WorldWideScience

Sample records for buoyant density gradient

  1. Preparation of Avocado Mitochondria Using Self-Generated Percoll Density Gradients and Changes in Buoyant Density during Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, F; Romani, R

    1982-11-01

    Mitochondria from avocado (Persea americana Mill, var. Fuerte and Hass) can be rapidly prepared at every stage of ripening using differential centrifugation and self-generated Percoll gradients. The procedure results in improved oxidative and phosphorylative properties, especially for mitochondria isolated from preclimacteric fruits.A gradual change in the buoyant density of avocado mitochondria takes place during ripening. Climacteric and postclimacteric avocado mitochondria have the same buoyant density as other plant mitochondria (potato, cauliflower), whereas mitochondria from preclimacteric fruit have a lower density. The transition in buoyant density occurs during the climacteric rise, and two populations of intact mitochondria (p = 1.060 and p = 1.075) can be separated at this stage. Evidence indicates that the difference in mitochondrial buoyant density between preclimacteric and postclimacteric mitochondria is likely due to interactions with soluble cytosolic components.

  2. Buoyant densities of phototrophic sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R.

    1985-01-01

    The buoyant densities of bacterial cells are greatly influenced by the accumulation of intracellular reserve material. The buoyant density of phototrophic bacteria that are planktonic is of particular interest, since these organisms must remain in the photic zone of the water column for optimal growth. Separation of cells by their buoyant density may also be of use in separating and identifying organisms from a natural population. The bacteria used were obtained from pure cultures, enrichments, or samples taken directly from the environment.

  3. Protoplast water content of bacterial spores determined by buoyant density sedimentation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay, J A; Beaman, T C; Gerhardt, P

    1985-01-01

    Protoplast wet densities (1.315 to 1.400 g/ml), determined by buoyant density sedimentation in Metrizamide gradients, were correlated inversely with the protoplast water contents (26.4 to 55.0 g of water/100 g of wet protoplast) of nine diverse types of pure lysozyme-sensitive dormant bacterial spores. The correlation equation provided a precise method for obtaining the protoplast water contents of other spore types with small impure samples and indicated that the average protoplast dry densi...

  4. Energy in density gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Vranjes, J.; Kono, M

    2015-01-01

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindric configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and in partic...

  5. Energy in density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J., E-mail: jvranjes@yahoo.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Kono, M., E-mail: kono@fps.chuo-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  6. Density Driven Removal of Sediment from a Buoyant Muddy Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhnia, M.; Strom, K.

    2014-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effect of settling driven instabilities on sediment removal from hypopycnal plumes. Traditional approaches scale removal rates with particle settling velocity however, it has been suggested that the removal from buoyant suspensions happens at higher rates. The enhancement of removal is likely due to gravitational instabilities, such as fingering, at two-fluid interface. Previous studies have all sought to suppress flocculation, and no simple model exists to predict the removal rates under the effect of such instabilities. This study examines whether or not flocculation hampers instability formation and presents a simple removal rate model accounting for gravitational instabilities. A buoyant suspension of flocculated Kaolinite overlying a base of clear saltwater was investigated in a laboratory tank. Concentration was continuously measured in both layers with a pair of OBS sensors, and interface was monitored with digital cameras. Snapshots from the video were used to measure finger velocity. Samples of flocculated particles at the interface were extracted to retrieve floc size data using a floc camera. Flocculation did not stop creation of settling-driven fingers. A simple cylinder-based force balance model was capable of predicting finger velocity. Analogy of fingering process of fine grained suspensions to thermal plume formation and the concept of Grashof number enabled us to model finger spacing as a function of initial concentration. Finally, from geometry, the effective cross-sectional area was correlated to finger spacing. Reformulating the outward flux expression was done by substitution of finger velocity, rather than particle settling velocity, and finger area instead of total area. A box model along with the proposed outward flux was used to predict the SSC in buoyant layer. The model quantifies removal flux based on the initial SSC and is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. A change in a single gene of Salmonella typhimurium can dramatically change its buoyant density.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, W W; Kirkish, M A; Koch, A L

    1994-01-01

    The growth rates and buoyant densities of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant, TL126 (proB74A+), with enhanced osmotolerance caused by proline overproduction were measured and compared with the growth rates and buoyant densities of an isogenic (wild-type) strain, TL128 (proB+ A+), with normal control of proline production. Growth rates were determined in a rich medium (Luria broth) with added NaCl to produce various osmotic strengths ranging from 300 to 2,000 mosM. At low concentrations of NaCl, ...

  8. Evidence for osmoregulation of cell growth and buoyant density in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldwin, W W; Kubitschek, H. E.

    1984-01-01

    The buoyant density of cells of Escherichia coli B/r NC32 increased with the osmolarity of the growth medium. Growth rate and its variability were also dependent upon the osmolarity of the medium. Maximum growth rates and minimum variability of these rates were obtained in Luria broth by addition of NaCl to a concentration of about 0.23 M.

  9. Physiological considerations in applying laboratory-determined buoyant densities to predictions of bacterial and protozoan transport in groundwater: Results of in-situ and laboratory tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Kinner, N.; Mayberry, N.

    1997-01-01

    Buoyant densities were determined for groundwater bacteria and microflagellates (protozoa) from a sandy aquifer (Cape Cod, MA) using two methods: (1) density-gradient centrifugation (DGC) and (2) Stoke's law approximations using sedimentation rates observed during natural-gradient injection and recovery tests. The dwarf (average cell size, 0.3 ??m), unattached bacteria inhabiting a pristine zone just beneath the water table and a majority (~80%) of the morphologically diverse community of free- living bacteria inhabiting a 5-km-long plume of organically-contaminated groundwater had DGC-determined buoyant densities <1.019 g/cm3 before culturing. In the aquifer, sinking rates for the uncultured 2-??m size class of contaminant plume bacteria were comparable to that of the bromide tracer (1.9 x 10-3 M), also suggesting a low buoyant density. Culturing groundwater bacteria resulted in larger (0.8-1.3 ??m), less neutrally- buoyant (1.043-1.081 g/cm3) cells with potential sedimentation rates up to 64-fold higher than those predicted for the uncultured populations. Although sedimentation generally could be neglected in predicting subsurface transport for the community of free-living groundwater bacteria, it appeared to be important for the cultured isolates, at least until they readapt to aquifer conditions. Culturing-induced alterations in size of the contaminant-plume microflagellates (2-3 ??m) were ameliorated by using a lower nutrient, acidic (pH 5) porous growth medium. Buoyant densities of the cultured microflagellates were low, i.e., 1.024-1.034 g/cm3 (using the DGC assay) and 1.017-1.039 g/cm3 (estimated from in-situ sedimentation rates), suggesting good potential for subsurface transport under favorable conditions.

  10. Numerical study of a buoyant plume from a multi-flue stack into a variable temperature gradient atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velamati, Ratna Kishore; Vivek, M; Goutham, K; Sreekanth, G R; Dharmarajan, Santosh; Goel, Mukesh

    2015-11-01

    Air pollution is one of the major global hazards and industries have been one of its major contributors. This paper primarily focuses on analyzing the dispersion characteristics of buoyant plumes of the pollutant released from a multi-flue vertical stack into a variable temperature gradient atmosphere (α) in a constant-velocity cross wind using two stack configurations-inline and parallel. The study is conducted for different Froude numbers, Fr = 12.64, 9.55, and 8.27. The atmospheric temperature gradients considered for the study are 0, +1, +1.5, and +2 K/100 m. The numerical study is done using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. The effects of stack configuration, α, and Fr on the plume characteristics are presented. It is observed that the plume rises higher and disperses over a larger area with the inline configuration due to better mixing and shielding effect. With higher α, it is seen that the plume rises initially and then descends due to variation of the buoyant force. The plume rise initially is strongly influenced by the momentum of the jet, and as it moves downstream, it is influenced by the cooling rate of the plume. Furthermore, the plume rises higher and disperses over a larger area with a decrease in Fr. PMID:26099599

  11. Interpretation of the reduced density gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Boto, Roberto A.; Contreras-García, Julia; Tierny, Julien; Piquemal, Jean-Philip

    2015-01-01

    An interpretation of the reduced density gradient in terms of the bosonic kinetic energy density is presented. Contrary to other bonding indicators based on the kinetic energy density such as the localised orbital locator (LOL) or the electron localization function (ELF), the reduced density gradient is not only able to identify covalent bondings, but also ionic and non-covalent interactions. This study reveals that the critical points of the reduced density gradient are closely connected wit...

  12. Combining Step Gradients and Linear Gradients in Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashok A; Walz, Jenna A; Gonidec, Mathieu; Mace, Charles R; Whitesides, George M

    2015-06-16

    Combining aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS) and magnetic levitation (MagLev) provides a method to produce hybrid gradients in apparent density. AMPS—solutions of different polymers, salts, or surfactants that spontaneously separate into immiscible but predominantly aqueous phases—offer thermodynamically stable steps in density that can be tuned by the concentration of solutes. MagLev—the levitation of diamagnetic objects in a paramagnetic fluid within a magnetic field gradient—can be arranged to provide a near-linear gradient in effective density where the height of a levitating object above the surface of the magnet corresponds to its density; the strength of the gradient in effective density can be tuned by the choice of paramagnetic salt and its concentrations and by the strength and gradient in the magnetic field. Including paramagnetic salts (e.g., MnSO4 or MnCl2) in AMPS, and placing them in a magnetic field gradient, enables their use as media for MagLev. The potential to create large steps in density with AMPS allows separations of objects across a range of densities. The gradients produced by MagLev provide resolution over a continuous range of densities. By combining these approaches, mixtures of objects with large differences in density can be separated and analyzed simultaneously. Using MagLev to add an effective gradient in density also enables tuning the range of densities captured at an interface of an AMPS by simply changing the position of the container in the magnetic field. Further, by creating AMPS in which phases have different concentrations of paramagnetic ions, the phases can provide different resolutions in density. These results suggest that combining steps in density with gradients in density can enable new classes of separations based on density. PMID:25978093

  13. GPS, GNSS, and Ionospheric Density Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, P. M.; O'Hanlon, B.; Humphreys, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Ionospheric density and density gradients affect GNSS signals in two ways. They can introduce ranging errors or irregularities that form on the density gradients producing scintillation. Here we focus on the issue of ranging errors. There are two approaches to mitigating ranging errors produced by ionospheric density gradients which can be 20-30 m during major magnetic storms. The first approach is to use a reference receiver(s) to determine the ionospheric contribution to ranging errors. The ranging error is then transmitted to the user for correction within the mobile receiver. This approach is frequently referred to as differential GPS and, when multiple reference receivers are used, the system is referred to as an augmentation system. This approach is vulnerable to ionospheric gradients depending on the reference receiver spacing(s) and latency in applying the correction within the mobile receiver. The second approach is to transmit navigation signals at two frequencies and then use the relative delay between the two signals to both estimate the ranging error and calculate the correct range. Currently the dual frequency technique is used by US military receivers with an encryption key and some civilian receivers which must be stationary and average over times long compared to those required for navigation. However, the technology of space based radio navigation is changing. GPS will soon be a system with three frequencies and multiple codes. Furthermore Europe, Russia, and China are developing independent systems to complement and compete with GPS while India and Japan are developing local systems to enhance GPS performance in their regions. In this talk we address two questions. How do density gradients affect augmentation systems including the social consequences and will the new GPS/GNSS systems with multiple civilian frequencies be able to remove ionospheric errors. The answers are not at all clear.

  14. Regularized Multitask Learning for Multidimensional Log-Density Gradient Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Ikko; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Log-density gradient estimation is a fundamental statistical problem and possesses various practical applications such as clustering and measuring nongaussianity. A naive two-step approach of first estimating the density and then taking its log gradient is unreliable because an accurate density estimate does not necessarily lead to an accurate log-density gradient estimate. To cope with this problem, a method to directly estimate the log-density gradient without density estimation has been explored and demonstrated to work much better than the two-step method. The objective of this letter is to improve the performance of this direct method in multidimensional cases. Our idea is to regard the problem of log-density gradient estimation in each dimension as a task and apply regularized multitask learning to the direct log-density gradient estimator. We experimentally demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed multitask method in log-density gradient estimation and mode-seeking clustering.

  15. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  16. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  17. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k (perpendicular) ρs ∼< 10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  18. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-14

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm(-3). Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change. PMID:27595315

  19. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm-3. Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change.

  20. Non-Boussinesq turbulent buoyant jet of a low-density gas leaks into high-density ambient

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-12-01

    In this article, we study the problem of low-density gas jet injected into high-density ambient numerically which is important in applications such as fuel injection and leaks. It is assumed that the local rate of entrainment is consisted of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. The integral models of the mass, momentum and concentration fluxes are obtained and transformed to a set of ordinary differential equations using some similarity transformations. The resulting system is solved to determine the centerline quantities which are used to get the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet. Therefore, the centerline and mean quantities are used together with the governing equation to determine some important turbulent quantities such as, cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity- concentration correlation, turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity. Throughout this paper the developed model is verified by comparing the present results with experimental results and jet/plume theory from the literature. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A study on improvement of RANS analysis for erosion of density stratified layer of multicomponent gas by buoyant jet in a containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis on a density stratification layer consisting of multiple gases in the reactor containment vessel is important for the safety assessment of sever accidents. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the project on the containment thermal hydraulics. We carried out Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses in order to investigate the erosion of the density stratification layer by a vertical buoyant jet under this project. We used the Reynolds averaged numerical simulation (RANS) and Large eddy simulation (LES) models to analyze the erosion of a density stratification layer by a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel which represents a containment vessel. This numerical study calculates the turbulent mixing of a two-component (air and helium) gas mixture. The turbulence models used for the RANS analyses are two types of k-ε models. The first model is the low Reynolds number k-ε model developed by Launder and Sharma. The second model is revised from the first model in order to accurately consider the turbulent production and damping in a stratification layer. The results have indicated that both the RANS and LES models simulate almost the same behavior of the erosion of the density stratification layer. While the erosion rate calculated by the low-Re k-ε model was faster than that of the LES model, the modified k-ε model could calculate the erosion rate similar to the LES result. (author)

  2. Density gradients in ceramic pellets measured by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density gradients are of fundamental importance in ceramic processing and computed tomography (CT) can provide accurate measurements of density profiles in sintered and unsintered ceramic parts. As a demonstration of this potential, the density gradients in an unsintered pellet pressed from an alumina powder were measured by CT scanning. To detect such small density gradients, the CT images must have good density resolution and be free from beam-hardening effects. This was achieved by measuring high-contrast (low-noise) images with the use of an Ir-192 isotopic source. A beam-hardening correction was applied. The resulting images are discussed relative to the transmission of forces through the powder mass during the pelletizing process

  3. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  4. Separation of colloidal two dimensional materials by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have been made through various approaches but obtaining monodispersed simply by synthesis optimization gained little success, which highlighted the need for introducing nanoseparation methods. Density gradient ultracentrifugation method has emerged as a versatile and scalable method for sorting colloidal 2D nanomaterials. Isopycnic separation was applied on thickness-dependent separation of graphene nanosheets. And rate-zonal separation, as a more versatile separation method, demonstrated its capability in sorting nanosheets of chemically modified single layered graphene, layered double hydroxide, and even metallic Ag. Establishing such density gradient ultracentrifugation method not only achieves monodispersed nanosheets and provides new opportunities for investigation on size dependent properties of 2D materials, but also makes the surface modification possible by introducing “reaction zones” during sedimentation of the colloids. - Graphical abstract: Two-dimensional (2D) materials have been made through various approaches but obtaining monodispersed simply by synthesis optimization gained little success, which highlighted the need for introducing nanoseparation methods. Density gradient ultracentrifugation method has emerged as a versatile and scalable method for sorting colloidal 2D nanomaterials according to their size of thickness difference. Establishing such density gradient ultracentrifugation method not only achieves monodispersed nanosheets and provides new opportunities for investigation on size dependent properties of 2D materials, but also makes the surface modification possible by introducing “reaction zones” during sedimentation of the colloids. - Highlights: • Density gradient ultracentrifugation was applied on size separation of 2D material. • Isopycnic separation was applied on separation of low density materials. • Rate-zonal separation was applied on separation of large density materials. • Size

  5. Fabrication and evaluation of uniform and gradient density epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domeier, L.A.; Skala, D.M.; Goods, S.H. [and others

    1997-11-01

    Filled epoxy materials which vary in density in a designed manner have been fabricated and their mechanical properties evaluated. Density variations were produced by incorporating different volume fractions of either glass microballoons (GMB) or alumina. Several different sample types were evaluated including uniform density (0.8 g/cm{sup 3} < {rho} < 2.0 g/cm{sup 3}) samples and gradient density samples (GMB only, 0.8 g/cm{sup 3} < {rho} < 1.2 g/cm{sup 3}). The uniform density specimens were evaluated for the effects of filler type and concentration on modulus and toughness. Results indicated that addition of alumina filler significantly increased the resulting modulus while addition of GMB had little measurable effect. These differences could be understood in terms of the differing moduli of the additives relative to that of the epoxy matrix. In the former case the alumina particulates had a modulus much greater than that of the epoxy while in the latter case, the modulus of the GMB additive was only slightly greater than that of the matrix. Addition of either filler significantly degraded the toughness of the composite specimens and precluded the use of gradients to enhance toughness performance. Discontinuous {open_quotes}block{close_quotes} gradients used for testing were fabricated by simple sequential pours of formulations with different GMB loadings and were evaluated for modulus, strength and ductility. Continuous gradients were fabricated in process studies by programmed shifts in the peristaltic pumping/mixing ratio of epoxies filled with either alumina or GMB. None of the continuous gradient materials were mechanically tested. These results suggest that applications utilizing gradient materials containing alumina and similar high modulus fillers to provide designed stiffness rather than improved toughness are the most appropriate targets for future investigation.

  6. Enhancement of electric and magnetic wave fields at density gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reiniusson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We use Freja satellite data to investigate irregular small-scale density variations. The observations are made in the auroral region at about 1000-1700 km. The density variations are a few percent, and the structures are found to be spatial down to a scale length of a few ion gyroradii. Irregular density variations are often found in an environment of whistler mode/lower hybrid waves and we show that at the density gradients both the electric and magnetic wave fields are enhanced.

  7. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  8. Density gradients and the expansion-shrinkage transition during sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Peizhen K.; Li Wenxia; Lannutti, John J

    2004-04-19

    Links between density gradients, internal microstructure and in situ sintering shrinkage in compacts formed from spray-dried alumina powder are established using a laser dilatometer and X-ray computed tomography (CT). All samples initially have the same overall density but different internal structures. An expansion-shrinkage transition occurs between 1000 and 1100 deg. C. Forming conditions appear to play a role: the samples compacted at 25% RH (Relative Humidity) shrank more rapidly than those compacted at 98% RH below 1300 deg. C; above 1300 deg. C, however, the specimen formed at 98% RH shrank more rapidly. CT examination following sintering showed both preservation and exaggeration of the original density gradients. Microstructural connectivity apparently contributes to both the observed macroscopic expansion and the onset of shrinkage. Discrete element modeling clearly suggests that the effective 'transmission' of particle-level behavior to the macroscopic level is controlled both by internal agglomerate density and initial agglomerate bonding.

  9. A density gradient theory based method for surface tension calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The density gradient theory has been becoming a widely used framework for calculating surface tension, within which the same equation of state is used for the interface and bulk phases, because it is a theoretically sound, consistent and computationally affordable approach. Based on the observati...

  10. The latitudinal gradient of the NO peak density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latitudinal gradients of the maximum nitric oxide densities near 110 km are presented for solstice and equinox periods from 1982 through 1985 as observed by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer satellite. The data indicate that the response of the maximum NO densities to the declining level of solar activity is latitudinally and seasonally dependent: the polar regions exhibit little sensitivity to solar activity, while the low latitude NO responds strongly. The data also reveal marked asymmetries in the latitudinal structure of the two hemispheres for each season. During June solstice periods, the latitudinal distribution is fairly flat, unlike December solstice periods which tend to show a definite minimum near 30 degree N. Similarly, March data show very little latitudinal variation in the NO peak density between about ± 40 degree, while the September data show marked gradients for the later years. The SME data further indicate that the nitric oxide densities vary considerably from day to day, even during very quiet geomagnetic periods, suggesting that the concept of an average distribution is of limited usefulness in understanding nitric oxide. A two-dimensional model is used to simualte the June solar cycle minimum data. The latitudinally averaged magnitudes of the observed NO peak densities are reproduced reasonably well by the model, but the shape of the latitudinal variation is not

  11. Interacting Eigenmodes of a plasma diode with a density gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of narrow high frequency electric field spikes in plasma density gradients is investigated using one-dimensional particle in cell simulations. It is found that the shape of the plasma density gradient is very important for the spike formation. The spike appears also in simulations with immobile ions showing that a coupling to the ion motion, as for example in wave interactions, is not necessary for the formation of HF spikes. However, the HF spike influences the ion motion, and ion waves are seen in the simulations. It has been found, in experiments and simulations, that the electron velocity distribution function deviates from the Maxwellian distribution. Dispersion relations are calculated using realistic distribution functions. The spike can be seen as a coupled system of two Eigenmodes of a plasma diode fed by the beam-plasma interaction. Based on a simplified fluid description of such Eigenmodes, explanations for the localization of the spike, spatially and in frequency, are given. The density amplitude is comparable with the DC density level close to the cathode. Space charge limits of waves in this region seem to determine the amplitude of the spike through the Poisson's equation

  12. Interacting Eigenmodes of a plasma diode with a density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loefgren, T.; Gunell, H.

    1997-08-01

    The formation of narrow high frequency electric field spikes in plasma density gradients is investigated using one-dimensional particle in cell simulations. It is found that the shape of the plasma density gradient is very important for the spike formation. The spike appears also in simulations with immobile ions showing that a coupling to the ion motion, as for example in wave interactions, is not necessary for the formation of HF spikes. However, the HF spike influences the ion motion, and ion waves are seen in the simulations. It has been found, in experiments and simulations, that the electron velocity distribution function deviates from the Maxwellian distribution. Dispersion relations are calculated using realistic distribution functions. The spike can be seen as a coupled system of two Eigenmodes of a plasma diode fed by the beam-plasma interaction. Based on a simplified fluid description of such Eigenmodes, explanations for the localization of the spike, spatially and in frequency, are given. The density amplitude is comparable with the DC density level close to the cathode. Space charge limits of waves in this region seem to determine the amplitude of the spike through the Poisson`s equation. 12 refs, 19 figs.

  13. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  14. Density gradients and internal dust in the Orion nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Binette, L; Mayya, Y D

    2002-01-01

    The ionization structure of the Orion nebula can be described as a skin-like ionization structure on the surface of a dense cloud. We propose that a steep density stratification, increasing as a powerlaw ($n \\propto x^{-2}$) function of distance x from the ionization front, exhibits properties which agree with our long-slit spectrum of the Orion nebula. For instance, there exist a unicity relation between both the Hbeta surface brightness or the ionization front [SII] density, and the scale L of the powerlaw, where L is the distance between the ionization front and the onset of the density near the exciting star. Internal dust is required to obtain a simultaneous acceptable fit of both the [SII] density and then Hbeta suface brightness observations. Nebular models containing small dust grains provide a better fit than large grains. The line ratio gradients observed along the slit are qualitatively reproduced by our density stratified models assuming a stellar temperature of 38000 K. Collisional deexcitation a...

  15. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  16. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabra I Djomehri

    Full Text Available Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca to phosphorus (P and Ca to zinc (Zn elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc. A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49, hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46, cementum (1.51, and bone (1.68 were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765 and in cementum (595-990, highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations.

  17. Mineral density volume gradients in normal and diseased human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djomehri, Sabra I; Candell, Susan; Case, Thomas; Browning, Alyssa; Marshall, Grayson W; Yun, Wenbing; Lau, S H; Webb, Samuel; Ho, Sunita P

    2015-01-01

    Clinical computed tomography provides a single mineral density (MD) value for heterogeneous calcified tissues containing early and late stage pathologic formations. The novel aspect of this study is that, it extends current quantitative methods of mapping mineral density gradients to three dimensions, discretizes early and late mineralized stages, identifies elemental distribution in discretized volumes, and correlates measured MD with respective calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) and Ca to zinc (Zn) elemental ratios. To accomplish this, MD variations identified using polychromatic radiation from a high resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) benchtop unit were correlated with elemental mapping obtained from a microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) using synchrotron monochromatic radiation. Digital segmentation of tomograms from normal and diseased tissues (N=5 per group; 40-60 year old males) contained significant mineral density variations (enamel: 2820-3095 mg/cc, bone: 570-1415 mg/cc, cementum: 1240-1340 mg/cc, dentin: 1480-1590 mg/cc, cementum affected by periodontitis: 1100-1220 mg/cc, hypomineralized carious dentin: 345-1450 mg/cc, hypermineralized carious dentin: 1815-2740 mg/cc, and dental calculus: 1290-1770 mg/cc). A plausible linear correlation between segmented MD volumes and elemental ratios within these volumes was established, and Ca/P ratios for dentin (1.49), hypomineralized dentin (0.32-0.46), cementum (1.51), and bone (1.68) were observed. Furthermore, varying Ca/Zn ratios were distinguished in adapted compared to normal tissues, such as in bone (855-2765) and in cementum (595-990), highlighting Zn as an influential element in prompting observed adaptive properties. Hence, results provide insights on mineral density gradients with elemental concentrations and elemental footprints that in turn could aid in elucidating mechanistic processes for pathologic formations. PMID:25856386

  18. Moho Density Contrast in Central Eurasia from GOCE Gravity Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Eshagh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Seismic data are primarily used in studies of the Earth’s inner structure. Since large parts of the world are not yet sufficiently covered by seismic surveys, products from the Earth’s satellite observation systems have more often been used for this purpose in recent years. In this study we use the gravity-gradient data derived from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE, the elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM and other global datasets to determine the Moho density contrast at the study area which comprises most of the Eurasian plate (including parts of surrounding continental and oceanic tectonic plates. A regional Moho recovery is realized by solving the Vening Meinesz-Moritz’s (VMM inverse problem of isostasy and a seismic crustal model is applied to constrain the gravimetric solution. Our results reveal that the Moho density contrast reaches minima along the mid-oceanic rift zones and maxima under the continental crust. This spatial pattern closely agrees with that seen in the CRUST1.0 seismic crustal model as well as in the KTH1.0 gravimetric-seismic Moho model. However, these results differ considerably from some previously published gravimetric studies. In particular, we demonstrate that there is no significant spatial correlation between the Moho density contrast and Moho deepening under major orogens of Himalaya and Tibet. In fact, the Moho density contrast under most of the continental crustal structure is typically much more uniform.

  19. NUMERICAL PREDICTION OF LINE BUOYANT JETS IN CROSS FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The k-ε turbulence model was used to establish the mathematicalmodel of two-dimensional line buoyant jets in crossflow. The hybrid finite analytic method and staggered grid were applied to the calculation of line buoyant jets. Only receiving water with uniform density is considered. The distribution of velocity, temperature and turbulent kinetic energy were analyzed, and the variation of the maximum velocity was given. The effect of velocity ratio and densimetric Froude number on line buoyant jets was considered.

  20. Stable smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics in very steep density gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Benjamin T; Monaghan, Joseph J; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The equations of smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD), even with the various corrections to instabilities so far proposed, have been observed to be unstable when a very steep density gradient is necessarily combined with a variable smoothing length formalism. Here we consider in more detail the modifications made to the SPMHD equations in LBP2015 that resolve this instability by replacing the smoothing length in the induction and anisotropic force equations with an average smoothing length term. We then explore the choice of average used and compare the effects on a test `cylinder-in-a-box' problem and the collapse of a magnetised molecular cloud core. We find that, aside from some benign numerical effects at low resolutions for the quadratic mean, the formalism is robust as to the choice of average but that in complicated models it is essential to apply the average to both equations; in particular, all four averages considered exhibit similar conservation properties. This improved formalism allows ...

  1. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results.

  2. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results

  3. The influence of electron density gradient direction on gradient-drift instabilities in the E-layer of the ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Berngardt, O I

    2010-01-01

    We show that the dispersion relation for gradient-drift and Farley-Buneman instabilities within the approximation of the two-fluid MHD should contain the terms which are traditionally supposed to be small. These terms are caused by taking into account divergence of particles velocity and electron density gradient along the magnetic field direction. It is shown that at heights below 115km the solution of the dispersion relation transforms into standard one, except the situations, when the electron density gradient is parallel to magnetic field or wave-vector. In these cases the traditionally neglected summands to the growth rate of the irregularities becomes significant. The additional terms depend on relative directions of electron density gradient, magnetic field and mean velocities. This leads to the different instability growth conditions at equatorial and high-latitude regions of the ionosphere. The obtained results do not contradict with the experimental data.

  4. Settling of almost neutrally buoyant particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hinsberg, Michel; Clercx, Herman; Toschi, Federico

    2015-11-01

    Settling of particles in a turbulent flow occurs in various industrial and natural phenomena, examples are clouds and waste water treatment. It is well known that turbulence can enhance the settling velocity of particles. Many studies have been done, numerically and experimentally to investigate this behavior for the case of ``heavy'' particles, with particle to fluid density ratios above 100. Here we investigate the case of almost neutrally buoyant particles, i.e. density ratios between 1 and 100. In the case of light particles the Maxey-Riley equations cannot be simplified to only the Stokes drag and gravity force as pressure gradient, added mass and Basset history force are important as well. We investigate the influence of these forces on the settling velocity of particles and show that the extra forces can both increase or decrease the settling velocity, depending on the combination of the Stokes number and gravity applied.

  5. Gram-scale fractionation of nanodiamonds by density gradient ultracentrifugation

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Size is a defining characteristic of nanoparticles; it influences their optical and electronic properties as well as their interactions with molecules and macromolecules. Producing nanoparticles with narrow size distributions remains one of the main challenges to their utilization. At this time, the number of practical approaches to optimize the size distribution of nanoparticles in many interesting materials systems, including diamond nanocrystals, remains limited. Diamond nanocrystals synthesized by detonation protocols-so-called detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs)-are promising systems for drug delivery, photonics, and composites. DNDs are composed of primary particles with diameters mainly <10 nm and their aggregates (ca. 10-500 nm). Here, we introduce a large-scale approach to rate-zonal density gradient ultracentrifugation to obtain monodispersed fractions of nanoparticles in high yields. We use this method to fractionate a highly concentrated and stable aqueous solution of DNDs and to investigate the size distribution of various fractions by dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. This fractionation method enabled us to separate gram-scale amounts of DNDs into several size ranges within a relatively short period of time. In addition, the high product yields obtained for each fraction allowed us to apply the fractionation method iteratively to a particular size range of particles and to collect various fractions of highly monodispersed primary particles. Our method paves the way for in-depth studies of the physical and optical properties, growth, and aggregation mechanism of DNDs. Applications requiring DNDs with specific particle or aggregate sizes are now within reach. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Calculate Electric Field Gradient of TiO2 Within Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>TiO2 electric field gradient has been calculated utilizing WIEN2K program, which is ab initio based on density function theory (DFT). DFT uses the charge density as a variable instead of electronic wave

  7. Negatively buoyant starting jets

    OpenAIRE

    Marugán-Cruz, C.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Javier; Martínez-Bazán, C.

    2009-01-01

    The initial development of negatively buoyant jets has been investigated experimentally and numerically, focusing on the role played by gravity in the evolution of the leading vortex ring. Under the experimental conditions considered in this work, the densimetric Froude number, Fr= ρjU²j/[(ρ₀ − ρj) gD] , which represents the ratio between the jet momentum and the buoyancy forces, emerges as the most relevant parameter characterizing the dynamics of the flow. Two different flow regimes h...

  8. Planar gradient coil design by scaling the spatial frequencies of minimum-inductance current density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S Y; Park, B S; Yi, J H; Yi, W

    1997-11-01

    Gradient coil inductance has been remarkably reduced by the minimum-inductance design technique, which minimizes the magnetic energy stored by the gradient coil. The planar gradient coil designed by this technique, however, often has poor magnetic field linearity. Scaling the spatial frequencies of the current density function derived by this method, the magnetic field linearity of the planar gradient coil can be greatly improved with a small sacrifice of gradient coil inductance. A figure of merit of the planar gradient coil has been found to be improved by scaling the spatial frequencies.

  9. Three-dimensional flow structure in highly buoyant jet by scanning stereo PIV combined with POD analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study flow structure in highly buoyant jet with inflow. • Three-dimensional velocity field is measured by scanning stereo PIV. • We examine flow structure by three-dimensional POD analysis. • Magnitude and scale of velocity fluctuation in POD mode is discussed. • Role of cross-flow across longitudinal structure is reported. - Abstract: The flow characteristics and the structure of highly buoyant jet of low density fluid issuing into a stagnant surrounding of high density fluid is studied by scanning stereo PIV combined with proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) analysis. The experiment is carried out at Froude number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 200, which satisfies the inflow condition due to the unstable density gradient near the nozzle exit. An increase in the maximum mean velocity occurs and the vertical velocity fluctuation is highly amplified near the nozzle exit, which suggests the influence of inflow due to the unstable density gradient. The POD analysis indicates that the vertical velocity fluctuation is the major source of fluctuating energy contributing to the development of the highly buoyant jet. The examination of the POD modes show that the longitudinal structure of the vertical velocity fluctuation is generated along the jet axis having the opposite sign of velocity fluctuation on both sides of the jet axis. The vertical scale of the POD mode decreases with increasing the mode number and results in the frequent appearance of cross-flow across the buoyant jet. The reconstruction flow from the POD modes indicates that the vortex structure is caused by the highly sheared layer between the upward and downward velocity and the inflow is induced by the vortex structure. The magnitude of the vortex structure seems to be weakened with an increase in the distance from the nozzle and the buoyant jet approaches to an asymptotic state in the further downstream

  10. A numerical study on charged-particle scattering and radiography of a steep density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Guangchao; Wang, Xiaofang

    2016-09-01

    Electron and proton radiography of polystyrene planar targets with different density gradients is studied by Monte Carlo simulations in a regime that the incident charged-particle's kinetic energy is much higher than its energy loss in the targets. It is shown that by scattering of the electrons or protons, the density gradient causes modulations of the charged-particle beam transmitted from the target and the modulation contrast is sensitive only to a steep gradient, which suggests a novel diagnostic method wherein a steep density gradient could be distinguished from the scattering of a charged-particle beam in radiography. By using a 100-MeV charged-particle beam, it is found that the modulation is evident for a steep density gradient of width smaller than 1 μm for electron radiography and 0.6 μm for proton radiography, respectively, but almost negligible when the density gradient width is greater than 1 μm. The feasibility of diagnosing the steep density gradients in compressed matter is confirmed by the simulations of radiographing a laser-ablated planar foil. Simulations also show that it is possible to diagnose the density gradients inside a multilayered spherical capsule.

  11. Stabilization of electron-scale turbulence by electron density gradient in national spherical torus experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Ruiz, J.; White, A. E. [MIT-Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mazzucato, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Theory and experiments have shown that electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence on the electron gyro-scale, k{sub ⊥}ρ{sub e} ≲ 1, can be responsible for anomalous electron thermal transport in NSTX. Electron scale (high-k) turbulence is diagnosed in NSTX with a high-k microwave scattering system [D. R. Smith et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 123501 (2008)]. Here we report on stabilization effects of the electron density gradient on electron-scale density fluctuations in a set of neutral beam injection heated H-mode plasmas. We found that the absence of high-k density fluctuations from measurements is correlated with large equilibrium density gradient, which is shown to be consistent with linear stabilization of ETG modes due to the density gradient using the analytical ETG linear threshold in F. Jenko et al. [Phys. Plasmas 8, 4096 (2001)] and linear gyrokinetic simulations with GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995)]. We also found that the observed power of electron-scale turbulence (when it exists) is anti-correlated with the equilibrium density gradient, suggesting density gradient as a nonlinear stabilizing mechanism. Higher density gradients give rise to lower values of the plasma frame frequency, calculated based on the Doppler shift of the measured density fluctuations. Linear gyrokinetic simulations show that higher values of the electron density gradient reduce the value of the real frequency, in agreement with experimental observation. Nonlinear electron-scale gyrokinetic simulations show that high electron density gradient reduces electron heat flux and stiffness, and increases the ETG nonlinear threshold, consistent with experimental observations.

  12. Effect of combined density gradient centrifugation on X- and Y- sperm separation and chromatin integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Tahereh Esmaeilpour; Leila Elyasi; Soghra Bahmanpour; Alireza Ghannadi; Ahmad Monabbati; Farzaneh Dehghani; Marjaneh Kazerooni

    2012-01-01

    Background: It has been claimed that by using different washing methods, the sperms can be separated according to size, motility, density, chromosomal content and surface markings and charge. These methods also reduce sperm chromatin deficiencies and screen the sperms before applying in assisted reproduction techniques. Objective: This study compared simple density gradient methods and a combined method with albumin density gradient and PureSperm separation (alb/PureSperm) for sex preselectio...

  13. Hydrostatic Modeling of Buoyant Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroman, A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Deremble, B.

    2014-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has led to increased interest in understanding point source convection dynamics. Most of the existing oil plume models use a Lagrangian based approach, which computes integral measures such as plume centerline trajectory and plume radius. However, this approach doesn't account for feedbacks of the buoyant plume on the ambient environment. Instead, we employ an Eulerian based approach to acquire a better understanding of the dynamics of buoyant plumes. We have performed a series of hydrostatic modeling simulations using the MITgcm. Our results show that there is a dynamical response caused by the presence of the buoyant plume, in that there is a modification of the background flow. We find that the buoyant plume becomes baroclinically unstable and sheds eddies at the neutral buoyancy layer. We also explore different scenarios to determine the effect of the buoyancy source and the temperature stratification on the evolution of buoyant plumes.

  14. Turbulent Buoyant Jets in Flowing Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    1991-01-01

    The mean behaviour of horizontal turbulent buoyant jets in co-flowing currents is investigated experimentally and numerically, in terms of jet trajectory, dilution and centerline density deficit and velocity decay. It is demonstrated in the paper that the laboratory data on the jet trajectory...... of turbulent buoyant jet in the presence of arnbient current and provide a ready tool for the purpose of sea outfall design....... and dilution can be successfully correlated by use of momentum or buoyancy length scales. In addition the centerline density deficit and velocity decay are well predicted by using an integral and a k - ∈turbulence model. The results shown here help us to understand in a better way the physical phenornenon...

  15. BMP4 density gradient in disk-shaped confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozorgui, Behnaz; Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    We present a quantitative model that explains the scaling of BMP4 gradients during gastrulation and the recent experimental observation that geometric confinement of human embryonic stem cells is sufficient to recapitulate much of germ layer patterning. Based on a assumption that BMP4 diffusion rate is much smaller than the diffusion rate of it's inhibitor molecules, our results confirm that the length-scale which defines germ layer territories does not depend on system size.

  16. Bell-Plesset effects for an accelerating interface with contiguous density gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amendt, P

    2005-12-20

    A Plesset-type treatment [J. Appl. Phys. 25, 96 (1954)] is used to assess the effects of contiguous density gradients at an accelerating spherical classical interface on Rayleigh-Taylor and Bell-Plesset perturbation growth. Analytic expressions are obtained that describe enhanced Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth from contiguous density gradients aligned with the acceleration and which increase the effective Atwood number of the perturbed interface. A new pathway for geometric amplification of surface perturbations on an accelerating interface with contiguous density gradients is identified. A resonance condition between the density-gradient scalelength and the radius of the interface is also predicted based on a linearized analysis of Bernoulli's equation, potentially leading to enhanced perturbation growth. Comparison of the analytic treatment with detailed two-dimensional single-mode growth-factor simulations shows good agreement for low-mode numbers where the effects of spherical geometry are most manifested.

  17. Anisotropy, radial gradients of SCR density and diagnostic of atmosphere optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigation of N-S asymmetry of solar cosmic ray for 10 flares during 1997-2002 years was carried out. Calculation of N-S asymmetry was made on the base of neutron monitors data of world net stations. Research of behavior of radial gradients of SCR density in dependence on variations of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and N-S asymmetry was conducted. It was shown, that By component of IMF have definitive influence on radial gradients of SCR density. (author)

  18. Evaluation of gradient corrections in grid-free density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Almloef - Zheng approach to grid-free density functional theory (DFT) uses the resolution of the identity (RI) instead of a finite grid to evaluate the integrals. Application of the RI can lead to stability problems, particularly when gradients are involved. The focus of the current work is on choosing a stable method of evaluating the gradient correction using the RI. A stable method is compared to several unstable methods. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  19. Density-dependent adaptive resistance allows swimming bacteria to colonize an antibiotic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hol, Felix J H; Hubert, Bert; Dekker, Cees; Keymer, Juan E

    2016-01-01

    During antibiotic treatment, antibiotic concentration gradients develop. Little is know regarding the effects of antibiotic gradients on populations of nonresistant bacteria. Using a microfluidic device, we show that high-density motile Escherichia coli populations composed of nonresistant bacteria can, unexpectedly, colonize environments where a lethal concentration of the antibiotic kanamycin is present. Colonizing bacteria establish an adaptively resistant population, which remains viable for over 24 h while exposed to the antibiotic. Quantitative analysis of multiple colonization events shows that collectively swimming bacteria need to exceed a critical population density in order to successfully colonize the antibiotic landscape. After colonization, bacteria are not dormant but show both growth and swimming motility under antibiotic stress. Our results highlight the importance of motility and population density in facilitating adaptive resistance, and indicate that adaptive resistance may be a first step to the emergence of genetically encoded resistance in landscapes of antibiotic gradients.

  20. Neutron radiography of a static density gradient of 3He gas at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, G.; Antognini, A.; Eggenberger, A.; Kirch, K.; Piegsa, F. M.; Soler, U.; Stahn, J.; Taqqu, D.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate a stationary helium gas density gradient which is needed for a proposed novel low-energy μ+ beam line. In a closed system with constant pressure the corresponding density gradient is only a function of the temperature. In a neutron radiography experiment two gas cells with different geometries were filled with 3He gas at constant pressures of about 10 mbar. Temperatures in the range from 6 K to 40 K were applied and density distributions with a maximum to minimum density ratio of larger than 3 were realized. The distribution was investigated employing the strongly neutron absorbing isotope 3He. A simple one-dimensional approach derived from Fourier's law describes the obtained gas density with a deviation < 2 %.

  1. Non-Boussinesq Integral Model for Horizontal Turbulent Buoyant Round Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal buoyant jet is a fundamental flow regime for hydrogen safety analysis in power industry. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast non-Boussinesq engineering model the horizontal buoyant round jets. Verification of this integral model is established with available experimental data and comparisons over a large range of density variations with the CFD codes GASFLOW. The model has proved to be an efficient engineering tool for predicting horizontal strongly buoyant round jets.

  2. An Independent Component Analysis Algorithm through Solving Gradient Equation Combined with Kernel Density Estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Yun-feng; WANG Yu-jia; YANG Jie

    2009-01-01

    A new algorithm for linear instantaneous independent component analysis is proposed based on max-imizing the log-likelihood contrast function which can be changed into a gradient equation. An iterative method is introduced to solve this equation efficiently. The unknown probability density functions as well as their first and second derivatives in the gradient equation are estimated by kernel density method. Computer simulations on artificially generated signals and gray scale natural scene images confirm the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithm.

  3. Investigation of Vapor-Liquid Nucleation for Associating Fluids by Density Gradient Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Dong; LIU Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    An equation of state (EOS) applicable to both the uniform and non-uniform associating fluids was established by using the density-gradient expansion, in which the influence parameter κis formulated as a function of tempera-ture. The molecular parameters were regressed by fitting to the experimental data of vapor pressures and liquid den-sities. Within the framework of density gradient theory (DGT), the nucleation rates for water, heavy water, metha-nol, ethanol, 1-propanoi, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol and 1-hexanol were calculated. The results were satisfactory com-pared with the experimental data. Our study shows that DGT preserves all the advantages of density functional the-ory (DFT) in capturing the structure and properties of nucleus but gives much more accurate nucleation rates by adjusting the influence parameter.

  4. Stabilized density gradient theory algorithm for modeling interfacial properties of pure and mixed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mu, Xiaoqun; Alpak, Faruk O; Chapman, Walter G

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient theory (DGT) allows fast and accurate determination of surface tension and density profile through a phase interface. Several algorithms have been developed to apply this theory in practical calculations. While the conventional algorithm requires a reference substance of the system, a modified "stabilized density gradient theory" (SDGT) algorithm is introduced in our work to solve DGT equations for multiphase pure and mixed systems. This algorithm makes it possible to calculate interfacial properties accurately at any domain size larger than the interface thickness without choosing a reference substance or assuming the functional form of the density profile. As part of DGT inputs, the perturbed chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) equation of state (EoS) was employed for the first time with the SDGT algorithm. PC-SAFT has excellent performance in predicting liquid phase properties as well as phase behaviors. The SDGT algorithm with the PC-SAFT EoS was tested and compared with ...

  5. Accuracy of generalized gradient approximation functionals for density functional perturbation theory calculations

    OpenAIRE

    He, Lianhua; Liu, Fang; Hautier, Geoffroy; Oliveira, Micael J. T.; Marques, Miguel A. L.; Vila, Fernando D.; Rehr, J. J.; Rignanese, G. -M.; Zhou, Aihui

    2013-01-01

    We assess the validity of various exchange-correlation functionals for computing the structural, vibrational, dielectric, and thermodynamical properties of materials in the framework of density-functional perturbation theory (DFPT). We consider five generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) functionals (PBE, PBEsol, WC, AM05, and HTBS) as well as the local density approximation (LDA) functional. We investigate a wide variety of materials including a semiconductor (silicon), a metal (copper), a...

  6. Vertical gradients of lung density in supine subjects with fibrosing alveolitis or pulmonary emphysema.

    OpenAIRE

    Millar, A B; Denison, D M

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography was used to determine the vertical gradient of density in the peripheral lung tissue of 12 patients with histologically proved fibrosing alveolitis and 12 patients with chronic bronchitis and evidence of pulmonary emphysema on the computed tomograms. Measurements were made at total lung capacity and at residual volume and compared with similar measurements from 12 normal subjects reported in a previous study. At residual volume the mean peripheral tissue density in the emp...

  7. Pitfalls of using the geometric-mean combining rule in the density gradient theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    It is popular and attractive to model the interfacial tension using the density gradient theory with the geometric-mean combining rule, in which the same equation of state is used for the interface and bulk phases. The computational efficiency is the most important advantage of this theory. In th...

  8. A collocation method for surface tension calculations with the density gradient theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Mahler; Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.

    2016-01-01

    Surface tension calculations are important in many industrial applications and over a wide range of temperatures, pressures and compositions. Empirical parachor methods are not suitable over a wide condition range and the combined use of density gradient theory with equations of state has been pr...

  9. Vertical density gradient in the eastern North Atlantic during the last 30,000 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogerson, M.; Ramirez, J. [University of Hull, Geography Department, Hull (United Kingdom); Bigg, G.R. [University of Sheffield, Department of Geography, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Rohling, E.J. [University of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre, School of Ocean and Earth Science, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-15

    Past changes in the density and momentum structure of oceanic circulation are an important aspect of changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and consequently climate. However, very little is known about past changes in the vertical density structure of the ocean, even very extensively studied systems such as the North Atlantic. Here we exploit the physical controls on the settling depth of the dense Mediterranean water plume derived from the Strait of Gibraltar to obtain the first robust, observations-based, probabilistic reconstruction of the vertical density gradient in the eastern North Atlantic during the last 30,000 years. We find that this gradient was weakened by more than 50%, relative to the present, during the last Glacial Maximum, and that changes in general are associated with reductions in AMOC intensity. However, we find only a small change during Heinrich Event 1 relative to the Last Glacial Maximum, despite strong evidence that overturning was substantially altered. This implies that millennial-scale changes may not be reflected in vertical density structure of the ocean, which may be limited to responses on an ocean-overturning timescale or longer. Regardless, our novel reconstruction of Atlantic density structure can be used as the basis for a dynamical measure for validation of model-based AMOC reconstructions. In addition, our general approach is transferrable to other marginal sea outflow plumes, to provide estimates of oceanic vertical density gradients in other locations. (orig.)

  10. Comparative study on density gradients and swim-up preparation techniques utilizing neat and cryopreserved spermatozoa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shyam S.R. Allamaneni; Ashok Agarwal; Sreedhar Rama; Pavithra Ranganathan; Rakesh K. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To 1) compare post-wash and post-thaw parameters of sperm processed with PureSperm density gradient technique and swim-up method; and 2) test the efficacy of two commonly available density gradient media PureSperm and Isolate. Methods: This prospective study used semen specimens from 22 patients. Specimens from nine patients were processed by both PureSperm density gradient and swim-up method. These specimens were then cryopreserved.Thirteen specimens were processed by both PureSperm (40 % and 80 %) and Isolate (50 % and 90 %) double density gradient techniques. The two fractions processed by both PureSperm and swim-up were analyzed for post-wash sperm characteristics. Post-thaw analysis was done after 24 hours. Sperm fractions obtained after processing with PureSperm and Isolate were compared for post-wash sperm characteristics and ROS levels. Results: Specimens prepared with PureSperm had significantly higher median total motile sperm counts (TMSC) (32.2 × 106 vs.17.6 × 106), recovery rates (69.2 % vs. 50.0 %), and longevity at 4 hours (83.0 % vs. 55.0 %) compared to specimen prepared by swim-up. Post-thaw specimens also had a higher recovery and longevity at 4 hours with PureSperm as compared to the swim-up. Semen specimens processed by PureSperm had significantly higher total sperm count,TMSC, and percentage recovery rates (30.0 % vs. 19.7 %) than Isolate. Conclusion: Semen quality is better preserved in fresh and cryopreserved semen prepared with PureSperm density gradient compared to swim-up. A significant enrichment of sperm is observed with PureSperm compared to Isolate. Higher recovery rates of mature motile sperm obtained after PureSperm sperm preparation may be beneficial for successful ART.

  11. Current density functional theory using meta-generalized gradient exchange-correlation functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Furness, James W.; Verbeke, Joachim; Tellgren, Erik I; Stopkowicz, Stella; Ekström, Ulf; Helgaker, Trygve; Teale, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    We present the self-consistent implementation of current-dependent (hybrid) meta generalized gradient approximation (mGGA) density functionals using London atomic orbitals. A previously proposed generalized kinetic energy density is utilized to implement mGGAs in the framework of Kohn--Sham current density-functional theory (KS-CDFT). A unique feature of the non-perturbative implementation of these functionals is the ability to seamlessly explore a wide range of magnetic fields up to 1 a.u. (...

  12. Effects of density, velocity gradient, and compressibility on side-jet formation in round jets with variable density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Akinori

    2013-11-01

    When a low density gas compared with the ambient gas is discharged from a round nozzle, side jets that are radial ejections of jet fluid are generated at the initial region of the jet. The density ratio between the jet fluid and the ambient fluid is a main parameter for the side-jet formation. Since the side-jet formation is also related to the instability of shear layer, it depends on the velocity gradient of the shear layer in the jet. The velocity gradient is evaluated by a ratio of the momentum thickness and the nozzle diameter at the nozzle exit. Compressibility suppresses the instability and the generation of the side jets. The compressibility is evaluated by a Mach number, which is a ratio defined by an issuing velocity of the jet and a sound velocity in the ambient fluid. Influence of these three parameters on the side-jet formation was examined experimentally. The density ratio and momentum thickness ratio were varied from 0.14 to 1.53, and from 14 to 155, respectively. The Mach number was varied to 0.7. Existence of side jets was confirmed by flow visualization using a laser sheet. Domains for the side-jet formation by the density ratio, the momentum thickness ratio, and the Mach number were determined.

  13. Drag of buoyant vortex rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S-K; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015)], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers. PMID:26565349

  14. Drag of buoyant vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasel-Be-Hagh, Ahmadreza; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.; Turner, John Stewart

    2015-10-01

    Extending from the model proposed by Vasel-Be-Hagh et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 769, 522 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.126], a perturbation analysis is performed to modify Turner's radius by taking into account the viscous effect. The modified radius includes two terms; the zeroth-order solution representing the effect of buoyancy, and the first-order perturbation correction describing the influence of viscosity. The zeroth-order solution is explicit Turner's radius; the first-order perturbation modification, however, includes the drag coefficient, which is unknown and of interest. Fitting the photographically measured radius into the modified equation yields the time history of the drag coefficient of the corresponding buoyant vortex ring. To give further clarification, the proposed model is applied to calculate the drag coefficient of a buoyant vortex ring at a Bond number of approximately 85; a similar procedure can be applied at other Bond numbers.

  15. Baroclinic pressure gradient difference schemes of subtracting the local averaged density stratification in sigma coordinates models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shouxian; ZHANG Wenjing

    2008-01-01

    Much has been written of the error in computing the baroclinic pressure gradient (BPG) with sigma coordinates in ocean or atmos- pheric numerical models. The usual way to reduce the error is to subtract area-averaged density stratification of the whole computa- tion region. But if there is great difference between the area-averaged and the local averaged density stratification, the error will be obvious. An example is given to show that the error from this method may be larger than that from no correction sometimes. The definition of local area is put forward. Then, four improved BPG difference schemes of subtracting the local averaged density strat- ification are designed to reduce the error. Two of them are for diagnostic calculation (density field is fixed), and the others are for prognostic calculation (density field is not fixed). The results show that the errors from these schemes all significantly decrease.

