WorldWideScience

Sample records for buoyancy

  1. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  2. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  3. Wave Dragon Buoyancy Regulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jens; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    Wave Dragon is a wave energy converter, which was deployed offshore at Nissum Bredning in Denmark in 2003. The experience gained from operating Wave Dragon during 2003 and 2004 has shown that the buoyancy regulation system can be improved in a number of ways. This study describes the current...... situation, and proposes a number of activities in order to improve the buoyancy regulation system. This work was performed under EU ENERGIE contract no. ENK5-CT-2002-00603, and is a contribution to WP 2.3/2.4 and D40/D41....

  4. Buoyancy effects on smoldering combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, S.; Peterson, J.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Pagni, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of buoyancy on the rate of spread of a concurrent smolder reaction through a porous combustible material is investigated theoretically and experimentally. In the experiments, buoyant forces are controlled by varying the density difference, and the smolder rate spread through porous alpha cellulose (0.83 void fraction) is measured as a function of the ambient air pressure. The smolder velocity is found to increase with the ambient pressure; extinction occurs when the buoyancy forces cannot overcome the drag forces, indicating that diffusion by itself cannot support the spread of a smolder reaction. Theoretical predictions are found to be in good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Buoyancy-Induced, Columnar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Mark; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Free buoyancy-induced, columnar vortices (dust devils) that are driven by thermal instabilities of ground-heated, stratified air in areas with sufficient insolation convert the potential energy of low-grade heat in the surface air layer into a vortex flow with significant kinetic energy. A variant of the naturally-occurring vortex is deliberately triggered and anchored within an azimuthal array of vertical, stator-like flow vanes that form an open-top enclosure and impart tangential momentum to the radially entrained air. This flow may be exploited for power generation by coupling the vortex to a vertical-axis turbine. The fundamental mechanisms associated with the formation, evolution, and dynamics of an anchored, buoyancy-driven columnar vortex within such a facility are investigated experimentally using a heated ground plane. Specific emphasis is placed on the manipulation of the vortex formation and structure and the dependence of the vorticity production and sustainment mechanisms on the thermal resources and characteristic scales of the anchoring flow vanes using stereo-PIV. It is shown that manipulation of the formation and advection of vorticity concentrations within the enclosure can be exploited for increasing the available kinetic energy. Supported by ARPA-E.

  6. Thermal buoyancy on Venus - Underthrusting vs subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Jeffrey D.; Head, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal and buoyancy consequences of the subduction endmember are modeled in an attempt to evaluate the conditions distinguishing underthrusting and subduction. Thermal changes in slabs subducting into the Venusian mantle with a range of initial geotherms are used to predict density changes and, thus, slab buoyancy. Based on a model for subduction-induced mantle flow, it is then argued that the angle of the slab dip helps differentiate between underthrusting and subduction. Mantle flow applies torques to the slab which, in combination with torques due to slab buoyancy, act to change the angle of slab dip.

  7. Lithospheric buoyancy and continental intraplate stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M.L.; Mooney, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    Lithospheric buoyancy, the product of lithospheric density and thickness, is an important physical property that influences both the long-term stability of continents and their state of stress. We have determined lithospheric buoyancy by applying the simple isostatic model of Lachenbruch and Morgan (1990). We determine the crustal portion of lithospheric buoyancy using the USGS global database of more than 1700 crustal structure determinations (Mooney et al., 2002), which demonstrates that a simple relationship between crustal thickness and surface elevation does not exist. In fact, major regions of the crust at or near sea level (0-200 m elevation) have crustal thicknesses that vary between 25 and 55 km. Predicted elevations due to the crustal component of buoyancy in the model exceed observed elevations in nearly all cases (97% of the data), consistent with the existence of a cool lithospheric mantle lid that is denser than the asthenosphere on which it floats. The difference between the observed and predicted crustal elevation is assumed to be equal to the decrease in elevation produced by the negative buoyancy of the mantle lid. Mantle lid thickness was first estimated from the mantle buoyancy and a mean lid density computed using a basal crust temperature determined from extrapolation of surface heat flow, assuming a linear thermal gradient in the mantle lid. The resulting values of total lithosphere thickness are in good agreement with thicknesses estimated from seismic data, except beneath cratonic regions where they are only 40-60% of the typical estimates (200-350 km) derived from seismic data. This inconsistency is compatible with petrologic data and tomography and geoid analyses that have suggested that cratonic mantle lids are ??? 1% less dense than mantle lids elsewhere. By lowering the thermally determined mean mantle lid density in cratons by 1%, our model reproduces the observed 200-350+ km cratonic lithospheric thickness. We then computed

  8. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-08-25

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov\\'s spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)∼k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  9. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... quite well with the Epstein's formula but in other cases the measured data show clear deviations from the Epstein's formula. Thus, revised formulas for natural ventilation are proposed....

  10. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... quite well with the Epstein's formula ratio are presented. In some cases the measured airflow rates fit quite well with the Epstein's formula but in other cases the measured data show clear deviations from the Epstein's formula. Thus, revised formulas for natural ventilation are proposed....

  11. Microgravity Flow Regime Data: Buoyancy and Mixing Apparatus Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Adam; Best, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Zero-g two-phase flow data set qualification and flight experiment design have not been standardized and as a result, agreement among researchers has not been reached regarding what experimental conditions adequately approximate those of microgravity. The effects of buoyancy forces and mixing apparatus on the flow regime transitions are presented in this study. The gravity conditions onboard zero-g aircraft are at best 10-3 g which is used to approximate the 10-5 g conditions of microgravity, thus the buoyancy forces present on zero-g aircraft can become significantly large and unrepresentative of microgravity. When buoyancy forces approach those of surface tension forces, buoyancy induced coalescence occurs. When discussing flow regime transitions, these large buoyancy forces lead to flow regime transitions which otherwise would not occur. The buoyancy attributes of the two-phase flow data sets available in the literature are evaluated to determine which data sets exhibit buoyancy induced transitions. Upon comparison of the representative data sets, the affects of different mixing apparatus can be seen in the superficial velocity flow regime maps.

  12. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator- NB38 -Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory. It was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, the HST was finally designed and built becoming operational in the 1990s. The HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. Pictured is MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) that served as the test center for shuttle astronauts training for Hubble related missions. Shown are astronauts Bruce McCandless and Sharnon Lucid being fitted for their space suits prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  13. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, Buoyancy Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Buoyancy Flux data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  14. Rigorous buoyancy driven bubble mixing for centrifugal microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, S; Schulz, M; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2016-01-21

    We present batch-mode mixing for centrifugal microfluidics operated at fixed rotational frequency. Gas is generated by the disk integrated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to liquid water (H2O) and gaseous oxygen (O2) and inserted into a mixing chamber. There, bubbles are formed that ascent through the liquid in the artificial gravity field and lead to drag flow. Additionaly, strong buoyancy causes deformation and rupture of the gas bubbles and induces strong mixing flows in the liquids. Buoyancy driven bubble mixing is quantitatively compared to shake mode mixing, mixing by reciprocation and vortex mixing. To determine mixing efficiencies in a meaningful way, the different mixers are employed for mixing of a lysis reagent and human whole blood. Subsequently, DNA is extracted from the lysate and the amount of DNA recovered is taken as a measure for mixing efficiency. Relative to standard vortex mixing, DNA extraction based on buoyancy driven bubble mixing resulted in yields of 92 ± 8% (100 s mixing time) and 100 ± 8% (600 s) at 130g centrifugal acceleration. Shake mode mixing yields 96 ± 11% and is thus equal to buoyancy driven bubble mixing. An advantage of buoyancy driven bubble mixing is that it can be operated at fixed rotational frequency, however. The additional costs of implementing buoyancy driven bubble mixing are low since both the activation liquid and the catalyst are very low cost and no external means are required in the processing device. Furthermore, buoyancy driven bubble mixing can easily be integrated in a monolithic manner and is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as injection moulding or thermoforming. We consider buoyancy driven bubble mixing an excellent alternative to shake mode mixing, in particular if the processing device is not capable of providing fast changes of rotational frequency or if the low average rotational frequency is challenging for the other integrated fluidic operations.

  15. Buoyancy-generated variable-density turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, D.L.; Clark, T.T.; Riley, J.J.

    1996-07-01

    Because of the importance of turbulence mixing in many applications, a number of turbulence mixing models have been proposed for variable- density flows. These engineering models (one- point statistical models) typically include the transport of the turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent energy dissipation rate (i.e., k - {epsilon} models). The model presented by Besnard, Harlow, Rauenzahn and Zemach (1992) (herein referred to as BHRZ) is a one-point model intended to describe variable-density turbulent flows. Transport equations for the Reynolds stress tensor, R{sub ij}, and the turbulent energy dissipation rate, the density-velocity correlation, a{sub i}, and the density-specific volume correlation, b are derived. This model employs- techniques and concepts from incompressible, constant- density turbulence modeling and incorporates ideas from two-phase flow models. Clark and Spitz (1994) present a two-point model for variable-density turbulence. Their derivation is based on transport equations that, are based 0481 on two-point- generalizations of R{sub ij}, a{sub ij}, and b. These equations are Fourier transformed with respect to the separation distance between the two points. Transport equations are derived for R{sub ij}, a{sub i}, b. As in the one-point model, this model contains many ad-hoc assumptions and unknown model coefficients that must be determined by comparison with experimental and numerical data. However, the two-point formalism requires fewer equilibrium assumptions then does a single-point model. Our primary concern in this paper lies in the nonlinear processes of turbulence and the influence of large density variations (not within the Boussinesq limit) on these processes. To. isolate the effects of variable-density on the turbulence we restrict our flow to be incompressible, statistically homogeneous buoyancy-generated. turbulence. To our knowledge there have not been any simulations reported for this problem.

