forward and backward simulations and preservation of a well-mixed state with unsteady conditions. The stationary state CBL drift term with density correction was incorporated into the FLEXPART and FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian models, and included the use of an ad hoc transition function that modulates the third moment of the vertical velocity based on stability parameters. Due to the current implementation of the FLEXPART models, only a steady-state horizontally homogeneous drift term could be included. To avoid numerical instability, in the presence of non-stationary and horizontally inhomogeneous conditions, a re-initialization procedure for particle velocity was used. The criteria for re-initialization and resulting errors were assessed for the case of non-stationary conditions by comparing a reference numerical solution in simplified unsteady conditions, obtained using the non-stationary drift term, and a solution based on the steady drift with re-initialization. Two examples of "real-world" numerical simulations were performed under different convective conditions to demonstrate the effect of the vertical gradient in density on the particle dispersion in the CBL.

  13. Comparative validation using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR and conventional PCR of bovine semen centrifuged in continuous density gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.V. Resende

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the sperm enrichment with X-bearing spermatozoa, after one centrifugation in a Percoll or OptiPrep continuous density gradient, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR of sperm DNA and resultant in vitro-produced bovine embryos by PCR. Frozen/thawed sperm was layered on density gradients and the tubes were centrifuged. Supernatants were gently aspirated and the sperm recovered from the bottom of the tubes. Cleavage and blastocyst rates were determined through in vitro production of embryos and PCR was performed to identify the embryos' genetic sex. A difference in blastocyst rate was found in the Percoll treatment compared to OptiPrep (P<0.05. The percentage of female embryos in the Percoll and OptiPrep groups was 62.0% and 47.1%, respectively. These results were confirmed by qPCR of spermatozoa DNA and underestimation was seen only in the Percoll group. It was possible to sexing sperm using simple approach.

  14. Buoyant Magnetic Loops Generated by Global Convective Dynamo Action

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Brun, A Sacha; Miesch, Mark S; Toomre, Juri

    2012-01-01

    Our global 3D simulations of convection and dynamo action in a Sun-like star reveal that persistent wreaths of strong magnetism can be built within the bulk of the convention zone. Here we examine the characteristics of buoyant magnetic structures that are self-consistently created by dynamo action and turbulent convective motions in a simulation with solar stratification but rotating at three times the current solar rate. These buoyant loops originate within sections of the magnetic wreaths in which turbulent flows amplify the fields to much larger values than is possible through laminar processes. These amplified portions can rise through the convective layer by a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells, forming buoyant loops. We measure statistical trends in the polarity, twist, and tilt of these loops. Loops are shown to preferentially arise in longitudinal patches somewhat reminiscent of active longitudes in the Sun, although broader in extent. We show that the strength o...

  15. Parallel electron temperature and density gradients measured in the JET MkI divertor using thermal helium beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, S.J. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Morgan, P.D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Ul`Haq, Y. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking]|[Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Maggi, C.F. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Erents, S.K. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking]|[UKAEA Fusion, Culham, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Fundamenski, W. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking]|[Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Horton, L.D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Loarte, A. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Matthews, G.F. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Monk, R.D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Stangeby, P.C. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking]|[Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the first application of a thermal helium beam diagnostic to a divertor. The helium beam is used to determine spectroscopically the electron temperature and density from the inner and outer strike points up to the X-point, using helium line ratios which are primarily sensitive to electron density and temperature, as reported by Schweer (1992). Measurement of the neutral helium line intensities in the outer divertor target were performed under attached, high recycling and detached plasma conditions in ohmic and L-mode discharges. An interpretative model has been developed using the DIVIMP code at JET which incorporates the helium injection point, the nozzle divergence and the viewing arrangement of the periscope for a particular equilibrium. (orig.).

  16. Correlations Between the Gradient of Contrast Density, Evaluated by Cardio CT, and Functional Significance of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzan Marius

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis is a challenging task, being extremely important for the establishment of indication for revascularization in atherosclerotic coronary artery stenosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of a new marker reflecting the functional significance of a coronary artery stenosis, represented by the attenuation degree of contrast density along the stenosis by Coronary CT.

  17. Dense nanoparticles exhibit enhanced vascular wall targeting over neutrally buoyant nanoparticles in human blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex J; Eniola-Adefeso, Omolola

    2015-07-01

    For vascular-targeting carrier (VTC) systems to be effective, carriers must be able to localize and adhere to the vascular wall at the target site. Research suggests that neutrally buoyant nanoparticles are limited by their inability to localize to the endothelium, making them sub-optimal as carriers. This study examines whether particle density can be exploited to improve the targeting (localization and adhesion) efficiency of nanospheres to the vasculature. Silica spheres with 500 nm diameter, which have a density roughly twice that of blood, exhibit improved adhesion to inflamed endothelium in an in vitro model of human vasculature compared to neutrally buoyant polystyrene spheres of the same size. Silica spheres also display better near-wall localization in the presence of red blood cells than they do in pure buffer, likely resulting in the observed improvement in adhesion. Titania spheres (4 times more dense than blood) adhere at levels higher than polystyrene, but only in conditions when gravity or centrifugal force acts in the direction of adhesion. In light of the wide array of materials proposed for use as carrier systems for drug delivery and diagnostics, particle density may be a useful tool for improving the targeting of diseased tissues. PMID:25870170

  18. On the near field behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besalduch L.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We have performed an experimental campaign in the laboratory on the near field behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets, issuing from a circular sharp-edged orifice, in order to investigate the symmetry properties of this phenomenon. The velocity measurements were obtained via a non intrusive image analysis technique, namely Feature Tracking Velocimetry. We present here both first and second order statistics, showing that the asymmetry of inclined negatively buoyant jets cannot be considered only a far field feature of this phenomenon, as it arises very close to the release point.

  19. Horizontal H 2-air turbulent buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    The current article is devoted to introducing mathematical and physical analyses with numerical investigation of a buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage in air from a horizontal round source. H 2-air jet is an example of the non-Boussinesq buoyant jet in which a low-density gas jet is injected/leak into a high-density ambient. The density of the mixture is a function of the concentration only, the binary gas mixture is assumed to be of a linear mixing type and the rate of entrainment is assumed to be a function of the plume centerline velocity and the ratio of the mean plume and ambient densities. On the other hand, the local rate of entrainment consists of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. The top-hat profile assumption is used to obtain the mean centerline velocity, width, density and concentration of the H 2-air horizontal jet in addition to kinematic relations which govern the jet trajectories. A set of ordinary differential equations is obtained and solved numerically using Runge-Kutta method. In the second step, the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet are obtained based on Gaussian model. Finally, several quantities of interest, including the cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity-concentration correlation (radial flux), turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity, are obtained by solving the governing partial differential equations. Additionally, the turbulent Schmidt number is estimated and the normalized jet-feed material density and the normalized momentum flux density are correlated. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Accuracy of wind tunnel modeling of buoyant plume rise around buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispersion modeling of buoyant exhausts in the vicinity of building clusters, such as from boilers, incinerators, and diesel generators, is often conducted using wind tunnel modeling. The receptors of interest are usually air intakes within the building clusters. Exact wind tunnel modeling of buoyant plume rise requires stack exhaust Froude number scaling between model simulations and the full scale, along with undistorted exit densities and ratios of exit velocity to approach wind speed. The Froude number requirements constrains the air speed in the tunnel to be lower than 0.5 m/s for typical geometric scale reductions. Such low air speeds can make the air flow around the buildings Reynolds number dependent, an undesirable result. Distortions of exhaust density ratios and of exit diameters have been suggested in the past to maintain higher tunnel speeds. Davidson has presented an analytical plume rise equation which combines the 1/3 and 2/3 exponent laws for momentum-dominated and buoyancy-dominated plume rise. The analytical model was reported to compare well with water flume data. Davidson also recommends that the equation can be used to predict the errors in modeled plume rise when various wind tunnel modeling schemes are used to avoid the Froude number modeling requirement. This paper extends the work of Davidson by comparing the analytical equation to several wind tunnel and field plume rise databases. The analytical equation is then used to examine wind tunnel modeling schemes for two types of buoyant exhausts commonly modeled near buildings: emergency diesel generators and boilers

  1. Numerical simulation of buoyant drops suspended in a shear flow: suspensions at low and moderate areal fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suspension of buoyant drops at low and moderate areal fractions is studied at non-zero Reynolds numbers in simple shear flow. The flow is studied as a function of the Capillary number, the Reynolds number, the Froude number and the density ratio. It is found that the effective viscosity decreases with Capillary number. The normal stress difference increases with Capillary number. The effective viscosity and normal stress difference also depend on the Reynolds number. At a relatively low area fraction (ϕ = 0.22 ) the normal stress difference decreases with Froude number and becomes negative at large Froude numbers. At a moderate areal fraction (ϕ = 0.44 ) the behavior of the suspension is similar to the relatively low areal fraction, except that the normal stress difference is always positive. Also, the flow weakly depends on the Froude number at moderate areal fraction. The density distribution of buoyant drops across the channel is non-uniform. (paper)

  2. Numerical simulation of buoyant drops suspended in a shear flow: suspensions at low and moderate areal fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, S; Mortazavi, S, E-mail: s.goodarzi@me.iut.ac.ir, E-mail: saeedm@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    Suspension of buoyant drops at low and moderate areal fractions is studied at non-zero Reynolds numbers in simple shear flow. The flow is studied as a function of the Capillary number, the Reynolds number, the Froude number and the density ratio. It is found that the effective viscosity decreases with Capillary number. The normal stress difference increases with Capillary number. The effective viscosity and normal stress difference also depend on the Reynolds number. At a relatively low area fraction (#Greek Phi Symbol# = 0.22 ) the normal stress difference decreases with Froude number and becomes negative at large Froude numbers. At a moderate areal fraction (#Greek Phi Symbol# = 0.44 ) the behavior of the suspension is similar to the relatively low areal fraction, except that the normal stress difference is always positive. Also, the flow weakly depends on the Froude number at moderate areal fraction. The density distribution of buoyant drops across the channel is non-uniform. (paper)

  3. Design and evaluation of hydrophobic coated buoyant core as floating drug delivery system for sustained release of cisapride

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Shery; Nair, Anroop B; Patil, Pandurang N

    2011-01-01

    An inert hydrophobic buoyant coated–core was developed as floating drug delivery system (FDDS) for sustained release of cisapride using direct compression technology. Core contained low density, porous ethyl cellulose, which was coated with an impermeable, insoluble hydrophobic coating polymer such as rosin. It was further seal coated with low viscosity hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC E15) to minimize moisture permeation and better adhesion with an outer drug layer. It was found that sta...

  4. Highly robust thin-film composite pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) hollow fiber membranes with high power densities for renewable salinity-gradient energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; Wang, Peng; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-07-16

    The practical application of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) technology for renewable blue energy (i.e., osmotic power generation) from salinity gradient is being hindered by the absence of effective membranes. Compared to flat-sheet membranes, membranes with a hollow fiber configuration are of great interest due to their high packing density and spacer-free module fabrication. However, the development of PRO hollow fiber membranes is still in its infancy. This study aims to open up new perspectives and design strategies to molecularly construct highly robust thin film composite (TFC) PRO hollow fiber membranes with high power densities. The newly developed TFC PRO membranes consist of a selective polyamide skin formed on the lumen side of well-constructed Matrimid hollow fiber supports via interfacial polymerization. For the first time, laboratory PRO power generation tests demonstrate that the newly developed PRO hollow fiber membranes can withstand trans-membrane pressures up to 16 bar and exhibit a peak power density as high as 14 W/m(2) using seawater brine (1.0 M NaCl) as the draw solution and deionized water as the feed. We believe that the developed TFC PRO hollow fiber membranes have great potential for osmotic power harvesting. PMID:23772898

  5. An effect of a horizontal buoyant jet on the temperature distribution inside a hot water storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A vortex is generated when the buoyant jet impinges the opposite wall linearly. • The vortex height “Zb” is nearly equal to the edge of the temperature gradient layer. • Empirical formulas were proposed between Zb and the buoyant jet’s length scale lM. • A 1D model for simulating temperature distribution was proposed. • The performance of the model was verified by comparing the unsteady test results. -- Abstract: The hot water storage tank (for stratified thermal storage) with a heat pump draws a lot of attention nowadays due to its high performance. In Japan, reheating of the bath is commonly used, and as this mode, the jet injects horizontally at the middle of the tank, so the temperature distribution of the tank changes complexly with time. Hence a model is needed to simulate this phenomenon, precisely. Additionally, in the process of designing a hot water storage system, it is necessary to simulate temperature distribution quickly, since a test run itself is a time consuming process. In this study, visualization experiments were performed using tracer particles and thermo-sensitive liquid crystals. Experiments were also carried out to find the unsteady temperature distribution in a tank when the positively or negatively buoyant jet was injected horizontally in the middle of the tank whose size is limited and has an influence from the opposite wall. If the momentum effect of the buoyant jet is stronger than that of buoyancy, the buoyant jet impinge against the opposite wall of the tank, and a vortex was observed near the opposite wall. Empirical formulas were proposed to predict the height of the vortex “Zb” under various conditions, such as the momentum and the buoyancy of the buoyant jet, and the Prandtl number of the tank water. Furthermore, the 3D-CFD was carried out to supplement the 3D behavior of the inner tank fluid. A one dimensional model, “uniformly distributed injection model”, for simulating temperature

  6. PREDICTION OF CHARACTERISTICS FOR VERTICAL ROUND NEGATIVE BUOYANT JETS IN HOMOGENEOUS AMBIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The k-ε turbulence model is used to establish a mathematicalmodel of a vertical round jet with negative buoyancy in a static homogeneous ambient. The hybrid finite analytic method, with a non-uniform staggered grid, is used to calculate the whole flow field. The variations of centerline velocity, density and turbulent kinetic energy along the axial line for a given exit densimetric Froude number are found to converge to single curves under the unified scaling law derived by Chen and Rodi. The profiles of mean velocities, mean density difference and the half-width of negative buoyant jets for velocity and density are given. The calculation confirmed that the maximum height of rise is proportional to M03/4B0-1/2 ,where M0 and B0 are the momentum flux and the buoyancy flux at the source, respectively.

  7. Buoyant Magnetic Loops Generated by Global Convective Dynamo Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Brown, Benjamin P.; Sacha Brun, A.; Miesch, Mark S.; Toomre, Juri

    2014-02-01

    Our global 3D simulations of convection and dynamo action in a Sun-like star reveal that persistent wreaths of strong magnetism can be built within the bulk of the convention zone. Here we examine the characteristics of buoyant magnetic structures that are self-consistently created by dynamo action and turbulent convective motions in a simulation with solar stratification but rotating at three times the current solar rate. These buoyant loops originate within sections of the magnetic wreaths in which turbulent flows amplify the fields to much higher values than is possible through laminar processes. These amplified portions can rise through the convective layer by a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells, forming buoyant loops. We measure statistical trends in the polarity, twist, and tilt of these loops. Loops are shown to preferentially arise in longitudinal patches somewhat reminiscent of active longitudes in the Sun, although broader in extent. We show that the strength of the axisymmetric toroidal field is not a good predictor of the production rate for buoyant loops or the amount of magnetic flux in the loops that are produced.

  8. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically...

  9. High Purity and Yield Separation of Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Dispersed in Aqueous Solutions with Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation Using Mixed Dispersants of Polysaccharides and Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Koji; Uchida, Katsumi; Kaminosono, Yoshiya; Shimizu, Kazushi; Ishii, Tadahiro; Yajima, Hirofumi

    2013-03-01

    The heterogeneity of as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) prevents their potential applications in high-resolution field-effect transistors, nanoscale sensors, and conductive films. In the present study, we demonstrate the development of a new selective-separation procedure for collecting semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) with a high purity from as-synthesized SWNTs individually dispersed with mixed dispersing agents consisting of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in water using density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU). Ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) absorption, resonance Raman, and NIR photoluminescence spectroscopies revealed that the s-SWNTs were enriched to a purity of more than 97%, and that the recovery was approximately 40% through the DGU treatment. This separation strategy is expected to impact the application fields using s-SWNTs.

  10. 3D imaging of flow patterns in an internally-pumped microfluidic device: redox magnetohydrodynamics and electrochemically-generated density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Kreidermacher, Adam; Fritsch, Ingrid; Heyes, Colin D

    2013-05-01

    Redox magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a promising technique for developing new electrochemical-based microfluidic flow devices with unique capabilities, such as easily switching flow direction and adjusting flow speeds and flow patterns as well as avoiding bubble formation. However, a detailed description of all the forces involved and predicting flow patterns in confined geometries is lacking. In addition to redox-MHD, density gradients caused by the redox reactions also play important roles. Flow in these devices with small fluid volumes has mainly been characterized by following microbead motion by optical microscopy either by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) or by processing the microbead images by particle image velocimetry (PIV) software. This approach has limitations in spatial resolution and dimensionality. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to quantitatively and accurately measure flow speeds and patterns in the ~5-50 μm/s range in redox-MHD-based microfluidic devices, from which 3D flow maps are obtained with a spatial resolution down to 2 μm. The 2 μm spatial resolution flow speeds map revealed detailed flow profiles during redox-MHD in which the velocity increases linearly from above the electrode and reaches a plateau across the center of the cell. By combining FCS and video-microscopy (with PTV and PIV processing approaches), we are able to quantify a vertical flow of ~10 μm/s above the electrodes as a result of density gradients caused by the redox reactions and follow convection flow patterns. Overall, combining FCS, PIV, and PTV analysis of redox-MHD is a powerful combination to more thoroughly characterize the underlying forces in these promising microfluidic devices. PMID:23537496

  11. 46 CFR 160.010-5 - Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. 160.010-5 Section 160.010-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Buoyant Apparatus for Merchant Vessels § 160.010-5 Buoyant apparatus...

  12. Small dense LDL is more susceptible to glycation than more buoyant LDL in Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Nahla N; Soran, Handrean; Pemberton, Philip; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Durrington, Paul N

    2013-03-01

    Glycation of apoB (apolipoprotein B) of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) increases its atherogenicity. Concentrations of both serum glyc-apoB (glycated apoB) and SD-LDL (small dense LDL) (syn LDL3; D=1.044-1.063 g/ml) are increased in diabetes and are closely correlated. We studied whether SD-LDL is more susceptible to glycation in vitro than more buoyant LDL in statin- and non-statin-treated Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serum SD-LDL apoB and glyc-apoB on statins was 20±2 (means±S.D.) and 3.6±0.41 compared with 47±3 and 5.89±0.68 mg/dl in those not receiving statins (P<0.001 and <0.01, respectively). There was a dose-dependent increase in glycation on incubation of LDL subfractions with glucose, which was accompanied by an increase in LPO (lipid peroxide) and electrophoretic mobility and a decrease in free amino groups. SD-LDL was more susceptible to these changes than more buoyant LDL. Both SD-LDL and more buoyant LDL from statin-treated patients were less susceptible to glycation. There were fewer free amino groups on LDL subfractions from statin-treated patients, which may contribute to this resistance. In conclusion, greater susceptibility of SD-LDL to glycation is likely to contribute to the raised levels of circulating glyc-apoB in diabetes. Statins are associated with lower levels of both SD-LDL and glyc-apoB. PMID:22985435

  13. Near field characteristics of buoyant helium plumes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kuchimanchi K Bharadwaj; Debopam Das; Pavan K Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Puffing and entrainment characteristics of helium plumes emanating out into ambient air from a circular orifice are investigated in the present study. Velocity and density fields are measured across a diametric plane using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively in phase resolved manner. Experiments are performed in Froude numbers range 0.2–0.4 and for Reynolds numbers 58–248. Puffing frequency measurements reveal that the plume puffing frequencies are insensitive to the plume exit conditions, since the instability is buoyancy driven. The frequencies obtained in the present case are in agreement with frequencies obtained by Cetegen & Kasper (1996) for plumes originating from circular nozzles of various L/D ratios. Velocity and density measurements reveal that toroidal vortex formed during a puffing cycle entrains ambient air as it traverses downstream and this periodic engulfment governs the entrainment mechanism in pulsating plumes. The obtained velocity and density fields are used to calculate mass entrainment rates. It is revealed that though the flow is unsteady, the contribution of unsteady term in mass conservation to entrainment is negligible, and it becomes zero over a puff cycle. Finally, an empirical relation for variation of mass entrainment with height has been proposed, in which the non-dimensional mass entrainment is found to follow a power law with the non-dimensional height.

  14. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  15. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shunsuke A. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yasutaka [Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Department of Medical and General Sciences, Nihon Institute of Medical Science, 1276 Shimogawara, Moroyama-Machi, Iruma-Gun, Saitama 350-0435 (Japan); Shinohara, Yasushi [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, 06120 Halle (Germany); Yabana, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  16. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases

  17. A modeling of buoyant gas plume migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silin, D.; Patzek, T.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-12-01

    This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. Ideally, the injected greenhouse gas stays in the injection zone for a geologic time, eventually dissolves in the formation brine and remains trapped by mineralization. However, one of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is that naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leakage from primary storage. Even in a supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the formation brine. Buoyancy tends to drive the leaked CO{sub 2} plume upward. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution and migration, are critical for developing technology, monitoring policy, and regulations for safe carbon dioxide geologic sequestration. In this study, we obtain simple estimates of vertical plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. We describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases by a Buckley-Leverett type model. The model predicts that a plume of supercritical carbon dioxide in a homogeneous water-saturated porous medium does not migrate upward like a bubble in bulk water. Rather, it spreads upward until it reaches a seal or until it becomes immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration (Silin et al., 2007). In a layered reservoir, the simplified solution predicts a slower plume front propagation relative to a homogeneous formation with the same harmonic mean permeability. In contrast, the model yields much higher

  18. Beauty of lotus is more than skin deep: highly buoyant superhydrophobic films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yuri; Brugarolas, Teresa; Kang, Sung-Min; Park, Bum Jun; Kim, Byeong-Su; Lee, Chang-Soo; Lee, Daeyeon

    2014-05-28

    We develop highly buoyant superhydrophobic films that mimic the three-dimensional structure of lotus leaves. The high buoyancy of these structure stems from mechanically robust bubbles that significantly reduce the density of the superhydrophobic films. These highly buoyant superhydrophobic films stay afloat on water surface while carrying a load that is more than 200 times their own weight. In addition to imparting high buoyancy, the incorporation of robust hydrophilic bubbles enables the formation of free-standing structures that mimic the water-collection properties of Namib Desert beetle. We believe the incorporation of robust bubbles is a general method that opens up numerous possibilities in imparting high buoyancy to different structures that needs to stay afloat on water surfaces and can potentially be used for the fabrication of lightweight materials. (Image on the upper left reproduced with permission from Yong, J.; Yang, Q.; Chen, F.; Zhang, D.; Du, G.; Si, J.; Yun, F.; Hou, X. A Bioinspired Planar Superhydrophobic Microboat. J. Micromech. Microeng. 2014, 24, 035006). PMID:24801001

  19. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters as Seen by GRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H., IV; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a result of NASA's dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; submitted]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. By including (pre-impact) vertical porosity/density gradients in our impact simulations, we reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km, and the observed difference between the BAs of SPA and highland craters. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary density/porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with varying porosity. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. Larger

  20. Efecto de la Viscosidad y de la Densidad de Mezcla en el Gradiente de Presión de Flujo Homogéneo Gas-Líquido en Tuberías Horizontales Effect of the Mixture Viscosity and the Mixture Density on the Pressure Gradient of Gas-Liquid Homogeneous Flow in Horizontal Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneth M García

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se evalúa la precisión de 76 modelos homogéneos de gradiente de presión para determinar el gradiente de presión experimental reportado en una base de 2415 datos de flujos bifásico gas-líquido en tuberías horizontales. Estos modelos se formularon a partir de 4 ecuaciones de densidad de mezcla combinadas con 19 ecuaciones de viscosidad de mezcla. Al estudiar el efecto de la viscosidad y de la densidad de mezcla en el gradiente de presión, utilizando el modelo homogéneo, se observa que el mejor modelo obtuvo un error absoluto promedio de 25.7%, mientras que el peor modelo obtuvo un error cercano al 2000%. Los resultados obtenidos indican que la precisión del modelo homogéneo de gradiente de presión de flujo bifásico gas-líquido, depende significativamente de la adecuada selección de las ecuaciones de viscosidad y de densidad de mezcla.In this work the performance of 76 pressure gradient homogeneous models is evaluated in order to determine the experimental pressure gradient reported in a database consisting of 2415 gas-liquid two-phase flow experiments in horizontal pipes. These models were formulated starting from 4 mixture density equations combined with 19 mixture viscosity equations. To study the mixture viscosity and the mixture density effect in the pressure gradient, using the homogeneous model, it is observed that the best model gave an average absolute error of 25.7%, while the worst model obtained an error close to 2000%. The obtained results indicate that the performance of the gas-liquid two-phase flow pressure gradient homogeneous model depends significantly on the appropriate selection of the mixture viscosity and the mixture density equations.

  1. Instability of spiral and scroll waves in the presence of a gradient in the fibroblast density: the effects of fibroblast-myocyte coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Zimik, Soling

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast-myocyte coupling can modulate electrical-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue. In diseased hearts, the distribution of fibroblasts is heterogeneous, so there can be gradients in the fibroblast density (henceforth we call this GFD) especially from highly injured regions, like infarcted or ischemic zones, to less-wounded regions of the tissue. Fibrotic hearts are known to be prone to arrhythmias, so it is important to understand the effects of GFD in the formation and sustenance of arrhythmic re- entrant waves, like spiral or scroll waves. Therefore, we investigate the effects of GFD on the stability of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in a state-of-the- art mathematical model for cardiac tissue in which we also include fibroblasts. By introducing GFD in controlled ways, we show that spiral and scroll waves can be unstable in the presence of GFDs because of regions with varying spiral or scroll-wave frequency {\\omega}, induced by the GFD. We examine the effects of the resting membrane pote...

  2. The seasonal and solar cycle variations of electron density gradient scale length, vertical drift and layer height during magnetically quiet days: Implications for Spread F over Trivandrum, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, G.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.

    2009-12-01

    A study has been carried out on the behaviour of electron density gradient scale length, L, vertical drift and layer height, around post sunset hours, during the magnetically quiet days of summer, winter and equinox seasons of solar maximum (2002) and minimum years (1995), using ionosonde data of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.5°E, dip = 0.5°N) in the Indian longitude sector. The results indicate a clear seasonal and solar cycle variation in all the three parameters. Further, the seasonal variation of equatorial Spread F (ESF) during the above period is examined in terms of the relative roles of L, the vertical drift and layer height (of the F layer) in the triggering of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The results, show for the first time, that L also plays an important role, in controlling the quiet time seasonal and solar cycle variability of ESF; whereas in earlier studies this parameter had been taken to be constant. The detailed results are presented and discussed.

  3. Density gradient theory combined with the PC-SAFT equation of state used for modeling the surface tension of associating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinš Václav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The density gradient theory (GT combined with a SAFT-type (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory equation of state has been used for modeling the surface tension of associating fluids represented by a series of six alkanols ranging from methanol to 1-pentanol. The effect of nonzero dipole moment of the selected alkanols on the predicted surface tension was investigated in this study. Results of the GT + non-polar Perturbed Chain (PC SAFT equation of state were compared to predictions of GT combined with the PC-polar-SAFT, i.e. PCP-SAFT, equation. Both GT + PC-SAFT and GT + PCP-SAFT give reasonable prediction of the surface tension for pure alkanols. Results of both models are comparable as no significant difference in the modeled saturation properties and in the predicted surface tension using GT was found. Consideration of dipolar molecules of selected alkanols using PCP-SAFT had only minor effect on the predicted properties compared to the non-polar PC-SAFT model.

  4. Video Image Analysis of Turbulent Buoyant Jets Using a Novel Laboratory Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, T. J.; Colgan, R. E.; Ferencevych, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    Turbulent buoyant jets play an important role in the transport of heat and mass in a variety of environmental settings on Earth. Naturally occurring examples include the discharges from high-temperature seafloor hydrothermal vents and from some types of subaerial volcanic eruptions. Anthropogenic examples include flows from industrial smokestacks and the flow from the damaged well after the Deepwater Horizon oil leak of 2010. Motivated by a desire to find non-invasive methods for measuring the volumetric flow rates of turbulent buoyant jets, we have constructed a laboratory apparatus that can generate these types of flows with easily adjustable nozzle velocities and fluid densities. The jet fluid comprises a variable mixture of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, which can be injected at any angle with respect to the vertical into the quiescent surrounding air. To make the flow visible we seed the jet fluid with a water fog generated by an array of piezoelectric diaphragms oscillating at ultrasonic frequencies. The system can generate jets that have initial densities ranging from approximately 2-48% greater than the ambient air. We obtain independent estimates of the volumetric flow rates using well-calibrated rotameters, and collect video image sequences for analysis at frame rates up to 120 frames per second using a machine vision camera. We are using this apparatus to investigate several outstanding problems related to the physics of these flows and their analysis using video imagery. First, we are working to better constrain several theoretical parameters that describe the trajectory of these flows when their initial velocities are not parallel to the buoyancy force. The ultimate goal of this effort is to develop well-calibrated methods for establishing volumetric flow rates using trajectory analysis. Second, we are working to refine optical plume velocimetry (OPV), a non-invasive technique for estimating flow rates using temporal cross-correlation of image

  5. Long-term tracking of neutrally buoyant tracer particles in two-dimensional fluid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, M. S.; Solomon, T. H.