  16. Conditions of hydrodynamic instability appearance in fluid thin layers with changes in time thickness and density gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzegorczyn, Slawomir; Slezak, Andrzej; Michalska-Malecka, Katarzyna; Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella

    2012-01-01

    The transport of NaCl and ethanol through the microbial cellulose membrane was used as a generator of layers with density gradients, parallel to gravity vector. Changes in NaCl concentrations connected with density gradients in these layers were monitored by means of Ag vertical bar AgCl electrodes

  17. Cosmological constraints from the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski test: galaxy density gradient field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Park, Changbom [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Heogiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Forero-Romero, J. E. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, Cra. 1 No. 18A-10, Edificio Ip, Bogotá (Colombia); Kim, Juhan, E-mail: xiaodongli@kias.re.kr, E-mail: cbp@kias.re.kr, E-mail: je.forero@uniandes.edu.co, E-mail: kjhan@kias.re.kr [Center for Advanced Computation, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, 85 Hoegi-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    We propose a method based on the redshift dependence of the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test to measure the expansion history of the universe. It uses the isotropy of the galaxy density gradient field to constrain cosmological parameters. If the density parameter Ω {sub m} or the dark energy equation of state w are incorrectly chosen, the gradient field appears to be anisotropic with the degree of anisotropy varying with redshift. We use this effect to constrain the cosmological parameters governing the expansion history of the universe. Although redshift-space distortions (RSD) induced by galaxy peculiar velocities also produce anisotropies in the gradient field, these effects are close to uniform in magnitude over a large range of redshift. This makes the redshift variation of the gradient field anisotropy relatively insensitive to the RSD. By testing the method on mock surveys drawn from the Horizon Run 3 cosmological N-body simulations, we demonstrate that the cosmological parameters can be estimated without bias. Our method is complementary to the baryon acoustic oscillation or topology methods as it depends on D{sub AH} , the product of the angular diameter distance and the Hubble parameter.

  18. Variable density sampling based on physically plausible gradient waveform. Application to 3D MRI angiography

    CERN Document Server

    Chauffert, Nicolas; Boucher, Marianne; Mériaux, Sébastien; CIUCIU, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Performing k-space variable density sampling is a popular way of reducing scanning time in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, given a sampling trajectory, it is not clear how to traverse it using gradient waveforms. In this paper, we actually show that existing methods [1, 2] can yield large traversal time if the trajectory contains high curvature areas. Therefore, we consider here a new method for gradient waveform design which is based on the projection of unrealistic initial trajectory onto the set of hardware constraints. Next, we show on realistic simulations that this algorithm allows implementing variable density trajectories resulting from the piecewise linear solution of the Travelling Salesman Problem in a reasonable time. Finally, we demonstrate the application of this approach to 2D MRI reconstruction and 3D angiography in the mouse brain.

  19. The influence of near-wall density and viscosity gradients on turbulence in channel flows

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Ashish; Pecnik, Rene

    2016-01-01

    The influence of near-wall density and viscosity gradients on near-wall turbulence in a channel are studied by means of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the low-Mach number approximation of the Navier--Stokes equations. Different constitutive relations for density and viscosity as a function of temperature are used in order to mimic a wide range of fluid behaviours and to develop a generalised framework for studying turbulence modulations in variable property flows. Instead of scaling the velocity solely based on local density, as done for the van Driest transformation, we derive an extension of the scaling that is based on gradients of the semi-local Reynolds number $Re_\\tau^*$. This extension of the van Driest transformation is able to collapse velocity profiles for flows with near-wall property gradients as a function of the semi-local wall coordinate. However, flow quantities like mixing length, turbulence anisotropy and turbulent vorticity fluctuations do not show a universal scaling very close to th...

  20. Landscape Patterns of Wood Density and Aboveground Biomass Along a Tropical Elevation Gradient in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    This research sought to understand how tree wood density and taxonomic diversity relate to topography and three-dimensional vegetation structure in the tropical montane forest of Braulio Carrillo National Park in Costa Rica. The study utilized forest inventory and botanical data from twenty 1-ha plots ranging from 55 m to 2800 m above sea level and remote sensing data from an airborne lidar sensor (NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor [LVIS]) to quantify variations in forest structure. There is growing evidence that ecosystem structure may help to control the functional variations across landscapes. This study relates patterns of tree functional wood density and alpha diversity to three-dimensional structure using remote sensing observations of forest structure. We were able to test the effect of the gradient on wood density measured from collected tree cores and on the subsequent aboveground biomass estimations. We sought to determine if there was a significant pattern of wood density across the altitudinal gradient, which has implications for conservation of both ecosystem services and biodiversity. We also wanted to determine how many random individuals could be sampled to accurately estimate aboveground biomass in a one-hectare plot. Our results indicate that there is a strong relationship between LVIS-derived forest 3D-structure and alpha diversity, likely controlled by variations in abiotic factors and topography along the elevation. Using spatial analysis with the aid of remote sensing data, we found patterns along the environmental gradients defining species composition and forest structure. Wood density values were found to vary significantly from database values for the same species. This variation in tree growth has repercussions on overall forest structure, and subsequent carbon estimates extrapolated from field measurements. Because these wood density values are directly tied to biomass estimates, it is possible that carbon storage has been

  1. Isolation of human salivary extracellular vesicles by iodixanol density gradient ultracentrifugation and their characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Iwai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic methods that focus on the extracellular vesicles (EVs present in saliva have been attracting great attention because of their non-invasiveness. EVs contain biomolecules such as proteins, messenger RNA (mRNA and microRNA (miRNA, which originate from cells that release EVs, making them an ideal source for liquid biopsy. Although there have been many reports on density-based fractionation of EVs from blood and urine, the number of reports on EVs from saliva has been limited, most probably because of the difficulties in separating EVs from viscous saliva using density gradient centrifugation. This article establishes a protocol for the isolation of EVs from human saliva using density gradient centrifugation. The fractionated salivary EVs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, western blot and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate that salivary EVs have a smaller diameter (47.8±12.3 nm and higher density (1.11 g/ml than EVs isolated from conditioned cell media (74.0±23.5 nm and 1.06 g/ml, respectively. Additionally, to improve the throughput of density-based fractionation of EVs, the original protocol was further modified by using a fixed angle rotor instead of a swinging rotor. It was also confirmed that several miRNAs were expressed strongly in the EV-marker-expressing fractions.

  2. The effect of longitudinal density gradient on electron plasma wake field acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Tsiklauri, David

    2016-01-01

    3-, 2- and 1-dimensional, particle-in-cell, fully electromagnetic simulations of electron plasma wake field acceleration in the blow out regime are presented. Earlier results are extended by (i) studying the effect of longitudinal density gradient; (ii) avoiding use of co-moving simulation box; (iii) inclusion of ion motion; and (iv) studying fully electromagnetic plasma wake fields. It is established that injecting driving and trailing electron bunches into a positive density gradient of ten-fold increasing density over 10 cm long Lithium vapor plasma, results in spatially more compact and three times larger, compared to the uniform density case, electric fields (-6.4 x 10^{10} V/m), leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 24.4 GeV (starting from initial 20.4 GeV), with an energy transfer efficiencies from leading to trailing bunch of 75 percent. In the uniform density case -2.5 x 10^{10} V/m wake is created leading to acceleration of the trailing bunch up to 22.4 GeV, with an energy transfer eff...

  3. Travelling waves of density for a fourth-gradient model of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, Henri; Saccomandi, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    In mean-field theory, the non-local state of fluid molecules can be taken into account using a statistical method. The molecular model combined with a density expansion in Taylor series of the fourth order yields an internal energy value relevant to the fourth-gradient model, and the equation of isothermal motions takes then density's spatial derivatives into account for waves travelling in both liquid and vapour phases. At equilibrium, the equation of the density profile across interfaces is more precise than the Cahn and Hilliard equation, and near the fluid's critical point, the density profile verifies an Extended Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, allowing kinks, which converges towards the Cahn-Hillard equation when approaching the critical point. Nonetheless, we also get pulse waves oscillating and generating critical opalescence.

  4. Modeling the kinetics of cell membrane spreading on substrates with ligand density gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2008-01-01

    An analytical model is developed for the effect of surface gradient in ligand density on the adhesion kinetics of a curved elastic membrane with mobile receptors. The displacement and speed of spreading at the edge of adhesion zone as well as the density profile of receptors along the membrane are predicted as a function of time. According to results, in the diffusion-controlled regime, the front edge displacement of adhesion zone and the rate of membrane spreading decreased with increasing the ligand density in a certain direction. Furthermore, the displacement of the edge of the adhesion zone did not scale with the square root of time, as observed on substrates with uniform ligand density. PMID:18082168

  5. Numerical Study of Plasma Density Gradient Effects on Farley-Buneman Waves Traveling in the Equatorial E Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Lon Fern and Fu-Shong Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a two-dimensional numerical study of a plasma density gradient effect on Farley-Buneman waves (FB waves is per formed via a two-fluid code in which the electron inertia is neglected while the ion inertia is retained. We focused the simulations on the inter action between a single wave mode and the back ground E region where the vertical density gradient pro file and the weaker than FB thresh old ambient electric field were considered. From 2D density contour maps, it was found that the FB wave grows in the region of _ _ E > 0 (where _ is the electron density gradient and v E is the electric field, the initial growth rate was in reason able agreement with the prediction of the combined linear theory of Farley-Buneman and gradient drift in stabilities, and the propagation speed was modulated by the gradient strength. Ac cording to the phase velocity evaluated by the Fourier anal y sis and peak to peak estimation method, the density gradients were found to have an effect of lowering the phase velocity at saturation, which is smaller than ion-acoustic speed for large scale waves, and the results demonstrated that the reduction of phase velocity by a density gradient effect was larger for a longer wave length wave than shorter wave length curve. It was also found that the plausible density gradient effects seem to be related to the thickness of the density gradient region and vertical electric field where the FB wave was traveling. The thicker unstable layer would cause a greater phase velocity reduction than the thinner unstable layer might cause, and the large driving electric field would reduce the wavelength dependence of density gradient effect on the saturation phase velocity.

  6. Population ecology of the gulf ribbed mussel across a salinity gradient: recruitment, growth and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honig, Aaron; Supan, John; LaPeyre, Megan K.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic intertidal bivalves play an essential role in estuarine ecosystems by contributing to habitat provision, water filtration, and promoting productivity. As such, changes that impact population distributions and persistence of local bivalve populations may have large ecosystem level consequences. Recruitment, growth, mortality, population size structure and density of the gulf coast ribbed mussel, Geukensia granosissima, were examined across a salinity gradient in southeastern Louisiana. Data were collected along 100-m transects at interior and edge marsh plots located at duplicate sites in upper (salinity ~4 psu), central (salinity ~8 psu) and lower (salinity ~15 psu) Barataria Bay, Louisiana, U.S.A. Growth, mortality and recruitment were measured in established plots from April through November 2012. Mussel densities were greatest within the middle bay (salinity ~8) regardless of flooding regime, but strongly associated with highest stem densities of Juncus roemerianus vegetation. Mussel recruitment, growth, size and survival were significantly higher at mid and high salinity marsh edge sites as compared to all interior marsh and low salinity sites. The observed patterns of density, growth and mortality in Barataria Bay may reflect detrital food resource availability, host vegetation community distribution along the salinity gradient, salinity tolerance of the mussel, and reduced predation at higher salinity edge sites.

  7. Inhomogeneous radiation degradation in polymers studied with a density gradient column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, K. T.; Clough, R. L.

    Radiation dose-rate effects are known to exist in many polymers and are typically caused by oxidation reactions. Since the buildup of oxidation products often leads to an increase in polymer density, a density gradient column was used in a novel way to study the mechanisms responsible for dose-rate effects in a commercial ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) electrical cable insulation material. After various aging conditions, density profiles of samples were obtained by measuring the density of small pieces cut successively from the outside to the inside of the approximately 1-mm thick insulation. By monitoring density profiles as a function of dose rate and total radiation dose, two inhomogeneous mechanisms were found to be responsible for the observed dose-rate effects in this EPR material. At high dose rates, oxygen-diffusion-limited degradation was identified, as evidenced by a density profile which showed increased density near the air-exposed surfaces of the insulation but little change in density in the interior of the sample. As the dose rate was lowered, the oxidation region spread inward until it encompassed the entire sample at dose rates below about 100 krad/hr. The second mechanism, responsible for continuing the dose-rate effects at lower dose rates, appears to involve copper-catalyzed oxidation. This mechanism is often found to be significant in thermal aging studies; evidence that it may also be significant under room-temperature, radiation-aging conditions came from the density profile results, which revealed large increases in density as the inside of the insulation (near the tinned-copper conductor) was approached. For the same total radiation dose, this increase became larger as the dose rate was lowered. Preliminary chemical analysis profiling techniques indicate significantly enhanced copper and tin concentrations as the inside of the insulation is approached, even for insulation stripped from the metallic conductor before aging. This implies that

  8. Buoyant Nanoparticles: Implications for Nano-Biointeractions in Cellular Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, C Y; DeLoid, G M; Pal, A; Demokritou, P

    2016-06-01

    In the safety and efficacy assessment of novel nanomaterials, the role of nanoparticle (NP) kinetics in in vitro studies is often ignored although it has significant implications in dosimetry, hazard ranking, and nanomedicine efficacy. It is demonstrated here that certain nanoparticles are buoyant due to low effective densities of their formed agglomerates in culture media, which alters particle transport and deposition, dose-response relationships, and underestimates toxicity and bioactivity. To investigate this phenomenon, this study determines the size distribution, effective density, and assesses fate and transport for a test buoyant NP (polypropylene). To enable accurate dose-response assessment, an inverted 96-well cell culture platform is developed in which adherent cells are incubated above the buoyant particle suspension. The effect of buoyancy is assessed by comparing dose-toxicity responses in human macrophages after 24 h incubation in conventional and inverted culture systems. In the conventional culture system, no adverse effects are observed at any NP concentration tested (up to 250 μg mL(-1) ), whereas dose-dependent decreases in viability and increases in reactive oxygen species are observed in the inverted system. This work sheds light on an unknown issue that plays a significant role in vitro hazard screening and proposes a standardized methodology for buoyant NP assessments. PMID:27135209

  9. Thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory with generalized-gradient approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Chai, Jeng-Da

    2014-01-01

    We extend the recently proposed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT) [J.-D. Chai, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 154104 (2012)] to generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) exchange-correlation density functionals. Relative to our previous TAO-LDA (i.e., the local density approximation to TAO-DFT), the resulting TAO-GGAs are significantly superior for a wide range of applications, such as thermochemistry, kinetics, and reaction energies. For noncovalent interactions, TAO-GGAs with empirical dispersion corrections are shown to yield excellent performance. Due to their computational efficiency for systems with strong static correlation effects, TAO-LDA and TAO-GGAs are applied to study the electronic properties (e.g., the singlet-triplet energy gaps, vertical ionization potentials, vertical electron affinities, fundamental gaps, and symmetrized von Neumann entropy) of acenes with different number of linearly fused benzene rings (up to 100), which is very challenging for conventional electronic ...

  10. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. Use of density gradient centrifugation, magnetically activated cell sorting and in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campagnoli, C; Multhaupt, H A; Ludomirski, A;

    1997-01-01

    centrifugation and dual antibody labeling methods. The protocol was designed to compare the efficacy of antitransferrin receptor (CD71)/antiglycophorin A (GPA) antibodies with antithrom-bospondin receptor (CD36)/anti-GPA antibodies in identifying nucleated erythrocytes in maternal blood. Cytospin preparations...... cells recovered did not differ. Seven of seven male pregnancies were correctly identified. One case of trisomy 21 was detected. CONCLUSION: The in situ hybridization analysis of fetal nucleated erythrocytes isolated from maternal blood using single density gradient centrifugation, anti-CD71/anti...

  11. A novel technique for real-time estimation of edge pedestal density gradients via reflectometer time delay data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Sung, C.; Peebles, W. A.; Bobrek, M.

    2016-11-01

    A new model-based technique for fast estimation of the pedestal electron density gradient has been developed. The technique uses ordinary mode polarization profile reflectometer time delay data and does not require direct profile inversion. Because of its simple data processing, the technique can be readily implemented via a Field-Programmable Gate Array, so as to provide a real-time density gradient estimate, suitable for use in plasma control systems such as envisioned for ITER, and possibly for DIII-D and Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. The method is based on a simple edge plasma model with a linear pedestal density gradient and low scrape-off-layer density. By measuring reflectometer time delays for three adjacent frequencies, the pedestal density gradient can be estimated analytically via the new approach. Using existing DIII-D profile reflectometer data, the estimated density gradients obtained from the new technique are found to be in good agreement with the actual density gradients for a number of dynamic DIII-D plasma conditions.

  12. Fermi surface in local-density-functional theory and in gradient expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearns, Daniel; Kohn, Walter

    1989-05-01

    It has recently been shown that the Kohn-Sham (KS) equations, even with the exact exchange-correlation potential, vxc(r), in general do not yield the exact physical Fermi surface (FS). The latter may be obtained either from the discontinuities of the momentum distribution in the exact ground state or, equally well, from the locus of singularities in q space of the exact density-density response function, χ(q,q) (Kohn effect). The present paper considers approximations in which the exact exchange-correlation energy functional is replaced by a gradient expansion of arbitrary finite order m [e.g., Exc(2)[n] =Fd3 [exc(n(r))n(r)+gxc (n(r))||∇n(r)||2

  13. Single or double sperm wash processing by density gradient centrifugation: effect on clomiphene citrate induced intrauterine insemination cycle outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Turhan, Nilgün; PEKEL, Aslıhan; Onaran, Yüksel; DUVAN, Zehra Candan İLTEMİR; Bayrak, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    To compare the motility yields of single or double wash after density gradient centrifugation of the ejaculate and their effects on pregnancy rates in clomiphene citrate induced intrauterine insemination (IUI) cycles. Materials and methods: This prospective randomized controlled study included 341 IUI cycles. Sperm specimens processed by density gradient centrifugation either with single wash (the single wash group, n = 170) or double wash treatment (the double wash group, n = 171). Sperm p...

  14. Effects of population density and chemical environment on the behavior of Escherichia coli in shallow temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In shallow temperature gradients, changes in temperature that bacteria experience occur over long time scales. Therefore, slow processes such as adaptation, metabolism, chemical secretion and even gene expression become important. Since these are cellular processes, the cell density is an important parameter that affects the bacteria's response. We find that there are four density regimes with distinct behaviors. At low cell density, bacteria do not cause changes in their chemical environment; however, their response to the temperature gradient is strongly influenced by it. In the intermediate cell-density regime, the consumption of nutrients becomes significant and induces a gradient of nutrients opposing the temperature gradient due to higher consumption rate at the high temperature. This causes the bacteria to drift toward low temperature. In the high cell-density regime, interactions among bacteria due to secretion of an attractant lead to a strong local accumulation of bacteria. This together with the gradient of nutrients, resulted from the differential consumption rate, creates a fast propagating pulse of bacterial density. These observations are a result of classical nonlinear population dynamics. At extremely high cell density, a change in the physiological state of the bacteria is observed. The bacteria, at the individual level, become cold seeking. This appears initially as a result of a change in the methylation level of the two most abundant sensing receptors, Tsr and Tar. It is further enforced at an even higher cell density by a change in the expression level of these receptors. (perspective)

  15. In vitro and in vivo MR evaluation of internal gradient to assess trabecular bone density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Santis, S; Rebuzzi, M; Capuani, S [CNR IPCF UOS Roma, Department of Physics, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy); Di Pietro, G; Maraviglia, B [Department of Physics, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , Rome (Italy); Fasano, F, E-mail: silvia.capuani@roma1.infn.i [Siemens Medical, Milan (Italy)

    2010-10-07

    Here we propose a new magnetic resonance (MR) strategy based on the evaluation of internal gradient (G{sub i}) to assess the trabecular bone (TB) density in spongy bone. Spongy bone is a porous system characterized by a solid trabecular network immersed in bone marrow and characterized by a different relative percentage of water and fats. Using a 9.4 T MR micro-imaging system, we first evaluated the relative water and fat G{sub i} as extracted from the Spin-Echo decay function in vitro of femoral head samples from calves. Indeed, the differential effects of fat and water diffusion result in different types of G{sub i} behavior. Using a clinical MR 3T scanner, we then investigated in vivo the calcanei of individuals characterized by different known TB densities. We demonstrate, on these samples, that water is more prevalent in the boundary zone, while fats are rearranged primarily in the central zone of each pore. In vitro experiments showed that water G{sub i} magnitude from the samples was directly proportional to their TB density. Similar behavior was also observed in the clinical measures. Conversely, fat G{sub i} did not provide any information on spongy-bone density. Our results suggest that water G{sub i} may be a reliable marker to assess the status of spongy bone.

  16. An Experimental Investigation on Inclined Negatively Buoyant Jets

    OpenAIRE

    Bashitialshaaer, Raed; Larson, Magnus; Persson, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets. Such jets arise when brine is discharged from desalination plants. A turbulent jet with a specific salinity was discharged through a circular nozzle at an angle to the horizontal into a tank with fresh water and the spatial evolution of the jet was recorded. Four different initial jet parameters were changed, namely the nozzle diameter, the initial jet inclination, the jet density and the flow...

  17. Hydrodynamic modeling of towed buoyant submarine antenna's in multidirectional seas.

    OpenAIRE

    Geiger, Sam R.

    2000-01-01

    A finite difference computer model is developed to simulate the exposure statistics of a radio frequency buoyant antenna as it is towed in a three-dimensional random seaway. The model allows the user to prescribe antenna properties (length, diameter, density, etc.), sea conditions (significant wave height, development of sea), tow angle, and tow speed. The model then simulates the antenna-sea interaction for the desired duration to collect statistics relating to antenna performance. The model...

  18. Emergence flux declines disproportionately to larval density along a stream metals gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Travis S; Kraus, Johanna M; Walters, David M; Wanty, Richard B

    2013-08-01

    Effects of contaminants on adult aquatic insect emergence are less well understood than effects on insect larvae. We compared responses of larval density and adult emergence along a metal contamination gradient. Nonlinear threshold responses were generally observed for larvae and emergers. Larval densities decreased significantly at low metal concentrations but precipitously at concentrations of metal mixtures above aquatic life criteria (cumulative criterion accumulation ratio (CCAR) ≥ 1). In contrast, adult emergence declined precipitously at low metal concentrations (CCAR ≤ 1), followed by a modest decline above this threshold. Adult emergence was a more sensitive indicator of the effect of low metals concentrations on aquatic insect communities compared to larvae, presumably because emergence is limited by a combination of larval survival and other factors limiting successful emergence. Thus effects of exposure to larvae are not manifest until later in life (during metamorphosis and emergence). This loss in emergence reduces prey subsidies to riparian communities at concentrations considered safe for aquatic life. Our results also challenge the widely held assumption that adult emergence is a constant proportion of larval densities in all streams.

  19. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1.......5×107 V m-1. Current density was also measured as a function of temperature and field. Space charge due exclusively to the temperature gradient was detected, with density of order 0.01 C m-3. The activation energy associated with the transport of electrons through the bulk was calculated as 0.09 e......V. However, measurements of the temperature dependence of the current in isothermal samples yielded activation energies in the range 0.9-1.3 eV. It is deduced that most of this larger activation energy is associated with charge injection at the electrodes. Electron mobilities not less than 2×10-12 m2 V-1 s-1...

  20. Strain energy density gradients in bone marrow predict osteoblast and osteoclast activity: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Duncan; Schulte, Friederike A; Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2015-03-18

    Huiskes et al. hypothesized that mechanical strains sensed by osteocytes residing in trabecular bone dictate the magnitude of load-induced bone formation. More recently, the mechanical environment in bone marrow has also been implicated in bone׳s response to mechanical stimulation. In this study, we hypothesize that trabecular load-induced bone formation can be predicted by mechanical signals derived from an integrative µFE model, incorporating a description of both the bone and marrow phase. Using the mouse tail loading model in combination with in vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) we tracked load induced changes in the sixth caudal vertebrae of C57BL/6 mice to quantify the amount of newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes. To identify the mechanical signals responsible for adaptation, local morphometric changes were compared to micro-finite element (µFE) models of vertebrae prior to loading. The mechanical parameters calculated were strain energy density (SED) on trabeculae at bone forming and resorbing surfaces, SED in the marrow at the boundary between bone forming and resorbing surfaces, along with SED in the trabecular bone and marrow volumes. The gradients of each parameter were also calculated. Simple regression analysis showed mean SED gradients in the trabecular bone matrix to significantly correlate with newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes R(2)=0.57 and 0.41, respectively, pbone marrow plays a significant role in determining osteoblast and osteoclast activity.

  1. New density functional parameterizations to accurate calculations of electric field gradient variations among compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Régis Tadeu; Haiduke, Roberto Luiz Andrade

    2015-10-30

    This research provides a performance investigation of density functional theory and also proposes new functional parameterizations to deal with electric field gradient (EFG) calculations at nuclear positions. The entire procedure is conducted within the four-component formalism. First, we noticed that traditional hybrid and long-range corrected functionals are more efficient in the description of EFG variations for a set of elements (indium, antimony, iodine, lutetium, and hafnium) among linear molecules. Thus, we selected the PBE0, B3LYP, and CAM-B3LYP functionals and promoted a reoptimization of their parameters for a better description of these EFG changes. The PBE0q variant developed here showed an overall promising performance in a validation test conducted with potassium, iodine, copper, and gold. In general, the correlation coefficients found in linear regressions between experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants and calculated EFGs are improved while the systematic EFG errors also decrease as a result of this reparameterization. PMID:26284820

  2. Unified models of E-layer plasma turbulence from density gradients and Hall currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Ehab; Litt, Sandeep; Horton, Wendell; Smolyakov, Andrei; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    The Earth's ionosphere is rich with plasma irregularities of scale-lengths extend from few centimeters to hundreds of kilometers. The combination of small-scale turbulence with large coherent structures is at the forefront of basic plasma turbulence theory. A new unified model for the small-scale plasma turbulence called Type-I and Type-II in the E-region ionosphere is presented. Simulations and a proposed laboratory experiment for these plasma waves in a weakly ionized plasma are reported. The ions [Argon in the lab and NO+ in the ionosphere] are collisional and the electrons ExB drifts produce Hall currents. The dispersion relations are analyzed for both density gradient and electron current driven instabilities. A basic understanding of the turbulence is important for forecasting disruptions in GNSS communication signals from RF signal scattering produced by the E-layer plasma turbulence on the 10cm to 10m scales lengths. NSF:AGS-0964692.

  3. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF DENSITY GRADIENT CENTRIFUGATION FOR EXFOLIATIVE TUMOR CELLS IN MALIGNANT PLEURAL EFFUSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭胤仕; 朱任之

    2004-01-01

    Objective To find out a specific method for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions( MPEs )with higher sensitivity and practicality. Methods The diagnosis of MPEs were made using density gradient centrifugation ( DGC ) , smear cytologic examination (SCE) and pleural needle biopsy (PNB). Comparisons between these results and those of benign pleural effusions were also made. Results The positive rates of DGC,SCE and PNB for diagnosing MPEs were 94. 3% ,62.9% and 44.6% , respectively, and the positive rate of SCE combined with PNB for diagnosing MPEs was 73.2 %. The positive rate of the exfoliative tumor cells ( ETCs ) by DGC was much higher than that of SCE or/and PNB with no false-positive. Conclusion The ETCs isolated by DGC from the MPEs is quite specific for the diagnosis of malignant tumors with higher sensitivity and practicality in clinico-pathological practice.

  4. Versatile van der Waals Density Functional Based on a Meta-Generalized Gradient Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haowei; Yang, Zeng-Hui; Perdew, John P.; Sun, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    A "best-of-both-worlds" van der Waals (vdW) density functional is constructed, seamlessly supplementing the strongly constrained and appropriately normed (SCAN) meta-generalized gradient approximation for short- and intermediate-range interactions with the long-range vdW interaction from r VV 10 , the revised Vydrov-van Voorhis nonlocal correlation functional. The resultant SCAN +r VV 10 is the only vdW density functional to date that yields excellent interlayer binding energies and spacings, as well as intralayer lattice constants in 28 layered materials. Its versatility for various kinds of bonding is further demonstrated by its good performance for 22 interactions between molecules; the cohesive energies and lattice constants of 50 solids; the adsorption energy and distance of a benzene molecule on coinage-metal surfaces; the binding energy curves for graphene on Cu(111), Ni(111), and Co(0001) surfaces; and the rare-gas solids. We argue that a good semilocal approximation should (as SCAN does) capture the intermediate-range vdW through its exchange term. We have found an effective range of the vdW interaction between 8 and 16 Å for systems considered here, suggesting that this interaction is negligibly small at the larger distances where it reaches its asymptotic power-law decay.

  5. The effect of electron beam pitch angle and density gradient on solar type III radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pechhacker, Roman

    2012-01-01

    1.5D Particle-In-Cell simulations of a hot, low density electron beam injected into magnetized, maxwellian plasma were used to further explore the alternative non-gyrotropic beam driven electromagnetic emission mechanism, first studied in Tsiklauri (2011). Variation of beam injection angle and background density gradient showed that the emission process is caused by the perpendicular component of the beam injection current, whereas the parallel component only produces Langmuir waves, which play no role in the generation of EM waves in our mechanism. Particular emphasis was put on the case, where the beam is injected perpendicularly to the background magnetic field, as this turned off any electrostatic wave generation along the field and left a purely electromagnetic signal in the perpendicular components. The simulations establish the following key findings: i) Initially waves at a few w_ce/gamma are excited, mode converted and emitted at w_pe ii) The emission intensity along the beam axis is proportional to ...

  6. Sea surface density gradients in the Nordic Seas during the Holocene as revealed by paired microfossil and isotope proxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Nicolas; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; Bauch, Henning A.;

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to assess the Holocene surface-subsurface seawater density gradient on millennial time-scale based on the reconstruction of potential density (σθ) by combining data from dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and planktic foraminiferal (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (s)) stable oxygen isotopes (δ...... and persistence of surface water buoyancy. Active overturning became more likely after 6.5 ka BP as suggested by a reduced and recurrently inverted vertical σθ gradient, while intermittent eastward spreading of lower-density surface waters continued to modulate the area of potential overturning. Despite some...... reservation regarding the accuracy of the σθ values reconstructed, the documentation of relative changes of σθ gradients through time and space is suggested as a helpful tool for the appraisal of past overturning likeliness....

  7. Sperm fractions obtained following density gradient centrifugation in human ejaculates show differences in sperm DNA longevity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime Goslvez; Stephen Johnston; Carmen Lpez-Fernndez; Altea Goslbez; Francisca Arroyo; Jose Lus Fernndez; Juan G lvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the DNA longevity characteristics associated with each resultant fraction following density gradient centrifugation (DGC) in comparison to that of the original neat ejaculated sample. Methods:An aliquot of neat semen (NSS) collected from 7 patients was processed using DGC resulting in 3 fractions;Fraction 1:seminal plasma/40%gradient interface (GI);Fraction 2:40%GI/80%GI;Fraction 3:80%GI/pellet. An aliquot of each fraction and NSS was cryopreserved, thawed and incubated at 37 ℃for 24h;the increase of sperm DNA fragmentation was assessed using the Dyn-Halosperm assay following 0, 3, 6 and 24h of incubation. Results:While there was a significant reduction in the incidence of baseline sperm DNA fragmentation following DGC in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity was shown to be higher in the NSS than in any other sub-population following incubation. The highest levels of baseline DNA damage were found in Fractions 1 and 2;these fractions also showed the highest rate DNA fragmentation following incubation, subsequently exhibiting the lowest DNA longevity. Conclusion:1) Unnecessary incubation of spermatozoa prior to artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization, should be avoided, since sperm DNA longevity is significantly reduced after ex vivo sperm handling and 2) Although sperm selection by DCG significantly reduces the baseline levels of SDF of sperm in Fraction 3, sperm DNA longevity in this fraction was ultimately lower following 24 h incubation when compared to sperm recovered from non-centrifuged NSS.

  8. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  9. Wind influence on a coastal buoyant outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Michael M.; Garvine, Richard W.

    2005-03-01

    This paper investigates the interplay between river discharge and winds in forcing coastal buoyant outflows. During light winds a plume influenced by the Earth's rotation will flow down shelf (in the direction of Kelvin wave propagation) as a slender buoyancy-driven coastal current. Downwelling favorable winds augment this down-shelf flow, narrow the plume, and mix the water column. Upwelling favorable winds drive currents that counter the buoyancy-driven flow, spread plume waters offshore, and rapidly mix buoyant waters. Two criteria are developed to assess the wind influence on a buoyant outflow. The wind strength index (Ws) determines whether a plume's along-shelf flow is in a wind-driven or buoyancy-driven state. Ws is the ratio of the wind-driven and buoyancy-driven along-shelf velocities. Wind influence on across-shelf plume structure is rated with a timescale (ttilt) for the isopycnal tilting caused by wind-driven Ekman circulation. These criteria are used to characterize wind influence on the Delaware Coastal Current and can be applied to other coastal buoyant outflows. The Delaware buoyant outflow is simulated for springtime high-river discharge conditions. Simulation results and Ws values reveal that the coastal current is buoyancy-driven most of the time (∣Ws∣ 1) several times during the high-discharge period. Strong upwelling events reverse the buoyant outflow; they constitute an important mechanism for transporting fresh water up shelf. Across-shelf plume structure is more sensitive to wind influence than the along-shelf flow. Values of ttilt indicate that moderate or strong winds persisting throughout a day can modify plume width significantly. Plume widening during upwelling events is accompanied by mixing that can erase the buoyant outflow.

  10. Influence of current density on nano-Al2O3/Ni+Co bionic gradient composite coatings by electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Liu; Luquan Ren; Sirong Yu; Zhuwu Han

    2008-01-01

    Metal and nano-ceramic nanocomposite coatings were prepared on the gray cast iron surface by the electredeposition method. The Ni-Co was used as the metal matrix, and nano-Al2O3 was chosen as the second-phase particulates. To avoid poor inter-face bonding and stress distribution, the gradient structure of biology materials was found as the model and therefore the gradient composite coating was prepared. The morphology of the composite coatings was flatter and the microstructure was denser than that of pure Ni-Co coatings. The composite coatings were prepared by different current densities, and the 2-D and 3-D morphologies of the surface coatings were observed. The result indicated that the 2-D structure became rougher and the 3-D surface density of apices became less when the current density was increased. The content of nanoparticulates reached a maximum value at the current density particles caused dispersive strengthening and grain refining.

  11. Radial gradients of phase space density in the inner electron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2012-12-01

    While the outer radiation belt (3.5 inner radiation belt (1.2 inner electron belt in recent years. It has been generally accepted that the equilibrium structure of radiation belt electrons is explained by the slow inward radial diffusion from a source in the outer belt and losses by Coulomb collision and wave-particle interaction. In this study, we examine this well accepted theory using the radial profiles of the phase space density (PSD), inferred from in situ measurements made by three different satellites: S3-3, CRRES, and POLAR. Our results show that electron PSD in the inner electron belt has a clear prominent local peak and negative radial gradient in the outer portion of the inner zone, i.e., decreasing PSD with increasingL-value. A likely explanation for the peaks in PSD is acceleration due to energy diffusion produced by lightning-generated and anthropogenic whistlers. These results indicate that either additional local acceleration mechanism is responsible for the formation of the inner electron belt or inner electron belt is formed by sporadic injections of electrons into the inner zone. The currently well accepted model of slow diffusion and losses will be further examined by the upcoming Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission.

  12. Influence of Mean-Density Gradient on Small-Scale Turbulence Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas

    2000-01-01

    A physics-based methodology is described to predict jet-mixing noise due to small-scale turbulence. Both self- and shear-noise source teens of Lilley's equation are modeled and the far-field aerodynamic noise is expressed as an integral over the jet volume of the source multiplied by an appropriate Green's function which accounts for source convection and mean-flow refraction. Our primary interest here is to include transverse gradients of the mean density in the source modeling. It is shown that, in addition to the usual quadrupole type sources which scale to the fourth-power of the acoustic wave number, additional dipole and monopole sources are present that scale to lower powers of wave number. Various two-point correlations are modeled and an approximate solution to noise spectra due to multipole sources of various orders is developed. Mean flow and turbulence information is provided through RANS-k(epsilon) solution. Numerical results are presented for a subsonic jet at a range of temperatures and Mach numbers. Predictions indicated a decrease in high frequency noise with added heat, while changes in the low frequency noise depend on jet velocity and observer angle.

  13. Dilution of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls.......The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls....

  14. Theoretical design of gradient coils with minimum power dissipation: accounting for the discretization of current density into coil windings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    While, Peter T; Korvink, Jan G; Shah, N Jon; Poole, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    Gradient coil windings are typically constructed from either variable width copper tracks or fixed width wires. Excessive power dissipation within these windings during gradient coil operation limits the maximum drive current or duty cycle of the coil. It is common to design gradient coils in terms of a continuous minimum power current density and to perform a discretization to obtain the locations of the coil tracks or wires. However, the existence of finite gaps between these conductors and a maximum conductor width leads to an underestimation of coil resistance when calculated using the continuous current density. Put equivalently, the actual current density within the tracks or wires is higher than that used in the optimization and this departure results in suboptimal coil designs. In this work, a mapping to an effective current density is proposed to account for these effects and provide the correct contribution to the power dissipation. This enables the design of gradient coils that are genuinely optimal in terms of power minimization, post-discretization. The method was applied to the theoretical design of a variety of small x- and z-gradient coils for use in small animal imaging and coils for human head imaging. Computer-driven comparisons were made between coils designed with and without the current density mapping, in terms of simulated power dissipation. For coils to be built using variable width tracks, the method provides slight reductions in power dissipation in most cases and substantial gains only in cases where the minimum separation between track centre-lines is less than twice the gap size. However, for coils to be built using fixed width wires, very considerable reductions in dissipated power are consistently attainable (up to 60%) when compared to standard approaches of coil optimization. PMID:23994605

  15. Response of bird species densities to habitat structure and fire history along a Midwestern open-forest gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundel, R.; Pavlovic, N.B.

    2007-01-01

    Oak savannas were historically common but are currently rare in the Midwestern United States. We assessed possible associations of bird species with savannas and other threatened habitats in the region by relating fire frequency and vegetation characteristics to seasonal densities of 72 bird species distributed across an open-forest gradient in northwestern Indiana. About one-third of the species did not exhibit statistically significant relationships with any combination of seven vegetation characteristics that included vegetation cover in five vertical strata, dead tree density, and tree height. For 40% of the remaining species, models best predicting species density incorporated tree density. Therefore, management based solely on manipulating tree density may not be an adequate strategy for managing bird populations along this open-forest gradient. Few species exhibited sharp peaks in predicted density under habitat conditions expected in restored savannas, suggesting that few savanna specialists occur among Midwestern bird species. When fire frequency, measured over fifteen years, was added to vegetation characteristics as a predictor of species density, it was incorporated into models for about one-quarter of species, suggesting that fire may modify habitat characteristics in ways that are important for birds but not captured by the structural habitat variables measured. Among those species, similar numbers had peaks in predicted density at low, intermediate, or high fire frequency. For species suggested by previous studies to have a preference for oak savannas along the open-forest gradient, estimated density was maximized at an average fire return interval of about one fire every three years. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2007.

  16. Single-step enrichment of basophils from human peripheral blood by a novel method using a Percoll density gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiono, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Takuya; Okada, Tadashi; Ito, Yoichiro

    2016-08-01

    We have developed a novel continuous flow-through cell separation method using a Percoll density gradient. This method can continuously separate a large number of cells into five fractions according to their densities. To apply this method to the separation of basophils, Percoll density gradients were modified to improve basophil enrichment. When a set of Percoll density gradients was prepared (1.071, 1.075, 1.080, 1.084, and 1.090 g/mL) the basophils in a healthy volunteer were enriched by an average of 23.1 and 63.5% at Percoll densities of 1.075 (fraction 3) and 1.080 g/mL (fraction 4), respectively. On average, the yield of basophils was 1.66 × 10(5) cells in fraction 3 and 1.61 × 10(5) cells in fraction 4 from 9 mL of peripheral blood. The expression of CD203c (cluster of differentiation 203c) on separated basophils was upregulated by anti-immunoglobulin E stimulation similar to basophils in whole blood. Histamine release induced by calcium ionophore was also observed in the separated basophils. The present method will be useful for basophil enrichment since it preserves their function without using counterflow elutriation and immunological reagents, and this method will be effective as a preparative separation for cell purification by flow cytometry. PMID:27293108

  17. Preparation of Mg-Ti System Alloy and FGM with Density Gradient by Spark Plasma Sintering Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Qiang; ZHANG Lian-meng; TAN Hua; JING Fu-qian

    2004-01-01

    A new kind of functionally graded materials (FGM) with density gradient has come to showgreat potentials as flier-plates for creating quasi- isotropic compression waves. In order to meet the demand of lowerdensity in the front face for sueh fiier-plate, Mg with a low density of 1.74g/cm3 is selected to make a Mg-TiFGM. Mg- Ti alloys with various weight ratios were sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique at relativelow temperatures, and the processing of densification is mainly investigated. It is found that, up to 75wt% Ti, theMg- Ti alloys can be fully deasified at 560℃ due to the conglutination of Mg and the formation of a small amountof Mg- Ti solid solution. Finally, the Mg- Ti FGM with a density gradient from 1.74g/cm3 to 3.23g/cm3 is suc-cessfully fabricated.

  18. Generation of multiple toroidal dust vortices by a non-monotonic density gradient in a direct current glow discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observation of two well-separated dust vortices in an unmagnetized parallel plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported in this paper. A non-monotonic radial density profile, achieved by an especially designed cathode structure using a concentric metallic disk and ring of different radii, is observed to produce double dust tori between cathode and anode. PIV analysis of the still images of the double tori shows oppositely rotating dust structures between the central disk and the ring. Langmuir probe measurements of background plasma shows a non-uniform plasma density profile between the disk and the ring. Location and sense of rotation of the dust vortices coincides with the location and direction of the radial gradient in the ion drag force caused by the radial density gradient. The experimentally observed dust vorticity matches well with the calculated one using hydrodynamic formulations with shear in ion drag dominating over the dust charge gradient. These results corroborate that a radial gradient in the ion drag force directed towards cathode is the principal cause of dust rotation

  19. Generation of multiple toroidal dust vortices by a non-monotonic density gradient in a direct current glow discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Manjit, E-mail: manjit@ipr.res.in; Bose, Sayak; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Sharma, D.; Ghosh, J.; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Thomas, Edward [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Observation of two well-separated dust vortices in an unmagnetized parallel plate DC glow discharge plasma is reported in this paper. A non-monotonic radial density profile, achieved by an especially designed cathode structure using a concentric metallic disk and ring of different radii, is observed to produce double dust tori between cathode and anode. PIV analysis of the still images of the double tori shows oppositely rotating dust structures between the central disk and the ring. Langmuir probe measurements of background plasma shows a non-uniform plasma density profile between the disk and the ring. Location and sense of rotation of the dust vortices coincides with the location and direction of the radial gradient in the ion drag force caused by the radial density gradient. The experimentally observed dust vorticity matches well with the calculated one using hydrodynamic formulations with shear in ion drag dominating over the dust charge gradient. These results corroborate that a radial gradient in the ion drag force directed towards cathode is the principal cause of dust rotation.

  20. Analytical gradients of the state-average complete active space self-consistent field method with density fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delcey, Mickaël G. [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Pedersen, Thomas Bondo [Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1033 Blindern, 0315 Oslo (Norway); Aquilante, Francesco [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Dipartimento di chimica “G. Ciamician,” Università di Bologna, V. F. Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Lindh, Roland, E-mail: roland.lindh@kemi.uu.se [Department of Chemistry – Ångström, The Theoretical Chemistry Programme, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Uppsala Center for Computational Chemistry - UC_3, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 518, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-07-28

    An efficient implementation of the state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) gradients employing density fitting (DF) is presented. The DF allows a reduction both in scaling and prefactors of the different steps involved. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on a set of molecules ranging up to an iron-Heme b complex which with its 79 atoms and 811 basis functions is to our knowledge the largest SA-CASSCF gradient computed. For smaller systems where the conventional code could still be used as a reference, both the linear response calculation and the gradient formation showed a clear timing reduction and the overall cost of a geometry optimization is typically reduced by more than one order of magnitude while the accuracy loss is negligible.

  1. Linear stability analysis of the Vlasov-Poisson equations in high density plasmas in the presence of crossed fields and density gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, D. J.; Hansen, P. J.; Choudhury, S. Roy; Thomas, Gary E.

    1986-01-01

    The equations for the single-particle orbits in a nonneutral high density plasma in the presence of inhomogeneous crossed fields are obtained. Using these orbits, the linearized Vlasov equation is solved as an expansion in the orbital radii in the presence of inhomogeneities and density gradients. A model distribution function is introduced whose cold-fluid limit is exactly the same as that used in many previous studies of the cold-fluid equations. This model function is used to reduce the linearized Vlasov-Poisson equations to a second-order ordinary differential equation for the linearized electrostatic potential whose eigenvalue is the perturbation frequency.

  2. Comparison of ultracentrifugation and density gradient separation methods for isolating Tca8113 human tongue cancer cell line-derived exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhuoyuan; Wang, Chenxing; Li, Tang; LIU, ZHE; LI, LONGJIANG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the method of ultracentrifugation and density gradient separation for isolating Tca8113 human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line-derived exosomes. The exosomes were obtained from the culture supernatant of cultured Tca8113 cells, respectively, followed by identification with transmission electron microscopy observation and western blot analysis. The two different methods were then compared by the morphology, the distribution range of the parti...

  3. Turbulence Statistics of a Buoyant Jet in a Stratified Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleney, Amy Brooke

    Using non-intrusive optical diagnostics, turbulence statistics for a round, incompressible, buoyant, and vertical jet discharging freely into a stably linear stratified environment is studied and compared to a reference case of a neutrally buoyant jet in a uniform environment. This is part of a validation campaign for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Buoyancy forces are known to significantly affect the jet evolution in a stratified environment. Despite their ubiquity in numerous natural and man-made flows, available data in these jets are limited, which constrain our understanding of the underlying physical processes. In particular, there is a dearth of velocity field data, which makes it challenging to validate numerical codes, currently used for modeling these important flows. Herein, jet near- and far-field behaviors are obtained with a combination of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and multi-scale time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) for Reynolds number up to 20,000. Deploying non-intrusive optical diagnostics in a variable density environment is challenging in liquids. The refractive index is strongly affected by the density, which introduces optical aberrations and occlusions that prevent the resolution of the flow. One solution consists of using index matched fluids with different densities. Here a pair of water solutions - isopropanol and NaCl - are identified that satisfy these requirements. In fact, they provide a density difference up to 5%, which is the largest reported for such fluid pairs. Additionally, by design, the kinematic viscosities of the solutions are identical. This greatly simplifies the analysis and subsequent simulations of the data. The spectral and temperature dependence of the solutions are fully characterized. In the near-field, shear layer roll-up is analyzed and characterized as a function of initial velocity profile. In the far-field, turbulence statistics are reported for two different scales, one

  4. Investigations of a turbulent buoyant sodium jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes an experimental investigation of a turbulent buoyant sodium jet which was discharging into a slowly moving ambient. Measurements of mean velocity, mean temperature and temperature fluctuations were made using a miniature permanent magnet flowmeter probe for a range of conditions encompassing forced convection jets, buoyant jets and plumes. The geometrical arrangement departed from that for a classical free jet in that the jet emerged into a confined co-flow but the essential characteristics of free jet behaviour were observed. The decay of axial velocity was broadly the same as for fluid of higher Prandtl number. The decay of mean temperature differences and temperature fluctuations were different from that for fluids of higher Prandtl number due to the importance of molecular diffusion in heat transport. (author)

  5. Theoretical Analysis of A Buoyant Jet Interacting with Small Amplitude Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Pin LIN; Hung-Chu HSU; Yang-Yih CHEN

    2009-01-01

    A new theoretical solution is presented here for the dynamic characteristics of a buoyant jet due to opposing small amplitude waves.The conservation equations of mass,tangential momentum and vertical momentum are solved by the integral method which encompasses the Gaussian profiles of velocity and density.The action of waves is incorporated into the equations of motion as an external force and a new exact solution is obtained to predict the trajectory,velocity distribution and boundary thickness of the buoyant jet over an arbitrary lateral cross section.It is found that the velocity along the centerline is inversely proportional to the ratio of the momentum of the wave to the buoyant jet.The averaged boundary width varies with the fluctuation of the boundary width,the distance from the orifice and the velocity correction function.Owing to the motion d waves,the fluctuation of the boundary width is proportional to the wave steepness.

  6. Structured DC Electric Fields With and Without Associated Plasma Density Gradients Observed with the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Freudenreich, H.; Bromund, K.; Liebrecht, C.; Roddy, P.; Hunton, D.

    2009-01-01

    DC electric field observations and associated plasma drifts gathered with the Vector Electric Field Investigation on the Air Force Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite typically reveal considerable variation at large scales (approximately 100's of km), in both daytime and nighttime cases, with enhanced structures usually confined to the nightside. Although such electric field structures are typically associated with plasma density depletions and structures, as observed by the Planar Langmuir Probe on C/NOFS, what is surprising is the number of cases in which large amplitude, structured DC electric fields are observed without a significant plasma density counterpart structure, including their appearance at times when the ambient plasma density appears relatively quiescent. We investigate the relationship of such structured DC electric fields and the ambient plasma density in the C/NOFS satellite measurements observed thus far, taking into account both plasma density depletions and enhancements. We investigate the mapping of the electric fields along magnetic field lines from distant altitudes and latitudes to locations where the density structures, which presumably formed the original seat of the electric fields, are no longer discernible in the observations. In some cases, the electric field structures and spectral characteristics appear to mimic those associated with equatorial spread-F processes, providing important clues to their origins. We examine altitude, seasonal, and longitudinal effects in an effort to establish the origin of such structured DC electric fields observed both with, and without, associated plasma density gradients

  7. ROUNDED FLOWING STATES OF OBSTRUCTED BUOYANT JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAI Wen-xin; FANG Shen-guang

    2006-01-01

    The mutual relationships of three effective factors, the diameter D/d (d is the diameter of exit) of obstructed plate, exit densimetric Froude number and the distance H/d of the plate from jet orifice for obstructed buoyant jet in static ambient, are analyzed to explain normal and abnormal rounded flowing (reverberated and bifurcated flowing).The critical Froude numbers for obstructed buoyant jets with H/d=2, 4, 6, 8 which distinguished normal and abnormal flowing pattern are obtained. Normal rounded flowing is found only for a plate under a special value of H/d. A fitted formula of critical Froude numbers with H/d and D/d is presented to distinguish rounded flowing types. The occurring of reverberated or bifurcated flowing in abnormal rounded flow is analyzed. Based on the results of obstructed buoyant jets with D/d=1, normal rounded flowing occurred only for all conditions and axial dilution behind the plate under different H/D is obtained.

  8. A comparison of density functional theory and coupled cluster methods for the calculation of electric dipole polarizability gradients of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paidarová, Ivana; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have compared the performance of density functional theory (DFT) using five different exchange-correlation functionals with four coupled cluster theory based wave function methods in the calculation of geometrical derivatives of the polarizability tensor of methane. The polarizability gradients...... of hydrocarbons are important ingredients in the simulation of their electron energy loss spectra and reliable but cost-effective methods for obtaining the gradients need to be found. In the present work we present results of a systematic investigation on methane as a prototype molecule with special focus on DFT...... methods. The KT3, B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP, B97-2 and PBE0 DFT exchange-correlation functionals and the highly correlated wave function methods SOPPA(CCSD), CCSD-LR, CCSD and CCSD(T) were employed in combination with a series of eleven basis sets. Comparison of the DFT results with CCSD(T)/daug-cc-pVQZ reference...

  9. Fractionation of Saprolegnia diclina (Oomycetes) satelite DNAs by AgNO3/Cs2SO4 density gradient centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, G A; Green, B R

    1977-12-14

    Saprolegnia diclina DNA has been fractionated using preparative AgNO3/Cs2SO4 and CsCl density gradients. In addition to the previously identified major satellite DNA, there are two minor DNA components banding at 1.682 and 1.701 g - cm(-3) in CsCl. Purified major satellite DNA bands at 1.707 g - cm(-3) giving a base composition of 48% G + C in good agreement with 47% G + C calculated from its Tm value. The nuclear DNA base composition is 58% G + C by both methods. The base composition of the major satellite DNA suggests that it may represent ribosomal DNA cistrons.

  10. T2* and proton density measurement of normal human lung parenchyma using submillisecond echo time gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatabu, Hiroto; Alsop, David C.; Listerud, John; Bonnet, Mathieu; Gefter, Warren B

    1999-03-01

    Objective: To obtain T2* and proton density measurements of normal human lung parenchyma in vivo using submillisecond echo time (TE) gradient echo (GRE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and methods: Six normal volunteers were scanned using a 1.5-T system equipped with a prototype enhanced gradient (GE Signa, Waukausha, WI). Images were obtained during breath-holding with acquisition times of 7-16 s. Multiple TEs ranging from 0.7 to 2.5 ms were tested. Linear regression was performed on the logarithmic plots of signal intensity versus TE, yielding measurements of T2* and proton density relative to chest wall muscle. Measurements in supine and prone positions were compared, and effects of the level of lung inflation on lung signal were also evaluated. Results: The signal from the lung parenchyma diminished exponentially with prolongation of TE. The measured T2* in six normal volunteers ranged from 0.89 to 2.18 ms (1.43{+-}0.41 ms, mean{+-}S.D.). The measured relative proton density values ranged between 0.21 and 0.45 (0.29{+-}0.08, mean{+-}S.D.). Calculated T2* values of 1.46{+-}0.50, 1.01{+-}0.29 and 1.52{+-}0.18 ms, and calculated relative proton densities of 0.20{+-}0.03, 0.32{+-}0.13 and 0.35{+-}0.10 were obtained from the anterior, middle and posterior portions of the supine right lung, respectively. The anterior-posterior proton density gradient was reversed in the prone position. There was a pronounced increase in signal from lung parenchyma at maximum expiration compared with maximum inspiration. The ultrashort TE GRE technique yielded images demonstrating signal from lung parenchyma with minimal motion-induced noise. Conclusion: Quantitative in vivo measurements of lung T2* and relative proton density in conjunction with high-signal parenchymal images can be obtained using a set of very rapid breath-hold images with a recently developed ultrashort TE GRE sequence.