  16. Neutral Buoyancy Test - Large Space Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  17. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Test - Scientific Airlock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. Pictured is Astronaut Paul Weitz training on a mock-up of Spacelab's airlock-hatch cover. Training was also done on the use of foot restraints which had recently been developed to help astronauts maintain their positions during space walks rather than having their feet float out from underneath them while they tried to perform maintenance and repair operations. Every aspect of every space mission was researched and demonstrated in the NBS. Using the airlock hatch cover and foot restraints were

  18. Tidal tomography constrains Earth’s deep-mantle buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Harriet C. P.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Davis, James L.; Tromp, Jeroen; Yang, Hsin-Ying; Al-Attar, David

    2017-11-01

    Earth’s body tide—also known as the solid Earth tide, the displacement of the solid Earth’s surface caused by gravitational forces from the Moon and the Sun—is sensitive to the density of the two Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) beneath Africa and the Pacific. These massive regions extend approximately 1,000 kilometres upward from the base of the mantle and their buoyancy remains actively debated within the geophysical community. Here we use tidal tomography to constrain Earth’s deep-mantle buoyancy derived from Global Positioning System (GPS)-based measurements of semi-diurnal body tide deformation. Using a probabilistic approach, we show that across the bottom two-thirds of the two LLSVPs the mean density is about 0.5 per cent higher than the average mantle density across this depth range (that is, its mean buoyancy is minus 0.5 per cent), although this anomaly may be concentrated towards the very base of the mantle. We conclude that the buoyancy of these structures is dominated by the enrichment of high-density chemical components, probably related to subducted oceanic plates or primordial material associated with Earth’s formation. Because the dynamics of the mantle is driven by density variations, our result has important dynamical implications for the stability of the LLSVPs and the long-term evolution of the Earth system.

  19. Buoyancy-stirring interactions in a subtropical embayment: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... were ~2–3 °C higher than those observed. The model also underestimated the intensity of stratification in the wet season. These shortcomings all suggest an overestimate of vertical mixing by the model's turbulence closure scheme. Keywords: buoyancy; density gradient; Maputo Bay; seasonal variation; subtropical zone; ...

  20. Using Surface Integrals for Checking Archimedes' Law of Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. M. S.

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical derivation of the force exerted by an "inhomogeneous" (i.e. compressible) fluid on the surface of an "arbitrarily shaped" body immersed in it is not found in the literature, which may be attributed to our trust in Archimedes' law of buoyancy. However, this law, also known as Archimedes' principle (AP), does not yield the force…

  1. Semi-Empirical Models for Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager Andersen, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A literature study is presented on the theories and models dealing with buoyancy-driven ventilation in rooms. The models are categorised into four types according to how the physical process is conceived: column model, fan model, neutral plane model and pressure model. These models are analysed...

  2. Experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. Measurements were made for opening ratios L/D range from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length and the diameter of the opening, respectiv...

  3. Doubly diffusive magnetic buoyancy instability in the solar interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Rosner, R.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the buoyancy of diffuse magnetic fields has shown that in the presence of rotation, static equilibrium configurations of the toroidal magnetic field and ambient plasma can exist. In that case, the escape of toroidal magnetic flux from the solar interior may be determined by the growth of instabilities which the equilibrium configuration may be subject to. In connection with the present investigation, it is assumed that in the region of toroidal magnetic flux amplification, the magnetic field has not as yet filamented into flux ropes, and is therefore 'diffuse'. A study is conducted of the MHD stability of an electrically conducting and differentially rotating gas in the presence of a toroidal magnetic field, an external constant gravitational field, and radiance pressure. The full dispersion relation for the magnetic buoyancy problem is developed, and the solutions of the dispersion relation are discussed.

  4. Floating rings in vertical soap films : capillary driven bidimensional buoyancy

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, N

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the motion of buoyant rings in vertical soap films. Thickness differences and related bi-dimensional densities are considered as the motor leading to bi-dimensional buoyancy. We show how this effect can be re-interpreted thanks to surface tension profiles in soap films. We propose a model involving surface tension profiles in order to describe the motion of buoyant particles in vertical soap films, and compare it to experimental data.

  5. Geodynamic modelling of low-buoyancy thermo-chemical plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events that form Large Igneous Provinces are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models of thermal mantle plumes predict a flattening of the plume head to a disk-like structure, a kilometer-scale surface uplift just before the initiation of LIPs and thin plume tails. However, there are seismic observations and paleo-topography data that are difficult to explain with this classical approach. Here, using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes are thermo-chemical rather than purely thermal. It has been suggested a long time ago that subducted oceanic crust could be recycled by mantle plumes; and based on geochemical data, they may contain up to 15-20% of this recycled material in the form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth-dependent. We perform numerical experiments in a 3D spherical shell geometry to investigate the dynamics of the plume ascent, the interaction between plume- and plate-driven flow and the dynamics of melting in a plume head. For this purpose, we use the finite-element code ASPECT, which allows for complex temperature-, pressure- and composition-dependent material properties. Moreover, our models incorporate phase transitions (including melting) with the accompanying rheological and density changes, Clapeyron slopes and latent heat effects for both peridotite and eclogite, mantle compressibility and a strong temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity. We demonstrate that despite their low buoyancy, such plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Conditions for this ascent are high plume volume and moderate lower mantle subadiabaticity. While high plume buoyancy results in plumes directly advancing to the base of the lithosphere, plumes with slightly lower buoyancy pond in a depth of 300-400 km

  6. Longitudinal modelling of academic buoyancy and motivation: do the '5Cs' hold up over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J; Colmar, Susan H; Davey, Louise A; Marsh, Herbert W

    2010-09-01

    Academic buoyancy is students' ability to successfully deal with setbacks and challenges that are typical of academic life. The present study extends previous preliminary cross-sectional work that tentatively identified five motivational predictors of academic buoyancy - referred to as the '5Cs' of academic buoyancy: confidence (self-efficacy), coordination (planning), commitment (persistence), composure (low anxiety), and control (low uncertain control). The study seeks to more clearly ascertain the effects of motivation (and its mediating role) on academic buoyancy over and above prior academic buoyancy. The study comprised N=1,866 high school students from six schools. Longitudinal data were collected (1 year apart) and the hypothesized model exploring longitudinal effects was tested using structural equation modelling. After controlling for prior variance in academic buoyancy, the 5Cs were significant predictors of subsequent academic buoyancy. Furthermore, over and above the direct effects of prior academic buoyancy on subsequent academic buoyancy, the 5Cs significantly mediated this relationship. The study concludes with a discussion of the substantive, applied, and methodological implications for researchers and practitioners seeking to investigate and address the academic buoyancy of students who require the capacity to effectively function in an ever-challenging school environment.

  7. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei

    OpenAIRE

    Itsumi Nakamura; Carl G. Meyer; Katsufumi Sato

    2015-01-01

    We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two specie...

  8. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Low-Density Inertial Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of buoyancy on transition from laminar to turbulent flow are presented for momentum-dominated helium jet injected into ambient air. The buoyancy was varied in a 2.2-sec drop tower facility without affecting the remaining operating parameters. The jet flow in Earth gravity and microgravity was visualized using the rainbow schlieren deflectometry apparatus. Results show significant changes in the flow structure and transition behavior in the absence of buoyancy.

  9. Buoyancy effect on heat transfer in rotating smooth square U-duct at high rotation number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The buoyancy effect on heat transfer in a rotating, two-pass, square channel is experimentally investigated in current work. The classical copper plate technique is performed to measure the regional averaged heat transfer coefficients. In order to perform a fundamental research, all turbulators are removed away. Two approaches of altering Buoyancy numbers are selected: varying rotation number from 0 to 2.08 at Reynolds number ranges of 10000 to 70000, and varying inlet density ratio from 0.07 to 0.16 at Reynolds number of 10000. And thus, Buoyancy numbers range from 0 to 12.9 for both cases. According to the experimental results, the relationships between heat transfer and Buoyancy numbers are in accord with those obtained under different rotation numbers. For both leading and trailing surface, a critical Buoyancy number exists for each X/D location. Before the critical point, the effect of Buoyancy number on heat transfer is limited; but after that, the Nusselt number ratios show different increase rate. Given the same rotation number, higher wall temperature ratios with its corresponding higher Buoyancy numbers substantially enhance heat transfer on both passages. And the critical exceed-point that heat transfer from trailing surface higher than leading surface happens at the same Buoyancy number for different wall temperature ratios in the second passage. Thus, the stronger buoyancy effect promotes heat transfer enhancement at high rotation number condition.

  10. How gas buoyancy creates shallow-zone geopressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkommer, M.A. (Petrospec Computer Corp., Richardson, TX (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Within a buried formation, the difference between pore pressure in the top and the bottom of the zone is less if the formation contains gas than if it is liquid-filled. Consequently, if the zone is sufficiently thick, the driller can encounter gas pressures significantly higher than expected, when drilling into the top of the zone. Because this pressure would exceed that generated by a normal liquid pressure gradient for the well, the upper portion of the zone is thus geopressured. If unexpectedly encountered at shallow depths, such geopressures can create serious well control problems. This phenomenon is due to the lower density of gas, compared to liquid. It is the same principle which makes the surface pressure of a gas well much closer to bottomhole pressure than if the tubing were full of liquid. This article describes it as the buoyancy effect caused by the gas displacing, and thus floating upon, the formation liquid. The following discussion illustrates the effects with depth and formation thickness, and introduces computer-based methods for estimating and preparing for potential well control problems in shallow gas zones. For shallow gas reservoirs, correcting for buoyancy effect in an existing geopressure estimate by analyzing petrophysical and geophysical data can help optimize use of drilling mud, as well as improve casing design. Safety, economic and environmental risks related to loss of control, struck pipe and lost circulation are significant enough to warrant the cost of thorough geopressure estimation.