    1994-07-01

    An experimental technique has been developed to produce and to track neutrally buoyant particles in a two-dimensional fluid flow. The key aspect of the technique is the ability to track particles for extended intervals (over an hour), which is essential for quantitative studies of transport and mixing. The approach is composed of two stages. In the first stage, digital image processing hardware partially processes the images, reducing the data rate to 50 kbyte/s (typically) and allowing several hours of data to be stored on a conventional computer disk. In the second stage, programs extract particle trajectories from the reduced data. The approach is tested in an experiment on planetary-type flows in a rotating annulus. In an appendix, a technique is discussed for fabricating wax or crayon particles with arbitrary density.

  6. The stability of buoyant bubbles in the atmospheres of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, C R; Pope, E C D; Fangohr, H

    2005-01-01

    The buoyant rise of hot plasma bubbles inflated by AGN outflows in galaxy clusters can heat the cluster gas and thereby compensate radiative energy losses of this material. Numerical simulations of this effect often show the complete disruption of the bubbles followed by the mixing of the bubble material with the surrounding cluster gas due to fluid instabilities on the bubble surface. This prediction is inconsistent with the observations of apparently coherent bubble structures in clusters. We derive a general description in the linear regime of the growth of instabilities on the surface between two fluids under the influence of a gravitational field, viscosity, surface tension provided by a magnetic field and relative motion of the two fluids with respect to each other. We demonstrate that Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities are always suppressed, if the fluids are viscous. They are also suppressed in the inviscid case for fluids of very different mass densities. We show that the effects of shear viscosity as we...

  7. Measurements of Accelerations of Large Neutrally-buoyant Particles in Intense Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Rachel D; Voth, Greg A

    2009-01-01

    We measure acceleration statistics of neutrally buoyant spherical particles with diameter 0.4 , clearly resolve the transition from the tracer like behavior of small particles to the much smaller accelerations of large particles. For d>5 eta, decreases with diameter as d^{-2/3} in agreement with inertial range scaling arguments. A model relating to the pressure structure functions matches the transition from small to large particle behavior if the particles respond to pressure differences over (1.7 +- 0.3) d. A model relating to the fluid acceleration averaged over the particle diameter predicts the transition with no free parameters, but does not show clean inertial range scaling in the size range studied. Consistent with earlier work, we find that the scaled acceleration probability density function shows very little dependence on particle size.

  8. Experiments on the fragmentation of a buoyant liquid volume in another liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Landeau, Maylis; Olson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We present experiments on the instability and fragmentation of volumes of heavier liquid released into lighter immiscible liquids. We focus on the regime defined by small Ohnesorge numbers, density ratios of order one, and variable Weber numbers. The observed stages in the fragmentation process include deformation of the released fluid by either Rayleigh-Taylor instability or vortex ring roll-up and destabilization, formation of filamentary structures, capillary instability, and drop formation. At low and intermediate Weber numbers, a wide variety of fragmentation regimes is identified. Those regimes depend on early deformations, which mainly result from a competition between the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the roll-up of a vortex ring. At high Weber numbers, turbulent vortex ring formation is observed. We have adapted the standard theory of turbulent entrainment to buoyant vortex rings with initial momentum. We find consistency between this theory and our experiments, indicating that the conc...

  9. Effect of Side Wind on the Directional Stability and Aerodynamics of a Hybrid Buoyant Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Anwar U

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional stability characteristics explain the capabilities of a hybrid buoyant aircraft’s performance against the side wind, which induces flow separation that is chaotic in nature and may lead to oscillations of the aerodynamic surfaces. A numerical study is carried out to estimate the effect of side wind. The boundary conditions for the computational domain are set to velocity inlet and pressure outlet. Due to the incompressible flow at the cruise velocity, the density is taken to be constant. For these steady state simulations, the time is discretized in first order implicit and the SIMPLE scheme is employed for pressure velocity coupling alongwith k-ω SST model. Based on the results obtained so far, it is concluded that voluminous hybrid lifting fuselage is the major cause of directional.

  10. Magnetic Cycles and Buoyant Loops in Convective Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Solar-type stars display a rich spectrum of magnetic activity. Seeking to explore convective dynamo action in solar-like stars with the anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code, we have carried out a series of global 3-D MHD simulations. Here we report on the dynamo mechanisms realized in a series of numerical models of a sun-like star which explore the effects of decreasing diffusion. While these models nominally rotate at three times the current solar rate (3Ω), the results may be more widely applicable as both these simulations and the solar convection zone achieve similar levels of rotationally constrained convection. Previous simulations at 3Ω have shown that convective dynamos can build persistent wreath-like structures of strong toroidal magnetic field in the convection zone (Brown et al. 2010). Here we find that magnetic reversals and cycles can be realized at 3Ω by decreasing the explicit diffusion and thereby making the resolved flows more turbulent. In these more turbulent models, diffusive processes no longer play a primary role in the key dynamical balances which maintain differential rotation and generate the global-scale wreaths. With reduced resistive diffusion of magnetic fields, the axisymmetric poloidal fields can no longer achieve a steady state and this triggers reversals in global magnetic polarity. Additionally, the enhanced levels of turbulence lead to greater intermittency in the toroidal magnetic wreaths, which can create buoyant magnetic loops that rise from the deep interior to the upper regions of our simulated domain. Turbulence-enabled magnetic buoyancy in our most turbulent simulation yields large numbers of buoyant loops, enabling us to examine the distribution of the characteristics of buoyant magnetic loops, such as twist, tilt angle, and relation to axisymmetric fields. These models provide a pathway towards linking convective dynamo models and the emergence of magnetic flux in the Sun and sun-like stars.

  11. Dynamics of finite size neutrally buoyant particles in isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhimer, M; Jean, A; Praud, O; Bazile, R; Marchal, M; Couteau, G, E-mail: elhimer@imft.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT - Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-22

    The dynamics of neutrally buoyant particles suspended in a turbulent flow is investigated experimentally, with particles having diameters larger than the Kolmogorov length scale. To that purpose, a turbulence generator have been constructed and the resulting flow characterized. The fluid was then seeded with polystyrene particles of diameter about 1 mm and their velocity measured separately and simultaneously with the surrounding fluid. Comparison of the velocities statistics between the two phases shows no appreciable discrepancy. However, simultaneous velocity measurement shows that particles may move in different direction from the underlying flow.

  12. Self-concentrating buoyant glass microbubbles for high sensitivity immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Duane S; Hsu, Chia-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    Here, we report the novel application of a material with self-concentrating properties for enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassays. Termed as glass microbubbles, they are antibody functionalized buoyant hollow glass microspheres that simultaneously float and concentrate into a dense monolayer when dispensed in a liquid droplet. This self-concentrating charactaristic of the microbubbles allow for autonomous signal localization, which translates to a higher sensitivity compared to other microparticle-based immunoassays. We then demonstrated a "microbubble array" platform consisting of the glass microbubbles floating in a microfluidic liquid hemisphere array for performing multiplex immunoassays. PMID:26620967

  13. Buoyant triacylglycerol-filled green algae and methods therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, Ursula; Goodson, Carrie

    2015-04-14

    Cultures of Chlamydomonas are disclosed comprising greater than 340 mg/l triacylglycerols (TAG). The cultures can include buoyant Chlamydomonas. Methods of forming the cultures are also disclosed. In some embodiments, these methods comprise providing Chlamydomonas growing in log phase in a first culture medium comprising a nitrogen source and acetate, replacing the first culture medium with a second medium comprising acetate but no nitrogen source, and subsequently supplementing the second medium with additional acetate. In some embodiments, a culture can comprise at least 1,300 mg/l triacyglycerols. In some embodiments, cultures can be used to produce a biofuel such as biodiesel.

  14. Entrainment and mixing in vertical buoyant light-gas plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model is developed to determine the entrainment coefficient and the spread of a light-gas plume in a quiescent atmosphere. Experiments performed with low-velocity saltwater/freshwater and helium-in-air jets indicate that buoyant gas plumes spread significantly faster than thermal plumes. The calculated effluent concentrations are in excellent agreement with those measured when an entrainment coefficient of 0.15 is used in the plume equations. This is significantly higher than the entrainment coefficients of 0.075 to 0.093 reported for thermal plumes

  15. 密度梯度零件选区激光熔化制造基础工艺研究%Preliminary Study on Preparation of Density Gradient Parts Using Selective Laser Melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗子艺; 杨永强; 卢建斌; 王迪

    2011-01-01

    For the rapid manufacture of density gradient parts, the experiment of selective laser melting (SLM) process was carried out on Dimetal-280 system, the relationship between the density and the process parameter was analyzed.The parts with the density of 6.73 g/cm3 to 7.78 g/cm3 and the relative density of 83.09%~96.05% in the level direction and with the density of 7.04 g/cm3 to 7.55 g/cm3 and the relative density of 93.21%~86.91% in the thickness direction were formed using 316L stainless steel powder.The parts were observed by microscope after polished along the gradient direction.The results show that pore volume of the parts presents gradient variation according to the gradient variation of their density.The SLM technique has a great potential in manufacturing density gradient parts.%为了快速制造密度梯度零件,在快速成型设备DiMetal-280上进行了选区激光熔化(SLM)成型工艺研究,分析了工艺参数与致密度之间的关系.采用316L不锈钢粉末,制造了密度从6.73g/cm3到7.78g/cm3、致密度从83.09%到96.05%水平方向变化的零件,以及密度从7.04/cm3到7.55g/cm3、致密度从93.21%到86.91%厚度方向变化的零件;将零件沿梯度方向抛光后在显微镜下观察.结果表明,零件在梯度方向随着密度的梯度变化,孔隙量也呈现相应的梯度变化.本文采用的SLM技术在密度梯度零件制造中具有很大的潜力.

  16. Evolution of the buoyant bubbles in M87

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Kaiser, C R; Böhringer, H; Forman, W R

    2000-01-01

    The morphology of the X-ray and radio emitting features in the central 50 kpc region around the galaxy M87 strongly suggests that buoyant bubbles of cosmic rays (inflated by an earlier nuclear active phase of the galaxy) are slowly rising through the cooling gas. In the absence of strong surface tension, an intrinsic property of initially spherical bubbles is their transformation into tori as they rise through an external medium. Such structures can be identified in the radio images of the halo of M87. During their rise the bubbles uplift relatively cool X-ray emitting ambient gas from the central regions of the cooling flow to larger distances. This gas is colder than the ambient gas and has a higher volume emissivity. As a result, rising "radio" bubbles may be trailed by elongated X-ray features as indeed is observed in M87. We performed simple hydrodynamical simulations in order to qualitatively illustrate the evolution of the buoyant bubbles in the M87 environment.

  17. Cultivo de células mesenquimais do sangue de cordão umbilical com e sem uso do gradiente de densidade Ficoll-Paque Blood mesenchymal stem cell culture from the umbilical cord with and without Ficoll-Paque density gradient method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Sayoko Kawasaki-Oyama

    2008-03-01

    Ficoll-Paque gradient density method (d=1.077g/ml. METHODS: Ten samples of the umbilical cord blood obtained from full-term deliveries were submitted to two different procedures of mesenchymal stem cell culture: a Method without the Ficoll-Paque density gradient, which concentrates all nucleated cells; b Method with the Ficoll-Paque density gradient, which selects only low-density mononuclear cells. Cells were initially plated into 25 cm² cultures flasks at a density of 1x10(7 nucleated cells/cm² and 1x10(6 mononuclear cells/cm². RESULTS: It was obtained 2-13x10(7 (median = 2.35x10(7 nucleated cells/cm² by the method without the Ficoll-Paque gradient density, and 3.7-15.7x10(6 (median = 7.2x10(6 mononuclear cells/cm² by the method with the Ficoll-Paque gradient density. In all cultures adherent cells were observed 24 hours after being cultured. Cells presented fibroblastoid and epithelioid morphology. In most of the cultures, cell proliferation occurred in the first week, but after the second week only some cultures - derived from the method without the Ficoll-Paque gradient density - maintained the growth rate reaching confluence. Those cultures were submitted to trypsinization with 0.25% trypsin/EDTA solution and cultured for two to three months. CONCLUSION: In the samples analyzed, cell separation and mesenchymal stem cell culture techniques from human umbilical cord blood by the method without the Ficoll-Paque density gradient was more efficient than the method with the Ficoll-Paque density gradient.

  18. Variation of DNA Fragmentation Levels During Density Gradient Sperm Selection for Assisted Reproduction Techniques: A Possible New Male Predictive Parameter of Pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Monica; Tarozzi, Nicoletta; Cambi, Marta; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Passaro, Claudia; Luppino, Benedetta; Nadalini, Marco; Marchiani, Sara; Tamburrino, Lara; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario; Baldi, Elisabetta; Borini, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Predicting the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is one main goal of the present research on assisted reproduction. To understand whether density gradient centrifugation (DGC), used to select sperm, can affect sperm DNA integrity and impact pregnancy rate (PR), we prospectively evaluated sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF) by TUNEL/PI, before and after DGC. sDF was studied in a cohort of 90 infertile couples the same day of IVF/ICSI treatment. After DGC, sDF increased in 41 samples (Group A, median sDF value: 29.25% [interquartile range, IQR: 16.01-41.63] in pre- and 60.40% [IQR: 32.92-93.53] in post-DGC) and decreased in 49 (Group B, median sDF value: 18.84% [IQR: 13.70-35.47] in pre- and 8.98% [IQR: 6.24-15.58] in post-DGC). PR was 17.1% and 34.4% in Group A and B, respectively (odds ratio [OR]: 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-7.04, P = 0.056). After adjustment for female factor, female and male age and female BMI, the estimated OR increased to 3.12 (95% CI: 1.05-9.27, P = 0.041). According to the subgroup analysis for presence/absence of female factor, heterogeneity in the association between the Group A and B and PR emerged (OR: 4.22, 95% CI: 1.16-15.30 and OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.23-10.40, respectively, for couples without, n = 59, and with, n = 31, female factor).This study provides the first evidence that the DGC procedure produces an increase in sDF in about half of the subjects undergoing IVF/ICSI, who then show a much lower probability of pregnancy, raising concerns about the safety of this selection procedure. Evaluation of sDF before and after DGC configures as a possible new prognostic parameter of pregnancy outcome in IVF/ICSI. Alternative sperm selection strategies are recommended for those subjects who undergo the damage after DGC. PMID:27196465

  19. Non-Boussinesq turbulent buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Amin, M.F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    This paper is devoted to introduce a numerical investigation of a vertical axisymmetric non-Boussinesq buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage in air as an example of injecting a low-density gas jet into high-density ambient. As the domain temperature is assumed to be constant and therefore the density of the mixture is a function of the concentration only, the binary gas mixture is assumed to be of a linear mixing type. Also, it is assumed that the rate of entrainment to be a function of the plume centerline velocity and the ratio of the mean plume and ambient densities. On the other hand, the local rate of entrainment may be considered to be consisted from two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. Firstly, the integral models of the mass, momentum and concentration fluxes are obtained and transformed to a set of ordinary differential equations using some non-dimensional transformations known as similarity transformations. The given ordinary differential system is integrated numerically and the mean centerline mass fraction, jet width and mean centerline velocity are obtained. In the second step, the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet are obtained. Finally in the third step of this article, several quantities of interest, including the cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity-concentration correlation (radial flux), turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity, are obtained. In addition, the turbulent Schmidt number is estimated and the normalized jet-feed material density and the normalized momentum flux density are correlated. (author)

  20. 46 CFR 131.865 - Inflatable liferafts and inflatable buoyant apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inflatable liferafts and inflatable buoyant apparatus. 131.865 Section 131.865 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS OPERATIONS Markings for Fire Equipment and Emergency Equipment § 131.865 Inflatable liferafts and inflatable buoyant apparatus....

  1. 46 CFR 160.010-4 - General requirements for buoyant apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General requirements for buoyant apparatus. 160.010-4 Section 160.010-4 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Buoyant Apparatus for Merchant Vessels § 160.010-4 General requirements...

  2. Validity of several approximations for the turbulent buoyant jet in a stagnant neutrally-stratified ambient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of approximations are usually made in deriving integral model equations for the dispersion of a round turbulent buoyant jet into a stagnant neutrally-stratified ambient fluid. The magnitudes of differences in model predictions caused by making four of these approximations are calculated as a function of the initial densimetric Froude number and the initial relative density difference. The four approximations studied are (1) the Boussinesq approximation, (2) the use of a common Gaussian width for both mean axial velocity and mean temperature (or concentration) excess, (3) the neglect of fluctuation-correlation terms, and (4) the assumption of a linear relationship between excess density and excess temperature (or concentration). The four approximations are studied singly and then cumulatively as the predictions of the two models, one with and one without all approximations, are compared to seven low Froude number data cases. Results show that the Boussinesq approximation produces percentage differences in predictions which are about half of the initial relative density difference expressed in percentage. Use of a common Gaussian width for velocity and temperature produces differences from 6% to 30% depending on the entrainment assumption used. Fluctuation correlation effects rarely exceed 8%. Lastly, at Froude numbers below about 10 the correct nonlinear equation of state must often be used for heated waste jets to acheive accurate results, and the correct air equation of state may also be needed for low Froude number heated air jets, depending on the initial diameter and velocity

  3. Light scattering from suspensions under external gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Bonet i Avalos, Josep; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel; Rodríguez, R.; Pérez Madrid, Agustín

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the light-scattering spectrum of a suspension in a viscoelastic fluid under density and velocity gradients. When a density gradient is present, the dynamic structure factor exhibits universality in the sense that its expression depends only on the reduced frequency and the reduced density gradient. For a velocity gradient, however, the universality breaks down. In this last case we have found a transition point from one to three characteristic frequencies in the spectrum, which is ...

  4. A corrected vortex blob method for 3D thermal buoyant flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golia, Carmine; Buonomo, Bernardo; Viviani, Antonio [Seconda Universita di Napoli (SUN), Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale e Meccanica (DIAM), via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    This work explores novel ideas to improve the accuracy of integral approximation to differential operators (divergence, gradient and Laplacian) in the simulation of 3D thermal buoyant flows with meshless Lagrangian Blobs methods. Basically, we investigate and develop an integral discretization of the differential operators of the field equations, by using convolutions of truncated 3D-Taylor series expansions with a kernel function defined on a compact support around the blob centre of a given particle. This allows to overtake: circle the irregular distribution of cells in the compact support around the given blob, circle the deficiency of cells in the compact support due to the presence of a boundary cutting the compact support of nearby blobs. The accuracy and the order of approximation of such discretizations are determined in regular and randomly distorted grids of various sizes, and compared with the widely used particle strength exchange formulations. The analysis of the effects of using the new formulations to solve problems at realistic values of the Grashof number demonstrates the validity and the benefits of the novel findings. (author)

  5. Turbulent buoyant confined jet with variable source temperature

    CERN Document Server

    El-Amin, M F; Sun, S

    2013-01-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are considered for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-epsilon turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear variation that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during whole time. Numerical exp...

  6. Flow behaviour of negatively buoyant jets in immiscible ambient fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, A. [CIMNE International Center for Numerical Models in Engineering, Barcelona (Spain); CSIC, Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera, Barcelona (Spain); Phillips, J.C. [University of Bristol, Department of Earth Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom); Mier-Torrecilla, M.; Idelsohn, S.R.; Onate, E. [CIMNE International Center for Numerical Models in Engineering, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-01-15

    In this paper we investigate experimentally the injection of a negatively buoyant jet into a homogenous immiscible ambient fluid. Experiments are carried out by injecting a jet of dyed fresh water through a nozzle in the base of a cylindrical tank containing rapeseed oil. The fountain inlet flow rate and nozzle diameter were varied to cover a wide range of Richardson Ri (8 x 10{sup -4}

  7. Numerical simulations of buoyant reactive jets with sidewall effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Heping; JIANG Xi; WANG Wei; YANG Yun; XU Liang; FAN Weicheng

    2004-01-01

    The near field dynamics of buoyant reactive jets with adjacent sidewalls is investigated by time-dependent three-dimensional direct simulations. The physical problem is a fuel jet issuing vertically into an oxidant ambient environment in a corner configuration with sidewall boundaries. Simulation results are presented for two cases with different jet nozzle geometries: a corner-round reactive jet and a corner-square reactive jet with the same cross-sectional area on the nozzle plane. Buoyancy-induced large vortical structures evolve spatially in the flow field and transition to turbulence occurs downstream. Calculation of the mean flow properties shows that entrainment of the corner-round jet is stronger than that of the corner-square jet due to the stronger vortex deformation in the corner-round case.

  8. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Buoyant Convection in Geophysical Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorovich, E; Viegas, D; Wyngaard, J

    1998-01-01

    Studies of convection in geophysical flows constitute an advanced and rapidly developing area of research that is relevant to problems of the natural environment. During the last decade, significant progress has been achieved in the field as a result of both experimental studies and numerical modelling. This led to the principal revision of the widely held view on buoyancy-driven turbulent flows comprising an organised mean component with superimposed chaotic turbulence. An intermediate type of motion, represented by coherent structures, has been found to play a key role in geophysical boundary layers and in larger scale atmospheric and hydrospheric circulations driven by buoyant forcing. New aspects of the interaction between convective motions and rotation have recently been discovered and investigated. Extensive experimental data have also been collected on the role of convection in cloud dynamics and microphysics. New theoretical concepts and approaches have been outlined regarding scaling and parameteriz...

  9. Buoyant Turbulent Kinetic Energy Production in Steep-Slope Katabatic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Holly J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Higgins, Chad W.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2016-07-01

    We develop several critical concepts that should be considered when interpreting, modelling and designing future experiments for flows over sloping terrain. Vertical buoyancy fluxes in katabatic flows can be positive and a source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) despite the statically stable, thermal stratification that drives these flows. This phenomenon occurs when the ratio of along-slope to slope-normal kinematic heat fluxes is greater than the cotangent of the slope angle, suggesting a critical value of slope-angle steepness found in earlier studies. We provide field-data-based evidence that the along-slope heat flux may dominate the variables in this inequality, and therefore in generating buoyant TKE production or suppression over a steep slope. These data show the along-slope heat flux can be more variable and significantly larger in magnitude than the slope-normal component. The gradient Richardson number does not include the effects of the along-slope buoyancy; furthermore, none of the canonical stability parameters can properly reflect the TKE redistribution from turbulent transport divergence and the sink of TKE in cases of counter-gradient momentum fluxes, which we frequently observe near the peak of the katabatic jet. In such cases, canonical stability parameters inadequately represent the physical mechanisms associated with stability. These results have broad implications related to accurately modelling turbulence and surface exchanges over sloping terrain and illustrate the need to more thoroughly investigate the along-slope heat flux and its drivers, the meaning and definitions of stability, and the effects of non-local turbulent transport.

  10. Northern Monterey Bay upwelling shadow front: Observations of a coastally and surface-trapped buoyant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, C.B.; Washburn, L.; Barth, J.A.; Hoover, D.J.; Kirincich, A.R.; McManus, M.A.; Ryan, J.P.; Tyburczy, J.

    2009-01-01

    During the upwelling season in central California, northwesterly winds along the coast produce a strong upwelling jet that originates at Point A??o Nuevo and flows southward across the mouth of Monterey Bay. A convergent front with a mean temperature change of 3.77 ?? 0.29??C develops between the warm interior waters and the cold offshore upwelling jet. To examine the forcing mechanisms driving the location and movement of the upwelling shadow front and its effects on biological communities in northern Monterey Bay, oceanographic conditions were monitored using cross-shelf mooring arrays, drifters, and hydrographic surveys along a 20 km stretch of coast extending northwestward from Santa Cruz, California, during the upwelling season of 2007 (May-September). The alongshore location of the upwelling shadow front at the northern edge of the bay was driven by: regional wind forcing, through an alongshore pressure gradient; buoyancy forces due to the temperature change across the front; and local wind forcing (the diurnal sea breeze). The upwelling shadow front behaved as a surface-trapped buoyant current, which is superimposed on a poleward barotropic current, moving up and down the coast up to several kilometers each day. We surmise that the front is advected poleward by a preexisting northward barotropic current of 0.10 m s-1 that arises due to an alongshore pressure gradient caused by focused upwelling at Point A??o Nuevo. The frontal circulation (onshore surface currents) breaks the typical two-dimensional wind-driven, cross-shelf circulation (offshore surface currents) and introduces another way for water, and the material it contains (e.g., pollutants, larvae), to go across the shelf toward shore.Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Density-Dependent Regulation of Brook Trout Population Dynamics along a Core-Periphery Distribution Gradient in a Central Appalachian Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Huntsman, Brock M.; Petty, J. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Spatial population models predict strong density-dependence and relatively stable population dynamics near the core of a species' distribution with increasing variance and importance of density-independent processes operating towards the population periphery. Using a 10-year data set and an information-theoretic approach, we tested a series of candidate models considering density-dependent and density-independent controls on brook trout population dynamics across a core-periphery distribution...

  12. Use of a Force Sensor in Archimedes' Principle Experiment, Determination of Buoyant Force and Acceleration Due To Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Aurora, Tarlok

    2013-04-01

    In introductory physics, students verify Archimedes' principle by immersing an object in water in a container, with a side-spout to collect the displaced water, resulting in a large uncertainty, due to surface tension. A modified procedure was introduced, in which a plastic bucket is suspended from a force sensor, and an object hangs underneath the bucket. The object is immersed in water in a glass beaker (without any side spout), and the weight loss is measured with a computer-controlled force sensor. Instead of collecting the water displaced by the object, tap water was added to the bucket to compensate for the weight loss, and the Archimedes' principle was verified within less than a percent. With this apparatus, buoyant force was easily studied as a function of volume of displaced water; as well as a function of density of saline solution. By graphing buoyant force as a function of volume (or density of liquid), value of g was obtained from slope. Apparatus and sources of error will be discussed.

  13. Axi-asymmetric development of buoyant diapirs in analogue and numerical experiments: the role of source-layer tilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Urmi; Baruah, Amiya; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-04-01

    Diapiric structure owing to gravity instabilities, triggered by density inversion in the rock sequences, is a unique geodynamic manifestation. High-density layers that rest upon low-density layers tend to sink, forcing the latter to squeeze up in the form of domal shapes, called buoyant diapirs. Using two-layer viscous model experiments, we investigated the effects of source-layer tilt (β) in controlling the ascent behaviour of buoyant diapirs initiated by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results from our laboratory experiments, performed with a buoyant viscous layer (PDMS; density: 965.0 kg/m3) underlying a denser fluid (water; density: 998.2 kg/m3) suggest that the diapir shape is highly sensitive to β. The results suggest that diapirs growing from a tilted source layer ascend with contrasting lateral spreading rates in the up and down slope directions, resulting in axi-asymmetric geometry. Conversely, diapirs initiated from a horizontal source layer always maintain axi- symmetric shape as they grow. Interestingly, diapir heads retain a circular outline on the horizontal top surface irrespective of their degree of symmetry. However, for the axi-asymmetric cases, the upwelling axis is shifted more in the up-slope direction, i.e. away from the centre of this circular geometry. We show a spectrum of the axi-symmetric to -asymmetric geometrical transitions as a function of the source-layer tilt (β). For large β (> 4o), the diapirs become unstable, and their stems undergo a continuous drift in the upslope direction during their vertical growth. Whilst, several studies have shown the development of axi-asymmetric diapirs, the underlain flow kinematics in the viscous layers as a function of source layer tilt leading to such shape transition remains unclear. With this objective we ran computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, by employing the volume of fluid (VOF) method, to investigate the role of underlying dynamics for axi-asymmetric diapiric growth. This study

  14. Energy density of marine pelagic fish eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis-Vestergaard, J.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the literature on pelagic fish eggs enabled generalizations to be made of their energy densities, because the property of being buoyant in sea water appears to constrain the proximate composition of the eggs and thus to minimize interspecific variation. An energy density of 1.34 J mul...

  15. Shapes of Buoyant and Nonbuoyant Methane Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Peter B.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Laminar gas jet diffusion flames represent a fundamental combustion configuration. Their study has contributed to numerous advances in combustion, including the development of analytical and computational combustion tools. Laminar jet flames are pertinent also to turbulent flames by use of the laminar flamelet concept. Investigations into the shapes of noncoflowing microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames have primarily been pursued in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, by Cochran and coworkers and by Bahadori and coworkers. These studies were generally conducted at atmospheric pressure; they involved soot-containing flames and reported luminosity lengths and widths instead of the flame-sheet dimensions which are of Greater value to theory evaluation and development. The seminal model of laminar diffusion flames is that of Burke and Schumann, who solved the conservation of momentum equation for a jet flame in a coflowing ambient by assuming the velocity of fuel, oxidizer and products to be constant throughout. Roper and coworkers improved upon this model by allowing for axial variations of velocity and found flame shape to be independent of coflow velocity. Roper's suggestion that flame height should be independent of gravity level is not supported by past or present observations. Other models have been presented by Klajn and Oppenheim, Markstein and De Ris, Villermaux and Durox, and Li et al. The common result of all these models (except in the buoyant regime) is that flame height is proportional to fuel mass flowrate, with flame width proving much more difficult to predict. Most existing flame models have been compared with shapes of flames containing soot, which is known to obscure the weak blue emission of flame sheets. The present work involves measurements of laminar gas jet diffusion flame shapes. Flame images have been obtained for buoyant and nonbuoyant methane flames burning in quiescent air at various fuel flow-rates, burner diameters and ambient

  16. Petrochronological and structural arguments for upper plate thickening and relamination of the lower plate buoyant material in the Variscan Bohemian Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peřestý, Vít; Holder, Robert; Lexa, Ondrej; Racek, Martin; Jeřábek, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Recent tectonic models for the Variscan evolution of the Bohemian Massif emphasize the role of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for the 355-340 Ma evolution of the Moldanubian domain. This model is based on the presence of weak, low-density felsic material tectonically underplating a high-density mafic layer and its subsequent gravity-driven overturn. However, earlier phases of the Variscan orogeny concerning the emplacement of felsic low-density material to the base of the upper plate are so far poorly documented. We contribute to this problem by deciphering of polyphase early-Variscan (~375 Ma) deformation and metamorphism close to the main Variscan suture. Detailed structural, pseudosection and microstructural analyses combined with LASS monazite dating were carried out in metapelites along the western margin of the upper plate represented by the Teplá Crystalline Complex (TCC). This region is represented by a ~25 km wide deformation zone with E-W metamorphic gradients associated with two distinct early-Variscan events (~380-375 and ~375-370 Ma). The first compressional event produced a vertical NNE-SSW trending fabric and a continuous and prograde Barrovian metamorphic sequence ranging from biotite to kyanite zones at a field geotherm of 20 to 25 °C/km. Subsequently, a gently SE dipping normal shear-zone associated with retrogression develops along the base of the TCC. This sub-horizontal fabric shows normal metamorphic zonation ranging from sillimanite, biotite to chlorite zones and indicates vertical shortening related to unroofing of high pressure metabasites of the underlying Mariánské-Lázně Complex. The first metamorphic fabric is interpreted to result from early thickening of the upper plate during continental underthrusting of Saxothuringian continent (380 to 375 Ma) while the second deformation and metamorphism (~370 Ma) reflects vertical shortening produced by buoyant uplift of accreted Saxothuringian felsic crust. This event is the unique yet

  17. Factors affecting the density of Brassica napus seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Young, L.; Jalink, H.; Denkert, R.; Reaney , M

    2006-01-01

    Brassica napus seed is composed of low density oil (0.92 g.cm(-3)) and higher density solids (1.3-1.45 g.cm(-3)). Seed buoyant density may potentially be used to determine seed oil content and to separate seeds with different oil contents, however, we have found that seeds with the lowest buoyant density had lower than expected oil contents. It is proposed that the low oil content observed in the lowest density seed is a function of air gaps or pockets within the seed coat with sufficient vol...