  11. Thermodynamic, energy efficiency, and power density analysis of reverse electrodialysis power generation with natural salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Ngai Yin; Vermaas, David A; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Elimelech, Menachem

    2014-05-01

    Reverse electrodialysis (RED) can harness the Gibbs free energy of mixing when fresh river water flows into the sea for sustainable power generation. In this study, we carry out a thermodynamic and energy efficiency analysis of RED power generation, and assess the membrane power density. First, we present a reversible thermodynamic model for RED and verify that the theoretical maximum extractable work in a reversible RED process is identical to the Gibbs free energy of mixing. Work extraction in an irreversible process with maximized power density using a constant-resistance load is then examined to assess the energy conversion efficiency and power density. With equal volumes of seawater and river water, energy conversion efficiency of ∼ 33-44% can be obtained in RED, while the rest is lost through dissipation in the internal resistance of the ion-exchange membrane stack. We show that imperfections in the selectivity of typical ion exchange membranes (namely, co-ion transport, osmosis, and electro-osmosis) can detrimentally lower efficiency by up to 26%, with co-ion leakage being the dominant effect. Further inspection of the power density profile during RED revealed inherent ineffectiveness toward the end of the process. By judicious early discontinuation of the controlled mixing process, the overall power density performance can be considerably enhanced by up to 7-fold, without significant compromise to the energy efficiency. Additionally, membrane resistance was found to be an important factor in determining the power densities attainable. Lastly, the performance of an RED stack was examined for different membrane conductivities and intermembrane distances simulating high performance membranes and stack design. By thoughtful selection of the operating parameters, an efficiency of ∼ 37% and an overall gross power density of 3.5 W/m(2) represent the maximum performance that can potentially be achieved in a seawater-river water RED system with low

  12. Multiple-relaxation-time color-gradient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating two-phase flows with high density ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Yan; Liu, Haihu; Li, Qing; Kang, Qinjun; Sun, Jinju

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we propose a color-gradient lattice Boltzmann (LB) model for simulating two-phase flows with high density ratio and high Reynolds number. The model applies a multirelaxation-time (MRT) collision operator to enhance the stability of the simulation. A source term, which is derived by the Chapman-Enskog analysis, is added into the MRT LB equation so that the Navier-Stokes equations can be exactly recovered. Also, a form of the equilibrium density distribution function is used to simplify the source term. To validate the proposed model, steady flows of a static droplet and the layered channel flow are first simulated with density ratios up to 1000. Small values of spurious velocities and interfacial tension errors are found in the static droplet test, and improved profiles of velocity are obtained by the present model in simulating channel flows. Then, two cases of unsteady flows, Rayleigh-Taylor instability and droplet splashing on a thin film, are simulated. In the former case, the density ratio of 3 and Reynolds numbers of 256 and 2048 are considered. The interface shapes and spike and bubble positions are in good agreement with the results of previous studies. In the latter case, the droplet spreading radius is found to obey the power law proposed in previous studies for the density ratio of 100 and Reynolds number up to 500.

  13. Droplet and bubble nucleation modeled by density gradient theory – cubic equation of state versus saft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrubý Jan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents some preliminary results of the density gradient theory (GT combined with two different equations of state (EoS: the classical cubic equation by van der Waals and a recent approach based on the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT, namely its perturbed-chain (PC modification. The results showed that the cubic EoS predicted for a given surface tension the density profile with a noticeable defect. Bulk densities predicted by the cubic EoS differed as much as by 100 % from the reference data. On the other hand, the PC-SAFT EoS provided accurate results for density profile and both bulk densities in the large range of temperatures. It has been shown that PC-SAFT is a promising tool for accurate modeling of nucleation using the GT. Besides the basic case of a planar phase interface, the spherical interface was analyzed to model a critical cluster occurring either for nucleation of droplets (condensation or bubbles (boiling, cavitation. However, the general solution for the spherical interface will require some more attention due to its numerical difficulty.

  14. Iodixanol Gradient Centrifugation to Separate Components of the Low-Density Membrane Fraction from 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Jessica B A; Lamb, Christopher A; Gould, Gwyn W; Bryant, Nia J

    2016-02-01

    We optimized a set of fractionation techniques to facilitate the isolation of subcellular compartments containing insulin-sensitive glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4), which is mobilized from GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) in fat and muscle cells in response to insulin. In the absence of insulin, GLUT4 undergoes a continuous cycle of GSV formation and fusion with other compartments. Full membrane fractionation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes produces a low-density membrane fraction that contains both the constitutive recycling pool (the endosomal recycling compartments) and the insulin-sensitive pool (the GSVs). These two pools can be separated based on density using iodixanol gradient centrifugation, described here. PMID:26832683

  15. Relaxation of a steep density gradient in a simple fluid: Comparison between atomistic and continuum modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourali, Meisam; Maghari, Ali [Department of Physical Chemistry, School of Chemistry, College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meloni, Simone, E-mail: simone.meloni@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Chemistry and Biochemistry, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Magaletti, Francesco; Casciola, Carlo Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Università La Sapienza, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Ciccotti, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Università La Sapienza, P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-10-21

    We compare dynamical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and continuum simulations of the dynamics of relaxation of a fluid system characterized by a non-uniform density profile. Results match quite well as long as the lengthscale of density nonuniformities are greater than the molecular scale (∼10 times the molecular size). In presence of molecular scale features some of the continuum fields (e.g., density and momentum) are in good agreement with atomistic counterparts, but are smoother. On the contrary, other fields, such as the temperature field, present very large difference with respect to reference (atomistic) ones. This is due to the limited accuracy of some of the empirical relations used in continuum models, the equation of state of the fluid in the present example.

  16. Up-Hill Diffusion Creating Density Gradient - What is the Proper Entropy?

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    It is always some constraint that yields any nontrivial structure from statistical averages. As epitomized by the Boltzmann distribution, the energy conservation is often the principal constraint acting on mechanical systems. Here, we investigate a different type: the topological constraint imposed on `space'. Such constraint emerges from the null space of the Poisson operator linking energy gradient to phase space velocity, and appears as an adiabatic invariant altering the preserved phase space volume at the core of statistical mechanics. The correct measure of entropy, built on the distorted invariant measure, behaves consistently with the second law of thermodynamics. The opposite behavior (decreasing entropy and negative entropy production) arises in arbitrary coordinates. An ensamble of rotating rigid bodies is worked out. The theory is then applied to up-hill diffusion in a magnetosphere.

  17. Up-hill diffusion, creation of density gradients: Entropy measure for systems with topological constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, N.; Yoshida, Z.

    2016-06-01

    It is always some constraint that yields any nontrivial structure from statistical averages. As epitomized by the Boltzmann distribution, the energy conservation is often the principal constraint acting on mechanical systems. Here we investigate a different type: the topological constraint imposed on "space." Such a constraint emerges from the null space of the Poisson operator linking an energy gradient to phase space velocity and appears as an adiabatic invariant altering the preserved phase space volume at the core of statistical mechanics. The correct measure of entropy, built on the distorted invariant measure, behaves consistently with the second law of thermodynamics. The opposite behavior (decreasing entropy and negative entropy production) arises in arbitrary coordinates. An ensemble of rotating rigid bodies is worked out. The theory is then applied to up-hill diffusion in a magnetosphere.

  18. Coupled effect of viscosity and density gradients on fingering instabilities of a miscible slice in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2016-08-01

    Miscible displacements in porous media exhibit interesting spatio-temporal patterns. A deeper understanding of the physical mechanisms of these emergent patterns is relevant in a number of physicochemical processes. Here, we have numerically investigated the instabilities in a miscible slice in vertical porous media. Depending on the viscosity and density gradients at the two interfaces, four distinct flow configurations are obtained, which are partitioned into two different groups, each containing a pair of equivalent flows until the interaction between the two interfaces. An analysis of the pressure drop around the respective unstable interface(s) supports numerical results. We classify the stabilizing and destabilizing scenarios in a parameter space spanned by the log-mobility ratio (R) and the displacement velocity (U). When the viscosity and density gradients are unstably stratified at the opposite interfaces, the stability characteristics are very complex. The most notable findings of this paper are the existence of a stable region between two unstable regions in the R-U plane and occurrence of secondary instabilities. We further show that the stability regions in the R-U plane depend strongly on the slice width, and beyond a threshold value of it the stable zone remains almost unaltered. For thin sample, the stable region expands and the secondary instabilities disappear.

  19. Damping-Growth Transition for Ion-Acoustic Waves in a Density Gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.; Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans

    1975-01-01

    A damping-growth transition for ion-acoustic waves propagating in a nonuniform plasma (e-folding length for the density ln) is observed at a wavelength λ∼2πln. This result supports calculations performed in connection with the problem of heating of the solar corona by ion-acoustic waves generated...... in the solar photosphere....

  20. Gradients of Electron-Temperature and Density across M = 2 Magnetic Islands in Rtp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Milligen, B. P.; van Lammeren, A. C. A. P.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Schüller, F. C.; Verreck, M.

    1993-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of oscillations of the electron temperature, the electron density and the poloidal magnetic field in the Rijnhuizen tokamak RTP are combined to obtain an insight into the structure of MHD mode perturbations. The diagnostics used are a 20 channel heterodyne ECE radiometer, a

  1. Numerical Studies of Electron Acceleration Behind Self-Modulating Proton Beam in Plasma with a Density Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Petrenko, Alexey; Sosedkin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1e15 1/cm^3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project --- the proof-of-prin...

  2. Numerical studies of electron acceleration behind self-modulating proton beam in plasma with a density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, A.; Lotov, K.; Sosedkin, A.

    2016-09-01

    Presently available high-energy proton beams in circular accelerators carry enough momentum to accelerate high-intensity electron and positron beams to the TeV energy scale over several hundred meters of the plasma with a density of about 1015cm-3. However, the plasma wavelength at this density is 100-1000 times shorter than the typical longitudinal size of the high-energy proton beam. Therefore the self-modulation instability (SMI) of a long (~10 cm) proton beam in the plasma should be used to create the train of micro-bunches which would then drive the plasma wake resonantly. Changing the plasma density profile offers a simple way to control the development of the SMI and the acceleration of particles during this process. We present simulations of the possible use of a plasma density gradient as a way to control the acceleration of the electron beam during the development of the SMI of a 400 GeV proton beam in a 10 m long plasma. This work is done in the context of the AWAKE project-the proof-of-principle experiment on proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CERN.

  3. Mapping the genome of meta-generalized gradient approximation density functionals: The search for B97M-V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A meta-generalized gradient approximation density functional paired with the VV10 nonlocal correlation functional is presented. The functional form is selected from more than 1010 choices carved out of a functional space of almost 1040 possibilities. Raw data come from training a vast number of candidate functional forms on a comprehensive training set of 1095 data points and testing the resulting fits on a comprehensive primary test set of 1153 data points. Functional forms are ranked based on their ability to reproduce the data in both the training and primary test sets with minimum empiricism, and filtered based on a set of physical constraints and an often-overlooked condition of satisfactory numerical precision with medium-sized integration grids. The resulting optimal functional form has 4 linear exchange parameters, 4 linear same-spin correlation parameters, and 4 linear opposite-spin correlation parameters, for a total of 12 fitted parameters. The final density functional, B97M-V, is further assessed on a secondary test set of 212 data points, applied to several large systems including the coronene dimer and water clusters, tested for the accurate prediction of intramolecular and intermolecular geometries, verified to have a readily attainable basis set limit, and checked for grid sensitivity. Compared to existing density functionals, B97M-V is remarkably accurate for non-bonded interactions and very satisfactory for thermochemical quantities such as atomization energies, but inherits the demonstrable limitations of existing local density functionals for barrier heights

  4. Horizontal Ionospheric Electron Density Gradients Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC TIP: Spatial Distributions and Effects on VLF Wave Propagation at Mid-Latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien H. Chua

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial variability of electron densities in the nightside ionosphere and its effects on very-low frequency (VLF wave propagation using a suite of instruments from the FORMOSAT-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC spacecraft.We use observations from the Tiny Ionospheric Photometer (TIP instruments to infer the horizontal electron density gradients along each satellite track. We demonstrate that the OI 1356 _ radiance measured by the TIP instruments tracks the horizontal electron density structure well with high spatial resolution and unprecedented sensitivity. Accurate measurements of the horizontal electron density gradients are important for improving retrieved electron density profiles from GPS occultation and other tomographic remote sensing techniques. The processes underlying the variability in the large-scale, nightside electron density gradients are the main drivers of ionospheric weather. TIP observations reveal significant variability in both the small and large scale structure of the nightside ionosphere. The relative intensities, relative widths, and latitudinal separation of the northern and southern ionization crests of the Appleton anomalies show a high degree of longitudinal variation.We demonstrate how the TIP observations can be used to measure the horizontal gradient of the refractive index of whistler-mode VLF waves propagating in a cold, collisionless plasma. These measurements are critical for understanding how gradients in electron density associated with ionospheric structure such as depletions and the Appleton anomalies affect VLF wave propagation through the equatorial and mid-latitude ionosphere.

  5. The role of density gradients on tidal asymmetries in the German Bight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanev, Emil V.; Al-Nadhairi, Rahma; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the German Bight associated with river plumes and fresh water intrusions from tidal flats have been studied with numerical simulations. The horizontal and vertical patterns of the M2, M4 and M6 tides revealed complex distortions along the bathymetric channels connecting the coast and the open sea. A major focus was on the surface-to-bottom change in tidal asymmetries, which provides a major control on draining the tidal flats around the Elbe and Weser River mouths. Comparisons between baroclinic and barotropic experiments demonstrated that the estuarine gravitational circulation is responsible for pronounced differences in surface and bottom asymmetries. These differences could be considered as a basic control mechanism for sediment dynamics. The most prominent area of tidal distortions, manifested by a delay of the tidal wave, was located between the estuarine turbidity maximum and the estuarine mouth north of Cuxhaven. This area was characterized by the strongest periodic convergence and divergence of the flow and by the largest salinity gradients. The enhancement of the gravitational circulation occurred during the transition between spring and neap tides. The large-scale dynamics and small-scale topographic features could impact the sediment distribution as there was a marked interplay in the channels between stratification and turbulence. Also an explanation has been given for the mechanisms supporting the existence of a mud area ( Schlickgebiet) south of Helgoland Island, associated with trapping suspended particular matter.

  6. Highly durable superhydrophobic coatings with gradient density by movable spray method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenjimbayashi, Mizuki; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-09-01

    Superhydrophobic surface is expected to be applied in anti-fouling, anti-icing, and anti-bacterial. However, practical use is interrupted by low mechanical strength, time-consuming process, and limited coating substrate. Here highly durable superhydrophobic coatings were prepared by simple and novel spraying method, which sprays with changing the "spray distance between substrate and spray" (SD), named "movable spray method." We prepared the solution that changes wettability and durability with spraying distance by mixing SiO2 nanoparticles and ethyl alpha cyanoacrylate polymer (EAC). Then, we evaluated the chemical components and surface morphologies of each spraying distance coatings (0 ˜ 50 cm) by XPS, SEM, and laser scanning microscope. It revealed that surface roughness and SiO2/EAC ratio increased as the SD increases. Thus, durable superhydrophobic coatings were designed by spraying with increasing SD gradually. Glow discharge-optical emission spectrometry analysis revealed that designed coatings showed the gradual increase of SiO2/EAC ratio. As a result, coatings prepared on glass, wood, or aluminum substrates maintained their superhydrophobicity up to the abrasion at 40 kPa. This movable spray method is simple coating by the wet process and prepares robust hydrophobic coating on complex shape and large area substrates. The gradient functional surface was found to have mechanical durability and superhydrophobicity, and wide area applications will be expected.

  7. Do finite size neutrally buoyant particles cluster?

    CERN Document Server

    Fiabane, Lionel; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Monchaux, Romain; Cartellier, Alain; Bourgoin, Mickael

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the preferential concentration of particles which are neutrally buoyant but with a diameter significantly larger than the dissipation scale of the carrier flow. Such particles are known not to behave as flow tracers (Qureshi et al., Phys. Re. Lett. 2007) but whether they do cluster or not remains an open question. For this purpose, we take advantage of a new turbulence generating apparatus, the Lagrangian Exploration Module which produces homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a closed water flow. The flow is seeded with neutrally buoyant particles with diameter 700\\mum, corresponding to 4.4 to 17 times the turbulent dissipation scale when the rotation frequency of the impellers driving the flow goes from 2 Hz to 12 Hz, and spanning a range of Stokes numbers from 1.6 to 24.2. The spatial structuration of these inclusions is then investigated by a Voronoi tesselation analysis, as recently proposed by Monchaux et al. (Phys. Fluids 2010), from images of particle concentration field taken in a las...

  8. Development of detection filter for mammographic microcalcifications. A method based on density gradient and triple-ring filter analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirako, Kenichi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Hara, Takeshi [Gifu Univ. (Japan); Endo, Tokiko

    1995-09-01

    We have developed a new automated-detection algorithm for clustered microcalcifications on digital mammograms (breast radiographs). The vectors of density gradient were firstly calculated within the area of breast which was segmented automatically. Secondly, the triple-ring filter was developed to extract the specific features for the pattern of microcalcifications form the vectors. The simulation study was performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new method. The true positive detection rate of our algorithm was 90.3% with 0.84 false-positive detection per image on our data base of 132 mammograms. These results showed that our new algorithm is applicable to the mammographic computer-aided diagnostic system. (author).

  9. Multi-Dimensional Quantum Effect Simulation Using a Density-Gradient Model and Script-Level Programming Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Connor S.; Biegel, Bryan A.; Yu, Zhi-Ping; Ancona, Mario G.; Bude, J.; Dutton, Robert W.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A density-gradient (DG) model is used to calculate quantum-mechanical corrections to classical carrier transport in MOS (Metal Oxide Semiconductor) inversion/accumulation layers. The model is compared to measured data and to a fully self-consistent coupled Schrodinger and Poisson equation (SCSP) solver. Good agreement is demonstrated for MOS capacitors with gate oxide as thin as 21 A. It is then applied to study carrier distribution in ultra short MOSFETs (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) with surface roughness. This work represents the first implementation of the DG formulation on multidimensional unstructured meshes. It was enabled by a powerful scripting approach which provides an easy-to-use and flexible framework for solving the fourth-order PDEs (Partial Differential Equation) of the DG model.

  10. Isolation of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes in culture using Nycodenz density gradient columns and magnetic isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Jackie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large scale in vitro production of the mosquito stages of malaria parasites remains elusive, with only limited success for complete sporogonic development and only one report of development through to infective sporozoites. The initial step in this process is the production, in vitro, of ookinetes from gametocytaemic blood. Methods for isolation of these ookinetes from blood cells have been described; however, in addition to yield often being low, processing time and potential for contamination by erythrocytes remain high. Methods This study compares two procedures for retaining mature ookinetes from blood stage cultures, whilst removing red blood cells and other contaminants prior to further culture of the parasite. The well established method of isolation on Nycodenz cushions is compared with a novel method utilizing the innate magnetic properties of the haem pigment crystals found in the cytoplasm of ookinetes. Results Yield and viability of ookinetes were similar with both isolation methods. However, in our hands magnetic isolation produced a cleaner ookinete preparation much more quickly. Moreover, decreasing the flow rate through the magnetic column could further enhance the yield. Conclusion We recommend the enrichment of an ookinete preparation prior to further culture being performed using the magnetic properties of Plasmodium berghei ookinetes as an alternative to their density. The former technique is faster, removes more erythrocytes, but day-to-day costs are greater.

  11. Thermocapillary migration of liquid droplets in a temperature gradient in a density matched system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidnia, N.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of thermocapillary flow in droplets of a vegetable oil (partially hydrogenated soybean oil) immersed in silicone oil was conducted in a test cell with a heated top wall and a cooled bottom wall. The liquids are nearly immiscible and have equal densities at a temperature below the room temperature, thus providing a simulation of low-gravity conditions by reducing the buoyancy forces. The interfacial tension between the two oils was measured in the temperature range 20 to 50 C using a capillary tube and (d sigma)/(d T) was determined to be negative. Droplets ranging in sizes from 3 mm to 1 cm diameter were injected into the silicone oil. The vertical temperature profile in the bulk liquid (silicone oil) produces temperature variations along the interface which induce variations in the interfacial tension. The flow inside the droplet driven by the resulting interfacial shear stresses was observed using a laser light-sheet flow visualization technique. The flow direction is consistent with the sign of (d sigma)/(d T). The observed maximum surface velocities are compared to the theoretical predictions of Young et al. (1959).

  12. Turbulence attenuation by large neutrally buoyant particles

    CERN Document Server

    Cisse, Mamadou; Gibert, Mathieu; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Bec, Jeremie

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence modulation by inertial-range-size, neutrally-buoyant particles is investigated experimentally in a von K\\'arm\\'an flow. Increasing the particle volume fraction $\\Phi_\\mathrm{v}$, maintaining constant impellers Reynolds number attenuates the fluid turbulence. The inertial-range energy transfer rate decreases as $\\propto\\Phi_\\mathrm{v}^{2/3}$, suggesting that only particles located on a surface affect the flow. Small-scale turbulent properties, such as structure functions or acceleration distribution, are unchanged. Finally, measurements hint at the existence of a transition between two different regimes occurring when the average distance between large particles is of the order of the thickness of their boundary layers.

  13. Simulations of Buoyant Bubbles in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggen, M

    2003-01-01

    It is generally argued that most clusters of galaxies host cooling flows in which radiative cooling in the centre causes a slow inflow. However, recent observations by Chandra and XMM conflict with the predicted cooling flow rates. Here we report highly resolved hydrodynamic simulations which show that buoyant bubbles can offset the cooling in the inner regions of clusters and can significantly delay the deposition of cold gas. The subsonic rise of bubbles uplifts colder material from the central regions of the cluster. This colder material appears as bright rims around the bubbles. The bubbles themselves appear as depressions in the X-ray surface brightness as observed in a growing number of clusters.

  14. Dynamics of a buoyant plume in a linearly stratified environment using simultaneous PIV-PLIF measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mirajkar, Harish N

    2016-01-01

    The presence of stratified layer in atmosphere and ocean leads to buoyant vertical motions, commonly referred to as plumes. It is important to study the mixing dynamics of a plume at a local scale in order to model their evolution and growth. Such a characterization requires measuring the velocity and density of the mixing fluids simultaneously. Here, we present the results of a buoyant plume propagating in a linearly stratified medium with a density difference of 0.5%, thus yielding a buoyancy frequency of N=0.15 s^{-1}. To understand the plume behaviour, statistics such as centerline and axial velocities along varying downstream locations, turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds stress, and buoyancy flux were measured. The centerline velocity was found to decrease with increase in height. The Reynolds stress and buoyancy flux profiles showed the presence of a unstable layer and the mixing associated within that layer.

  15. Spatial Distribution of Oxygen Chemical Potential under Potential Gradients and Theoretical Maximum Power Density with 8YSZ Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae-Kwang; Im, Ha-Ni; Song, Sun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The maximum power density of SOFC with 8YSZ electrolyte as the function of thickness was calculated by integrating partial conductivities of charge carriers under various DC bias conditions at a fixed oxygen chemical potential gradient at both sides of the electrolyte. The partial conductivities were successfully taken using the Hebb-Wagner polarization method as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure, and the spatial distribution of oxygen partial pressure across the electrolyte was calculated based on Choudhury and Patterson’s model by considering zero electrode polarization. At positive voltage conditions corresponding to SOFC and SOEC, the high conductivity region was expanded, but at negative cell voltage condition, the low conductivity region near n-type to p-type transition was expanded. In addition, the maximum power density calculated from the current-voltage characteristic showed approximately 5.76 W/cm2 at 700 oC with 10 μm thick-8YSZ, while the oxygen partial pressure of the cathode and anode sides maintained ≈0.21 and 10-22 atm.

  16. Subgrid Scale Modeling for Large Eddy Simulation of Buoyant Turbulent Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaisas, Niranjan Shrinivas

    2013-01-01

    Buoyancy effects due to small density differences commonly exist in turbulent fluid flows occurring in nature and in engineering applications. The large eddy simulation (LES) technique, which is being increasingly used for simulating buoyant turbulent flows, requires accurate modeling of the subgrid sclae (SGS) momentum and buoyancy fluxes. This thesis presents a series of LES and direct numerical simulation (DNS) studies towards a priori and a posteriori evaluation of existing SGS models, an...

  17. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory: A Fully Translated Gradient Approximation and Its Performance for Transition Metal Dimers and the Spectroscopy of Re2Cl8(2-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Rebecca K; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-09-01

    We extend the on-top density functional of multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT) to include the gradient of the on-top density as well as the gradient of the density. We find that the theory is reasonably stable to this extension; furthermore, it provides improved accuracy for molecules containing transition metals. We illustrate the extended on-top density functionals by applying them to Cr2, Cu2, Ag2, Os2, and Re2Cl8(2-) as well as to our previous database of 56 data for bond dissociation energies, barrier heights, reaction energies, proton affinities, and the water dimer. The performance of MC-PDFT is comparable to or better than that of CASPT2. PMID:26575903

  18. Response of buoyant plumes to transient discharges investigated using an adaptive solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, J.; Rickard, G.; Popinet, S.; Stevens, C.

    2010-11-01

    The behavior of buoyant plumes driven by variable momentum inputs were examined using an adaptive Navier-Stokes solver (Gerris). Boundary conditions were representative of an idealized stratified, coastal environment. Salinity ranged from 5 to 30 in the top 5 m of the water column to replicate the strong vertical gradients experienced in fjord environments. Two-dimensional simulations examined the response of the buoyant plume driven by zero, steady, and variable momentum fluxes. The behavior was quantified in terms of the characteristic features of a buoyant plume, the thickness of the nose (or head of gravity current), and the trailing tail. Both the nose and tail of the plume were substantially thicker for the variable momentum run, whereas elongation and thinning of the plume was evident for the steady and zero momentum inputs. Furthermore, an order of magnitude difference in available potential energy was found for the variable momentum run. Validation of the Boussinesq approximation initially utilized the classic lock-exchange experiment with excellent agreement to previous numerical and theoretical experiments. Frontal speeds of the gravity current converged toward the theoretical value of Benjamin (1968). The adaptive mesh permitted lock-exchange simulations at Reynolds number (Re) of ˜10,500 and are some of the highest Re runs to date. Moreover, improved computational efficiency was achieved using the adaptive solver with simulations completed in 20% of the time they took on a static, high-resolution grid.

  19. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods for the production of arbovirus antigens inactivated by binary ethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Teck F

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cross-flow filtration methods have been developed and standardised for the safe and reproducible production of inactivated arbovirus antigens which are appropriate for use in diagnostic serological applications. Methods To optimise the maximum titre of growth during the propagation of arboviruses, the multiplicity of infection and choice of cell line were investigated using stocks of Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus grown in both mosquito and mammalian cell lines. To standardise and improve the efficacy of the inactivation of arboviral suspensions, stocks of Ross River virus, Barmah Forest virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Murray Valley encephalitis virus and Alfuy virus were chemically inactivated using binary ethylenimine at a final concentration of 3 mM. Aliquots were then taken at hourly intervals and crude inactivation rates were determined for each virus using a plaque assay. To ensure complete inactivation, the same aliquots were each passaged 3 times in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells and the presence of viral growth was detected using an immunofluorescent assay. For larger quantities of viral suspensions, centrifugation on an isopycnic sucrose density gradient or cross-flow filtration was used to produce concentrated, pure antigens or partially concentrated, semi-purified antigens respectively. Results The results of the propagation experiments suggested that the maximum viral titres obtained for both Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus were affected by the incubation period and choice of cell line, rather than the use of different multiplicity of infection values. Results of the binary ethylenimine inactivation trial suggested that standardised periods of 5 or 8 hours would be suitable to ensure effective and complete inactivation for a number of different arboviral antigens. Conclusion Two methods used to prepare inactivated arbovirus antigens have been

  20. Experimental Study on Liquid Free Surface in Buoyant-Thermocapillary Convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Li; KANG Qi; HU Wen-Rui

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate the surface deformations of buoyant-thermocapillary convection in a rectangular cavity due to gravity and temperature gradient between the two sidewalls. The cavity is 52mm×42 mm in horizontal cross section, the thickness of liquid layer h is changed from 2.5mm to 6.5 mm. Surface deformations of h = 3.5 mm and 6.0mm are discussed and compared. Temperature difference is increased gradually, and the flow in the liquid layer will change from stable convection to unstable convection. Two kinds of optical diagnostic system with image processor are developed for study of the kinetics of buoyant-thermocapillaxy convection, they give out the information of liquid free surface. The quantitative results are calculated by Fourier transform and correlation analysis, respectively. With the increasing temperature gradient, surface deformations calculated are more declining. It is interesting phenomenon that the inclining directions of the convections in thin and thick liquid layers are different. For a thin layer, the convection is mainly controlled by thermocapillary effect. However,for a thick layer, the convection is mainly controlled by buoyancy effect. The surface deformation theoretically analysed is consistent with our experimental results. The present experiment proves that surface deformation is related to temperature gradient and thickness of the liquid layer. In other words, surface deformation lies on capillary convection and buoyancy convection.

  1. Space Electron Density Gradient Studies using a 3D Embedded Reconfigurable Sounder and ESA/NASA CLUSTER Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoulis, George

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a direct comparison between data captured by a new embedded reconfigurable digital sounder, different ground-based ionospheric sounders spread around Europe and the ESA/NASA CLUSTER mission. The CLUSTER mission consists of four identical space probes flying in a formation that allows measurements of the electron density gradient in the local magnetic field. Both the ground-based and the spacecraft instrumentations assist in studying the motion, geometry and boundaries of the plasmasphere. The comparison results are in accordance to each other. Some slight deviations among the captured data were expected from the beginning of this investigation. These small discrepancies are reasonable and seriatim analyzed. The results of this research are significant, since the level of the plasma's ionization, which is related to the solar activity, dominates the propagation of electromagnetic waves through it. Similarly, unusually high solar activity presents serious hazards to orbiting satellites, spaceborne instrumentation, satellite communications and infrastructure located on the Earth's surface. Long-term collaborative study of the data is required to continue, in order to identify and determine the enhanced risk in advance. This would allow scientists to propose an immediate cure.

  2. The seasonal and solar cycle variations of electron density gradient scale length during magnetically disturbed days: implications for Spread F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, G.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.

    2009-07-01

    The behaviour of electron density gradient scale length, L, around post-sunset hours during the magnetically disturbed days of the summer, winter and equinox seasons of solar maximum (2002) and minimum years (1995) has been studied, using ionosonde data of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.5°E, dip = 0.5°N) in the Indian longitude sector. The results indicate a clear seasonal and solar cycle variation in L. Seasonal variations of the maximum vertical drift of the F layer were also examined on these days. In particular, the seasonal variation of the Equatorial Spread F (ESF) during this period is examined in terms of the relative roles of L and the vertical drift of the F layer in the triggering of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Our results on the clear-cut seasonal and solar cycle variation in L for disturbed days and its control of ESF occurrence are presented and discussed.

  3. Controllable Assembly and Separation of Colloidal Nanoparticles through a One-Tube Synthesis Based on Density Gradient Centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaohan; Li, Minglin; Kuang, Yun; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Zhao; Zhang, Jin; You, Shusen; Yin, Meizhen; Wan, Pengbo; Luo, Liang; Sun, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with finite primary units was achieved by introducing a thin salt (NaCl) solution layer into density gradient before centrifugation. The electrostatic interactions between Au nanoparticles would be affected and cause 1D assembly upon passing through the salt layer. A negatively charged polymer such as poly(acrylic acid) was used as an encapsulation/stabilization layer to help the formation of 1D Au assemblies, which were subsequently sorted according to unit numbers at succeeding separation zones. A centrifugal field was introduced as the external field to overcome the random Brownian motion of NPs and benefit the assembly effect. Such a facile "one-tube synthesis" approach couples assembly and separation in one centrifuge tube by centrifuging once. The method can be tuned by changing the concentration of interference salt layer, encapsulation layer, and centrifugation rate. Furthermore, positively charged fluorescent polymers such as perylenediimide-poly(N,N-diethylaminoethyl methacrylate) could encapsulate the assemblies to give tunable fluorescence properties. PMID:25809533

  4. First-principles local density approximation+U and generalized gradient approximation+U study of plutonium oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Xian-Geng

    2008-02-01

    The electronic structure and properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 have been studied from first principles by the all-electron projector-augmented-wave method. The local density approximation+U and the generalized gradient approximation+U formalisms have been used to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion among the localized Pu 5f electrons. We discuss how the properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 are affected by the choice of U as well as the choice of exchange-correlation potential. Also, oxidation reaction of Pu2O3, leading to formation of PuO2, and its dependence on U and exchange-correlation potential have been studied. Our results show that by choosing an appropriate U, it is promising to correctly and consistently describe structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3, which enable the modeling of redox process involving Pu-based materials possible.

  5. First-principles local density approximation (LDA)+ U and generalized gradient approximation (GGA) + U studies of plutonium oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Bo; Zhang Ping

    2008-01-01

    The electronic structures and properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 have been studied according to the first principles by using the all-electron projector-augmented-wave (PAW) method. The local density approximation (LDA)+U and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA)+U formalisms have been used to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion among the localized Pu 5f electrons. We discuss how the properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3 are affected by choosing the values of U and exchange-correlation potential. Also, the oxidation reaction of Pu2O3, leading to the formation of PuO2, and its dependence on U and exchange-correlation potential have been studied. Our results show that by choosing an appropriate U it is possible to consistently describe structural, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of PuO2 and Pu2O3, which enable the modelling of the redox process involving Pu-based materials.

  6. The shape and behaviour of a horizontal buoyant jet adjacent to a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, Henry; Hunt, Gary

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the incompressible turbulent buoyant jet formed when fluid is steadily ejected horizontally from a circular source into a quiescent environment of uniform density. As our primary focus, we introduce a horizontal boundary. For sufficiently large source-boundary separations, the buoyant jet is `free' to rise under the action of the buoyancy force. For smaller source-boundary separations, the jet attaches and `clings' to the boundary before, further downstream, pulling away from the boundary. Based on measurements of saline jets in freshwater we deduce the conditions required for a jet to cling. We present data for the variation in volume flux, flow envelope and centreline for both `clinging' and `free' jets. For source Froude numbers fr0 >= 12 the data collapses when scaled, identifying universal behaviours for both clinging jets and for free jets. The support and funding from Dyson Technology Ltd is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Sexagem de espermatozoides bovinos por centrifugação em gradiente descontínuo de densidade de Percoll Sex selection in bovine spermatozoa by using Percoll discontinuos density gradient centrifugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Fernanda Martins Hossepian de Lima

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo neste trabalho foi desenvolver um método de seleção do sexo de espermatozoides bovinos por centrifugação em gradiente de densidade de Percoll. Utilizou-se sêmen congelado de touros mantidos em regime de colheita de sêmen. A fração de espermatozoides X ou Y foi separada por centrifugação em treze diferentes gradientes de densidade de Percoll formados por 1 a 12 camadas com densidades que variaram de 1,004 g/mL a 1,123 g/mL. As soluções com diferentes densidades foram preparadas misturando-se, em proporções diferentes, meio de cultura Hank's e uma solução estoque composta de NaCl 1,5 M e Percoll (1:9, v/v. Sobre cada gradiente foi colocado um total de 50 × 10(6 espermatozoides descongelados em 0,7 mL de meio Hank's e centrifugados a 250 X g por 30 minutos, em rotor horizontal, a 25°C. Os espermatozoides das frações superior e inferior foram tratados com Quinacrina Mustarda e analisados (200 deles quanto à presença do corpúsculo-F. Dos espermatozoides encontrados no sedimento de dois gradientes, compostos de 8 e 12 frações com densidades variando entre 1,050 a 1,120 g/mL e 1,044 a 1,123 g/mL, respectivamente, visualizaram-se 25% com corpúsculo-F e os 75% restantes prováveis portadores do cromossomo X. O aumento na porcentagem de espermatozoides X após a centrifugação em gradiente de densidade permitirá que esse método de sexagem seja usado em larga escala na produção comercial de carne e leite bem como no teste de progênie.The objective of this work was to develop a bovine spermatozoid sex selection method by using Percoll density gradient centrifugation. It was used frozen semen of bulls kept in semen collection regime. Fraction X or Y was separated by centrifugation in three different Percoll density gradient formed by 1 to 12 layers with densities varying from 1.004 g/mL to 1.123 g/mL. Solutions with different densities were prepared by mixing, at different proportions, Hank's culture medium and a

  8. An Experimental Investigation on Inclined Negatively Buoyant Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Bashitialshaaer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was performed to investigate the behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets. Such jets arise when brine is discharged from desalination plants. A turbulent jet with a specific salinity was discharged through a circular nozzle at an angle to the horizontal into a tank with fresh water and the spatial evolution of the jet was recorded. Four different initial jet parameters were changed, namely the nozzle diameter, the initial jet inclination, the jet density and the flow rate. Five geometric quantities describing the jet trajectory that are useful in the design of brine discharge systems were determined. Dimensional analysis demonstrated that the geometric jet quantities studied, if normalized with the jet exit diameter, could be related to the densimetric Froude number. Analysis of the collected data showed that this was the case for a Froude number less than 100, whereas for larger values of the Froude number the scatter in the data increased significantly. As has been observed in some previous investigations, the slope of the best-fit straight line through the data points was a function of the initial jet angle (θ, where the slope increased with θ for the maximum levels (Ym studied, but had a more complex behavior for horizontal distances.

  9. The Centaurus A Northern Middle Lobe as a Buoyant Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Saxton, C J; Bicknell, G V; Saxton, Curtis J.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Bicknell, Geoffrey V.

    2001-01-01

    We model the northern middle radio lobe of Centaurus A (NGC 5128) as a buoyant bubble of plasma deposited by an intermittently active jet. The extent of the rise of the bubble and its morphology imply that the ratio of its density to that of the surrounding ISM is less than 10^{-2}, consistent with our knowledge of extragalactic jets and minimal entrainment into the precursor radio lobe. Using the morphology of the lobe to date the beginning of its rise through the atmosphere of Centaurus A, we conclude that the bubble has been rising for approximately 140Myr. This time scale is consistent with that proposed by Quillen et al. (1993) for the settling of post-merger gas into the presently observed large scale disk in NGC 5128, suggesting a strong connection between the delayed re-establishment of radio emission and the merger of NGC 5128 with a small gas-rich galaxy. This suggests a connection, for radio galaxies in general, between mergers and the delayed onset of radio emission. In our model, the elongated X-...

  10. Classification and prediction of buoyant surface discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on effluents that are often discharged into riverine, estuarine, and costal waters at or near the surface of the receiving water body. Although government regulations generally limit or prohibit surface discharges containing industrial or municipal pollutants, several exceptions exist, such as the discharge of heated water from power plants, and the discharge of effluent from combined sewer overflows. Past efforts to predict the dilution and geometric characteristics of buoyant surface flows have relied on integral modelling techniques involving the solution of a series of differential equations. Although these models have proven successful in predicting simple surface flows, they are extremely limited in applicability due to their inability to account for boundary interaction, strong buoyancy, and recirculating. The proposed method is a two step process involving: classification of the flow depending on the most significant discharge and ambient characteristics, and quantitative prediction of flow through use of simple analytical expressions applied to limited regions within the flow. Classification of the flow is used to distinguish between the great variety of flow patterns that exist under widely differing ambient and discharge conditions. Mathematical prediction of dilution and geometric parameters of the flow (width, depth and centerline trajectory) requires the use of length scales to delineate subregions within the flow. Analytical expressions based on perturbation solutions of the governing equations are applied to each subregion. Although the proposed methodology could be done in any of several frameworks, the authors have chose that of a computer expert system which provides a practical engineering tool for both design and regulatory use

  11. Buoyant subduction on Venus: Implications for subduction around coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, J. W.

    1993-03-01

    Potentially low lithospheric densities, caused by high Venus surface and perhaps mantle temperatures, could inhibit the development of negative buoyancy-driven subduction and a global system of plate tectonics/crustal recycling on that planet. No evidence for a global plate tectonic system was found so far, however, specific features strongly resembling terrestrial subduction zones in planform and topographic cross-section were described, including trenches around large coronae and chasmata in eastern Aphrodite Terra. The cause for the absence, or an altered expression, of plate tectonics on Venus remains to be found. Slab buoyancy may play a role in this difference, with higher lithospheric temperatures and a tendency toward positive buoyancy acting to oppose the descent of slabs and favoring under thrusting instead. The effect of slab buoyancy on subduction was explored and the conditions which would lead to under thrusting versus those allowing the formation of trenches and self-perpetuating subduction were defined. Applying a finite element code to assess the effects of buoyant forces on slabs subducting into a viscous mantle, it was found that mantle flow induced by horizontal motion of the convergent lithosphere greatly influences subduction angle, while buoyancy forces produce a lesser effect. Induced mantle flow tends to decrease subduction angle to near an under thrusting position when the subducting lithosphere converges on a stationary overriding lithosphere. When the overriding lithosphere is in motion, as in the case of an expanding corona, subduction angles are expected to increase. An initial stage involved estimating the changes in slab buoyancy due to slab healing and pressurization over the course of subduction. Modeling a slab, descending at a fixed angle and heated by conduction, radioactivity, and the heat released in phase changes, slab material density changes due to changing temperature, phase, and pressure were derived.

  12. Deformation statistics of sub-Kolmogorov-scale ellipsoidal neutrally buoyant drops in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Biferale, Luca; Verzicco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Small droplets in turbulent flows can undergo highly variable deformations and orientational dynamics. For neutrally buoyant droplets smaller than the Kolmogorov scale, the dominant effects from the surrounding turbulent flow arise through Lagrangian time histories of the velocity gradient tensor. Here we study the evolution of representative droplets using a model that includes rotation and stretching effects from the surrounding fluid, and restoration effects from surface tension including a constant droplet volume constraint, while assuming that the droplets maintain an ellipsoidal shape. The model is combined with Lagrangian time histories of the velocity gradient tensor extracted from DNS of turbulence to obtain simulated droplet evolutions. These are used to characterize the size, shape and orientation statistics of small droplets in turbulence. A critical capillary number, $Ca_c$ is identified associated with unbounded growth of one or two of the droplet's semi-axes. Exploiting analogies with dynamics ...

  13. Comparative assessment of density functional methods for evaluating essential parameters to simulate SERS spectra within the excited state energy gradient approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Mozhdeh; Jamshidi, Zahra

    2016-05-01

    The prospect of challenges in reproducing and interpretation of resonance Raman properties of molecules interacting with metal clusters has prompted the present research initiative. Resonance Raman spectra based on the time-dependent gradient approximation are examined in the framework of density functional theory using different methods for representing the exchange-correlation functional. In this work the performance of different XC functionals in the prediction of ground state properties, excitation state energies, and gradients are compared and discussed. Resonance Raman properties based on time-dependent gradient approximation for the strongly low-lying charge transfer states are calculated and compared for different methods. We draw the following conclusions: (1) for calculating the binding energy and ground state geometry, dispersion-corrected functionals give the best performance in comparison to ab initio calculations, (2) GGA and meta GGA functionals give good accuracy in calculating vibrational frequencies, (3) excited state energies determined by hybrid and range-separated hybrid functionals are in good agreement with EOM-CCSD calculations, and (4) in calculating resonance Raman properties GGA functionals give good and reasonable performance in comparison to the experiment; however, calculating the excited state gradient by using the hybrid functional on the hessian of GGA improves the results of the hybrid functional significantly. Finally, we conclude that the agreement of charge-transfer surface enhanced resonance Raman spectra with experiment is improved significantly by using the excited state gradient approximation.

  14. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, J; Knappe-Grüneberg, S; Gutkelch, D; Haueisen, J; Neuber, S; Schnabel, A; Burghoff, M

    2015-05-01

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  15. Development of a vector-tensor system to measure the absolute magnetic flux density and its gradient in magnetically shielded rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, J.; Knappe-Grüneberg, S.; Gutkelch, D.; Neuber, S.; Schnabel, A.; Burghoff, M. [Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Haueisen, J. [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Informatics, Technische Universität Ilmenau, PF 100565, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Several experiments in fundamental physics demand an environment of very low, homogeneous, and stable magnetic fields. For the magnetic characterization of such environments, we present a portable SQUID system that measures the absolute magnetic flux density vector and the gradient tensor. This vector-tensor system contains 13 integrated low-critical temperature (LTc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) inside a small cylindrical liquid helium Dewar with a height of 31 cm and 37 cm in diameter. The achievable resolution depends on the flux density of the field under investigation and its temporal drift. Inside a seven-layer mu-metal shield, an accuracy better than ±23 pT for the components of the static magnetic field vector and ±2 pT/cm for each of the nine components of the gradient tensor is reached by using the shifting method.

  16. A Breast Cell Atlas: Organelle analysis of the MDA-MB-231 cell line by density-gradient fractionation using isotopic marking and label-free analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sandin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein translocation between organelles in the cell is an important process that regulates many cellular functions. However, organelles can rarely be isolated to purity so several methods have been developed to analyse the fractions obtained by density gradient centrifugation. We present an analysis of the distribution of proteins amongst organelles in the human breast cell line, MDA-MB-231 using two approaches: an isotopic labelling and a label-free approach.

  17. CONSEQUENCES OF NON-LINEAR DENSITY EFFECTS ON BUOYANCY AND PLUME BEHAVIOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic plumes, as turbulent streams, grow by entraining ambient water. Buoyant plumes rise and dense ones sink, but, non-linear kinetic effects can reverse the buoyant force in mid-phenomenon. The class of nascent-density plumes begin as buoyant, upwardly accelerating plumes tha...

  18. Buoyant Magnetic Loops Generated by Global Convective Dynamo Action

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Brun, A Sacha; Miesch, Mark S; Toomre, Juri

    2012-01-01

    Our global 3D simulations of convection and dynamo action in a Sun-like star reveal that persistent wreaths of strong magnetism can be built within the bulk of the convention zone. Here we examine the characteristics of buoyant magnetic structures that are self-consistently created by dynamo action and turbulent convective motions in a simulation with solar stratification but rotating at three times the current solar rate. These buoyant loops originate within sections of the magnetic wreaths in which turbulent flows amplify the fields to much larger values than is possible through laminar processes. These amplified portions can rise through the convective layer by a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells, forming buoyant loops. We measure statistical trends in the polarity, twist, and tilt of these loops. Loops are shown to preferentially arise in longitudinal patches somewhat reminiscent of active longitudes in the Sun, although broader in extent. We show that the strength o...

  19. Gradient vector fields based on variational image decomposition for skeletonization of electronic speckle pattern interferometry fringe patterns with variable density and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xia; Tang, Chen; Li, Biyuan; Su, Yonggang

    2016-09-01

    The skeletonization methods based on gradient vector fields (GVFs) have been a powerful tool for electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) fringe patterns. However, the skeletonization of ESPI fringe patterns with variable density has been an open problem in this area. In this paper, we propose a novel method for calculating GVFs based on the variational image decomposition of ESPI fringe patterns with variable density. In the proposed method, the GVFs of low-density regions are described in Beppo-Levi space, the high-density regions in Hilbert space and the noise regions in curvelet space. The GVFs of a whole image are the sum of the decomposed GVFs of low-density regions and high-density regions. The skeletons of ESPI fringe patterns with variable density can be obtained based on the topological analysis of the GVFs of a whole image. We apply the proposed method to a computer-simulated and two experimentally obtained ESPI fringe patterns with variable density and compare them with the related skeleton methods based on GVFs. The experimental results have demonstrated that the proposed method outperforms the other methods, even when the quality of the ESPI fringe patterns is considerably low. PMID:27607264

  20. Horizontal H 2-air turbulent buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    The current article is devoted to introducing mathematical and physical analyses with numerical investigation of a buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage in air from a horizontal round source. H 2-air jet is an example of the non-Boussinesq buoyant jet in which a low-density gas jet is injected/leak into a high-density ambient. The density of the mixture is a function of the concentration only, the binary gas mixture is assumed to be of a linear mixing type and the rate of entrainment is assumed to be a function of the plume centerline velocity and the ratio of the mean plume and ambient densities. On the other hand, the local rate of entrainment consists of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. The top-hat profile assumption is used to obtain the mean centerline velocity, width, density and concentration of the H 2-air horizontal jet in addition to kinematic relations which govern the jet trajectories. A set of ordinary differential equations is obtained and solved numerically using Runge-Kutta method. In the second step, the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet are obtained based on Gaussian model. Finally, several quantities of interest, including the cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity-concentration correlation (radial flux), turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity, are obtained by solving the governing partial differential equations. Additionally, the turbulent Schmidt number is estimated and the normalized jet-feed material density and the normalized momentum flux density are correlated. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High density of tree-cavities and snags in tropical dry forest of western Mexico raises questions for a latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Vázquez

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that a latitudinal gradient exists of a low density of snags and high density of naturally-formed tree-cavities in tropical vs. temperate forests, though few cavities may have characteristics suitable for nesting by birds. We determined snag and cavity density, characteristics, and suitability for birds in a tropical dry forest biome of western Mexico, and evaluated whether our data fits the trend of snag and cavity density typically found in tropical moist and wet forests. We established five 0.25-ha transects to survey and measure tree-cavities and snags in each of three vegetation types of deciduous, semi-deciduous, and mono-dominant Piranhea mexicana forest, comprising a total of 3.75 ha. We found a high density of 77 cavities/ha, with 37 cavities suitable for birds/ha, where density, and characteristics of cavities varied significantly among vegetation types. Lowest abundance of cavities occurred in deciduous forest, and these were in smaller trees, at a lower height, and with a narrower entrance diameter. Only 8.6% of cavities were excavated by woodpeckers, and only 11% of cavities were occupied, mainly by arthropods, though 52% of all cavities were unsuitable for birds. We also found a high density of 56 snags/ha, with greatest density in deciduous forest (70 snags/ha, though these were of significantly smaller diameter, and snags of larger diameter were more likely to contain cavities. The Chamela-Cuixmala tropical dry forest had the highest density of snags recorded for any tropical or temperate forest, and while snag density was significantly correlated with mean snag dbh, neither latitude nor mean dbh predicted snag density in ten forest sites. The high spatial aggregation of snag and cavity resources in tropical dry forest may limit their availability, particularly for large-bodied cavity adopters, and highlights the importance of habitat heterogeneity in providing resources for primary and secondary cavity-nesters.

  2. Accuracy of wind tunnel modeling of buoyant plume rise around buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispersion modeling of buoyant exhausts in the vicinity of building clusters, such as from boilers, incinerators, and diesel generators, is often conducted using wind tunnel modeling. The receptors of interest are usually air intakes within the building clusters. Exact wind tunnel modeling of buoyant plume rise requires stack exhaust Froude number scaling between model simulations and the full scale, along with undistorted exit densities and ratios of exit velocity to approach wind speed. The Froude number requirements constrains the air speed in the tunnel to be lower than 0.5 m/s for typical geometric scale reductions. Such low air speeds can make the air flow around the buildings Reynolds number dependent, an undesirable result. Distortions of exhaust density ratios and of exit diameters have been suggested in the past to maintain higher tunnel speeds. Davidson has presented an analytical plume rise equation which combines the 1/3 and 2/3 exponent laws for momentum-dominated and buoyancy-dominated plume rise. The analytical model was reported to compare well with water flume data. Davidson also recommends that the equation can be used to predict the errors in modeled plume rise when various wind tunnel modeling schemes are used to avoid the Froude number modeling requirement. This paper extends the work of Davidson by comparing the analytical equation to several wind tunnel and field plume rise databases. The analytical equation is then used to examine wind tunnel modeling schemes for two types of buoyant exhausts commonly modeled near buildings: emergency diesel generators and boilers

  3. Flow directions and hydraulic gradients in the variable density flow system at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site in the Texas panhandle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedded salt, welded tuff, and basalt are the three rock types proposed as possible host rock for the nation's first high-level nuclear waste repository. Regional flow at the proposed bedded salt site in the Texas Panhandle is unique because it contains waters with highly variable fluid density. The site area is underlain by three regional hydrostratigraphic units: a shallow aquifer system developed in the Ogallala Formation and Dockum Group containing waters with less than 1500 mg/1 TDS, a shale and evaporite aquitard associated with the target salt horizon commonly containing waters with 300,000 mg/1 TDS, and a deep aquifer system developed in the Wolfcamp Series and Pennsylvanian System commonly containing waters with 50,000 to 200,000 mg/1 TDS. The associated fluid density variations can lead to miscalculation of flow directions, hydraulic gradients, and travel times. Pressure-depth diagrams based on shut-in pressure and specific-gravity data from drill-stem tests indicate that regionally the potential for downward flow exists in the shale and evaporite aquitard and the potential for horizontal flow exists in the deep aquifer system. Determination of the direction and magnitude of the vertical hydraulic gradient across the target salt horizon based on a method that solely uses pressure data and which incorporates the effects of variable fluid density indicates a downward-oriented hydraulic gradient at the proposed Texas Panhandle site. These methods do not require calculation of hydraulic head and, therefore, are a more realistic way of determining flow characteristics in variable density flow systems

  4. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically...