  11. Academic buoyancy and academic outcomes: towards a further understanding of students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), students without ADHD, and academic buoyancy itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Academic buoyancy is students' capacity to successfully overcome setback and challenge that is typical of the ordinary course of everyday academic life. It may represent an important factor on the psycho-educational landscape assisting students who experience difficulties in school and schoolwork. This study investigated the role of academic buoyancy in the achievement and cognitive, affective and behavioural engagement of (1) students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and (2) 'regular' (or 'general') students residing in the same classrooms and schools. The study also sought to extend prior research into academic buoyancy by including previously neglected and potentially influential factors such as personality and socio-economic status. Participants were n = 87 high school students with ADHD, n = 3374 non-ADHD peers, and n = 87 randomly drawn non-ADHD students. Survey-based data were analysed using multigroup (ADHD, non-ADHD, randomly weighted non-ADHD) multivariate (multiple independent/covariate and dependent variables) path analysis. The findings revealed a significant and positive association between academic buoyancy and outcomes for students with ADHD that generalized to non-ADHD groups. On occasion where academic buoyancy effects differed between the groups, effects favoured students with ADHD. Furthermore, academic buoyancy explained significant variance in outcomes for both groups of students after covariates (age, gender, parent education, language background, socio-economic status, personality) were entered. It is concluded that there is merit in widely promoting and fostering academic buoyancy among ADHD and non-ADHD students alike - and that academic buoyancy explains variance in outcomes beyond major intrapersonal factors such as personality, socio-economic status, ethnicity, and the like. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Role of buoyancy and heat release in fire modeling, propagation, and instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid M. Mughal; Yousuff M. Hussaini; Scott L. Goodrick; Philip Cunningham

    2007-01-01

    In an investigation of the dynamics of coupled fluid-combustion-buoyancy driven problems, an idealised model formulation is used to investigate the role of buoyancy and heat release in an evolving boundary layer, with particular emphasis on examining underlying fluid dynamics to explain observed phenomena arising in forest fire propagation. The role played by the...

  13. Variable buoyancy system for unmanned multi-domain vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Marc; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the system design, construction, and testing of an active variable buoyancy system (VBS) actuator with applications to unmanned multi-domain vehicles. Unmanned multi-domain vehicles require nontraditional VBS designs because of their unique operation requirements. We present a VBS actuator design that targets multi-domain vehicle design objectives of high endurance, stealth, and underwater loitering. The design features a rigid ballast tank with an inner elastic bladder connected to a hydraulic pump and a proportionally controlled vent valve. The system working fluid is obtained from the ambient surrounding water and the elastic bladder separates the water from pressurized gas, thus preventing any gas from escaping during a venting operation. An analytic model of the VBS characterizing the system dynamics is derived. Ballast tank prototype design and construction is discussed. A VBS test platform vehicle is presented, featuring two ballast tanks, motor, pump, and RF receiver for control.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of a buoyancy-induced turbulent fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kazushi; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Isao T.; Miyano, Takaya

    2017-11-01

    We conduct a numerical study on the dynamic behavior of a buoyancy-induced turbulent fire from the viewpoints of symbolic dynamics, complex networks, and statistical complexity. Here, we consider two classes of entropies: the permutation entropy and network entropy in ɛ -recurrence networks, both of which evaluate the degree of randomness in the underlying dynamics. These entropies enable us to capture the significant changes in the dynamic behavior of flow velocity fluctuations. The possible presence of two important dynamics, low-dimensional deterministic chaos in the near field dominated by the motion of large-scale vortices and high-dimensional chaos in the far field forming a well-developed turbulent plume, is clearly identified by the multiscale complexity-entropy causality plane.

  15. Buoyancy induced Couette-Poiseuille flow in a vertical microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahari, M.

    2017-10-01

    The fully developed buoyancy-induced (natural convective) Couette-Poiseuille flow in a vertical microchannel is investigated with the velocity slip and temperature jump boundary conditions. Closed form analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields are obtained. The effects of the fluid-wall interaction parameter, wall-ambient temperature difference ratio, Knudsen number, mixed convection parameter, and the dimensionless pressure gradient on the velocity, temperature, volume flow rate, heat flux between the plates and the Nusselt number have been discussed in detail through graphs. The outcomes of the investigation indicate that the volume flow rate increases with increasing values of mixed convection parameter, wall-ambient temperature difference ratio, and Knudsen number.

  16. Modeling the Buoyancy System of a Wave Energy Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom S.; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model of the buoyancy system in a wave energy power plant is presented. The plant ("Wave Dragon") is a floating device using the potential energy in overtopping waves to produce power. A water reservoir is placed on top of the WD, and hydro turbines lead the water to the sea...... producing electrical power. Through air chambers it is possible to control the level of the WD. It is important to control the level in order to maximize the power production in proportion to the wave height, here the amount of overtopping water and the amount of potential energy is conflicting....... The pressures in the air chambers may be individually controlled by an air fan through an array of valves. The paper presents a model describing the dynamics from the air inlet to the level. Results from validation of the model against plant data are presented....

  17. Large eddy simulation of a buoyancy-aided flow in a non-uniform channel – Buoyancy effects on large flow structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); He, S., E-mail: s.he@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Buoyancy may greatly redistribute the flow in a non-uniform channel. • Flow structures in the narrow gap are greatly changed when buoyancy is strong. • Large flow structures exist in wider gap, which is enhanced when heat is strong. • Buoyancy reduces mixing factor caused by large flow structures in narrow gap. - Abstract: It has been a long time since the ‘abnormal’ turbulent intensity distribution and high inter-sub-channel mixing rates were observed in the vicinity of the narrow gaps formed by the fuel rods in nuclear reactors. The extraordinary flow behaviour was first described as periodic flow structures by Hooper and Rehme (1984). Since then, the existences of large flow structures were demonstrated by many researchers in various non-uniform flow channels. It has been proved by many authors that the Strouhal number of the flow structure in the isothermal flow is dependent on the size of the narrow gap, not the Reynolds number once it is sufficiently large. This paper reports a numerical investigation on the effect of buoyancy on the large flow structures. A buoyancy-aided flow in a tightly-packed rod-bundle-like channel is modelled using large eddy simulation (LES) together with the Boussinesq approximation. The behaviour of the large flow structures in the gaps of the flow passage are studied using instantaneous flow fields, spectrum analysis and correlation analysis. It is found that the non-uniform buoyancy force in the cross section of the flow channel may greatly redistribute the velocity field once the overall buoyancy force is sufficiently strong, and consequently modify the large flow structures. The temporal and axial spatial scales of the large flow structures are influenced by buoyancy in a way similar to that turbulence is influenced. These scales reduce when the flow is laminarised, but start increasing in the turbulence regeneration region. The spanwise scale of the flow structures in the narrow gap remains more or

  18. Statistical Change Detection for Diagnosis of Buoyancy Element Defects on Moored Floating Vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Fang, Shaoji; Galeazzi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    . After residual generation, statistical change detection scheme is derived from mathematical models supported by experimental data. To experimentally verify loss of an underwater buoyancy element, an underwater line breaker is designed to create realistic replication of abrupt faults. The paper analyses......Floating platforms with mooring systems are used extensively in off-shore operations. Part of the mooring systems are underwater buoyancy elements that are attached to the mooring lines. Loss or damage of a buoyancy element is invisible but changes the characteristics of the mooring system...

  19. Self-similar evolution of the nonlinear magnetic buoyancy instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K.; Tajima, T.; Matsumoto, R.

    1990-01-01

    A new type of self-similar solution of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the nonlinear stage of the undular model (k parallel to B) of the magnetic buoyancy instability (the ballooning instability in fusion plasma physics or the Parker instability in astrophysics) is found through MHD simulation and theory. The linear theory developed agrees well with the simulation in the early (linear) stage. The nonlinear stages of the instability in the simulation show the self-similar evolution. One of the solutions obtained from the nonlinear analysis has the characteristics of nonlinear instability in Lagrangian coordinates; the fluid velocity and the Alfven speed on each magnetic loop increase exponentially with time, because the loop is evacuated by the field-aligned motion of matter resulting from gravitational acceleration. In the later stage of the nonlinear evolution, the solution property changes from exponential to power-law time dependence. The latter corresponds to a force-free expansion solution. The later saturation of the velocity increment is also discussed.

  20. Capillary and Gas Trapping Controls on Pumice Buoyancy in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauria, K. E.; Manga, M.; Wei, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Pumice can float on water for months to years. The longevity of pumice floatation is unexpected, however, because pumice pores are highly connected and water wets volcanic glass. As a result, observations of long floating times have not been reconciled with predictions of rapid sinking. We propose a mechanism to resolve this paradox - the trapping of gas bubbles by water within the pumice. Gas trapping refers to the isolation of gas by water within pore throats such that the gas becomes disconnected from the atmosphere and unable to escape. We use X-ray microtomography images of partially saturated pumice to demonstrate that gas trapping occurs in both ambient-temperature and hot (500°C) pumice. Furthermore, we show that the distribution of trapped gas clusters matches percolation theory predictions. Finally, we propose that diffusion out of trapped gaseous bubbles determines pumice floatation time. Experimental measurements of pumice floatation support a diffusion control on pumice buoyancy and we find that floatation time scales like τ L2/(Dθ2) where is the floatation time, L is the characteristic length of the pumice, D is the gas-water diffusion coefficient, and θ is pumice water saturation.