  18. Highly buoyant bent-over plumes in a boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Ali; Kaye, Nigel B.

    2016-04-01

    Highly buoyant plumes, such as wildfire plumes, in low to moderate wind speeds have initial trajectories that are steeper than many industrial waste plumes. They will rise further into the atmosphere before bending significantly. In such cases the plume's trajectory will be influenced by the vertical variation in horizontal velocity of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper examined the behavior of a plume in an unstratified environment with a power-law ambient velocity profile. Examination of previously published experimental measurements of plume trajectory show that inclusion of the boundary layer velocity profile in the plume model often provides better predictions of the plume trajectory compared to algebraic expressions developed for uniform flow plumes. However, there are many cases in which uniform velocity profile algebraic expressions are as good as boundary layer models. It is shown that it is only important to model the role of the atmospheric boundary layer velocity profile in cases where either the momentum length (square root of source momentum flux divided by the reference wind speed) or buoyancy length (buoyancy flux divided by the reference wind speed cubed) is significantly greater than the plume release height within the boundary layer. This criteria is rarely met with industrial waste plumes, but it is important in modeling wildfire plumes.

  19. Role of buoyant flame dynamics in wildfire spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Mark A; Cohen, Jack D; Forthofer, Jason M; McAllister, Sara S; Gollner, Michael J; Gorham, Daniel J; Saito, Kozo; Akafuah, Nelson K; Adam, Brittany A; English, Justin D

    2015-08-11

    Large wildfires of increasing frequency and severity threaten local populations and natural resources and contribute carbon emissions into the earth-climate system. Although wildfires have been researched and modeled for decades, no verifiable physical theory of spread is available to form the basis for the precise predictions needed to manage fires more effectively and reduce their environmental, economic, ecological, and climate impacts. Here, we report new experiments conducted at multiple scales that appear to reveal how wildfire spread derives from the tight coupling between flame dynamics induced by buoyancy and fine-particle response to convection. Convective cooling of the fine-sized fuel particles in wildland vegetation is observed to efficiently offset heating by thermal radiation until convective heating by contact with flames and hot gasses occurs. The structure and intermittency of flames that ignite fuel particles were found to correlate with instabilities induced by the strong buoyancy of the flame zone itself. Discovery that ignition in wildfires is critically dependent on nonsteady flame convection governed by buoyant and inertial interaction advances both theory and the physical basis for practical modeling. PMID:26183227

  20. Buoyant dispersal of CO2 during geological storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, M. A.; Woods, A. W.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage is currently the only technology that may allow significant reductions in CO2 emissions from large point sources. Seismic images of geological CO2 storage show the rise of CO2 is influenced by horizontal shales. The buoyant CO2 spreads beneath impermeable barriers until a gap allows its upward migration. The large number and small scale of these barriers makes the prediction of the CO2 migration path and hence the magnitude of CO2 trapping very challenging. We show that steady buoyancy dominated flows in complex geometries can be modeled as a cascade of flux partitioning events. This approach allows the analysis of two-dimensional plume dispersal from a horizontal injection well. We show that the plume spreads laterally with height y above the source according to (y/h)1/2 L, where L is the width of the shales and h is their vertical separation. The fluid volume below successive shale layers, and therefore the magnitude of trapped CO2, increase as (y/h)5/4 above the source, so that every additional layer of barriers traps more CO2 than the one below. Upscaling small scale flow barriers by reducing the vertical permeability, common in numerical simulations of CO2 storage, does not capture the dispersion and trapping of the CO2 plume by the flow barriers.

  1. Buoyant Magnetic Flux Ropes and Convection: Evolution Prior to Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2003-10-01

    We have performed detailed numerical 3-d simulations of the interaction of buoyantly ascending twisted magnetic flux ropes and solar-like stratified convection (with surface cells similar to solar supergranules in size). Results are presented for three different cases -- corresponding to different amounts of initial field line twist -- that represents fundamentally different types of instabilities: the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which case the flux rope disrupts and network patches are formed at surface cell boundaries; the kink instability that has been proposed as a mechanism for forming tightly packed δ-type spots; a stable flux rope where neither of the former instabilities arise, and the behavior of which is similar to classical text book flux tubes, except from a flux-loss due to the advective action of the convective flows. The simulations thus support the idea that the magnetic flux observed at the surface in bipolar regions are smaller, ceteris paribus, than that of the dynamo generated flux ropes near the bottom of the convection zone. Please note that this material is also available as an online htmladdnormallink{web-talk}{http://www.astro.su.se/ dorch/talks/01_CS12/}

  2. The vertical distribution of buoyant plastics at sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reisser

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-sized plastics are numerically abundant and widespread across the world's ocean surface. These buoyant macroscopic particles can be mixed within the upper water column due to turbulent transport. Models indicate that the largest decrease in their concentration occurs within the first few meters of water, where subsurface observations are very scarce. By using a new type of multi-level trawl at 12 sites within the North Atlantic accumulation zone, we measured concentrations and physical properties of plastics from the air–seawater interface to a depth of 5 m, at 0.5 m intervals. Our results show that plastic concentrations drop exponentially with water depth, but decay rates decrease with increasing Beaufort scale. Furthermore, smaller pieces presented lower rise velocities and were more susceptible to vertical transport. This resulted in higher depth decays of plastic mass concentration (mg m−3 than numerical concentration (pieces m−3. Further multi-level sampling of plastics will improve our ability to predict at-sea plastic load, size distribution, drifting pattern, and impact on marine species and habitats.

  3. Entrainment and mixing in vertical buoyant light-gas plumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen has great potential as a future fuel because of its nearly pollution-free combustion. However, it is highly diffusive and can easily leak through joints, cracks and defective valves if care is not taken. Accidental release of hydrogen into surrounding air and its subsequent mixing are of concern in evaluating the safe transport of hydrogen in buildings through piping. Hydrogen release into air is of importance in nuclear reactor safety analysis also. During certain postulated accidents in nuclear reactors, hydrogen may be produced by high temperature metal-steam reactions and released into the containment building. A simple model is developed to determine the entrainment coefficient and the spread of a light-gas plume in a quiescent atmosphere. Experiments performed with low velocity salt water/fresh-water and helium-in-air jets indicate that buoyant gas plumes spread significantly faster than thermal plumes. The calculated effluent concentrations are in excellent agreement with those measured when an entrainment coefficient of 0.15 is used in the plume equations. This is significantly higher than the entrainment coefficients of 0.075 to 0.093 reported for thermal plumes

  4. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE STABILITY AND MIXING OF VERTICAL ROUNE BUOYANT JET IN SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾玉红; 槐文信

    2005-01-01

    The k-epsilon model was applied to establish the mathematical model of vertical round buoyant jet discharging into confined depth, and it was solved using the Hybrid Finite Analytic Method ( HFAM ). The numerical predictions demonstrate two generic flow patterns for different jet discharge and environmental parameters: ( i ) a stable buoyant flow discharge with the mixed fluid leaving the near-field warm in a surface warm water layer;( ii ) an unstable buoyant flow discharge with recirculation and re-entrainment of warm water in the near field. Furthermore, the mixing characters of vertical round buoyant jet were numerically predicted. Both the stability criterion and numerical predictions of bulk dilutions are in excellent agreement with Lee and Jirka ' s experiments and theory.

  5. Buoyant jet and two-phase jet-plume modeling for application to large water pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Timothy L. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Westinghouse Nuclear, Madison, PA 15663 (United States); Revankar, Shripad T., E-mail: shripad@ecn.purdue.ed [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-780 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: A two-phase jet-plume model was developed to predict pool thermal response, pool surface temperature and consequently the pool cover gas pressure in enclosed spaces such as nuclear reactor wetwell. The jet-plume half-width, centerline velocity and temperature along the axis defining the plume's trajectory were solved as variables along the path. The pool surface temperature prediction is comparable to experimental data within 0.5 {sup o}C. - Abstract: Models of a single-phase liquid-into-liquid buoyant jet and a two-phase vapor-into-liquid turbulent jet-plume injected in horizontal orientation were developed for analyzing the dynamics of the mixing characteristics and thermal response for shallow submergence of the source in large pools. These models were developed from the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations in the cylindrical system for steady axisymmetric flow and incorporated the integral plume theory. The bases for the general assumptions such as self-similarity and use of Gaussian profiles to represent the velocity field across the effluent cross-section are examined. Subroutines were developed to reproduce the governing differential equations formulated from the continuity, momentum and conservation of buoyancy or energy equations which treats the jet-plume's half-width, velocity and temperature as variables and seek solutions of these variables along the jet-plume trajectory. Information on empirical closure relations obtained from experimental data such as the coefficient-of-entrainment, bubble slip velocity, momentum amplification factor, and plume spread-ratios for buoyancy and density-defect which are available for adiabatic cases were applied to the case of steam-into-water. Solutions were obtained without cross-flow in a linearly stratified ambient and then with cross-flow in a homogeneously mixed ambient for the single-phase formulation that represents a complete condensation scenario of a buoyant jet. The model was

  6. A buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for passive reactivity control of a Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandford, Edward D., E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Peterson, Per F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We develop a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for a FHR. • Shutdown rod system can be actively or passively activated during transients. • Response of the rod was computationally simulated and experimentally validated. • Initial results indicate rod could provide effective transient reactivity control. -- Abstract: This paper presents a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for use in Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs). The baseline design considered here is a 900 MWth modular version of the FHR class called the Pebble Bed Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) that uses pebble fuel. Due to the high volumetric heat capacity of the primary coolant, the FHRs operate with a high power density core with a similar average coolant temperature as in modular helium reactors. The reactivity control system for the baseline PB-AHTR uses a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod system that can be actively or passively activated during reactor transients. In addition to a traditional active insertion mechanism, the new shutdown rod system is designed to also operate passively, fulfilling the role of a reserve shutdown system. The physical response of the shutdown rod was simulated both computationally and experimentally, using scaling arguments where applicable, with an emphasis on key phenomena identified by a preliminary Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) study. This paper presents results from both the pre-predicted simulation and experimental validation efforts.

  7. A buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for passive reactivity control of a Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We develop a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for a FHR. • Shutdown rod system can be actively or passively activated during transients. • Response of the rod was computationally simulated and experimentally validated. • Initial results indicate rod could provide effective transient reactivity control. -- Abstract: This paper presents a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for use in Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs). The baseline design considered here is a 900 MWth modular version of the FHR class called the Pebble Bed Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) that uses pebble fuel. Due to the high volumetric heat capacity of the primary coolant, the FHRs operate with a high power density core with a similar average coolant temperature as in modular helium reactors. The reactivity control system for the baseline PB-AHTR uses a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod system that can be actively or passively activated during reactor transients. In addition to a traditional active insertion mechanism, the new shutdown rod system is designed to also operate passively, fulfilling the role of a reserve shutdown system. The physical response of the shutdown rod was simulated both computationally and experimentally, using scaling arguments where applicable, with an emphasis on key phenomena identified by a preliminary Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) study. This paper presents results from both the pre-predicted simulation and experimental validation efforts

  8. SEPARATION OF X-BEARING BOVINE SPERM BY CENTRIFUGATION IN CONTINUOUS PERCOLL AND OPTIPREP DENSITY GRADIENT: EFFECT IN SPERM VIABILITY AND IN VITRO EMBRYO PRODUCTION SEPARAÇÃO DE ESPERMATOZOIDES PORTADORES DO CROMOSSOMO X BOVINO POR CENTRIFUGAÇÃO EM GRADIENTE DE DENSIDADE CONTÍNUO DE PERCOLL E OPTIPREP: EFEITO SOBRE A VIABILIDADE ESPERMÁTICA E NA PRODUÇÃO IN VITRO DE EMBRIÕES

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Costa Lucio; Adriana Oliveira Almeida; Felipe Perecin; Marcelo Barbosa Bezerra; Max Vitória Resende; Vera Fernanda Martins Hossepian de Lima

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to separate X-bearing bovine sperm by continuous Percoll and OptiPrep density gradients and to validate the sexing of resultant in vitro produced embryos by Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Frozen/thawed sperm was layered on density gradients which were previously prepared in polystyrene tubes, 24 h before procedures and maintained at 4 °C. The tubes were centrifuged at 500...

  9. Abundance-area relationships in bird assemblages along an Afrotropical elevational gradient: space limitation in montane forest selects for higher population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Michal; Fjeldså, Jon; Sedláček, Ondřej; Motombi, Francis Njie; Djomo Nana, Eric; Mudrová, Karolína; Hořák, David

    2016-05-01

    The usual positive inter-specific relationship between range size and abundance of local populations can have notable exceptions in Afrotropical montane areas, where range-restricted bird species are unusually abundant. We tested how the area occupied locally by passerines and their geographic range size relate to local abundances along a tropical elevational gradient of Mt Cameroon, West-Central Africa. Data on bird assemblages were collected at six forested elevations (350, 650, 1100, 1500, 1850 m, 2200 m a.s.l.) using a standardised point count at 16 locations per elevation. Elevational ranges of birds were compiled from published sources and their geographic range sizes were determined as the occupancy of 1° x 1° grid cells. The observed relationship between local abundance and geographic range size within the entire passerine assemblage on Mt Cameroon disagrees with the most frequently reported positive pattern. However, the patterns differ among elevations, with positive trends of the abundance-range size relationship in lowland changing to negative trends towards higher elevations. Interestingly, the total assemblage abundances do not differ much among elevations and population size estimates of species occupying different parts of the gradient remain relatively constant. These patterns are caused by relatively high abundances of montane species, which might be a result of long-term ecological specialization and/or competitive release in species-poor montane locations and possibly facilitated by an extinction filter. Our data suggest that montane species' abilities to maintain dense populations might compensate for less area available near mountain tops and help these populations to circumvent extinction. PMID:26801494

  10. Analysing the effect of stand density and site conditions on structure and growth of oak species using Nelder trials along an environmental gradient: experimental design, evaluation methods, and results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enno; Uhl; Peter; Biber; Matthias; Ulbricht; Michael; Heym; Tamás; Horváth; Ferenc; Lakatos; Janós; Gál; Leonhard; Steinacker; Giustino; Tonon; Maurizio; Ventura; Hans; Pretzsch

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most current approaches in forest science and practice require information about structure and growth of individual trees rather than- or in addition to- sum and mean values of growth and yield at forest stand level as provided by classic experimental designs. By inventing the wheel design, Nelder provided the possibility to turn to the individual tree as basic information unit. Such trials provide valuable insights into the dependency of growth on stand density at particular sites.Methods: Here, we present an extension of the original design and evaluation by Nelder.(i) We established Nelder wheels along an environmental gradient through Europe in atlantic climate in Belgium and Germany, Mediterranean climate in Italy, continental climate in Hungary as well as on high land climate in Mexico. Such disjunct Nelder wheels along an environmental gradient can be regarded and analysed as a two-factor design with the factors of site condition and stand density.(ii) We present an advanced statistical approach to evaluate density dependent growth dynamics of trees planted in form of the Nelder design, which considers spatio-temporal autocorrelation.(iii)We prove the usefulness of the methods in improving ecological theory concerning density related productivity,trade-offs between facilitation and competition, and allometric relations between size variables.Results: First evaluations based on remeasured Nelder wheels in oak(Quercus robur L.) show a size growth differentiation during the first observation period. In particular, height growth is accelerated under higher competition indicating facilitation effects. We detect furthermore a high variability in allometric relations.Conclusions: The proposed design, methods, and results are discussed regarding their impact on forest practice,model building, and ecological theory. We conclude that the extended Nelder approach is highly efficient in providing currently lacking individual tree level information.

  11. Analysing the effect of stand density and site conditions on structure and growth of oak species using Nelder trials along an environmental gradient: experimental design, evaluation methods, and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enno Uhl

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Most current approaches in forest science and practice require information about structure and growth of individual trees rather than - or in addition to - sum and mean values of growth and yield at forest stand level as provided by classic experimental designs. By inventing the wheel design, Nelder provided the possibility to turn to the individual tree as basic information unit. Such trials provide valuable insights into the dependency of growth on stand density at particular sites. Methods Here, we present an extension of the original design and evaluation by Nelder. (i We established Nelder wheels along an environmental gradient through Europe in atlantic climate in Belgium and Germany, Mediterranean climate in Italy, continental climate in Hungary as well as on high land climate in Mexico. Such disjunct Nelder wheels along an environmental gradient can be regarded and analysed as a two-factor design with the factors of site condition and stand density. (ii We present an advanced statistical approach to evaluate density dependent growth dynamics of trees planted in form of the Nelder design, which considers spatio-temporal autocorrelation. (iii We prove the usefulness of the methods in improving ecological theory concerning density related productivity, trade-offs between facilitation and competition, and allometric relations between size variables. Results First evaluations based on remeasured Nelder wheels in oak (Quercus roburL. show a size growth differentiation during the first observation period. In particular, height growth is accelerated under higher competition indicating facilitation effects. We detect furthermore a high variability in allometric relations. Conclusions The proposed design, methods, and results are discussed regarding their impact on forest practice, model building, and ecological theory. We conclude that the extended Nelder approach is highly efficient in providing currently lacking individual tree level

  12. Modelling thermal radiation and soot formation in buoyant diffusion flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiative heat transfer plays an important role in fire problems since it is the dominant mode of heat transfer between flames and surroundings. It controls the pyrolysis, and therefore the heat release rate, and the growth rate of the fire. In the present work a numerical study of buoyant diffusion flames is carried out, with the main objective of modelling the thermal radiative transfer and the soot formation/destruction processes. In a first step, different radiative property models were tested in benchmark configurations. It was found that the FSCK coupled with the Modest and Riazzi mixing scheme was the best compromise in terms of accuracy and computational requirements, and was a good candidate to be implemented in CFD codes dealing with fire problems. In a second step, a semi-empirical soot model, considering acetylene and benzene as precursor species for soot nucleation, was validated in laminar co flow diffusion flames over a wide range of hydrocarbons (C1-C3) and conditions. In addition, the optically-thin approximation was found to produce large discrepancies in the upper part of these small laminar flames. Reliable predictions of soot volume fractions require the use of an advanced radiation model. Then the FSCK and the semi-empirical soot model were applied to simulate laboratory-scale and intermediate-scale pool fires of methane and propane. Predicted flame structures as well as the radiant heat flux transferred to the surroundings were found to be in good agreement with the available experimental data. Finally, the interaction between radiation and turbulence was quantified. (author)

  13. Persistence of Strain in Buoyant and Nonbuoyant Turbulent Nonpremixed Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boratav, O.; Elghobashi, S.; Zhong, R.

    1997-11-01

    The effects of chemical reaction and buoyancy on the persistence of strain are studied in three different flows: i) Nonbuoyant flame, ii) Buoyant flame with gravity perpendicular to the initial fuel-oxidant interface (horizontal flame) and iii) Same as (ii), but gravity is parallel to the initial interface (vertical flame). The magnitude of the rate of strain S_ij relative to vorticity ω is measured by the angle ψ = tan-1(2 S_ijS_ij/ω \\cdot ω). Three mixture fraction, F, regions of distinct ψ characteristics are identified: 1) F>F_st, 2) Fflames, regions and (2) are vorticity-dominated due to the large baroclinic vorticity production, i.e. ψ arrow 0, resulting in shifting the pdf's of the ω-strain eigendirection more towards the β direction than the α. In region (3), the vorticity production is negligible for all three flows and at all times, thus resulting in the persistence of strain dominance over vorticity, i.e. ψ ≈ π/2, enforcing the alignment of ω with the α eigendirection. Consequently, the nabla F transport equation shows that nabla F will be located in the β-γ plane near F_st. Since |γ| > |β|, the largest straining of nabla F will be mostly along the direction of the most compressive strain direction γ near F_st as observed in all three cases. Our DNS results show that in reacting flows, the peak scalar dissipation ɛF will be near F_st regardless of the presence of buoyancy.

  14. Numerical simulation of turbulent buoyant flows in horizontal channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical method is presented, to calculate the three-dimensional, time-dependent large scale structure of turbulent buoyant flows. The subject of the study is the Rayleigh-Benard-convection with air (Pr=0.71, Ra=2.5 106, 107) and sodium (Pr=0.006, Ra=8.4 104, 2.5 105, 106, 107) and a fluid layer with water and an internal heat source (Pr=7.0, RaI=1.5 1010) at moderate and high Rayleigh-numbers. The goal of the work is both, the analysis of structures of instantaneous as well as the statistical analysis of spatially and/or time averaged data, to give a contribution to the investigation of the characteristics of turbulent natural convection mainly in fluids with small Prandtl-numbers. The large eddy simulation of natural convection requires the development of appropriate momentum and heat subgrid scale models and the formulation of new boundary conditions. The used energy-length-models in the computer code TURBIT are extended methodically by modification of the characteristic length scales of the sub scale turbulence. The reduction or the increase of the sub scale turbulence correlations, caused by the influence of solid boundaries or the stratification, is considered. In the same way the new boundary conditions for the diffusive terms of the conservation equations are seen to be necessary, when the thermal or in the case of liquid metals the more critical hydrodynamic boundary layer is resolved insufficiently or not at all. The extended and new methods, models and boundary conditions, which enabled the realization of the planned simulations, are presented. (orig.)

  15. Supergranulation as the Sun's largest buoyantly driven mode of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Solar supergranulation has been characterized as horizontally divergent flow motions having a typical scale of 32 Mm using Doppler imaging, granule tracking and helioseismology. Unlike granules, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale height at the photosphere, supergranules do not appear to correspond to any particular length scale of the flow. Possible explanations ranging from convection theories involving Helium ionization to spatial correlation or self-organization of granular flows have been proposed as physical mechanisms to explain solar supergranulation. However, its existence remains largely a mystery. Remarkably, horizontal velocity power spectra obtained from Doppler imaging and correlation tracking of flow features at the solar surface reveal the presence of peaks corresponding to granular and supergranular scales, followed by a monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation, which suggests that large-scale modes in the deep layers of the convection zone may be suppressed. Using 3D anelastic simulations of solar convection we investigate whether supergranulation may reflect the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection inside the Sun. Results show that the amount of kinetic energy contained in the largest flow scales relative to that associated with supergranular motions is a function of the depth of the transition from a convectively unstable to convectively stable mean stratification inside the simulation. This suggests that the observed monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation may be explained by rapid cooling in the subphotospheric layers and an essentially isentropic solar interior, wherein convective driving is effectively suppressed.

  16. Early and long-term impacts of browsing by roe deer in oak coppiced woods along a gradient of population density

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Chianucci; Luca Mattioli; Emilio Amorini; Tessa Giannini; Andrea Marcon; Roberta Chirichella; Marco Apollonio; Andrea Cutini

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, wild ungulate populations have exhibited relevant geographic and demographic expansion in most European countries; roe deer is amongst the most widespread ungulate species. The increasing roe deer densities have led to strong impact on forest regeneration; the problem has been recently recognized in coppice woods, a silvicultural system which is widespread in Italy, where it amounts to about 56% of the total national forested area.In this study we investigated the e...

  17. A chemical model of the buoyant and neutrally buoyant plume above the TAG vent field, 26 degrees N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, M. D.; Elderfield, H.

    1993-07-01

    The kinetics of iron particle formation in the neutrally buoyant plume above the TAG vent field (26 degrees N, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) have been calculated from submersible-collected CTD data within the initial 150 m of plume rise. Results show that particles form by a two-stage process: about half the iron in the high temperature vent fluid is removed as sulfides within a few seconds of venting and the remainder is removed by Fe 2+ oxidation. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for the second process has been calculated ( k1 = 0.329min -1, similar to literature values for seawater) and gives a halflife time for Fe 2+ in solution of 2.1 minutes. The kinetics of iron particle formation have been used in a conceptual model of the chemistry of the TAG plume. The average dilution at which iron oxyhydroxide particles form, E¯ Fe, is ˜ 570 from which element/Fe ratios of particles at the top of the buoyant plume have been predicted. Oxyanion/Fe ratios can be chiefly accounted for by coprecipitation for Cr (71%), V (67%), As (45%) and P (42%) but Mo (0.1%) and U (0.02%) show anomalously low coprecipitation. Th/Fe and REE/Fe ratios are greater than can be accounted for by coprecipitation, demonstrating that scavenging occurs in the buoyant plume for these elements. 98% of the Th uptake and 15-75% of the REE uptake is by scavenging. Scavenging rate constants are 3.1 * 10 -6 (nmol/kg) -1 s -1 for Th and 1.4-33* 10 -8 (nmol/kg) -1 s -1 for the REE. A scavenging model has been fitted to trace metal data previously reported for neutrally buoyant hydrothermal plume particulate samples collected above the TAG vent field. The model is based on the assumption that there is a characteristic t1/2 for the dilution of the neutrally buoyant plume and this value has been calculated, by comparing 228Th and 230Th with 234Th isotope data, as fourty-one days (λ p = 0.0170 day -1). Scavenging rate constants are 2* 10 -9 (nmol/kg) -1 s -1 for Th and 3.5-16*10 -11 (nmol/kg) -1 s -1 for the REE

  18. Oil-entrapped sterculia gum-alginate buoyant systems of aceclofenac: development and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru, Pravat Ranjan; Nayak, Amit Kumar; Sahu, Rajendra Kumar

    2013-04-01

    The current investigation deals with the development and optimization of oil-entrapped sterculia gum-alginate buoyant beads containing aceclofenac by ionotropic emulsion-gelation technique using 3(2) factorial design. The effect of polymer to drug ratio and sodium alginate to sterculia gum ratio on the drug entrapment efficiency (%), and cumulative drug release after 7 h (%) was optimized. The optimized oil-entrapped sterculia gum-alginate buoyant beads containing aceclofenac (F-O) showed drug entrapment efficiency of 90.92±2.34%, cumulative drug release of 41.65±3.97% after 7 h in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2), and well buoyancy over 8 h in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) with 5.20 min buoyant lag-time. The in vitro drug release from these buoyant beads followed Korsmeyer-Peppas model (R(2)=0.9866-0.9995) with anomalous (non-Fickian) diffusion drug release mechanism. These new sterculia gum-alginate buoyant beads containing aceclofenac were also characterized using SEM, FTIR, and P-XRD analysis. PMID:23334180

  19. On gradient field theories: gradient magnetostatics and gradient elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Markus

    2014-01-01

    In this work the fundamentals of gradient field theories are presented and reviewed. In particular, the theories of gradient magnetostatics and gradient elasticity are investigated and compared. For gradient magnetostatics, non-singular expressions for the magnetic vector gauge potential, the Biot-Savart law, the Lorentz force and the mutual interaction energy of two electric current loops are derived and discussed. For gradient elasticity, non-singular forms of all dislocation key-formulas (...

  20. Force correcting atom centered potentials for generalized gradient approximated density functional theory: Approaching hybrid functional accuracy for geometries and harmonic frequencies in CCl$_3$F and other small molecules

    CERN Document Server

    von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2013-01-01

    Generalized gradient approximated (GGA) density functional theory (DFT) typically overestimates polarizability and bond-lengths, and underestimates force constants of covalent bonds. To overcome this problem we show that one can use empirical frequency correcting atom centered potentials (FCACPs), parameterized for every nuclear species. Parameters are obtained through minimization of a penalty functional that explicitly encodes hybrid DFT geometries and static polarizabilities of reference molecules. For hydrogen, fluorine, chlorine, and carbon the respective reference molecules consist of H$_2$, F$_2$, Cl$_2$, and CH$_4$. The transferability of this approach to other systems and properties is assessed for harmonic frequencies of a small set of molecules. Numerical evidence, gathered for CCl$_3$F, HF, HCl, CFH$_3$, and CHCl$_3$, indicates that the GGA+FCACP level of theory yields significantly improved harmonic frequencies at the desired hybrid DFT geometry minima, as well as systematically reduced molecular...

  1. Powering of cool filaments in cluster cores by buoyant bubbles - I. Qualitative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churazov, E.; Ruszkowski, M.; Schekochihin, A.