  5. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    -differences. Other methods as infra-red sensing are used for visualizing purpose. The results are used to calibrate an integral model of the dispersion. Conclusions are that the dispersion of a buoyant surface plume can be treated the superposition of a buoyancy induced stretching and turbulent diffusion, reduced...

  6. Numerical simulation of buoyant drops suspended in a shear flow: suspensions at low and moderate areal fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suspension of buoyant drops at low and moderate areal fractions is studied at non-zero Reynolds numbers in simple shear flow. The flow is studied as a function of the Capillary number, the Reynolds number, the Froude number and the density ratio. It is found that the effective viscosity decreases with Capillary number. The normal stress difference increases with Capillary number. The effective viscosity and normal stress difference also depend on the Reynolds number. At a relatively low area fraction (ϕ = 0.22 ) the normal stress difference decreases with Froude number and becomes negative at large Froude numbers. At a moderate areal fraction (ϕ = 0.44 ) the behavior of the suspension is similar to the relatively low areal fraction, except that the normal stress difference is always positive. Also, the flow weakly depends on the Froude number at moderate areal fraction. The density distribution of buoyant drops across the channel is non-uniform. (paper)

  7. Numerical simulation of buoyant drops suspended in a shear flow: suspensions at low and moderate areal fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, S; Mortazavi, S, E-mail: s.goodarzi@me.iut.ac.ir, E-mail: saeedm@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    Suspension of buoyant drops at low and moderate areal fractions is studied at non-zero Reynolds numbers in simple shear flow. The flow is studied as a function of the Capillary number, the Reynolds number, the Froude number and the density ratio. It is found that the effective viscosity decreases with Capillary number. The normal stress difference increases with Capillary number. The effective viscosity and normal stress difference also depend on the Reynolds number. At a relatively low area fraction (#Greek Phi Symbol# = 0.22 ) the normal stress difference decreases with Froude number and becomes negative at large Froude numbers. At a moderate areal fraction (#Greek Phi Symbol# = 0.44 ) the behavior of the suspension is similar to the relatively low areal fraction, except that the normal stress difference is always positive. Also, the flow weakly depends on the Froude number at moderate areal fraction. The density distribution of buoyant drops across the channel is non-uniform. (paper)

  8. Density-dependent regulation of brook trout population dynamics along a core-periphery distribution gradient in a central Appalachian watershed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock M Huntsman

    Full Text Available Spatial population models predict strong density-dependence and relatively stable population dynamics near the core of a species' distribution with increasing variance and importance of density-independent processes operating towards the population periphery. Using a 10-year data set and an information-theoretic approach, we tested a series of candidate models considering density-dependent and density-independent controls on brook trout population dynamics across a core-periphery distribution gradient within a central Appalachian watershed. We sampled seven sub-populations with study sites ranging in drainage area from 1.3-60 km(2 and long-term average densities ranging from 0.335-0.006 trout/m. Modeled response variables included per capita population growth rate of young-of-the-year, adult, and total brook trout. We also quantified a stock-recruitment relationship for the headwater population and coefficients of variability in mean trout density for all sub-populations over time. Density-dependent regulation was prevalent throughout the study area regardless of stream size. However, density-independent temperature models carried substantial weight and likely reflect the effect of year-to-year variability in water temperature on trout dispersal between cold tributaries and warm main stems. Estimated adult carrying capacities decreased exponentially with increasing stream size from 0.24 trout/m in headwaters to 0.005 trout/m in the main stem. Finally, temporal variance in brook trout population size was lowest in the high-density headwater population, tended to peak in mid-sized streams and declined slightly in the largest streams with the lowest densities. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that local density-dependent processes have a strong control on brook trout dynamics across the entire distribution gradient. However, the mechanisms of regulation likely shift from competition for limited food and space in headwater streams to

  9. Density-dependent regulation of brook trout population dynamics along a core-periphery distribution gradient in a central Appalachian watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsman, Brock M; Petty, J Todd

    2014-01-01

    Spatial population models predict strong density-dependence and relatively stable population dynamics near the core of a species' distribution with increasing variance and importance of density-independent processes operating towards the population periphery. Using a 10-year data set and an information-theoretic approach, we tested a series of candidate models considering density-dependent and density-independent controls on brook trout population dynamics across a core-periphery distribution gradient within a central Appalachian watershed. We sampled seven sub-populations with study sites ranging in drainage area from 1.3-60 km(2) and long-term average densities ranging from 0.335-0.006 trout/m. Modeled response variables included per capita population growth rate of young-of-the-year, adult, and total brook trout. We also quantified a stock-recruitment relationship for the headwater population and coefficients of variability in mean trout density for all sub-populations over time. Density-dependent regulation was prevalent throughout the study area regardless of stream size. However, density-independent temperature models carried substantial weight and likely reflect the effect of year-to-year variability in water temperature on trout dispersal between cold tributaries and warm main stems. Estimated adult carrying capacities decreased exponentially with increasing stream size from 0.24 trout/m in headwaters to 0.005 trout/m in the main stem. Finally, temporal variance in brook trout population size was lowest in the high-density headwater population, tended to peak in mid-sized streams and declined slightly in the largest streams with the lowest densities. Our results provide support for the hypothesis that local density-dependent processes have a strong control on brook trout dynamics across the entire distribution gradient. However, the mechanisms of regulation likely shift from competition for limited food and space in headwater streams to competition for

  10. Measurement of deuterium density profiles in the H-mode steep gradient region using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskey, S. R.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chrystal, C.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Pablant, N. A.; Stagner, L.

    2016-11-01

    Recent completion of a thirty two channel main-ion (deuterium) charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CER) diagnostic on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] enables detailed comparisons between impurity and main-ion temperature, density, and toroidal rotation. In a H-mode DIII-D discharge, these new measurement capabilities are used to provide the deuterium density profile, demonstrate the importance of profile alignment between Thomson scattering and CER diagnostics, and aid in determining the electron temperature at the separatrix. Sixteen sightlines cover the core of the plasma and another sixteen are densely packed towards the plasma edge, providing high resolution measurements across the pedestal and steep gradient region in H-mode plasmas. Extracting useful physical quantities such as deuterium density is challenging due to multiple photoemission processes. These challenges are overcome using a detailed fitting model and by forward modeling the photoemission using the FIDASIM code, which implements a comprehensive collisional radiative model.

  11. Near field characteristics of buoyant helium plumes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kuchimanchi K Bharadwaj; Debopam Das; Pavan K Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Puffing and entrainment characteristics of helium plumes emanating out into ambient air from a circular orifice are investigated in the present study. Velocity and density fields are measured across a diametric plane using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively in phase resolved manner. Experiments are performed in Froude numbers range 0.2–0.4 and for Reynolds numbers 58–248. Puffing frequency measurements reveal that the plume puffing frequencies are insensitive to the plume exit conditions, since the instability is buoyancy driven. The frequencies obtained in the present case are in agreement with frequencies obtained by Cetegen & Kasper (1996) for plumes originating from circular nozzles of various L/D ratios. Velocity and density measurements reveal that toroidal vortex formed during a puffing cycle entrains ambient air as it traverses downstream and this periodic engulfment governs the entrainment mechanism in pulsating plumes. The obtained velocity and density fields are used to calculate mass entrainment rates. It is revealed that though the flow is unsteady, the contribution of unsteady term in mass conservation to entrainment is negligible, and it becomes zero over a puff cycle. Finally, an empirical relation for variation of mass entrainment with height has been proposed, in which the non-dimensional mass entrainment is found to follow a power law with the non-dimensional height.

  12. Design and evaluation of hydrophobic coated buoyant core as floating drug delivery system for sustained release of cisapride

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Shery; Nair, Anroop B; Patil, Pandurang N

    2011-01-01

    An inert hydrophobic buoyant coated–core was developed as floating drug delivery system (FDDS) for sustained release of cisapride using direct compression technology. Core contained low density, porous ethyl cellulose, which was coated with an impermeable, insoluble hydrophobic coating polymer such as rosin. It was further seal coated with low viscosity hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC E15) to minimize moisture permeation and better adhesion with an outer drug layer. It was found that sta...

  13. PREDICTION OF CHARACTERISTICS FOR VERTICAL ROUND NEGATIVE BUOYANT JETS IN HOMOGENEOUS AMBIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The k-ε turbulence model is used to establish a mathematicalmodel of a vertical round jet with negative buoyancy in a static homogeneous ambient. The hybrid finite analytic method, with a non-uniform staggered grid, is used to calculate the whole flow field. The variations of centerline velocity, density and turbulent kinetic energy along the axial line for a given exit densimetric Froude number are found to converge to single curves under the unified scaling law derived by Chen and Rodi. The profiles of mean velocities, mean density difference and the half-width of negative buoyant jets for velocity and density are given. The calculation confirmed that the maximum height of rise is proportional to M03/4B0-1/2 ,where M0 and B0 are the momentum flux and the buoyancy flux at the source, respectively.

  14. Laplacian-level kinetic energy approximations based on the fourth-order gradient expansion: Global assessment and application to the subsystem formulation of density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Laricchia, S; Fabiano, E; Della Sala, F

    2014-01-01

    We test Laplacian-level meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) non-interacting kinetic energy functionals based on the fourth-order gradient expansion (GE4). We consider several well known Laplacian-level meta-GGAs from literature (bare GE4, modified GE4, and the MGGA functional of Perdew and Constantin [Phys. Rev. B \\textbf{75},155109 (2007)]), as well as two newly designed Laplacian-level kinetic energy functionals (named L0.4 and L0.6). First, a general assessment of the different functionals is performed, testing them for model systems (one-electron densities, Hooke's atom and different jellium systems), atomic and molecular kinetic energies as well as for their behavior with respect to density-scaling transformations. Finally, we assess, for the first time, the performance of the different functionals for Subsystem Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations on non-covalently interacting systems. We find that the different Laplacian-level meta-GGA kinetic functionals may improve the descript...

  15. An effect of a horizontal buoyant jet on the temperature distribution inside a hot water storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A vortex is generated when the buoyant jet impinges the opposite wall linearly. • The vortex height “Zb” is nearly equal to the edge of the temperature gradient layer. • Empirical formulas were proposed between Zb and the buoyant jet’s length scale lM. • A 1D model for simulating temperature distribution was proposed. • The performance of the model was verified by comparing the unsteady test results. -- Abstract: The hot water storage tank (for stratified thermal storage) with a heat pump draws a lot of attention nowadays due to its high performance. In Japan, reheating of the bath is commonly used, and as this mode, the jet injects horizontally at the middle of the tank, so the temperature distribution of the tank changes complexly with time. Hence a model is needed to simulate this phenomenon, precisely. Additionally, in the process of designing a hot water storage system, it is necessary to simulate temperature distribution quickly, since a test run itself is a time consuming process. In this study, visualization experiments were performed using tracer particles and thermo-sensitive liquid crystals. Experiments were also carried out to find the unsteady temperature distribution in a tank when the positively or negatively buoyant jet was injected horizontally in the middle of the tank whose size is limited and has an influence from the opposite wall. If the momentum effect of the buoyant jet is stronger than that of buoyancy, the buoyant jet impinge against the opposite wall of the tank, and a vortex was observed near the opposite wall. Empirical formulas were proposed to predict the height of the vortex “Zb” under various conditions, such as the momentum and the buoyancy of the buoyant jet, and the Prandtl number of the tank water. Furthermore, the 3D-CFD was carried out to supplement the 3D behavior of the inner tank fluid. A one dimensional model, “uniformly distributed injection model”, for simulating temperature

  16. Derivation of general analytic gradient expressions for density-fitted post-Hartree-Fock methods: an efficient implementation for the density-fitted second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkaya, Uğur

    2014-09-28

    General analytic gradient expressions (with the frozen-core approximation) are presented for density-fitted post-HF methods. An efficient implementation of frozen-core analytic gradients for the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) with the density-fitting (DF) approximation (applying to both reference and correlation energies), which is denoted as DF-MP2, is reported. The DF-MP2 method is applied to a set of alkanes, conjugated dienes, and noncovalent interaction complexes to compare the computational cost of single point analytic gradients with MP2 with the resolution of the identity approach (RI-MP2) [F. Weigend and M. Häser, Theor. Chem. Acc. 97, 331 (1997); R. A. Distasio, R. P. Steele, Y. M. Rhee, Y. Shao, and M. Head-Gordon, J. Comput. Chem. 28, 839 (2007)]. In the RI-MP2 method, the DF approach is used only for the correlation energy. Our results demonstrate that the DF-MP2 method substantially accelerate the RI-MP2 method for analytic gradient computations due to the reduced input/output (I/O) time. Because in the DF-MP2 method the DF approach is used for both reference and correlation energies, the storage of 4-index electron repulsion integrals (ERIs) are avoided, 3-index ERI tensors are employed instead. Further, as in case of integrals, our gradient equation is completely avoid construction or storage of the 4-index two-particle density matrix (TPDM), instead we use 2- and 3-index TPDMs. Hence, the I/O bottleneck of a gradient computation is significantly overcome. Therefore, the cost of the generalized-Fock matrix (GFM), TPDM, solution of Z-vector equations, the back transformation of TPDM, and integral derivatives are substantially reduced when the DF approach is used for the entire energy expression. Further application results show that the DF approach introduce negligible errors for closed-shell reaction energies and equilibrium bond lengths.

  17. On the errors of local density (LDA) and generalized gradient (GGA) approximations to the Kohn-Sham potential and orbital energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, O. V.; Mentel, Ł. M.; Baerends, E. J.

    2016-05-01

    In spite of the high quality of exchange-correlation energies Exc obtained with the generalized gradient approximations (GGAs) of density functional theory, their xc potentials vxc are strongly deficient, yielding upshifts of ca. 5 eV in the orbital energy spectrum (in the order of 50% of high-lying valence orbital energies). The GGAs share this deficiency with the local density approximation (LDA). We argue that this error is not caused by the incorrect long-range asymptotics of vxc or by self-interaction error. It arises from incorrect density dependencies of LDA and GGA exchange functionals leading to incorrect (too repulsive) functional derivatives (i.e., response parts of the potentials). The vxc potential is partitioned into the potential of the xc hole vxchole (twice the xc energy density ɛxc), which determines Exc, and the response potential vresp, which does not contribute to Exc explicitly. The substantial upshift of LDA/GGA orbital energies is due to a too repulsive LDA exchange response potential vxresp L D A in the bulk region. Retaining the LDA exchange hole potential plus the B88 gradient correction to it but replacing the response parts of these potentials by the model orbital-dependent response potential vxresp G L L B of Gritsenko et al. [Phys. Rev. A 51, 1944 (1995)], which has the proper step-wise form, improves the orbital energies by more than an order of magnitude. Examples are given for the prototype molecules: dihydrogen, dinitrogen, carbon monoxide, ethylene, formaldehyde, and formic acid.

  18. Supergranulation as the Largest Buoyantly Driven Convective Scale of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark P.

    2016-09-01

    The origin of solar supergranulation remains a mystery. Unlike granulation, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale-height in the photosphere, supergranulation does not reflect any obvious length scale of the solar convection zone. Moreover, recent observations of flows in the photosphere using Doppler imaging or correlation or feature tracking show a monotonic decrease in horizontal flow power at scales larger than supergranulation. Both local area and global spherical shell simulations of solar convection by contrast show the opposite, an increase in horizontal flow amplitudes to a low wavenumber. We examine these disparities and investigate how the solar supergranulation may arise as a consequence of nonlocal heat transport by cool diving plumes. Using three-dimensional anelastic simulations with surface driving, we show that the kinetic energy of the largest convective scales in the upper layers of a stratified domain reflects the depth of transition from strong buoyant driving to adiabatic stratification below caused by the dilution of the granular downflows. This depth is quite shallow because of the rapid increase of the mean density below the photosphere. We interpret the observed monotonic decrease in solar convective power at scales larger than supergranulation to be a consequence of this rapid transition, with the supergranular scale the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection in the Sun.

  19. Parallel electron temperature and density gradients measured in the JET MkI divertor using thermal helium beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, S.J. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Morgan, P.D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Ul`Haq, Y. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking]|[Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Maggi, C.F. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Erents, S.K. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking]|[UKAEA Fusion, Culham, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3EA (United Kingdom); Fundamenski, W. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking]|[Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Horton, L.D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Loarte, A. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Matthews, G.F. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Monk, R.D. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Stangeby, P.C. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking]|[Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    1997-02-01

    This paper describes the first application of a thermal helium beam diagnostic to a divertor. The helium beam is used to determine spectroscopically the electron temperature and density from the inner and outer strike points up to the X-point, using helium line ratios which are primarily sensitive to electron density and temperature, as reported by Schweer (1992). Measurement of the neutral helium line intensities in the outer divertor target were performed under attached, high recycling and detached plasma conditions in ohmic and L-mode discharges. An interpretative model has been developed using the DIVIMP code at JET which incorporates the helium injection point, the nozzle divergence and the viewing arrangement of the periscope for a particular equilibrium. (orig.).

  20. Correlations Between the Gradient of Contrast Density, Evaluated by Cardio CT, and Functional Significance of Coronary Artery Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzan Marius

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of the hemodynamic significance of a coronary artery stenosis is a challenging task, being extremely important for the establishment of indication for revascularization in atherosclerotic coronary artery stenosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of a new marker reflecting the functional significance of a coronary artery stenosis, represented by the attenuation degree of contrast density along the stenosis by Coronary CT.

  1. Highly robust thin-film composite pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) hollow fiber membranes with high power densities for renewable salinity-gradient energy generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; Wang, Peng; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2013-07-16

    The practical application of pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) technology for renewable blue energy (i.e., osmotic power generation) from salinity gradient is being hindered by the absence of effective membranes. Compared to flat-sheet membranes, membranes with a hollow fiber configuration are of great interest due to their high packing density and spacer-free module fabrication. However, the development of PRO hollow fiber membranes is still in its infancy. This study aims to open up new perspectives and design strategies to molecularly construct highly robust thin film composite (TFC) PRO hollow fiber membranes with high power densities. The newly developed TFC PRO membranes consist of a selective polyamide skin formed on the lumen side of well-constructed Matrimid hollow fiber supports via interfacial polymerization. For the first time, laboratory PRO power generation tests demonstrate that the newly developed PRO hollow fiber membranes can withstand trans-membrane pressures up to 16 bar and exhibit a peak power density as high as 14 W/m(2) using seawater brine (1.0 M NaCl) as the draw solution and deionized water as the feed. We believe that the developed TFC PRO hollow fiber membranes have great potential for osmotic power harvesting. PMID:23772898

  2. Efficient enrichment of hepatic cancer stem-like cells from a primary rat HCC model via a density gradient centrifugation-centered method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-hui Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because few definitive markers are available for hepatic cancer stem cells (HCSCs, based on physical rather than immunochemical properties, we applied a novel method to enrich HCSCs. METHODOLOGY: After hepatic tumor cells (HTCs were first isolated from diethylinitrosamine-induced F344 rat HCC model using percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation (PDGC and purified via differential trypsinization and differential attachment (DTDA, they were separated into four fractions using percoll continuous gradient centrifugation (PCGC and sequentially designated as fractions I-IV (FI-IV. Morphological characteristics, mRNA and protein levels of stem cell markers, proliferative abilities, induced differentiation, in vitro migratory capacities, in vitro chemo-resistant capacities, and in vivo malignant capacities were determined for the cells of each fraction. FINDINGS: As the density of cells increased, 22.18%, 11.62%, 4.73% and 61.47% of primary cultured HTCs were segregated in FI-FIV, respectively. The cells from FIII (density between 1.041 and 1.062 g/ml displayed a higher nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio and fewer organelles and expressed higher levels of stem cell markers (AFP, EpCAM and CD133 than cells from other fractions (P<0.01. Additionally, in vitro, the cells from FIII showed a greater capacity to self-renew, differentiate into mature HTCs, transit across membranes, close scratches, and carry resistance to chemotherapy than did cells from any other fraction; in vivo, injection of only 1×10(4 cells from FIII could generate tumors not only in subcutaneous tissue but also in the livers of nude mice. CONCLUSIONS: Through our novel method, HCSC-like cells were successfully enriched in FIII. This study will greatly contribute to two important areas of biological interest: CSC isolation and HCC therapy.

  3. 3D imaging of flow patterns in an internally-pumped microfluidic device: redox magnetohydrodynamics and electrochemically-generated density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Kreidermacher, Adam; Fritsch, Ingrid; Heyes, Colin D

    2013-05-01

    Redox magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a promising technique for developing new electrochemical-based microfluidic flow devices with unique capabilities, such as easily switching flow direction and adjusting flow speeds and flow patterns as well as avoiding bubble formation. However, a detailed description of all the forces involved and predicting flow patterns in confined geometries is lacking. In addition to redox-MHD, density gradients caused by the redox reactions also play important roles. Flow in these devices with small fluid volumes has mainly been characterized by following microbead motion by optical microscopy either by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) or by processing the microbead images by particle image velocimetry (PIV) software. This approach has limitations in spatial resolution and dimensionality. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to quantitatively and accurately measure flow speeds and patterns in the ~5-50 μm/s range in redox-MHD-based microfluidic devices, from which 3D flow maps are obtained with a spatial resolution down to 2 μm. The 2 μm spatial resolution flow speeds map revealed detailed flow profiles during redox-MHD in which the velocity increases linearly from above the electrode and reaches a plateau across the center of the cell. By combining FCS and video-microscopy (with PTV and PIV processing approaches), we are able to quantify a vertical flow of ~10 μm/s above the electrodes as a result of density gradients caused by the redox reactions and follow convection flow patterns. Overall, combining FCS, PIV, and PTV analysis of redox-MHD is a powerful combination to more thoroughly characterize the underlying forces in these promising microfluidic devices. PMID:23537496

  4. Ecohydrologic controls on vegetation density and evapotranspiration partitioning across the climatic gradients of the central United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Kochendorfer

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The soil-water balance and plant water use are investigated over a domain encompassing the central United States using the Statistical-Dynamical Ecohydrology Model (SDEM. The seasonality in the model and its use of the two-component Shuttleworth-Wallace canopy model allow for application of an ecological optimality hypothesis in which vegetation density, in the form of peak green leaf area index (LAI, is maximized, within upper and lower bounds, such that, in a typical season, soil moisture in the latter half of the growing season just reaches the point at which water stress is experienced. Another key feature of the SDEM is that it partitions evapotranspiration into transpiration, evaporation from canopy interception, and evaporation from the soil surface. That partitioning is significant for the soil-water balance because the dynamics of the three processes are very different. The partitioning and the model-determined peak in green LAI are validated based on observations in the literature, as well as through the calculation of water-use efficiencies with modeled transpiration and large-scale estimates of grassland productivity. Modeled-determined LAI are seen to be at least as accurate as the unaltered satellite-based observations on which they are based. Surprising little dependence on climate and vegetation type is found for the percentage of total evapotranspiration that is soil evaporation, with most of the variation across the study region attributable to soil texture and the resultant differences in vegetation density. While empirical evidence suggests that soil evaporation in the forested regions of the most humid part of the study region is somewhat overestimated, model results are in excellent agreement with observations from croplands and grasslands. The implication of model results for water-limited vegetation is that the higher (lower soil moisture content in wetter (drier climates is more-or-less completely offset by the greater

  5. Effect of Side Wind on the Directional Stability and Aerodynamics of a Hybrid Buoyant Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Anwar U

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional stability characteristics explain the capabilities of a hybrid buoyant aircraft’s performance against the side wind, which induces flow separation that is chaotic in nature and may lead to oscillations of the aerodynamic surfaces. A numerical study is carried out to estimate the effect of side wind. The boundary conditions for the computational domain are set to velocity inlet and pressure outlet. Due to the incompressible flow at the cruise velocity, the density is taken to be constant. For these steady state simulations, the time is discretized in first order implicit and the SIMPLE scheme is employed for pressure velocity coupling alongwith k-ω SST model. Based on the results obtained so far, it is concluded that voluminous hybrid lifting fuselage is the major cause of directional.

  6. The stability of buoyant bubbles in the atmospheres of galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, C R; Pope, E C D; Fangohr, H

    2005-01-01

    The buoyant rise of hot plasma bubbles inflated by AGN outflows in galaxy clusters can heat the cluster gas and thereby compensate radiative energy losses of this material. Numerical simulations of this effect often show the complete disruption of the bubbles followed by the mixing of the bubble material with the surrounding cluster gas due to fluid instabilities on the bubble surface. This prediction is inconsistent with the observations of apparently coherent bubble structures in clusters. We derive a general description in the linear regime of the growth of instabilities on the surface between two fluids under the influence of a gravitational field, viscosity, surface tension provided by a magnetic field and relative motion of the two fluids with respect to each other. We demonstrate that Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities are always suppressed, if the fluids are viscous. They are also suppressed in the inviscid case for fluids of very different mass densities. We show that the effects of shear viscosity as we...

  7. Buoyant triacylglycerol-filled green algae and methods therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, Ursula; Goodson, Carrie

    2015-04-14

    Cultures of Chlamydomonas are disclosed comprising greater than 340 mg/l triacylglycerols (TAG). The cultures can include buoyant Chlamydomonas. Methods of forming the cultures are also disclosed. In some embodiments, these methods comprise providing Chlamydomonas growing in log phase in a first culture medium comprising a nitrogen source and acetate, replacing the first culture medium with a second medium comprising acetate but no nitrogen source, and subsequently supplementing the second medium with additional acetate. In some embodiments, a culture can comprise at least 1,300 mg/l triacyglycerols. In some embodiments, cultures can be used to produce a biofuel such as biodiesel.

  8. Dynamics of finite size neutrally buoyant particles in isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhimer, M; Jean, A; Praud, O; Bazile, R; Marchal, M; Couteau, G, E-mail: elhimer@imft.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT - Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-22

    The dynamics of neutrally buoyant particles suspended in a turbulent flow is investigated experimentally, with particles having diameters larger than the Kolmogorov length scale. To that purpose, a turbulence generator have been constructed and the resulting flow characterized. The fluid was then seeded with polystyrene particles of diameter about 1 mm and their velocity measured separately and simultaneously with the surrounding fluid. Comparison of the velocities statistics between the two phases shows no appreciable discrepancy. However, simultaneous velocity measurement shows that particles may move in different direction from the underlying flow.

  9. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; Shinohara, Yasushi; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  10. Nonlinear electronic excitations in crystalline solids using meta-generalized gradient approximation and hybrid functional in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shunsuke A. [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yasutaka [Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Department of Medical and General Sciences, Nihon Institute of Medical Science, 1276 Shimogawara, Moroyama-Machi, Iruma-Gun, Saitama 350-0435 (Japan); Shinohara, Yasushi [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, 06120 Halle (Germany); Yabana, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Center for Computational Science, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan)

    2015-12-14

    We develop methods to calculate electron dynamics in crystalline solids in real-time time-dependent density functional theory employing exchange-correlation potentials which reproduce band gap energies of dielectrics; a meta-generalized gradient approximation was proposed by Tran and Blaha [Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 226401 (2009)] (TBm-BJ) and a hybrid functional was proposed by Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof [J. Chem. Phys. 118, 8207 (2003)] (HSE). In time evolution calculations employing the TB-mBJ potential, we have found it necessary to adopt the predictor-corrector step for a stable time evolution. We have developed a method to evaluate electronic excitation energy without referring to the energy functional which is unknown for the TB-mBJ potential. For the HSE functional, we have developed a method for the operation of the Fock-like term in Fourier space to facilitate efficient use of massive parallel computers equipped with graphic processing units. We compare electronic excitations in silicon and germanium induced by femtosecond laser pulses using the TB-mBJ, HSE, and a simple local density approximation (LDA). At low laser intensities, electronic excitations are found to be sensitive to the band gap energy: they are close to each other using TB-mBJ and HSE and are much smaller in LDA. At high laser intensities close to the damage threshold, electronic excitation energies do not differ much among the three cases.

  11. Evolution of the buoyant bubbles in M87

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Kaiser, C R; Böhringer, H; Forman, W R

    2000-01-01

    The morphology of the X-ray and radio emitting features in the central 50 kpc region around the galaxy M87 strongly suggests that buoyant bubbles of cosmic rays (inflated by an earlier nuclear active phase of the galaxy) are slowly rising through the cooling gas. In the absence of strong surface tension, an intrinsic property of initially spherical bubbles is their transformation into tori as they rise through an external medium. Such structures can be identified in the radio images of the halo of M87. During their rise the bubbles uplift relatively cool X-ray emitting ambient gas from the central regions of the cooling flow to larger distances. This gas is colder than the ambient gas and has a higher volume emissivity. As a result, rising "radio" bubbles may be trailed by elongated X-ray features as indeed is observed in M87. We performed simple hydrodynamical simulations in order to qualitatively illustrate the evolution of the buoyant bubbles in the M87 environment.

  12. The Effect of Pre-Impact Porosity and Vertical Density Gradients on the Gravity Signature of Lunar Craters as Seen by GRAIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milbury, C.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, H., IV; Collins, G. S.; Blair, D. M.; Soderblom, J. M.; Nimmo, F.; Bierson, C. J.; Phillips, R. J.; Zuber, M. T.

    2015-12-01

    As a result of NASA's dual spacecraft Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission [Zuber et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231507], we now know that the lunar crust is highly porous and that the porosity varies laterally [Wieczorek et al., 2013; doi:10.1126/science.1231530] and vertically [Besserer et al., 2014; doi:10.1002/2014GL060240]. Analysis of complex craters located within the lunar highlands reveals that: 1) craters larger than diameter D~210 have positive Bouguer Anomalies (BAs), 2) craters with D ≲ 100 km have both positive and negative BAs that vary about the (near 0) mean by approximately ± 25 mGal, and, 3) D and BA are anticorrelated for craters with D ≲ 100 km [Soderblom et al., 2015; submitted]. Numerical modeling by Milbury et al. [2015, LPSC] shows that pre-impact porosity is the dominant influence on the gravity signature of complex craters with D ≲ 100 km, and mantle uplift dominates the gravity for those with D > 140 km. Phillips et al. [2015, LPSC] showed that complex craters located in the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin tend to have more-negative BAs than similar craters in the highlands. By including (pre-impact) vertical porosity/density gradients in our impact simulations, we reproduce the observed anticorrelation between BA and D for D ≲ 100 km, and the observed difference between the BAs of SPA and highland craters. We use the iSALE hydrocode including pore space compaction [Wünnemann et al., 2006; doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2005.10.013] and dilatant bulking [Collins, 2014; doi:10.1002/2014JE004708] to understand how the gravity signature of impact craters develop. In this study we vary density/porosity with depth. We find that simulations that have constant porosity with depth have a lower BA for a given crater diameter than those with varying porosity. We used two different mean porosities (7% and 14%) and found that the BA increases with increasing porosity, similar to simulations with constant porosity. Larger

  13. Efecto de la Viscosidad y de la Densidad de Mezcla en el Gradiente de Presión de Flujo Homogéneo Gas-Líquido en Tuberías Horizontales Effect of the Mixture Viscosity and the Mixture Density on the Pressure Gradient of Gas-Liquid Homogeneous Flow in Horizontal Pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneth M García

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se evalúa la precisión de 76 modelos homogéneos de gradiente de presión para determinar el gradiente de presión experimental reportado en una base de 2415 datos de flujos bifásico gas-líquido en tuberías horizontales. Estos modelos se formularon a partir de 4 ecuaciones de densidad de mezcla combinadas con 19 ecuaciones de viscosidad de mezcla. Al estudiar el efecto de la viscosidad y de la densidad de mezcla en el gradiente de presión, utilizando el modelo homogéneo, se observa que el mejor modelo obtuvo un error absoluto promedio de 25.7%, mientras que el peor modelo obtuvo un error cercano al 2000%. Los resultados obtenidos indican que la precisión del modelo homogéneo de gradiente de presión de flujo bifásico gas-líquido, depende significativamente de la adecuada selección de las ecuaciones de viscosidad y de densidad de mezcla.In this work the performance of 76 pressure gradient homogeneous models is evaluated in order to determine the experimental pressure gradient reported in a database consisting of 2415 gas-liquid two-phase flow experiments in horizontal pipes. These models were formulated starting from 4 mixture density equations combined with 19 mixture viscosity equations. To study the mixture viscosity and the mixture density effect in the pressure gradient, using the homogeneous model, it is observed that the best model gave an average absolute error of 25.7%, while the worst model obtained an error close to 2000%. The obtained results indicate that the performance of the gas-liquid two-phase flow pressure gradient homogeneous model depends significantly on the appropriate selection of the mixture viscosity and the mixture density equations.

  14. Calorific value of Prosopis africana and Balanites aegyptiaca wood: Relationships with tree growth, wood density and rainfall gradients in the West African Sahel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Carmen Sotelo; Weber, John C. [World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), Sahel Office, B.P. E 5118 Bamako (Mali); Silva, Dimas Agostinho da; Bolzon de Muniz, Graciela Ines [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Av. Lothario Meissner, 900, CEP.: 80270-170-Curitiba (Brazil); Garcia, Rosilei A. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Instituto de Florestas, Departamento de Produtos Florestais, BR 465, km 07, 23890-000, Seropedica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-01-15

    Prosopis africana and Balanites aegyptiaca are native tree species in the West African Sahel and provide wood for fuel, construction and other essential products. A provenance/progeny test of each species was established at one relatively dry site in Niger, and evaluated at 13 years. Gross calorific value of the wood was determined for a random sample of trees in each test: gross CV and CVm{sup 3} = gross calorific value in MJ kg{sup -1} and MJ m{sup -3}, respectively. The major objectives were to determine if gross CV was positively correlated with wood density and tree growth, and if gross CV and/or CVm{sup 3} varied with rainfall gradients in the sample region. Provenances were grouped into a drier and more humid zone, and correlations were computed among all trees and separately in each zone. Results indicated that gross CV was not significantly correlated with density in either species. Gross CV was positively correlated with growth of P. africana (but not B. aegyptiaca) only in the drier zone. Gross CVm{sup 3} was positively correlated with growth of both species, and the correlations were stronger in the drier zone. Multiple regressions with provenance latitude, longitude and elevation indicated that provenance means for gross CV increased, in general, from the drier to the more humid zones. Regressions with gross CVm{sup 3} were not significant. Results are compared with earlier research reports from the provenance/progeny tests and with other tropical hardwood species; and practical implications are presented for tree improvement and conservation programs in the region. (author)

  15. Numerical simulations of buoyant reactive jets with sidewall effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Heping; JIANG Xi; WANG Wei; YANG Yun; XU Liang; FAN Weicheng

    2004-01-01

    The near field dynamics of buoyant reactive jets with adjacent sidewalls is investigated by time-dependent three-dimensional direct simulations. The physical problem is a fuel jet issuing vertically into an oxidant ambient environment in a corner configuration with sidewall boundaries. Simulation results are presented for two cases with different jet nozzle geometries: a corner-round reactive jet and a corner-square reactive jet with the same cross-sectional area on the nozzle plane. Buoyancy-induced large vortical structures evolve spatially in the flow field and transition to turbulence occurs downstream. Calculation of the mean flow properties shows that entrainment of the corner-round jet is stronger than that of the corner-square jet due to the stronger vortex deformation in the corner-round case.

  16. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Buoyant Convection in Geophysical Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorovich, E; Viegas, D; Wyngaard, J

    1998-01-01

    Studies of convection in geophysical flows constitute an advanced and rapidly developing area of research that is relevant to problems of the natural environment. During the last decade, significant progress has been achieved in the field as a result of both experimental studies and numerical modelling. This led to the principal revision of the widely held view on buoyancy-driven turbulent flows comprising an organised mean component with superimposed chaotic turbulence. An intermediate type of motion, represented by coherent structures, has been found to play a key role in geophysical boundary layers and in larger scale atmospheric and hydrospheric circulations driven by buoyant forcing. New aspects of the interaction between convective motions and rotation have recently been discovered and investigated. Extensive experimental data have also been collected on the role of convection in cloud dynamics and microphysics. New theoretical concepts and approaches have been outlined regarding scaling and parameteriz...

  17. Turbulent buoyant confined jet with variable source temperature

    CERN Document Server

    El-Amin, M F; Sun, S

    2013-01-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are considered for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-epsilon turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear variation that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during whole time. Numerical exp...

  18. Density gradient theory combined with the PC-SAFT equation of state used for modeling the surface tension of associating systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinš Václav

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The density gradient theory (GT combined with a SAFT-type (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory equation of state has been used for modeling the surface tension of associating fluids represented by a series of six alkanols ranging from methanol to 1-pentanol. The effect of nonzero dipole moment of the selected alkanols on the predicted surface tension was investigated in this study. Results of the GT + non-polar Perturbed Chain (PC SAFT equation of state were compared to predictions of GT combined with the PC-polar-SAFT, i.e. PCP-SAFT, equation. Both GT + PC-SAFT and GT + PCP-SAFT give reasonable prediction of the surface tension for pure alkanols. Results of both models are comparable as no significant difference in the modeled saturation properties and in the predicted surface tension using GT was found. Consideration of dipolar molecules of selected alkanols using PCP-SAFT had only minor effect on the predicted properties compared to the non-polar PC-SAFT model.

  19. The seasonal and solar cycle variations of electron density gradient scale length, vertical drift and layer height during magnetically quiet days: Implications for Spread F over Trivandrum, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manju, G.; Devasia, C. V.; Ravindran, S.

    2009-12-01

    A study has been carried out on the behaviour of electron density gradient scale length, L, vertical drift and layer height, around post sunset hours, during the magnetically quiet days of summer, winter and equinox seasons of solar maximum (2002) and minimum years (1995), using ionosonde data of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 76.5°E, dip = 0.5°N) in the Indian longitude sector. The results indicate a clear seasonal and solar cycle variation in all the three parameters. Further, the seasonal variation of equatorial Spread F (ESF) during the above period is examined in terms of the relative roles of L, the vertical drift and layer height (of the F layer) in the triggering of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The results, show for the first time, that L also plays an important role, in controlling the quiet time seasonal and solar cycle variability of ESF; whereas in earlier studies this parameter had been taken to be constant. The detailed results are presented and discussed.

  20. Instability of spiral and scroll waves in the presence of a gradient in the fibroblast density: the effects of fibroblast-myocyte coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Zimik, Soling

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast-myocyte coupling can modulate electrical-wave dynamics in cardiac tissue. In diseased hearts, the distribution of fibroblasts is heterogeneous, so there can be gradients in the fibroblast density (henceforth we call this GFD) especially from highly injured regions, like infarcted or ischemic zones, to less-wounded regions of the tissue. Fibrotic hearts are known to be prone to arrhythmias, so it is important to understand the effects of GFD in the formation and sustenance of arrhythmic re- entrant waves, like spiral or scroll waves. Therefore, we investigate the effects of GFD on the stability of spiral and scroll waves of electrical activation in a state-of-the- art mathematical model for cardiac tissue in which we also include fibroblasts. By introducing GFD in controlled ways, we show that spiral and scroll waves can be unstable in the presence of GFDs because of regions with varying spiral or scroll-wave frequency {\\omega}, induced by the GFD. We examine the effects of the resting membrane pote...

  1. [Erythrocyte removal from bone marrow by density gradient separation using the COBE 2991 cell processor with the triple-bag processing set].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellesso-Fleury, S; Rage, C; Tschaggeny, F; Gaudé, J; Gomez, M; Bourin, P

    2009-03-01

    ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation requires red blood cell depletion. Lots of laboratory adopted the technique of density gradient centrifugation (Ficoll-hypaque) using the COBE 2991 cell processor with simple-bag processing set. However, tubing of this set is not adapted to the currently available peristaltic pumps. Moreover, two other sets are required: one for the buffy-coat and one for postgradient cell washing. We developed a method using triple-bag processing set to conduct whole-step procedure (concentration, Ficoll and washing). Peristaltic PVC tubing is provided in one line of the set allowing a safe processing without several connections thus reducing risks of microbial contamination. First, we used buffy-coat of total blood for training, then, we carried out red cell depletion of healthy bone marrow donors. The red blood cell depletion was 97.9+/-1.1% and CD34+ recovery was 89.6+/-8.7%. These results are very close to those obtained with the simple-bag set (red cell depletion.=94.0+/-6.8% and CD34+ recovery=95.9+/-20.3%). We conclude that the triple-bag system, very little used in France, is practical, simplified the manipulation and is more safety than the simple-bag set.

  2. Validity of several approximations for the turbulent buoyant jet in a stagnant neutrally-stratified ambient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of approximations are usually made in deriving integral model equations for the dispersion of a round turbulent buoyant jet into a stagnant neutrally-stratified ambient fluid. The magnitudes of differences in model predictions caused by making four of these approximations are calculated as a function of the initial densimetric Froude number and the initial relative density difference. The four approximations studied are (1) the Boussinesq approximation, (2) the use of a common Gaussian width for both mean axial velocity and mean temperature (or concentration) excess, (3) the neglect of fluctuation-correlation terms, and (4) the assumption of a linear relationship between excess density and excess temperature (or concentration). The four approximations are studied singly and then cumulatively as the predictions of the two models, one with and one without all approximations, are compared to seven low Froude number data cases. Results show that the Boussinesq approximation produces percentage differences in predictions which are about half of the initial relative density difference expressed in percentage. Use of a common Gaussian width for velocity and temperature produces differences from 6% to 30% depending on the entrainment assumption used. Fluctuation correlation effects rarely exceed 8%. Lastly, at Froude numbers below about 10 the correct nonlinear equation of state must often be used for heated waste jets to acheive accurate results, and the correct air equation of state may also be needed for low Froude number heated air jets, depending on the initial diameter and velocity

  3. The Hatteras Front: August 2004 velocity and density structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savidge, Dana K.; Austin, Jay A.

    2007-07-01

    The Hatteras Front is a persistent mesoscale cross-shelf oriented front off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It is the boundary between relatively cool, fresh Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf waters and warmer, saltier shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight, which both converge along-shelf upon Cape Hatteras year round. The Frontal Interaction Near Cape Hatteras (FINCH) project was conducted in 2004-2005 to intensively sample the Hatteras Front with shipboard ADCP and undulating towed CTD. This paper documents velocity and density structures associated with the cross-shelf oriented zone of Hatteras Front during the August 2004 field season. Property gradients across the Hatteras Front are large, with temperature (T) and salinity (S) differences of ˜4-6°C, 2-5 psu, respectively over distances of 1-2 km. The T and S are not completely compensating, and a strong density (ρ) gradient also exists, with Δρ of ˜2 kg/m3 across a gentler 10 km wide front. The density gradient results in a steric sea-level height gradient of ˜1-2 cm across the Front, which is in approximate geostrophic balance with a surface intensified jet, directed shoreward along the cross-shelf oriented Front. The velocity is sheared with depth at 3.0 × 10-2 to 5.0 × 10-2 s-1 in the upper 5 m of the jet; a rate consistent with the density gradient according to the thermal wind relationship. Shoreward transport of ˜4.8 × 104 m3/s results from the surface intensified jet. The structure of the velocity field associated with the Hatteras Front resembles that of a slope-controlled buoyant plume, as described by Lentz and Helfrich (2002). Velocity and density structures are similar during both advancing (southwestward) and retreating (northeastward) motion of the Front.

  4. Buoyant Turbulent Kinetic Energy Production in Steep-Slope Katabatic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Holly J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Higgins, Chad W.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2016-07-01

    We develop several critical concepts that should be considered when interpreting, modelling and designing future experiments for flows over sloping terrain. Vertical buoyancy fluxes in katabatic flows can be positive and a source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) despite the statically stable, thermal stratification that drives these flows. This phenomenon occurs when the ratio of along-slope to slope-normal kinematic heat fluxes is greater than the cotangent of the slope angle, suggesting a critical value of slope-angle steepness found in earlier studies. We provide field-data-based evidence that the along-slope heat flux may dominate the variables in this inequality, and therefore in generating buoyant TKE production or suppression over a steep slope. These data show the along-slope heat flux can be more variable and significantly larger in magnitude than the slope-normal component. The gradient Richardson number does not include the effects of the along-slope buoyancy; furthermore, none of the canonical stability parameters can properly reflect the TKE redistribution from turbulent transport divergence and the sink of TKE in cases of counter-gradient momentum fluxes, which we frequently observe near the peak of the katabatic jet. In such cases, canonical stability parameters inadequately represent the physical mechanisms associated with stability. These results have broad implications related to accurately modelling turbulence and surface exchanges over sloping terrain and illustrate the need to more thoroughly investigate the along-slope heat flux and its drivers, the meaning and definitions of stability, and the effects of non-local turbulent transport.

  5. Northern Monterey Bay upwelling shadow front: Observations of a coastally and surface-trapped buoyant plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodson, C.B.; Washburn, L.; Barth, J.A.; Hoover, D.J.; Kirincich, A.R.; McManus, M.A.; Ryan, J.P.; Tyburczy, J.

    2009-01-01

    During the upwelling season in central California, northwesterly winds along the coast produce a strong upwelling jet that originates at Point A??o Nuevo and flows southward across the mouth of Monterey Bay. A convergent front with a mean temperature change of 3.77 ?? 0.29??C develops between the warm interior waters and the cold offshore upwelling jet. To examine the forcing mechanisms driving the location and movement of the upwelling shadow front and its effects on biological communities in northern Monterey Bay, oceanographic conditions were monitored using cross-shelf mooring arrays, drifters, and hydrographic surveys along a 20 km stretch of coast extending northwestward from Santa Cruz, California, during the upwelling season of 2007 (May-September). The alongshore location of the upwelling shadow front at the northern edge of the bay was driven by: regional wind forcing, through an alongshore pressure gradient; buoyancy forces due to the temperature change across the front; and local wind forcing (the diurnal sea breeze). The upwelling shadow front behaved as a surface-trapped buoyant current, which is superimposed on a poleward barotropic current, moving up and down the coast up to several kilometers each day. We surmise that the front is advected poleward by a preexisting northward barotropic current of 0.10 m s-1 that arises due to an alongshore pressure gradient caused by focused upwelling at Point A??o Nuevo. The frontal circulation (onshore surface currents) breaks the typical two-dimensional wind-driven, cross-shelf circulation (offshore surface currents) and introduces another way for water, and the material it contains (e.g., pollutants, larvae), to go across the shelf toward shore.Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. The effects of possibly buoyant flat slab segments on Nazca and South American plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Shea, R.; Crameri, F.

    2014-12-01

    Flat slabs are ubiquitous today and in Earth's past, present in at least 10% of present-day subduction zones. The Nazca slab is a classic example with large dip variations along strike, including two prominent flat segments in Peru and Argentina that coincide with the subduction of aseismic ridges. The origin of flat segments remain enigmatic though much work has examined the consequences for upper plate deformation and continued subduction. In the case of the Argentinian flat segment, detailed seismic imaging has shown significantly increased crustal thickness in the flat part of the slab. Our present understanding of oceanic crust formation suggests that incrased crustal thickness forms in response to larger degrees of partial melt, which in turn decrease the water content of the formed crust. The residuum from this process is depleted. The resulting combined lithospheric column is buoyant with respect to the underlying mantle, and likely cold from its contact with the overlying plate and unlikely to undergo the basalt-eclogite transition due to kinetic hindrances. This has consequences for mantle flow and the shear stresses it exerts at the base of the lithosphere and hence to plate motions. Interestingly, the motion of the Nazca-South America pair is difficult to reproduce even in the most sophisticated models (Stadler et al. 2010) without invoking special coupling, rheology or forces. We examine the effects of the subduction of neutral and buoyant flat segments on mantle flow and plate motions, globally and locally for Nazca and South America. We construct high-resolution models of the morphology and density structure of the Nazca slab and embed them in an existing global slab model. We compute the global viscous flow induced and predict plate motions consistent with the density heterogeneity and plate geometry. As an end member we also examine a Nazca slab that dips uniformly with a 30 degree dip. We find, perhaps unsurprisingly, that the most important

  7. Shapes of Buoyant and Nonbuoyant Methane Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Peter B.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Laminar gas jet diffusion flames represent a fundamental combustion configuration. Their study has contributed to numerous advances in combustion, including the development of analytical and computational combustion tools. Laminar jet flames are pertinent also to turbulent flames by use of the laminar flamelet concept. Investigations into the shapes of noncoflowing microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames have primarily been pursued in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, by Cochran and coworkers and by Bahadori and coworkers. These studies were generally conducted at atmospheric pressure; they involved soot-containing flames and reported luminosity lengths and widths instead of the flame-sheet dimensions which are of Greater value to theory evaluation and development. The seminal model of laminar diffusion flames is that of Burke and Schumann, who solved the conservation of momentum equation for a jet flame in a coflowing ambient by assuming the velocity of fuel, oxidizer and products to be constant throughout. Roper and coworkers improved upon this model by allowing for axial variations of velocity and found flame shape to be independent of coflow velocity. Roper's suggestion that flame height should be independent of gravity level is not supported by past or present observations. Other models have been presented by Klajn and Oppenheim, Markstein and De Ris, Villermaux and Durox, and Li et al. The common result of all these models (except in the buoyant regime) is that flame height is proportional to fuel mass flowrate, with flame width proving much more difficult to predict. Most existing flame models have been compared with shapes of flames containing soot, which is known to obscure the weak blue emission of flame sheets. The present work involves measurements of laminar gas jet diffusion flame shapes. Flame images have been obtained for buoyant and nonbuoyant methane flames burning in quiescent air at various fuel flow-rates, burner diameters and ambient

  8. Axi-asymmetric development of buoyant diapirs in analogue and numerical experiments: the role of source-layer tilts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Urmi; Baruah, Amiya; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-04-01

    Diapiric structure owing to gravity instabilities, triggered by density inversion in the rock sequences, is a unique geodynamic manifestation. High-density layers that rest upon low-density layers tend to sink, forcing the latter to squeeze up in the form of domal shapes, called buoyant diapirs. Using two-layer viscous model experiments, we investigated the effects of source-layer tilt (β) in controlling the ascent behaviour of buoyant diapirs initiated by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Results from our laboratory experiments, performed with a buoyant viscous layer (PDMS; density: 965.0 kg/m3) underlying a denser fluid (water; density: 998.2 kg/m3) suggest that the diapir shape is highly sensitive to β. The results suggest that diapirs growing from a tilted source layer ascend with contrasting lateral spreading rates in the up and down slope directions, resulting in axi-asymmetric geometry. Conversely, diapirs initiated from a horizontal source layer always maintain axi- symmetric shape as they grow. Interestingly, diapir heads retain a circular outline on the horizontal top surface irrespective of their degree of symmetry. However, for the axi-asymmetric cases, the upwelling axis is shifted more in the up-slope direction, i.e. away from the centre of this circular geometry. We show a spectrum of the axi-symmetric to -asymmetric geometrical transitions as a function of the source-layer tilt (β). For large β (> 4o), the diapirs become unstable, and their stems undergo a continuous drift in the upslope direction during their vertical growth. Whilst, several studies have shown the development of axi-asymmetric diapirs, the underlain flow kinematics in the viscous layers as a function of source layer tilt leading to such shape transition remains unclear. With this objective we ran computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations, by employing the volume of fluid (VOF) method, to investigate the role of underlying dynamics for axi-asymmetric diapiric growth. This study

  9. Buoyant Magnetic Flux Ropes and Convection: Evolution Prior to Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorch, S. B. F.

    2003-10-01

    We have performed detailed numerical 3-d simulations of the interaction of buoyantly ascending twisted magnetic flux ropes and solar-like stratified convection (with surface cells similar to solar supergranules in size). Results are presented for three different cases -- corresponding to different amounts of initial field line twist -- that represents fundamentally different types of instabilities: the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which case the flux rope disrupts and network patches are formed at surface cell boundaries; the kink instability that has been proposed as a mechanism for forming tightly packed δ-type spots; a stable flux rope where neither of the former instabilities arise, and the behavior of which is similar to classical text book flux tubes, except from a flux-loss due to the advective action of the convective flows. The simulations thus support the idea that the magnetic flux observed at the surface in bipolar regions are smaller, ceteris paribus, than that of the dynamo generated flux ropes near the bottom of the convection zone. Please note that this material is also available as an online htmladdnormallink{web-talk}{http://www.astro.su.se/ dorch/talks/01_CS12/}

  10. The vertical distribution of buoyant plastics at sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reisser

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-sized plastics are numerically abundant and widespread across the world's ocean surface. These buoyant macroscopic particles can be mixed within the upper water column due to turbulent transport. Models indicate that the largest decrease in their concentration occurs within the first few meters of water, where subsurface observations are very scarce. By using a new type of multi-level trawl at 12 sites within the North Atlantic accumulation zone, we measured concentrations and physical properties of plastics from the air–seawater interface to a depth of 5 m, at 0.5 m intervals. Our results show that plastic concentrations drop exponentially with water depth, but decay rates decrease with increasing Beaufort scale. Furthermore, smaller pieces presented lower rise velocities and were more susceptible to vertical transport. This resulted in higher depth decays of plastic mass concentration (mg m−3 than numerical concentration (pieces m−3. Further multi-level sampling of plastics will improve our ability to predict at-sea plastic load, size distribution, drifting pattern, and impact on marine species and habitats.

  11. Highly buoyant bent-over plumes in a boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Ali; Kaye, Nigel B.

    2016-04-01

    Highly buoyant plumes, such as wildfire plumes, in low to moderate wind speeds have initial trajectories that are steeper than many industrial waste plumes. They will rise further into the atmosphere before bending significantly. In such cases the plume's trajectory will be influenced by the vertical variation in horizontal velocity of the atmospheric boundary layer. This paper examined the behavior of a plume in an unstratified environment with a power-law ambient velocity profile. Examination of previously published experimental measurements of plume trajectory show that inclusion of the boundary layer velocity profile in the plume model often provides better predictions of the plume trajectory compared to algebraic expressions developed for uniform flow plumes. However, there are many cases in which uniform velocity profile algebraic expressions are as good as boundary layer models. It is shown that it is only important to model the role of the atmospheric boundary layer velocity profile in cases where either the momentum length (square root of source momentum flux divided by the reference wind speed) or buoyancy length (buoyancy flux divided by the reference wind speed cubed) is significantly greater than the plume release height within the boundary layer. This criteria is rarely met with industrial waste plumes, but it is important in modeling wildfire plumes.