  1. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - NB32 - Large Space Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory; it was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, HST was finally designed and built; and it finally became operational in the 1990s. HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator served as the training facility for shuttle astronauts for Hubble related missions. Shown is astronaut Sharnon Lucid having her life support system being checked prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  2. Using surface integrals for checking the Archimedes' law of buoyancy

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, F M S

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical derivation of the force exerted by an \\emph{inhomogeneous} (i.e., compressible) fluid on the surface of an \\emph{arbitrarily-shaped} body immersed in it is not found in literature, which may be attributed to our trust on Archimedes' law of buoyancy. However, this law, also known as Archimedes' principle (AP), does not yield the force observed when the body is in contact to the container walls, as is more evident in the case of a block immersed in a liquid and in contact to the bottom, in which a \\emph{downward} force that \\emph{increases with depth} is observed. In this work, by taking into account the surface integral of the pressure force exerted by a fluid over the surface of a body, the general validity of AP is checked. For a body fully surrounded by a fluid, homogeneous or not, a gradient version of the divergence theorem applies, yielding a volume integral that simplifies to an upward force which agrees to the force predicted by AP, as long as the fluid density is a \\emph{continuous func...

  3. Buoyancy driven acceleration in a hospital operating room indoor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Zhai, John

    2011-11-01

    In hospital operating rooms, centrally located non-isothermal ceiling jets provide sterile air for protecting the surgical site from infectious particles in the room air as well as room cooling. Modern operating rooms are requiring larger temperature differences to accommodate increasing cooling loads for heat gains from medical equipment. This trend may lead to significant changes in the room air distribution patterns that may sacrifice the sterile air field across the surgical table. Quantitative flow visualization experiments using laser sheet illumination and RANS modeling of the indoor environment were conducted to demonstrate the impact of the indoor environment thermal conditions on the room air distribution. The angle of the jet shear layer was studied as function of the area of the vena contracta of the jet, which is in turn dependent upon the Archimedes number of the jet. Increases in the buoyancy forces cause greater air velocities in the vicinity of the surgical site increasing the likelihood of deposition of contaminants in the flow field. The outcome of this study shows the Archimedes number should be used as the design parameter for hospital operating room air distribution in order to maintain a proper supply air jet for covering the sterile region. This work is supported by ASHRAE.

  4. Buoyancy Regulation and the Energetics of Diving in Dolphins Seals, Sea Lions and Sea Otters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    We examined swim speed and ascent descent rates in sea lions and elephant seals in order to make comparisons in their diving strategies and how these may be effected by different strategies of buoyancy regulation...

  5. Buoyancy package for self-contained acoustic doppler current profiler mooring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Krishnakumar, V.

    A buoyancy package for self-contained Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler(SC-ADCP 1200 RD instruments USA) was designed and fabricated indigenously, for subsurface mooring in coastal waters. The system design is discussed. The design to keep SC...

  6. Annual and seasonal mean buoyancy fluxes for the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.

    INSAT-derived monthly mean precipitation, combined with estimates of evaporation from COADS, are used to prepare the annual mean and seasonal distributions of evaporation-precipitation (E-P)) and buoyancy fluxes for the tropical Indian Ocean...

  7. Effects of body condition on buoyancy in endangered North Atlantic right whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousek-McGregor, Anna E; Miller, Carolyn A; Moore, Michael J; Nowacek, Douglas P

    2014-01-01

    Buoyancy is an important consideration for diving marine animals, resulting in specific ecologically relevant adaptations. Marine mammals use blubber as an energy reserve, but because this tissue is also positively buoyant, nutritional demands have the potential to cause considerable variation in buoyancy. North Atlantic right whales Eubalaena glacialis are known to be positively buoyant as a result of their blubber, and the thickness of this layer varies considerably, but the effect of this variation on buoyancy has not been explored. This study compared the duration and rate of ascending and descending glides, recorded with an archival tag, with blubber thickness, measured with an ultrasound device, in free-swimming right whales. Ascending whales with thicker blubber had shorter portions of active propulsion and longer passive glides than whales with thinner blubber, suggesting that blubber thickness influences buoyancy because the buoyant force is acting in the same direction as the animal's movement during this phase. Whales with thinner layers also used similar body angles and velocities when traveling to and from depth, while those with thicker layers used shallower ascent angles but achieved higher ascent velocities. Such alterations in body angle may help to reduce the cost of transport when swimming against the force of buoyancy in a state of augmented positive buoyancy, which represents a dynamic response to reduce the energetic consequences of physiological changes. These results have considerable implications for any diving marine animal during periods of nutritional stress, such as during seasonal migrations and annual variations in prey availability.

  8. Neutral Buoyancy Simultor (NBS) NB-1 Large Mass Transfer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Pictured is a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) student working in a spacesuit on the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) project which was developed as a joint effort between MFSC and MIT. The EASE experiment required that crew members assemble small components to form larger components, working from the payload bay of the space shuttle.

  9. Gravitaxis of Euglena gracilis depends only partially on passive buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Lebert, Michael; Streb, Christine; Häder, Donat-Peter

    In darkness, the unicellular freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis shows a pronounced negative gravitactic behavior, and the cells swim actively upward in the water column. Up to now it was unclear whether this behavior is based on a passive (physical) alignment mechanism (e.g., buoyancy due to a fore-aft asymmetry of the cell body) or on an active physiological mechanism. A sounding rocket experiment was performed in which the effect of sub-1g-accelerations (0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.2g) on untreated living cells and immobilized (fixation with liquid nitrogen) cells was observed. By means of computerized image analysis the angles of the cells long axis with respect to the acceleration vector were analyzed in order to calculate and compare the reorientation kinetics of the immobilized cells versus that of the controls. In both groups, the reorientation kinetics depended on the dose, but the reorientation of the living cells was about five times faster than that of the immobilized cells. This indicates that in young cells gravitaxis can be explained by a physical mechanism only to a small extend. In older cultures, in which the cells often have a drop shaped cell body, the physical reorientation is considerably faster, and a more pronounced influence of passive alignment caused by fore/aft asymmetry (drag-gravity model) can not be excluded. In addition to these results, Euglena gracilis cells seem to respond very sensitively to small accelerations when they are applied after a longer microgravity period. The data indicate that gravitactic orientation occurred at an acceleration as low as 0.05g.

  10. Neutral Buoyancy Test - NB-18 - Large Space Structure Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  11. Academic Buoyancy and Academic Outcomes: Towards a Further Understanding of Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Students without ADHD, and Academic Buoyancy Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Academic buoyancy is students' capacity to successfully overcome setback and challenge that is typical of the ordinary course of everyday academic life. It may represent an important factor on the psycho-educational landscape assisting students who experience difficulties in school and schoolwork. Aims: This study investigated the…

  12. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer

  13. The argonaut shell: gas-mediated buoyancy control in a pelagic octopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Julian K.; Norman, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Argonauts (Cephalopoda: Argonautidae) are a group of rarely encountered open-ocean pelagic octopuses with benthic ancestry. Female argonauts inhabit a brittle ‘paper nautilus’ shell, the role of which has puzzled naturalists for millennia. The primary role attributed to the shell has been as a receptacle for egg deposition and brooding. Our observations of wild argonauts have revealed that the thin calcareous shell also functions as a hydrostatic structure, employed by the female argonaut to precisely control buoyancy at varying depths. Female argonauts use the shell to ‘gulp’ a measured volume of air at the sea surface, seal off the captured gas using flanged arms and forcefully dive to a depth where the compressed gas buoyancy counteracts body weight. This process allows the female argonaut to attain neutral buoyancy at depth and potentially adjust buoyancy to counter the increased (and significant) weight of eggs during reproductive periods. Evolution of this air-capture strategy enables this negatively buoyant octopus to survive free of the sea floor. This major shift in life mode from benthic to pelagic shows strong evolutionary parallels with the origins of all cephalopods, which attained gas-mediated buoyancy via the closed-chambered shells of the true nautiluses and their relatives. PMID:20484241

  14. Effect of bioadhesion on initial in vitro buoyancy of effervescent floating matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin HCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeetendra Singh Negi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate effect of bioadhesion on the initial in vitro buoyancy behaviour of effervescent matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin HCl (CIPRO. Tablets were prepared by direct compression using HPMC K4M and Carbopol 971P as hydrophilic-controlled release polymers, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 as gas-generating agent, polyplasdone XL, Explotab and Ac-Di-Sol as swelling agents. Tablets were evaluated for normal and modified initial in vitro floating behavior, floating duration, swelling behavior and in vitro drug release studies. A modified buoyancy lag time for tablets was determined in order to include the effect of bioadhesion on initial buoyancy. The initial buoyancy was found depended on bioadhesion ability of tablets. The lowest modified buoyancy lag time of 20 seconds was obtained for Formulation F7 having both NaHCO 3 and polyplasdone XL. The floating duration was also found dependent on concentration of NaHCO 3 and swelling agents. The drug release of F7 was also sustained up to 12-hr duration with anomalous drug transport mechanism.