    2013-11-01

    Cool-core clusters (e.g. Perseus or M87) often possess a network of bright gaseous filaments, observed in radio, infrared, optical and X-ray bands. We propose that these filaments are powered by the reconnection of the magnetic field in the wakes of buoyant bubbles. Active galactic nucleus (AGN)-inflated bubbles of relativistic plasma rise buoyantly in the cluster atmosphere, stretching and amplifying the field in the wake to values of β = 8πPgas/B2 ˜ 1. The field lines in the wake have opposite directions and are forced together as the bubble motion stretches the filament. This setup bears strong similarity to the coronal loops on the Sun or to the Earth's magnetotail. The reconnection process naturally explains both the required level of local dissipation rate in filaments and the overall luminosity of filaments. The original source of power for the filaments is the potential energy of buoyant bubbles, inflated by the central AGN.

  2. Powering of cool filaments in cluster cores by buoyant bubbles. I. Qualitative model

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A

    2013-01-01

    Cool-core clusters (e.g., Perseus or M87) often possess a network of bright gaseous filaments, observed in radio, IR, optical and X-ray bands. We propose that these filaments are powered by the reconnection of the magnetic field in the wakes of buoyant bubbles. AGN-inflated bubbles of relativistic plasma rise buoyantly in the cluster atmosphere, stretching and amplifying the field in the wake to values of $\\beta =8\\pi P_{gas}/B^2\\sim 1$. The field lines in the wake have opposite directions and are forced together as the bubble motion stretches the filament. This setup bears strong similarity to the coronal loops on the Sun or the Earth magneto-tail. The reconnection process naturally explains both the required level of local dissipation rate in filaments and the overall luminosity of filaments. The original source of power for the filaments is the potential energy of buoyant bubbles, inflated by the central AGN.

  3. Note: Buoyant-force assisted liquid membrane electrochemical etching for nano-tip preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yongbin; Wang, Yufeng; Wu, Xiujuan; Xu, Kun; Qu, Ningsong

    2014-12-01

    A liquid membrane electrochemical etching process for preparing nano-tips is proposed by the introduction of buoyant force to the lower tip, in which the lower portion of the anodic wire is immersed into a floating layer. A mathematical model of this method is derived. Both calculation and experimental results demonstrate that the introduction of buoyant force can significantly decrease the tip radius. The lubricating oil and deionized water floating layers were tested for the processing of nano-tips. Further, high-aspect-ratio nano-electrodes were prepared by applying a relative vertical movement to the anodic wire. PMID:25554341

  4. STABILITY AND MIXING CHARACTER FOR BUOYANT JETS IN QUIESCENT SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yu-hong

    2005-01-01

    The near field stability and mixing characteristics of buoyant jets produced by thermal diffuse in quiescent shallow water are investigated numerically to predict under what combinations of discharge and ambient characteristics the near field will be stable or unstable.Analyses for different discharging types show that the discharge stability is purely dependent on the near-field behavior of the jets, or the dynamic interaction of the buoyant jet region, the surface impingement region and the internal hydraulic jump region, and is independent of the far-field geometry of the receiving water.The stability criterion is a function of the relative submerged depth, and source densimetric Froude number.

  5. Formation of large-scale structures with sharp density gradient through Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a two-dimensional slab under the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-fluid and the finite Larmor effects on linear and nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a two-dimensional slab are studied numerically with special attention to high-wave-number dynamics and nonlinear structure formation at a low β-value. The two effects stabilize the unstable high wave number modes for a certain range of the β-value. In nonlinear simulations, the absence of the high wave number modes in the linear stage leads to the formation of the density field structure much larger than that in the single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation, together with a sharp density gradient as well as a large velocity difference. The formation of the sharp velocity difference leads to a subsequent Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability only when both the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius terms are incorporated, whereas it is not observed otherwise. It is shown that the emergence of the secondary instability can modify the outline of the turbulent structures associated with the primary Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  6. BUOYANT PLUME DISPERSAL IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER: ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTAL DATA AND LAGRANGIAN MODELING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this research program is to improve our knowledge and predictive capability of buoyant plume dispersion in the convective boundary layer (CBL) with emphasis on the mean (C) and root-mean-square (?c) concentration fields. The CBL turbulence leads to large random fluc...

  7. 46 CFR 117.137 - Stowage of life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of life floats and buoyant apparatus. 117.137 Section 117.137 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS CARRYING MORE THAN 150 PASSENGERS OR WITH OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS FOR MORE THAN 49 PASSENGERS LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS...

  8. The Effect of an Externally Attached Neutrally Buoyant Transmitter on Mortal Injury during Simulated Hydroturbine Passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Richard S.; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2012-02-03

    On their seaward migration, juvenile salmonids commonly pass hydroelectric dams. Fish passing through hydroturbines experience a rapid decrease in pressure as they pass by the turbine blade and the severity of this decompression can be highly variable. This rapid decrease in pressure can result in injuries such as swim bladder rupture, exophthalmia, and emboli and hemorrhaging in the fins and tissues. However, recent research indicates that the presence of a telemetry tag (acoustic, radio, inductive) implanted inside the coelom of a juvenile salmon increases the likelihood that the fish will be injured or die during turbine passage. Thus, previous research conducted using telemetry tags implanted into the coelom of fish may have been inaccurate. Thus, a new technique is needed to provide unbiased estimates of survival through turbines. This research provides an evaluation of the effectiveness of a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter. Both nontagged fish and fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter were exposed to a range of rapid decompressions simulating turbine passage. Juvenile Chinook salmon tagged with a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter did not receive a higher degree of barotrauma than their nontagged counterparts. We suggest that future research include field-based comparisons of survival and behavior among fish tagged with a neutrally buoyant external transmitter and those internally implanted with transmitters.

  9. 46 CFR 180.137 - Stowage of life floats and buoyant apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stowage of life floats and buoyant apparatus. 180.137 Section 180.137 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT AND ARRANGEMENTS Survival Craft Arrangements and Equipment § 180.137 Stowage of life floats...

  10. Subduction of a buoyant plateau at the Manila Trench: Tomographic evidence and geodynamic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianke; Zhao, Dapeng; Dong, Dongdong

    2016-02-01

    We determined P-wave tomographic images by inverting a large number of arrival-time data from 2749 local earthquakes and 1462 teleseismic events, which are used to depict the three-dimensional morphology of the subducted Eurasian Plate along the northern segment of the Manila Trench. Dramatic changes in the dip angle of the subducted Eurasian Plate are revealed from the north to the south, being consistent with the partial subduction of a buoyant plateau beneath the Luzon Arc. Slab tears may exist along the edges of the buoyant plateau within the subducted plate induced by the plateau subduction, and the subducted lithosphere may be absent at depths greater than 250 km at ˜19°N and ˜21°N. The subducted buoyant plateau is possibly oriented toward NW-SE, and the subducted plate at ˜21°N is slightly steeper than that at ˜19°N. These results may explain why the western and eastern volcanic chains in the Luzon Arc are separated by ˜50 km at ˜18°N, whereas they converge into a single volcanic chain northward, which may be related to the oblique subduction along the Manila Trench caused by the northwestern movement of the Philippine Sea Plate. A low-velocity zone is revealed at depths of 20-200 km beneath the Manila Accretionary Prism at ˜22°N, suggesting that the subduction along the Manila Trench may stop there and the collision develops northward. The Taiwan Orogeny may originate directly from the subduction of the buoyant plateau, because the initial time of the Taiwan Orogeny is coincident with that of the buoyant plateau subduction.

  11. Gradient structures in hardmetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functionally graded materials enable combinations of properties like hardness and toughness that can not be achieved with homogeneous materials. The formation of gradients in tungsten carbides correlates with the migration of binder which is caused by differences in the composition of the green body, gas-phase treatment during sintering or the mean particle size and particle-size distribution of the hard phase. In order to examine the gradient formation fracture bars were made of differently fine-grained WC powders and variable additions of Co and carbon black. Beside homogeneous samples two-layer samples were manufactured by step-wise pressing of powders with different composition and/or grain size. The densification behavior of the green bodies and the magnetic and mechanical properties of the sintered compacts were measured. On two-layer samples with full density the concentration profiles of Co, C and W was determined parallel to the pressing direction over the entire sample height (≤ 10 mm) by ESMA. Additionally, hardness and fracture toughness were measured along this line. Differences in cobalt contents are rapidly homogenized in liquid-phase sintering. But large Co gradients can be generated by differences in particle sizes of the hard phase, the non-metal content (carbon, oxygen) and impurities in the ppm range (influence of the wetting and solubility conditions). After sintering the binder content of the finer grained layer is generally higher than in the coarser layer independent of the starting composition. In two-layer samples Co gradients up to 10 mm in thickness and hardness differences to 500 units (HV10) could be produced. (author)

  12. Influence of cooling on dynamics of buoyant jet

    CERN Document Server

    Goncharov, V P

    2016-01-01

    The Rayleigh--Taylor instability which is responsible for the occurrence of narrow upward jets are studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic model with horizontally--nonuniform density and the Newtonian cooling. As analysis shows, the total hierarchy of instabilities in this model consists of three regimes -- collapse, algebraic instability, and inertial motion. Realization of these stages, mutual transitions and interference depend on a ratio between two characteristic time scales -- collapse time and cooling time.

  13. Adiabatic density surface, neutral density surface, potential density surface, and mixing path

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Rui-xin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, adiabatic density surface, neutral density surface and potential density surface are compared. The adiabatic density surface is defined as the surface on which a water parcellcan move adiabatically, without changing its potential temperature and salinity. For a water parcelltaken at a given station and pressure level, the corresponding adiabatic density surface can be determined through simple calculations. This family of surface is neutrally buoyant in the world ocean, and different from other surfaces that are not truly neutrally buoyant. In order to explore mixing path in the ocean, a mixing ratio m is introduced, which is defined as the portion of potential temperature and salinity of a water parcellthat has exchanged with the environment during a segment of migration in the ocean. Two extreme situations of mixing path in the ocean are m=0 (no mixing), which is represented by the adiabatic density curve, and m=1, where the original information is completely lost through mixing. The latter is represented by the neutral density curve. The reality lies in between, namely, 0

  14. Morphology of flows and buoyant bubbles in the Virgo cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlovski, Georgi; Pope, Edward C D; Fangohr, Hans

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that the active galactic nuclei (AGN) associated with the central elliptical galaxy in clusters of galaxies are playing an important role in the evolution of the intracluster medium (ICM) and clusters themselves. We use high resolution three-dimensional simulations to study the interaction of the cavities created by AGN outflows (bubbles) with the ambient ICM. The gravitational potential of the cluster is modelled using the observed temperature and density profiles of the Virgo cluster. We demonstrate the importance of the hydrodynamical Kutta-Zhukovsky forces associated with the vortex ring structure of the bubbles, and discuss possible effects of diffusive processes on their evolution.

  15. Rev1, Rev3, or Rev7 siRNA Abolishes Ultraviolet Light-Induced Translesion Replication in HeLa Cells: A Comprehensive Study Using Alkaline Sucrose Density Gradient Sedimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Takezawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available When a replicative DNA polymerase stalls upon encountering a lesion on the template strand, it is relieved by other low-processivity polymerase(s, which insert nucleotide(s opposite the lesion, extend by a few nucleotides, and dissociate from the 3′-OH. The replicative polymerase then resumes DNA synthesis. This process, termed translesion replication (TLS or replicative bypass, may involve at least five different polymerases in mammals, although the participating polymerases and their roles have not been entirely characterized. Using siRNAs originally designed and an alkaline sucrose density gradient sedimentation technique, we verified the involvement of several polymerases in ultraviolet (UV light-induced TLS in HeLa cells. First, siRNAs to Rev3 or Rev7 largely abolished UV-TLS, suggesting that these 2 gene products, which comprise Polζ, play a main role in mutagenic TLS. Second, Rev1-targeted siRNA also abrogated UV-TLS, indicating that Rev1 is also indispensable to mutagenic TLS. Third, Polη-targeted siRNA also prevented TLS to a greater extent than our expectations. Forth, although siRNA to Polι had no detectable effect, that to Polκ delayed UV-TLS. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting apparent evidence for the participation of Polκ in UV-TLS.

  16. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  17. Generating buoyant magnetic flux ropes in solar-like convective dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Our Sun exhibits strong convective dynamo action which results in magnetic flux bundles emerging through the stellar surface as magnetic spots. Global-scale dynamo action is believed to generate large-scale magnetic structures in the deep solar interior through the interplay of convection, rotation, and shear. Portions of these large-scale magnetic structures are then believed to rise through the convective layer, forming magnetic loops which then pierce the photosphere as sunspot pairs. Previous global simulations of 3D MHD convection in rotating spherical shells have demonstrated mechanisms whereby large-scale magnetic wreaths can be generated in the bulk of the convection zone. Our recent simulations have achieved sufficiently high levels of turbulence to permit portions of these wreaths to become magnetically buoyant and rise through the simulated convective layer through a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells. These buoyant magnetic loops are created in the bulk of the...

  18. Characteristics of flammable, buoyant hydrogen plumes rising from open vertical containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fardisi, S.; Karim, Ghazi A. [University of Calgary, Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Department, 2500 University Drive, NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2009-08-15

    The dynamics of the dispersion of a fixed mass of the highly buoyant hydrogen when exposed to overlaying atmosphere with a negligible pressure difference from open vertical cylindrical enclosures are examined. Features of the rapid formation and dispersion of flammable mixtures both inside and immediate outside of the enclosure and their corresponding propagation rates were examined using a 3-D CFD model. For the cases considered, the puffs of the fuel-air mixture appear to produce lean flammable boundaries that move mainly at a near constant rate for much of the time. A similar simulation that used an axis-symmetrical 2-D model tended to under-predict the dynamics of the lean and rich mixture boundaries. Hydrogen plume characteristics were compared with that of the less buoyant methane and helium release. Unlike methane, helium propagation rate was found fairly close to that of hydrogen. (author)

  19. Buoyant Magnetic Loops in a Global Dynamo Simulation of a Young Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark S; Toomre, Juri

    2011-01-01

    The current dynamo paradigm for the Sun and sun-like stars places the generation site for strong toroidal magnetic structures deep in the solar interior. Sunspots and star-spots on sun-like stars are believed to arise when sections of these magnetic structures become buoyantly unstable and rise from the deep interior to the photosphere. Here we present the first 3-D global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation in which turbulent convection, stratification, and rotation combine to yield a dynamo that self-consistently generates buoyant magnetic loops. We simulate stellar convection and dynamo action in a spherical shell with solar stratification, but rotating three times faster than the current solar rate. Strong wreaths of toroidal magnetic field are realized by dynamo action in the convection zone. By turning to a dynamic Smagorinsky model for subgrid-scale turbulence, we here attain considerably reduced diffusion in our simulation. This permits the regions of strongest magnetic field in these wreaths to rise...

  20. Influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2015-01-01

    The influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in a porous medium is investigated through a linear stability analysis (LSA) as well as direct numerical simulations (DNS). The linear stability method implemented in this paper is based on an initial value approach, which helps to capture the onset of instability more accurately than the quasi-steady state analysis. In the absence of displacement, we show that viscosity contrast delays the onset of instability in buoyantly unstable miscible fluids. Further, it is observed that suitably choosing the viscosity contrast and injection velocity a gravitationally unstable miscible interface can be stabilized completely. Through LSA we draw a phase diagram, which shows three distinct stability regions in a parameter space spanned by the displacement velocity and the viscosity contrast. DNS are performed corresponding to parameters from each regime and the results obtained are in accordance with the linear stability results. Moreover, the conv...

  1. Gravity-driven thin-film flow with negatively buoyant particles

    OpenAIRE

    Mavromoustaki, A.; David, P; Hill, S.; Latterman, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Mata, M; Bertozzi, A. L.

    2011-01-01

    This arXiv article describes the fluid dynamics video on `Gravity-driven thin-film flow with negatively buoyant particles', presented at the 64th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics in Baltimore, MD in November 2011. The video shows three different experiments where a thin film of silicone oil laden with particles, is allowed to flow down an incline under the action of gravity. The videos were recorded at the UCLA Applied Math Laboratory.

  2. Laser Soot-Scattering Imaging of a Large Buoyant Diffusion Flame

    OpenAIRE

    Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Toner, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    A novel diagnostic technique, which makes use of laser light scattered by soot particles, was used in an effort to identify the flame sheets within a natural gas diffusion flame. Soot particles, inherently created and consumed in the flame, were used as the scattering medium, which obviated the need for externally supplied seed material. Since no foreign material was added to the flame, the current technique can be considered truly nonintrusive. The soot distribution within a large buoyant...

  3. Buoyant balaenids: the ups and downs of buoyancy in right whales.

    OpenAIRE

    Nowacek, D. P.; Johnson, M P; Tyack, P.L.; Shorter, K. A.; McLellan, W. A.; Pabst, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of marine mammal species have been shown to conserve energy by using negative buoyancy to power prolonged descent glides during dives. A new non-invasive tag attached to North Atlantic right whales recorded swim stroke from changes in pitch angle derived from a three-axis accelerometer. These results show that right whales are positively buoyant near the surface, a finding that has significant implications for both energetics and management. Some of the most powerful fluke strokes o...

  4. BEHAVIOR OF OBSTRUCTED SQUARE BUOYANT VERTICAL JETS IN STATIC AMBIENT (Ⅰ)-VERIFICATION OF MATHEMATICAL MODEL AND NUMERICAL METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAI Wen-xin; FANG Shen-guang; DAI Hui-chao

    2006-01-01

    Some experiments were made for the buoyant jet from a square orifice with a square disc placed on it in static ambient and concentration along the axis in self-similar area behind disc was measured. And at the same time a three-dimensional mathematical model was established to simulate the whole flowing under different conditions. All the results predicted by the numerical calculation were substantiated by the experiments.The results were compared with experiential formula for obstructed round buoyant vertical jets in static ambient and it was found that the two concentration distributions had good accordance. Star shape of temperature isolines on cross-sections in the near areas from the disc was found and it was a very special figure for obstructed square buoyant vertical jets with a square disc. The shape will transform to concentric circles gradually alike to the round buoyant vertical jet in self-similar area with increasing of the distance from the disc.

  5. Buoyant Magnetic Loops in a Global Dynamo Simulation of a Young Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Brown, Benjamin P.; Brun, Allan Sacha; Miesch, Mark S.; Toomre, Juri

    2011-10-01

    The current dynamo paradigm for the Sun and Sun-like stars places the generation site for strong toroidal magnetic structures deep in the solar interior. Sunspots and starspots on Sun-like stars are believed to arise when sections of these magnetic structures become buoyantly unstable and rise from the deep interior to the photosphere. Here, we present the first three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation in which turbulent convection, stratification, and rotation combine to yield a dynamo that self-consistently generates buoyant magnetic loops. We simulate stellar convection and dynamo action in a spherical shell with solar stratification, but rotating three times faster than the current solar rate. Strong wreaths of toroidal magnetic field are realized by dynamo action in the convection zone. By turning to a dynamic Smagorinsky model for subgrid-scale turbulence, we here attain considerably reduced diffusion in our simulation. This permits the regions of strongest magnetic field in these wreaths to rise toward the top of the convection zone via a combination of magnetic buoyancy instabilities and advection by convective giant cells. Such a global simulation yielding buoyant loops represents a significant step forward in combining numerical models of dynamo action and flux emergence.

  6. Numerical Study of A Round Buoyant Jet Under the Effect of JONSWAP Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-ping; LI Chi-wai; ZHANG Chang-kuan; XU Zhen-shan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the hydrodynamic behaviours of a round buoyant jet under the effect of JONSWAP random waves.A three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model is developed to simulate the buoyant jet in a stagnant ambient and JONSWAP random waves.By comparison of velocity and concentration fields,it is found that the buoyant jet exhibits faster decay of centedine velocity,wider lateral spreading and larger initial dilution under the wave effect,indicating that wave dynamics improves the jet entrainment and mixing in the near field,and subsequently mitigate the jet impacts in the far field.The effect of buoyancy force on the jet behaviours in the random waves is also numerically investigated.The results show that the wave effect on the jet entrainment and mixing is considerably weakened under the existence of buoyancy force,resulting in a slower decay rate of centerline velocity and a narrower jet width for the jet with initial buoyancy.

  7. Formulation and In Vitro evaluation of pH sensitive oil entrapped polymeric blended gellan gum buoyant beads of clarithromycin

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, G.; Singh, S

    2010-01-01

    "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: A gastroretentive pH sensitive system has been a frontier approach to release the drug in controlled manner in stomach and duodenum. The aim of this study was to develop buoyant beads of gellan based, wherein, the oil was entrapped, blended with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose or carbopol 934 in order to evaluate its potential for targeted sustained delivery of clarithromycin in the gastric region. "nMethods: Buoyant beads ...

  8. 密度梯度离心法分离脐血单个核细胞方法的优化%Optimization of the Isolation of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells by Density Gradient Centrifugation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任思坡; 吴秀娟; 罗小虎; 李全双; 韩光宇; 谭昆; 拾莉; 耿跃春

    2012-01-01

    Objective To optimized the method of separating umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells by density gradient cen-trifugation in order to improve the mononuclear cells yield. Methods Selected 40 copies Cord blood,each 40 millilitre,and e-qually separated into the conventional group and optimized group. The cord blood in conventional group mixed with Normal saline 1 ∶ 1 mixture of diluted, directly through the Ficoll separation medium, mononuclear cells. Optimized the group through the first cord blood washed once,added equal amount of the full wind and percussion blending NS,200 mesh filter and kept the cell suspension Ficoll separation medium solution and the volume ratio of 1 ∶ 1 for the separation operation. For each isolated from cord blood mononuclear cells diluted by white blood cells count dilution. Results Conventional group,after the separation of the white film there were 11 interface was not clear,but were mixed with a small amount of red blood cells. Optimized the group,after the separation of the white film has 1,interface was not clear,only very few red blood cells mixed. Two methods to collect the cord blood mononuclear cells compared to optimize the group than the conventional group (P<0. 01). Conclusion Improve cord blood mononuclear cells yield by optimizing density gradient centrifugation steps.%目的 对密度梯度离心法分离脐血单个核细胞的方法进行优化,以提高该方法分离脐血单个核细胞的收率.方法 脐血40份,每份40 ml,分为常规组和优化组,每组20份.常规组脐血与NS1∶1混合稀释后,直接通过Ficoll分离液分离单个核细胞;优化组通过先将脐血洗涤一次,加入等量NS充分吹打混匀,200目筛网过滤,保持细胞悬液和Ficoll分离液1:1的体积比进行分离操作.对每份分离得到的脐血单个核细胞通过白细胞稀释液稀释后计数.结果 常规组分离后的白膜层有11份界面不清晰,同时均混有少量的红细胞.优

  9. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Hilmar; Peeters, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Optical (fluorescence) and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP) and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF). In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS) were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV). The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes) and spatial (decimeters) resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal) and spatial (basin scale) scales. PMID:24303028

  10. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  11. INFLUENCES OF SLOPE GRADIENT ON SOIL EROSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青泉; 陈力; 李家春

    2001-01-01

    The main factors influencing soil erosion include the net rain excess, the water depth, the velocity, the shear stress of overland flows , and the erosion-resisting capacity of soil. The laws of these factors varying with the slope gradient were investigated by using the kinematic wave theory. Furthermore, the critical slope gradient of erosion was driven. The analysis shows that the critical slope gradient of soil erosion is dependent on grain size , soil bulk density , surface roughness, runoff length, net rain excess, and the friction coefficient of soil, etc. The critical slope gradient has been estimated theoretically with its range between 41. 5 °~ 50°.

  12. Numerical studies of pulsating buoyant plume in isothermal and non isothermal situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational study has been carried out for predicting the behaviour of buoyant plume in isothermal and non isothermal configuration. General simulation objectives of any buoyant flow simulation are macroscopic in nature and deals with the grass data in respect of buoyancy induced scalar transport. However, the accuracy of predicting such macroscopic parameters is a strong function of several other microscopic parameters which govern the overall macroscopic behaviour. Some of the microscopic parameters for analysis could be buoyancy induced stable/unstable flows, relative plume behaviour, baroclinic velocity distribution etc. Only the CFD based flow modelling approach is capable of calculating several of these aspects. LES based modelling scores over the conventional RANS based computational modelling. The primary objective of the present study was to model buoyant plume simulation of different types in order to explore the details regarding plume and flow structure, instabilities and puffing behaviour. One of the influencing parameters on the overall plume behaviour is the buoyancy resolution index i.e. fineness of chosen grid in relation to the buoyancy intensity and other hydrodynamic parameters. The grid sensitivity studies have been carried out to find out the optimum value grid size by way of buoyant pool fire simulations. Comparative simulation has also been made for a square and round pool fire and it was found that for engineering simulations equivalent area square pool modeling is sufficient. Using the optimum value of grid size and square pool shape simulations have been carried out for different value of fire intensity. The flame puffing frequency as calculated by the reported correlation was compared against the computationally observed puffing frequency and the agreement was generally found to be excellent. Besides these results the comparisons of predicted peak flames temperatures data for various case studies with the available experimental data

  13. Efecto de la Viscosidad y de la Densidad de Mezcla en el Gradiente de Presión de Flujo Homogéneo Gas-Líquido en Tuberías Horizontales Effect of the Mixture Viscosity and the Mixture Density on the Pressure Gradient of Gas-Liquid Homogeneous Flow in Horizontal Pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    Janneth M García; Francisco García

    2009-01-01

    En este trabajo se evalúa la precisión de 76 modelos homogéneos de gradiente de presión para determinar el gradiente de presión experimental reportado en una base de 2415 datos de flujos bifásico gas-líquido en tuberías horizontales. Estos modelos se formularon a partir de 4 ecuaciones de densidad de mezcla combinadas con 19 ecuaciones de viscosidad de mezcla. Al estudiar el efecto de la viscosidad y de la densidad de mezcla en el gradiente de presión, utilizando el modelo homogéneo, se obser...

  14. Gradient Descent Bit Flipping Algorithms for Decoding LDPC Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Wadayama, Tadashi; Nakamura, Keisuke; Yagita, Masayuki; Funahashi, Yuuki; Usami, Shogo; Takumi, Ichi

    2007-01-01

    A novel class of bit-flipping (BF) algorithms for decoding low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes is presented. The proposed algorithms, which are called gradient descent bit flipping (GDBF) algorithms, can be regarded as simplified gradient descent algorithms. Based on gradient descent formulation, the proposed algorithms are naturally derived from a simple non-linear objective function.

  15. Energy density of marine pelagic fish eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis-Vestergaard, J.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the literature on pelagic fish eggs enabled generalizations to be made of their energy densities, because the property of being buoyant in sea water appears to constrain the proximate composition of the eggs and thus to minimize interspecific variation. An energy density of 1.34 J mul......(-1) of total egg volume is derived for most species spawning eggs without visible oil globules. The energy density of eggs with oil globules is predicted by (σ) over cap = 1.34 + 40.61 x (J mul(-1)) where x is the fractional volume of the oil globule. (C) 2002 The Fisheries Society of the British...

  16. A numerical study of the motion of a neutrally buoyant cylinder in two dimensional shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Chen, Shih-Di; Chu, Chin-Chou; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the motion of a neutrally buoyant cylinder of circular or elliptic shape in two dimensional shear flow of a Newtonian fluid by direct numerical simulation. The numerical results are validated by comparisons with existing theoretical, experimental and numerical results, including a power law of the normalized angular speed versus the particle Reynolds number. The centerline between two walls is an expected equilibrium position of the cylinder mass center in shear flow. When placing the particle away from the centerline initially, it migrates toward another equilibrium position for higher Reynolds numbers due to the interplay between the slip velocity, the Magnus force, and the wall repulsion force.

  17. Three-Dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Buoyant Bubbles in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Sean M.; De Young, David S.; Jones, Thomas W.

    2009-12-01

    We present the results of numerical models of bubble dynamics and morphology in magnetized galaxy cluster environments. Our set of simulations follows the evolution of initially spherical bubbles that rise buoyantly through the intracluster medium. As a result of commonly used initial conditions, such bubbles quickly develop into a toroidal shape that is stable against fragmentation in the absence of magnetic forces. The inclusion of even modest ambient magnetic fields, however, substantially affects such structures, and we discuss how bubble evolution depends upon ambient field strength and geometry.

  18. Mushroom-Shaped Structures as Tracers of Buoyant Flow in the Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A; Avillez, Miguel A. de; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2001-01-01

    Recent HI emission observations of the Southern Galactic hemisphere have revealed a mushroom-like structure extending from z=-70 to -450 pc, composed of a stem and a cap. Similar structures occur in three-dimensional simulations of a dynamic galactic disk driven by isolated and clustered supernovae. Using these simulations, we show that hot gas in the Galactic disk that is not evacuated through chimneys expands into the cooler gas of the thick disk, forming mushroom-shaped structures. This new class of objects traces buoyant flow of hot gas into the thick disk.

  19. AEROSTATIC AND AERODYNAMIC MODULES OF A HYBRID BUOYANT AIRCRAFT: AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ul Haque

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach is essential for the estimation of the requirements of aerodynamic and aerostatic lift for a hybrid buoyant aircraft. Such aircrafts have two different modules to balance the weight of aircraft; aerostatic module and aerodynamic module. Both these modules are to be treated separately for estimation of the mass budget of propulsion systems and required power. In the present work, existing relationships of aircraft and airship are reviewed for its further application for these modules. Limitations of such relationships are also disussed and it is precieved that it will provide a strating point for better understanding of design anatomy of such aircraft.