  12. 密度梯度零件选区激光熔化制造基础工艺研究%Preliminary Study on Preparation of Density Gradient Parts Using Selective Laser Melting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗子艺; 杨永强; 卢建斌; 王迪

    2011-01-01

    For the rapid manufacture of density gradient parts, the experiment of selective laser melting (SLM) process was carried out on Dimetal-280 system, the relationship between the density and the process parameter was analyzed.The parts with the density of 6.73 g/cm3 to 7.78 g/cm3 and the relative density of 83.09%~96.05% in the level direction and with the density of 7.04 g/cm3 to 7.55 g/cm3 and the relative density of 93.21%~86.91% in the thickness direction were formed using 316L stainless steel powder.The parts were observed by microscope after polished along the gradient direction.The results show that pore volume of the parts presents gradient variation according to the gradient variation of their density.The SLM technique has a great potential in manufacturing density gradient parts.%为了快速制造密度梯度零件,在快速成型设备DiMetal-280上进行了选区激光熔化(SLM)成型工艺研究,分析了工艺参数与致密度之间的关系.采用316L不锈钢粉末,制造了密度从6.73g/cm3到7.78g/cm3、致密度从83.09%到96.05%水平方向变化的零件,以及密度从7.04/cm3到7.55g/cm3、致密度从93.21%到86.91%厚度方向变化的零件;将零件沿梯度方向抛光后在显微镜下观察.结果表明,零件在梯度方向随着密度的梯度变化,孔隙量也呈现相应的梯度变化.本文采用的SLM技术在密度梯度零件制造中具有很大的潜力.

  13. Cultivo de células mesenquimais do sangue de cordão umbilical com e sem uso do gradiente de densidade Ficoll-Paque Blood mesenchymal stem cell culture from the umbilical cord with and without Ficoll-Paque density gradient method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Sayoko Kawasaki-Oyama

    2008-03-01

    Ficoll-Paque gradient density method (d=1.077g/ml. METHODS: Ten samples of the umbilical cord blood obtained from full-term deliveries were submitted to two different procedures of mesenchymal stem cell culture: a Method without the Ficoll-Paque density gradient, which concentrates all nucleated cells; b Method with the Ficoll-Paque density gradient, which selects only low-density mononuclear cells. Cells were initially plated into 25 cm² cultures flasks at a density of 1x10(7 nucleated cells/cm² and 1x10(6 mononuclear cells/cm². RESULTS: It was obtained 2-13x10(7 (median = 2.35x10(7 nucleated cells/cm² by the method without the Ficoll-Paque gradient density, and 3.7-15.7x10(6 (median = 7.2x10(6 mononuclear cells/cm² by the method with the Ficoll-Paque gradient density. In all cultures adherent cells were observed 24 hours after being cultured. Cells presented fibroblastoid and epithelioid morphology. In most of the cultures, cell proliferation occurred in the first week, but after the second week only some cultures - derived from the method without the Ficoll-Paque gradient density - maintained the growth rate reaching confluence. Those cultures were submitted to trypsinization with 0.25% trypsin/EDTA solution and cultured for two to three months. CONCLUSION: In the samples analyzed, cell separation and mesenchymal stem cell culture techniques from human umbilical cord blood by the method without the Ficoll-Paque density gradient was more efficient than the method with the Ficoll-Paque density gradient.

  14. Gradient equivalent crystal theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zypman, F R; Ferrante, J

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents an extension of the formalism of equivalent crystal theory (ECT) by introducing an electron density gradient term so that the total model density becomes a more accurate representation of the real local density. Specifically, we allow for the electron density around a lattice site to have directionality, in addition to an average value, as assumed in ECT. We propose that an atom senses its neighbouring density as a weighted sum-the weights given by the its own electronic probability. As a benchmark, the method is used to compute vacancy migration energy curves of iron. These energies are in good agreement with previously published results. PMID:21690822

  15. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE STABILITY AND MIXING OF VERTICAL ROUNE BUOYANT JET IN SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾玉红; 槐文信

    2005-01-01

    The k-epsilon model was applied to establish the mathematical model of vertical round buoyant jet discharging into confined depth, and it was solved using the Hybrid Finite Analytic Method ( HFAM ). The numerical predictions demonstrate two generic flow patterns for different jet discharge and environmental parameters: ( i ) a stable buoyant flow discharge with the mixed fluid leaving the near-field warm in a surface warm water layer;( ii ) an unstable buoyant flow discharge with recirculation and re-entrainment of warm water in the near field. Furthermore, the mixing characters of vertical round buoyant jet were numerically predicted. Both the stability criterion and numerical predictions of bulk dilutions are in excellent agreement with Lee and Jirka ' s experiments and theory.

  16. Petrochronological and structural arguments for upper plate thickening and relamination of the lower plate buoyant material in the Variscan Bohemian Massif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peřestý, Vít; Holder, Robert; Lexa, Ondrej; Racek, Martin; Jeřábek, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Recent tectonic models for the Variscan evolution of the Bohemian Massif emphasize the role of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for the 355-340 Ma evolution of the Moldanubian domain. This model is based on the presence of weak, low-density felsic material tectonically underplating a high-density mafic layer and its subsequent gravity-driven overturn. However, earlier phases of the Variscan orogeny concerning the emplacement of felsic low-density material to the base of the upper plate are so far poorly documented. We contribute to this problem by deciphering of polyphase early-Variscan (~375 Ma) deformation and metamorphism close to the main Variscan suture. Detailed structural, pseudosection and microstructural analyses combined with LASS monazite dating were carried out in metapelites along the western margin of the upper plate represented by the Teplá Crystalline Complex (TCC). This region is represented by a ~25 km wide deformation zone with E-W metamorphic gradients associated with two distinct early-Variscan events (~380-375 and ~375-370 Ma). The first compressional event produced a vertical NNE-SSW trending fabric and a continuous and prograde Barrovian metamorphic sequence ranging from biotite to kyanite zones at a field geotherm of 20 to 25 °C/km. Subsequently, a gently SE dipping normal shear-zone associated with retrogression develops along the base of the TCC. This sub-horizontal fabric shows normal metamorphic zonation ranging from sillimanite, biotite to chlorite zones and indicates vertical shortening related to unroofing of high pressure metabasites of the underlying Mariánské-Lázně Complex. The first metamorphic fabric is interpreted to result from early thickening of the upper plate during continental underthrusting of Saxothuringian continent (380 to 375 Ma) while the second deformation and metamorphism (~370 Ma) reflects vertical shortening produced by buoyant uplift of accreted Saxothuringian felsic crust. This event is the unique yet

  17. Buoyant jet and two-phase jet-plume modeling for application to large water pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, Timothy L. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Westinghouse Nuclear, Madison, PA 15663 (United States); Revankar, Shripad T., E-mail: shripad@ecn.purdue.ed [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 790-780 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: A two-phase jet-plume model was developed to predict pool thermal response, pool surface temperature and consequently the pool cover gas pressure in enclosed spaces such as nuclear reactor wetwell. The jet-plume half-width, centerline velocity and temperature along the axis defining the plume's trajectory were solved as variables along the path. The pool surface temperature prediction is comparable to experimental data within 0.5 {sup o}C. - Abstract: Models of a single-phase liquid-into-liquid buoyant jet and a two-phase vapor-into-liquid turbulent jet-plume injected in horizontal orientation were developed for analyzing the dynamics of the mixing characteristics and thermal response for shallow submergence of the source in large pools. These models were developed from the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations in the cylindrical system for steady axisymmetric flow and incorporated the integral plume theory. The bases for the general assumptions such as self-similarity and use of Gaussian profiles to represent the velocity field across the effluent cross-section are examined. Subroutines were developed to reproduce the governing differential equations formulated from the continuity, momentum and conservation of buoyancy or energy equations which treats the jet-plume's half-width, velocity and temperature as variables and seek solutions of these variables along the jet-plume trajectory. Information on empirical closure relations obtained from experimental data such as the coefficient-of-entrainment, bubble slip velocity, momentum amplification factor, and plume spread-ratios for buoyancy and density-defect which are available for adiabatic cases were applied to the case of steam-into-water. Solutions were obtained without cross-flow in a linearly stratified ambient and then with cross-flow in a homogeneously mixed ambient for the single-phase formulation that represents a complete condensation scenario of a buoyant jet. The model was

  18. Supergranulation as the Sun's largest buoyantly driven mode of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Solar supergranulation has been characterized as horizontally divergent flow motions having a typical scale of 32 Mm using Doppler imaging, granule tracking and helioseismology. Unlike granules, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale height at the photosphere, supergranules do not appear to correspond to any particular length scale of the flow. Possible explanations ranging from convection theories involving Helium ionization to spatial correlation or self-organization of granular flows have been proposed as physical mechanisms to explain solar supergranulation. However, its existence remains largely a mystery. Remarkably, horizontal velocity power spectra obtained from Doppler imaging and correlation tracking of flow features at the solar surface reveal the presence of peaks corresponding to granular and supergranular scales, followed by a monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation, which suggests that large-scale modes in the deep layers of the convection zone may be suppressed. Using 3D anelastic simulations of solar convection we investigate whether supergranulation may reflect the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection inside the Sun. Results show that the amount of kinetic energy contained in the largest flow scales relative to that associated with supergranular motions is a function of the depth of the transition from a convectively unstable to convectively stable mean stratification inside the simulation. This suggests that the observed monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation may be explained by rapid cooling in the subphotospheric layers and an essentially isentropic solar interior, wherein convective driving is effectively suppressed.

  19. Modelling thermal radiation and soot formation in buoyant diffusion flames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiative heat transfer plays an important role in fire problems since it is the dominant mode of heat transfer between flames and surroundings. It controls the pyrolysis, and therefore the heat release rate, and the growth rate of the fire. In the present work a numerical study of buoyant diffusion flames is carried out, with the main objective of modelling the thermal radiative transfer and the soot formation/destruction processes. In a first step, different radiative property models were tested in benchmark configurations. It was found that the FSCK coupled with the Modest and Riazzi mixing scheme was the best compromise in terms of accuracy and computational requirements, and was a good candidate to be implemented in CFD codes dealing with fire problems. In a second step, a semi-empirical soot model, considering acetylene and benzene as precursor species for soot nucleation, was validated in laminar co flow diffusion flames over a wide range of hydrocarbons (C1-C3) and conditions. In addition, the optically-thin approximation was found to produce large discrepancies in the upper part of these small laminar flames. Reliable predictions of soot volume fractions require the use of an advanced radiation model. Then the FSCK and the semi-empirical soot model were applied to simulate laboratory-scale and intermediate-scale pool fires of methane and propane. Predicted flame structures as well as the radiant heat flux transferred to the surroundings were found to be in good agreement with the available experimental data. Finally, the interaction between radiation and turbulence was quantified. (author)

  20. The effect of particle properties on the depth profile of buoyant plastics in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Merel; Reisser, Julia; Slat, Boyan; Ferrari, Francesco F.; Schmid, Moritz S.; Cunsolo, Serena; Brambini, Roberto; Noble, Kimberly; Sirks, Lys-Anne; Linders, Theo E. W.; Schoeneich-Argent, Rosanna I.; Koelmans, Albert A.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on buoyant microplastics in the marine environment rely on sea surface sampling. Consequently, microplastic amounts can be underestimated, as turbulence leads to vertical mixing. Models that correct for vertical mixing are based on limited data. In this study we report measurements of the depth profile of buoyant microplastics in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, from 0 to 5 m depth. Microplastics were separated into size classes (0.5–1.5 and 1.5–5.0 mm) and types (‘fragments’ and ‘lines’), and associated with a sea state. Microplastic concentrations decreased exponentially with depth, with both sea state and particle properties affecting the steepness of the decrease. Concentrations approached zero within 5 m depth, indicating that most buoyant microplastics are present on or near the surface. Plastic rise velocities were also measured, and were found to differ significantly for different sizes and shapes. Our results suggest that (1) surface samplers such as manta trawls underestimate total buoyant microplastic amounts by a factor of 1.04–30.0 and (2) estimations of depth-integrated buoyant plastic concentrations should be done across different particle sizes and types. Our findings can assist with improving buoyant ocean plastic vertical mixing models, mass balance exercises, impact assessments and mitigation strategies. PMID:27721460

  1. Light scattering from suspensions under external gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Bonet i Avalos, Josep; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel; Rodríguez, R.; Pérez Madrid, Agustín

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the light-scattering spectrum of a suspension in a viscoelastic fluid under density and velocity gradients. When a density gradient is present, the dynamic structure factor exhibits universality in the sense that its expression depends only on the reduced frequency and the reduced density gradient. For a velocity gradient, however, the universality breaks down. In this last case we have found a transition point from one to three characteristic frequencies in the spectrum, which is ...

  2. Density-Dependent Regulation of Brook Trout Population Dynamics along a Core-Periphery Distribution Gradient in a Central Appalachian Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Huntsman, Brock M.; Petty, J. Todd

    2014-01-01

    Spatial population models predict strong density-dependence and relatively stable population dynamics near the core of a species' distribution with increasing variance and importance of density-independent processes operating towards the population periphery. Using a 10-year data set and an information-theoretic approach, we tested a series of candidate models considering density-dependent and density-independent controls on brook trout population dynamics across a core-periphery distribution...

  3. Gradient networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroczkai, Zoltán; Kozma, Balázs; Bassler, Kevin E.; Hengartner, N. W.; Korniss, G.

    2008-04-01

    Gradient networks are defined (Toroczkai and Bassler 2004 Nature 428 716) as directed graphs formed by local gradients of a scalar field distributed on the nodes of a substrate network G. We present the derivation for some of the general properties of gradient graphs and give an exact expression for the in-degree distribution R(l) of the gradient network when the substrate is a binomial (Erd{\\;\\kern -0.10em \\raise -0.35ex \\{{^{^{\\prime\\prime}}}}\\kern -0.57em \\o} s-Rényi) random graph, G_{N,p} , and the scalars are independent identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. We show that in the limit N \\to \\infty, p \\to 0, z = pN = \\mbox{const} \\gg 1, R(l)\\propto l^{-1} for l Bassler (2004 Nature 428 716).

  4. STABILITY AND MIXING CHARACTER FOR BUOYANT JETS IN QUIESCENT SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yu-hong

    2005-01-01

    The near field stability and mixing characteristics of buoyant jets produced by thermal diffuse in quiescent shallow water are investigated numerically to predict under what combinations of discharge and ambient characteristics the near field will be stable or unstable.Analyses for different discharging types show that the discharge stability is purely dependent on the near-field behavior of the jets, or the dynamic interaction of the buoyant jet region, the surface impingement region and the internal hydraulic jump region, and is independent of the far-field geometry of the receiving water.The stability criterion is a function of the relative submerged depth, and source densimetric Froude number.

  5. Analysing the effect of stand density and site conditions on structure and growth of oak species using Nelder trials along an environmental gradient: experimental design, evaluation methods, and results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enno; Uhl; Peter; Biber; Matthias; Ulbricht; Michael; Heym; Tamás; Horváth; Ferenc; Lakatos; Janós; Gál; Leonhard; Steinacker; Giustino; Tonon; Maurizio; Ventura; Hans; Pretzsch

    2015-01-01

    Background: Most current approaches in forest science and practice require information about structure and growth of individual trees rather than- or in addition to- sum and mean values of growth and yield at forest stand level as provided by classic experimental designs. By inventing the wheel design, Nelder provided the possibility to turn to the individual tree as basic information unit. Such trials provide valuable insights into the dependency of growth on stand density at particular sites.Methods: Here, we present an extension of the original design and evaluation by Nelder.(i) We established Nelder wheels along an environmental gradient through Europe in atlantic climate in Belgium and Germany, Mediterranean climate in Italy, continental climate in Hungary as well as on high land climate in Mexico. Such disjunct Nelder wheels along an environmental gradient can be regarded and analysed as a two-factor design with the factors of site condition and stand density.(ii) We present an advanced statistical approach to evaluate density dependent growth dynamics of trees planted in form of the Nelder design, which considers spatio-temporal autocorrelation.(iii)We prove the usefulness of the methods in improving ecological theory concerning density related productivity,trade-offs between facilitation and competition, and allometric relations between size variables.Results: First evaluations based on remeasured Nelder wheels in oak(Quercus robur L.) show a size growth differentiation during the first observation period. In particular, height growth is accelerated under higher competition indicating facilitation effects. We detect furthermore a high variability in allometric relations.Conclusions: The proposed design, methods, and results are discussed regarding their impact on forest practice,model building, and ecological theory. We conclude that the extended Nelder approach is highly efficient in providing currently lacking individual tree level information.

  6. Abundance-area relationships in bird assemblages along an Afrotropical elevational gradient: space limitation in montane forest selects for higher population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Michal; Fjeldså, Jon; Sedláček, Ondřej; Motombi, Francis Njie; Djomo Nana, Eric; Mudrová, Karolína; Hořák, David

    2016-05-01

    The usual positive inter-specific relationship between range size and abundance of local populations can have notable exceptions in Afrotropical montane areas, where range-restricted bird species are unusually abundant. We tested how the area occupied locally by passerines and their geographic range size relate to local abundances along a tropical elevational gradient of Mt Cameroon, West-Central Africa. Data on bird assemblages were collected at six forested elevations (350, 650, 1100, 1500, 1850 m, 2200 m a.s.l.) using a standardised point count at 16 locations per elevation. Elevational ranges of birds were compiled from published sources and their geographic range sizes were determined as the occupancy of 1° x 1° grid cells. The observed relationship between local abundance and geographic range size within the entire passerine assemblage on Mt Cameroon disagrees with the most frequently reported positive pattern. However, the patterns differ among elevations, with positive trends of the abundance-range size relationship in lowland changing to negative trends towards higher elevations. Interestingly, the total assemblage abundances do not differ much among elevations and population size estimates of species occupying different parts of the gradient remain relatively constant. These patterns are caused by relatively high abundances of montane species, which might be a result of long-term ecological specialization and/or competitive release in species-poor montane locations and possibly facilitated by an extinction filter. Our data suggest that montane species' abilities to maintain dense populations might compensate for less area available near mountain tops and help these populations to circumvent extinction. PMID:26801494

  7. Capitalizing Resolving Power of Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation by Freezing and Precisely Slicing Centrifuged Solution: Enabling Identification of Complex Proteins from Mitochondria by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiqing; Lu, Joann J.; Rao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient centrifugation is widely utilized for various high purity sample preparations, and density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) is often used for more resolution-demanding purification of organelles and protein complexes. Accurately locating different isopycnic layers and precisely extracting solutions from these layers play a critical role in achieving high-resolution DGU separations. In this technique note, we develop a DGU procedure by freezing the solution rapidly (but gently) after centrifugation to fix the resolved layers and by slicing the frozen solution to fractionate the sample. Because the thickness of each slice can be controlled to be as thin as 10 micrometers, we retain virtually all the resolution produced by DGU. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we fractionate complex V from HeLa mitochondria using a conventional technique and this freezing-slicing (F-S) method. The comparison indicates that our F-S method can reduce complex V layer thicknesses by ~40%. After fractionation, we analyze complex V proteins directly on a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twelve out of fifteen subunits of complex V are positively identified. Our method provides a practical protocol to identify proteins from complexes, which is useful to investigate biomolecular complexes and pathways in various conditions and cell types.

  8. Capitalizing Resolving Power of Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation by Freezing and Precisely Slicing Centrifuged Solution: Enabling Identification of Complex Proteins from Mitochondria by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiqing; Lu, Joann J; Rao, Wei; Liu, Shaorong

    2016-01-01

    Density gradient centrifugation is widely utilized for various high purity sample preparations, and density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) is often used for more resolution-demanding purification of organelles and protein complexes. Accurately locating different isopycnic layers and precisely extracting solutions from these layers play a critical role in achieving high-resolution DGU separations. In this technique note, we develop a DGU procedure by freezing the solution rapidly (but gently) after centrifugation to fix the resolved layers and by slicing the frozen solution to fractionate the sample. Because the thickness of each slice can be controlled to be as thin as 10 micrometers, we retain virtually all the resolution produced by DGU. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we fractionate complex V from HeLa mitochondria using a conventional technique and this freezing-slicing (F-S) method. The comparison indicates that our F-S method can reduce complex V layer thicknesses by ~40%. After fractionation, we analyze complex V proteins directly on a matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization, time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Twelve out of fifteen subunits of complex V are positively identified. Our method provides a practical protocol to identify proteins from complexes, which is useful to investigate biomolecular complexes and pathways in various conditions and cell types. PMID:27668122

  9. Effect of Technology Enhanced Conceptual Change Texts on Students' Understanding of Buoyant Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gulbin; Selcuk, Gamze Sezgin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of technology enhanced conceptual change texts on elementary school students' understanding of buoyant force was investigated. The conceptual change texts (written forms) used in this study are proven for effectiveness and are enriched by using technology support in this study. These texts were tried out on two groups. A…

  10. Influence of cooling on dynamics of buoyant jet

    CERN Document Server

    Goncharov, V P

    2016-01-01

    The Rayleigh--Taylor instability which is responsible for the occurrence of narrow upward jets are studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic model with horizontally--nonuniform density and the Newtonian cooling. As analysis shows, the total hierarchy of instabilities in this model consists of three regimes -- collapse, algebraic instability, and inertial motion. Realization of these stages, mutual transitions and interference depend on a ratio between two characteristic time scales -- collapse time and cooling time.

  11. Early and long-term impacts of browsing by roe deer in oak coppiced woods along a gradient of population density

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Chianucci; Luca Mattioli; Emilio Amorini; Tessa Giannini; Andrea Marcon; Roberta Chirichella; Marco Apollonio; Andrea Cutini

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few decades, wild ungulate populations have exhibited relevant geographic and demographic expansion in most European countries; roe deer is amongst the most widespread ungulate species. The increasing roe deer densities have led to strong impact on forest regeneration; the problem has been recently recognized in coppice woods, a silvicultural system which is widespread in Italy, where it amounts to about 56% of the total national forested area.In this study we investigated the e...

  12. Force correcting atom centered potentials for generalized gradient approximated density functional theory: Approaching hybrid functional accuracy for geometries and harmonic frequencies in CCl$_3$F and other small molecules

    CERN Document Server

    von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2013-01-01

    Generalized gradient approximated (GGA) density functional theory (DFT) typically overestimates polarizability and bond-lengths, and underestimates force constants of covalent bonds. To overcome this problem we show that one can use empirical frequency correcting atom centered potentials (FCACPs), parameterized for every nuclear species. Parameters are obtained through minimization of a penalty functional that explicitly encodes hybrid DFT geometries and static polarizabilities of reference molecules. For hydrogen, fluorine, chlorine, and carbon the respective reference molecules consist of H$_2$, F$_2$, Cl$_2$, and CH$_4$. The transferability of this approach to other systems and properties is assessed for harmonic frequencies of a small set of molecules. Numerical evidence, gathered for CCl$_3$F, HF, HCl, CFH$_3$, and CHCl$_3$, indicates that the GGA+FCACP level of theory yields significantly improved harmonic frequencies at the desired hybrid DFT geometry minima, as well as systematically reduced molecular...

  13. Generating buoyant magnetic flux ropes in solar-like convective dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Our Sun exhibits strong convective dynamo action which results in magnetic flux bundles emerging through the stellar surface as magnetic spots. Global-scale dynamo action is believed to generate large-scale magnetic structures in the deep solar interior through the interplay of convection, rotation, and shear. Portions of these large-scale magnetic structures are then believed to rise through the convective layer, forming magnetic loops which then pierce the photosphere as sunspot pairs. Previous global simulations of 3D MHD convection in rotating spherical shells have demonstrated mechanisms whereby large-scale magnetic wreaths can be generated in the bulk of the convection zone. Our recent simulations have achieved sufficiently high levels of turbulence to permit portions of these wreaths to become magnetically buoyant and rise through the simulated convective layer through a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells. These buoyant magnetic loops are created in the bulk of the...

  14. Influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2015-01-01

    The influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in a porous medium is investigated through a linear stability analysis (LSA) as well as direct numerical simulations (DNS). The linear stability method implemented in this paper is based on an initial value approach, which helps to capture the onset of instability more accurately than the quasi-steady state analysis. In the absence of displacement, we show that viscosity contrast delays the onset of instability in buoyantly unstable miscible fluids. Further, it is observed that suitably choosing the viscosity contrast and injection velocity a gravitationally unstable miscible interface can be stabilized completely. Through LSA we draw a phase diagram, which shows three distinct stability regions in a parameter space spanned by the displacement velocity and the viscosity contrast. DNS are performed corresponding to parameters from each regime and the results obtained are in accordance with the linear stability results. Moreover, the conv...

  15. Laser Soot-Scattering Imaging of a Large Buoyant Diffusion Flame

    OpenAIRE

    Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Toner, Stephen J.

    1987-01-01

    A novel diagnostic technique, which makes use of laser light scattered by soot particles, was used in an effort to identify the flame sheets within a natural gas diffusion flame. Soot particles, inherently created and consumed in the flame, were used as the scattering medium, which obviated the need for externally supplied seed material. Since no foreign material was added to the flame, the current technique can be considered truly nonintrusive. The soot distribution within a large buoyant...

  16. Gravity-driven thin-film flow with negatively buoyant particles

    OpenAIRE

    Mavromoustaki, A.; David, P; Hill, S.; Latterman, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Mata, M; Bertozzi, A. L.

    2011-01-01

    This arXiv article describes the fluid dynamics video on `Gravity-driven thin-film flow with negatively buoyant particles', presented at the 64th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics in Baltimore, MD in November 2011. The video shows three different experiments where a thin film of silicone oil laden with particles, is allowed to flow down an incline under the action of gravity. The videos were recorded at the UCLA Applied Math Laboratory.

  17. Buoyant balaenids: the ups and downs of buoyancy in right whales.

    OpenAIRE

    Nowacek, D. P.; Johnson, M P; Tyack, P.L.; Shorter, K. A.; McLellan, W. A.; Pabst, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of marine mammal species have been shown to conserve energy by using negative buoyancy to power prolonged descent glides during dives. A new non-invasive tag attached to North Atlantic right whales recorded swim stroke from changes in pitch angle derived from a three-axis accelerometer. These results show that right whales are positively buoyant near the surface, a finding that has significant implications for both energetics and management. Some of the most powerful fluke strokes o...

  18. Numerical Study of A Round Buoyant Jet Under the Effect of JONSWAP Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-ping; LI Chi-wai; ZHANG Chang-kuan; XU Zhen-shan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the hydrodynamic behaviours of a round buoyant jet under the effect of JONSWAP random waves.A three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model is developed to simulate the buoyant jet in a stagnant ambient and JONSWAP random waves.By comparison of velocity and concentration fields,it is found that the buoyant jet exhibits faster decay of centedine velocity,wider lateral spreading and larger initial dilution under the wave effect,indicating that wave dynamics improves the jet entrainment and mixing in the near field,and subsequently mitigate the jet impacts in the far field.The effect of buoyancy force on the jet behaviours in the random waves is also numerically investigated.The results show that the wave effect on the jet entrainment and mixing is considerably weakened under the existence of buoyancy force,resulting in a slower decay rate of centerline velocity and a narrower jet width for the jet with initial buoyancy.

  19. BEHAVIOR OF OBSTRUCTED SQUARE BUOYANT VERTICAL JETS IN STATIC AMBIENT (Ⅰ)-VERIFICATION OF MATHEMATICAL MODEL AND NUMERICAL METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAI Wen-xin; FANG Shen-guang; DAI Hui-chao

    2006-01-01

    Some experiments were made for the buoyant jet from a square orifice with a square disc placed on it in static ambient and concentration along the axis in self-similar area behind disc was measured. And at the same time a three-dimensional mathematical model was established to simulate the whole flowing under different conditions. All the results predicted by the numerical calculation were substantiated by the experiments.The results were compared with experiential formula for obstructed round buoyant vertical jets in static ambient and it was found that the two concentration distributions had good accordance. Star shape of temperature isolines on cross-sections in the near areas from the disc was found and it was a very special figure for obstructed square buoyant vertical jets with a square disc. The shape will transform to concentric circles gradually alike to the round buoyant vertical jet in self-similar area with increasing of the distance from the disc.

  20. In-situ optical and acoustical measurements of the buoyant cyanobacterium p. Rubescens: spatial and temporal distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmar Hofmann

    Full Text Available Optical (fluorescence and acoustic in-situ techniques were tested in their ability to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of plankton in freshwater ecosystems with special emphasis on the harmful and buoyant cyanobacterium P. rubescens. Fluorescence was measured with the multi-spectral FluoroProbe (Moldaenke FluoroProbe, MFP and a Seapoint Chlorophyll Fluorometer (SCF. In-situ measurements of the acoustic backscatter strength (ABS were conducted with three different acoustic devices covering multiple acoustic frequencies (614 kHz ADCP, 2 MHz ADP, and 6 MHz ADV. The MFP provides a fast and reliable technique to measure fluorescence at different wavelengths in situ, which allows discriminating between P. rubescens and other phytoplankton species. All three acoustic devices are sensitive to P. rubescens even if other scatterers, e.g., zooplankton or suspended sediment, are present in the water column, because P. rubescens containing gas vesicles has a strong density difference and hence acoustic contrast to the ambient water and other scatterers. After calibration, the combination of optical and acoustical measurements not only allows qualitative and quantitative observation of P. rubescens, but also distinction between P. rubescens, other phytoplankton, and zooplankton. As the measuring devices can sample in situ at high rates they enable assessment of plankton distributions at high temporal (minutes and spatial (decimeters resolution or covering large temporal (seasonal and spatial (basin scale scales.

  1. Adiabatic density surface, neutral density surface, potential density surface, and mixing path

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Rui-xin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, adiabatic density surface, neutral density surface and potential density surface are compared. The adiabatic density surface is defined as the surface on which a water parcellcan move adiabatically, without changing its potential temperature and salinity. For a water parcelltaken at a given station and pressure level, the corresponding adiabatic density surface can be determined through simple calculations. This family of surface is neutrally buoyant in the world ocean, and different from other surfaces that are not truly neutrally buoyant. In order to explore mixing path in the ocean, a mixing ratio m is introduced, which is defined as the portion of potential temperature and salinity of a water parcellthat has exchanged with the environment during a segment of migration in the ocean. Two extreme situations of mixing path in the ocean are m=0 (no mixing), which is represented by the adiabatic density curve, and m=1, where the original information is completely lost through mixing. The latter is represented by the neutral density curve. The reality lies in between, namely, 0

  2. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  3. Rev1, Rev3, or Rev7 siRNA Abolishes Ultraviolet Light-Induced Translesion Replication in HeLa Cells: A Comprehensive Study Using Alkaline Sucrose Density Gradient Sedimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Takezawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available When a replicative DNA polymerase stalls upon encountering a lesion on the template strand, it is relieved by other low-processivity polymerase(s, which insert nucleotide(s opposite the lesion, extend by a few nucleotides, and dissociate from the 3′-OH. The replicative polymerase then resumes DNA synthesis. This process, termed translesion replication (TLS or replicative bypass, may involve at least five different polymerases in mammals, although the participating polymerases and their roles have not been entirely characterized. Using siRNAs originally designed and an alkaline sucrose density gradient sedimentation technique, we verified the involvement of several polymerases in ultraviolet (UV light-induced TLS in HeLa cells. First, siRNAs to Rev3 or Rev7 largely abolished UV-TLS, suggesting that these 2 gene products, which comprise Polζ, play a main role in mutagenic TLS. Second, Rev1-targeted siRNA also abrogated UV-TLS, indicating that Rev1 is also indispensable to mutagenic TLS. Third, Polη-targeted siRNA also prevented TLS to a greater extent than our expectations. Forth, although siRNA to Polι had no detectable effect, that to Polκ delayed UV-TLS. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting apparent evidence for the participation of Polκ in UV-TLS.

  4. Mushroom-Shaped Structures as Tracers of Buoyant Flow in the Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A; Avillez, Miguel A. de; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2001-01-01

    Recent HI emission observations of the Southern Galactic hemisphere have revealed a mushroom-like structure extending from z=-70 to -450 pc, composed of a stem and a cap. Similar structures occur in three-dimensional simulations of a dynamic galactic disk driven by isolated and clustered supernovae. Using these simulations, we show that hot gas in the Galactic disk that is not evacuated through chimneys expands into the cooler gas of the thick disk, forming mushroom-shaped structures. This new class of objects traces buoyant flow of hot gas into the thick disk.

  5. AEROSTATIC AND AERODYNAMIC MODULES OF A HYBRID BUOYANT AIRCRAFT: AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ul Haque

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach is essential for the estimation of the requirements of aerodynamic and aerostatic lift for a hybrid buoyant aircraft. Such aircrafts have two different modules to balance the weight of aircraft; aerostatic module and aerodynamic module. Both these modules are to be treated separately for estimation of the mass budget of propulsion systems and required power. In the present work, existing relationships of aircraft and airship are reviewed for its further application for these modules. Limitations of such relationships are also disussed and it is precieved that it will provide a strating point for better understanding of design anatomy of such aircraft.

  6. Residence times of neutrally-buoyant matter such as larvae, sewage or nutrients on coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Kerry P.; Gay, Stephen L.; Andrews, John C.

    1990-12-01

    Coral reef flushing times at an individual reef scale are specified and a general formula to determine these times is developed. The formula is confirmed by comparison with residence times predicted by numerical small-scale reef models, including those from a 4 month unsteady current simulation of John Brewer Reef on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The method proves to be a satisfactory alternative to the numerical modelling. When neutrally-buoyant material around a reef is removed by the currents, the concentrations decay exponentially. The decay rate depends primarily on free stream current and reef dimensions. Secondary factors are the tidal excursion, shelf depth, lagoon size and residual current in the lee of the reef. These factors, when combined into a decay coefficient, specify the rate of loss of neutrally-buoyant material (e.g. some larvae, pollutants and sewage) from a coral reef and its surrounds. The analytical formula can be used to predict the flushing rates or the percentage of material still remaining on a reef after a selected time interval. We demonstrate that material can remain on or near typical reefs in common weather conditions for several weeks.

  7. Characterization of Buoyant Fluorescent Particles for Field Observations of Water Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Tauro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the feasibility of off-the-shelf buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in turbid water flows is investigated. Microspheres’ fluorescence intensity is experimentally measured and detected in placid aqueous suspensions of increasing concentrations of clay to simulate typical conditions occurring in natural drainage networks. Experiments are conducted in a broad range of clay concentrations and particle immersion depths by using photoconductive cells and image-based sensing technologies. Results obtained with both methodologies exhibit comparable trends and show that the considered particles are fairly detectable in critically turbid water flows. Further information on performance and integration of the studied microspheres in low-cost measurement instrumentation for field observations is obtained through experiments conducted in a custom built miniature water channel. This experimental characterization provides a first assessment of the feasibility of commercially available buoyant fluorescent beads in the analysis of high turbidity surface water flows. The proposed technology may serve as a minimally invasive sensing system for hazardous events, such as pollutant diffusion in natural streams and flash flooding due to extreme rainfall.

  8. Saltwater intrusion at a buoyant jet discharge in a fringing reef lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, S. M.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Enriquez, C.; Valle-Levinson, A.

    2013-05-01

    The influence of tides and waves on turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) from a buoyant jet discharge in a fringing reef lagoon was observed with measurements obtained throughout an 11-day period in July 2011. Tidal variations within the lagoon modulated TKE levels, temperature, and salinity at the buoyant jet. During neap and low tides, TKE values were predominantly >0.015 m2/s2. During neap tides, TKE at the jet was greater than during spring tides, meaning that larger tidal oscillations inhibited TKE production at the jet. When the water surface over the jet remained >0.02 m above the mean, TKE was suppressed to intrusion into the aquifer. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the jet discharge to fortnightly tides, despite the small tidal range (intrusion into the aquifer caused by the spring tide oscillations. Therefore, increased sea levels, as illustrated here by the combination of incident waves, wave set-up and fortnightly tidal oscillations, is expected to threaten delicate aquifer conditions and vital water resources for coastal communities worldwide.

  9. Analysis of a turbulent buoyant confined jet modeled using realizable k-ε model

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-06-13

    Through this paper, analyses of components of the unheated/heated turbulent confined jet are introduced and some models to describe them are developed. Turbulence realizable k-ε model is used to model the turbulence of this problem. Numerical simulations of 2D axisymmetric vertical hot water confined jet into a cylindrical tank have been done. Solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while velocity, pressure, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank are analyzed. For seeking verification, an experiment was conducted for measuring of the temperature of the same system, and comparison between the measured and simulated temperature shows a good agreement. Using the simulated results, some models are developed to describe axial velocity, centerline velocity, radial velocity, dynamic pressure, mass flux, momentum flux and buoyancy flux for both unheated (non-buoyant) and heated (buoyant) jet. Finally, the dynamics of the heated jet in terms of the plume function which is a universal quantity and the source parameter are studied and therefore the maximum velocity can be predicted theoretically. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  10. 密度梯度离心法分离脐血单个核细胞方法的优化%Optimization of the Isolation of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mononuclear Cells by Density Gradient Centrifugation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任思坡; 吴秀娟; 罗小虎; 李全双; 韩光宇; 谭昆; 拾莉; 耿跃春

    2012-01-01

    Objective To optimized the method of separating umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells by density gradient cen-trifugation in order to improve the mononuclear cells yield. Methods Selected 40 copies Cord blood,each 40 millilitre,and e-qually separated into the conventional group and optimized group. The cord blood in conventional group mixed with Normal saline 1 ∶ 1 mixture of diluted, directly through the Ficoll separation medium, mononuclear cells. Optimized the group through the first cord blood washed once,added equal amount of the full wind and percussion blending NS,200 mesh filter and kept the cell suspension Ficoll separation medium solution and the volume ratio of 1 ∶ 1 for the separation operation. For each isolated from cord blood mononuclear cells diluted by white blood cells count dilution. Results Conventional group,after the separation of the white film there were 11 interface was not clear,but were mixed with a small amount of red blood cells. Optimized the group,after the separation of the white film has 1,interface was not clear,only very few red blood cells mixed. Two methods to collect the cord blood mononuclear cells compared to optimize the group than the conventional group (P<0. 01). Conclusion Improve cord blood mononuclear cells yield by optimizing density gradient centrifugation steps.%目的 对密度梯度离心法分离脐血单个核细胞的方法进行优化,以提高该方法分离脐血单个核细胞的收率.方法 脐血40份,每份40 ml,分为常规组和优化组,每组20份.常规组脐血与NS1∶1混合稀释后,直接通过Ficoll分离液分离单个核细胞;优化组通过先将脐血洗涤一次,加入等量NS充分吹打混匀,200目筛网过滤,保持细胞悬液和Ficoll分离液1:1的体积比进行分离操作.对每份分离得到的脐血单个核细胞通过白细胞稀释液稀释后计数.结果 常规组分离后的白膜层有11份界面不清晰,同时均混有少量的红细胞.优

  11. INFLUENCES OF SLOPE GRADIENT ON SOIL EROSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青泉; 陈力; 李家春

    2001-01-01

    The main factors influencing soil erosion include the net rain excess, the water depth, the velocity, the shear stress of overland flows , and the erosion-resisting capacity of soil. The laws of these factors varying with the slope gradient were investigated by using the kinematic wave theory. Furthermore, the critical slope gradient of erosion was driven. The analysis shows that the critical slope gradient of soil erosion is dependent on grain size , soil bulk density , surface roughness, runoff length, net rain excess, and the friction coefficient of soil, etc. The critical slope gradient has been estimated theoretically with its range between 41. 5 °~ 50°.

  12. Translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, Varghese; van der Poel, Erwin P; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental measurements of the translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in isotropic turbulence. We introduce an efficient method to simultaneously determine the position and (absolute) orientation of a spherical body from visual observation. The method employs a minimization algorithm to obtain the orientation from the 2D projection of a specific pattern drawn onto the surface of the sphere. This has the advantages that it does not require a database of reference images, is easily scalable using parallel processing, and enables accurate absolute orientation reference. Analysis of the sphere's translational dynamics reveals clear differences between the streamwise and transverse directions. The translational auto-correlations and PDFs provide evidence for periodicity in the particle's dynamics even under turbulent conditions. The angular autocorrelations show weak periodicity. The angular accelerations exhibit wide tails, however without a directional dependence.

  13. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Buoyant Bubbles in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neill, S M; Jones, T W

    2009-01-01

    We report results of 3D MHD simulations of the dynamics of buoyant bubbles in magnetized galaxy cluster media. The simulations are three dimensional extensions of two dimensional calculations reported by Jones & De Young (2005). Initially spherical bubbles and briefly inflated spherical bubbles all with radii a few times smaller than the intracluster medium (ICM) scale height were followed as they rose through several ICM scale heights. Such bubbles quickly evolve into a toroidal form that, in the absence of magnetic influences, is stable against fragmentation in our simulations. This ring formation results from (commonly used) initial conditions that cause ICM material below the bubbles to drive upwards through the bubble, creating a vortex ring; that is, hydrostatic bubbles develop into "smoke rings", if they are initially not very much smaller or very much larger than the ICM scale height. Even modest ICM magnetic fields with beta = P_gas/P_mag ~ 10^3 can influence the dynamics of the bubbles, provided...

  14. FULLY RESOLVED NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TURBULENT PIPE FLOWS LADEN WITH LARGE NEUTRALLY- BUOYANT PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Teng-hu; SHAO Xue-ming; YU Zhao-sheng

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we employ a fully-resolved numerical simulation method (the fictitious domain method) to investigate the effects of large neutrally-buoyant particles on the turbulent flow in a pipe at low Reynolds number and non-dilute regimes. The tube Reynolds number is fixed to be 4 900, the particle-pipe diameter ratio is 0.1, and the particle volume fraction ranges from 0.33% to 10%. Our results indicate that the presence of large particles decreases the maximum root-of-mean-square (rms) of the streamwise velocity fluctuation near the wall by weakening the intensity of large-scale streamwise vortices, although in the region very close to the wall the particles increase the rms of streamwise velocity fluctuation. On the other hand, the particles induce small-scale vortices in the near-wall region, resulting in the enhancement of the rms of radial and circumferential velocity fluctuations there.

  15. Flow instability of buoyant-Marangoni convection in the LEC GaAs melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ShuXian; LI MingWei

    2008-01-01

    Flow transitions and instabilities have significant effects on the quality of the crystals. The flow and heat transfer in the LEC GaAs melt are numerically studied by a time-dependent and three-dimensional turbulent flow model. The effects of the change of the buoyancy and Marangoni force on the flow state are analyzed by changing the temperature difference between the crystal and the crucible walls. The results show that the flow will transform from axisymmetric steady flow to non-axisymmetric oscillatory flow when the temperature difference exceeds the critical value, and that the mechanism of the transition is attributed to the Marangoni instability. The critical temperature differences for the flow transitions corresponding to different melt depth H are numerically predicted. Several important characteristics of the non-axisymmetric buoyant-Marangoni convection are numerically observed and compared with that of the non-axisymmetric mixed convection coupled with crystal rotation.

  16. Efecto de la Viscosidad y de la Densidad de Mezcla en el Gradiente de Presión de Flujo Homogéneo Gas-Líquido en Tuberías Horizontales Effect of the Mixture Viscosity and the Mixture Density on the Pressure Gradient of Gas-Liquid Homogeneous Flow in Horizontal Pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    Janneth M García; Francisco García

    2009-01-01

    En este trabajo se evalúa la precisión de 76 modelos homogéneos de gradiente de presión para determinar el gradiente de presión experimental reportado en una base de 2415 datos de flujos bifásico gas-líquido en tuberías horizontales. Estos modelos se formularon a partir de 4 ecuaciones de densidad de mezcla combinadas con 19 ecuaciones de viscosidad de mezcla. Al estudiar el efecto de la viscosidad y de la densidad de mezcla en el gradiente de presión, utilizando el modelo homogéneo, se obser...

  17. Gradient Descent Bit Flipping Algorithms for Decoding LDPC Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Wadayama, Tadashi; Nakamura, Keisuke; Yagita, Masayuki; Funahashi, Yuuki; Usami, Shogo; Takumi, Ichi

    2007-01-01

    A novel class of bit-flipping (BF) algorithms for decoding low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes is presented. The proposed algorithms, which are called gradient descent bit flipping (GDBF) algorithms, can be regarded as simplified gradient descent algorithms. Based on gradient descent formulation, the proposed algorithms are naturally derived from a simple non-linear objective function.

  18. SEPARATION OF X-BEARING BOVINE SPERM BY CENTRIFUGATION IN CONTINUOUS PERCOLL AND OPTIPREP DENSITY GRADIENT: EFFECT IN SPERM VIABILITY AND IN VITRO EMBRYO PRODUCTION SEPARAÇÃO DE ESPERMATOZOIDES PORTADORES DO CROMOSSOMO X BOVINO POR CENTRIFUGAÇÃO EM GRADIENTE DE DENSIDADE CONTÍNUO DE PERCOLL E OPTIPREP: EFEITO SOBRE A VIABILIDADE ESPERMÁTICA E NA PRODUÇÃO IN VITRO DE EMBRIÕES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Costa Lucio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of this study was to separate X-bearing bovine sperm by continuous Percoll and OptiPrep density gradients and to validate the sexing of resultant in vitro produced embryos by Polimerase Chain Reaction (PCR. Frozen/thawed sperm was layered on density gradients which were previously prepared in polystyrene tubes, 24 h before procedures and maintained at 4 °C. The tubes were centrifuged at 500 x g for 15 min at 22 °C. Supernatants were gently aspirated and the sperm recovered from the bottom of the tubes. Viability and integrity of sperm were evaluated by Trypan Blue/Giemsa stain. Cleavage and blastocyst rates were determined by in vitro production of embryos and PCR was performed for identification of the embryos’ genetic sex. No damage in viability and acrossomal integrity and in cleavage and blastocyst rates was found in the Percoll and OptiPrep treatment compared to the non-centrifuged group (P>0.05. The percentage of female embryos in the Percoll and OptiPrep group was 63.0 and 47.6%, respectively. The female embryos in control group were 48.7%. A sexual deviation in the Percoll density gradient was achieved without reduction of sperm viability and in vitro production rates.

    KEY WORDS: Bovine, centrifugation, in vitro production of embryos, PCR, X-bearing sperm.

    O objetivo deste estudo foi separar espermatozoides bovinos portadores do cromossomo X pela centrifugação em gradiente de densidade contínuo de Percoll e OptiPrep, e validar a sexagem pela reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR, dos embriões produzidos in vitro. Para a sexagem, espermatozoides descongelados foram depositados nos gradientes de densidade, previamente preparados, em tubos de poliestireno, 24 horas antes da sexagem e mantidos a 4°C. Centrifugou-se a 500 x g por quinze minutos a 22°C. Os sobrenadantes foram aspirados, e os espermatozoides recuperados do

  19. The gradient flow in a twisted box

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Alberto [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2013-08-15

    We study the perturbative behavior of the gradient flow in a twisted box. We apply this information to define a running coupling using the energy density of the flow field. We study the step-scaling function and the size of cutoff effects in SU(2) pure gauge theory. We conclude that the twisted gradient flow running coupling scheme is a valid strategy for step-scaling purposes due to the relatively mild cutoff effects and high precision.

  20. Numerical simulation and analysis of confined turbulent buoyant jet with variable source

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2016-01-23

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are undertaken for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The average deviation of the simulated temperature by realizable k-ɛ turbulent model and the measured temperature is within 2%. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear variation that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits, particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during the whole course. Numerical experiments for constant, monotone increasing and monotone decreasing of inlet temperature are done to show its effect on the buoyancy force in terms of Richardson number.

  1. Numerical simulation and analysis of confined turbulent buoyant jet with variable source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EL-AMIN Mohamed F; AL-GHAMDI Abdulmajeed; SALAMA Amgad; SUN Shuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are undertaken for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-ε turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The average devia- tion of the simulated temperature by realizablek-ε turbulent model and the measured temperature is within 2%. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear varia- tion that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits, particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during the whole course. Numerical experime- nts for constant, monotone increasing and monotone decreasing of inlet temperature are done to show its effect on the buoyancy force in terms of Richardson number.

  2. Isolation of Low Abundance Proteins and Cells Using Buoyant Glass Microbubble Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional protein affinity chromatography relies on highly porous resins that have large surface areas. These properties are ideal for fast flow separation of proteins from biological samples with maximum yields, but these properties can also lead to increased nonspecific protein binding. In certain applications where the purity of an isolated protein is more important than the yield, using a glass solid phase could be advantageous as glass is nonporous and hydrophilic and has a low surface area and low nonspecific protein binding. As a proof of principle, we used protein A-conjugated hollow glass microbubbles to isolate fluorescently labeled neurofilament heavy chain spiked into serum and compared them to protein A Sepharose and protein A magnetic beads (Dynabeads using an anti-neurofilament protein antibody. As expected, a greater volume of glass bubbles was required to match the binding capacity of the magnetic beads and Sepharose resins. On the other hand, nonspecific protein binding to glass bubbles was greatly reduced compared to the other resins. Additionally, since the glass bubbles are buoyant and transparent, they are well suited for isolating cells from biological samples and staining them in situ.

  3. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory. Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  4. Numerical simulation of 2D buoyant jets in ice-covered and temperature-stratified water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruochuan

    A two-dimensional (2D) unsteady simulation model is applied to the problem of a submerged warm water discharge into a stratified lake or reservoir with an ice cover. Numerical simulations and analyses are conducted to gain insight into large-scale convective recirculation and flow processes in a cold waterbody induced by a buoyant jet. Jet behaviors under various discharge temperatures are captured by directly modeling flow and thermal fields. Flow structures and processes are described by the simulated spatial and temporal distributions of velocity and temperature in various regions: deflection, recirculation, attachment, and impingement. Some peculiar hydrothermal and dynamic features, e.g. reversal of buoyancy due to the dilution of a warm jet by entraining cold ambient water, are identified and examined. Simulation results show that buoyancy is the most important factor controlling jet behavior and mixing processes. The inflow boundary is treated as a liquid wall from which the jet is offset. Similarity and difference in effects of boundaries perpendicular and parallel to flow, and of buoyancy on jet attachment and impingement, are discussed. Symmetric flow configuration is used to de-emphasize the Coanda effect caused by offset.

  5. Experimental Studies for the characterization of the mixing processes in negative buoyant jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Querzoli G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A negatively buoyant jet (NBJ corresponds to the physical phenomenon that develops when a fluid is discharged upwards into a lighter environment or downwards into a heavier receptor fluid. In a NBJ the flow is initially driven mostly by the momentum, so it basically behaves as a simple jet released withthe same angle, while far from the outlet the buoyancy prevails, bending the jet axis down and making it similar to a plume. The coexistence in the same phenomenon of both the characteristics of simple jets and plumes makes the NBJs a phenomenon still not entirely explained but, considering also the numerous practical applications, very interesting to study. Here some of the experimental results are presented. The laboratory experiment were obtained on a model simulating a typical sea discharge of brine from desalination plants: a pipe laid down on the sea bottom, with orifices on its lateral wall, releasing brine (heavier than the sea water with a certain angle to the horizontal, in order to increase the jet path before sinking to the seafloor. A non-intrusive image analysis technique, namely Feature Tracking Velocimetry, is applied to measure velocity fields, with the aim at understanding the influence of some non-dimensional parameters driving the phenomenon (e.g. Reynolds number, release angle on the structure of the NBJ and of the turbulence.

  6. Turbulent channel flow of dense suspensions of neutrally-buoyant spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Picano, F; Brandt, L

    2014-01-01

    Dense particle suspensions are widely encountered in many applications and in environmental flows. While many previous studies investigate their rheological properties in laminar flows, little is known on the behaviour of these suspensions in the turbulent/inertial regime. The present study aims to fill this gap by investigating the turbulent flow of a Newtonian fluid laden with solid neutrally-buoyant spheres at relatively high volume fractions in a plane channel. An Immersed Boundary Method has been used to account for the dispersed phase performing Direct Numerical Simulation in the range of volume fractions $\\Phi=0-0.2$. The results show that the mean velocity profiles are significantly altered by the presence of a solid phase with a decrease of the von K\\'arm\\'an constant in the log-law. The overall drag is found to increase with the volume fraction, more than one would expect just considering the increase of the system viscosity due to the presence of the particles. At the highest volume fraction here i...

  7. Steady thermocapillary-buoyant convection in a shallow annular pool.Part 2: Two immiscible fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Rong Li; Shuang-Cheng Wang; Chun-Mei Wu

    2011-01-01

    This work is devoted to the study of steady thermocapillary-buoyant convection in a system of two horizontal superimposed immiscible liquid layers filling a lateral heated thin annular pool.The governing equations are solved using an asymptotic theory for the aspect ratios e → 0.Asymptotic solutions of the velocity and temperature fields are obtained in the core region away from the cylinder walls.In order to validate the asymptotic solutions,numerical simulations are also carried out and the results are compared to each other.It is found that the present asymptotic solutions are valid in most of the core region.And the applicability of the obtained asymptotic solutions decreases with the increase of the aspect ratio and the thickness ratio of the two layers.For a system of gallium arsenide (lower layer) and boron oxide (upper layer),the buoyancy slightly weakens the thermocapillary convection in the upper layer and strengthens it in the lower layer.