  15. Effect of bioadhesion on initial in vitro buoyancy of effervescent floating matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin HCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Jeetendra Singh; Trivedi, Abhinav; Khanduri, Praveen; Negi, Vandana; Kasliwal, Nikhil

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effect of bioadhesion on the initial in vitro buoyancy behaviour of effervescent matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin HCl (CIPRO). Tablets were prepared by direct compression using HPMC K4M and Carbopol 971P as hydrophilic-controlled release polymers, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) as gas-generating agent, polyplasdone XL, Explotab and Ac-Di-Sol as swelling agents. Tablets were evaluated for normal and modified initial in vitro floating behavior, floating duration, swelling behavior and in vitro drug release studies. A modified buoyancy lag time for tablets was determined in order to include the effect of bioadhesion on initial buoyancy. The initial buoyancy was found depended on bioadhesion ability of tablets. The lowest modified buoyancy lag time of 20 seconds was obtained for Formulation F7 having both NaHCO(3) and polyplasdone XL. The floating duration was also found dependent on concentration of NaHCO(3) and swelling agents. The drug release of F7 was also sustained up to 12-hr duration with anomalous drug transport mechanism.

  16. Ceramic Spheres—A Novel Solution to Deep Sea Buoyancy Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic-based hollow spheres are considered a great driving force for many applications such as offshore buoyancy modules due to their large diameter to wall thickness ratio and uniform wall thickness geometric features. We have developed such thin-walled hollow spheres made of alumina using slip casting and sintering processes. A diameter as large as 50 mm with a wall thickness of 0.5–1.0 mm has been successfully achieved in these spheres. Their material and structural properties were examined by a series of characterization tools. Particularly, the feasibility of these spheres was investigated with respect to its application for deep sea (>3000 m buoyancy modules. These spheres, sintered at 1600 °C and with 1.0 mm of wall thickness, have achieved buoyancy of more than 54%. As the sphere’s wall thickness was reduced (e.g., 0.5 mm, their buoyancy reached 72%. The mechanical performance of such spheres has shown a hydrostatic failure pressure above 150 MPa, corresponding to a rating depth below sea level of 5000 m considering a safety factor of 3. The developed alumina-based ceramic spheres are feasible for low cost and scaled-up production and show great potential at depths greater than those achievable by the current deep-sea buoyancy module technologies.

  17. Buoyancy increase and drag-reduction through a simple superhydrophobic coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gi Byoung; Patir, Adnan; Page, Kristopher; Lu, Yao; Allan, Elaine; Parkin, Ivan P

    2017-06-08

    A superhydrophobic paint was fabricated using 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOTES), TiO 2 nanoparticles and ethanol. The paint has potential for aquatic application of a superhydrophobic coating as it induces increased buoyancy and drag reduction. Buoyance testing showed that the reduction of surface energy by superhydrophobic coating made it feasible that glass, a high density material, was supported by the surface tension of water. In a miniature boat sailing test, it was shown that the low energy surface treatment decreased the adhesion of water molecules to the surface of the boat resulting in a reduction of the drag force. Additionally, a robust superhydrophobic surface was fabricated through layer-by-layer coating using adhesive double side tape and the paint, and after a 100 cm abrasion test with sand paper, the surface still retained its water repellency, enhanced buoyancy and drag reduction.

  18. Flows and Stratification of an Enclosure Containing Both Localised and Vertically Distributed Sources of Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jamie; Linden, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We examine the flows and stratification established in a naturally ventilated enclosure containing both a localised and vertically distributed source of buoyancy. The enclosure is ventilated through upper and lower openings which connect the space to an external ambient. Small scale laboratory experiments were carried out with water as the working medium and buoyancy being driven directly by temperature differences. A point source plume gave localised heating while the distributed source was driven by a controllable heater mat located in the side wall of the enclosure. The transient temperatures, as well as steady state temperature profiles, were recorded and are reported here. The temperature profiles inside the enclosure were found to be dependent on the effective opening area A*, a combination of the upper and lower openings, and the ratio of buoyancy fluxes from the distributed and localised source Ψ =Bw/Bp . Industrial CASE award with ARUP.

  19. Study of Buoyancy Effects in Diffusion Flames Using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Gollahalli, Subramanyam R.; Griffin, DeVon

    1997-01-01

    Diffusion flames are extensively encountered in many domestic and industrial processes. Even after many decades of research, a complete understanding of the diffusion flame structure is not available. The structure and properties of the flames are governed by the mixing (laminar or turbulent), chemical kinetics, radiation and soot processes. Another important phenomenon that affects flame structure in normal gravity is buoyancy. The presence of buoyancy has long hindered the rational understanding of many combustion processes. In gas jet diffusion flames, buoyancy affects the structure of the shear layer, the development of fluid instabilities, and formation of the coherent structures in the near nozzle region of the gas jets. The buoyancy driven instabilities generate vorticial structures outside the flame resulting in flame flicker. The vortices also strongly interact with the small-scale structures in the jet shear layer. This affects the transitional and turbulence characteristics of the flame. For a fundamental understanding of diffusion flames it is essential to isolate the effects of buoyancy. This is the primary goal of the experiments conducted in microgravity. Previous investigations, have shown dramatic differences between the jet flames in microgravity and normal gravity. It has been observed that flames in microgravity are taller and more sooty than in normal gravity. The fuels used in these experiments were primarily hydrocarbons. In the absence of buoyancy the soot resides near the flame region, which adversely affects the entrainment of reactants. It is very important to eliminate the interference of soot on flame characteristics in microgravity. The present work, therefore, focuses on the changes in the flame structure due to buoyancy without the added complexities of heterogeneous reactions. Clean burning hydrogen is used as the fuel to avoid soot formation and minimize radiative losses. Because of the low luminosity of hydrogen flames, we use

  20. Investigating Students' Ideas About Buoyancy and the Influence of Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, James; Borland, David

    2016-04-01

    While haptics (simulated touch) represents a potential breakthrough technology for science teaching and learning, there is relatively little research into its differential impact in the context of teaching and learning. This paper describes the testing of a haptically enhanced simulation (HES) for learning about buoyancy. Despite a lifetime of everyday experiences, a scientifically sound explanation of buoyancy remains difficult to construct for many. It requires the integration of domain-specific knowledge regarding density, fluid, force, gravity, mass, weight, and buoyancy. Prior studies suggest that novices often focus on only one dimension of the sinking and floating phenomenon. Our HES was designed to promote the integration of the subconcepts of density and buoyant forces and stresses the relationship between the object itself and the surrounding fluid. The study employed a randomized pretest-posttest control group research design and a suite of measures including an open-ended prompt and objective content questions to provide insights into the influence of haptic feedback on undergraduate students' thinking about buoyancy. A convenience sample (n = 40) was drawn from a university's population of undergraduate elementary education majors. Two groups were formed from haptic feedback (n = 22) and no haptic feedback (n = 18). Through content analysis, discernible differences were seen in the posttest explanations sinking and floating across treatment groups. Learners that experienced the haptic feedback made more frequent use of "haptically grounded" terms (e.g., mass, gravity, buoyant force, pushing), leading us to begin to build a local theory of language-mediated haptic cognition.

  1. Influence of Buoyancy Control Performance on Power Production by the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Tedd, James; Friis-Madsen, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the real sea performance of the buoyancy control system of Wave Dragon, a floating wave energy converter using the overtopping principle. The device operates with the full independent control system which has been tested during three years of operation. The impact...

  2. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe : Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference

  3. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V

    2015-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200 km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years....

  4. Consistent Two-Equation Closure Modelling for Atmospheric Research: Buoyancy and Vegetation Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Kelly, Mark C.; Leclerc, Monique Y.

    2012-01-01

    A self-consistent two-equation closure treating buoyancy and plant drag effects has been developed, through consideration of the behaviour of the supplementary equation for the length-scale-determining variable in homogeneous turbulent flow. Being consistent with the canonical flow regimes of gri...

  5. Buoyancy effects in vertical rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field and single sided heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostichev, P. I.; Poddubnyi, I. I.; Razuvanov, N. G.

    2017-11-01

    In some DEMO blanket designs liquid metal flows in vertical ducts of rectangular cross-section between ceramic breeder units providing their cooling. Heat exchange in these conditions is governed by the influence of magnetic field (coplanar) and by buoyancy effects that depend on the flow orientation to the gravity vector (downward and upward flow). Magnetohydrodynamic and heat transfer of liquid metal in vertical rectangular ducts is not well researched. Experimental study of buoyancy effects in rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field for one-sided heat load and downward and upward flowsis presented in this paper. The detail research with has been done on mercury MHD close loop with using of the probe technique allow to discover several advantageous and disadvantageous effects. The intensive impact of buoyancy force has been observed in a few regime of downward flow which has been laminarized by magnetic field. Due to the development in the flow of the secondary large-scale vortices heat transfer improved and the temperature fluctuations of the abnormally high intensity have been fixed. On the contrary, in the upward flow the buoyancy force stabilized the flow which lead to decreasing of the turbulence heat transfer ratio and, consequently, deterioration of heat transfer.

  6. Experimental Study of Wind-Opposed Buoyancy-Driven Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A.; Bjerre, M.; Chen, Z. D.

    Natural ventilation driven by natural forces, i.e. wind and thermal buoyancy, is an environmentally friendly system for buildings and has been increasingly used around the world in recent years to mitigate the impact on the global environment due to the significant energy consumption by heating...