  20. SEPARATION OF X-BEARING BOVINE SPERM BY CENTRIFUGATION IN CONTINUOUS PERCOLL AND OPTIPREP DENSITY GRADIENT: EFFECT IN SPERM VIABILITY AND IN VITRO EMBRYO PRODUCTION SEPARAÇÃO DE ESPERMATOZOIDES PORTADORES DO CROMOSSOMO X BOVINO POR CENTRIFUGAÇÃO EM GRADIENTE DE DENSIDADE CONTÍNUO DE PERCOLL E OPTIPREP: EFEITO SOBRE A VIABILIDADE ESPERMÁTICA E NA PRODUÇÃO IN VITRO DE EMBRIÕES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Costa Lucio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of this study was to separate X-bearing bovine sperm by continuous Percoll and OptiPrep density gradients and to validate the sexing of resultant in vitro produced embryos by Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Frozen/thawed sperm was layered on density gradients which were previously prepared in polystyrene tubes, 24 h before procedures and maintained at 4 °C. The tubes were centrifuged at 500 x g for 15 min at 22 °C. Supernatants were gently aspirated and the sperm recovered from the bottom of the tubes. Viability and integrity of sperm were evaluated by Trypan Blue/Giemsa stain. Cleavage and blastocyst rates were determined by in vitro production of embryos and PCR was performed for identification of the embryos’ genetic sex. No damage in viability and acrossomal integrity and in cleavage and blastocyst rates was found in the Percoll and OptiPrep treatment compared to the non-centrifuged group (P>0.05. The percentage of female embryos in the Percoll and OptiPrep group was 63.0 and 47.6%, respectively. The female embryos in control group were 48.7%. A sexual deviation in the Percoll density gradient was achieved without reduction of sperm viability and in vitro production rates.

    KEY WORDS: Bovine, centrifugation, in vitro production of embryos, PCR, X-bearing sperm.

    O objetivo deste estudo foi separar espermatozoides bovinos portadores do cromossomo X pela centrifugação em gradiente de densidade contínuo de Percoll e OptiPrep, e validar a sexagem pela reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR, dos embriões produzidos in vitro. Para a sexagem, espermatozoides descongelados foram depositados nos gradientes de densidade, previamente preparados, em tubos de poliestireno, 24 horas antes da sexagem e mantidos a 4°C. Centrifugou-se a 500 x g por quinze minutos a 22°C. Os sobrenadantes foram aspirados, e os espermatozoides recuperados do

  1. Formation of lower continental crust by relamination of buoyant arc lavas and plutons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Peter B.; Behn, Mark D.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of the Earth's continents is enigmatic. Volcanic arc magmas generated above subduction zones have geochemical compositions that are similar to continental crust, implying that arc magmatic processes played a central role in generating continental crust. Yet the deep crust within volcanic arcs has a very different composition from crust at similar depths beneath the continents. It is therefore unclear how arc crust is transformed into continental crust. The densest parts of arc lower crust may delaminate and become recycled into the underlying mantle. Here we show, however, that even after delamination, arc lower crust still has significantly different trace element contents from continental lower crust. We suggest that it is not delamination that determines the composition of continental crust, but relamination. In our conceptual model, buoyant magmatic rocks generated at arcs are subducted. Then, upon heating at depth, they ascend and are relaminated at the base of the overlying crust. A review of the average compositions of buoyant magmatic rocks -- lavas and plutons -- sampled from the Aleutians, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Kohistan and Talkeetna arcs reveals that they fall within the range of estimated major and trace elements in lower continental crust. Relamination may thus provide an efficient process for generating lower continental crust.

  2. Characterization of Buoyant Fluorescent Particles for Field Observations of Water Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Tauro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the feasibility of off-the-shelf buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in turbid water flows is investigated. Microspheres’ fluorescence intensity is experimentally measured and detected in placid aqueous suspensions of increasing concentrations of clay to simulate typical conditions occurring in natural drainage networks. Experiments are conducted in a broad range of clay concentrations and particle immersion depths by using photoconductive cells and image-based sensing technologies. Results obtained with both methodologies exhibit comparable trends and show that the considered particles are fairly detectable in critically turbid water flows. Further information on performance and integration of the studied microspheres in low-cost measurement instrumentation for field observations is obtained through experiments conducted in a custom built miniature water channel. This experimental characterization provides a first assessment of the feasibility of commercially available buoyant fluorescent beads in the analysis of high turbidity surface water flows. The proposed technology may serve as a minimally invasive sensing system for hazardous events, such as pollutant diffusion in natural streams and flash flooding due to extreme rainfall.

  3. Laboratory experiments on the interaction between inclined negatively buoyant jets and regular waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Simone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the results from a series of laboratory experiments on inclined negatively buoyant jets released in a receiving environment with waves. This simulates the case, typical of many practical applications, of the sea discharge of fluids denser than the receiving environment, as in the case of the brine from a desalination plant. The experiments were performed employing a Light Induced Fluorescence (LIF technique, in order to measure the concentration fields. Both the jet and the wave motion features were varied, in order to simulate a typical discharge into the Mediterranean Sea. Reference discharges in a stagnant environment were performed as well. The jet behaviour was analyzed from a statistical point of view, both considering the global phenomenon and its single phases. The influence of the wave motion on the inclined negatively buoyant jet geometry and dilution turns out to be a combined action of a split into two branches of the jet and a rotation. Their combined action decreases the jet maximum height and the impact distance, and is the main cause for the higher dilution reached in a wavy environment.

  4. Saltwater intrusion at a buoyant jet discharge in a fringing reef lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, S. M.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Enriquez, C.; Valle-Levinson, A.

    2013-05-01

    The influence of tides and waves on turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) from a buoyant jet discharge in a fringing reef lagoon was observed with measurements obtained throughout an 11-day period in July 2011. Tidal variations within the lagoon modulated TKE levels, temperature, and salinity at the buoyant jet. During neap and low tides, TKE values were predominantly >0.015 m2/s2. During neap tides, TKE at the jet was greater than during spring tides, meaning that larger tidal oscillations inhibited TKE production at the jet. When the water surface over the jet remained >0.02 m above the mean, TKE was suppressed to intrusion into the aquifer. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the jet discharge to fortnightly tides, despite the small tidal range (intrusion into the aquifer caused by the spring tide oscillations. Therefore, increased sea levels, as illustrated here by the combination of incident waves, wave set-up and fortnightly tidal oscillations, is expected to threaten delicate aquifer conditions and vital water resources for coastal communities worldwide.

  5. Analysis of a turbulent buoyant confined jet modeled using realizable k-ε model

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-06-13

    Through this paper, analyses of components of the unheated/heated turbulent confined jet are introduced and some models to describe them are developed. Turbulence realizable k-ε model is used to model the turbulence of this problem. Numerical simulations of 2D axisymmetric vertical hot water confined jet into a cylindrical tank have been done. Solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while velocity, pressure, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank are analyzed. For seeking verification, an experiment was conducted for measuring of the temperature of the same system, and comparison between the measured and simulated temperature shows a good agreement. Using the simulated results, some models are developed to describe axial velocity, centerline velocity, radial velocity, dynamic pressure, mass flux, momentum flux and buoyancy flux for both unheated (non-buoyant) and heated (buoyant) jet. Finally, the dynamics of the heated jet in terms of the plume function which is a universal quantity and the source parameter are studied and therefore the maximum velocity can be predicted theoretically. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Residence times of neutrally-buoyant matter such as larvae, sewage or nutrients on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Kerry P.; Gay, Stephen L.; Andrews, John C.

    1990-12-01

    Coral reef flushing times at an individual reef scale are specified and a general formula to determine these times is developed. The formula is confirmed by comparison with residence times predicted by numerical small-scale reef models, including those from a 4 month unsteady current simulation of John Brewer Reef on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The method proves to be a satisfactory alternative to the numerical modelling. When neutrally-buoyant material around a reef is removed by the currents, the concentrations decay exponentially. The decay rate depends primarily on free stream current and reef dimensions. Secondary factors are the tidal excursion, shelf depth, lagoon size and residual current in the lee of the reef. These factors, when combined into a decay coefficient, specify the rate of loss of neutrally-buoyant material (e.g. some larvae, pollutants and sewage) from a coral reef and its surrounds. The analytical formula can be used to predict the flushing rates or the percentage of material still remaining on a reef after a selected time interval. We demonstrate that material can remain on or near typical reefs in common weather conditions for several weeks.

  7. Cultivo de células mesenquimais do sangue de cordão umbilical com e sem uso do gradiente de densidade Ficoll-Paque Blood mesenchymal stem cell culture from the umbilical cord with and without Ficoll-Paque density gradient method

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Sayoko Kawasaki-Oyama; Domingo Marcolino Braile; Heloisa Cristina Caldas; João Carlos Ferreira Leal; Eny Maria Goloni-Bertollo; Érika Cristina Pavarino-Bertelli; Mário Abbud Filho; Izaura dos Santos

    2008-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: Implantação de técnicas de isolamento e cultivo de células-tronco mesenquimais do sangue de cordão umbilical humano, com e sem uso de gradiente de densidade Ficoll-Paque (d=1,077g/ml). MÉTODOS: Dez amostras de sangue de cordão umbilical humano de gestação a termo foram submetidas a dois procedimentos de cultivo de células-tronco mesenquimais: sem gradiente de densidade Ficoll-Paque e com gradiente de densidade. As células foram semeadas em frascos de 25cm² a uma densidade de 1x10(7...

  8. The gradient flow in a twisted box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Alberto [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2013-08-15

    We study the perturbative behavior of the gradient flow in a twisted box. We apply this information to define a running coupling using the energy density of the flow field. We study the step-scaling function and the size of cutoff effects in SU(2) pure gauge theory. We conclude that the twisted gradient flow running coupling scheme is a valid strategy for step-scaling purposes due to the relatively mild cutoff effects and high precision.

  9. Emission, Structure and Optical Properties of Overfire Soot from Buoyant Turbulent Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koylu, Umit Ozgur

    The present study investigated soot and carbon monoxide emissions, and evaluated the optical properties of soot, in the overfire region of buoyant turbulent diffusion flames burning in still air. Soot and carbon monoxide emissions, and the corresponding correlation between these emissions, were studied experimentally. The optical properties of soot were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The experiments involved gas (acetylene, propylene, ethylene, propane, methane) and liquid (toluene, benzene, n-heptane, iso-propanol, ethanol, methanol) fuels. The investigation was limited to the fuel-lean (overfire) region of buoyant turbulent diffusion flames burning in still air. Measurements included flame heights, characteristic flame residence times, carbon monoxide and soot concentrations, mixture fractions, ex-situ soot structure parameters (primary particle sizes, number of primary particles in aggregates, fractal dimensions), and in-situ optical cross sections (differential scattering, total scattering, and absorption) of soot in the overfire region of buoyant turbulent diffusion flames, emphasizing conditions in the long residence time regime where these properties are independent of position in the overfire region and flame residence time. The predictions of optical cross sections for polydisperse aggregates were based on Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory for fractal aggregates; the predictions of this theory were evaluated by combining the TEM structure and the light scattering/extinction measurements. Carbon monoxide concentrations and mixture fractions were correlated in the overfire region of gas- and liquid -fueled turbulent diffusion flames. Soot volume fraction state relationships were observed for liquid fuels, supporting earlier observations for gas fuels. A strong correlation between carbon monoxide and soot concentrations was established in the fuel-lean region of both gas- and liquid-fueled turbulent diffusion flames. The structure and emission

  10. Buoyant Response of the Tank 241-SY-101 Crust to Transfer and Back-Dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mixer pump installed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in July 1993 has prevented the large buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GRE) it has historically exhibited. But the absence of periodic disruption from GREs and the action of mixing have allowed the crust to grow. The accelerated gas retention has resulted in over 30 inches of waste level growth and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, SY-101 will be diluted in the fall of 1999 to dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank. The plan is to transfer waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. Back-dilution water may be added at the transfer pump inlet, the base of the mixer pump, and on top of the crust. The mixer pump will continue to be required to prevent formation of a deep nonconnective layer and resumption of BD GREs. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the transfer and back-dilution processes do not significantly degrade the pump's effectiveness. Part of the strategy to avoid mixer pump degradation is to keep the base of the crust layer well above the pump inlet, which is 236 inches above the tank bottom. The maximum transfer for which an equal back-dilution is possible without sinking the crust is 90 kgal if water is injected at the 96-inch transfer pump inlet and 120 kgal for injection at the 9-inch mixer pump burrowing ring. To keep the crust base above the lowest observed elevation of 295 inches, transfer and back-dilution must be limited to 143 kgal and 80 kgal, respectively, for the 96-inch back-dilution and 175 kgal with a 112 kgal back-dilution using the 9-inch back-dilution elevation. These limits can be avoided by adding water to the top of the crust to dissolve the negatively buoyant layers. If 20 kgal of water is placed on top of the crust and the rest of the back-dilution is placed

  11. Buoyant Response of the Tank 241-SY-101 Crust to Transfer and Back-Dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CW Stewart

    1999-11-08

    The mixer pump installed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in July 1993 has prevented the large buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GRE) it has historically exhibited. But the absence of periodic disruption from GREs and the action of mixing have allowed the crust to grow. The accelerated gas retention has resulted in over 30 inches of waste level growth and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, SY-101 will be diluted in the fall of 1999 to dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank. The plan is to transfer waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. Back-dilution water may be added at the transfer pump inlet, the base of the mixer pump, and on top of the crust. The mixer pump will continue to be required to prevent formation of a deep nonconnective layer and resumption of BD GREs. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the transfer and back-dilution processes do not significantly degrade the pump's effectiveness. Part of the strategy to avoid mixer pump degradation is to keep the base of the crust layer well above the pump inlet, which is 236 inches above the tank bottom. The maximum transfer for which an equal back-dilution is possible without sinking the crust is 90 kgal if water is injected at the 96-inch transfer pump inlet and 120 kgal for injection at the 9-inch mixer pump burrowing ring. To keep the crust base above the lowest observed elevation of 295 inches, transfer and back-dilution must be limited to 143 kgal and 80 kgal, respectively, for the 96-inch back-dilution and 175 kgal with a 112 kgal back-dilution using the 9-inch back-dilution elevation. These limits can be avoided by adding water to the top of the crust to dissolve the negatively buoyant layers. If 20 kgal of water is placed on top of the crust and the rest of the back-dilution is

  12. A substrate independent approach for generation of surface gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, surface gradients have attracted significant interest for various research and technological applications. In this paper, we report a facile and versatile method for generating surface gradients of immobilized nanoparticles, nanotopography and ligands that is independent from the substrate material. The method consists of first depositing a functional polymer layer on a substrate and subsequent time controlled immersion of this functionalized substrate in solution gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) or poly (styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Chemical characterization by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and morphological analysis by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) show that the density of nanoparticles and the concentration of PSS across the surface increases in a gradient manner. As expected, time of immersion determines the concentration of surface bound species. We also demonstrate the generation of surface gradients of pure nanotopography. This is achieved by depositing a 5 nm thick plasma polymer layer on top of the number density gradient of nanoparticles to achieve a homogeneous surface chemistry. The surface independent approach for generation of surface gradients presented in this paper may open opportunities for a wider use of surface gradient in research and in various technologies. - Highlights: ► We present a substrate independent approach for generation of surface gradients. ► We demonstrate well-defined density gradients of gold and silver nanoparticles. ► We provide an example of pure surface nanotopography gradients. ► We demonstrate concentration gradients of bound ligands

  13. A substrate independent approach for generation of surface gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreham, Renee V. [Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095 (Australia); Mierczynska, Agnieszka; Pierce, Madelene [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095 (Australia); Short, Robert D.; Taheri, Shima; Bachhuka, Akash; Cavallaro, Alex; Smith, Louise E. [Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095 (Australia); Vasilev, Krasimir, E-mail: krasimir.vasilev@unisa.edu.au [Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes 5095 (Australia)

    2013-01-01

    Recently, surface gradients have attracted significant interest for various research and technological applications. In this paper, we report a facile and versatile method for generating surface gradients of immobilized nanoparticles, nanotopography and ligands that is independent from the substrate material. The method consists of first depositing a functional polymer layer on a substrate and subsequent time controlled immersion of this functionalized substrate in solution gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) or poly (styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Chemical characterization by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and morphological analysis by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) show that the density of nanoparticles and the concentration of PSS across the surface increases in a gradient manner. As expected, time of immersion determines the concentration of surface bound species. We also demonstrate the generation of surface gradients of pure nanotopography. This is achieved by depositing a 5 nm thick plasma polymer layer on top of the number density gradient of nanoparticles to achieve a homogeneous surface chemistry. The surface independent approach for generation of surface gradients presented in this paper may open opportunities for a wider use of surface gradient in research and in various technologies. - Highlights: ► We present a substrate independent approach for generation of surface gradients. ► We demonstrate well-defined density gradients of gold and silver nanoparticles. ► We provide an example of pure surface nanotopography gradients. ► We demonstrate concentration gradients of bound ligands.

  14. Electric field gradients in Hg compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcisauskaité, Vaida; Knecht, Stefan; Sauer, Stephan P. A.;

    2012-01-01

    We examine the performance of Density Functional Theory (DFT) approaches based on the Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonian (with and without inclusion of spinorbit coupling) for predictions of electric ¿eld gradients (EFGs) at the heavy atom Hg nucleus. This is achieved by compar......We examine the performance of Density Functional Theory (DFT) approaches based on the Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonian (with and without inclusion of spinorbit coupling) for predictions of electric ¿eld gradients (EFGs) at the heavy atom Hg nucleus. This is achieved...

  15. Wind tunnel model experiments on a buoyant emission from a building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes wind tunnel model experiments of a preliminary nature on a leak of buoyant gas from the face of a building, the intention being to reproduce some facets of one kind of catastrophic reactor failure. The measurements covered heat release rates of 1 to 100 MW over a windspeed range of 1 to 10 ms-1. Measurements were made of ground level concentrations of the released gas downwind of the building, together with a limited number of vertical concentration measurements. Results of the experiments showed that ground level concentrations were mainly determined by plume buoyancy; the point of emission on the building, or even the presence of the building having only a secondary effect. (author)

  16. Buoyant thermal plumes from planetary landers and rovers: Application to sizing of meteorological masts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Sotzen, Kristin S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Landers on Mars and Titan may have warm surfaces as a result of solar heating or the carriage of radioisotope power sources. This warmth can perturb downwind meteorological measurements, but cannot be modeled as a simple aerodynamic wake because buoyant forces can be significant. Methods. We use an analytic model from the industrial aerodynamics literature on smoke dispersion from fires and smokestacks to evaluate the plume trajectories. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are also performed for a Titan lander. Results. CFD yields results similar to the analytic model. (Albeit with a possibly weaker dependence on windspeed than the classic model.) We apply the models to evaluate the probability of immersion of instrumentation in plumes from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity and for a Titan lander under various wind scenarios. Conclusions. Lander perturbations can be easily calculated. Practice implications. None.

  17. Under-Liquid Self-Assembly of Submerged Buoyant Polymer Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multanen, Victor; Pogreb, Roman; Bormashenko, Yelena; Shulzinger, Evgeny; Whyman, Gene; Frenkel, Mark; Bormashenko, Edward

    2016-06-14

    The self-assembly of submerged cold-plasma-treated polyethylene beads (PBs) is reported. The plasma-treated immersed millimetrically sized PBs formed well-ordered 2D quasicrystalline structures. The submerged floating of "light" (buoyant) PBs is possible because of the energy gain achieved by the wetting of the high-energy plasma-treated polymer surface prevailing over the energy loss due to the upward climb of the liquid over the beads. The capillary "immersion" attraction force is responsible for the observed self-assembly. The observed 2D quasicrystalline structures demonstrate "dislocations" and "point defects". The mechanical vibration of self-assembled rafts built of PBs leads to the healing of point defects. The immersion capillary lateral force governs the self-assembly, whereas the elastic force is responsible for the repulsion of polymer beads. PMID:27193509

  18. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Buoyant Bubbles in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neill, S M; Jones, T W

    2009-01-01

    We report results of 3D MHD simulations of the dynamics of buoyant bubbles in magnetized galaxy cluster media. The simulations are three dimensional extensions of two dimensional calculations reported by Jones & De Young (2005). Initially spherical bubbles and briefly inflated spherical bubbles all with radii a few times smaller than the intracluster medium (ICM) scale height were followed as they rose through several ICM scale heights. Such bubbles quickly evolve into a toroidal form that, in the absence of magnetic influences, is stable against fragmentation in our simulations. This ring formation results from (commonly used) initial conditions that cause ICM material below the bubbles to drive upwards through the bubble, creating a vortex ring; that is, hydrostatic bubbles develop into "smoke rings", if they are initially not very much smaller or very much larger than the ICM scale height. Even modest ICM magnetic fields with beta = P_gas/P_mag ~ 10^3 can influence the dynamics of the bubbles, provided...

  19. Buoyant Bubbles in Intracluster Gas: Effects of Magnetic Fields and Anisotropic Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Ruobing

    2009-01-01

    Recent observations by Chandra and XMM-Newton indicate there are complex structures at the cores of galaxy clusters, such as cavities and filaments. One plausible model for the formation of such structures is the interaction of radio jets with the intracluster medium (ICM). To investigate this idea, we use three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations including anisotropic (Braginskii) viscosity to study the effect of magnetic fields on the evolution and morphology of buoyant bubbles in the ICM. We investigate a range of different initial magnetic field geometries and strengths, and study the resulting x-ray surface brightness distribution for comparison to observed clusters. Magnetic tension forces and viscous transport along field lines tend to suppress instabilities parallel, but not perpendicular, to field lines. Thus, the evolution of the bubble depends strongly on the initial field geometry. We find toroidal field loops initially confined to the interior of the bubble are best able reproduce the obs...

  20. Finite-size effects in the dynamics of neutrally buoyant particles in turbulent flow

    CERN Document Server

    Homann, Holger

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of neutrally buoyant particles transported by a turbulent flow is investigated for spherical particles with radii of the order of the Kolmogorov dissipative scale or larger. The pseudo-penalisation spectral method that has been proposed by Pasquetti et al. (2008) is adapted to integrate numerically the simultaneous dynamics of the particle and of the fluid. Such a method gives a unique handle on the limit of validity of point-particle approximations, which are generally used in applicative situations. Analytical predictions based on such models are compared to result of very well resolved direct numerical simulations. Evidence is obtained that Faxen corrections give dominant finite-size corrections to velocity and acceleration fluctuations for particle diameters up to four times the Kolmogorov scale. The dynamics of particles with larger diameters is dominated by inertial-range physics, and is consistent with predictions obtained from dimensional analysis.

  1. Dynamics of single rising bubbles in neutrally buoyant liquid-solid suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshyar, Nasim; van Ommen, J Ruud; Hamersma, Peter J; Sundaresan, Sankaran; Mudde, Robert F

    2013-06-14

    We experimentally investigate the effect of particles on the dynamics of a gas bubble rising in a liquid-solid suspension while the particles are equally sized and neutrally buoyant. Using the Stokes number as a universal scale, we show that when a bubble rises through a suspension characterized by a low Stokes number (in our case, small particles), it will hardly collide with the particles and will experience the suspension as a pseudoclear liquid. On the other hand, when the Stokes number is high (large particles), the high particle inertia leads to direct collisions with the bubble. In that case, Newton's collision rule applies, and direct exchange of momentum and energy between the bubble and the particles occurs. We present a simple theory that describes the underlying mechanism determining the terminal bubble velocity. PMID:25165930

  2. Experimental insights on the development of buoyant plumes injected into a porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Xiaoying; Woods, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a series of new laboratory experiments which examine the rise of a two-dimensional buoyancy-driven plume of freshwater through a porous layer initially saturated with aqueous saline solution. Measurements show that the plume head accounts for a constant fraction of about 0.7 of the buoyancy supplied at the source and that it grows as it rises through the porous layer. However, the morphology of the plume head becomes increasingly complex as the ratio of the injection speed to the buoyancy rise speed increases, with the fluid spreading laterally and developing localized buoyant fingers which intermingle with the ambient fluid. Behind the plume head, a tail of nearly constant width develops providing a pathway from the source to the plume head. These starting plume dynamics may be relevant for buoyancy-driven contaminant dispersal and also for the convection which develops during CO2 sequestration as CO2 dissolves into aquifer water.

  3. Translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, Varghese; van der Poel, Erwin P; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental measurements of the translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in isotropic turbulence. We introduce an efficient method to simultaneously determine the position and (absolute) orientation of a spherical body from visual observation. The method employs a minimization algorithm to obtain the orientation from the 2D projection of a specific pattern drawn onto the surface of the sphere. This has the advantages that it does not require a database of reference images, is easily scalable using parallel processing, and enables accurate absolute orientation reference. Analysis of the sphere's translational dynamics reveals clear differences between the streamwise and transverse directions. The translational auto-correlations and PDFs provide evidence for periodicity in the particle's dynamics even under turbulent conditions. The angular autocorrelations show weak periodicity. The angular accelerations exhibit wide tails, however without a directional dependence.

  4. Flow instability of buoyant-Marangoni convection in the LEC GaAs melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ShuXian; LI MingWei

    2008-01-01

    Flow transitions and instabilities have significant effects on the quality of the crystals. The flow and heat transfer in the LEC GaAs melt are numerically studied by a time-dependent and three-dimensional turbulent flow model. The effects of the change of the buoyancy and Marangoni force on the flow state are analyzed by changing the temperature difference between the crystal and the crucible walls. The results show that the flow will transform from axisymmetric steady flow to non-axisymmetric oscillatory flow when the temperature difference exceeds the critical value, and that the mechanism of the transition is attributed to the Marangoni instability. The critical temperature differences for the flow transitions corresponding to different melt depth H are numerically predicted. Several important characteristics of the non-axisymmetric buoyant-Marangoni convection are numerically observed and compared with that of the non-axisymmetric mixed convection coupled with crystal rotation.

  5. Gradient Clogging in Depth Filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, S.; Redner, S.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate clogging in depth filtration, in which a dirty fluid is ``cleaned'' by the trapping of dirt particles within the pore space during flow through a porous medium. This leads to a gradient percolation process which exhibits a power law distribution for the density of trapped particles at downstream distance x from the input. To achieve a non-pathological clogging (percolation) threshold, the system length L should scale no faster than a power of ln w, where w is the width. Non-tri...

  6. Formation of Self-Generated Gradients of Iodixanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Graham

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of self-generated gradients of iodixanol from a solution of uniform concentration requires the use of vertical or near-vertical rotors. The density profile that is generated depends upon the sedimentation path length of the rotor, centrifugation time, RCF and temperature. Modulation of the starting concentration changes the density range of the gradient. This Protocol Article illustrates the effect of these parameters on gradient shape in a few selected rotors. Because the gradients are formed by the centrifugal field, they are highly reproducible and easy to execute.

  7. Generalized gradient approximation made simple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generalized gradient approximations Exc = ∫ d3 r f(n↑, n↓, triangledown n↑, triangledown n↓) for the exchange-correlation energy typically surpass the accuracy of the local spin density approximation and compete with standard quantum-chemical methods in electronic-structure calculations. But the derivation and analytic expression for the integrand f tend to be complicated and over-parametrized. We present a simple derivation of a simple but accurate expression for f, involving no parameter other than fundamental-constants. The derivation invoices only general ideas (not details) of the real-space cutoff construction, and agrees closely with the result of this construction. Besides its greater simplicity, this PBE96 functional has other advantages over PW91: (1) The correct behavior of the correlation energy is recovered under uniform scaling to the high-density limit. (2) The linear response of the uniform electron gas agrees with the accurate local spin density prediction. 96:006128*1 Paper TuI 6 Many-body effects are hidden in the universal density functional. The interaction of degenerate states via two-body operators, such as the electron-electron repulsion (for describing multiplets or the interaction of molecular fragments at large separations) are thus not explicitly considered in the Kohn-Sham scheme. In practice the density functionals have to be approximated, and there is a fundamental difficulty which arises in the case of degeneracy. While density functionals should be universal, the effect of degeneracy is linked to the potential characteristic to the atom, molecule, or crystal. There are, however, several possibilities to treat degeneracy effects within density functional theory, a few of which will be discussed. These take profit of the use of two-body operators, which can be, but must not be, the physical electron-electron interaction

  8. Laser textured surface gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Van Duong; Dunn, Andrew; Wasley, Thomas J.; Li, Ji; Kay, Robert W.; Stringer, Jonathan; Smith, Patrick J.; Esenturk, Emre; Connaughton, Colm; Shephard, Jonathan D.

    2016-05-01

    This work demonstrates a novel technique for fabricating surfaces with roughness and wettability gradients and their subsequent applications for chemical sensors. Surface roughness gradients on brass sheets are obtained directly by nanosecond laser texturing. When these structured surfaces are exposed to air, their wettability decreases with time (up to 20 days) achieving both spatial and temporal wettability gradients. The surfaces are responsive to organic solvents. Contact angles of a series of dilute isopropanol solutions decay exponentially with concentration. In particular, a fall of 132° in contact angle is observed on a surface gradient, one order of magnitude higher than the 14° observed for the unprocessed surface, when the isopropanol concentration increased from 0 to 15.6 wt%. As the wettability changes gradually over the surface, contact angle also changes correspondingly. This effect offers multi-sensitivity at different zones on the surface and is useful for accurate measurement of chemical concentration.

  9. Quaternion Gradient and Hessian

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Dongpo; Mandic, Danilo P.

    2014-01-01

    The optimization of real scalar functions of quaternion variables, such as the mean square error or array output power, underpins many practical applications. Solutions often require the calculation of the gradient and Hessian, however, real functions of quaternion variables are essentially non-analytic. To address this issue, we propose new definitions of quaternion gradient and Hessian, based on the novel generalized HR (GHR) calculus, thus making possible efficient derivation of optimizati...