  8. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on how wave–current and wave–turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory. Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  9. An inkjet-printed buoyant 3-D lagrangian sensor for real-time flood monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2014-06-01

    A 3-D (cube-shaped) Lagrangian sensor, inkjet printed on a paper substrate, is presented for the first time. The sensor comprises a transmitter chip with a microcontroller completely embedded in the cube, along with a $1.5 \\\\lambda 0 dipole that is uniquely implemented on all the faces of the cube to achieve a near isotropic radiation pattern. The sensor has been designed to operate both in the air as well as water (half immersed) for real-time flood monitoring. The sensor weighs 1.8 gm and measures 13 mm$\\\\,\\\\times\\\\,$ 13 mm$\\\\,\\\\times\\\\,$ 13 mm, and each side of the cube corresponds to only $0.1 \\\\lambda 0 (at 2.4 GHz). The printed circuit board is also inkjet-printed on paper substrate to make the sensor light weight and buoyant. Issues related to the bending of inkjet-printed tracks and integration of the transmitter chip in the cube are discussed. The Lagrangian sensor is designed to operate in a wireless sensor network and field tests have confirmed that it can communicate up to a distance of 100 m while in the air and up to 50 m while half immersed in water. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  10. Isolation of rare tumor cells from blood cells with buoyant immuno-microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixin Shi

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are exfoliated at various stages of cancer, and could provide invaluable information for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. There is an urgent need for the development of cost-efficient and scalable technologies for rare CTC enrichment from blood. Here we report a novel method for isolation of rare tumor cells from excess of blood cells using gas-filled buoyant immuno-microbubbles (MBs. MBs were prepared by emulsification of perfluorocarbon gas in phospholipids and decorated with anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM antibody. EpCAM-targeted MBs efficiently (85% and rapidly (within 15 minutes bound to various epithelial tumor cells suspended in cell medium. EpCAM-targeted MBs efficiently (88% isolated frequent tumor cells that were spiked at 100,000 cells/ml into plasma-depleted blood. Anti-EpCAM MBs efficiently (>77% isolated rare mouse breast 4T1, human prostate PC-3 and pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells spiked into 1, 3 and 7 ml (respectively of plasma-depleted blood. Using EpCAM targeted MBs CTCs from metastatic cancer patients were isolated, suggesting that this technique could be developed into a valuable clinical tool for isolation, enumeration and analysis of rare cells.

  11. An EOF analysis of HF Doppler radar current measurements of the Chesapeake Bay buoyant outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmorino, G. O.; Shay, L. K.; Haus, B. K.; Handler, R. A.; Graber, H. C.; Horne, M. P.

    1999-02-01

    Surface currents measured by HF Doppler radar as part of a study of the Chesapeake Bay outflow plume are examined using a 'real-vector' empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis (Kaihatu et al., 1998). Based on about 23 days of nearly continuous data, the analysis shows that the first three EOF modes, judged to be the only significant modes, account for 76% of the variance in the data set. The buoyant outflow occurs primarily in the mean flow field. The first EOF mode is dominated by wind forcing and the second mode by across-shelf semi-diurnal tidal forcing. The third mode exhibits a large-scale horizontal shear and contains a curved region of weak relative flow which appears to delineate the offshore edge of the plume; also, the third-mode response varies over the spring-neap cycle, suggesting a modulation of the outflow plume by a tidal residual eddy. The analysis therefore has provided a useful, exploratory examination of this dataset of surface currents.

  12. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-05-01

    The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory). Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  13. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivdal, M.; Broström, G.; Christensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on how wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis-Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory). Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  14. The motion of a neutrally buoyant particle of an elliptic shape in two dimensional shear flow: a numerical study

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Shih-Lin; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Chu, Chin-Chou

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the motion of a neutrally buoyant cylinder of an elliptic shape freely moving in two dimensional shear flow by direct numerical simulation. An elliptic shape cylinder in shear flow, when initially being placed at the middle between two walls, either keeps rotating or has a stationary inclination angle depending on the particle Reynolds number $Re=G_r r_a^2/\

  15. The Effects of Neutrally Buoyant, Externally Attached Transmitters on Swimming Performance and Predator Avoidance of Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janak, Jill M.; Brown, Richard S.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Pflugrath, Brett D.; Stephenson, John R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Seaburg, Adam

    2012-08-01

    The presence of an externally attached telemetry tag is often associated with the potential for impaired swimming performance (i.e., snags and drag) as well as increased susceptibility to predation, specifically for smaller fish. The effects on swimming performance due to the presence of a neutrally buoyant externally attached acoustic transmitter were examined by comparing critical swimming speeds (Ucrit) for juvenile Chinook salmon tagged with two different neutrally buoyant external transmitters (Type A and B), nontagged individuals, and those surgically implanted with the current JSATS acoustic transmitter. Fish tagged with the Type A and B designs had lower Ucrit when compared to nontagged individuals. However, there was no difference in Ucrit among fish tagged with Type A or B designs compared to those with surgically implanted tags. Further testing was then conducted to determine if predator avoidance ability was affected due to the presence of Type A tags when compared to nontagged fish. No difference was detected in the number of tagged and nontagged fish consumed by rainbow trout throughout the predation trials. The results of this study support the further testing on the efficacy of a neutrally buoyant externally attached telemetry tag for survival studies involving juvenile salmonids passing through hydro turbines.

  16. Passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer: 2. Observations and simulations of microplastic marine debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, K.; Kukulka, T.; Proskurowski, G.; Law, K. L.

    2015-11-01

    This paper is the second of a two-part series that investigates passive buoyant tracers in the ocean surface boundary layer (OSBL). The first part examines the influence of equilibrium wind-waves on vertical tracer distributions, based on large eddy simulations (LESs) of the wave-averaged Navier-Stokes equation. Motivated by observations of buoyant microplastic marine debris (MPMD), this study applies the LES model and the parametric one-dimensional column model from part one to examine the vertical distributions of MPMD. MPMD is widely distributed in vast regions of the subtropical gyres and has emerged as a major open ocean pollutant whose distribution is subject to upper ocean turbulence. The models capture shear-driven turbulence, Langmuir turbulence (LT), and enhanced turbulent kinetic energy input due to breaking waves (BWs). Model results are only consistent with observations of MPMD profiles and the relationship between surface concentrations and wind speed if LT effects are included. Neither BW nor shear-driven turbulence is capable of deeply submerging MPMD, suggesting that the observed vertical MPMD distributions are a characteristic signature of wave-driven LT. Thus, this study demonstrates that LT substantially increases turbulent transport in the OSBL, resulting in deep submergence of buoyant tracers. The parametric model is applied to 11 years of observations in the North Atlantic and North Pacific subtropical gyres to show that surface measurements substantially underestimate MPMD concentrations by a factor of 3-13.

  17. A substrate independent approach for generation of surface gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, surface gradients have attracted significant interest for various research and technological applications. In this paper, we report a facile and versatile method for generating surface gradients of immobilized nanoparticles, nanotopography and ligands that is independent from the substrate material. The method consists of first depositing a functional polymer layer on a substrate and subsequent time controlled immersion of this functionalized substrate in solution gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) or poly (styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Chemical characterization by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and morphological analysis by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) show that the density of nanoparticles and the concentration of PSS across the surface increases in a gradient manner. As expected, time of immersion determines the concentration of surface bound species. We also demonstrate the generation of surface gradients of pure nanotopography. This is achieved by depositing a 5 nm thick plasma polymer layer on top of the number density gradient of nanoparticles to achieve a homogeneous surface chemistry. The surface independent approach for generation of surface gradients presented in this paper may open opportunities for a wider use of surface gradient in research and in various technologies. - Highlights: ► We present a substrate independent approach for generation of surface gradients. ► We demonstrate well-defined density gradients of gold and silver nanoparticles. ► We provide an example of pure surface nanotopography gradients. ► We demonstrate concentration gradients of bound ligands

  18. Electric field gradients in Hg compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arcisauskaité, Vaida; Knecht, Stefan; Sauer, Stephan P. A.;

    2012-01-01

    We examine the performance of Density Functional Theory (DFT) approaches based on the Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonian (with and without inclusion of spinorbit coupling) for predictions of electric ¿eld gradients (EFGs) at the heavy atom Hg nucleus. This is achieved by compar......We examine the performance of Density Functional Theory (DFT) approaches based on the Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonian (with and without inclusion of spinorbit coupling) for predictions of electric ¿eld gradients (EFGs) at the heavy atom Hg nucleus. This is achieved...

  19. Trace Metal and Sulfur Dynamics in the First Meter of Buoyant Hydrothermal Vent Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, A.; Gartman, A.; Shaw, T. J.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of metals and metal sulfides within the buoyant plume is critical to determining the ultimate fate of metals emitted from hydrothermal vents. The concentration, size fractionation, and partitioning of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb) were determined within the first meter of the rising plume at three vent fields (TAG, Snakepit, and Rainbow) along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. At Rainbow, total Fe concentrations exceed total sulfide concentrations by an order of magnitude, whereas at the other two sites, total Fe and total sulfide concentrations are nearly equal. At all three sites, Mn and Fe are primarily in the filtered (< 0.2 μm) fraction and Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, and Pb are mainly in the unfiltered fraction. At TAG and Snakepit, unfiltered copper is correlated with unfiltered cobalt, and unfiltered zinc is correlated with unfiltered cadmium and lead. At Rainbow, unfiltered zinc, cadmium and lead are correlated, but unfiltered copper and cobalt are not, indicating precipitation dynamics at Rainbow are different than those at TAG and Snakepit due to bulk geochemical differences, including a higher iron to sulfide ratio. A sequential HCl/HNO3 leaching method was used to distinguish metals present in pyrite and chalcopyrite in both unfiltered and filtered samples. Significant portions of unfiltered Cu and Co were extracted in HNO3, whereas unfiltered Zn, Cd, and Pb were extracted in HCl. Up to 95 % of filtered Cu, Co, and Zn, up to 80% Cd, and up to 60 % Pb are only extractable in HNO3, indicating that a significant portion of metals < 0.2 μm are incorporated into a recalcitrant fraction such as nanoparticulate pyrite or chalcopyrite.

  20. Formation of Self-Generated Gradients of Iodixanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Graham

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of self-generated gradients of iodixanol from a solution of uniform concentration requires the use of vertical or near-vertical rotors. The density profile that is generated depends upon the sedimentation path length of the rotor, centrifugation time, RCF and temperature. Modulation of the starting concentration changes the density range of the gradient. This Protocol Article illustrates the effect of these parameters on gradient shape in a few selected rotors. Because the gradients are formed by the centrifugal field, they are highly reproducible and easy to execute.

  1. Second gradient poromechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Sciarra, Giulio; Coussy, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Second gradient theories have been developed in mechanics for treating different phenomena as capillarity in fluids, plasticity and friction in granular materials or shear band deformations. Here, there is an attempt of formulating a second gradient Biot like model for porous materials. In particular the interest is focused in describing the local dilatant behaviour of a porous material induced by pore opening elastic and capillary interaction phenomena among neighbouring pores and related micro-filtration phenomena by means of a continuum microstructured model. The main idea is to extend the classical macroscopic Biot model by including in the description second gradient effects. This is done by assuming that the surface contribution to the external work rate functional depends on the normal derivative of the velocity or equivalently assuming that the strain work rate functional depends on the porosity and strain gradients. According to classical thermodynamics suitable restrictions for stresses and second g...

  2. Gradient Particle Magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Maron, Jason L.; Howes, Gregory G.

    2001-01-01

    We introduce Gradient Particle Magnetohydrodynamics (GPM), a new Lagrangian method for magnetohydrodynamics based on gradients corrected for the locally disordered particle distribution. The development of a numerical code for MHD simulation using the GPM algorithm is outlined. Validation tests simulating linear and nonlinear sound waves, linear MHD waves, advection of magnetic fields in a magnetized vortex, hydrodynamical shocks, and three-dimensional collapse are presented, demonstrating th...

  3. A semi-empirical model to predict the probability of capture of buoyant particles by a cylindrical collector through capillarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo, Paolo; Pietro Viero, Daniele; Defina, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    The seeds of many aquatic plants, as well as many propagulae and larvae, are buoyant and transported at the water surface. These particles are therefore subject to surface tension, which may enhance their capture by emergent vegetation through capillary attraction. In this work, we develop a semi-empirical model that predicts the probability that a floating particle is retained by plant stems and branches piercing the water surface, due to capillarity, against the drag force exerted by the flowing water. Specific laboratory experiments are also performed to calibrate and validate the model.

  4. Cell orientation gradients on an inverse opal substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Zou, Xin; Zhao, Ze; Mu, Zhongde; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2015-05-20

    The generation of cell gradients is critical for understanding many biological systems and realizing the unique functionality of many implanted biomaterials. However, most previous work can only control the gradient of cell density and this has no effect on the gradient of cell orientation, which has an important role in regulating the functions of many connecting tissues. Here, we report on a simple stretched inverse opal substrate for establishing desired cell orientation gradients. It was demonstrated that tendon fibroblasts on the stretched inverse opal gradient showed a corresponding alignment along with the elongation gradient of the substrate. This "random-to-aligned" cell gradient reproduces the insertion part of many connecting tissues, and thus, will have important applications in tissue engineering.

  5. Multiscale architectured materials with composition and grain size gradients manufactured using high-pressure torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Yun; Kim, Jung Gi; Park, Hyo Wook; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-05-01

    The concept of multiscale architectured materials is established using composition and grain size gradients. Composition-gradient nanostructured materials are produced from coarse grained interstitial free steels via carburization and high-pressure torsion. Quantitative analyses of the dislocation density using X-ray diffraction and microstructural studies clearly demonstrate the gradients of the dislocation density and grain size. The mechanical properties of the gradient materials are compared with homogeneous nanostructured carbon steel without a composition gradient in an effort to investigate the gradient effect. Based on the above observations, the potential of multiscale architecturing to open a new material property is discussed.

  6. Multiscale architectured materials with composition and grain size gradients manufactured using high-pressure torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Yun; Kim, Jung Gi; Park, Hyo Wook; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-05-27

    The concept of multiscale architectured materials is established using composition and grain size gradients. Composition-gradient nanostructured materials are produced from coarse grained interstitial free steels via carburization and high-pressure torsion. Quantitative analyses of the dislocation density using X-ray diffraction and microstructural studies clearly demonstrate the gradients of the dislocation density and grain size. The mechanical properties of the gradient materials are compared with homogeneous nanostructured carbon steel without a composition gradient in an effort to investigate the gradient effect. Based on the above observations, the potential of multiscale architecturing to open a new material property is discussed.

  7. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  8. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low power microwave cold test and high power, high gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  9. Magnetic Fields in Massive Stars. II. The Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes Through the Radiative Interior

    CERN Document Server

    MacGregor, K B

    2003-01-01

    We present results from an investigation of the dynamical behavior of buoyant magnetic flux rings in the radiative interior of a uniformly rotating early-type star. Our physical model describes a thin, axisymmetric, toroidal flux tube that is released from the outer boundary of the convective core, and is acted upon by buoyant, centrifugal, Coriolis, magnetic tension, and aerodynamic drag forces. We find that rings emitted in the equatorial plane can attain a stationary equilibrium state that is stable with respect to small displacements in radius, but is unstable when perturbed in the meridional direction. Rings emitted at other latitudes travel toward the surface along trajectories that largely parallel the rotation axis of the star. Over much of the ascent, the instantaneous rise speed is determined by the rate of heating by the absorption of radiation that diffuses into the tube from the external medium. Since the time scale for this heating varies like the square of the tube cross-sectional radius, for t...

  10. Uniform gradient expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannini, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.giovannini@cern.ch [Department of Physics, Theory Division, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); INFN, Section of Milan-Bicocca, 20126 Milan (Italy)

    2015-06-30

    Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  11. Learning gradients on manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Sayan; Zhou, Ding-Xuan; 10.3150/09-BEJ206

    2010-01-01

    A common belief in high-dimensional data analysis is that data are concentrated on a low-dimensional manifold. This motivates simultaneous dimension reduction and regression on manifolds. We provide an algorithm for learning gradients on manifolds for dimension reduction for high-dimensional data with few observations. We obtain generalization error bounds for the gradient estimates and show that the convergence rate depends on the intrinsic dimension of the manifold and not on the dimension of the ambient space. We illustrate the efficacy of this approach empirically on simulated and real data and compare the method to other dimension reduction procedures.

  12. Theoretical analysis and semianalytical solutions for a turbulent buoyant hydrogen-air jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Semianalytical solutions are developed for turbulent hydrogen-air plume. We derived analytical expressions for plume centerline variables (radius, velocity, and density deficit) in terms of a single universal function, called plume function. By combining the obtained analytical expressions of centerline variables with empirical Gaussian expressions of the mean variables, we obtain semianalytical expressions for mean quantities of hydrogen-air plume (velocity, density deficit, and mass fraction).

  13. Manipulating the Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaze, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a cooperative learning, group lab for a Calculus III course to facilitate comprehension of the gradient vector and directional derivative concepts. The lab is a hands-on experience allowing students to manipulate a tangent plane and empirically measure the effect of partial derivatives on the direction of optimal ascent. (Contains 7…

  14. Time Rate Gradient Effects and Negative Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miksch, Edmond

    2008-03-01

    The Harvard tower Experiment and tests with accurate atomic clocks show that a clock at a high elevation indicates more elapsed time than a clock at a low elevation, both clocks properly measuring time at their locations. This fact mandates that Newton's first law of motion be rewritten to cite impulse balance rather than force balance. Time rate gradient effects explain how the weight of a precisely vertical and precisely uniform electric field or a precisely vertical and precisely uniform magnetic field is supported in a precisely unidirectional gravitational field. Time rate gradient effects also explain how the weight of a unidirectional gravitational field is reacted. It is confirmed that the mass density of the gravitational field is negative. http://www.TimeRateGradient.com; http://www.Negative-Mass.com; http://www.EinsteinsElevator.com

  15. Energy density of marine pelagic fish eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis-Vestergaard, J.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the literature on pelagic fish eggs enabled generalizations to be made of their energy densities, because the property of being buoyant in sea water appears to constrain the proximate composition of the eggs and thus to minimize interspecific variation. An energy density of 1.34 J mul......(-1) of total egg volume is derived for most species spawning eggs without visible oil globules. The energy density of eggs with oil globules is predicted by (σ) over cap = 1.34 + 40.61 x (J mul(-1)) where x is the fractional volume of the oil globule. (C) 2002 The Fisheries Society of the British...... Isles. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved...

  16. Dropwise Condensation on a Radial Gradient Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    In transient dropwise condensation from steam onto a cool surface, distributions of drops evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence. This study examines how surface functionalization affects drop growth and coalescence. Surfaces are treated by silanization to deliver either a spatially uniform contact-angle (hydrophilic, neutral, and hydrophobic) or a radial gradient of contact-angles. The time evolution of number-density and associated drop-size distributions are reported. For a typical condensation experiment on a uniform angle surface, the number-density curves show two regimes: an initial increase in number-density as a result of nucleation and a subsequent decrease in number-density as a result of larger scale coalescence events. Without a removal mechanism, the fractional coverage, regardless of treatment, approaches unity. For the same angle-surface, the associated drop-size distributions progress through four different shapes along the growth curve. In contrast, for a radial gradient surface where removal by sweeping occurs, the number-density increases and then levels off to a value close to the maximum number-density that is well below unity coverage and only two shapes of distributions are observed. Implications for heat transfer will be discussed. This work was supported by a NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  17. Constrained length minimum inductance gradient coil design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronik, B A; Rutt, B K

    1998-02-01

    A gradient coil design algorithm capable of controlling the position of the homogeneous region of interest (ROI) with respect to the current-carrying wires is required for many advanced imaging and spectroscopy applications. A modified minimum inductance target field method that allows the placement of a set of constraints on the final current density is presented. This constrained current minimum inductance method is derived in the context of previous target field methods. Complete details are shown and all equations required for implementation of the algorithm are given. The method has been implemented on computer and applied to the design of both a 1:1 aspect ratio (length:diameter) central ROI and a 2:1 aspect ratio edge ROI gradient coil. The 1:1 design demonstrates that a general analytic method can be used to easily obtain very short gradient coil designs for use with specialized magnet systems. The edge gradient design demonstrates that designs that allow imaging of the neck region with a head sized gradient coil can be obtained, as well as other applications requiring edge-of-cylinder regions of uniformity.

  18. Gradient Bundle Analysis: A Full Topological Approach to Chemical Bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Morgenstern, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The "chemical bond" is a central concept in molecular sciences, but there is no consensus as to what a bond actually is. Therefore, a variety of bonding models have been developed, each defining the structure of molecules in a different manner with the goal of explaining and predicting chemical properties. This thesis describes the initial development of gradient bundle analysis (GBA), a chemical bonding model that creates a high resolution picture of chemical interactions within the charge density framework. GBA is based on concepts from the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), but uses a more complete picture of the topology and geometry of the electron charge density to understand and predict bonding interactions. Gradient bundles are defined as volumes bounded by zero-flux surfaces (ZFSs) in the gradient of the charge density with well-defined energies. The structure of gradient bundles provides an avenue for detecting the locations of valence electrons, which correspond to reactive regions in a ...

  19. Rates of photocatalytic oxidation of crude oil on salt water on buoyant, cenosphere-attached titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rate of TiO2-photocatalyzed oxidation of crude oils spilled on aqueous 0.5 M NaCA was determined by measuring the rate of O2 uptake. The photocatalyst was attached to 100-μm-diameter fly-ash-derived buoyant cenospheres. Partial hydrophobic coating of the cenospheres assured their retention at the air-oil interface. The rate depended on the near-UV (broad band, 365-nm peak) irradiance below 25W m-2, but varied only mildly with irradiance in the 25-45 W m-2 range. It increased upon wave motion imitating agitation of the liquid, and upon increase of the cenosphere:oil mass ratio. It varied only mildly for different crudes. From the measured rates, cleanup times as short as 5-10 days were estimated

  20. Behavior of near-field dilution of thermal buoyant jet discharged horizontally in compound open-channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The RNG к-ε model considering the buoyancy effect,which is solved by the hybrid finite analytic method,is used to simulate the mixture of the horizontal round thermal buoyant jet in compound open channel flow.The mixing features near the spout and flowing characteristic of the secondary currents are studied by numerical simulation.Meanwhile,(1) the distribution of the measured isovels for stream-wise velocity,(2) secondary currents,(3) the distribution of the measured isovels for temperature of typical cross-section near the spout,were obtained by the three-dimensional Micro ADV and the Temperature measuring device.Compared with experimental data,the RNG к-εmodel based on buoyancy effect can preferably simulate the jet which performs the bifurcation phenomenon,jet reattachment (Conada effect) and beach secondary currents phenomenon with the effect of ambient flow,buoyancy,and secondary currents of compound section and so on.

  1. Formulation and In Vitro evaluation of pH sensitive oil entrapped polymeric blended gellan gum buoyant beads of clarithromycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Tripathi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available "n  "nBackground and the purpose of the study: A gastroretentive pH sensitive system has been a frontier approach to release the drug in controlled manner in stomach and duodenum. The aim of this study was to develop buoyant beads of gellan based, wherein, the oil was entrapped, blended with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose or carbopol 934 in order to evaluate its potential for targeted sustained delivery of clarithromycin in the gastric region. "nMethods: Buoyant beads of gellan was developed by inotropic gelation technique using calcium carbonate as gas forming agent and the drug polymer dispersion was emulsified with mineral oil. The oil was entrapped and blended with hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose or carbopol 934. The developed beads were evaluated in terms of diameter, % floating, encapsulation efficiency, In vitro drug release, In vivo gastric residence efficacy and clarithromycine concentration in the mucosa of the experimental animal model. "nResults: The scanning electron microscope photograph indicated that the prepared beads were spherical in shape and buoyancy, encapsulation efficiency and drug content obtained from all batches were satisfactory. Particle size and percentage buoyancy of the gel beads increased by raising the concentration of calcium carbonate. The formulation exhibited sustained release profile and was best fitted in the Peppas model with n < 0.45. Subsequent coating of microbeads exhibited zero-order sustained pattern of the drug release up to 8 hrs. Batch B4 showed comparatively better residence and the drug concentration in the gastric mucosa of the treated animals. Conclusion:The result provides evidence that the prepared optimized formulation may be used effectively for pH sensitive gastric targeted antibiotic such as clarithromycin.

  2. A field evaluation of an external and neutrally buoyant acoustic transmitter for juvenile salmon: implications for estimating hydroturbine passage survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Brown

    Full Text Available Turbine-passed fish are exposed to rapid decreases in pressure which can cause barotrauma. The presence of an implanted telemetry tag increases the likelihood of injury or death from exposure to pressure changes, thus potentially biasing studies evaluating survival of turbine-passed fish. Therefore, a neutrally buoyant externally attached tag was developed to eliminate this bias in turbine passage studies. This new tag was designed not to add excess mass in water or take up space in the coelom, having an effective tag burden of zero with the goal of reducing pressure related biases to turbine survival studies. To determine if this new tag affects fish performance or susceptibility to predation, it was evaluated in the field relative to internally implanted acoustic transmitters (JSATS; Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System used widely for survival studies of juvenile salmonids. Survival and travel time through the study reach was compared between fish with either tag type in an area of high predation in the Snake and Columbia rivers, Washington. An additional group of fish affixed with neutrally-buoyant dummy external tags were implanted with passive integrated transponder (PIT tags and recovered further downstream to assess external tag retention and injury. There were no significant differences in survival to the first detection site, 12 river kilometers (rkm downstream of release. Travel times were also similar between groups. Conversely, externally-tagged fish had reduced survival (or elevated tag loss to the second detection site, 65 rkm downstream. In addition, the retention study revealed that tag loss was first observed in fish recaptured approximately 9 days after release. Results suggest that this new tag may be viable for short term (<8 days single-dam turbine-passage studies and under these situations, may alleviate the turbine passage-related bias encountered when using internal tags, however further research is needed to

  3. Increasing SLEDed Linac Gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Zoltan D

    2001-11-08

    This note will show how to increase the SLED [1] gradient by varying Q{sub e}, the external Q of the SLED cavity, by increasing its Q{sub 0} and by increasing the compression ratio. If varying the external Q is to be effective, then the copper losses should be small so that Q{sub 0} >> Q{sub e}. Methods of varying Q{sub e} will be indicated but no experimental data will be presented. If we increase the klystron pulse width from 3.5 to 5 {micro}S and increase Q{sub 0} from the present 100000 to 300000, then the gradient increases by 19% and the beam energy increases from 50 to 60 GeV. This note will also discuss SLED operation at 11424 MHz, the NLC frequency. Without Q{sub e} switching, using SLED at 11424 MHz increases the SLAC gradient from 21 MV/m to 34 MV/m, and at the same repetition rate, uses about 1/5 of rf average power. If we also double the compression ratio, we reach 47 MV/m and over 100 GeV beam energy.

  4. Dropwise condensation on a cold gradient substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2012-11-01

    Distributions of drops that arise from dropwise condensation evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence of drops. An understanding of how surface-energy gradients applied to the substrate affect drop growth and coalescence is needed for design of effective surfaces for large-scale dropwise condensation. Transient dropwise condensation from a vapor phase onto a cold and chemically treated surface is reported. The surfaces were treated to deliver either a uniform contact-angle or a gradient of contact-angles by silanization. The time evolution of drop-size and number-density distributions is reported. For a typical condensation experiment, the drop distributions advance through two stages: an increase in drop density as a result of nucleation and a decrease in drop density as a result of larger scale coalescence events. Because the experiment is transient in nature, the shape of the distribution can be used to predict the number of drop generations and their stage of development. Preliminary results for gradient surfaces will be discussed and compared against observations of behavior on uniformly coated surfaces. NASA Space Technology Research Fellowship (NSTRF).

  5. Reinforcement Learning by Value Gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Fairbank, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The concept of the value-gradient is introduced and developed in the context of reinforcement learning. It is shown that by learning the value-gradients exploration or stochastic behaviour is no longer needed to find locally optimal trajectories. This is the main motivation for using value-gradients, and it is argued that learning value-gradients is the actual objective of any value-function learning algorithm for control problems. It is also argued that learning value-gradients is significantly more efficient than learning just the values, and this argument is supported in experiments by efficiency gains of several orders of magnitude, in several problem domains. Once value-gradients are introduced into learning, several analyses become possible. For example, a surprising equivalence between a value-gradient learning algorithm and a policy-gradient learning algorithm is proven, and this provides a robust convergence proof for control problems using a value function with a general function approximator.

  6. Application of Semen Preparation by the Density Gradient Centrifugation Technique Combined with the Swim- Up Method in Vitro Fertilization and Embryo Transfer with Donor Semen%密度梯度离心联合上游法的精液处理在供精体外受精胚胎移植中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭玉梅; 宋革; 祝晓丽; 郑炜炜

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察供精体外受精-胚胎移植术(D-IVF)中采用密度梯度离心法联合上游法处理精液后的胚胎情况。方法:回顾本院2013年1月-2014年7月D-IVF 135个周期,观察冷冻精液复苏后经采用密度梯度离心法联合上游法处理后精子总活动率、前向运动精子活动率等精液情况,以及受精以后的受精率、卵裂率、临床妊娠率,对照组为同期46个因丈夫梗阻性无精行ICSI的周期。结果:处理后精子总活动率、前向运动精子活动率均大大提高,但是精子密度却大大下降,处理前后比较差异均有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论:密度梯度离心法联合上游法的精液处理方法在D-IVF中是一种稳定可行的方法。%Objective:To observe embryonic development by using sperm selection prepared by the density gradient centrifugation technique combined with the swim-up method in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer with donor semen(D-IVF). Method:135 cases of routine D-IVF were retrospective analyzed from January 2013 to July 2014. The sperm condense,total activity rate and progressive motility were observed after sperm recovery and sperm selection. The fertilization rate,cleavage rate, high-quality embryo rate and pregnancy rate were compared by the 135 cases and the control groups consist of 46 cases of ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection)with husband semen. Result:After treatment,the total activity rate of sperm and the sperm activity rate were significantly increased,but the sperm density was significantly decreased,the differences were statistically significant(P0.05).Conclusion:The density gradient centrifugation technique combined withthe swim-up method is a stable and feasible method in D-IVF.

  7. The effects of first-order strain gradient in micro piezoelectric-bimorph power harvesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuantai; Wang, Jining; Yang, Feng; Xue, Huan; Hu, Hongping; Wang, Ji

    2011-04-01

    The effects of first-order strain gradient in micro piezoelectric-bimorph (PB) power harvesters are investigated by including the first-order gradient terms in the energy density functions. For a PB, the gradient effects can be focused on the analysis of the strain gradient effect in the thickness direction through choosing the strains and the electric displacements as the independent constitutive variables. It is shown theoretically that the first-order gradient effects have raised the natural frequency of the PB and effectively enhanced the output power density of the harvester. PMID:21507763

  8. The Differential Virial Theorem with Gradient Formulas for the Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Finley, James P

    2016-01-01

    A gradient dependent formula is derived for the spinless one-particle density-matrix operator z from the differential virial theorem. A gradient dependent formula is also derived for a spinless one-particle density-matrix operator that can replace the two operators of the differential virial theorem that arise from the kinetic energy operator. Other operators are also derived that can replace the operators mentioned above in the differential virial theorem; these operators depend on the real part of spinless one-particle density-matrix.

  9. Gedanken Densities and Exact Constraints in Density Functional Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Perdew, John P; Sun, Jianwei; Burke, Kieron

    2014-01-01

    Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is no...

  10. A multiscale gradient-dependent plasticity model for size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Hao; Taheri-Nassaj, Nasrin; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical behaviour of polycrystalline material is closely correlated to grain size. In this study, we investigate the size-dependent phenomenon in multi-phase steels using a continuum dislocation dynamic model coupled with viscoplastic self-consistent model. We developed a dislocation-based strain gradient plasticity model and a stress gradient plasticity model, as well as a combined model, resulting in a theory that can predict size effect over a wide range of length scales. Results show that strain gradient plasticity and stress gradient plasticity are complementary rather than competing theories. The stress gradient model is dominant at the initial strain stage, and is much more effective for predicting yield strength than the strain gradient model. For larger deformations, the strain gradient model is dominant and more effective for predicting size-dependent hardening. The numerical results are compared with experimental data and it is found that they have the same trend for the yield stress. Furthermore, the effect of dislocation density at different strain stages is investigated, and the findings show that the Hall-Petch relation holds for the initial strain stage and breaks down for higher strain levels. Finally, a power law to describe the size effect and the transition zone between the strain gradient and stress gradient dominated regions is developed.

  11. An experimental study on the formation of negatively-buoyant vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jeff X.; Hunt, Gary R.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments to examine the formation of dense saline vortex rings projected vertically upwards into a quiescent freshwater environment were conducted. The setup was designed to dispense a cylindrical column of source fluid with aspect ratio L / D (the length L of dispensed saline column to the nozzle diameter D) over a pre-set time interval. In an effort to execute an impulsive start and finish, a controlled flow circulation driven by a gear pump was developed to approximate a top-hat profile of source exit velocity versus time. Our measurements focus on describing the evolving morphology of the vortex rings with time and with source conditions (L / D and source Froude number). Our results reveal distinct formation regimes and our estimates of time required for formation as a function of density difference confirm predictions from previously published numerical simulations. The volume-based approach we adopt provides potentially a new angle for investigating the physics of these flows.

  12. Strain gradient crystal plasticity: A continuum mechanics approach to modeling micro-structural evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2015-01-01

    In agreement with dislocation theory, recent experiments show, both quantitatively and qualitatively, how geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) distribute in dislocation wall and cell structures. Hence, GND density fields are highly localized with large gradients and discontinuities occurring...... between the cells. This behavior is not typical for strain gradient crystal plasticity models. The present study employs a higher order extension of conventional crystal plasticity theory in which the viscous slip rate is influenced by the gradients of GND densities through a back stress...

  13. 应用硫酸鱼精蛋白处理蔗糖密度梯度超速离心高度纯化流行性乙型脑炎灭活疫苗(非洲绿猴肾细胞)%Purification of Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine from Vero Cell by Protamine Sulfate and Sucrose Density Gradient Ultracentrifugation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨国松; 韦娟; 姜建; 丁志芬

    2011-01-01

    Objective To prepare a purified inactivated Japanese encephalitis vaccine (JEV) by ultracentrifugation. Methods Japanese encephalitis supernatant was collected from bioreactor. After concentrated by ultra-filtration and inactivated by formaldehyde, the inactivated virus suspension was treated with protamine sulfate and purified by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. The sucrose was removed by ultra-filtration. Results The residual of vero cells deaxyribonucleic acid(DNA) was reduced to 10pg/dose and total protein content was reduced to lμg/dose, the host cell protein was decreased to 15ng/dose, and satisfied recovery was obtained. Conclusion A purified inactivated JEV was prepared by optimizing condition of protamine sulfate treatment and sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation purification.%目的 通过离心试验,制备出一种高纯度的流行性乙型脑炎(乙脑)灭活纯化疫苗(非洲绿猴肾细胞)[Purified Inactivated Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine (Vero Cell),JEV].方法 生物反应器培养的Vero细胞乙脑病毒液,超滤浓缩、甲醛灭活后,应用硫酸鱼精蛋白处理,再经过高速离心,蔗糖密度梯度超速离心纯化,超滤除糖,配制成JEV(Vero细胞).结果 经检测,疫苗中Vero细胞脱氧核糖核酸残留量≤10pg(皮克,Picogram)/剂,蛋白含量≤1μg(微克)/剂,宿主蛋白残留量≤30ng(纳克,Nanogram)/ml,并获得较高的抗原回收率.结论 经过优化硫酸鱼精蛋白处理和蔗糖密度梯度超速离心纯化,制得了高纯度的JEV(Vero细胞).

  14. 密度梯度分离/免疫荧光技术检测再生水中隐孢子虫和贾第鞭毛虫%Detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in reclaimed wastewater systems using immunofluorescence assay and density gradient separation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈智敏; 张昱; 杨敏; 肖淑敏; 张冬青; 李红岩; 郭瑞光

    2011-01-01

    采用乙酸乙酯漂浮方法和酸溶解法分别解决了再生水进水中有机杂质以及再生水中剩余絮凝剂干扰隐孢子虫和贾第鞭毛虫检测的关键问题,在此基础上,建立了成本远低于EPA 1623法的隐孢子虫和贾第鞭毛虫检测方法的密度梯度分离/免疫荧光技术.利用该方法对我国北方2个城市的污水再生处理系统进行了检测,再生水进出水的回收率分别为18%~31%卵囊和24%~95%包囊,能够满足检测要求.结果表明,在5个再生水系统的9个进水样品中,隐孢子虫的阳性率为89%,平均浓度为26个/10 L;贾第鞭毛虫的阳性率为100%,平均浓度为138个/10 L.再生水出水中也有两虫检出.%For the reclaimed influents and the reclaimed effluents with excess coagulant, the ethyl acetate floatation and acid dissociation were suggested to be added to enhance the purification and increase the recovery,respectively. Then an immunofluorescence assay and density gradient separation method for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts, was developed in reclaimed wastewater systems. The Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts of reclaimed wastewaters were detected in T and B cities in north China using immunofluorescence assay and density gradient separation method. The acceptable recoveries obtained from reclaimed influents and effluents were in the range of 18%~31% oocysts and 24% ~95% cysts. The results showed that Cryptosporidium were detected in 89% samples with mean concentration of 26 oocysts/10 L,while Giardia were detected in 100% samples with mean concentration of 138 cysts/10 L in the influents of 5 reclaimed wastewater systems. Besides, Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts were also present in the effluents of some reclaimed wastewater systems.

  15. Doubled Power Density from Salinity Gradients at Reduced Intermembrane Distance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, David A.; Saakes, Michel; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    2011-01-01

    The mixing of sea and river water can be used as a renewable energy source. The Gibbs free energy that is released when salt and fresh water mix can be captured in a process called reverse electrodialysis (RED). This research investigates the effect of the intermembrane distance and the feedwater fl

  16. Charge gradient microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seungbum; Tong, Sheng; Park, Woon Ik; Hiranaga, Yoshiomi; Cho, Yasuo; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Here we present a simple and fast method to reliably image polarization charges using charge gradient microscopy (CGM). We collected the current from the grounded CGM probe while scanning a periodically poled lithium niobate single crystal and single-crystal LiTaO3 thin film on the Cr electrode. We observed current signals at the domains and domain walls originating from the displacement current and the relocation or removal of surface charges, which enabled us to visualize the ferroelectric domains at a scan frequency above 78 Hz over 10 μm. We envision that CGM can be used in high-speed ferroelectric domain imaging and piezoelectric energy-harvesting devices. PMID:24760831

  17. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  18. Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N.L.

    1983-11-10

    Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

  19. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, T.; Einarsson, J.; Nordmark, A.; Aidun, C. K.; Lundell, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-12-01

    We numerically analyze the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem, we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number Rea. As Rea→0 and as the box size of the system tends to infinity, we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in Rea for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are substantial finite-size corrections to the analytical results obtained for the unbounded system. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice Boltzmann simulations to analyze the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio λc≈0.137 below which tumbling is stable (as well as log rolling). The simulation results show a bifurcation line in the λ -Rea plane that reaches λ ≈0.1275 at the smallest shear Reynolds number (Rea=1 ) at which we could simulate with the lattice Boltzmann code, in qualitative agreement with the analytical results.

  20. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, T; Nordmark, A; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2015-01-01

    We numerically analyse the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number, ${\\rm Re}_a$. As ${\\rm Re}_a \\to 0$ and as the box size of the system tends to infinity we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in ${\\rm Re}_a$ for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are corrections to the analytical result of order ${\\rm Re}_a^{3/2}$. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice-Boltzmann simulations to analyse the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio $\\lambda_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.137$ below which tumbling ...

  1. Multi-Parametric Study of Rising 3D Buoyant Flux Tubes in an Adiabatic Stratification Using AMR

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01

    We study the buoyant rise of magnetic flux tubes embedded in an adiabatic stratification using two-and three-dimensional, MHD simulations. We analyze the dependence of the tube evolution on the field line twist and on the curvature of the tube axis in different diffusion regimes. To be able to achieve a comparatively high spatial resolution we use the FLASH code, which has a built-in Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) capability. Our 3D experiments reach Reynolds numbers that permit a reasonable comparison of the results with those of previous 2D simulations. When the experiments are run without AMR, hence with a comparatively large diffusivity, the amount of longitudinal magnetic flux retained inside the tube increases with the curvature of the tube axis. However, when a low-diffusion regime is reached by using the AMR algorithms, the magnetic twist is able to prevent the splitting of the magnetic loop into vortex tubes and the loop curvature does not play any significant role. We detect the generation of vortic...

  2. A novel technique to neutralize the Yawing moment due to asymmetric thrust in a hybrid buoyant aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Anwar U

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dorsal fin is used in swimming animals like shark for the generation of thrust as well as to meet the requirement of the lateral stability. In the case of aircraft, rudders are normally used for the said requirement. In the present work, this nature inspired idea is explored for its application to neutralize the unavoidable asymmetric thrust produced by the twin engines of a hybrid buoyant aircraft. First, the estimation of asymmetric thrust is obtained with the help of analytical techniques for maximum thrust condition at 4 degree angle of attack. The moment generated by it is utilized for the sizing of a dorsal fin which looks similar to a tapered wing and is placed aft of the center of gravity. Wind tunnel testing at subsonic speed is carried out to explore the design features of this rotatable dorsal fin. It is found that a small rotation of 5 degree can generate the required moment. However, such rotation requires a complete pneumatic/electro-mechanical system and an alternative of it is to use a cambered airfoil for the dorsal fin installed at fixed location. Such a flow controlling device can also be used as an antenna mast, which is commonly installed out the fuselage of the aircraft for communication purposes. Moreover, by incorporating this technique, a pilot doesn’t have to put an extra effort to make the aircraft stable in the presence of side wind.

  3. A novel technique to neutralize the Yawing moment due to asymmetric thrust in a hybrid buoyant aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Anwar U.; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.; Sulaeman, Erwin; J. S Ali, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Dorsal fin is used in swimming animals like shark for the generation of thrust as well as to meet the requirement of the lateral stability. In the case of aircraft, rudders are normally used for the said requirement. In the present work, this nature inspired idea is explored for its application to neutralize the unavoidable asymmetric thrust produced by the twin engines of a hybrid buoyant aircraft. First, the estimation of asymmetric thrust is obtained with the help of analytical techniques for maximum thrust condition at 4 degree angle of attack. The moment generated by it is utilized for the sizing of a dorsal fin which looks similar to a tapered wing and is placed aft of the center of gravity. Wind tunnel testing at subsonic speed is carried out to explore the design features of this rotatable dorsal fin. It is found that a small rotation of 5 degree can generate the required moment. However, such rotation requires a complete pneumatic/electro-mechanical system and an alternative of it is to use a cambered airfoil for the dorsal fin installed at fixed location. Such a flow controlling device can also be used as an antenna mast, which is commonly installed out the fuselage of the aircraft for communication purposes. Moreover, by incorporating this technique, a pilot doesn't have to put an extra effort to make the aircraft stable in the presence of side wind.

  4. Eruption versus intrusion? Arrest of propagation of constant volume, buoyant, liquid-filled cracks in an elastic, brittle host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taisne, B.; Tait, S.

    2009-06-01

    When a volume of magma is released from a source at depth, one key question is whether or not this will culminate in an eruption or in the emplacement of a shallow intrusion. We address some of the physics behind this question by describing and interpreting laboratory experiments on the propagation of cracks filled with fixed volumes of buoyant liquid in a brittle, elastic host. Experiments were isothermal, and the liquid was incompressible. The cracks propagated vertically because of liquid buoyancy but were then found to come to a halt at a configuration of static mechanical equilibrium, a result that is inconsistent with the prediction of the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics in two dimensions. We interpret this result as due to a three-dimensional effect. At the curved crack front, horizontal cracking is necessary in order for vertical propagation to take place. As the crack elongates and thins, the former becomes progressively harder and, in the end, impossible to fracture. We present a scaling law for the final length and breadth of cracks as a function of a governing dimensionless parameter, constructed from the liquid volume, the buoyancy, and host fracture toughness. An important implication of this result is that a minimum volume of magma is required for a volcanic eruption to occur for a given depth of magma reservoir.

  5. Large Scale Gas Mixing and Stratification Triggered by a Buoyant Plume With and Without Occurrence of Condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The benefits of using codes with 3-D capabilities to address safety issues of LWRs will be applicable to both the current generation of nuclear reactors as well to future ALWRs. The phenomena governing the containment response in case of some postulated severe accident scenarios include gas (air, hydrogen, steam) stratification in the containment, gas distribution between containment compartments, wall condensation, etc. These phenomena are driven by buoyant high momentum injection (jets) and/or low momentum injection (plumes). For instance, mixing in the immediate vicinity of the postulated line break is mainly dominated by very high velocity efflux, while low-momentum flows are responsible for most of the transport processes within the containment. A project named SETH is currently in progress under the auspices of 15 OECD countries, with the aim of creating an experimental database suitable to assess the 3-D code capabilities in analyzing key-physical phenomena relevant for LWR safety analysis. This paper describes some results of two SETH tests, performed in the PANDA facility (located at PSI in Switzerland), focusing on plumes flowing near a containment wall. The plumes are generated by injecting a constant amount of steam in one of two interconnected vessels initially filled with air. In one of the two tests the temperature of the injected steam and the initial containment wall and fluid temperatures allowed for condensation during the test. (authors)

  6. Pore-Scale Modeling of Reactive-Multiphase-Buoyant Flow for Carbon Capture and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, S.; Cunningham, J. A.; Trotz, M.; Thomas, M. W.; Stewart, M.

    2010-12-01

    Physical and geochemical processes at multiple scales are yet to be understood for the storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in aquifers and the concomitant mitigation of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. In deep saline aquifers, the pores in the potential aquifers for CO2 storage are initially filled with saline water (brine). The entrapment of brine in pores after injection of CO2 is controlled by capillary forces and by the inertial force driving CO2 inside the carbonate aquifer. The entrapped/residual brine will be a site for geochemical reactions which could alter the pore network and/or the permeability of the formation. Therefore, the pore-scale understanding of displacement of resident brine by CO2 is critical to evaluate the storage efficiency of carbonate aquifers and to quantify any dissolution or precipitation of minerals (e.g., gypsum, calcite, dolomite). In this project, we have developed a multiphase flow model, based on the lattice Boltzmann equation, that can describe pore-scale displacement of brine by invading CO2. The multiphase flow model is applied to three different pore networks saturated with brine. The amount of brine trapped after invasion of the domain by CO2 is strongly dependent on the pore network. We also examine the effects of CO2 density and viscosity (which depend on formation temperature and pressure) on the amount of entrapped brine. Only by resolving the flow at the pore scale can we predict the residual brine saturation and other parameters which control CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers. Future work will focus on coupling the pore-scale multiphase flow model to a chemistry model to predict mineral dissolution and precipitation.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Buoyant Pulsating Exchange Flow through Circular Opening in Horizontal Partition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gera

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An interesting transport phenomenon is observed through openings between two compartments separated by a thin, vented, horizontal partition such as those between containment internals in nuclear power systems, in industrial installations in event of fire, passive cooling of heated structures and in natural building ventilation. A heavier fluid located on the top of a lighter fluid and separated by a horizontal vent constitutes a gravitationally unstable system. Horizontal vents produce flow, which are unstable with irregular oscillatory behavior. The objective of the present work was to simulate such type of flow across a circular opening in horizontal partition in presence of buoyancy force. Unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations have been solved with Finite Volume Method. The equations were solved using the in-house CFD code based upon the well-established pressure-based finite volume methodology. In terms of temporal differencing second order accurate Crank-Nicolson scheme was used. Interpolation to cell faces for the convective terms was performed using a third order QUICK scheme, second order central differencing was used for the viscous terms. Pressure-velocity coupling was based on the SIMPLE procedure. The upper chamber was filled with salt water and the lower chamber with fresh water, creating a density differential between the two chambers. Opposing forces at the interface created a gravitationally unstable system, and an oscillating exchange of fluid developed. Three different cases for vent length to diameter ratio (L/D 0.008, 0.0376 and 0.106 from a reported experiment were examined. The pulsation frequencies and their decay with time have been determined. The flow coefficients were computed and compared with experimental results.

  8. Rigidity of gradient Ricci Solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Peter; Wylie, William

    2007-01-01

    We define a gradient Ricci soliton to be rigid if it is a flat bundle $% N\\times_{\\Gamma}\\mathbb{R}^{k}$ where $N$ is Einstein. It is known that not all gradient solitons are rigid. Here we offer several natural conditions on the curvature that characterize rigid gradient solitons. Other related results on rigidity of Ricci solitons are also explained in the last section.

  9. Gradients in the Number of Species at Reef-Seagrass Ecotones Explained by Gradients in Abundance

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Tuya; Vanderklift, Mathew A.; Thomas Wernberg; Thomsen, Mads S.

    2011-01-01

    Gradients in the composition and diversity (e.g. number of species) of faunal assemblages are common at ecotones between juxtaposed habitats. Patterns in the number of species, however, can be confounded by patterns in abundance of individuals, because more species tend to be found wherever there are more individuals. We tested whether proximity to reefs influenced patterns in the composition and diversity ('species density'  =  number of species per area and 'species richness'  =  number of ...

  10. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. Three practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed. PMID:24409142

  11. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  12. Damping of toroidal ion temperature gradient modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    The temporal evolution of linear toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes is studied based on a kinetic integral equation including an initial condition. It is shown how to evaluate the analytic continuation of the integral kernel as a function of a complex-valued frequency, which is useful for analytical and numerical calculations of the asymptotic damping behavior of the ITG mode. In the presence of the toroidal {nabla}B-curvature drift, the temporal dependence of the density and potential perturbations consists of normal modes and a continuum mode, which correspond to contributions from poles and from an integral along a branch cut, respectively, of the Laplace-transformed potential function of the complex-valued frequency. The normal modes have exponential time dependence with frequencies and growth rates determined by the dispersion relation while the continuum mode, which has a ballooning structure, shows a power law decay {proportional_to} t{sup -2} in the asymptotic limit, where t is the time variable. Therefore, the continuum mode dominantly describes the long-time asymptotic behavior of the density and potential perturbations for the stable system where all normal modes have negative growth rates. By performing proper analytic continuation for the homogeneous version of the kinetic integral equation, dependences of the normal modes` growth rate, real frequency, and eigenfunction on {eta}{sub i} (the ratio of the ion temperature gradient to the density gradient), k{sub {theta}} (the poloidal wavenumber), s (the magnetic shear parameter), and {theta}{sub k} (the ballooning angle corresponding to the minimum radial wavenumber) are numerically obtained for both stable and unstable cases. (author)

  13. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is worthwhile considering that only some 30 species make up the bulk of the bacterial population in human faeces at any one time based on the classical cultivation-based approach. The situation in the rumen is similar. Thus, it is practical to focus on specific groups of interest within the complex community. These may be the predominant or the most active species, specific physiological groups or readily identifiable (genetic) clusters of phylogenetically related organisms. Several 16S rDNA fingerprinting techniques can be invaluable for selecting and monitoring sequences or phylogenetic groups of interest and are described below. Over the past few decades, considerable attention was focussed on the identification of pure cultures of microbes on the basis of genetic polymorphisms of DNA encoding rRNA such as ribotyping, amplified fragment length polymorphism and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. However, many of these methods require prior cultivation and are less suitable for use in analysis of complex mixed populations although important in describing cultivated microbial diversity in molecular terms. Much less attention was given to molecular characterization of complex communities. In particular, research into diversity and community structure over time has been revolutionized by the advent of molecular fingerprinting techniques for complex communities. Denaturing or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE/TGGE) methods have been successfully applied to the analysis of human, pig, cattle, dog and rodent intestinal populations

  14. Experimental research on Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the multi-layered fluids interfaces with different density gradients%不同密度梯度的多层流体界面上的Richt myer-Meshkov不稳定性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施红辉; 杜凯; 王超; 章利特; 贾会霞; 董若凌

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on our previous study of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability research of a gas-liquid interface. Using the fluids with different densities, one can build two kinds of three-phase interfaces of gas-liquid-liquid, I. E. , gas-silicone oil-water and gas-alco-hol-silicone oil interfaces, which have totally different direction of viscosity gradient. In the experiment, we use nitrogen gas as the high pressure driving gas and measure the development of spike height and bubble depth from these two interfaces at different shock wave Mach numbers. After analyzing all the experimental data we find some regular flow patterns. Then we compare the regular pattern with the results that we have already known. Meanwhile, the difference between the two kinds of three-phase interfaces in R-M instability development is also studied in this paper. The result shows that when the liquid viscosity gradient direction is agreed with the shock wave motion direction, the instability of the interface and the turbulent mixing become more significant.%在气-液界面Richtmyer-Meshkov(R-M)不稳定性研究的基础上,利用不同流体间密度的差异,构造了空气-硅油-水、空气-酒精-硅油两种流体粘度方向迥异的气-液-液三相界面,实验中以氮气作为高压驱动气体,在不同激波马赫数下对这两种界面R-M不稳定性后期尖钉与气泡区发展进行了测量与统计,通过对实验数据的分析,得出了相关规律,并用这些规律与已有的单层气-液界面R-M不稳定性研究成果作比较,得出了异同点.同时,还研究了两种三相界面在R-M不稳定发展中的差异.实验结果表明:当流体的粘度梯度方向(从小到大的方向)与激波方向一致时,界面失稳更加明显,湍流混合更为显著.

  15. Electric field gradients in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the recent works on electric field gradient in metals is given. The main emphasis is put on the temperature dependence of the electric field gradient in nonmagnetic metals. Some methods of investigation of this effect using nuclear probes are described. One of them is nuclear accoustic resonance method. (S.B.)