  7. Teaching Archimedes' Principle to Sixth Graders without Teaching Mass, Density, Pressure, Volume or Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Neeraja

    2017-01-01

    Flotation is usually taught in Indian schools after students have been introduced to the concepts of mass, density, pressure, volume and buoyancy. This paper describes an attempt to teach the principle of flotation to a class of sixth graders--who had not yet been taught these concepts--so they could understand (and perhaps, arrive at) Archimedes'…

  8. Teaching Archimedes' Principle to Sixth Graders without Teaching Mass, Density, Pressure, Volume or Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Neeraja

    Flotation is usually taught in Indian schools after students have been introduced to the concepts of mass, density, pressure, volume and buoyancy. This paper describes an attempt to teach the principle of flotation to a class of sixth graders--who had not yet been taught these concepts--so they could understand (and perhaps, arrive at) Archimedes'…

  9. Non-Uniqueness of the Point of Application of the Buoyancy Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliava, Janis; Megel, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Even though the buoyancy force (also known as the Archimedes force) has always been an important topic of academic studies in physics, its point of application has not been explicitly identified yet. We present a quantitative approach to this problem based on the concept of the hydrostatic energy, considered here for a general shape of the…

  10. Buoyancy-driven flow in a peat moss layer as a mechanism for solute transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappoldt, C.; Pieters, G.J.J.M.; Adema, E.B.; Baaijens, G.J.; Grootjans, A.P.; Duijn, van C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Transport of nutrients, CO2, methane, and oxygen plays an important ecological role at the surface of wetland ecosystems. A possibly important transport mechanism in a water-saturated peat moss layer (usually Sphagnum cuspidatum) is nocturnal buoyancy flow, the downward flow of relatively cold

  11. On the influence of buoyancy and suction/injection In Heat and Mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we examined the influence of buoyancy and suction/injection in the problem of unsteady convection with chemical reaction and radiative heat transfer past a flat porous plate moving through a binary mixture in an optically thin environment is presented. The dimensionless governing equations for this ...

  12. Academic Buoyancy in Secondary School: Exploring Patterns of Convergence in English, Mathematics, Science, and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Lars-Erik; Hall, James; Martin, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Past research into the ability of students to "bounce back" from everyday academic setback (academic buoyancy) has lacked sensitivity to the contexts in which children demonstrate this behavior. Here we aimed to contextualize past findings by reporting the results of an exploratory investigation that featured: (1) repeated measurement of…

  13. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Itsumi; Meyer, Carl G; Sato, Katsufumi

    2015-01-01

    We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two species of deep-sea sharks (bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a prickly shark, Echinorhinus cookei) in their natural habitat, we used accelerometer-magnetometer data loggers to measure their swimming performance. Both species of deep-sea sharks showed similar diel vertical migrations: they swam at depths of 200-300 m at night and deeper than 500 m during the day. Ambient water temperature was around 15°C at 200-300 m but below 7°C at depths greater than 500 m. During vertical movements, all deep-sea sharks showed higher swimming efforts during descent than ascent to maintain a given swimming speed, and were able to glide uphill for extended periods (several minutes), indicating that these deep-sea sharks are in fact positively buoyant in their natural habitats. This positive buoyancy may adaptive for stealthy hunting (i.e. upward gliding to surprise prey from underneath) or may facilitate evening upward migrations when muscle temperatures are coolest, and swimming most sluggish, after spending the day in deep, cold water. Positive buoyancy could potentially be widespread in fish conducting daily vertical migration in deep-sea habitats.

  14. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsumi Nakamura

    Full Text Available We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two species of deep-sea sharks (bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a prickly shark, Echinorhinus cookei in their natural habitat, we used accelerometer-magnetometer data loggers to measure their swimming performance. Both species of deep-sea sharks showed similar diel vertical migrations: they swam at depths of 200-300 m at night and deeper than 500 m during the day. Ambient water temperature was around 15°C at 200-300 m but below 7°C at depths greater than 500 m. During vertical movements, all deep-sea sharks showed higher swimming efforts during descent than ascent to maintain a given swimming speed, and were able to glide uphill for extended periods (several minutes, indicating that these deep-sea sharks are in fact positively buoyant in their natural habitats. This positive buoyancy may adaptive for stealthy hunting (i.e. upward gliding to surprise prey from underneath or may facilitate evening upward migrations when muscle temperatures are coolest, and swimming most sluggish, after spending the day in deep, cold water. Positive buoyancy could potentially be widespread in fish conducting daily vertical migration in deep-sea habitats.

  15. Academic buoyancy, student's achievement, and the linking role of control: A cross-lagged analysis of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Rebecca J; Martin, Andrew J; Malmberg, Lars-Erik; Hall, James; Ginns, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Previous research has indicated that although academic buoyancy and student's achievement are associated, the relationship is relatively modest. We sought to determine whether another construct might link academic buoyancy and student's achievement. Based on prior theoretical and empirical work, we examined a sense of control as one possible linking mechanism. The study analysed data from 2,971 students attending 21 Australian high schools. We conducted a cross-lagged panel design as a first means of disentangling the relative salience of academic buoyancy, control, and achievement (Phase 1). Based upon these results, we proceeded with follow-up analyses of an ordered process model linking the constructs over time (Phase 2). Findings showed that buoyancy and achievement were associated with control over time, but not with one another (Phase 1). In addition, control appeared to play a role in how buoyancy influenced achievement and that a cyclical process may operate among the three factors over time (Phase 2). The findings suggest that control may play an important role in linking past experiences of academic buoyancy and achievement to subsequent academic buoyancy and achievement. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  16. The Principles of Buoyancy in Marine Fish Eggs and Their Vertical Distributions across the World Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby, Svein; Kristiansen, Trond

    2015-01-01

    Buoyancy acting on plankton, i.e. the difference in specific gravity between plankton and the ambient water, is a function of salinity and temperature. From specific gravity measurements of marine fish eggs salinity appears to be the only determinant of the buoyancy indicating that the thermal expansions of the fish egg and the ambient seawater are equal. We analyze the mechanisms behind thermal expansion in fish eggs in order to determine to what extent it can be justified to neglect the effects of temperature on buoyancy. Our results confirm the earlier assumptions that salinity is the basic determinant on buoyancy in marine fish eggs that, in turn, influence the vertical distributions and, consequently, the dispersal of fish eggs from the spawning areas. Fish populations have adapted accordingly by producing egg specific gravities that tune the egg buoyancy to create specific vertical distributions for each local population. A wide variety of buoyancy adaptations are found among fish populations. The ambient physical conditions at the spawning sites form a basic constraint for adaptation. In coastal regions where salinity increases with depth, and where the major fraction of the fish stocks spawns, pelagic and mesopelagic egg distributions dominate. However, in the larger part of worlds' oceans salinity decreases with depth resulting in different egg distributions. Here, the principles of vertical distributions of fish eggs in the world oceans are presented in an overarching framework presenting the basic differences between regions, mainly coastal, where salinity increases with depth and the major part of the world oceans where salinity decreases with depth. We show that under these latter conditions, steady-state vertical distribution of mesopelagic fish eggs cannot exist as it does in most coastal regions. In fact, a critical spawning depth must exist where spawning below this depth threshold results in eggs sinking out of the water column and become lost for

  17. Second-law analysis for buoyancy-driven hydromagnetic couple stress fluid flow through a porous channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem, Semiu O.; Adesanya, Samuel O.; Vincent, Uchechukwu E.

    2016-08-01

    This paper examines the combined effects of the buoyancy force and of the magnetic field on the entropy generation rate in the flow of a couple stress fluid through a porous vertical channel. The flow's dynamical equations were non-dimensionalised and solved via the application of the Adomian decomposition method (ADM). Variations of some thermo-physical parameters were conducted and discussed, with regard to the physics of the fluid. Our result shows that the entropy generation rate increases as the buoyancy increases in the fluid. In addition, the irreversibility in the flow system results mainly from the fluid's viscosity, ohmic heating, and the buoyancy.

  18. Buoyancy effect on atmospheric surface layer: measurements from the East Coast of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Z.; Reda, E.; Zulkifli, Rozli

    2017-04-01

    The nature and evolution of the atmospheric surface layer is still unresolved completely. Many questions regarding the existence of the z-less layer and trend of the cross correlations still remain open. This research analyzes some of the surface layer ambiguities. In this research temperature, velocity and turbulence data were collected from a weather station facility located in the Marine Ecosystem Research Centre (EKOMAR) Mersing on the East Coast of Malaysia. Two high resolution hotwires were utilized at 3 m and 12 m heights above ground. Both gradient Richardson number and Obukhov stability parameter were calculated. Turbulence spectra were plotted at different stability conditions. The results does not show the existence of the z-less layer at deep stable condition. The buoyancy force, under unstable condition, was found responsible for the increase of vertical correlation factor. The fingerprint of the buoyancy force was detected in the spectra at low frequencies.

  19. Buoyancy Limitation of Filamentous Cyanobacteria under Prolonged Pressure due to the Gas Vesicles Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeynayaka, Helayaye Damitha Lakmali; Asaeda, Takashi; Kaneko, Yasuko

    2017-08-01

    Freshwater cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena galeata were cultured in chambers under artificially generated pressures, which correspond to the hydrostatic pressures at deep water. Variations occurred in gas vesicles volume, and buoyancy state of cells under those conditions were analyzed at different time intervals (5 min, 1 day, and 5 days). Variations in gas vesicles morphology of cells were observed by transmission electron microscopy images. Settling velocity ( Vs) of cells which governs the buoyancy was observed with the aid of a modified optical microscope. Moreover, effects of the prolonged pressure on cell ballast composition (protein and polysaccharides) were examined. Elevated pressure conditions reduced the cell ballast and caused a complete disappearance of gas vesicles in Pseudanabaena galeata cells. Hence cyanobacteria cells were not able to float within the study period. Observations and findings of the study indicate the potential application of hydrostatic pressure, which naturally occurred in hypolimnion of lakes, to inhibit the re-suspension of cyanobacteria cells.