  10. Gradient Particle Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Maron, Jason L.; Howes, Gregory G.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce Gradient Particle Magnetohydrodynamics (GPM), a new Lagrangian method for magnetohydrodynamics based on gradients corrected for the locally disordered particle distribution. The development of a numerical code for MHD simulation using the GPM algorithm is outlined. Validation tests simulating linear and nonlinear sound waves, linear MHD waves, advection of magnetic fields in a magnetized vortex, hydrodynamical shocks, and three-dimensional collapse are presented, demonstrating th...

  11. 2D and 3D numerical models on compositionally buoyant diapirs in the mantle wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Morgan, Jason Phipps; Hort, Matthias; Rüpke, Lars H.

    2011-11-01

    We present 2D and 3D numerical model calculations that focus on the physics of compositionally buoyant diapirs rising within a mantle wedge corner flow. Compositional buoyancy is assumed to arise from slab dehydration during which water-rich volatiles enter the mantle wedge and form a wet, less dense boundary layer on top of the slab. Slab dehydration is prescribed to occur in the 80-180 km deep slab interval, and the water transport is treated as a diffusion-like process. In this study, the mantle's rheology is modeled as being isoviscous for the benefit of easier-to-interpret feedbacks between water migration and buoyant viscous flow of the mantle. We use a simple subduction geometry that does not change during the numerical calculation. In a large set of 2D calculations we have identified that five different flow regimes can form, in which the position, number, and formation time of the diapirs vary as a function of four parameters: subduction angle, subduction rate, water diffusivity (mobility), and mantle viscosity. Using the same numerical method and numerical resolution we also conducted a suite of 3D calculations for 16 selected parameter combinations. Comparing the 2D and 3D results for the same model parameters reveals that the 2D models can only give limited insights into the inherently 3D problem of mantle wedge diapirism. While often correctly predicting the position and onset time of the first diapir(s), the 2D models fail to capture the dynamics of diapir ascent as well as the formation of secondary diapirs that result from boundary layer perturbations caused by previous diapirs. Of greatest importance for physically correct results is the numerical resolution in the region where diapirs nucleate, which must be high enough to accurately capture the growth of the thin wet boundary layer on top of the slab and, subsequently, the formation, morphology, and ascent of diapirs. Here 2D models can be very useful to quantify the required resolution, which we

  12. Buoyant Effects on the Flammability of Silicone Samples Planned for the Spacecraft Fire Experiment (Saffire)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Justin; Ferkul, Paul V.; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Ruff, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Flammability experiments on silicone samples were conducted in anticipation of the Spacecraft Fire Experiment (Saffire). The sample geometry was chosen to match the NASA 6001 Test 1 specification, namely 5 cm wide by 30 cm tall. Four thicknesses of silicone (0.25, 0.36, 0.61 and 1.00 mm) were examined. Tests included traditional upward buoyant flame spread using Test 1 procedures, downward opposed flow flame spread, horizontal and angled flame spread, forced flow upward and downward flame spread. In addition to these configurations, upward and downward tests were also conducted in a chamber with varying oxygen concentrations. In the upward buoyant flame spread tests, the flame generally did not burn the entire sample. As thickness was increased, the flame spread distance decreased before flame extinguishment. For the thickest sample, ignition could not be achieved. In the downward tests, the two thinnest samples permitted the flame to burn the entire sample, but the spread rate was lower compared to the corresponding upward values. The other two thicknesses could not be ignited in the downward configuration. The increased flammability for downward spreading flames relative to upward ones is uncommon. The two thinnest samples also burned completely in the horizontal configuration, as well as at angles up to 75 degrees from the horizontal. The upward and downward flammability behavior was compared in atmospheres of varying oxygen concentration to determine a maximum oxygen concentration for each configuration. Upward tests in air with an added forced flow were more flammable. Complementary analyses using SEM and TGA techniques suggest the importance of the silica layer formed on the burned sample surface. As silicone burns upward, silica deposits downstream •If the silicone is ignited in the downward configuration, it burns the entire length of the sample •Burning upward at an angle increases the burn length in some cases possibly due to less silica deposition

  13. Evaluation of gravitational gradients generated by Earth's crustal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert; Eshagh, Mehdi; Bagherbandi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Spectral formulas for the evaluation of gravitational gradients generated by upper Earth's mass components are presented in the manuscript. The spectral approach allows for numerical evaluation of global gravitational gradient fields that can be used to constrain gravitational gradients either synthesised from global gravitational models or directly measured by the spaceborne gradiometer on board of the GOCE satellite mission. Gravitational gradients generated by static atmospheric, topographic and continental ice masses are evaluated numerically based on available global models of Earth's topography, bathymetry and continental ice sheets. CRUST2.0 data are then applied for the numerical evaluation of gravitational gradients generated by mass density contrasts within soft and hard sediments, upper, middle and lower crust layers. Combined gravitational gradients are compared to disturbing gravitational gradients derived from a global gravitational model and an idealised Earth's model represented by the geocentric homogeneous biaxial ellipsoid GRS80. The methodology could be used for improved modelling of the Earth's inner structure.

  14. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  15. Experimental Studies for the characterization of the mixing processes in negative buoyant jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Querzoli G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A negatively buoyant jet (NBJ corresponds to the physical phenomenon that develops when a fluid is discharged upwards into a lighter environment or downwards into a heavier receptor fluid. In a NBJ the flow is initially driven mostly by the momentum, so it basically behaves as a simple jet released withthe same angle, while far from the outlet the buoyancy prevails, bending the jet axis down and making it similar to a plume. The coexistence in the same phenomenon of both the characteristics of simple jets and plumes makes the NBJs a phenomenon still not entirely explained but, considering also the numerous practical applications, very interesting to study. Here some of the experimental results are presented. The laboratory experiment were obtained on a model simulating a typical sea discharge of brine from desalination plants: a pipe laid down on the sea bottom, with orifices on its lateral wall, releasing brine (heavier than the sea water with a certain angle to the horizontal, in order to increase the jet path before sinking to the seafloor. A non-intrusive image analysis technique, namely Feature Tracking Velocimetry, is applied to measure velocity fields, with the aim at understanding the influence of some non-dimensional parameters driving the phenomenon (e.g. Reynolds number, release angle on the structure of the NBJ and of the turbulence.

  16. An EOF analysis of HF Doppler radar current measurements of the Chesapeake Bay buoyant outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmorino, G. O.; Shay, L. K.; Haus, B. K.; Handler, R. A.; Graber, H. C.; Horne, M. P.

    1999-02-01

    Surface currents measured by HF Doppler radar as part of a study of the Chesapeake Bay outflow plume are examined using a 'real-vector' empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis (Kaihatu et al., 1998). Based on about 23 days of nearly continuous data, the analysis shows that the first three EOF modes, judged to be the only significant modes, account for 76% of the variance in the data set. The buoyant outflow occurs primarily in the mean flow field. The first EOF mode is dominated by wind forcing and the second mode by across-shelf semi-diurnal tidal forcing. The third mode exhibits a large-scale horizontal shear and contains a curved region of weak relative flow which appears to delineate the offshore edge of the plume; also, the third-mode response varies over the spring-neap cycle, suggesting a modulation of the outflow plume by a tidal residual eddy. The analysis therefore has provided a useful, exploratory examination of this dataset of surface currents.

  17. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on how wave–current and wave–turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory. Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  18. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-05-01

    The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory). Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  19. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on how wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory). Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  20. Steady thermocapillary-buoyant convection in a shallow annular pool.Part 2: Two immiscible fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Rong Li; Shuang-Cheng Wang; Chun-Mei Wu

    2011-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of steady thermocapillary-buoyant convection in a system of two horizontal superimposed immiscible liquid layers filling a lateral heated thin annular pool.The governing equations are solved using an asymptotic theory for the aspect ratios e → 0.Asymptotic solutions of the velocity and temperature fields are obtained in the core region away from the cylinder walls.In order to validate the asymptotic solutions,numerical simulations are also carried out and the results are compared to each other.It is found that the present asymptotic solutions are valid in most of the core region.And the applicability of the obtained asymptotic solutions decreases with the increase of the aspect ratio and the thickness ratio of the two layers.For a system of gallium arsenide (lower layer) and boron oxide (upper layer),the buoyancy slightly weakens the thermocapillary convection in the upper layer and strengthens it in the lower layer.

  1. Trace Metal and Sulfur Dynamics in the First Meter of Buoyant Hydrothermal Vent Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, A.; Gartman, A.; Shaw, T. J.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of metals and metal sulfides within the buoyant plume is critical to determining the ultimate fate of metals emitted from hydrothermal vents. The concentration, size fractionation, and partitioning of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb) were determined within the first meter of the rising plume at three vent fields (TAG, Snakepit, and Rainbow) along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. At Rainbow, total Fe concentrations exceed total sulfide concentrations by an order of magnitude, whereas at the other two sites, total Fe and total sulfide concentrations are nearly equal. At all three sites, Mn and Fe are primarily in the filtered (zinc is correlated with unfiltered cadmium and lead. At Rainbow, unfiltered zinc, cadmium and lead are correlated, but unfiltered copper and cobalt are not, indicating precipitation dynamics at Rainbow are different than those at TAG and Snakepit due to bulk geochemical differences, including a higher iron to sulfide ratio. A sequential HCl/HNO3 leaching method was used to distinguish metals present in pyrite and chalcopyrite in both unfiltered and filtered samples. Significant portions of unfiltered Cu and Co were extracted in HNO3, whereas unfiltered Zn, Cd, and Pb were extracted in HCl. Up to 95 % of filtered Cu, Co, and Zn, up to 80% Cd, and up to 60 % Pb are only extractable in HNO3, indicating that a significant portion of metals < 0.2 μm are incorporated into a recalcitrant fraction such as nanoparticulate pyrite or chalcopyrite.

  2. The negatively buoyant turbulent wall jet: performance of alternative options in RANS modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the application of different levels of turbulence closure and near-wall treatment to the computation of a 2D downward-directed wall jet that encounters a slow, upward-moving flow. The working fluid is water and the two streams may be at the same temperature or the wall-jet fluid may be hotter, leading to significant buoyant effects. The distance of penetration of the wall jet is found to be highly dependent on the turbulence model employed. It is established first that the new analytical wall function (AWF) developed by the authors [Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 23 (2002) 148] leads to flow predictions in close agreement with a so-called 'low-Reynolds-number' treatment where computations extend all the way to the wall. However, for some test cases, both sets of calculations (employing an eddy-viscosity model) indicate too great a penetration of the wall-jet into the opposing stream. The use of the AWF in conjunction with a second-moment closure, particularly one which satisfies the two-component-limit, gives generally closer agreement

  3. Magnetic Cycles and Buoyant Magnetic Structures in a Rapidly Rotating Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicholas J.; Brown, B. P.; Brun, S.; Miesch, M. S.; Toomre, J.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of sun-like stars rotating faster than our current sun show that they exhibit solar-like magnetic cycles and features, such as star spots. Using global 3-D simulations to study the coupling of large-scale convection, rotation, and magnetism in a younger sun, we have probed the effects of more rapid rotation on stellar dynamos and the nature of magnetic cycles. Our anelastic spherical harmonics (ASH) code allows study of the convective envelope, occupying the outer 30% by radius of a sun-like star. Major MHD simulations carried out at three times the current solar rotation rate reveal magnetic dynamo action that can produce wreaths of strong toroidal magnetic field at low latitudes, often with opposite polarity in the two hemispheres. The presence of the wreaths is quite surprising, for they arise as quite persistent global structures amidst the vigorous and turbulent convection. We have recently explored behavior in systems with considerably lower diffusivities, achieved with a dynamic Smagorinsky treatment of unresolved turbulence. The lower levels of diffusion create magnetic wreaths that undergo prominent variations in field strength, even exhibiting global magnetic cycles that involve polarity reversals. Additionally, during the cycle maximum, when magnetic energies and mean magnetic fields peak, the wreaths possess buoyant magnetic structures that rise coherently through much of the convective envelope via a combination of advection by convective upflows and magnetic buoyancy. We explore aspects of these rising magnetic structures and the evolving global dynamo action which produces them.

  4. An inkjet-printed buoyant 3-D lagrangian sensor for real-time flood monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2014-06-01

    A 3-D (cube-shaped) Lagrangian sensor, inkjet printed on a paper substrate, is presented for the first time. The sensor comprises a transmitter chip with a microcontroller completely embedded in the cube, along with a $1.5 \\\\lambda 0 dipole that is uniquely implemented on all the faces of the cube to achieve a near isotropic radiation pattern. The sensor has been designed to operate both in the air as well as water (half immersed) for real-time flood monitoring. The sensor weighs 1.8 gm and measures 13 mm$\\\\,\\\\times\\\\,$ 13 mm$\\\\,\\\\times\\\\,$ 13 mm, and each side of the cube corresponds to only $0.1 \\\\lambda 0 (at 2.4 GHz). The printed circuit board is also inkjet-printed on paper substrate to make the sensor light weight and buoyant. Issues related to the bending of inkjet-printed tracks and integration of the transmitter chip in the cube are discussed. The Lagrangian sensor is designed to operate in a wireless sensor network and field tests have confirmed that it can communicate up to a distance of 100 m while in the air and up to 50 m while half immersed in water. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  5. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory. Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  6. Isolation of rare tumor cells from blood cells with buoyant immuno-microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixin Shi

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are exfoliated at various stages of cancer, and could provide invaluable information for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. There is an urgent need for the development of cost-efficient and scalable technologies for rare CTC enrichment from blood. Here we report a novel method for isolation of rare tumor cells from excess of blood cells using gas-filled buoyant immuno-microbubbles (MBs. MBs were prepared by emulsification of perfluorocarbon gas in phospholipids and decorated with anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM antibody. EpCAM-targeted MBs efficiently (85% and rapidly (within 15 minutes bound to various epithelial tumor cells suspended in cell medium. EpCAM-targeted MBs efficiently (88% isolated frequent tumor cells that were spiked at 100,000 cells/ml into plasma-depleted blood. Anti-EpCAM MBs efficiently (>77% isolated rare mouse breast 4T1, human prostate PC-3 and pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells spiked into 1, 3 and 7 ml (respectively of plasma-depleted blood. Using EpCAM targeted MBs CTCs from metastatic cancer patients were isolated, suggesting that this technique could be developed into a valuable clinical tool for isolation, enumeration and analysis of rare cells.

  7. Turbulent channel flow of dense suspensions of neutrally-buoyant spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Picano, F; Brandt, L

    2014-01-01

    Dense particle suspensions are widely encountered in many applications and in environmental flows. While many previous studies investigate their rheological properties in laminar flows, little is known on the behaviour of these suspensions in the turbulent/inertial regime. The present study aims to fill this gap by investigating the turbulent flow of a Newtonian fluid laden with solid neutrally-buoyant spheres at relatively high volume fractions in a plane channel. An Immersed Boundary Method has been used to account for the dispersed phase performing Direct Numerical Simulation in the range of volume fractions $\\Phi=0-0.2$. The results show that the mean velocity profiles are significantly altered by the presence of a solid phase with a decrease of the von K\\'arm\\'an constant in the log-law. The overall drag is found to increase with the volume fraction, more than one would expect just considering the increase of the system viscosity due to the presence of the particles. At the highest volume fraction here i...

  8. Numerical simulation and analysis of confined turbulent buoyant jet with variable source

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2016-01-23

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are undertaken for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The average deviation of the simulated temperature by realizable k-ɛ turbulent model and the measured temperature is within 2%. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear variation that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits, particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during the whole course. Numerical experiments for constant, monotone increasing and monotone decreasing of inlet temperature are done to show its effect on the buoyancy force in terms of Richardson number.

  9. Numerical simulation of 2D buoyant jets in ice-covered and temperature-stratified water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruochuan

    A two-dimensional (2D) unsteady simulation model is applied to the problem of a submerged warm water discharge into a stratified lake or reservoir with an ice cover. Numerical simulations and analyses are conducted to gain insight into large-scale convective recirculation and flow processes in a cold waterbody induced by a buoyant jet. Jet behaviors under various discharge temperatures are captured by directly modeling flow and thermal fields. Flow structures and processes are described by the simulated spatial and temporal distributions of velocity and temperature in various regions: deflection, recirculation, attachment, and impingement. Some peculiar hydrothermal and dynamic features, e.g. reversal of buoyancy due to the dilution of a warm jet by entraining cold ambient water, are identified and examined. Simulation results show that buoyancy is the most important factor controlling jet behavior and mixing processes. The inflow boundary is treated as a liquid wall from which the jet is offset. Similarity and difference in effects of boundaries perpendicular and parallel to flow, and of buoyancy on jet attachment and impingement, are discussed. Symmetric flow configuration is used to de-emphasize the Coanda effect caused by offset.

  10. Assessment of the CATHARE 3D capabilities in predicting the temperature mixing under asymmetric buoyant driven flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We assess the coolant mixing in the RPV downcomer and the core lower plenum under buoyant asymmetric conditions. • We evaluate the capabilities of the thermal-hydralic system computer codes to simulate such phenomenon. • We considered the PKL2-ROCOM T1.1 and T2.1 experimental tests. • We used the 3D features of the CATHARE thermal-hydraulic system code to simulate the experiments. • Acceptable prediction of the buoyant mixing in the downcomer is obtained. - Abstract: Coolant mixing in the reactor vessel of a pressurized water reactor constitutes a key parameter for predicting the core behaviour under abnormal asymmetric cooling conditions. This issue was recently investigated within the experimental framework of the OECD/PKL-2 project. The aim was twofold: to assess the coolant mixing in the vessel downcomer and the core lower plenum under buoyant asymmetric cooling loops, as well as to evaluate the capabilities of computer codes in simulating such phenomenon. It is commonly known that CFD codes are applied for this objective using millions of nodes and large computer resources. However, thermal-hydraulic system codes having the 3D vessel models could also be considered for such purpose. Indeed, these codes benefit from large validation background, require less computational resources and include 3D capabilities that are up to now not fully exploited. In this framework the CATHARE 3D models are assessed against two asymmetrical buoyant mixing experimental tests performed at the ROCOM facility. The outcomes of the current study show good prediction potentialities of the 3D thermal-hydraulic system codes. However their applicability to NPP scale has to be further investigated experimentally and analytically as well

  11. Assessment of the CATHARE 3D capabilities in predicting the temperature mixing under asymmetric buoyant driven flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousbia Salah, Anis, E-mail: anis.bousbiasalah@belv.be; Vlassenbroeck, Jacques

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • We assess the coolant mixing in the RPV downcomer and the core lower plenum under buoyant asymmetric conditions. • We evaluate the capabilities of the thermal-hydralic system computer codes to simulate such phenomenon. • We considered the PKL2-ROCOM T1.1 and T2.1 experimental tests. • We used the 3D features of the CATHARE thermal-hydraulic system code to simulate the experiments. • Acceptable prediction of the buoyant mixing in the downcomer is obtained. - Abstract: Coolant mixing in the reactor vessel of a pressurized water reactor constitutes a key parameter for predicting the core behaviour under abnormal asymmetric cooling conditions. This issue was recently investigated within the experimental framework of the OECD/PKL-2 project. The aim was twofold: to assess the coolant mixing in the vessel downcomer and the core lower plenum under buoyant asymmetric cooling loops, as well as to evaluate the capabilities of computer codes in simulating such phenomenon. It is commonly known that CFD codes are applied for this objective using millions of nodes and large computer resources. However, thermal-hydraulic system codes having the 3D vessel models could also be considered for such purpose. Indeed, these codes benefit from large validation background, require less computational resources and include 3D capabilities that are up to now not fully exploited. In this framework the CATHARE 3D models are assessed against two asymmetrical buoyant mixing experimental tests performed at the ROCOM facility. The outcomes of the current study show good prediction potentialities of the 3D thermal-hydraulic system codes. However their applicability to NPP scale has to be further investigated experimentally and analytically as well.

  12. The motion of a neutrally buoyant particle of an elliptic shape in two dimensional shear flow: a numerical study

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Shih-Lin; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Chu, Chin-Chou

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the motion of a neutrally buoyant cylinder of an elliptic shape freely moving in two dimensional shear flow by direct numerical simulation. An elliptic shape cylinder in shear flow, when initially being placed at the middle between two walls, either keeps rotating or has a stationary inclination angle depending on the particle Reynolds number $Re=G_r r_a^2/\

  13. Multiscale architectured materials with composition and grain size gradients manufactured using high-pressure torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Yun; Kim, Jung Gi; Park, Hyo Wook; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-05-01

    The concept of multiscale architectured materials is established using composition and grain size gradients. Composition-gradient nanostructured materials are produced from coarse grained interstitial free steels via carburization and high-pressure torsion. Quantitative analyses of the dislocation density using X-ray diffraction and microstructural studies clearly demonstrate the gradients of the dislocation density and grain size. The mechanical properties of the gradient materials are compared with homogeneous nanostructured carbon steel without a composition gradient in an effort to investigate the gradient effect. Based on the above observations, the potential of multiscale architecturing to open a new material property is discussed.

  14. Experimental evidence of a buoyant mass difference between bovine spermatozoa bearing X- and Y-chromosomes using a micromechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Marco; Battaglia, Raffaele; Ferrini, Gianluca; Puglisi, Roberto; Balduzzi, Donatella; Galli, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    Flow cytometry is to date the only commercially viable technique for sex preselection of mammalian spermatozoa, measuring the different DNA content in X- and Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa. Here we present experimental evidence of a measurable difference between bovine spermatozoa bearing X- and Y-chromosomes based on their buoyant mass. Single cells of two populations of flow-cytometrically sorted spermatozoa were analyzed by means of a micromechanical resonator, consisting of a suspended doubly-clamped microcapillary. Spermatozoa buoyant mass is related to the transitory variation in vibration phase lag, caused by the passage through the sensitive area of a single sperm cell suspended in a fluid. Data analysis shows two well-separated distributions and provides evidence of the sensor capabilities to detect the buoyant mass of single cells with such accuracy to distinguish X- and Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa. These preliminary results suggest the possibility to develop an intriguing technique alternative to flow cytometry in the field of sperm sorting. PMID:24419052

  15. Genetic affinities between trans-oceanic populations of non-buoyant macroalgae in the high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C; Spencer, Hamish G; Salvatore, Laura C; Garcia, Gabriella R; Waters, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Marine biologists and biogeographers have long been puzzled by apparently non-dispersive coastal taxa that nonetheless have extensive transoceanic distributions. We here carried out a broad-scale phylogeographic study to test whether two widespread Southern Hemisphere species of non-buoyant littoral macroalgae are capable of long-distance dispersal. Samples were collected from along the coasts of southern Chile, New Zealand and several subAntarctic islands, with the focus on high latitude populations in the path of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current or West Wind Drift. We targeted two widespread littoral macroalgal species: the brown alga Adenocystisutricularis (Ectocarpales, Heterokontophyta) and the red alga Bostrychiaintricata (Ceramiales, Rhodophyta). Phylogenetic analyses were performed using partial mitochondrial (COI), chloroplast (rbcL) and ribosomal nuclear (LSU / 28S) DNA sequence data. Numerous deeply-divergent clades were resolved across all markers in each of the target species, but close phylogenetic relationships - even shared haplotypes - were observed among some populations separated by large oceanic distances. Despite not being particularly buoyant, both Adenocystisutricularis and Bostrychiaintricata thus show genetic signatures of recent dispersal across vast oceanic distances, presumably by attachment to floating substrata such as wood or buoyant macroalgae. PMID:23894421

  16. The Effects of Neutrally Buoyant, Externally Attached Transmitters on Swimming Performance and Predator Avoidance of Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janak, Jill M.; Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Stephenson, John R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Seaburg, Adam

    2012-08-01

    The presence of an externally attached telemetry tag is often associated with the potential for impaired swimming performance (i.e., snags and drag) as well as increased susceptibility to predation, specifically for smaller fish. The effects on swimming performance due to the presence of a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter were examined by comparing critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) for juvenile Chinook salmon tagged with two different neutrally buoyant external transmitters (Type A and B), nontagged individuals, and those surgically implanted with the current JSATS acoustic transmitter. Fish tagged with the Type A and B designs had lower Ucrit when compared to nontagged individuals. However, there was no difference in Ucrit among fish tagged with Type A or B designs compared to those with surgically implanted tags. Further testing was then conducted to determine if predator avoidance ability was affected due to the presence of Type A tags when compared to nontagged fish. No difference was detected in the number of tagged and nontagged fish consumed by rainbow trout throughout the predation trials. The results of this study support the further testing on the efficacy of a neutrally buoyant externally attached telemetry tag for survival studies involving juvenile salmonids passing through hydro turbines.

  17. Gradient tabu search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanenko, Svetlana; Engels, Bernd

    2007-01-30

    This paper presents a modification of the tabu search called gradient tabu search (GTS). It uses analytical gradients for a fast minimization to the next local minimum and analytical diagonal elements of the Hessian to escape local minima. For an efficient blocking of already visited areas tabu regions and tabu directions are introduced into the tabu list (TL). Trials with various well-known test functions indicate that the GTS is a very promising approach to determine local and global minima of differentiable functions. Possible application areas could be optimization routines for force field parameters or conformational searches for large molecules. PMID:17186482

  18. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed

  19. Optical Color Gradients in Star-Forming Ring Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Korchagin, V.; Mayya, Y. D.; Vorobyov, E. I.

    2001-01-01

    We compute radial color gradients produced by an outwardly propagating circular wave of star formation and compare our results with color gradients observed in the classical ring galaxy, the ``Cartwheel''. We invoke two independent models of star formation in the ring galaxies. The first one is the conventional density wave scenario, in which an intruder galaxy creates a radially propagating density wave accompanied by an enhanced star formation following the Schmidt law. The second scenario ...

  20. Discrete gradient methods have an energy conservation law

    OpenAIRE

    McLachlan, Robert I; Quispel, G. R. W.

    2013-01-01

    We show for a variety of classes of conservative PDEs that discrete gradient methods designed to have a conserved quantity (here called energy) also have a time-discrete conservation law. The discrete conservation law has the same conserved density as the continuous conservation law, while its flux is found by replacing all derivatives of the conserved density appearing in the continuous flux by discrete gradients.

  1. Collisional transport in a plasma with steep gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validity is given to the newly proposed two δf method for neoclassical transport calculation, which can be solve the drift kinetic equation considering effects of steep plasma gradients, large radial electric field, finite banana width, and an orbit topology near the axis. The new method is applied to the study of ion transport with steep plasma gradients. It is found that the ion thermal diffusivity decreases as the scale length of density gradient decreases, while the ion particle flux due to ion-ion self collisions increases with increasing gradient. (author)

  2. Manipulating the Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaze, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a cooperative learning, group lab for a Calculus III course to facilitate comprehension of the gradient vector and directional derivative concepts. The lab is a hands-on experience allowing students to manipulate a tangent plane and empirically measure the effect of partial derivatives on the direction of optimal ascent. (Contains 7…

  3. Perturbation and stability analyses of nonlinear buoyant flow in mushy layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okhuysen, B S [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Riahi, D N, E-mail: driahi@utpa.ed [Department of Mathematics, 1201 West University Drive, University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78541-2999 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    We consider the problem of weakly nonlinear buoyant flow and its stability in horizontal dendrite layers, often referred to as mushy layers, during solidification of binary alloys. A mushy layer is a layer that is formed adjacent to the solidification front and is composed of both solid dendrites and melt. Understanding the convective flow driven by the buoyancy force within the mushy layer is known to be important for proper production of high-quality solidified alloy. In the present study, no restriction is imposed on the thickness of the mushy layer, and a number of simplifying assumptions made in previous related nonlinear analyses are lifted here in order to determine the results on the basis of a more realistic model. Using perturbation and stability analyses and some numerical approaches, we determine the steady stable solutions to the weakly nonlinear problem under a certain range of the parameter values where such analyses are valid. The relevant parameters for the present problem are the Rayleigh number representing the buoyancy, the Stefan number representing the latent heat of solidification, a concentration ratio parameter representing the composition of the solid dendrites in the mushy layer, and the far-field temperature parameter. We found, in particular, that depending on the range of parameter values, stable convective flow is possible in the form of subcritical or supercritical down-hexagons, with down-flow at the cells' centers and up-flow at the cells' boundaries, and subcritical or supercritical up-hexagons, with up-flow at the cells' centers and down-flow at the cells' boundaries, supercritical rectangles, supercritical squares and supercritical rolls.

  4. Laminar round jet diffusion flame buoyant instabilities: Study on the disappearance of varicose structures at ultra-low Froude number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulanger, Joan [Gas Turbine Laboratory, Institute for Aerospace Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-04-15

    At very low Froude number, buoyancy instabilities of round laminar jet diffusion flames disappear (except for small tip oscillations referred to as flickering) and those flames look stable and smooth. This study examines the contributions of the different phenomena in the flow dynamics that may explain this effect. It is observed that, at ultra-low Froude/Reynolds numbers, the material influenced by buoyancy is the plume of the flame and not the flame itself (reaction zone) that is short. Therefore, the vorticity creation zone does not profit from the reaction neighbourhood promoting a sharp gradient of density. Expansion and stretch are also important as they push vorticity creation terms more inside the flame and closer to the burner rim compared to moderate Froude flames. In these latter, the vorticity is continuously created around the flame reaction zone, along its developed height and closer to the vertical direction (in average). (author)

  5. Gradient Bundle Analysis: A Full Topological Approach to Chemical Bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The "chemical bond" is a central concept in molecular sciences, but there is no consensus as to what a bond actually is. Therefore, a variety of bonding models have been developed, each defining the structure of molecules in a different manner with the goal of explaining and predicting chemical properties. This thesis describes the initial development of gradient bundle analysis (GBA), a chemical bonding model that creates a high resolution picture of chemical interactions within the charge density framework. GBA is based on concepts from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), but uses a more complete picture of the topology and geometry of the electron charge density to understand and predict bonding interactions. Gradient bundles are defined as volumes bounded by zero-flux surfaces (ZFSs) in the gradient of the charge density with well-defined energies. The structure of gradient bundles provides an avenue for detecting the locations of valence electrons, which correspond to reactive regions in a ...