  16. On the solution of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations by the conjugate gradient method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egido, J.L. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Lessing, J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Martin, V. [Analisis Numerico, Facultad de Informatica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, E-28660 Boadilla del Monte, Madrid (Spain); Robledo, L.M. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica

    1995-11-06

    The conjugate gradient method is formulated in the Hilbert space for density and non-density dependent Hamiltonians. We apply it to the solution of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations with constraints. As a numerical application we show calculations with the finite range density dependent Gogny force. The number of iterations required to reach convergence is reduced by a factor of three to four as compared with the standard gradient method. (orig.).

  17. Temperature Gradients on the Cell Wall in the Critical Viscosity Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Robert F.; Moldover, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Because of the diverging susceptibility delta rho/delta Tau near the liquid-vapor critical point, temperature gradients must be kept small to maintain adequate sample homogeneity. In our Science Requirements Document we paid particular attention to radial density gradients caused by equilibration of the xenon sample. Axial density gradients were addressed through the requirement that the cell's copper wall have a gradient less than 22 microK/m. This report re-examines the cell wall's temperature distribution in more detail by estimating all known significant contributions to temperature differences on the cell's wall.

  18. Analysis of cell locomotion on ligand gradient substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza S; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2009-06-01

    Directional cell motility plays a key role in many biological processes like morphogenesis, inflammation, wound repair, angiogenesis, immune response, and tumor metastasis. Cells respond to the gradient in surface ligand density by directed locomotion towards the direction of higher ligand density. Theoretical models which address the physical basis underlying the regulatory effect of ligand gradient on cell motility are highly desirable. Predictive models not only contribute to a better understanding of biological processes, but they also provide a quantitative interconnection between cell motility and biophysical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) for rational design of biomaterials as scaffolds in tissue engineering. In this work, we consider a one-dimensional (1D) continuum viscoelastic model to predict the cell velocity in response to linearly increasing density of surface ligands on a substrate. The cell is considered as a 1D linear viscoelastic object with position dependent elasticity due to the variation in actin network density. The cell-substrate interaction is characterized by a frictional force, controlled by the density of ligand-receptor pairs. The generation of contractile stresses is described in terms of kinetic equations for the reactions between actins, myosins, and guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins. The model predictions show a reasonable agreement with experimentally measured cell speeds, considering biologically relevant values for the model parameters. The model predicts a biphasic relationship between cell speed and slope of gradient as well as a maximum limiting speed after a finite migration time. For a given slope of ligand gradient, the onset of the limiting speed appears at longer times for substrates with lower ligand gradients. The model can be applied to the design of biomaterials as scaffolds for guided tissue regeneration as it predicts an optimum range for the slope of ligand gradient. PMID:19205048

  19. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  20. On the combined gravity gradient modeling for applied geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Veryaskin, Alexey

    2007-01-01

    Gravity gradiometry research and development has intensified in recent years to the extent that technologies providing a resolution of about 1 Eotvos per 1 sec average shall likely soon be available for multiple critical applications such as natural resources exploration, oil reservoir monitoring and defence establishment. Much of the content of this paper was composed a decade ago, and only minor modifications were required for the conclusions to be just as applicable today. In this paper we demonstrate how gravity gradient data can be modeled, and show some examples of how gravity gradient data can be combined in order to extract valuable information. In particular, this study demonstrates the importance of two gravity gradient components, Txz and Tyz which, when processed together, can provide more information on subsurface density contrasts than that derived solely from the vertical gravity gradient (Tzz).

  1. Improved Hodograph Method and the Amplitude-Phase Gradient Method to estimate the latitude dependence of the FLR frequency, plasma density, and the resonance width using data from a ground magnetometer pair: Application to CARISMA and MAGDAS station pairs in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, H.; Pilipenko, V.; Mann, I. R.; Milling, D. K.; Saita, S.; Kitamura, K.; Yumoto, K.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Improved Hodograph Method (IHM below) and the Amplitude-Phase Gradient Method (APGM below) are both applied to data from two ground magnetometers latitudinally separated by ~100km and yield the field-line-resonance (FLR) frequency and the ionospheric resonance width as functions of the latitude; from the FLR frequency we can estimate the magnetospheric plasma mass density, and from the resonance width we can estimate the damping rate of FLR, which is related to how much of the FLR-generated ULF waves are absorbed by the ionosphere. The both methods apply FFT to the two magnetometers' data, and calculate the amplitude ratio and the cross phase from the two stations' data as functions of the frequency. From there the two methods use different approaches: IHM fits a curve to the obtained ratio (as a complex number including both the amplitude ratio and the cross phase) on the complex plane to separate out the non-FLR signal in the data, while APGM assumes that the obtained amplitude ratio and cross phase include the FLR signal only and obtains the FLR frequency and the resonance width in an algebraic manner. In this paper we apply the two methods to simultaneously observed data from ground station pairs of WAD (CGM latitude and longitude: 61.3 and 318.3) - WEYB (58.6, 320.9), LGRR (61.8, 332.4) - PINA (60.0, 331.8), and PINA - THRF (57.8, 331.5), where WAD belongs to MAGDAS/CPMN while the other four belong to CARISMA. We show that IHM can properly estimate the latitudinal profile of the resonance width (which is the improved point of IHM over the original Hodograph Method) by comparing the results of applying IHM to the LGRR-PINA and PINA-THRF pairs, located along the same meridian. We also compare the IHM and APGM results to support the above-stated advantage of IHM over APGM. In addition, comparing the results of applying IHM and APGM to WAD-WEYB and LGRR-PINA-THRF, having similar latitudes but different longitudes, we discuss the longitude dependence of the FLR

  2. Flame Propagation Through Concentration Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunyaIINO; MitsuakiTANABE; 等

    2000-01-01

    The experiment was carried out in homogeneous propane-air mixture and in several concentration gradient of mixture.Igniter is put on the upper side of the combustion chamber,In concentration gradient experiment.ixture was ignited from lean side.An experimental study was conducted in a combustion chamber.The combustion chamber has glass windows for optical measurements at any side.For the measurement of distribution of fuel concentration,infraed absorption method using 3.39μm He-Ne laser was used,and for the observation of proagating flams,Schlieren method was employed.As a measurment result of flame propagation velocity and flammable limit,for a mixture of an identical local equivalence ratio.flame propagation velocity in concentration gradient is faster than that in homogeneous mixture,and rich flammable limit in concentration gradient shows a tendency to be higher than that in homogeneous mixture.

  3. Long pendulums in gravitational gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suits, B H [Physics Department, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2006-03-01

    Previous results for long pendulums above a spherical Earth are generalized for arbitrary non-uniform gravitational fields in the limit of small oscillation. As is the case for the previous results, gravitational gradients are multiplied by the length of the string even though the string is assumed massless. The effect is shown to arise from the constraint on the motion imposed by the string. The significance of these results for real gradients is discussed. (letters and comments)

  4. Gradient boosting machines, a tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Natekin, Alexey; Knoll, Alois

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods with a strong focus on machine learning aspects of modeling. A theoretical information is complemented with de...

  5. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    OpenAIRE

    Alexey Natekin; Alois Knoll

    2013-01-01

    Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all th...

  6. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G;

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  7. Hypernormal Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Giacomini, Raffaella; Gottschling, Andreas; Haefke, Christian; White, Halbert

    2002-01-01

    We derive a new family of probability densities that have the property of closed-form integrability. This flexible family finds a variety of applications, of which we illustrate density forecasting from models of the AR-ARCH class for U.S. inflation. We find that the hypernormal distribution for the model's disturbances leads to better density forecasts than the ones produced under the assumption that the disturbances are Normal or Student's t.

  8. Some factors affecting the use of lighter than air systems. [economic and performance estimates for dirigibles and semi-buoyant hybrid vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havill, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    The uses of lighter-than-air vehicles are examined in the present day transportation environment. Conventional dirigibles were found to indicate an undesirable economic risk due to their low speeds and to uncertainties concerning their operational use. Semi-buoyant hybrid vehicles are suggested as an alternative which does not have many of the inferior characteristics of conventional dirigibles. Economic and performance estimates for hybrid vehicles indicate that they are competitive with other transportation systems in many applications, and unique in their ability to perform some highly desirable emergency missions.

  9. Protein adsorption on gradient surfaces on polyethylene prepared in a shielded gas plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, Hendrikje; Bos, Roelof; van Oeveren, Willem; de Vries, Jacob; Busscher, Hendrik

    1999-01-01

    In this study, a new and simple method is described to prepare wettability gradients on polymers by means of glow discharge in a partly shielded argon plasma. The surface characteristics of thus prepared gradients on low density polyethylene were determined by contact angle measurements and electron

  10. Urban-Rural Gradients of Ecosystem Services and the Linkages with Socioeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The principle of urban-rural gradients can reveal the spatial variations of ecosystem services and socioeconomic dimensions. The interrelations between ecosystem services and socioeconomics have scarcely been considered in the context of urban-rural areas. We investigated the spatial gradients and the mutual linkages of several ecosystem services and socioeconomic variables in the urban-rural areas of Leipzig, Germany, and Kunming, China. The results showed some regularities in the spatial patterns of ecosystem services and socioeconomic dimensions in both study areas. Habitat quality and f-evapotranspiration of Leipzig and habitat quality of Kunming demonstrated apparent increasing trends along all gradient patterns. However, the other ecosystem services presented divergent spatial variabilities in different gradient patterns. Road density, urban fabric and population density showed identical declining trends in both case study areas. Differently, household size, housing area as well as unemployment rate in Leipzig presented inconsistent spatial dynamics with considerable fluctuations. With regard to the gradient interrelations, road density, urban fabric and population density were strongly correlated with most ecosystem services in both case study areas. In contrast, the gradients of household size, housing area and unemployment rate of Leipzig showed inconsistent correlations with the ecosystem services gradients. Our study provides evidence to the argument that typical patterns of ecosystem service gradients do not exist in different urban-rural areas.

  11. Densities, Spectral Densities and Modality

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, PL Laurie; Kovac, A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of specifying a simple approximating density function for a given data set (x1,…,xn). Simplicity is measured by the number of modes but several different definitions of approximation are introduced. The taut string method is used to control the numbers of modes and to produce candidate approximating densities. Refinements are introduced that improve the local adaptivity of the procedures and the method is extended to spectral densities.

  12. Arm classification and velocity gradients in spiral galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biviano, A.; Girardi, M.; Giuricin, G.; Mardirossian, F.; Mezzetti, M. (Trieste Univ. (Italy) Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (Italy) Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Trieste (Italy) Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (Italy) Centro Interuniversitario Regionale di Astrofisica e Cosmologia (Italy))

    1991-08-01

    On the basis of published rotation curves, velocity gradients are compiled for 94 galaxies. A significant correlation is found in this sample of galaxies between their gradients and arm classes (as given by Elmegreen and Elmegreen, 1982); galaxies with steeper curves tend to have a flocculent arm structure, and galaxies with flatter curves tend to have a grand design morphology. The correlation is true, since it is not induced by other correlations. The present result is in agreement with previous suggestions by Whitmore (1984) and with the recent result by Elmegreen and Elmegreen; it is also consistent with the predictions of density wave theory for the formation of the spiral structure. 89 refs.

  13. The influence of ALN-Al gradient material gradient index on ballistic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballistic performance of the gradient material is superior to laminated material, and gradient materials have different gradient types. Using ls-dyna to simulate the ballistic performance of ALN-AL gradient target plates which contain three gradient index (b = 1, b = 0.5, b = 2). Through Hopkinson bar numerical simulation to the target plate materials, we obtained the reflection stress wave and transmission stress wave state of gradient material to get the best gradient index. The internal stress state of gradient material is simulated by amplification processing of the target plate model. When the gradient index b is equal to 1, the gradient target plate is best of all.

  14. Computer simulation model of salt-gradient solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panahi, Z.

    1981-01-01

    The mass and energy transfer processes of salt-gradient solar pond were developed into a finite element of computer model. The system represented by the model can be: (1) a non-convective salt-gradient solar pond for which the energy transfer takes place by conduction through the brine and the round beneath the pond; (2) a stratified three-zone solar pond consisting of upper and lower convective zones and a non-convective gradient zone in between. The temperature of the upper and lower convective zones are predicted in terms of the net energy input to the zones. The energy fluxes at the pond surface include: reflected and absorbed solar radiation, evaporation energy loss, net long wave radiation loss to the atmosphere, advected energy of precipitation and inflow water, and convective heat loss at the surface. The model predicts the time dependent concentration, density, and temperature gradients in the pond. The program can operate with any time step of less than or equal to 24 hours, using either average daily or variables (with the time step) values of air temperature (calculated in the model using average, maximum and minimum values) and solar radiation data. The different cases that have been studied using the model are (1) the performance of a non-insulated salt-gradient solar pond with seepage of the brine and energy exchange through the ground below the pond; (2) the performance of an insulated salt-gradient solar pond with seepage of the brine and energy exchange through the ground below the pond; (2) the performance of an insulated salt-gradient and stratified three-zone solar pond. For stratified ponds comparisons on performance are made by changing the thickness of: (1) the upper convective zone, (2) the non-convective gradient zone, and (3) the lower convective (storage) zone.

  15. Gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    We compute the gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics. The results are compared with the corresponding expansion of the underlying kinetic-theory model with the collision term treated in the relaxation time approximation. We find that a recent formulation of anisotropic hydrodynamics based on an anisotropic matching principle yields the first three terms of the gradient expansion in agreement with those obtained for the kinetic theory. This gives further support for this particular hydrodynamic model as a good approximation of the kinetic-theory approach. We further find that the gradient expansion of anisotropic hydrodynamics is an asymptotic series, and the singularities of the analytic continuation of its Borel transform indicate the presence of non-hydrodynamic modes.

  16. Gradient Domain Guided Image Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Fei; Chen, Weihai; Wen, Changyun; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-11-01

    Guided image filter (GIF) is a well-known local filter for its edge-preserving property and low computational complexity. Unfortunately, the GIF may suffer from halo artifacts, because the local linear model used in the GIF cannot represent the image well near some edges. In this paper, a gradient domain GIF is proposed by incorporating an explicit first-order edge-aware constraint. The edge-aware constraint makes edges be preserved better. To illustrate the efficiency of the proposed filter, the proposed gradient domain GIF is applied for single-image detail enhancement, tone mapping of high dynamic range images and image saliency detection. Both theoretical analysis and experimental results prove that the proposed gradient domain GIF can produce better resultant images, especially near the edges, where halos appear in the original GIF. PMID:26285153

  17. The lower hybrid drift instability and the evolution of plasma gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of plasma gradients is studied with hybrid computer simulations (particle ions, fluid electrons with nonzero mass) carried out in the x-y plane of a plasma with a modest density gradient in the x direction and a magnetic field B = Bz(x)z. These initial density and magnetic field profiles represent a one-dimensional equilibrium of the sheath region of a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) near the separatrix. 2 figs

  18. HGSYSTEM/UF6 model enhancements for plume rise and dispersion around buildings, lift-off of buoyant plumes, and robustness of numerical solver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HGSYSTEM/UF6 model was developed for use in preparing Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) by estimating the consequences of possible accidental releases of UF6 to the atmosphere at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) located in Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky. Although the latter report carries a 1996 date, the work that is described was completed in late 1994. When that report was written, the primary release scenarios of interest were thought to be gas pipeline and liquid tank ruptures over open terrain away from the influence of buildings. However, upon further analysis of possible release scenarios, the developers of the SARs decided it was necessary to also consider accidental releases within buildings. Consequently, during the fall and winter of 1995-96, modules were added to HGSYSTEM/UF6 to account for flow and dispersion around buildings. The original HGSYSTEM/UF6 model also contained a preliminary method for accounting for the possible lift-off of ground-based buoyant plumes. An improved model and a new set of wind tunnel data for buoyant plumes trapped in building recirculation cavities have become available that appear to be useful for revising the lift-off algorithm and modifying it for use in recirculation cavities. This improved lift-off model has been incorporated in the updated modules for dispersion around buildings

  19. 1/12-Scale mixing interface visualization and buoyant particle release tests in support of Tank 241-SY-101 hydrogen mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of tank waste safety programs, visualization tests were performed in the 1/12-scale tank facility, using a low-viscosity simulant. The primary objective of the tests was to obtain video records of the transient jet-sludge interaction. The intent is that these videos will provide useful qualitative data for comparison with model predictions. Two tests were initially planned: mixing interface visualization (MIV) and buoyant particle release (BPR). Completion of the buoyant particle release test was set aside in order to complete additional MIV tests. Rheological measurements were made on simulant samples before testing, and the simulant was found to exhibit thixotropic behavior. Shear vane measurements were also made on an in-situ analog of the 1/12-scale tank simulant. Simulant shear strength has been observed to be time dependent. The primary objective of obtaining video records of jet-sludge interaction was satisfied, and the records yielded jet location information which may be of use in completing model comparisons. The modeling effort is not part of this task, but this report also discusses test specific instrumentation, visualization techniques, and shear vane instrumentation which would enable improved characterization of jet-sludge interaction and simulant characteristics

  20. Bond Growth under Temperature Gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Satyawali

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Grain and bond growth for dry snow are determined by the distribution of temperature andtemperature gradient in the snow matrix. From the standpoint of particle approach and based oncubic packing structure, a bond growth model has been developed for TG metamorphism. The paper.highlights the importance of bond formation and its effect on snow viscosity and finally on the rateof settlement. This is very important for developing a numerical snow pack model if microstructureis considered to be a basic parameter. A few experiments have been carried out to validate bond formation under temperature gradient.

  1. Steady thermal——solutal capillary convection in a shallow annular pool with the radial temperature and concentration gradients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YouRong; GONG ZhenXing; WU ChunMei; WU ShuangYing

    2012-01-01

    Using asymptotical analysis,we investigate the characteristics of the coupled thermal and solutal capillary convection with the radial temperature and solute concentration gradients in a shallow annular pool with the free surface.The pool is heated from the outer cylinder with high solutal concentration and cooled at the inner cylinder with low solutal concentration.The asymptotic solution is obtained in the core region in the limit as the aspect ratio,which is defined as the ratio of the depth to the width of the pool,goes to zero.The comparison with the previous work certifies that the asymptotic solution is right and believable.The influences of the solutal capillary force,the buoyant force,the Soret effect and the geometric parameters on the fluid flow are analyzed.

  2. Imaging the Buried Chicxulub Crater with Gravity Gradients and Cenotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, A. R.; Pilkington, M.; Halpenny, J. F.; Ortiz-Aleman, C.; Chavez, R. E.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Connors, M.; Graniel-Castro, E.; Camara-Zi, A.; Vasquez, J.

    1995-09-01

    Differing interpretations of the Bouguer gravity anomaly over the Chicxulub crater, Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, have yielded diameter estimates of 170 to 320 km. Knowing the crater's size is necessary to quantify the lethal perturbations to the Cretaceous environment associated with its formation. The crater's size (and internal structure) is revealed by the horizontal gradient of the Bouguer gravity anomaly over the structure, and by mapping the karst features of the Yucatan region. To improve our resolution of the crater's gravity signature we collected additional gravity measurements primarily along radial profiles, but also to fill in previously unsurveyed areas. Horizontal gradient analysis of Bouguer gravity data objectively highlights the lateral density contrasts of the impact lithologies and suppresses regional anomalies which may obscure the gravity signature of the Chicxulub crater lithologies. This gradient technique yields a striking circular structure with at least 6 concentric gradient features between 25 and 85 km radius. These features are most distinct in the southwest probably because of denser sampling of the gravity field. Our detailed profiles detected an additional feature and steeper gradients (up to 5 mGal/km) than the original survey. We interpret the outer four gradient maxima to represent concentric faults in the crater's zone of slumping as is also revealed by seismic reflection data. The inner two probably represent the margin of the central uplift and the peak ring and or collapsed transient cavity. Radial gradients in the SW quadrant over the inferred ~40 km-diameter central uplift (4) may represent structural "puckering" as revealed at eroded terrestrial craters. Gradient features related to regional gravity highs and lows are visible outside the crater, but no concentric gradient features are apparent at distances > 90 km radius. The marginal gradient features may be modelled by slump faults as observed in large complex craters on

  3. Arithmetic density

    CERN Document Server

    Garay, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    Arithmetic class are closed subsets of the euclidean space which generalise arithmetical conditions encoutered in dynamical systems, such as diophantine conditions or Bruno type conditions. I prove density estimates for such sets using Dani-Kleinbock-Margulis techniques.

  4. A Variational Deduction of Second Gradient Poroelasticity Part I: General Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sciarra, Giulio; Ianiro, Nicoletta; Madeo, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Second gradient theories have to be used to capture how local micro heterogeneities macroscopically affect the behavior of a continuum. In this paper a configurational space for a solid matrix filled by an unknown amount of fluid is introduced. The Euler-Lagrange equations valid for second gradient poromechanics, generalizing those due to Biot, are deduced by means of a Lagrangian variational formulation. Starting from a generalized Clausius-Duhem inequality, valid in the framework of second gradient theories, the existence of a macroscopic solid skeleton Lagrangian deformation energy, depending on the solid strain and the Lagrangian fluid mass density as well as on their Lagrangian gradients, is proven.

  5. Effect on Stratum Gradient Frequency Distribution of Landslides in the Three Gorges Area of Northeast Chongqing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Xiaoyi; QIAO Jianping

    2006-01-01

    The landslide data were calculated in the Three Gorges Area of northeast Chongqing. The results showed that landslide frequency distributions of gradients accorded with the Weibull probability density distribution function. The landslide hazard ratios of gradients were acquired by Weibull accumulation probability distribution function in the different geological units. There was discord between landslide hazard ratio of different geological units and variance of landslide gradient. But they were approximate homology in the strata of Jurassic. The results indicate that the Weibull distribution can quantitatively evaluate the landslide hazard ratios of gradients of the different strata in the Three Gorges Area.

  6. A high transmission broadband gradient index lens using elastic shell acoustic metamaterial elements

    CERN Document Server

    Titovich, Alexey S; Norris, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    The use of cylindrical elastic shells as elements in acoustic metamaterial devices is demonstrated through simulations and underwater measurements of a cylindrical-to-plane wave lens. Transformation acoustics (TA) of a circular region to a square dictates that the effective density in the lens remain constant and equal to that of water. Piecewise approximation to the desired effective compressibility is achieved using a square array with elements based on the elastic shell metamaterial concept developed in [30]. The size of the elements are chosen based on availability of shells, minimizing fabrication difficulties. The tested device is neutrally buoyant comprising 48 elements of nine different types of commercial shells made from aluminum, brass, copper, and polymers. Simulations indicate a broadband range in which the device acts as a cylindrical to plane wave lens. The experimental findings confirm the broadband quadropolar response from approximately 20 to 40 kHz, with positive gain of the radiation patte...

  7. On gradient Ricci solitons with Symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Peter; Wylie, William

    2007-01-01

    We study gradient Ricci solitons with maximal symmetry. First we show that there are no non-trivial homogeneous gradient Ricci solitons. Thus the most symmetry one can expect is an isometric cohomogeneity one group action. Many examples of cohomogeneity one gradient solitons have been constructed. However, we apply the main result in our paper "Rigidity of gradient Ricci solitons" to show that there are no noncompact cohomogeneity one shrinking gradient solitons with nonnegative curvature.

  8. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin;

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  9. The geomagnetic field gradient tensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We develop the general mathematical basis for space magnetic gradiometry in spherical coordinates. The magnetic gradient tensor is a second rank tensor consisting of 3 × 3 = 9 spatial derivatives. Since the geomagnetic field vector B is always solenoidal (∇ · B = 0) there are only eight independe...... of the small-scale structure of the Earth’s lithospheric field....

  10. Treatment of Layered Structures Using a Semilocal meta-GGA Density Functional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Georg; Ferrighi, Lara; Hammer, Bjørk

    2010-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations on solids consisting of covalently bonded layers held together by dispersive interactions are presented. Utilizing the kinetic energy density in addition to the density and its gradients gives the meta-generalized gradient approximation (MGGA) M06-L enough f...

  11. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your bone density ... people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine whether you ...

  12. Ontogeny of body density and the swimbladder in yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, L D; Qin, J G

    2013-02-01

    The ontogeny of larval body density and the morphological and histological events during swimbladder development were investigated in two cohorts of yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi larvae to understand the relationship between larval morphology and body density. Larvae inflation occurred on 3 dph, and the inflation window was 3-5 dph when the pneumatic duct was still connected to the gut. The swimbladder volume increased with larval age and the epithelial lining on the swimbladder became flattened squamous cells after initial inflation. Seriola lalandi developed into a physoclist with the formation of the rete mirabile and the gas-secreting gland comprised low-columnar epithelial cells. Larvae with successfully inflated swimbladders remained positively buoyant, whereas larvae without SB inflation became negatively buoyant and their body density gradually reached 1.030 ± 0.001 g cm(-3) by 10 dph. Diel density changes were observed after 5 dph, owing to day time deflation and night-time inflation of the swimbladder. These results show that SB inflation has a direct effect on body density in larval S. lalandi and environmental factors should be further investigated to enhance the rate of SB inflation to prevent the sinking death syndrome in the early life stage of the fish larvae.

  13. Ontogeny of body density and the swimbladder in yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, L D; Qin, J G

    2013-02-01

    The ontogeny of larval body density and the morphological and histological events during swimbladder development were investigated in two cohorts of yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi larvae to understand the relationship between larval morphology and body density. Larvae Seriola lalandi developed into a physoclist with the formation of the rete mirabile and the gas-secreting gland comprised low-columnar epithelial cells. Larvae with successfully inflated swimbladders remained positively buoyant, whereas larvae without SB inflation became negatively buoyant and their body density gradually reached 1.030 ± 0.001 g cm(-3) by 10 dph. Diel density changes were observed after 5 dph, owing to day time deflation and night-time inflation of the swimbladder. These results show that SB inflation has a direct effect on body density in larval S. lalandi and environmental factors should be further investigated to enhance the rate of SB inflation to prevent the sinking death syndrome in the early life stage of the fish larvae. PMID:23398074

  14. A second gradient formulation for a 2D fabric sheet with inextensible fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placidi, Luca; Greco, Leopoldo; Bucci, Sara; Turco, Emilio; Rizzi, Nicola Luigi

    2016-10-01

    We present numerical simulations of rectangular woven fabrics made of two, initially orthogonal, families of inextensible fibres. We consider an energy functional which includes both first and second gradients of the displacement. The energy density is expressed in terms of the angles between the fibres directions, using trigonometric functions and their gradients. In particular, we focus on an energy density depending on the squared tangent of the shear angle, which automatically satisfies some natural properties of the energy. The numerical results show that final configurations obtained by the second gradient energies are smoother than the first gradient ones. Moreover, we show that if a second gradient energy is considered, the shear energy is better uniformly distributed.

  15. Beyond the local density approximation : improving density functional theory for high energy density physics applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Ann Elisabet; Modine, Normand Arthur; Desjarlais, Michael Paul; Muller, Richard Partain; Sears, Mark P.; Wright, Alan Francis

    2006-11-01

    A finite temperature version of 'exact-exchange' density functional theory (EXX) has been implemented in Sandia's Socorro code. The method uses the optimized effective potential (OEP) formalism and an efficient gradient-based iterative minimization of the energy. The derivation of the gradient is based on the density matrix, simplifying the extension to finite temperatures. A stand-alone all-electron exact-exchange capability has been developed for testing exact exchange and compatible correlation functionals on small systems. Calculations of eigenvalues for the helium atom, beryllium atom, and the hydrogen molecule are reported, showing excellent agreement with highly converged quantumMonte Carlo calculations. Several approaches to the generation of pseudopotentials for use in EXX calculations have been examined and are discussed. The difficult problem of finding a correlation functional compatible with EXX has been studied and some initial findings are reported.

  16. Semiclassical origins of density functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kieron

    By careful numerical analysis of non-relativistic atomic correlation energies, we show that (a) the local density approximation becomes relatively exact for the correlation energy as the atomic number approaches infinity, (b) we find the leading correction, which is about 38.5 milliHartrees per atom, (c) show how this correction dominates for larger atoms and (d) how to construct a generalized gradient approximation that respects this limit (See KB, A. Cancio, T. Gould, S. Pittalis, arXiv:1409.4834). The relevance to density functional calculations will also be explained. Support provided by NSF CHE-1464795.

  17. Estimates of high absolute densities and emergence rates of demersal zooplankton from the Agatti Atoll, laccadives

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Achuthankutty, C.T.; Nair, S.R.S.

    , by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc. Separation and concentration of living dinoflagellate resting cysts from marine sediments via density-gradient centrifugation Abstract-A method for separating and con- centrating resting cysts... of dinoflagellates from marine sediments via centrifugation in a non- toxic, isosmotic density gradient has been de- veloped and tested. The density-gradient medi- um is an aqueous suspension of colloidal silica (Nalco 1060) made isosmotic with seawater...

  18. A macroscopic crowd motion model of gradient flow type

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, Bertrand; Santambrogio, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    A simple model to handle the flow of people in emergency evacuation situations is considered: at every point x, the velocity U(x) that individuals at x would like to realize is given. Yet, the incompressibility constraint prevents this velocity field to be realized and the actual velocity is the projection of the desired one onto the set of admissible velocities. Instead of looking at a microscopic setting (where individuals are represented by rigid discs), here the macroscopic approach is investigated, where the unknwon is the evolution of the density . If a gradient structure is given, say U is the opposite of the gradient of D where D is, for instance, the distance to the exit door, the problem is presented as a Gradient Flow in the Wasserstein space of probability measures. The functional which gives the Gradient Flow is neither finitely valued (since it takes into account the constraints on the density), nor geodesically convex, which requires for an ad-hoc study of the convergence of a discrete scheme.

  19. Thermally tailored gradient topography surface on elastomeric thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudeshna; Bhandaru, Nandini; Das, Ritopa; Harikrishnan, G; Mukherjee, Rabibrata

    2014-05-14

    We report a simple method for creating a nanopatterned surface with continuous variation in feature height on an elastomeric thin film. The technique is based on imprinting the surface of a film of thermo-curable elastomer (Sylgard 184), which has continuous variation in cross-linking density introduced by means of differential heating. This results in variation of viscoelasticity across the length of the surface and the film exhibits differential partial relaxation after imprinting with a flexible stamp and subjecting it to an externally applied stress for a transient duration. An intrinsic perfect negative replica of the stamp pattern is initially created over the entire film surface as long as the external force remains active. After the external force is withdrawn, there is partial relaxation of the applied stresses, which is manifested as reduction in amplitude of the imprinted features. Due to the spatial viscoelasticity gradient, the extent of stress relaxation induced feature height reduction varies across the length of the film (L), resulting in a surface with a gradient topography with progressively varying feature heights (hF). The steepness of the gradient can be controlled by varying the temperature gradient as well as the duration of precuring of the film prior to imprinting. The method has also been utilized for fabricating wettability gradient surfaces using a high aspect ratio biomimetic stamp. The use of a flexible stamp allows the technique to be extended for creating a gradient topography on nonplanar surfaces as well. We also show that the gradient surfaces with regular structures can be used in combinatorial studies related to pattern directed dewetting. PMID:24697617

  20. Thermally tailored gradient topography surface on elastomeric thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sudeshna; Bhandaru, Nandini; Das, Ritopa; Harikrishnan, G; Mukherjee, Rabibrata

    2014-05-14

    We report a simple method for creating a nanopatterned surface with continuous variation in feature height on an elastomeric thin film. The technique is based on imprinting the surface of a film of thermo-curable elastomer (Sylgard 184), which has continuous variation in cross-linking density introduced by means of differential heating. This results in variation of viscoelasticity across the length of the surface and the film exhibits differential partial relaxation after imprinting with a flexible stamp and subjecting it to an externally applied stress for a transient duration. An intrinsic perfect negative replica of the stamp pattern is initially created over the entire film surface as long as the external force remains active. After the external force is withdrawn, there is partial relaxation of the applied stresses, which is manifested as reduction in amplitude of the imprinted features. Due to the spatial viscoelasticity gradient, the extent of stress relaxation induced feature height reduction varies across the length of the film (L), resulting in a surface with a gradient topography with progressively varying feature heights (hF). The steepness of the gradient can be controlled by varying the temperature gradient as well as the duration of precuring of the film prior to imprinting. The method has also been utilized for fabricating wettability gradient surfaces using a high aspect ratio biomimetic stamp. The use of a flexible stamp allows the technique to be extended for creating a gradient topography on nonplanar surfaces as well. We also show that the gradient surfaces with regular structures can be used in combinatorial studies related to pattern directed dewetting.

  1. Shifting densities

    OpenAIRE

    Mille, Matthieu

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the author adopt a time-geography approach to examine the temporal variation of urban density by analysing spatial load changes at different times of the day at the communal and community level. The evolution of means of transport coupled with the abandon of the notion of direct proximity to the urban dwelling place provide the basis for this new approach to the study of urban densities. The shift towards spatial specialisation within cities has lead to radical changes in the f...

  2. Cell adhesion on ligand gradient substrates: a thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2010-01-01

    Gradient distribution of bio-adhesive proteins can regulate multiple cellular processes, including adhesion, growth, and migration. The ability to control the cell function by changing the surface density of immobilized ligands has become increasingly important in design of implantable medical devices and tissue regenerating scaffolds. Recent techniques in fabrication of substrates with controlled surface properties allow the examination of cell sensitivity to a wide range of adhesion gradients. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to these directional cues warrants a quantitative assessment of macroscopic cellular response to the surface gradients, supported by predictive theoretical models. This article presents a theoretical basis to examine the effect of ligand gradients on cellular adhesion, using an equilibrium thermodynamic model. The model facilitates a systematic investigation of the complex interplay of cell-substrate specific adhesions, non-specific repulsions, and membrane elasticity. This purely mechanistic model predicts a biphasic dependence between the extent of cell spreading and its position across the gradient substrate. PMID:19701944

  3. Chemical Abundance Gradients in the Star-forming Ring Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchagin, Vladimir; Vorobyov, Eduard; Mayya, Y. D.

    1999-09-01

    Ring waves of star formation, propagating outward in the galactic disks, leave chemical abundance gradients in their wakes. We show that the relative [Fe/O] abundance gradients in ring galaxies can be used as a tool for determining the role of the SN Ia explosions in their chemical enrichment. We consider two mechanisms--a self-induced wave and a density wave--that can create outwardly propagating star-forming rings in a purely gaseous disk and demonstrate that the radial distribution of the relative [Fe/O] abundance gradients depends neither on the particular mechanism of the wave formation anor on the parameters of the star-forming process. We show that the [Fe/O] profile is determined by the velocity of the wave, the initial mass function, and the initial chemical composition of the star-forming gas. If the role of SN Ia explosions is negligible in the chemical enrichment, the ratio [Fe/O] remains constant throughout the galactic disk with a steep gradient at the wave front. If SN Ia stars are important in the production of cosmic iron, the [Fe/O] ratio has a gradient in the wake of the star-forming wave with the value depending on the frequency of SN Ia explosions.

  4. Synergistic NGF/B27 gradients position synapses heterogeneously in 3D micropatterned neural cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Kunze

    Full Text Available Native functional brain circuits show different numbers of synapses (synaptic densities in the cerebral cortex. Until now, different synaptic densities could not be studied in vitro using current cell culture methods for primary neurons. Herein, we present a novel microfluidic based cell culture method that combines 3D micropatterning of hydrogel layers with linear chemical gradient formation. Micropatterned hydrogels were used to encapsulate dissociated cortical neurons in laminar cell layers and neurotrophic factors NGF and B27 were added to influence the formation of synapses. Neurotrophic gradients allowed for the positioning of distinguishable synaptic densities throughout a 3D micropatterned neural culture. NGF and B27 gradients were maintained in the microfluidic device for over two weeks without perfusion pumps by utilizing a refilling procedure. Spatial distribution of synapses was examined with a pre-synaptic marker to determine synaptic densities. From our experiments, we observed that (1 cortical neurons responded only to synergistic NGF/B27 gradients, (2 synaptic density increased proportionally to synergistic NGF/B27 gradients; (3 homogeneous distribution of B27 disturbed cortical neurons in sensing NGF gradients and (4 the cell layer position significantly impacted spatial distribution of synapses.

  5. Gradient Plasticity Model and its Implementation into MARMOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Erin I.; Li, Dongsheng; Zbib, Hussein M.; Sun, Xin

    2013-08-01

    The influence of strain gradient on deformation behavior of nuclear structural materials, such as boby centered cubic (bcc) iron alloys has been investigated. We have developed and implemented a dislocation based strain gradient crystal plasticity material model. A mesoscale crystal plasticity model for inelastic deformation of metallic material, bcc steel, has been developed and implemented numerically. Continuum Dislocation Dynamics (CDD) with a novel constitutive law based on dislocation density evolution mechanisms was developed to investigate the deformation behaviors of single crystals, as well as polycrystalline materials by coupling CDD and crystal plasticity (CP). The dislocation density evolution law in this model is mechanism-based, with parameters measured from experiments or simulated with lower-length scale models, not an empirical law with parameters back-fitted from the flow curves.

  6. PIV MEASUREMENTS FOR GAS FLOW UNDER GRADIENT MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Xiaodong; WU Feng; F.YAMAMOTO

    2004-01-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques were developed to measure the convective N2-air flow under gradient magnetic fields. The velocity fields were calculated by the Minimum Quadratic Difference (MQD) algorithm and spurious vectors were eliminated by Delaunay Tessellation.The N2-air flow was measured as the magnetic flux density varying from 0 ~ 1.5 T. A strengthened vortex flow of air was observed under the condition that the magnetic field was applied, and the velocity of N2 jet rose with the increase of the magnetic density. The experimental results show that the magnetic force will induce a vortex flow and cause a convection flow of the air mixture when both gradients of the O2 concentration and the magnetic field intensity exist.

  7. Gradient enhanced damage sizing for structural health management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gradient enhanced method is proposed to extract a probability distribution of damage size based on damage images from structural health monitoring. The method provides comprehensive information about damage size and enables prediction of remaining useful life (RUL) of aircraft plate-like structures. A three-step procedure is designed to construct a likelihood function about damage size from intensity image, and a gradient function is employed a priori to obtain a narrow distribution of damage size in the Bayesian framework, providing the empirical probability density function of damage size, from which the probability of damage size larger than critical crack size can be calculated. RUL of plate-like structures can be obtained by calculating the cycles after which the crack size would reach a critical value by a damage growth model. The proposed method converts an ultrasonic damage imaging result to probability density function of damage size, with potential to provide accurate and precise estimation of RUL. (paper)

  8. Ant Abundance along a Productivity Gradient: Addressing Two Conflicting Hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udi Segev

    Full Text Available The number of individuals within a population or community and their body size can be associated with changes in resource supply. While these relationships may provide a key to better understand the role of abiotic vs. biotic constraints in animal communities, little is known about the way size and abundance of organisms change along resource gradients. Here, we studied this interplay in ants, addressing two hypotheses with opposite predictions regarding variation in population densities along resource gradients- the 'productivity hypothesis' and the 'productivity-based thinning hypothesis'. The hypotheses were tested in two functional groups of ground-dwelling ants that are directly primary consumers feeding on seeds: specialized seed-eaters and generalist species. We examined variations in colony density and foraging activity (a size measurement of the forager caste in six ant assemblages along a steep productivity gradient in a semi-arid region, where precipitation and plant biomass vary 6-fold over a distance of 250km. An increase in the density or foraging activity of ant colonies along productivity gradients is also likely to affect competitive interactions among colonies, and consequently clinal changes in competition intensity were also examined. Ant foraging activity increased with productivity for both functional groups. However, colony density revealed opposing patterns: it increased with productivity for the specialized seed-eaters, but decreased for the generalist species. Competition intensity, evaluated by spatial partitioning of species at food baits and distribution of colonies, was uncorrelated with productivity in the specialized seed-eaters, but decreased with increasing productivity in the generalists. Our results provide support for two contrasting hypotheses regarding the effect of resource availability on the abundance of colonial organisms- the 'productivity hypothesis' for specialized seed-eaters and the 'productivity

  9. Ant Abundance along a Productivity Gradient: Addressing Two Conflicting Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Udi; Kigel, Jaime; Lubin, Yael; Tielbörger, Katja

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals within a population or community and their body size can be associated with changes in resource supply. While these relationships may provide a key to better understand the role of abiotic vs. biotic constraints in animal communities, little is known about the way size and abundance of organisms change along resource gradients. Here, we studied this interplay in ants, addressing two hypotheses with opposite predictions regarding variation in population densities along resource gradients- the 'productivity hypothesis' and the 'productivity-based thinning hypothesis'. The hypotheses were tested in two functional groups of ground-dwelling ants that are directly primary consumers feeding on seeds: specialized seed-eaters and generalist species. We examined variations in colony density and foraging activity (a size measurement of the forager caste) in six ant assemblages along a steep productivity gradient in a semi-arid region, where precipitation and plant biomass vary 6-fold over a distance of 250km. An increase in the density or foraging activity of ant colonies along productivity gradients is also likely to affect competitive interactions among colonies, and consequently clinal changes in competition intensity were also examined. Ant foraging activity increased with productivity for both functional groups. However, colony density revealed opposing patterns: it increased with productivity for the specialized seed-eaters, but decreased for the generalist species. Competition intensity, evaluated by spatial partitioning of species at food baits and distribution of colonies, was uncorrelated with productivity in the specialized seed-eaters, but decreased with increasing productivity in the generalists. Our results provide support for two contrasting hypotheses regarding the effect of resource availability on the abundance of colonial organisms- the 'productivity hypothesis' for specialized seed-eaters and the 'productivity-based thinning

  10. Sintered composite gradient tool materials

    OpenAIRE

    J. Mikuła; G. Matula; K. Gołombek; L.A. Dobrzański

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Development of a new generation of the composite gradient tool materials with the core sintered withthe matrix obtained using the powder metallurgy of the chemical composition corresponding to the HS6-5-2 highspeedsteel reinforced with the WC and TiC type hard carbide phases with the growing portions of these phases inthe outward direction from the core to the surface.Design/methodology/approach: Powder Metallurgy, SEM, X-Ray Microanalysis.Findings: Powder metallurgy processes were u...

  11. Smooth Optimization with Approximate Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    d'Aspremont, Alexandre

    2005-01-01

    We show that the optimal complexity of Nesterov's smooth first-order optimization algorithm is preserved when the gradient is only computed up to a small, uniformly bounded error. In applications of this method to semidefinite programs, this means in some instances computing only a few leading eigenvalues of the current iterate instead of a full matrix exponential, which significantly reduces the method's computational cost. This also allows sparse problems to be solved efficiently using spar...

  12. Multilayer coating for high gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The multilayer coating for high gradients is reviewed. Not only the S-I-S structure, but also the S-S bilayer structure are also treated. This is an incomplete manuscript of an invited article which will be submitted to a journal. I have uploaded this version in order to help the understanding on my talk at the TESLA Technology Collaboration meeting at Saclay, France.

  13. Density structures inside the plasmasphere: Cluster observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darrouzet, F.; Decreau, P.M.E.; De Keyser, J.;

    2004-01-01

    The electron density profiles derived from the EFW and WHISPER instruments on board the four Cluster spacecraft reveal density structures inside the plasmasphere and at its outer boundary, the plasmapause. We have conducted a statistical study to characterize these density structures. We focus...... on the plasmasphere crossing on I I April 2002, during which Cluster observed several density irregularities inside the plasmasphere, as well as a plasmaspheric plume. We derive the density gradient vectors from simultaneous density measurements by the four spacecraft. We also determine the normal velocity...... of the boundaries of the plume and of the irregularities from the time delays between those boundaries in the four individual density profiles, assuming they are planar. These new observations yield novel insights about the occurrence of density irregularities, their geometry and their dynamics. These in...

  14. Laplacian-based generalized gradient approximations for the exchange energy

    CERN Document Server

    Cancio, Antonio C

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that in the gradient expansion approximation to density functional theory (DFT) the gradient and Laplacian of the density make interchangeable contributions to the exchange correlation (XC) energy. This is an arbitrary "gauge" freedom for building DFT models, normally used to eliminate the Laplacian from the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) level of DFT development. We explore the implications of keeping the Laplacian at this level of DFT, to develop a model that fits the known behavior of the XC hole, which can only be described as a system average in conventional GGA. We generate a family of exchange models that obey the same constraints as conventional GGA's, but which in addition have a finite-valued potential at the atomic nucleus unlike GGA's. These are tested against exact densities and exchange potentials for small atoms, and for constraints chosen to reproduce the SOGGA and the APBE variants of the GGA. The model reliably reproduces exchange energies of closed shell atoms, on...

  15. The potential for buoyant displacement gas release events in Tank 241-SY-102 after waste transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is a double-shell, radioactive waste storage tank with waste that, before the recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing buoyant displacement (BD) gas release events (GREs). Some BD GREs caused gas concentrations in the tank headspace to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of its stored gas. The installation of a mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has since prevented BD GREs. However, operation of the mixer pump over the years caused gas retention in the floating crust layer and a corresponding accelerated waste level growth. The accelerating crust growth trend observed in 1997--98 led to initiation of sequences of waste removal and water back-dilutions in December 1999. Waste is removed from the mixed slurry layer in Tank SY-101 and transferred into Tank 241-Sy-102 (SY-102). Water is then added back to dissolve soluble solids that retain gas. The initial transfer of 89,500 gallons of SY-101 waste, diluted in-line at 0.94:1 by volume with water, to SY-102 was conducted in December 1999. The second transfer of 230,000 gallons of original SY-101 waste, diluted approximately 0.9:1, was completed in January 2000, and the third transfer of 205,500 gallons of original SY-101 waste diluted at 0.9:1 was completed in March 2000

  16. On the structure of gradient Yamabe solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Huai-Dong; Zhang, Yingying

    2011-01-01

    We show that every complete nontrivial gradient Yamabe soliton admits a special global warped product structure with a one-dimensional base. Based on this, we prove a general classification theorem for complete nontrivial locally conformally flat gradient Yamabe solitons.

  17. Mapping land cover gradients through analysis of hyper-temporal NDVI imagery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, A.; Bie, de C.A.J.M.; Skidmore, A.K.; Scarrott, R.G.; Hamad, A.; Venus, V.; Lymberakis, P.

    2013-01-01

    The green cover of the earth exhibits various spatial gradients that represent gradual changes in space of vegetation density and/or in species composition. To date, land cover mapping methods differentiate at best, mapping units with different cover densities and/or species compositions, but typica

  18. Gradient Flow Convolutive Blind Source Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Nielsen, Chinton Møller

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the performance of instantaneous gradient flow beamforming by Cauwenberghs et al. is reduced significantly in reverberant conditions. By expanding the gradient flow principle to convolutive mixtures, separation in a reverberant environment is possible. By use of a circ......Experiments have shown that the performance of instantaneous gradient flow beamforming by Cauwenberghs et al. is reduced significantly in reverberant conditions. By expanding the gradient flow principle to convolutive mixtures, separation in a reverberant environment is possible. By use...

  19. Community and ecosystem responses to elevational gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Maja K.; Sanders, Nate; Wardle, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Community structure and ecosystem processes often vary along elevational gradients. Their responses to elevation are commonly driven by changes in temperature, and many community- and ecosystem-level variables therefore frequently respond similarly to elevation across contrasting gradients. There...... using elevational gradients for understanding community and ecosystem responses to global climate change at much larger spatial and temporal scales than is possible through conventional ecological experiments. However, future studies that integrate elevational gradient approaches with experimental...

  20. An education gradient in health, a health gradient in education, or a confounded gradient in both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jamie L; von Hippel, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    There is a positive gradient associating educational attainment with health, yet the explanation for this gradient is not clear. Does higher education improve health (causation)? Do the healthy become highly educated (selection)? Or do good health and high educational attainment both result from advantages established early in the life course (confounding)? This study evaluates these competing explanations by tracking changes in educational attainment and Self-rated Health (SRH) from age 15 to age 31 in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997 cohort. Ordinal logistic regression confirms that high-SRH adolescents are more likely to become highly educated. This is partly because adolescent SRH is associated with early advantages including adolescents' academic performance, college plans, and family background (confounding); however, net of these confounders adolescent SRH still predicts adult educational attainment (selection). Fixed-effects longitudinal regression shows that educational attainment has little causal effect on SRH at age 31. Completion of a high school diploma or associate's degree has no effect on SRH, while completion of a bachelor's or graduate degree have effects that, though significant, are quite small (less than 0.1 points on a 5-point scale). While it is possible that educational attainment would have greater effect on health at older ages, at age 31 what we see is a health gradient in education, shaped primarily by selection and confounding rather than by a causal effect of education on health.

  1. Second order gradient ascent pulse engineering

    CERN Document Server

    de Fouquieres, P; Glaser, S J; Kuprov, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    We report some improvements to the gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) algorithm for optimal control of quantum systems. These include more accurate gradients, convergence acceleration using the BFGS quasi-Newton algorithm as well as faster control derivative calculation algorithms. In all test systems, the wall clock time and the convergence rates show a considerable improvement over the approximate gradient ascent.

  2. On the classification of gradient Ricci solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Peter; Wylie, William

    2007-01-01

    We show that the only complete shrinking gradient Ricci solitons with vanishing Weyl tensor are quotients of the standard ones. This gives a new proof of the Hamilton-Ivey-Perel'man classification of 3-dimensional shrinking gradient solitons. We also prove a classification for expanding gradient Ricci solitons with constant scalar curvature and suitably decaying Weyl tensor.

  3. Enviromental Effects on Internal Color Gradients of Early-Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Barbera, F.; de Carvalho, R. R.; Gal, R. R.; Busarello, G.; Haines, C. P.; Mercurio, A.; Merluzzi, P.; Capaccioli, M.; Djorgovski, S. G.

    2007-05-01

    One of the most debated issues of observational and theoretical cosmology is that of how the environment affects the formation and evolution of galaxies. To gain new insight into this subject, we have derived surface photometry for a sample of 3,000 early-type galaxies belonging to 163 clusters with different richness, spanning a redshift range of 0.05 to 0.25. This large data-set is used to analyze how the color distribution inside galaxies depends on several parameters, such as cluster richness, local galaxy density, galaxy luminosity and redshift. We find that the internal color profile of galaxies strongly depends on the environment where galaxies reside. Galaxies in poor and rich clusters are found to follow two distinct trends in the color gradient vs. redshift diagram, with color gradients beeing less steep in rich rather than in poor clusters. No dependence of color gradients on galaxy luminosity is detected both for poor and rich clusters. We find that color gradients strongly depend on local galaxy density, with more shallow gradients in high density regions. Interestingly, this result holds only for low richness clusters, with color gradients of galaxies in rich clusters showing no dependence on local galaxy density. Our results support a reasonable picture whereby young early-type galaxies form in a dissipative collapse process, and then undergo increased (either major or minor) merging activity in richer rather than in poor clusters.

  4. Evolution of density compensated fronts in simulated ocean mixed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helber, R. W.; Hebert, D. A.; Koch, A.

    2015-12-01

    Observations within the ocean surface mixed layer indicate a tendency for temperature gradients to form that are compensated for their effect on density by salinity gradients. These density compensated fronts tend to occur in the absence of strong surface forcing and thus weak vertical mixing. Observations show that density compensated fronts are quickly erased by surface cooling events. The presence of density compensated gradients in the surface mixed layer, however, are not well represented in regional and global ocean circulation model predictions. In these models, subgrid-scale processes are parameterized with minimal ability to represent double diffusion. Recent advances in parameterizations have been developed to model the re-stratification of the mixed layer by sub-mesoscale eddies. These ageostrophic dynamics can lead to long filaments that are governed by process on length scales from 100 m to 10 km and time scales near a day. The impact of these processes in model physics on density compensated fronts is unclear. To improve our understanding of compensated front evolution in the ocean, three different mixing schemes are tested to evaluate the creation of horizontally density compensated gradients in model simulations. One scheme extracts potential energy of ocean fronts for mixing dependent on horizontal and vertical buoyancy gradients, mixed layer depth, and inertial period. The other two schemes mix temperature and salinity horizontally dependent on the buoyancy gradient. All schemes provide a three dimensional approach to mixing that differentiates the horizontal eddy diffusion of temperature and salinity.

  5. NIF optics phase gradient specfication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, W.; Auerbach, J.; Hunt, J.; Lawson, L.; Manes, K.; Orth, C.; Sacks, R.; Trenholme, J.; Wegner, P.

    1997-05-02

    A root-mean-square (rms) phase gradient specification seems to allow a good connection between the NIP optics quality and focal spot requirements. Measurements on Beamlet optics individually, and as a chain, indicate they meet the assumptions necessary to use this specification, and that they have a typical rms phase gradient of {approximately}80 {angstrom}/cm. This may be sufficient for NIP to meet the proposed Stockpile Stewardship Management Program (SSMP) requirements of 80% of a high- power beam within a 200-250 micron diameter spot. Uncertainties include, especially, the scale length of the optics phase noise, the ability of the adaptive optic to correct against pump-induced distortions and optics noise, and the possibility of finding mitigation techniques against whole-beam self-focusing (e.g. a pre- correction optic). Further work is needed in these areas to better determine the NIF specifications. This memo is a written summary of a presentation on this topic given by W. Williams 24 April 1997 to NIP and LS&T personnel.

  6. Strain gradient effects on cyclic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2010-01-01

    Size effects on the cyclic shear response are studied numerically using a recent higher order strain gradient visco-plasticity theory accounting for both dissipative and energetic gradient hardening. Numerical investigations of the response under cyclic pure shear and shear of a finite slab between...... rigid platens have been carried out, using the finite element method. It is shown for elastic–perfectly plastic solids how dissipative gradient effects lead to increased yield strength, whereas energetic gradient contributions lead to increased hardening as well as a Bauschinger effect. For linearly...... hardening materials it is quantified how dissipative and energetic gradient effects promote hardening above that of conventional predictions. Usually, increased hardening is attributed to energetic gradient effects, but here it is found that also dissipative gradient effects lead to additional hardening in...