  20. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Hydrogen Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Burt W.; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed in earth-gravity to determine how buoyancy affected transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. The jet exit Froude number characterizing buoyancy in the flame was varied from 1.65 x 10(exp 5) to 1.14 x 10(exp 8) by varying the operating pressure and/or burner inside diameter. Laminar fuel jet was discharged vertically into ambient air flowing through a combustion chamber. Flame characteristics were observed using rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a line-of-site optical diagnostic technique. Results show that the breakpoint length for a given jet exit Reynolds number increased with increasing Froude number. Data suggest that buoyant transitional flames might become laminar in the absence of gravity. The schlieren technique was shown as effective in quantifying the flame characteristics.

  1. Numerical and Experimental Study on Negative Buoyance Induced Vortices in N-Butane Jet Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-07-26

    Near nozzle flow field in flickering n-butane diffusion jet flames was investigated with a special focus on transient flow patterns of negative buoyance induced vortices. The flow structures were obtained through Mie scattering imaging with seed particles in a fuel stream using continuous-wave (CW) Argon-ion laser. Velocity fields were also quantified with particle mage velocimetry (PIV) system having kHz repetition rate. The results showed that the dynamic motion of negative buoyance induced vortices near the nozzle exit was coupled strongly with a flame flickering instability. Typically during the flame flickering, the negative buoyant vortices oscillated at the flickering frequency. The vortices were distorted by the flickering motion and exhibited complicated transient vortical patterns, such as tilting and stretching. Numerical simulations were also implemented based on an open source C++ package, LaminarSMOKE, for further validations.

  2. CO$_2$ dissolution controlled by buoyancy driven shear dispersion in a background hydrological flow

    CERN Document Server

    Unwin, H Juliette T; Woods, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the long-time flow which controls the dissolution of a plume of CO$_2$ following injection into an anticline structure in a deep saline aquifer of finite vertical extent. Over times of tens to thousands of years, some of the CO$_2$ will dissolve into the underlying groundwater to produce a region of relatively dense, CO$_2$ saturated water directly below the plume of CO$_2$. Continued dissolution then requires the supply of CO$_2$ unsaturated aquifer water. This may be provided by a background hydrological flow or buoyancy driven flow caused by the density contrast between the CO$_2$ saturated and unsaturated water in the aquifer. At long times, the interaction of the cross-layer diffusive mixing with the buoyancy, leads to buoyancy driven shear dispersion of the CO$_2$. With a background hydrological flow, the upstream transport of dissolved CO$_2$ by this dispersion becomes balanced by the oncoming hydrological flow so that CO$_2$ rich water can only spread a ...

  3. Schlieren Measurements of Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Low-Density Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent flow in helium jets discharged into air was studied using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry technique. In particular, the effects of buoyancy on jet oscillations and flow transition length were considered. Experiments to simulate microgravity were conducted in the 2.2s drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet Reynolds numbers varied from 800 to1200 and the jet Richardson numbers ranged between 0.01 and 0.004. Schlieren images revealed substantial variations in the flow structure during the drop. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of the data obtained in Earth gravity experiments revealed the existence of a discrete oscillating frequency in the transition region, which matched the frequency in the upstream laminar regime. In microgravity, the transition occurred farther downstream indicating laminarization of the jet in the absence of buoyancy. The amplitude of jet oscillations was reduced by up to an order of magnitude in microgravity. Results suggest that jet oscillations were buoyancy induced and that the brief microgravity period may not be sufficient for the oscillations to completely subside.

  4. Buoyancy effect on the flow pattern and the thermal performance of an array of circular cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Fornarelli, Francesco; Oresta, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we found, by means of numerical simulations, a transition in the oscillatory character of the flow field for a particular combination of buoyancy and spacing in an array of six circular cylinders at a Reynolds number of 100 and Prandtl number of 0.7. The cylinders are iso-thermal and they are aligned with the Earth acceleration (g). According to the array orientation, an aiding or an opposing buoyancy is considered. The effect of natural convection with respect to the forced convection is modulated with the Richardson number, Ri, ranging between -1 and 1. Two values of center to center spacing (s=3.6d - 4d) are considered. The effects of buoyancy and spacing on the flow pattern in the near and far field are described. Several transitions in the flow patterns are found and a parametric analysis of the dependence of the force coefficients and Nusselt number with respect to the Richardson number is reported. For Ri=-1, the change of spacing ratio from 3.6 to 4 induces a transition in the standard d...

  5. On the relative importance of thermal and chemical buoyancy in impact-induced melting on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas, T.; Breuer, D.

    2017-09-01

    We ran series of 2D numerical mantle convection simulations of the thermochemical evolution of a Mars-like planet. In order to study the importance of compositional buoyancy of melting mantle, the models were set up in pairs of one including all thermal and compositional contributions to buoyancy and one accounting only for the thermal contributions. Single large impacts were introduced as causes of additional strong local anomalies, and their evolution in the framework of the convecting mantle was tracked. They confirm that the additional buoyancy provided by the depletion of melting mantle can establish a global stable stratification of the convecting mantle and throttle crust production. Furthermore, it is essential in the stabilization and preservation of local compositional anomalies directly beneath the lithosphere and offers a possible explanation for the existence of distinct, long-lived reservoirs in the martian mantle. Such anomalies will be detected by gravimetry rather than by seismic or heat flow measurements. The crustal thickness can be locally overestimated by up to 15-22 km if impact-induced density anomalies in the mantle are neglected.

  6. Buoyancy under control: underwater locomotor performance in a deep diving seabird suggests respiratory strategies for reducing foraging effort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants--as in other families of diving seabirds--of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control.

  7. A novel method for calculating and measuring the second-order buoyancy experienced by a magnet immersed in magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Hao, Du; Li, Decai

    2018-01-01

    The phenomenon whereby an object whose density is greater than magnetic fluid can be suspended stably in magnetic fluid under the magnetic field is one of the peculiar properties of magnetic fluids. Examples of applications based on the peculiar properties of magnetic fluid are sensors and actuators, dampers, positioning systems and so on. Therefore, the calculation and measurement of magnetic levitation force of magnetic fluid is of vital importance. This paper concerns the peculiar second-order buoyancy experienced by a magnet immersed in magnetic fluid. The expression for calculating the second-order buoyancy was derived, and a novel method for calculating and measuring the second-order buoyancy was proposed based on the expression. The second-order buoyancy was calculated by ANSYS and measured experimentally using the novel method. To verify the novel method, the second-order buoyancy was measured experimentally with a nonmagnetic rod stuck on the top surface of the magnet. The results of calculations and experiments show that the novel method for calculating the second-order buoyancy is correct with high accuracy. In addition, the main causes of error were studied in this paper, including magnetic shielding of magnetic fluid and the movement of magnetic fluid in a nonuniform magnetic field.

  8. The Solar Vortex: Electric Power Generation using Anchored, Buoyancy-Induced Columnar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, Ari

    2015-04-01

    Naturally-occurring, buoyancy-driven columnar vortices (``dust devils'') that are driven by the instability of thermally stratified air layers and sustained by the entrainment of ground- heated air, occur spontaneously in the natural environment with core diameters of 1-50 m and heights up to 1 km. These vortices convert low-grade waste heat in the air layer overlying the warm surface into a solar-induced wind with significant kinetic energy. Unlike dust devil vortices that are typically free to wander laterally, the Solar Vortex (SoV) is deliberately triggered and anchored within a cylindrical domain bounded by an azimuthal array of stationary ground-mounted vertical vanes and sustained by continuous entrainment of the ground-heated air through these vanes. The mechanical energy of the anchored vortex is exploited for power generation by coupling the vortex to a vertical-axis turbine. This simple, low-cost electric power generating unit is competitive in cost, intermittency, and capacity factor with traditional solar power technologies. The considerable kinetic energy of the vortex column cannot be explained by buoyancy alone, and the fundamental mechanisms associated with the formation, evolution, and dynamics of an anchored, buoyancy-driven columnar vortex were investigated experimentally and numerically with specific emphasis on flow manipulation for increasing the available kinetic energy and therefore the generated power. These investigations have also considered the dependence of the vortex scaling and strength on the thermal resources and on the flow enclosure in the laboratory and in the natural environment. Preliminary outdoor tests of a two-meter scale prototype successfully demonstrated the ability to engender and anchor a columnar vortex using only solar radiation and couple the flow to a vertical axis wind turbine. A kilowatt-scale outer door prototype will be tested during the summer of 2015.

  9. Pressure evolution in shallow magma chambers upon buoyancy-driven replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, P.; Montagna, C. P.; Longo, A.