  6. Online Gradient Boosting

    OpenAIRE

    Beygelzimer, Alina; Hazan, Elad; Kale, Satyen; Luo, Haipeng

    2015-01-01

    We extend the theory of boosting for regression problems to the online learning setting. Generalizing from the batch setting for boosting, the notion of a weak learning algorithm is modeled as an online learning algorithm with linear loss functions that competes with a base class of regression functions, while a strong learning algorithm is an online learning algorithm with convex loss functions that competes with a larger class of regression functions. Our main result is an online gradient b...

  7. Fixed field alternating gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Machida, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator was invented in the 1950s. Although many studies were carried out up to the late 1960s, there has been relatively little progress until recently, when it received widespread attention as a type of accelerator suitable for very fast acceleration and for generating high-power beams. In this paper, we describe the principles and design procedure of a FFAG accelerator.

  8. Conjugate gradient method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Segeth, Karel

    Liberec : Technická univerzita v Liberci, 2006, s. 335-341. ISBN 80-7372-055-8. [International Conference Presentation of Mathematics ICPM ´05. Liberec (CZ), 20.09.2005-23.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/04/1503 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : linear algebraic system * conjugate gradient method * preconditioning Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  9. Tissue gradients of energy metabolites mirror oxygen tension gradients in a rat mammary carcinoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It has been shown that oxygen gradients exist in R3230AC tumors grown in window chambers. The fascial surface is better oxygenated than the tumor surface. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether gradients exist for energy metabolites and other end points related to oxygen transport. Methods and Materials: Imaging bioluminescence was used to measure ATP, glucose, and lactate in cryosections of R3230AC tumors. Mean vessel density and hypoxic tissue fraction were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Tumor redox ratio was assessed by redox ratio scanning. Results: Lactate content and hypoxic fraction increased, whereas ATP, glucose, redox ratio, and vessel density decreased from the fascial to the tumor surface. Conclusions: The data support a switch from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism concomitant with the PO2 gradient. The vascular hypoxia that exists in perfused vessels at the tumor surface leads to macroscopic tissue regions with restricted oxygen availability and altered metabolic status. Methods to reduce tumor hypoxia may have to take this into account if such gradients exist in human tumors. The results also have implications for hypoxia imaging, because macroscopic changes in PO2 (or related parameters) will be easier to see than PO2 gradients limited to the diffusion distance of oxygen

  10. The impact of buoyant gas-phase flow and heterogeneity on thermo-hydrological behavior at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To safety and permanently store high-level nuclear waste, the potential Yucca Mountain repository system must mitigate the release and transport of radionuclides for tens of thousands of years. In the failure scenario of greatest concern, water would contact a waste package, accelerate its failure rate, and eventually transport radionuclides to the water table. Our analyses have demonstrated that the only significant source of liquid water is fracture flow from: (1) natural infiltration, (2) condensate drainage generated under boiling conditions, and (3) condensate drainage generated under sub-boiling conditions. The first source of liquid water arises from the ambient system; the second and third sources are generated by repository heat. Buoyant, gas-phase flow, occurring either on a sub-repository scale or on a mountain scale, may play an important role in generating the second and third sources of liquid water. By considering a wide range in bulk permeability of the fractured rock, we identify a threshold bulk permeability at which buoyant, gas-phase convection begins to dominate hydrological behavior. At 10 times this threshold, convection begins to dominate thermal behavior. These effects can dominate moisture movement in the unsaturated zone on the order of 100,000 yr. We find that the development of a large above-boiling zone suppresses the effects of buoyant vapor flow. Zones of sharply contrasting bulk permeability also influence condensate generation and drainage. Of particular concern are conditions that focus vapor flow and condensate drainage, which could result in persistent refluxing at the repository, causing water to drip onto waste packages. These effects can occur under both sub-boiling and boiling conditions Long-term in situ heater tests are required to diagnose the potential for major repository-heat- driven sources of fractures flow

  11. Generalized quasi Yamabe gradient solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, Benedito Leandro; de Oliveira, Hudson Pina

    2016-01-01

    We prove that a nontrivial complete generalized quasi Yamabe gradient soliton (M; g) must be a quasi Yamabe gradient soliton on each connected component of M and that a nontrivial complete locally conformally at generalized quasi Yamabe gradient soliton has a special warped product structure.

  12. Non local density functionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of approximations to the Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham density functionals is tested by comparing with essentially exact results for light atoms (the He isoelectronic series, Be, and Ne). The approximation schemes considered here are the effective gradient schemes due to Langreth and Mehl (LM), and the -modified weighted density- (MWD) approximation due to Gunnarsson and Jones. Compared to the local-density (LD) approximation the LM schemes give markedly better exchange-correlation energies and a certain improvement of density profiles, effective potentials, and orbital eigenvalues. The MWD scheme gives improvements for the exchange-correlation energies but not for the densities, potentials, or eigenvalues. The sensitivity of the MWD scheme with respect to the model pair correlation used, as well as some additional approximations used in practical applications of the MWD scheme, are also analysed. (author)

  13. The Differential Virial Theorem with Gradient Formulas for the Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Finley, James P

    2016-01-01

    A gradient dependent formula is derived for the spinless one-particle density-matrix operator z from the differential virial theorem. A gradient dependent formula is also derived for a spinless one-particle density-matrix operator that can replace the two operators of the differential virial theorem that arise from the kinetic energy operator. Other operators are also derived that can replace the operators mentioned above in the differential virial theorem; these operators depend on the real part of spinless one-particle density-matrix.

  14. Application of Semen Preparation by the Density Gradient Centrifugation Technique Combined with the Swim- Up Method in Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer with Donor Semen%密度梯度离心联合上游法的精液处理在供精体外受精胚胎移植中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭玉梅; 宋革; 祝晓丽; 郑炜炜

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察供精体外受精-胚胎移植术(D-IVF)中采用密度梯度离心法联合上游法处理精液后的胚胎情况。方法:回顾本院2013年1月-2014年7月D-IVF 135个周期,观察冷冻精液复苏后经采用密度梯度离心法联合上游法处理后精子总活动率、前向运动精子活动率等精液情况,以及受精以后的受精率、卵裂率、临床妊娠率,对照组为同期46个因丈夫梗阻性无精行ICSI的周期。结果:处理后精子总活动率、前向运动精子活动率均大大提高,但是精子密度却大大下降,处理前后比较差异均有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论:密度梯度离心法联合上游法的精液处理方法在D-IVF中是一种稳定可行的方法。%Objective:To observe embryonic development by using sperm selection prepared by the density gradient centrifugation technique combined with the swim-up method in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer with donor semen(D-IVF). Method:135 cases of routine D-IVF were retrospective analyzed from January 2013 to July 2014. The sperm condense,total activity rate and progressive motility were observed after sperm recovery and sperm selection. The fertilization rate,cleavage rate, high-quality embryo rate and pregnancy rate were compared by the 135 cases and the control groups consist of 46 cases of ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection)with husband semen. Result:After treatment,the total activity rate of sperm and the sperm activity rate were significantly increased,but the sperm density was significantly decreased,the differences were statistically significant(P0.05).Conclusion:The density gradient centrifugation technique combined withthe swim-up method is a stable and feasible method in D-IVF.

  15. Nonlinear Conjugate Gradient Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukšan, Ladislav; Vlček, Jan

    Praha: Matematický ústav AV ČR, v.v.i, 2015 - (Chleboun, J.; Přikryl, P.; Segeth, K.; Šístek, J.; Vejchodský, T.), s. 130-135 ISBN 978-80-85823-64-6. [Programs and Algorithms of Numerical Mathematics /17./. Dolní Maxov (CZ), 08.06.2014-13.06.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : minimization * nonlinear conjugate gradient methods * comparison of methods * efficiency of methods Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://dml.cz/handle/10338.dmlcz/702674

  16. A multiscale gradient-dependent plasticity model for size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Hao; Taheri-Nassaj, Nasrin; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline material is closely correlated to grain size. In this study, we investigate the size-dependent phenomenon in multi-phase steels using a continuum dislocation dynamic model coupled with viscoplastic self-consistent model. We developed a dislocation-based strain gradient plasticity model and a stress gradient plasticity model, as well as a combined model, resulting in a theory that can predict size effect over a wide range of length scales. Results show that strain gradient plasticity and stress gradient plasticity are complementary rather than competing theories. The stress gradient model is dominant at the initial strain stage, and is much more effective for predicting yield strength than the strain gradient model. For larger deformations, the strain gradient model is dominant and more effective for predicting size-dependent hardening. The numerical results are compared with experimental data and it is found that they have the same trend for the yield stress. Furthermore, the effect of dislocation density at different strain stages is investigated, and the findings show that the Hall-Petch relation holds for the initial strain stage and breaks down for higher strain levels. Finally, a power law to describe the size effect and the transition zone between the strain gradient and stress gradient dominated regions is developed.

  17. Gedanken Densities and Exact Constraints in Density Functional Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Perdew, John P; Sun, Jianwei; Burke, Kieron

    2014-01-01

    Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is no...

  18. Synthesis of buoyant metal-coated fly ash cenosphere and its excellent catalytic performance in dye degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhai, Jianping; Li, Qin

    2015-04-15

    In this work, Ag(+) and Ag(0) were absorbed onto the surface of 3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane modified fly ash cenospheres (FACs) in two Ag activation processes. The activation methods, avoiding traditional surface sensitization by SnCl2, successfully initiated electroless copper particles deposition for the preparation of buoyant Cu-FAC and CuAg-FAC composites. The CuAg-FAC had a much more uniform morphology than the Cu-FAC. The catalytic performance of the Cu-FAC and CuAg-FAC was examined by the reduction of Orange IV azo dye with the presence of NaBH4. 98.4% of Orange IV was rapidly reduced within 25 min by the CuAg-FAC, whereas 76.4% of Orange IV was removed by the Cu-FAC. The results reveal that the degradation processes matched well with the pseudo-first-order kinetics model, and rate constants of 0.057 and 0.186 min(-1) were obtained for the Cu-FAC and CuAg-FAC, respectively. Moreover, two other dyes of Orange II and Reactive Black 5 were also efficiently reduced by the CuAg-FAC which could be easily recycled and stably reused at least four times. These buoyant metal-coated FAC composites would be very useful in various catalytic reductions. PMID:25585281

  19. A hybrid approach for the simulation of a nearly neutrally buoyant nanoparticle thermal motion in an incompressible Newtonian fluid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, B; Radhakrishnan, R; Eckmann, D M; Ayyaswamy, P S

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid scheme based on Markovian fluctuating hydrodynamics of the fluid and a non-Markovian Langevin dynamics with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise perturbing the translational and rotational equations of motion of a nanoparticle is employed to study the thermal motion of a nearly neutrally buoyant nanoparticle in an incompressible Newtonian fluid medium. A direct numerical simulation adopting an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian based finite element method is employed in simulating the thermal motion of the particle suspended in the fluid contained in a cylindrical vessel. The instantaneous flow around the particle and the particle motion are fully resolved. The numerical results show that (a) the calculated temperature of the nearly neutrally buoyant Brownian particle in a quiescent fluid satisfies the equipartition theorem; (b) the translational and rotational decay of the velocity autocorrelation functions result in algebraic tails, over long time; (c) the translational and rotational mean square displacements of the particle obeys Stokes-Einstein and Stokes-Einstein-Debye relations, respectively; and (d) the parallel and perpendicular diffusivities of the particle closer to the wall are consistent with the analytical results, where available. The study has important implications for designing nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery. PMID:23814315

  20. Buoyant magnetic flux ropes in a magnetized stellar envelope: Idealized numerical 2.5-D MHD simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dorch, S B F

    2006-01-01

    Context: The context of this paper is buoyant toroidal magnetic flux ropes, which is a part of flux tube dynamo theory and the framework of solar-like magnetic activity. Aims: The aim is to investigate how twisted magnetic flux ropes interact with a simple magnetized stellar model envelope--a magnetic "convection zone"--especially to examine how the twisted magnetic field component of a flux rope interacts with a poloidal magnetic field in the convection zone. Method: Both the flux ropes and the atmosphere are modelled as idealized 2.5-dimensional concepts using high resolution numerical magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Results: It is illustrated that twisted toroidal magnetic flux ropes can interact with a poloidal magnetic field in the atmosphere to cause a change in both the buoyant rise dynamics and the flux rope's geometrical shape. The details of these changes depend primarily on the polarity and strength of the atmospheric field relative to the field strength of the flux rope. It is suggested th...

  1. 应用硫酸鱼精蛋白处理蔗糖密度梯度超速离心高度纯化流行性乙型脑炎灭活疫苗(非洲绿猴肾细胞)%Purification of Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine from Vero Cell by Protamine Sulfate and Sucrose Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国松; 韦娟; 姜建; 丁志芬

    2011-01-01

    Objective To prepare a purified inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine (JEV) by ultracentrifugation. Methods Japanese encephalitis supernatant was collected from bioreactor. After concentrated by ultra-filtration and inactivated by formaldehyde, the inactivated virus suspension was treated with protamine sulfate and purified by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. The sucrose was removed by ultra-filtration. Results The residual of vero cells deaxyribonucleic acid(DNA) was reduced to 10pg/dose and total protein content was reduced to lμg/dose, the host cell protein was decreased to 15ng/dose, and satisfied recovery was obtained. Conclusion A purified inactivated JEV was prepared by optimizing condition of protamine sulfate treatment and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation purification.%目的 通过离心试验,制备出一种高纯度的流行性乙型脑炎(乙脑)灭活纯化疫苗(非洲绿猴肾细胞)[Purified Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine (Vero Cell),JEV].方法 生物反应器培养的Vero细胞乙脑病毒液,超滤浓缩、甲醛灭活后,应用硫酸鱼精蛋白处理,再经过高速离心,蔗糖密度梯度超速离心纯化,超滤除糖,配制成JEV(Vero细胞).结果 经检测,疫苗中Vero细胞脱氧核糖核酸残留量≤10pg(皮克,Picogram)/剂,蛋白含量≤1μg(微克)/剂,宿主蛋白残留量≤30ng(纳克,Nanogram)/ml,并获得较高的抗原回收率.结论 经过优化硫酸鱼精蛋白处理和蔗糖密度梯度超速离心纯化,制得了高纯度的JEV(Vero细胞).

  2. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  3. Theoretical analysis and semianalytical solutions for a turbulent buoyant hydrogen-air jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Semianalytical solutions are developed for turbulent hydrogen-air plume. We derived analytical expressions for plume centerline variables (radius, velocity, and density deficit) in terms of a single universal function, called plume function. By combining the obtained analytical expressions of centerline variables with empirical Gaussian expressions of the mean variables, we obtain semianalytical expressions for mean quantities of hydrogen-air plume (velocity, density deficit, and mass fraction).

  4. Theoretical Analysis and Semianalytical Solutions for a Turbulent Buoyant Hydrogen-Air Jet

    OpenAIRE

    El-Amin, M. F.; Shuyu Sun; Amgad Salama

    2012-01-01

    Semianalytical solutions are developed for turbulent hydrogen-air plume. We derived analytical expressions for plume centerline variables (radius, velocity, and density deficit) in terms of a single universal function, called plume function. By combining the obtained analytical expressions of centerline variables with empirical Gaussian expressions of the mean variables, we obtain semianalytical expressions for mean quantities of hydrogen-air plume (velocity, density deficit, and mass fraction).

  5. Integrated gravity and gravity gradient 3D inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Pengbo; Huang, Danian; Yuan, Yuan; Geng, Meixia; Liu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Gravity data, which are critical in mineral, oil, and gas exploration, are obtained from the vertical component of the gravity field, while gravity gradient data are measured from changes in the gravity field in three directions. However, few studies have sought to improve exploration techniques by integrating gravity and gravity gradient data using inversion methods. In this study, we developed a new method to integrate gravity and gravity gradient data in a 3D density inversion using the non-linear conjugate gradient (NLCG) method and the minimum gradient support (MGS) functional to regularize the 3D inverse problem and to obtain a clear and accurate image of the anomalous body. The NLCG algorithm, which is suitable for solving large-scale nonlinear optimization problems and requires no memory storage, was compared to the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) quasi-Newton algorithm and the results indicated that the convergence rate of NLCG is slower, but that the storage requirement and computation time is lower. To counteract the decay in kernel function, we introduced a depth weighting function for anomalous bodies at the same depth, with information about anomalous body depth obtained from well log and seismic exploration data. For anomalous bodies at different depths, we introduced a spatial gradient weighting function to incorporate additional information obtained in the inversion. We concluded that the spatial gradient weighting function enhanced the spatial resolution of the recovered model. Furthermore, our results showed that including multiple components for inversion increased the resolution of the recovered model. We validated our model by applying our inversion method to survey data from Vinton salt dome, Louisiana, USA. The results showed good agreement with known geologic information; thus confirming the accuracy of this approach.

  6. Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N.L.

    1983-11-10

    Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

  7. Rigidity of gradient Ricci Solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Peter; Wylie, William

    2007-01-01

    We define a gradient Ricci soliton to be rigid if it is a flat bundle $% N\\times_{\\Gamma}\\mathbb{R}^{k}$ where $N$ is Einstein. It is known that not all gradient solitons are rigid. Here we offer several natural conditions on the curvature that characterize rigid gradient solitons. Other related results on rigidity of Ricci solitons are also explained in the last section.

  8. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  9. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  10. Gradients in the Number of Species at Reef-Seagrass Ecotones Explained by Gradients in Abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Tuya; Vanderklift, Mathew A.; Thomas Wernberg; Thomsen, Mads S.

    2011-01-01

    Gradients in the composition and diversity (e.g. number of species) of faunal assemblages are common at ecotones between juxtaposed habitats. Patterns in the number of species, however, can be confounded by patterns in abundance of individuals, because more species tend to be found wherever there are more individuals. We tested whether proximity to reefs influenced patterns in the composition and diversity ('species density'  =  number of species per area and 'species richness'  =  number of ...

  11. The trapping and escape of buoyant vortex rings in sharply stratified fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Camassa, R; McLaughlin, R; Mertens, K; Monbureau, E; Nenon, D; Smith, C; Viotti, C; White, B

    2011-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we study the dynamics of miscible vortex rings falling in ambient strongly (near two-layer) stratified fluid. Experiments and direct numerical simulations using the variable density Navier-Stokes (VARDEN) solver are presented and compared. Critical phenomena are identified depending upon the key parameters of the experiment (fluid and ring densities, upper layer vortex travel distance, etc) in which the descending dense vortex ring may experience complete trapping, partial trapping, or fissioning into a cascade of smaller vortices. The interaction of the vortex ring with the upper layer fluids leads to viscous entrainment which alters the effective buoyancy of the ring. Upon impinging on a density transition, the entrained fluid imparts different dynamics as it attempts to regain equilibrium leading to the critical behaviors.

  12. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is worthwhile considering that only some 30 species make up the bulk of the bacterial population in human faeces at any one time based on the classical cultivation-based approach. The situation in the rumen is similar. Thus, it is practical to focus on specific groups of interest within the complex community. These may be the predominant or the most active species, specific physiological groups or readily identifiable (genetic) clusters of phylogenetically related organisms. Several 16S rDNA fingerprinting techniques can be invaluable for selecting and monitoring sequences or phylogenetic groups of interest and are described below. Over the past few decades, considerable attention was focussed on the identification of pure cultures of microbes on the basis of genetic polymorphisms of DNA encoding rRNA such as ribotyping, amplified fragment length polymorphism and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. However, many of these methods require prior cultivation and are less suitable for use in analysis of complex mixed populations although important in describing cultivated microbial diversity in molecular terms. Much less attention was given to molecular characterization of complex communities. In particular, research into diversity and community structure over time has been revolutionized by the advent of molecular fingerprinting techniques for complex communities. Denaturing or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE/TGGE) methods have been successfully applied to the analysis of human, pig, cattle, dog and rodent intestinal populations

  13. Rates of photocatalytic oxidation of crude oil on salt water on buoyant, cenosphere-attached titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of TiO2-photocatalyzed oxidation of crude oils spilled on aqueous 0.5 M NaCA was determined by measuring the rate of O2 uptake. The photocatalyst was attached to 100-μm-diameter fly-ash-derived buoyant cenospheres. Partial hydrophobic coating of the cenospheres assured their retention at the air-oil interface. The rate depended on the near-UV (broad band, 365-nm peak) irradiance below 25W m-2, but varied only mildly with irradiance in the 25-45 W m-2 range. It increased upon wave motion imitating agitation of the liquid, and upon increase of the cenosphere:oil mass ratio. It varied only mildly for different crudes. From the measured rates, cleanup times as short as 5-10 days were estimated

  14. Relation between shape of liquid-gas interface and evolution of buoyantly unstable three-dimensional chemical fronts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestíková, L

    2013-09-01

    Buoyantly unstable 3D chemical fronts were seen traveling through an iodate-arsenous acid reaction solution. The experiments were performed in channel reactors with rectangular cross sections, where the top of the reaction solution was in contact with air. A concave or convex meniscus was pinned to reactor lateral walls. Influence of the meniscus shape on front development was investigated. For the concave meniscus, an asymptotic shape of fronts holding negative curvature was observed. On the other hand, fronts propagating in the solution with the convex meniscus kept only positive curvature. Those fronts were also a bit faster than fronts propagating in the solution with the concave meniscus. A relation between the meniscus shape, flow distribution, velocity, and shape is discussed. PMID:24125360

  15. An oscillating motion of a red blood cell and a neutrally buoyant particle in Poiseuille flow in a narrow channel

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Two motions of oscillation and vacillating breathing (swing) of a red blood cell have been observed in bounded Poiseuille flows (Phys. Rev. E 85, 16307 (2012)). To understand such motions, we have studied the oscillating motion of a neutrally buoyant rigid particle of the same shape in Poiseuille flow in a narrow channel and obtained that the crucial point is to have the particle interacting with Poiseuille flow with its mass center moving up and down in the channel central region. Since the mass center of the cell migrates toward the channel central region, its oscillating motion of the inclination angle is similar to the aforementioned motion as long as the cell keeps the shape of long body. But as the up-and-down oscillation of the cell mass center damps out, the oscillating motion of the inclination angle also damps out and the cell inclination angle approaches to a fixed angle.

  16. Behavior of near-field dilution of thermal buoyant jet discharged horizontally in compound open-channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The RNG к-ε model considering the buoyancy effect,which is solved by the hybrid finite analytic method,is used to simulate the mixture of the horizontal round thermal buoyant jet in compound open channel flow.The mixing features near the spout and flowing characteristic of the secondary currents are studied by numerical simulation.Meanwhile,(1) the distribution of the measured isovels for stream-wise velocity,(2) secondary currents,(3) the distribution of the measured isovels for temperature of typical cross-section near the spout,were obtained by the three-dimensional Micro ADV and the Temperature measuring device.Compared with experimental data,the RNG к-εmodel based on buoyancy effect can preferably simulate the jet which performs the bifurcation phenomenon,jet reattachment (Conada effect) and beach secondary currents phenomenon with the effect of ambient flow,buoyancy,and secondary currents of compound section and so on.

  17. 46 CFR 160.060-3a - Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests. 160.060-3a Section 160.060-3a Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Specification for...

  18. 46 CFR 160.052-3a - Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests. 160.052-3a Section 160.052-3a Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Specification for...

  19. 46 CFR 160.047-3a - Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests. 160.047-3a Section 160.047-3a Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Specification for...

  20. Formulation and In Vitro evaluation of pH sensitive oil entrapped polymeric blended gellan gum buoyant beads of clarithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Tripathi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: A gastroretentive pH sensitive system has been a frontier approach to release the drug in controlled manner in stomach and duodenum. The aim of this study was to develop buoyant beads of gellan based, wherein, the oil was entrapped, blended with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose or carbopol 934 in order to evaluate its potential for targeted sustained delivery of clarithromycin in the gastric region. "nMethods: Buoyant beads of gellan was developed by inotropic gelation technique using calcium carbonate as gas forming agent and the drug polymer dispersion was emulsified with mineral oil. The oil was entrapped and blended with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose or carbopol 934. The developed beads were evaluated in terms of diameter, % floating, encapsulation efficiency, In vitro drug release, In vivo gastric residence efficacy and clarithromycine concentration in the mucosa of the experimental animal model. "nResults: The scanning electron microscope photograph indicated that the prepared beads were spherical in shape and buoyancy, encapsulation efficiency and drug content obtained from all batches were satisfactory. Particle size and percentage buoyancy of the gel beads increased by raising the concentration of calcium carbonate. The formulation exhibited sustained release profile and was best fitted in the Peppas model with n < 0.45. Subsequent coating of microbeads exhibited zero-order sustained pattern of the drug release up to 8 hrs. Batch B4 showed comparatively better residence and the drug concentration in the gastric mucosa of the treated animals. Conclusion:The result provides evidence that the prepared optimized formulation may be used effectively for pH sensitive gastric targeted antibiotic such as clarithromycin.

  1. A field evaluation of an external and neutrally buoyant acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon: implications for estimating hydroturbine passage survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Brown

    Full Text Available Turbine-passed fish are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure which can cause barotrauma. The presence of an implanted telemetry tag increases the likelihood of injury or death from exposure to pressure changes, thus potentially biasing studies evaluating survival of turbine-passed fish. Therefore, a neutrally buoyant externally attached tag was developed to eliminate this bias in turbine passage studies. This new tag was designed not to add excess mass in water or take up space in the coelom, having an effective tag burden of zero with the goal of reducing pressure related biases to turbine survival studies. To determine if this new tag affects fish performance or susceptibility to predation, it was evaluated in the field relative to internally implanted acoustic transmitters (JSATS; Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System used widely for survival studies of juvenile salmonids. Survival and travel time through the study reach was compared between fish with either tag type in an area of high predation in the Snake and Columbia rivers, Washington. An additional group of fish affixed with neutrally-buoyant dummy external tags were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT tags and recovered further downstream to assess external tag retention and injury. There were no significant differences in survival to the first detection site, 12 river kilometers (rkm downstream of release. Travel times were also similar between groups. Conversely, externally-tagged fish had reduced survival (or elevated tag loss to the second detection site, 65 rkm downstream. In addition, the retention study revealed that tag loss was first observed in fish recaptured approximately 9 days after release. Results suggest that this new tag may be viable for short term (<8 days single-dam turbine-passage studies and under these situations, may alleviate the turbine passage-related bias encountered when using internal tags, however further research is needed to

  2. Electric field gradients in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the recent works on electric field gradient in metals is given. The main emphasis is put on the temperature dependence of the electric field gradient in nonmagnetic metals. Some methods of investigation of this effect using nuclear probes are described. One of them is nuclear accoustic resonance method. (S.B.)

  3. Computational Strain Gradient Crystal Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    A model for strain gradient crystal visco-plasticity is formulated along the lines proposed by Fleck andWillis (2009) for isotropic plasticity. Size-effects are included in the model due to the addition of gradient terms in both the free energy as well as through a dissipation potential. A finite...

  4. Experimental research on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the multi-layered fluids interfaces with different density gradients%不同密度梯度的多层流体界面上的Richt myer-Meshkov不稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施红辉; 杜凯; 王超; 章利特; 贾会霞; 董若凌

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on our previous study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability research of a gas-liquid interface. Using the fluids with different densities, one can build two kinds of three-phase interfaces of gas-liquid-liquid, I. E. , gas-silicone oil-water and gas-alco-hol-silicone oil interfaces, which have totally different direction of viscosity gradient. In the experiment, we use nitrogen gas as the high pressure driving gas and measure the development of spike height and bubble depth from these two interfaces at different shock wave Mach numbers. After analyzing all the experimental data we find some regular flow patterns. Then we compare the regular pattern with the results that we have already known. Meanwhile, the difference between the two kinds of three-phase interfaces in R-M instability development is also studied in this paper. The result shows that when the liquid viscosity gradient direction is agreed with the shock wave motion direction, the instability of the interface and the turbulent mixing become more significant.%在气-液界面Richtmyer-Meshkov(R-M)不稳定性研究的基础上,利用不同流体间密度的差异,构造了空气-硅油-水、空气-酒精-硅油两种流体粘度方向迥异的气-液-液三相界面,实验中以氮气作为高压驱动气体,在不同激波马赫数下对这两种界面R-M不稳定性后期尖钉与气泡区发展进行了测量与统计,通过对实验数据的分析,得出了相关规律,并用这些规律与已有的单层气-液界面R-M不稳定性研究成果作比较,得出了异同点.同时,还研究了两种三相界面在R-M不稳定发展中的差异.实验结果表明:当流体的粘度梯度方向(从小到大的方向)与激波方向一致时,界面失稳更加明显,湍流混合更为显著.

  5. Temperature Gradients on the Cell Wall in the Critical Viscosity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the diverging susceptibility delta rho/delta Tau near the liquid-vapor critical point, temperature gradients must be kept small to maintain adequate sample homogeneity. In our Science Requirements Document we paid particular attention to radial density gradients caused by equilibration of the xenon sample. Axial density gradients were addressed through the requirement that the cell's copper wall have a gradient less than 22 microK/m. This report re-examines the cell wall's temperature distribution in more detail by estimating all known significant contributions to temperature differences on the cell's wall.