  7. Investigation of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin-film solar cells with carrier concentration gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaxiong

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effect of carrier concentration gradient on Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin-film solar cells, the properties of CZTS solar cells were studied by numerical method. The photovoltaic performances of carrier concentration gradient CZTS solar cells were calculated by the solutions of Poisson's equation, continuity equation, and current density equation using AFors-Het v2.4 program. The carrier concentration gradient was changed to analyze its effect. Compared with CZTS solar cells without carrier concentration gradient, the photovoltaic performances of CZTS solar cells can be enhanced by using carrier concentration gradient absorber. The carrier concentration gradient can extend the distribution region of built-in electric field, which is beneficial to the drift of photo-generated carriers. However, the carrier concentration gradient also affects the recombination and series resistances of solar cells. When the defect density of CZTS layer is high, the photo-generated carriers are affected significantly by recombination, resulting in slight effect of carrier concentration gradient. Therefore, the defect density should be reduced to enhance the effect of carrier concentration gradient on improving conversion efficiency of CZTS thin-film solar cells.

  8. Global theory to understand toroidal drift waves in steep gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua-sheng; Li, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from a typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf. H. S. Xie and Y. Xiao, Phys. Plasmas 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters "quantum number" l and ballooning angle ϑk , (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, >50 % , and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structures. With velocity space integral, semi-local theory predicts that the critical jump gradient of the most unstable ion temperature gradient mode from ground state l = 0 to non-ground state l = 1 is LT-1R ˜50 . These features can have important consequences to turbulent transport.

  9. Importance of pressure gradient in solid oxide fuel cell electrodes for modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Meng; Leung, Dennis Y. C.; Leung, Michael K. H.

    The pressure gradients in the electrodes of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) are frequently neglected without any justification in calculating the concentration overpotentials of the SOFC electrodes in modeling studies. In this short communication, a comparative study has been conducted to study the effect of pressure gradients on mass transfer and the resulting concentration overpotentials of an SOFC running on methane (CH 4) fuel. It is found that the pressure gradients in both anode and cathode are significant in the fuel cell electrochemical activities. Neglecting the anode pressure gradient in the calculation can lead to underestimation of the concentration overpotential by about 20% at a typical current density of 5000 A m -2 and at a temperature of 1073 K. The deviation can be even larger at a higher temperature. At the cathode, neglecting the pressure gradient can result in overestimation of the concentration overpotential by about 10% under typical working conditions.

  10. Preparation and characterization of chemical gradient surfaces and their application for the study of cellular interaction phenomena

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardy, TG; Schakenraad, JM; vanderMei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    1997-01-01

    Chemical gradient surfaces are surfaces with a gradually changing chemistry along their length which is responsible for a position bound variation in physical properties, most notably, the wettability. In this review, methods to prepare (palladium deposition, diffusion technique, density gradient me

  11. MAGNETIC FIELD GRADIENT EFFECTS ON ION FLUX BEHAVIORS IN ECR PLASMA SOURCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The available electron cyclotron resonance plasma source has been simulated in two-dimensional configuration space (z, r) and three-dimensional velocity space (Vz, Vr Vθ). The simulation is focused on the magnetic field gradient effects on ion flux behaviors in electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources. The simulation results show that, when the magnetic field gradients increase, electron temperature, plasma density, ionization rate, and ion flux in Zdirection would decrease, while ion energy and plasma potential would increase.

  12. First-principles calculation of electric field gradients in metals, semiconductors, and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwanziger, J.W. [Dalhousie Univ, Dept Chem, Halifax, NS (Canada); Dalhousie Univ, Inst Res Mat, Halifax, NS (Canada); Torrent, M. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Dept Phys Theor and Appl, Bruyeres 91 (France)

    2008-07-01

    A scheme for computing electric field gradients within the projector augmented wave (PAW) formalism of density functional theory is presented. On the basis of earlier work (M. Profeta, F. Mauri, C.J. Pickard, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 541, 2003) the present implementation handles metallic cases as well as insulators and semiconductors with equal efficiency. Details of the implementation, as well as applications and the discussion of the limitations of the PAW method for computing electric field gradients are presented. (authors)

  13. First-principles calculation of electric field gradients in metals, semiconductors, and insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scheme for computing electric field gradients within the projector augmented wave (PAW) formalism of density functional theory is presented. On the basis of earlier work (M. Profeta, F. Mauri, C.J. Pickard, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 541, 2003) the present implementation handles metallic cases as well as insulators and semiconductors with equal efficiency. Details of the implementation, as well as applications and the discussion of the limitations of the PAW method for computing electric field gradients are presented. (authors)

  14. A Novel Method Of Gradient Forming and Fluid Manipulation in Reduced Gravity Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran N.; Leslie, F.

    1999-01-01

    The use of magnetic fields to control the motion and position of non-conducting liquids has received growing interest in recent times. The possibility of using the forces exerted by a nonuniform magnetic field on a ferrofluid to not only achieve fluid manipulation but also to actively control fluid motion makes it an attractive candidate for applications such as heat transfer in space systems. Terrestrial heat transfer equipment often relies on the normal gravitational force to hold liquid in a desired position or to provide a buoyant force to enhance the heat transfer rate. The residual gravitational force present in a space environment may no longer serve these useful functions and other forces, such as surface tension, can play a significant role in determining heat transfer rates. Although typically overwhelmed by gravitational forces in terrestrial applications, the body force induced in a ferrofluid by a nonuniform magnetic field can help to achieve these objectives in a microgravity environment. This paper will address the fluid manipulation aspect and will comprise of results from model fluid experiments and numerical modeling of the problem. Results from a novel method of forming concentration gradients that are applicable to low gravity applications will be presented. The ground based experiments are specifically tailored to demonstrate the magnetic manipulation capability of a ferrofluid and show that gravitational effects can be countered in carefully designed systems. The development of governing equations for the system will be presented along with a sampling of numerical results.

  15. Strength gradient enhances fatigue resistance of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiabin; Wang, Gang; Wang, Hongtao; Wei, Yujie; Gao, Huajian

    2016-02-01

    Steels are heavily used in infrastructure and the transportation industry, and enhancing their fatigue resistance is a major challenge in materials engineering. In this study, by introducing a gradient microstructure into 304 austenitic steel, which is one of the most widely used types of stainless steel, we show that a strength gradient substantially enhances the fatigue life of the material. Pre-notched samples with negative strength gradients in front of the notch’s tip endure many more fatigue cycles than do samples with positive strength gradients during the crack initiation stage, and samples with either type of gradient perform better than do gradient-free samples with the same average yield strength. However, as a crack grows, samples with positive strength gradients exhibit better resistance to fatigue crack propagation than do samples with negative gradients or no gradient. This study demonstrates a simple and promising strategy for using gradient structures to enhance the fatigue resistance of materials and complements related studies of strength and ductility.

  16. Combinational concentration gradient confinement through stagnation flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicia, Toh G G; Yang, Chun; Wang, Zhiping; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-01-21

    Concentration gradient generation in microfluidics is typically constrained by two conflicting mass transport requirements: short characteristic times (τ) for precise temporal control of concentration gradients but at the expense of high flow rates and hence, high flow shear stresses (σ). To decouple the limitations from these parameters, here we propose the use of stagnation flows to confine concentration gradients within large velocity gradients that surround the stagnation point. We developed a modified cross-slot (MCS) device capable of feeding binary and combinational concentration sources in stagnation flows. We show that across the velocity well, source-sink pairs can form permanent concentration gradients. As source-sink concentration pairs are continuously supplied to the MCS, a permanently stable concentration gradient can be generated. Tuning the flow rates directly controls the velocity gradients, and hence the stagnation point location, allowing the confined concentration gradient to be focused. In addition, the flow rate ratio within the MCS rapidly controls (τ ∼ 50 ms) the location of the stagnation point and the confined combinational concentration gradients at low flow shear (0.2 Pa < σ < 2.9 Pa). The MCS device described in this study establishes the method for using stagnation flows to rapidly generate and position low shear combinational concentration gradients for shear sensitive biological assays. PMID:26671507

  17. Transport of Parallel Momentum by Toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient Instability near Marginality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Yoon and T.S. Hahm

    2009-10-20

    The turbulent angular momentum flux carried by ions resonant with toroidal ion temperature gradient(ITG) instability is calculated via quasilinear calculation using the phase-space conserving gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame. The results near ITG marginality indicate that the inward turbulent equipartition (TEP) momentum pinch [Hahm T.S. et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 072302] remains as the most robust part of pinch. In addition, ion temperature gradient driven momentum flux is inward for typical parameters, while density gradient driven momentum flux is outward as in the previous kinetic result in slab geometry [Diamond P.H. et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 012303].

  18. A gradient system on the quantum information space that realizes the Karmarkar flow for linear programming

    OpenAIRE

    Uwano, Yoshio; Yuya, Hiromi

    2008-01-01

    In the paper of Uwano [Czech. J. of Phys., vol.56, pp.1311-1316 (2006)], a gradient system is found on the space of density matrices endowed with the quantum SLD Fisher metric (to be referred to as the quantum information space) that realizes a generalization of a gradient system on the space of multinomial distributions studied by Nakamura [Japan J. Indust. Appl. Math., vol.10, pp.179-189 (1993)]. On motived by those papers, the present paper aims to construct a gradient system on the quantu...

  19. Magnet design for superconducting open gradient magnetic separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahoranta, Maria; Lehtonen, Jorma; Mikkonen, Risto

    2003-04-01

    The use of superconductivity opens new applications for magnetic separation because very high magnetic fields become available. In this paper the magnet design for a laboratory scale superconducting open gradient magnetic separator is presented. The separator will be used to optimize the separation parameters for different kinds of applications, such as the foundry sand purification. Therefore, the goal of the magnet design is to obtain a constant magnetic force density distribution inside the working volume. The high magnitude of magnetic force density is required because the materials to be separated have low magnetic susceptibilities. The maximum achievable force density is determined by the critical current in superconducting magnets. The advantages and drawbacks of solenoid, racetrack and saddle coil geometries are compared. Ways for improving the performance of the system is discussed. Finally, the influence of the stray field on the slurry flow outside the working volume is studied.

  20. Analysis of physical mechanisms underlying density-dependent transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landman, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the interaction between (large) density gradients and flow and transport in porous media is studied. Large gradients in the density of groundwater exist for example near deep salt rock formations, which are considered as possible long-term storage sites for radioactive waste. Further

  1. Wnt Secretion and Gradient Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir L. Katanaev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentration gradients formed by the lipid-modified morphogens of the Wnt family are known for their pivotal roles during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt morphogens are also implicated in a variety of human diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, the signaling cascades triggered by Wnts have received considerable attention during recent decades. However, how Wnts are secreted and how concentration gradients are formed remains poorly understood. The use of model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster has provided important advances in this area. For instance, we have previously shown that the lipid raft-associated reggie/flotillin proteins influence Wnt secretion and spreading in Drosophila. Our work supports the notion that producing cells secrete Wnt molecules in at least two pools: a poorly diffusible one and a reggie/flotillin-dependent highly diffusible pool which allows morphogen spreading over long distances away from its source of production. Here we revise the current views of Wnt secretion and spreading, and propose two models for the role of the reggie/flotillin proteins in these processes: (i reggies/flotillins regulate the basolateral endocytosis of the poorly diffusible, membrane-bound Wnt pool, which is then sorted and secreted to apical compartments for long-range diffusion, and (ii lipid rafts organized by reggies/flotillins serve as “dating points” where extracellular Wnt transiently interacts with lipoprotein receptors to allow its capture and further spreading via lipoprotein particles. We further discuss these processes in the context of human breast cancer. A better understanding of these phenomena may be relevant for identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies.

  2. Gradient type optimization methods for electronic structure calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xin; Wen, Zaiwen; Zhou, Aihui

    2013-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) in electronic structure calculations can be formulated as either a nonlinear eigenvalue or direct minimization problem. The most widely used approach for solving the former is the so-called self-consistent field (SCF) iteration. A common observation is that the convergence of SCF is not clear theoretically while approaches with convergence guarantee for solving the latter are often not competitive to SCF numerically. In this paper, we study gradient type methods for solving the direct minimization problem by constructing new iterations along the gradient on the Stiefel manifold. Global convergence (i.e., convergence to a stationary point from any initial solution) as well as local convergence rate follows from the standard theory for optimization on manifold directly. A major computational advantage is that the computation of linear eigenvalue problems is no longer needed. The main costs of our approaches arise from the assembling of the total energy functional and its grad...

  3. NIF optical specifications - the importance of the RMS gradient specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, J M; Cotton, C T; English, R E; Henesian, M A; Hunt J T; Kelly, J H; Lawson, J K; Sacks, J B; Shoup, M J; Trenholme, W H

    1998-07-06

    The performance of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), especially in terms of laser focusability, will be determined by several key factors. One of these key factors is the optical specification for the thousands of large aperture optics that will comprise the 192 beamlines. We have previously reported on the importance of the specification of the power spectral density (PSD) on NIF performance. Recently, we have been studying the importance of long spatial wavelength (>33 mm) phase errors on focusability. We have concluded that the preferred metric for determining the impact of these long spatial wavelength phase errors is the rms phase gradient. In this paper, we outline the overall approach to NIF optical specifications, detail the impact of the rms phase gradient on NIF focusability, discuss its trade-off with the PSD in determining the spot size and review measurements of optics similar to those to be manufactured for NIF.

  4. Physisorbed Polymer-Tethered Lipid Bilayer with Lipopolymer Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Naumann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Physisorbed polymer-tethered lipid bilayers consisting of phospholipids and lipopolymers represent an attractive planar model membrane platform, in which bilayer fluidity and membrane elastic properties can be regulated through lipopolymer molar concentration. Herein we report a method for the fabrication of such a planar model membrane system with a lateral gradient of lipopolymer density. In addition, a procedure is described, which leads to a sharp boundary between regions of low and high lipopolymer molar concentrations. Resulting gradients and sharp boundaries are visualized on the basis of membrane buckling structures at elevated lipopolymer concentrations using epifluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, results from spot photobleaching experiments are presented, which provide insight into the lipid lateral fluidity in these model membrane architectures. The presented experimental data highlight a planar, solid-supported membrane characterized by fascinating length scale-dependent dynamics and elastic properties with remarkable parallels to those observed in cellular membranes.

  5. Global Theory to Understand Toroidal Drift Waves in Steep Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf., Xie and Xiao, Phys. Plasmas, 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters `quantum number' $l$ and ballooning angle $\\vartheta_k$, (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, $>50\\%$, and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structu...

  6. Mathematics of Experimentally Generated Chemoattractant Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Marten; van Haastert, Peter J M

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells move in the direction of a chemical gradient. Several assays have been developed to measure this chemotactic response, but no complete mathematical models of the spatial and temporal gradients are available to describe the fundamental principles of chemotaxis. Here we provide analytical solutions for the gradients formed by release of chemoattractant from a point source by passive diffusion or forced flow (micropipettes) and gradients formed by laminar diffusion in a Zigmond chamber. The results show that gradients delivered with a micropipette are formed nearly instantaneously, are very steep close to the pipette, and have a steepness that is strongly dependent on the distance from the pipette. In contrast, gradients in a Zigmond chamber are formed more slowly, are nearly independent of the distance from the source, and resemble the temporal and spatial properties of the natural cAMP wave that Dictyostelium cells experience during cell aggregation. PMID:27271915

  7. Mathematics of Experimentally Generated Chemoattractant Gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Marten; van Haastert, Peter J M

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells move in the direction of a chemical gradient. Several assays have been developed to measure this chemotactic response, but no complete mathematical models of the spatial and temporal gradients are available to describe the fundamental principles of chemotaxis. Here we provide analytical solutions for the gradients formed by release of chemoattractant from a point source by passive diffusion or forced flow (micropipettes) and gradients formed by laminar diffusion in a Zigmond chamber. The results show that gradients delivered with a micropipette are formed nearly instantaneously, are very steep close to the pipette, and have a steepness that is strongly dependent on the distance from the pipette. In contrast, gradients in a Zigmond chamber are formed more slowly, are nearly independent of the distance from the source, and resemble the temporal and spatial properties of the natural cAMP wave that Dictyostelium cells experience during cell aggregation.

  8. Gradients in the number of species at reef-seagrass ecotones explained by gradients in abundance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Tuya

    Full Text Available Gradients in the composition and diversity (e.g. number of species of faunal assemblages are common at ecotones between juxtaposed habitats. Patterns in the number of species, however, can be confounded by patterns in abundance of individuals, because more species tend to be found wherever there are more individuals. We tested whether proximity to reefs influenced patterns in the composition and diversity ('species density'  =  number of species per area and 'species richness'  =  number of species per number of individuals of prosobranch gastropods in meadows of two seagrasses with different physiognomy: Posidonia and Amphibolis. A change in the species composition was observed from reef-seagrass edges towards the interiors of Amphibolis, but not in Posidonia meadows. Similarly, the abundance of gastropods and species density was higher at edges relative to interiors of Amphibolis meadows, but not in Posidonia meadows. However, species richness was not affected by proximity to reefs in either type of seagrass meadow. The higher number of species at the reef-Amphibolis edge was therefore a consequence of higher abundance, rather than species richness per se. These results suggest that patterns in the composition and diversity of fauna with proximity to adjacent habitats, and the underlying processes that they reflect, likely depend on the physiognomy of the habitat.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of Taylor-Couette flow subjected to a radial temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Hao; Liu, Nansheng, E-mail: lns@ustc.edu.cn; Lu, Xiyun [Department of Modern Mechanics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Khomami, Bamin, E-mail: bkhomami@utk.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Direct numerical simulations have been performed to study the Taylor-Couette (TC) flow between two rotating, coaxial cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient. Specifically, the influence of the buoyant force and the outer cylinder rotation on the turbulent TC flow system with the radius ratio η = 0.912 was examined. For the co-rotating TC flows with Re{sub i} (inner cylinder) =1000 and Re{sub o} (outer cylinder) =100, a transition pathway to highly turbulent flows is realized by increasing σ, a parameter signifying the ratio of buoyant to inertial force. This nonlinear flow transition involves four intriguing states that emerge in sequence as chaotic wavy vortex flow for σ = 0, wavy interpenetrating spiral flows for σ = 0.02 and 0.05, intermittent turbulent spirals for σ = 0.1 and 0.2, and turbulent spirals for σ = 0.4. Overall, the fluid motion changes from a centrifugally driven flow regime characterized by large-scale wavy Taylor vortices (TVs) to a buoyancy-dominated flow regime characterized by small-scale turbulent vortices. Commensurate changes in turbulence statistics and heat transfer are seen as a result of the weakening of large-scale TV circulations and enhancement of turbulent motions. Additionally, the influence of variation of the outer cylinder rotation, −500 < Re{sub o} < 500 in presence of buoyancy (σ = 0.1) with Re{sub i} = 1000, has been considered. Specifically, it is demonstrated that this variation strongly influences the azimuthal and axial mean flows with a weaker influence on the fluctuating fluid motions. Of special interest, here are the turbulent dynamics near the outer wall where a marked decrease of turbulence intensity and a sign inversion of the Reynolds stress R{sub rz} are observed for the strongly counter-rotating regimes (Re{sub o} = − 300 and −500). To this end, it has been shown that the underlying flow physics for this drastic modification are associated with the modification of the correlation

  10. On lower order strain gradient plasticity theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    By way of numerical examples, this paper explores the nature of solutions to a class of strain gradient plasticity theories that employ conventional stresses, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions. Strain gradients come into play in these modified conventional theories only to alter...... the tangent moduli governing increments of stress and strain. It is shown that the modification is far from benign from a mathematical standpoint, changing the qualitative character of solutions and leading to a new type of localization that is at odds with what is expected from a strain gradient theory....... The findings raise questions about the physical acceptability of this class of strain gradient theories....

  11. Wireless SAW Based Temperature Gradient Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Photonics proposes design and development of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature gradient sensor for instrumentation of thermal protection systems...

  12. Space charge and steady state current in LDPE samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim; Bambery, K. R.; Fleming, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic theory predicts that a dielectric sample in which a steady DC current of density ε is flowing, and in which the ratio of permittivity ε to conductivity σ varies with position, will acquire a space charge density j·grad(ε/σ). A simple and convenient way to generate an ε/σ gradient...... in a homogeneous sample is to establish a temperature gradient across it. The resulting spatial variation in ε is usually small in polymeric insulators, but the variation in σ can be appreciable. Laser induced pressure pulse (LIPP) measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of ultra pure LDPE equipped...

  13. High density matter at RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thomas S Ullrich

    2004-02-01

    QCD predicts a phase transition between hadronic matter and a quark-gluon plasma at high energy density. The relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a new facility dedicated to the experimental study of matter under extreme conditions. Already the first round of experimental results at RHIC indicated that the conditions to create a new state of matter are indeed reached in the collisions of heavy nuclei. Studies of particle spectra and their correlations at low transverse momenta provide evidence of strong pressure gradients in the highly interacting dense medium and hint that we observe a system in thermal equilibrium. Recent runs with high statistics allow us to explore the regime of hard-scattering processes where the suppression of hadrons at large transverse momentum, and quenching of di-jets are observed thus providing further evidence for extreme high density matter created in collisions at RHIC.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Density Current Evolution in a Diverging Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Javan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When a buoyant inflow of higher density enters a reservoir, it sinks below the ambient water and forms an underflow. Downstream of the plunge point, the flow becomes progressively diluted due to the fluid entrainment. This study seeks to explore the ability of 2D width-averaged unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS simulation approach for resolving density currents in an inclined diverging channel. 2D width-averaged unsteady RANS equations closed by a buoyancy-modified − turbulence model are integrated in time with a second-order fractional step approach coupled with a direct implicit method and discretized in space on a staggered mesh using a second-order accurate finite volume approach incorporating a high-resolution semi-Lagrangian technique for the convective terms. A series of 2D width-averaged unsteady simulations is carried out for density currents. Comparisons with the experimental measurements and the other numerical simulations show that the predictions of velocity and density field are with reasonable accuracy.

  15. Variations of n /sub e/h/ profiles and of vertical gradients at low latitudes during disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncharova, E.E.; Zevakina, R.A.; Palacio, L.

    1979-11-01

    The paper examines the electron density height profile and vertical gradients of electron density distribution as a function of the type and phase of ionospheric disturbances on the basis of data from the Cuban geophysical center for 1968. The difference between low-latitude height variations of electron density and those at midlatitudes is investigated, and possible causes of electron density height variations at low latitudes are discussed.

  16. Electric field gradient and electronic properties of crown thioether compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo Dalmatti Alves Lima, Filipe, E-mail: flima@if.usp.br; Rodrigues do Nascimento, Rafael; Brown Goncalves, Marcos [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Cottenier, Stefaan [Ghent University, Center for Molecular Modeling (Belgium); Caldas, Marilia Junqueira; Petrilli, Helena Maria [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    We compare published TDPAC experiments on {sup 111}Cd in the crown thioether C{sub 6}H{sub 12}S{sub 3}AgCl with ab-initio electronic structure calculations performed within the framework of the Density Functional Theory using the Projector Augmented Wave method. We conclude from this comparison that the Cd atom at the very moment of the TDPAC experiment is positively charged, and we point out to a methodological difference between reproducing experimental electric-field gradients in molecules versus solid metals.

  17. An Inexpensive Digital Gradient Controller for HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, James E.; Carr, Peter W.

    1983-01-01

    Use of gradient elution techniques in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is often essential for direct separation of complex mixtures. Since most commercial controllers have features that are of marginal value for instructional purposes, a low-cost controller capable of illustrating essential features of gradient elution was developed.…

  18. Mathematics of Experimentally Generated Chemoattractant Gradients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Marten; van Haastert, Peter J M; Jin, Tian; Hereld, Dale

    2016-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells move in the direction of a chemical gradient. Several assays have been developed to measure this chemotactic response, but no complete mathematical models of the spatial and temporal gradients are available to describe the fundamental principles of chemotaxis. Here we provide a

  19. Newton's method in the context of gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Neuberger

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a common theoretical treatment for gradient and Newton type methods for general classes of problems. First, for Euler-Lagrange equations Newton's method is characterized as an (asymptotically optimal variable steepest descent method. Second, Sobolev gradient type minimization is developed for general problems using a continuous Newton method which takes into account a "boundary condition" operator.

  20. On 4-dimensional gradient shrinking solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Lei; Wallach, Nolan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we classify the four dimensional gradient shrinking solitons under certain curvature conditions satisfied by all solitons arising from finite time singularities of Ricci flow on compact four manifolds with positive isotropic curvature. As a corollary we generalize a result of Perelman on three dimensional gradient shrinking solitons to dimension four.

  1. Dual fuel gradients in uranium silicide plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, B.W. [Babock and Wilcox, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Babcock & Wilcox has been able to achieve dual gradient plates with good repeatability in small lots of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} plates. Improvements in homogeneity and other processing parameters and techniques have allowed the development of contoured fuel within the cladding. The most difficult obstacles to overcome have been the ability to evaluate the bidirectional fuel loadings in comparison to the perfect loading model and the different methods of instilling the gradients in the early compact stage. The overriding conclusion is that to control the contour of the fuel, a known relationship between the compact, the frames and final core gradient must exist. Therefore, further development in the creation and control of dual gradients in fuel plates will involve arriving at a plausible gradient requirement and building the correct model between the compact configuration and the final contoured loading requirements.

  2. Stellar Metallicity Gradients in SDSS galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roig, Benjamin; Yan, Renbin

    2015-01-01

    We infer stellar metallicity and abundance ratio gradients for a sample of red galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Main galaxy sample. Because this sample does not have multiple spectra at various radii in a single galaxy, we measure these gradients statistically. We separate galaxies into stellar mass bins, stack their spectra in redshift bins, and calculate the measured absorption line indices in projected annuli by differencing spectra in neighboring redshift bins. After determining the line indices, we use stellar population modeling from the EZ\\_Ages software to calculate ages, metallicities, and abundance ratios within each annulus. Our data covers the central regions of these galaxies, out to slightly higher than $1 R_{e}$. We find detectable gradients in metallicity and relatively shallow gradients in abundance ratios, similar to results found for direct measurements of individual galaxies. The gradients are only weakly dependent on stellar mass, and this dependence is well-correlated with...

  3. Multi-parameter gradient procedure for polarimetry data inversion in tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrzanowski, J., E-mail: j.chrzanowski@am.szczecin.pl [Maritime University, Szczecin Wały Chrobrego 1/2 (Poland); Kravtsov, Yu. A. [Maritime University, Szczecin Wały Chrobrego 1/2 (Poland); Mazon, D. [Association Euratom/CEA, CEA Cadarache DSM/IRFM, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); JET, Culham (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► We use gradient procedure to fit plasma parameters to polarimetric data. ► Calculations are performed in developed by authors angular variables technique. ► Numerical results are compared with experimentally measured angular parameters. ► We observe satisfied accuracy of inversion procedure after several iterations. -- Abstract: Multi-parameter gradient procedure is suggested which allows fitting tokamak plasma model to polarimetric data. One of the simplest version of gradient procedure deals with four parameters model: maximum values of electron density, maximum value of electric current density in plasma, common radius of electron density, electric current distributions and increment of the safety factor inside plasma. Using recently developed by authors angular variables technique (AVT) in plasma polarimetry we may compute angular parameters of polarization ellipse for a given set of four plasma parameters and compare them with experimentally measured angular parameters. With angular parameters, measured in two channels polarimetric system (two azimuthal and two ellipticity angles, totally four experimental values). Applying then gradient procedure for squared difference between computed and measured parameters, we find four parameters of plasma model and thereby perform inversion of polarimetric data. Numerical simulations have approved that gradient procedure provides acceptable accuracy of inversion already after several iterations.

  4. Experimental study on shrinkage characteristics of semi-coke/coke under gradient temperature during coking process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Z.; Guo, Z.; Wang, S. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2006-04-15

    A furnace equipped with a removable measuring scale in the side was applied to study on the shrinkage characteristics of semi-coke/coke under gradient temperature during coking process. 1500 g coking coal was used in the test. The effects of coking time, central temperature, heating-up rate and gradient temperature on lateral shrinkage were studied under different heating rate. The results show that the coal begins to shrink at a central temperature range of 280 to 360{sup o}C and ends at about 900{sup o}C. The lateral shrinkage is in a range of 5 mm to 8.5 mm and lateral shrinkage ratio is 7 to 12%. Generally, the gradient temperature increases and lateral shrinkage decreases with increasing heating-up rate and density. The central temperature of beginning shrinkage, the second shrinkage peak, gradient temperature of different locations and shrinkage coefficient of coal decreases with the increase of heating rate. The central temperature of beginning shrinkage and gradient temperature of different locations increase with increasing density. But the increase of density has no influence on shrinkage coefficient and shrinkage peak. In addition, the temperature rise rates at different locations are different during different coking stages. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Dislocation microstructures and strain-gradient plasticity with one active slip plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Sergio; Garroni, Adriana; Müller, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We study dislocation networks in the plane using the vectorial phase-field model introduced by Ortiz and coworkers, in the limit of small lattice spacing. We show that, in a scaling regime where the total length of the dislocations is large, the phase field model reduces to a simpler model of the strain-gradient type. The limiting model contains a term describing the three-dimensional elastic energy and a strain-gradient term describing the energy of the geometrically necessary dislocations, characterized by the tangential gradient of the slip. The energy density appearing in the strain-gradient term is determined by the solution of a cell problem, which depends on the line tension energy of dislocations. In the case of cubic crystals with isotropic elasticity our model shows that complex microstructures may form in which dislocations with different Burgers vector and orientation react with each other to reduce the total self-energy.

  6. Optimum dimple diameter for friction reduction with laser surface texturing: the effect of velocity gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphological texturing of surfaces has demonstrated high potential to reduce friction and wear. In order to understand the effect of different velocity gradients over the textured area on the optimum dimple diameter, we textured brass pins with round dimples having diameters between 20 and 200 μm. The dimple depth and packing density were kept constant. The samples were tested in a pin-on-disc fashion against sapphire discs and experiments were conducted under mixed lubrication and for two different sliding radii. Our results show that larger velocity gradients favor smaller dimples, whereas for the smaller velocity gradients, larger dimple diameters were beneficial. The effect of there being an influence of the velocity gradient was also found in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Experimentally, friction forces could be reduced by up to 80%, demonstrating the tremendous potential of laser surface texturing (LST) to lower friction forces and reduce CO2 emissions. (paper)

  7. Intracellular chemical gradients: morphing principle in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Robert G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in computational biology allow systematic investigations to ascertain whether internal chemical gradients can be maintained in bacteria – an open question at the resolution limit of fluorescence microscopy. While it was previously believed that the small bacterial cell size and fast diffusion in the cytoplasm effectively remove any such gradient, a new computational study published in BMC Biophysics supports the emerging view that gradients can exist. The study arose from the recent observation that phosphorylated CtrA forms a gradient prior to cell division in Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium known for its complicated cell cycle. Tropini et al. (2012 postulate that such gradients can provide an internal chemical compass, directing protein localization, cell division and cell development. More specifically, they describe biochemical and physical constraints on the formation of such gradients and explore a number of existing bacterial cell morphologies. These chemical gradients may limit in vitro analyses, and may ensure timing control and robustness to fluctuations during critical stages in cell development.

  8. Liquid mixture convection during phase separation in a temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamorgese, A. G.; Mauri, R.

    2011-03-01

    We simulate the phase separation of a low-viscosity binary mixture, assuming that the fluid system is confined between two walls that are cooled down to different temperatures below the critical point of the mixture, corresponding to quenches within the unstable range of its phase diagram. Spinodal decomposition patterns for off-critical mixtures are studied numerically in two dimensions in the creeping flow limit and for a large Lewis number, together with their dependence on the fluidity coefficient. Our numerical results reproduce the large-scale unidirectional migration of phase-separating droplets that was observed experimentally by Califano et al. ["Large-scale, unidirectional convection during phase separation of a density-matched liquid mixture," Phys. Fluids 17, 094109 (2005)], who measured typical speeds that are quite larger than the Marangoni velocity. To understand this finding, we then studied the temperature-gradient-induced motion of an isolated droplet of the minority phase embedded in a continuous phase, showing that when the drop is near local equilibrium, its speed is of the same order as the Marangoni velocity, i.e., it is proportional to the unperturbed temperature gradient and the fluidity coefficient. However, far from local equilibrium, i.e., for very large unperturbed temperature gradients, the drop first accelerates to a speed that is larger than the Marangoni velocity, then, later, it decelerates, exhibiting an increase-decrease behavior, as described by Yin et al. ["Thermocapillary migration of nondeformable drops," Phys. Fluids 20, 082101 (2008)]. Such behavior is due to the large nonequilibrium, Korteweg-driven convection, which at first accelerates the droplets to relatively large velocities, and then tends to induce an approximately uniform inside temperature distribution so that the drop experiences an effective temperature gradient that is much smaller than the unperturbed one and, consequently, decelerates.

  9. Density Distributions of Cyclotrimethylenetrinitramines (RDX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D M

    2002-03-19

    As part of the US Army Foreign Comparative Testing (FCT) program the density distributions of six samples of class 1 RDX were measured using the density gradient technique. This technique was used in an attempt to distinguish between RDX crystallized by a French manufacturer (designated insensitive or IRDX) from RDX manufactured at Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP), the current source of RDX for Department of Defense (DoD). Two samples from different lots of French IRDX had an average density of 1.7958 {+-} 0.0008 g/cc. The theoretical density of a perfect RDX crystal is 1.806 g/cc. This yields 99.43% of the theoretical maximum density (TMD). For two HAAP RDX lots the average density was 1.786 {+-} 0.002 g/cc, only 98.89% TMD. Several other techniques were used for preliminary characterization of one lot of French IRDX and two lot of HAAP RDX. Light scattering, SEM and polarized optical microscopy (POM) showed that SNPE and Holston RDX had the appropriate particle size distribution for Class 1 RDX. High performance liquid chromatography showed quantities of HMX in HAAP RDX. French IRDX also showed a 1.1 C higher melting point compared to HAAP RDX in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) consistent with no melting point depression due to the HMX contaminant. A second part of the program involved characterization of Holston RDX recrystallized using the French process. After reprocessing the average density of the Holston RDX was increased to 1.7907 g/cc. Apparently HMX in RDX can act as a nucleating agent in the French RDX recrystallization process. The French IRDX contained no HMX, which is assumed to account for its higher density and narrower density distribution. Reprocessing of RDX from Holston improved the average density compared to the original Holston RDX, but the resulting HIRDX was not as dense as the original French IRDX. Recrystallized Holston IRDX crystals were much larger (3-500 {micro}m or more) then either the original class 1 HAAP RDX or

  10. Inferred calcification rate of a temperate azooxanthellate caryophylliid coral along a wide latitudinal gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroselli, E.; Brambilla, V.; Ricci, F.; Mattioli, G.; Levy, O.; Falini, G.; Dubinsky, Z.; Goffredo, S.

    2016-09-01

    Correlations between environmental parameters (depth temperature and solar radiation) and growth parameters (bulk skeletal density, linear extension rate and net calcification rate) of the solitary azooxanthellate coral, Caryophyllia inornata, were investigated along an 8° latitudinal gradient on the western Italian coasts. Net calcification rate correlated positively with both bulk skeletal density and linear extension rate, showing that C. inornata allocates calcification resources evenly to thickening the skeleton and increasing linear growth. Overall, the three growth parameters did not follow gradients in the two environmental parameters, showing a different trend compared to most studies on zooxanthellate corals. However, the results are in agreement with the only previous analysis of an azooxanthellate coral, Leptopsammia pruvoti, studied along the same latitudinal gradient. In a comparison of the response to temperature of all Mediterranean species whose growth has been investigated to date, azooxanthellate corals were more tolerant to temperature increases than zooxanthellate corals.

  11. Asymmetric transmission of acoustic waves in a layer thickness distribution gradient structure using metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jung-San; Chang, I.-Ling; Huang, Wan-Ting; Chen, Lien-Wen; Huang, Guan-Hua

    2016-09-01

    This research presents an innovative asymmetric transmission design using alternate layers of water and metamaterial with complex mass density. The directional transmission behavior of acoustic waves is observed numerically inside the composite structure with gradient layer thickness distribution and the rectifying performance of the present design is evaluated. The layer thickness distributions with arithmetic and geometric gradients are considered and the effect of gradient thickness on asymmetric wave propagation is systematically investigated using finite element simulation. The numerical results indicate that the maximum pressure density and transmission through the proposed structure are significantly influenced by the wave propagation direction over a wide range of audible frequencies. Tailoring the thickness of the layered structure enables the manipulation of asymmetric wave propagation within the desired frequency range. In conclusion, the proposed design offers a new possibility for developing directional-dependent acoustic devices.

  12. Photosynthetic activity of spinach chloroplasts after isopycnic centrifugation in gradients of silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, J J; Price, C A

    1974-10-01

    Chloroplast suspensions from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) were clearly resolved into intact and stripped chloroplasts by isopycnic centrifugation in density gradients of silica sol ("Ludox") and polyethlene glycol. The intact chloroplasts fixed CO(2) and evolved O(2) more rapidly than the crude suspensions; the stripped chloroplasts were inactive. During the photosynthetic fixation of (14)CO(2) in the intact chloroplasts recovered from the gradient, the (14)C label was observed to spread through the photosynthetic intermediate pools, as well as into starch, which indicates that the purified chloroplasts are metabolically competent. This appears to be the first report of the retention of photosynthetic activity following the purification of chloroplasts in density gradients. PMID:16658922

  13. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking

  14. GRADIENT ENERGY DETECTION OF LSB STEGANOGRAPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi; Sui Aifen; Niu Xinxin; Yang Yixian

    2005-01-01

    The spatial Least Significant Bit (LSB) steganography results in the alteration of the smooth characteristics between adjoining pixels of the raw image. The relation between the length of embedded message and the gradient energy is theoretically analyzed, and then a steganalysis and detection method, named Gradient Energy-Flipping Rate (GEFR) detection is proposed. Based on the analysis of the variation of the gradient energy, which results from the LSB steganography in color and grayscale image, the secret message embedded in the target image is detected, and the length of the embedded message is estimated. The method is proved effective and accurate by simulation (detection rate reaches 0.01bit per pixel).

  15. Colour and stellar population gradients in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tortora, C; Cardone, V F; Capaccioli, M; Jetzer, P; Molinaro, R

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the colour, age and metallicity gradients in a wide sample of local SDSS early- and late-type galaxies. From the fitting of stellar population models we find that metallicity is the main driver of colour gradients and the age in the central regions is a dominant parameter which rules the scatter in both metallicity and age gradients. We find a consistency with independent observations and a set of simulations. From the comparison with simulations and theoretical considerations we are able to depict a general picture of a formation scenario.

  16. Gradient Yamabe Solitons on Warped Products

    OpenAIRE

    He, Chenxu

    2011-01-01

    The special nature of gradient Yamabe soliton equation which was first observed by Cao-Sun-Zhang\\cite{CaoSunZhang} shows that a complete gradient Yamabe soliton with non-constant potential function is either defined on the Euclidean space with rotational symmetry, or on the warped product of the real line with a manifold of constant scalar curvature. In this paper we consider the classification in the latter case. We show that a complete gradient steady Yamabe soliton on warped product is nec...

  17. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Feng [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Physics & Electronic Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  18. Nf=2+1 QCD thermodynamics from gradient flow

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Yusuke; Iwami, Ryo; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Umeda, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The energy-momentum tensor is a very important quantity in QCD thermodynamics. Its expectation value contains information of the pressure and the energy density as its diagonal part. Further properties like viscosity and specific heat can be extracted from its correlation functions. A non-perturbative evaluation on lattice has been successful only for the pressure and the energy density by making use of property of the thermodynamical free energy intelligently. Recently a new method was introduced to calculate the energy-momentum tensor on lattice using the gradient flow. The method has been applied to quenched QCD and proved to be successful. In this paper we apply the gradient flow method to the Nf=2+1 flavors QCD. We adopt a single but fine lattice spacing which corresponds to $a\\simeq0.07$ fm. A wide range of temperature is covered from $T\\simeq174$ MeV to $697$ MeV. The $u$ and $d$ quarks are rather heavy $m_\\pi/m_\\rho\\simeq0.63$ but the $s$ quark is set to almost its physical mass $m_{\\eta_{ss}}/m_\\phi\\...

  19. Properties of Interstellar Turbulence from Gradients of Linear Radio Polarization Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Gaensler, B M

    2011-01-01

    Faraday rotation of linearly polarized radio signals provides a very sensitive probe of fluctuations in the interstellar magnetic field and ionized gas density resulting from magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We used a set of statistical tools to analyze images of the spatial gradient of linearly polarized radio emission ($|\

  20. Improved Lieb-Oxford exchange-correlation inequality with gradient correction

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Lewin

    2014-01-01

    We prove a Lieb-Oxford-type inequality on the exchange-correlation energy of a general many-particle quantum state, with a lower constant than the original statement but involving an additional gradient correction. The result is similar to a recent inequality of Benguria, Bley and Loss, except that the correction term is purely local, as is appropriate for density functional theory.

  1. An approach to the field study of hydraulic gradients in variable- salinity ground water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    A field study approach is proposed for reliably estimating hydraulic gradients in subregions within a region of variable-salinity ground water. It is based upon Hubbert's concept about the kind of density distributions that are required for ground water to have a potential. The approach consists of dividing a region of variable-salinity ground water into subregions with constant density, subregions with only vertical variations in density, and subregions with vertical and lateral variations in density before determining magnitude and direction of hydraulic gradients. The approach was applied to an unconfined coastal aquifer and also to a confined and layered coastal aquifer that is used for sub-surface injection. As the two applications show, the analysis of water levels and pressures from subregions with constant or approximately constant density and the analysis of pressures from subregions with only vertical variations in density provide simple and direct means for deducing the characteristics of hydraulic gradients within a region of variable-salinity ground water. -from Author

  2. Gradients in the Number of Species at Reef-Seagrass Ecotones Explained by Gradients in Abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuya, Fernando; Vanderklift, Mathew A.; Wernberg, Thomas; Thomsen, Mads S.

    2011-01-01

    Gradients in the composition and diversity (e.g. number of species) of faunal assemblages are common at ecotones between juxtaposed habitats. Patterns in the number of species, however, can be confounded by patterns in abundance of individuals, because more species tend to be found wherever there are more individuals. We tested whether proximity to reefs influenced patterns in the composition and diversity (‘species density’ = number of species per area and ‘species richness’ = number of species per number of individuals) of prosobranch gastropods in meadows of two seagrasses with different physiognomy: Posidonia and Amphibolis. A change in the species composition was observed from reef-seagrass edges towards the interiors of Amphibolis, but not in Posidonia meadows. Similarly, the abundance of gastropods and species density was higher at edges relative to interiors of Amphibolis meadows, but not in Posidonia meadows. However, species richness was not affected by proximity to reefs in either type of seagrass meadow. The higher number of species at the reef-Amphibolis edge was therefore a consequence of higher abundance, rather than species richness per se. These results suggest that patterns in the composition and diversity of fauna with proximity to adjacent habitats, and the underlying processes that they reflect, likely depend on the physiognomy of the habitat. PMID:21629654

  3. CMB Anisotropies from a Gradient Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    A pure gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect at linear level. We confirm this by showing that its contribution to the dipolar power asymmetry of CMB anisotropies vanishes, if Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To this end, the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit is extended to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. At second order, a gradient mode generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce a quadrupole moment. For instance in a matter-dominated model it is equal to 5/18 times the square of the linear gradient part. This quadrupole can be cancelled by superposing a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a non-linear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  4. Unimodal and crossmodal gradients of spatial attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Föcker, J.; Hötting, K.; Gondan, Matthias;

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) studies have shown that spatial attention is gradually distributed around the center of the attentional focus. The present study compared uni- and crossmodal gradients of spatial attention to investigate whether the orienting of auditory and visual...... spatial attention is based on modality specific or supramodal representations of space. Auditory and visual stimuli were presented from five speaker locations positioned in the right hemifield. Participants had to attend to the innermost or outmost right position in order to detect either visual...... or auditory deviant stimuli. Detection rates and event-related potentials (ERPs) indicated that spatial attention is distributed as a gradient. Unimodal spatial ERP gradients correlated with the spatial resolution of the modality. Crossmodal spatial gradients were always broader than the corresponding...

  5. Vegetation patterns and environmental gradients in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adomou, A.

    2005-01-01

    Key words: West Africa, Benin, vegetation patterns, floristic areas, phytogeography, chorology, floristic gradients, climatic factors, water availability, Dahomey Gap, threatened plants, biodiversity, conservation.Understanding plant species distribution patterns and the underlying factors is a cruc

  6. Artificial photosynthesis: Light-activated calcium gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David H.

    2002-12-01

    Photosynthetic organisms use light to create chemical gradients across bilayer membranes that drive energetically unfavourable reactions. Synthetic systems that accomplish the same feat may find uses in a variety of biological and non-biological applications.

  7. The gradient flow in simple field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Monahan, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The gradient flow is a valuable tool for the lattice community, with applications from scale-setting to implementing chiral fermions. Here I focus on the gradient flow as a means to suppress power-divergent mixing. Power-divergent mixing stems from the hypercubic symmetry of the lattice regulator and is a particular difficulty for calculations of, for example, high moments of parton distribution functions. The gradient flow removes power-divergent mixing on the lattice, provided the flow time is kept fixed in physical units, at the expense of introducing a new physical scale in the continuum. One approach to dealing with this new scale is the smeared operator product expansion, a formalism that systematically connects nonperturbative calculations of flowed operators to continuum physics. I study the role of the gradient flow in suppressing power-divergent mixing and present the first nonperturbative study in scalar field theory.

  8. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals. PMID:12149553

  9. The mapping of electronic energy distributions using experimental electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirelson, Vladimir G

    2002-08-01

    It is demonstrated that the approximate kinetic energy density calculated using the second-order gradient expansion with parameters of the multipole model fitted to experimental structure factors reproduces the main features of this quantity in a molecular or crystal position space. The use of the local virial theorem provides an appropriate derivation of approximate potential energy density and electronic energy density from the experimental (model) electron density and its derivatives. Consideration of these functions is not restricted by the critical points in the electron density and provides a comprehensive characterization of bonding in molecules and crystals.

  10. Chelation gradients for investigation of metal ion binding at silica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Balamurali; Higgins, Daniel A; Collinson, Maryanne M

    2014-08-26

    Centimeter-long surface gradients in bi- and tridentate chelating agents have been formed via controlled rate infusion, and the coordination of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) to these surfaces has been examined as a function of distance by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). 3-(Trimethoxysilylpropyl)ethylenediamine and 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine were used as precursor silanes to form the chelation gradients. When the gradients were exposed to a metal ion solution, a series of coordination complexes formed along the length of the substrate. For both chelating agents at the three different concentrations studied, the amine content gradually increased from top to bottom as expected for a surface chemical gradient. While the Cu 2p peak area had nearly the same profile as nitrogen, the Zn 2p peak area did not and exhibited a plateau along much of the gradient. The normalized nitrogen-to-metal peak area ratio (N/M) was found to be highly dependent on the type of ligand, its surface concentration, and the type of metal ion. For Cu(2+), the N/M ratio ranged from 8 to 11 on the diamine gradient and was ∼4 on the triamine gradient, while for Zn(2+), the N/M ratio was 4-8 on diamine and 5-7 on triamine gradients. The extent of protonation of amine groups was higher for the diamine gradients, which could lead to an increased N/M ratio. Both 1:1 and 1:2 ligand/metal complexes along with dinuclear complexes are proposed to form, with their relative amounts dependent on the ligand, ligand density, and metal ion. Collectively, the methods and results described herein represent a new approach to study metal ion binding and coordination on surfaces, which is especially important to the extraction, preconcentration, and separation of metal ions.

  11. Voltammetry under a Controlled Temperature Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Krejci, Jr.; Tomas Marvanek; Zuzana Sajdlova; Jan Krejci

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical measurements are generally done under isothermal conditions. Here we report on the application of a controlled temperature gradient between the working electrode surface and the solution. Using electrochemical sensors prepared on ceramic materials with extremely high specific heat conductivity, the temperature gradient between the electrode and solution was applied here as a second driving force. This application of the Soret phenomenon increases the mass transfer in the Nerns...

  12. Nonlinear strain gradient elastic thin shallow shells

    OpenAIRE

    Lazopoulos, K.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The governing equilibrium equations for strain gradient elastic thin shallow shells are derived, considering non-linear strains and linear constitutive strain gradient elastic relations. Adopting Kirchhoff's theory of thin shallow structures, the equilibrium equations, along with the boundary conditions, are formulated through a variational procedure. It turns out that new terms are introduced, indicating the importance of the cross-section area in bending of thin plates. ...

  13. Gradient-prolongation commutativity and graph theory

    OpenAIRE

    Musy, François; Nicolas, Laurent; Perrussel, Ronan

    2007-01-01

    6 pages International audience This Note gives conditions that must be imposed to algebraic multilevel discretizations involving at the same time nodal and edge elements so that a gradient-prolongation commutativity condition will be satisfied; this condition is very important, since it characterizes the gradients of coarse nodal functions in the coarse edge function space. They will be expressed using graph theory and they provide techniques to compute approximation bases at each level.

  14. The local power of the gradient test

    CERN Document Server

    Lemonte, Artur

    2010-01-01

    The asymptotic expansion of the distribution of the gradient test statistic is derived for a composite hypothesis under a sequence of Pitman alternative hypotheses converging to the null hypothesis at rate $n^{-1/2}$, $n$ being the sample size. Comparisons of the local powers of the gradient, likelihood ratio, Wald and score tests reveal no uniform superiority property. The power performance of all four criteria in one-parameter exponential family is examined.

  15. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel M; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Simon, M Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-08-16

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm(3)) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1-6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  16. ONLINE REGULARIZED GENERALIZED GRADIENT CLASSIFICATION ALGORITHMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leilei Zhang; Baohui Sheng; Jianli Wang

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers online classification learning algorithms for regularized classification schemes with generalized gradient.A novel capacity independent approach is presented.It verifies the strong convergence of sizes and yields satisfactory convergence rates for polynomially decaying step sizes.Compared with the gradient schemes,this al-gorithm needs only less additional assumptions on the loss function and derives a stronger result with respect to the choice of step sizes and the regularization parameters.

  17. Design of spherical symmetric gradient index lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Miñano Dominguez, Juan Carlos; Grabovičkić, Dejan; Benitez Gimenez, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Juan Carlos; Santamaria Galdon, Maria Asuncion

    2012-01-01

    Spherical symmetric refractive index distributions also known as Gradient Index lenses such as the Maxwell-Fish-Eye (MFE), the Luneburg or the Eaton lenses have always played an important role in Optics. The recent development of the technique called Transformation Optics has renewed the interest in these gradient index lenses. For instance, Perfect Imaging within the Wave Optics framework has recently been proved using the MFE distribution. We review here the design problem of these lenses, ...

  18. Cellular Sensing Ability in Spatial Gradients Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Liou, Shu-Hao

    2011-01-01

    Many eukaryotic and prokaruotic cells can exhibit remarkable sensing ability under tiny gradient of chemical compound. Here we consider the completely grand partition function with ligands and receptors and demonstrate the minimum asymptotic variances to show the ability. These results avoid the inconsistencies from other studies. Moreover, we show the gradient steepness is more important element in sensing ability than local concentration, and our results are corresponding with other experiment results.

  19. Gradient-based compressive image fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang CHEN‡; Zheng QIN

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel image fusion scheme based on gradient and scrambled block Hadamard ensemble (SBHE) sam-pling for compressive sensing imaging. First, source images are compressed by compressive sensing, to facilitate the transmission of the sensor. In the fusion phase, the image gradient is calculated to reflect the abundance of its contour information. By com-positing the gradient of each image, gradient-based weights are obtained, with which compressive sensing coefficients are achieved. Finally, inverse transformation is applied to the coefficients derived from fusion, and the fused image is obtained. Information entropy (IE), Xydeas’s and Piella’s metrics are applied as non-reference objective metrics to evaluate the fusion quality in line with different fusion schemes. In addition, different image fusion application scenarios are applied to explore the scenario adaptability of the proposed scheme. Simulation results demonstrate that the gradient-based scheme has the best per-formance, in terms of both subjective judgment and objective metrics. Furthermore, the gradient-based fusion scheme proposed in this paper can be applied in different fusion scenarios.

  20. Pressure gradient influence in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, Nico; Kaehler, Christian J.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding wall-bounded turbulence is still an ongoing process. Although remarkable progress has been made in the last decades, many challenges still remain. Mean flow statistics are well understood in case of zero pressure gradient flows. However, almost all turbulent boundary layers in technical applications, such as aircrafts, are subjected to a streamwise pressure gradient. When subjecting turbulent boundary layers to adverse pressure gradients, significant changes in the statistical behavior of the near-wall flow have been observed in experimental studies conducted however the details dynamics and characteristics of these flows has not been fully resolved. The sensitivity to Reynolds number and the dependency on several parameters, including the dependence on the pressure gradient parameter, is still under debate and very little information exists about statistically averaged quantities such as the mean velocity profile or Reynolds stresses. In order to improve the understanding of wall-bounded turbulence, this work experimentally investigates turbulent boundary layer subjected to favorable and adverse pressure gradients by means of Particle Image Velocimetry over a wide range of Reynolds numbers, 4200 statistics was found to increase significantly for a flow subjected to an adverse pressure gradient.