  6. On the combined gravity gradient modeling for applied geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Veryaskin, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    Gravity gradiometry research and development has intensified in recent years to the extent that technologies providing a resolution of about 1 Eotvos per 1 sec average shall likely soon be available for multiple critical applications such as natural resources exploration, oil reservoir monitoring and defence establishment. Much of the content of this paper was composed a decade ago, and only minor modifications were required for the conclusions to be just as applicable today. In this paper we demonstrate how gravity gradient data can be modeled, and show some examples of how gravity gradient data can be combined in order to extract valuable information. In particular, this study demonstrates the importance of two gravity gradient components, Txz and Tyz which, when processed together, can provide more information on subsurface density contrasts than that derived solely from the vertical gravity gradient (Tzz).

  7. Effects of the safety factor on ion temperature gradient mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven-instability is derived from Braginskii magnetohydrodynamic equation of ions. The safety factor in toroidal plasma is introduced into the model through the current density. The effects of safety factor or current density on both the instability in perpendicular and parallel wavenumber spectra and the critical stability thresholds are studied. It is shown that the significant value of the safety factor plays an important role in stabilizing the ITG instability. (author)

  8. Improved Hodograph Method and the Amplitude-Phase Gradient Method to estimate the latitude dependence of the FLR frequency, plasma density, and the resonance width using data from a ground magnetometer pair: Application to CARISMA and MAGDAS station pairs in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, H.; Pilipenko, V.; Mann, I. R.; Milling, D. K.; Saita, S.; Kitamura, K.; Yumoto, K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Improved Hodograph Method (IHM below) and the Amplitude-Phase Gradient Method (APGM below) are both applied to data from two ground magnetometers latitudinally separated by ~100km and yield the field-line-resonance (FLR) frequency and the ionospheric resonance width as functions of the latitude; from the FLR frequency we can estimate the magnetospheric plasma mass density, and from the resonance width we can estimate the damping rate of FLR, which is related to how much of the FLR-generated ULF waves are absorbed by the ionosphere. The both methods apply FFT to the two magnetometers' data, and calculate the amplitude ratio and the cross phase from the two stations' data as functions of the frequency. From there the two methods use different approaches: IHM fits a curve to the obtained ratio (as a complex number including both the amplitude ratio and the cross phase) on the complex plane to separate out the non-FLR signal in the data, while APGM assumes that the obtained amplitude ratio and cross phase include the FLR signal only and obtains the FLR frequency and the resonance width in an algebraic manner. In this paper we apply the two methods to simultaneously observed data from ground station pairs of WAD (CGM latitude and longitude: 61.3 and 318.3) - WEYB (58.6, 320.9), LGRR (61.8, 332.4) - PINA (60.0, 331.8), and PINA - THRF (57.8, 331.5), where WAD belongs to MAGDAS/CPMN while the other four belong to CARISMA. We show that IHM can properly estimate the latitudinal profile of the resonance width (which is the improved point of IHM over the original Hodograph Method) by comparing the results of applying IHM to the LGRR-PINA and PINA-THRF pairs, located along the same meridian. We also compare the IHM and APGM results to support the above-stated advantage of IHM over APGM. In addition, comparing the results of applying IHM and APGM to WAD-WEYB and LGRR-PINA-THRF, having similar latitudes but different longitudes, we discuss the longitude dependence of the FLR

  9. Growth and deformation structure of gradient and layer-gradient Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, Stanislav V., E-mail: ovm@spti.tsu.ru; Pinzhin, Yurii P., E-mail: pinzhin@phys.tsu.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Korotaev, Alexandr D., E-mail: korotaev@phys.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    The features of the growth structure and modification of gradient and layer-gradient Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N coatings in the areas of deformation and fracture during indentation and scratch testing were investigated using transmission and scanning electron microscopy methods. The influence of the concentration of alloying elements and displacement potential in the substrate on the secondary sputtering, phase composition and the level of combined torsion and bending of the crystal lattice of doped TiN were determined. It was found out that the size of the crystals in deformation location bands grows with deformation of gradient nanocrystal coatings. The article shows that layer-gradient coatings combining submicrocrystalline and nanocrystalline structures have the increased plasticity and fracture toughness due to enhanced density of interfaces and formation of the soft metal phase (Cu) in the surface layer.

  10. Growth and deformation structure of gradient and layer-gradient Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The features of the growth structure and modification of gradient and layer-gradient Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N coatings in the areas of deformation and fracture during indentation and scratch testing were investigated using transmission and scanning electron microscopy methods. The influence of the concentration of alloying elements and displacement potential in the substrate on the secondary sputtering, phase composition and the level of combined torsion and bending of the crystal lattice of doped TiN were determined. It was found out that the size of the crystals in deformation location bands grows with deformation of gradient nanocrystal coatings. The article shows that layer-gradient coatings combining submicrocrystalline and nanocrystalline structures have the increased plasticity and fracture toughness due to enhanced density of interfaces and formation of the soft metal phase (Cu) in the surface layer

  11. Abundance gradients in low surface brightness spirals: clues on the origin of common gradients in galactic discs

    CERN Document Server

    Bresolin, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    We acquired spectra of 141 HII regions in ten late-type low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs). The analysis of the chemical abundances obtained from the nebular emission lines shows that metallicity gradients are a common feature of LSBGs, contrary to previous claims concerning the absence of such gradients in this class of galaxies. The average slope, when expressed in units of the isophotal radius, is found to be significantly shallower in comparison to galaxies of high surface brightness. This result can be attributed to the reduced surface brightness range measured across their discs, when combined with a universal surface mass density-metallicity relation. With a similar argument we explain the common abundance gradient observed in high surface brightness galaxy (HSBG) discs and its approximate dispersion. This conclusion is reinforced by our result that LSBGs share the same common abundance gradient with HSBGs, when the slope is expressed in terms of the exponential disc scale length.

  12. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  13. Spatial gradient tuning in metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Tom; Goldflam, Michael; Jokerst, Nan; Basov, Dimitri; Smith, David

    2011-03-01

    Gradient Index (GRIN) metamaterials have been used to create devices inspired by, but often surpassing the potential of, conventional GRIN optics. The unit-cell nature of metamaterials presents the opportunity to exert much greater control over spatial gradients than is possible in natural materials. This is true not only during the design phase but also offers the potential for real-time reconfiguration of the metamaterial gradient. This ability fits nicely into the picture of transformation-optics, in which spatial gradients can enable an impressive suite of innovative devices. We discuss methods to exert control over metamaterial response, focusing on our recent demonstrations using Vanadium Dioxide. We give special attention to role of memristance and mem-capacitance observed in Vanadium Dioxide, which simplify the demands of stimuli and addressing, as well as intersecting metamaterials with the field of memory-materials.

  14. Flame Propagation Through Concentration Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunyaIINO; MitsuakiTANABE; 等

    2000-01-01

    The experiment was carried out in homogeneous propane-air mixture and in several concentration gradient of mixture.Igniter is put on the upper side of the combustion chamber,In concentration gradient experiment.ixture was ignited from lean side.An experimental study was conducted in a combustion chamber.The combustion chamber has glass windows for optical measurements at any side.For the measurement of distribution of fuel concentration,infraed absorption method using 3.39μm He-Ne laser was used,and for the observation of proagating flams,Schlieren method was employed.As a measurment result of flame propagation velocity and flammable limit,for a mixture of an identical local equivalence ratio.flame propagation velocity in concentration gradient is faster than that in homogeneous mixture,and rich flammable limit in concentration gradient shows a tendency to be higher than that in homogeneous mixture.

  15. Sobolev gradients and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, John William

    1997-01-01

    A Sobolev gradient of a real-valued functional is a gradient of that functional taken relative to the underlying Sobolev norm. This book shows how descent methods using such gradients allow a unified treatment of a wide variety of problems in differential equations. Equal emphasis is placed on numerical and theoretical matters. Several concrete applications are made to illustrate the method. These applications include (1) Ginzburg-Landau functionals of superconductivity, (2) problems of transonic flow in which type depends locally on nonlinearities, and (3) minimal surface problems. Sobolev gradient constructions rely on a study of orthogonal projections onto graphs of closed densely defined linear transformations from one Hilbert space to another. These developments use work of Weyl, von Neumann and Beurling.

  16. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G;

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...

  17. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with de...

  18. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Alexey Natekin; Alois Knoll

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all th...

  19. An experimental study on the formation of negatively-buoyant vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jeff X.; Hunt, Gary R.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments to examine the formation of dense saline vortex rings projected vertically upwards into a quiescent freshwater environment were conducted. The setup was designed to dispense a cylindrical column of source fluid with aspect ratio L / D (the length L of dispensed saline column to the nozzle diameter D) over a pre-set time interval. In an effort to execute an impulsive start and finish, a controlled flow circulation driven by a gear pump was developed to approximate a top-hat profile of source exit velocity versus time. Our measurements focus on describing the evolving morphology of the vortex rings with time and with source conditions (L / D and source Froude number). Our results reveal distinct formation regimes and our estimates of time required for formation as a function of density difference confirm predictions from previously published numerical simulations. The volume-based approach we adopt provides potentially a new angle for investigating the physics of these flows.

  20. The effect of water uptake gradient in membrane electrode assembly on fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, H., E-mail: hajime.phy@gmail.co [Research Institute for Science Engineering, Waseda University, 103, R.J.Shillman Hall, 3-14-9, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Shiraki, F.; Oshima, Y.; Tatsumi, T.; Yoshikawa, T.; Sasaki, T. [Research Institute for Science Engineering, Waseda University, 103, R.J.Shillman Hall, 3-14-9, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan); Oshima, A. [Institute for Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Washio, M. [Research Institute for Science Engineering, Waseda University, 103, R.J.Shillman Hall, 3-14-9, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0072 (Japan)

    2011-02-15

    Novel proton exchange membranes (PEMs) with functionally gradient ionic sites were fabricated utilizing low energy electron beam (EB) irradiations. The low energy electron beam irradiation to polymer membranes possessed the property of gradient energy deposition in the membrane thickness direction. In the process of EB grafting of styrene onto base films, selective ranges of the gradient energy deposition were used. Micro FT-IR spectra showed that the simulated energy deposition of EB irradiation to base polymer membranes in the thickness direction corresponded to the amount of styrene grafted onto EB-irradiated films. After sulfonation, a functionally gradient ionic site PEM (gradient-PEM) was prepared, corresponding to EB depth-dose profile. The functionally gradients of ionic sites in the gradient-PEM and flat-PEM were evaluated with XPS and SEM-EDX. The results of XPS and SEM-EDX suggest that the prepared gradient-PEM had a gradient sulfonated acid groups. In addition, the polarization performance of MEA based on gradient-PEM was improved in high current density. It was thought that water uptake gradient could have a function to prevent flooding in the MEA during FC operation. Thus, the functionally gradient-PEMs could be a promising solution to manage the water behavior in MEA.

  1. Analysis of physical mechanisms underlying density-dependent transport in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Landman, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the interaction between (large) density gradients and flow and transport in porous media is studied. Large gradients in the density of groundwater exist for example near deep salt rock formations, which are considered as possible long-term storage sites for radioactive waste. Furthermore, density effects play a role in many other groundwater applications, such as salt water intrusion. Density gradients mainly affect the flow field and mass transport in two ways: by fluid volum...

  2. Urban-Rural Gradients of Ecosystem Services and the Linkages with Socioeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The principle of urban-rural gradients can reveal the spatial variations of ecosystem services and socioeconomic dimensions. The interrelations between ecosystem services and socioeconomics have scarcely been considered in the context of urban-rural areas. We investigated the spatial gradients and the mutual linkages of several ecosystem services and socioeconomic variables in the urban-rural areas of Leipzig, Germany, and Kunming, China. The results showed some regularities in the spatial patterns of ecosystem services and socioeconomic dimensions in both study areas. Habitat quality and f-evapotranspiration of Leipzig and habitat quality of Kunming demonstrated apparent increasing trends along all gradient patterns. However, the other ecosystem services presented divergent spatial variabilities in different gradient patterns. Road density, urban fabric and population density showed identical declining trends in both case study areas. Differently, household size, housing area as well as unemployment rate in Leipzig presented inconsistent spatial dynamics with considerable fluctuations. With regard to the gradient interrelations, road density, urban fabric and population density were strongly correlated with most ecosystem services in both case study areas. In contrast, the gradients of household size, housing area and unemployment rate of Leipzig showed inconsistent correlations with the ecosystem services gradients. Our study provides evidence to the argument that typical patterns of ecosystem service gradients do not exist in different urban-rural areas.

  3. A novel technique to neutralize the Yawing moment due to asymmetric thrust in a hybrid buoyant aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Anwar U

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dorsal fin is used in swimming animals like shark for the generation of thrust as well as to meet the requirement of the lateral stability. In the case of aircraft, rudders are normally used for the said requirement. In the present work, this nature inspired idea is explored for its application to neutralize the unavoidable asymmetric thrust produced by the twin engines of a hybrid buoyant aircraft. First, the estimation of asymmetric thrust is obtained with the help of analytical techniques for maximum thrust condition at 4 degree angle of attack. The moment generated by it is utilized for the sizing of a dorsal fin which looks similar to a tapered wing and is placed aft of the center of gravity. Wind tunnel testing at subsonic speed is carried out to explore the design features of this rotatable dorsal fin. It is found that a small rotation of 5 degree can generate the required moment. However, such rotation requires a complete pneumatic/electro-mechanical system and an alternative of it is to use a cambered airfoil for the dorsal fin installed at fixed location. Such a flow controlling device can also be used as an antenna mast, which is commonly installed out the fuselage of the aircraft for communication purposes. Moreover, by incorporating this technique, a pilot doesn’t have to put an extra effort to make the aircraft stable in the presence of side wind.

  4. Effect of grid resolution and subgrid assumptions on the model prediction of a reactive buoyant plume under convective conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have introduced a new and elaborate approach to understand the impact of grid resolution and subgrid chemistry assumption on the grid-model prediction of species concentrations for a system with highly non-homogeneous chemistry - a reactive buoyant plume immediately downwind of the stack in a convective boundary layer. The Parcel-Grid approach plume was used to describe both the air parcel turbulent transport and chemistry. This approach allows an identical transport process for all simulations. It also allows a description of subgrid chemistry. The ambient and plume parcel transport follows the description of Luhar and Britter (Atmos. Environ, 23 (1989) 1911, 26A (1992) 1283). The chemistry follows that of the Carbon-Bond mechanism. Three different grid sizes were considered: fine, medium and coarse, together with three different subgrid chemistry assumptions: micro-scale or individual parcel, tagged-parcel (plume and ambient parcels treated separately), and untagged-parcel (plume and ambient parcels treated indiscriminately). Reducing the subgrid information is not necessarily similar to increasing the model grid size. In our example, increasing the grid size leads to a reduction in the suppression of ozone in the presence of a high-NOx stack plume, and a reduction in the effectiveness of the NOx-inhibition effect. On the other hand, reducing the subgrid information (by using the untagged-parcel assumption) leads to an increase in ozone reduction and an enhancement of the NOx-inhibition effect insofar as the ozone extremum is concerned. (author)

  5. Algal Parasite Herpodiscus durvillaeae (Phaeophyceae: Sphacelariales) Inferred to have Traversed the Pacific Ocean with its Buoyant Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Ceridwen I; Waters, Jonathan M

    2013-02-01

    The parasitic phaeophycean endophyte Herpodiscus durvillaeae (Lindauer) G. R. South has previously only been recorded from New Zealand, in association with a single host species, Durvillaea antarctica (Chamisso) Hariot (southern bull-kelp). Here we use DNA sequence data from plastid and nuclear markers (chloroplast rbcL, ribosomal LSU, and a nuclear pseudogene copy of COI) to test for the presence of H. durvillaeae beyond the New Zealand region, and on host species other than D. antarctica. Analyses of samples from the Falkland Islands confirm the first record of H. durvillaeae from the Atlantic Ocean. We report that Falkland Islands H. durvillaeae are genetically indistinguishable from samples of this species from New Zealand's sub-Antarctic Campbell Island, suggesting recent dispersal of the parasite across the Pacific Ocean, presumably by rafting with its buoyant macroalgal host. We also here record H. durvillaeae from New Zealand endemics Durvillaea poha Fraser et al. and D. willana Lindauer. PMID:27008401

  6. Multi-parametric Study of Rising 3D Buoyant Flux Tubes in an Adiabatic Stratification Using AMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Moreno-Insertis, Fernando; Cheung, Mark C. M.

    2015-11-01

    We study the buoyant rise of magnetic flux tubes embedded in an adiabatic stratification using two-and three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We analyze the dependence of the tube evolution on the field line twist and on the curvature of the tube axis in different diffusion regimes. To be able to achieve a comparatively high spatial resolution we use the FLASH code, which has a built-in Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) capability. Our 3D experiments reach Reynolds numbers that permit a reasonable comparison of the results with those of previous 2D simulations. When the experiments are run without AMR, hence with a comparatively large diffusivity, the amount of longitudinal magnetic flux retained inside the tube increases with the curvature of the tube axis. However, when a low-diffusion regime is reached by using the AMR algorithms, the magnetic twist is able to prevent the splitting of the magnetic loop into vortex tubes and the loop curvature does not play any significant role. We detect the generation of vorticity in the main body of the tube of opposite sign on the opposite sides of the apex. This is a consequence of the inhomogeneity of the azimuthal component of the field on the flux surfaces. The lift force associated with this global vorticity makes the flanks of the tube move away from their initial vertical plane in an antisymmetric fashion. The trajectories have an oscillatory motion superimposed, due to the shedding of vortex rolls to the wake, which creates a Von Karman street.

  7. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, T; Nordmark, A; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2015-01-01

    We numerically analyse the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number, ${\\rm Re}_a$. As ${\\rm Re}_a \\to 0$ and as the box size of the system tends to infinity we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in ${\\rm Re}_a$ for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are corrections to the analytical result of order ${\\rm Re}_a^{3/2}$. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice-Boltzmann simulations to analyse the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio $\\lambda_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.137$ below which tumbling ...

  8. Axial allometry in a neutrally buoyant environment: effects of the terrestrial-aquatic transition on vertebral scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K E; Pierce, S E

    2016-03-01

    Ecological diversification into new environments presents new mechanical challenges for locomotion. An extreme example of this is the transition from a terrestrial to an aquatic lifestyle. Here, we examine the implications of life in a neutrally buoyant environment on adaptations of the axial skeleton to evolutionary increases in body size. On land, mammals must use their thoracolumbar vertebral column for body support against gravity and thus exhibit increasing stabilization of the trunk as body size increases. Conversely, in water, the role of the axial skeleton in body support is reduced, and, in aquatic mammals, the vertebral column functions primarily in locomotion. Therefore, we hypothesize that the allometric stabilization associated with increasing body size in terrestrial mammals will be minimized in secondarily aquatic mammals. We test this by comparing the scaling exponent (slope) of vertebral measures from 57 terrestrial species (23 felids, 34 bovids) to 23 semi-aquatic species (pinnipeds), using phylogenetically corrected regressions. Terrestrial taxa meet predictions of allometric stabilization, with posterior vertebral column (lumbar region) shortening, increased vertebral height compared to width, and shorter, more disc-shaped centra. In contrast, pinniped vertebral proportions (e.g. length, width, height) scale with isometry, and in some cases, centra even become more spool-shaped with increasing size, suggesting increased flexibility. Our results demonstrate that evolution of a secondarily aquatic lifestyle has modified the mechanical constraints associated with evolutionary increases in body size, relative to terrestrial taxa. PMID:26679743

  9. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, T; Einarsson, J; Nordmark, A; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2015-12-01

    We numerically analyze the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem, we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number Re(a). As Re(a)→0 and as the box size of the system tends to infinity, we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in Re(a) for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are substantial finite-size corrections to the analytical results obtained for the unbounded system. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice Boltzmann simulations to analyze the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio λ(c)≈0.137 below which tumbling is stable (as well as log rolling). The simulation results show a bifurcation line in the λ-Re(a) plane that reaches λ≈0.1275 at the smallest shear Reynolds number (Re(a)=1) at which we could simulate with the lattice Boltzmann code, in qualitative agreement with the analytical results. PMID:26764819

  10. Multi-Parametric Study of Rising 3D Buoyant Flux Tubes in an Adiabatic Stratification Using AMR

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01

    We study the buoyant rise of magnetic flux tubes embedded in an adiabatic stratification using two-and three-dimensional, MHD simulations. We analyze the dependence of the tube evolution on the field line twist and on the curvature of the tube axis in different diffusion regimes. To be able to achieve a comparatively high spatial resolution we use the FLASH code, which has a built-in Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) capability. Our 3D experiments reach Reynolds numbers that permit a reasonable comparison of the results with those of previous 2D simulations. When the experiments are run without AMR, hence with a comparatively large diffusivity, the amount of longitudinal magnetic flux retained inside the tube increases with the curvature of the tube axis. However, when a low-diffusion regime is reached by using the AMR algorithms, the magnetic twist is able to prevent the splitting of the magnetic loop into vortex tubes and the loop curvature does not play any significant role. We detect the generation of vortic...

  11. A novel technique to neutralize the Yawing moment due to asymmetric thrust in a hybrid buoyant aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Anwar U.; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.; Sulaeman, Erwin; J. S Ali, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Dorsal fin is used in swimming animals like shark for the generation of thrust as well as to meet the requirement of the lateral stability. In the case of aircraft, rudders are normally used for the said requirement. In the present work, this nature inspired idea is explored for its application to neutralize the unavoidable asymmetric thrust produced by the twin engines of a hybrid buoyant aircraft. First, the estimation of asymmetric thrust is obtained with the help of analytical techniques for maximum thrust condition at 4 degree angle of attack. The moment generated by it is utilized for the sizing of a dorsal fin which looks similar to a tapered wing and is placed aft of the center of gravity. Wind tunnel testing at subsonic speed is carried out to explore the design features of this rotatable dorsal fin. It is found that a small rotation of 5 degree can generate the required moment. However, such rotation requires a complete pneumatic/electro-mechanical system and an alternative of it is to use a cambered airfoil for the dorsal fin installed at fixed location. Such a flow controlling device can also be used as an antenna mast, which is commonly installed out the fuselage of the aircraft for communication purposes. Moreover, by incorporating this technique, a pilot doesn't have to put an extra effort to make the aircraft stable in the presence of side wind.

  12. Large Scale Gas Mixing and Stratification Triggered by a Buoyant Plume With and Without Occurrence of Condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The benefits of using codes with 3-D capabilities to address safety issues of LWRs will be applicable to both the current generation of nuclear reactors as well to future ALWRs. The phenomena governing the containment response in case of some postulated severe accident scenarios include gas (air, hydrogen, steam) stratification in the containment, gas distribution between containment compartments, wall condensation, etc. These phenomena are driven by buoyant high momentum injection (jets) and/or low momentum injection (plumes). For instance, mixing in the immediate vicinity of the postulated line break is mainly dominated by very high velocity efflux, while low-momentum flows are responsible for most of the transport processes within the containment. A project named SETH is currently in progress under the auspices of 15 OECD countries, with the aim of creating an experimental database suitable to assess the 3-D code capabilities in analyzing key-physical phenomena relevant for LWR safety analysis. This paper describes some results of two SETH tests, performed in the PANDA facility (located at PSI in Switzerland), focusing on plumes flowing near a containment wall. The plumes are generated by injecting a constant amount of steam in one of two interconnected vessels initially filled with air. In one of the two tests the temperature of the injected steam and the initial containment wall and fluid temperatures allowed for condensation during the test. (authors)

  13. Hypernormal Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Giacomini, Raffaella; Gottschling, Andreas; Haefke, Christian; White, Halbert

    2002-01-01

    We derive a new family of probability densities that have the property of closed-form integrability. This flexible family finds a variety of applications, of which we illustrate density forecasting from models of the AR-ARCH class for U.S. inflation. We find that the hypernormal distribution for the model's disturbances leads to better density forecasts than the ones produced under the assumption that the disturbances are Normal or Student's t.

  14. A tunable microplasma gradient-index lens for millimeter waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy [School of Engineering, University of California Merced, Merced, California 95343 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    This work presents proof of concept of a novel application of field emission assisted (FEA) microplasmas that exploits the relatively high plasma number densities encountered in these devices. We hypothesize that the number density gradients and the resulting gradient in the microplasma relative permittivity/refractive index can be utilized as a tunable diverging lens with on/off ability to defocus waves in the Terahertz regime. Electron number density profiles obtained from one-dimensional particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collisions simulations for a typical FEA microplasma are used to determine the relative permittivity and conductivity profiles. Frequency domain wave propagation simulations using these profiles show that sub-mm waves can be controlled using the microplasma lens with the degree of defocusing depending on the wavelength. In spite of the non-zero conductivity, the medium is not significantly lossy at the frequencies considered.

  15. A tunable microplasma gradient-index lens for millimeter waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents proof of concept of a novel application of field emission assisted (FEA) microplasmas that exploits the relatively high plasma number densities encountered in these devices. We hypothesize that the number density gradients and the resulting gradient in the microplasma relative permittivity/refractive index can be utilized as a tunable diverging lens with on/off ability to defocus waves in the Terahertz regime. Electron number density profiles obtained from one-dimensional particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collisions simulations for a typical FEA microplasma are used to determine the relative permittivity and conductivity profiles. Frequency domain wave propagation simulations using these profiles show that sub-mm waves can be controlled using the microplasma lens with the degree of defocusing depending on the wavelength. In spite of the non-zero conductivity, the medium is not significantly lossy at the frequencies considered

  16. Direct numerical simulation of transitional and turbulent buoyant planar jet flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehravaran, K.; Jaberi, F. A.

    2004-12-01

    The effects of gravity on the physical and compositional structures of transitional and turbulent diffusion flames are studied via analysis of the data generated by direct numerical simulation of a planar jet flame at various gravity conditions. A fully compressible, high-order compact, finite-difference computational scheme is used together with a global kinetics model for chemical reaction. The results of our nonreacting turbulent jet simulations are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The results of our reacting jet simulations are also consistent with previous findings and indicate that in the absence of gravity, combustion damps the flow instability, and hence reduces "turbulence production" and jet growth. However, in the "finite-gravity" conditions, combustion generated density variations may promote turbulence and enhance both the mixing and the combustion through buoyancy effects. Our results also indicate that the gravity effects on a transitional/turbulent jet flame is not limited to large-scale flame flickering, and there is a significant impact on small-scale turbulence and mixing as well. Furthermore, the analysis of compositional flame structures suggests that the finite-rate chemistry effects are more significant in finite-gravity conditions than in zero-gravity.

  17. The influence of ALN-Al gradient material gradient index on ballistic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballistic performance of the gradient material is superior to laminated material, and gradient materials have different gradient types. Using ls-dyna to simulate the ballistic performance of ALN-AL gradient target plates which contain three gradient index (b = 1, b = 0.5, b = 2). Through Hopkinson bar numerical simulation to the target plate materials, we obtained the reflection stress wave and transmission stress wave state of gradient material to get the best gradient index. The internal stress state of gradient material is simulated by amplification processing of the target plate model. When the gradient index b is equal to 1, the gradient target plate is best of all.

  18. The influence of ALN-Al gradient material gradient index on ballistic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youcong; Liu, Qiwen; Li, Yao; Shen, Qiang

    2013-03-01

    Ballistic performance of the gradient material is superior to laminated material, and gradient materials have different gradient types. Using ls-dyna to simulate the ballistic performance of ALN-AL gradient target plates which contain three gradient index (b = 1, b = 0.5, b = 2). Through Hopkinson bar numerical simulation to the target plate materials, we obtained the reflection stress wave and transmission stress wave state of gradient material to get the best gradient index. The internal stress state of gradient material is simulated by amplification processing of the target plate model. When the gradient index b is equal to 1, the gradient target plate is best of all.

  19. Gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    We compute the gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics. The results are compared with the corresponding expansion of the underlying kinetic-theory model with the collision term treated in the relaxation time approximation. We find that a recent formulation of anisotropic hydrodynamics based on an anisotropic matching principle yields the first three terms of the gradient expansion in agreement with those obtained for the kinetic theory. This gives further support for this particular hydrodynamic model as a good approximation of the kinetic-theory approach. We further find that the gradient expansion of anisotropic hydrodynamics is an asymptotic series, and the singularities of the analytic continuation of its Borel transform indicate the presence of non-hydrodynamic modes.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Buoyant Pulsating Exchange Flow through Circular Opening in Horizontal Partition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gera

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An interesting transport phenomenon is observed through openings between two compartments separated by a thin, vented, horizontal partition such as those between containment internals in nuclear power systems, in industrial installations in event of fire, passive cooling of heated structures and in natural building ventilation. A heavier fluid located on the top of a lighter fluid and separated by a horizontal vent constitutes a gravitationally unstable system. Horizontal vents produce flow, which are unstable with irregular oscillatory behavior. The objective of the present work was to simulate such type of flow across a circular opening in horizontal partition in presence of buoyancy force. Unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations have been solved with Finite Volume Method. The equations were solved using the in-house CFD code based upon the well-established pressure-based finite volume methodology. In terms of temporal differencing second order accurate Crank-Nicolson scheme was used. Interpolation to cell faces for the convective terms was performed using a third order QUICK scheme, second order central differencing was used for the viscous terms. Pressure-velocity coupling was based on the SIMPLE procedure. The upper chamber was filled with salt water and the lower chamber with fresh water, creating a density differential between the two chambers. Opposing forces at the interface created a gravitationally unstable system, and an oscillating exchange of fluid developed. Three different cases for vent length to diameter ratio (L/D 0.008, 0.0376 and 0.106 from a reported experiment were examined. The pulsation frequencies and their decay with time have been determined. The flow coefficients were computed and compared with experimental results.