    2017-03-01

    The invasion of active magma chambers by primitive magma of deeper provenance is a frequent occurrence in volcanic systems, and it is commonly associated with pressurization. Chamber replenishment is driven by pressure and buoyancy forces that cause magma ascent towards shallow depths. We examine the end-member case of pure buoyancy-driven (natural) convection in crustal reservoirs deriving from the presence of degassed, dense magma at shallow level, that can originate a gravitational instability. Space-time-dependent numerical simulations of magma dynamics in composite underground systems reveal highly nonlinear pressure evolution dominated by decompression at shallow depths. This counterintuitive result originates from the compressible nature of multiphase magmas and their complex convection and mixing dynamics. Shallow magma chamber decompression on replenishment is favored by large volatile contents of the uprising magma, resulting in large density contrasts among the resident and the incoming components. These results show that the intuitive concept of magma chamber pressurization upon replenishment may not always hold in real situations dominated by buoyancy, and provide new perspectives for the interpretation of geophysical records at active volcanoes.Plain Language SummaryA common process at active volcanoes worldwide is the arrival of magma from depth of tens of kilometers into shallower (depths of some km) reservoirs ("magma chambers"), containing themselves magma that can be different in terms of gas content and composition. We present numerical simulations that describe this process, with particular reference to the Campi Flegrei volcano in Italy. Our results show that, depending on the specific conditions and the gas contents of the two magma types, this process can lead to a decrease in pressure of the shallow chamber. When interpreting ground deformation signals, very often magma rise toward shallow depths is linked to inflation, caused by pressure

  10. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    OpenAIRE

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference between the core and the annular layer, is counterbalanced. From earlier studies it is known that at the interface between the annular layer and the core waves are present that move with respect to the ...

  11. Dynamic effects of plate-buoyancy subduction at Manila Trench, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.; Zhan, W.; Sun, J.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    Bathymetric map of SCS plate shows two subducting buoyancies, the fossil ridge and the oceanic plateau, which are supposed to impact slab segmentation into the north from Taiwan to 18°N, and the south from 17°N to Mindoro. Hypocenter distribution show that slab dip angle turns lower southwards from 45° to 30° in the north segment, and relatively equals ~45° in the south segment at the depth of 100km. Moreover, volcano distribution can be segmented into Miocene WVC, Quaternary EVC in the north and combined SVC in the south (Fig. A). We found that WVC and SVC mostly locate in a parallel belt ~50km apart to Manila trench, however EVC turn father southwards from 50km to 100km (Fig. B). Above characters congruously indicate that SCS plate kept equal dip angle in Miocene; then the north segment shallowed at 18°N and developed northwards in Quaternary, resulting in lower dip angle than the invariant south segment. To check the transformation of slab dip angle from 45° to 30° between 17~18°N, focal mechanism solution nearby 17°N are found 90° in rake and dip angle, strike parallel to the fossil ridge, indicating a slab tear located coincident with the ridge, where is a weak zone of higher heat flow and lower plate coupling ratio than the adjacent zones and slab can be easily tore as an interface for SCS plate segmentation. Subduction of the two buoyancies within SCS plate is supposed as influential dynamic factor: It caused the trench retreat rate reduced, forming a cusp and a flat convex of Manila trench shape; Moreover, the buoyancies resisted subduction, resulting in shear stress heterogeneity of SCS plate, in consequence the fossil ridge as a fragile belt potentially became stress concentration zone that easily tore; Then the buoyant oceanic plateau might lead to shallowing of the northern SCS plate. To examine the hypothesis, dynamic effects of the two subducting buoyancies are being respectively investigated based on numerical models. (Grt. 41376063, 2013

  12. A Six-DOF Buoyancy Tank Microgravity Test Bed with Active Drag Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chong; Chen, Shiyu; Yuan, Jianping; Zhu, Zhanxia

    2017-10-01

    Ground experiment under microgravity is very essential because it can verify the space enabling technologies before applied in space missions. In this paper, a novel ground experiment system that can provide long duration, large scale and high microgravity level for the six degree of freedom (DOF) spacecraft trajectory tracking is presented. In which, the most gravity of the test body is balanced by the buoyancy, and the small residual gravity is offset by the electromagnetic force. Because the electromagnetic force on the test body can be adjusted in the electromagnetic system, it can significantly simplify the balancing process using the proposed microgravity test bed compared to the neutral buoyance system. Besides, a novel compensation control system based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method is developed to estimate and compensate the water resistance online, in order to improve the fidelity of the ground experiment. A six-DOF trajectory tracking in the microgravity system is applied to testify the efficiency of the proposed compensation controller, and the experimental simulation results are compared to that obtained using the classic proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method. The simulation results demonstrated that, for the six-DOF motion ground experiment, the microgravity level can reach to 5 × 10-4 g. And, because the water resistance has been estimated and compensated, the performance of the presented controller is much better than the PID controller. The presented ground microgravity system can be applied in on-orbit service and other related technologies in future.

  13. A turbulence spectral model for sound propagation in the atmosphere that incorporates shear and buoyancy forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson

    2000-11-01

    A three-dimensional model for turbulent velocity fluctuations in the atmospheric boundary layer is developed and used to calculate scattering of sound. The model, which is based on von Karman's spectrum, incorporates separate contributions from shear- and buoyancy-forced turbulence. New equations are derived from the model that predict the strength and diffraction parameters for scattering of sound as a function of height from the ground and atmospheric conditions. The need is demonstrated for retaining two distinct scattering length scales, one associated with scattering strength and the other with diffraction. These length scales are height dependent and vary substantially with the relative proportions of shear and buoyancy forcing. The turbulence model predicts that for forward-scattered waves the phase variance is much larger than the log-amplitude variance, a behavior borne out by experimental data. A new method for synthesizing random fields, based on empirical orthogonal functions, is developed to accommodate the height dependence of the turbulence model. The method is applied to numerical calculations of scattering into an acoustic shadow zone, yielding good agreement with previous measurements.

  14. Simulation of buoyancy-induced turbulent flow from a hot horizontal jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    Experimental visualizations and numerical simulations of a horizontal hot water jet entering cold water into a rectangular storage tank are described. Three different temperature differences and their corresponding Reynolds numbers are considered. Both experimental visualization and numerical computations are carried out for the same flow and thermal conditions. The realizable k - ε model is used for modeling the turbulent flow while the buoyancy is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation. Polynomial approximations of the water properties are used to compare with the Boussinesq approximation. Numerical solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while pressure, velocity, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank as well as the Froude number are analyzed. The experimental visualizations are performed at intervals of five seconds for all different cases. The simulated results are compared with the visualized results, and both of them show the stratification phenomena and buoyancy force effects due to temperature difference and density variation. After certain times, depending on the case condition, the flow tends to reach a steady state. © 2014 Publishing House for Journal of Hydrodynamics.

  15. Experimental parameterisation of principal physics in buoyancy variations of marine teleost eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Mi Jung

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the high buoyancy of pelagic marine eggs is due to substantial influx of water across the cell membrane just before ovulation. Here we further develop the theoretical basis by applying laboratory observations of the various components of the fertilized egg in first-principle equations for egg specific gravity (ρ(egg followed by statistical validation. We selected Atlantic cod as a model animal due to the affluent amount of literature on this species, but also undertook additional dedicated experimental works. We found that specific gravity of yolk plus embryo is central in influencing ρ(egg and thereby the buoyancy. However, our established framework documents the effect on ρ(egg of the initial deposition of the heavy chorion material in the gonad prior to spawning. Thereafter, we describe the temporal changes in ρ(egg during incubation: Generally, the eggs showed a slight rise in ρ(egg from fertilization to mid-gastrulation followed by a gradual decrease until full development of main embryonic organs just before hatching. Ontogenetic changes in ρ(egg were significantly associated with volume and mass changes of yolk plus embryo. The initial ρ(egg at fertilization appeared significantly influenced by the chorion volume fraction which is determined by the combination of the final chorion volume of the oocyte and of the degree of swelling (hydrolyzation prior to spawning. The outlined principles and algorithms are universal in nature and should therefore be applicable to fish eggs in general.

  16. A Review of Some Recent Studies on Buoyancy Driven Flows in an Urban Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodhisatta Hajra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some recent studies (after 2000 pertaining to buoyancy driven flows in nature and thier use in reducing air pollution levels in a city (city ventilation. Natural convection flows occur due to the heating and cooling of various urban surfaces (e.g., mountain slopes, leading to upslope and downslope flows. Such flows can have a significant effect on city ventilation which has been the subject of study in the recent times due to increased pollution levels in a city. A major portion of the research reviewed here consists of natural convection flows occurring along mountain slopes, with a few studies devoted to flows along building walls. The studies discussed here primarily include field measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD models. This review shows that for densely populated cities with high pollution levels, natural convection flows (mountain slope or building walls can significantly aid the dispersion of pollutants. Additional studies in this area using CFD and water channel measurements can explain the physical processes involved in such flows and help improve CFD modelling. Future research should focus on a complete understanding of the mechanisms of buoyancy flows in nature and developing design guidelines for better planning of cities.

  17. Resistance characteristics of innovative eco-fitness equipment: a water buoyancy muscular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Han; Liu, Ya-Chen; Tai, Hsing-Hao; Liu, Chiang

    2018-03-01

    This paper propose innovative eco-fitness equipment-a water buoyancy muscular machine (WBM machine) in which resistance is generated by buoyancy and fluid resistance. The resistance characteristics during resistance adjustment and under isometric, concentric, eccentric and isokinetic conditions were investigated and compared to a conventional machine with metal weight plates. The results indicated that the isometric, concentric and eccentric resistances could be adjusted by varying the water volume; the maximum resistances under isometric, concentric and eccentric conditions were 163.8, 338.5 and 140.9 N, respectively. The isometric resistances at different positions remained constant in both machines; however the isometric resistance was lower for WBM machine when at a position corresponding to a 5% total displacement. The WBM machine has lower resistance under eccentric conditions and higher resistance under concentric conditions. Although the conventional machine has an identical trend, the variation was minor (within 4 N). In the WBM machine, the eccentric resistance was approximately 30-45% of the concentric resistance. Concentric resistances increased with an increase in velocity in both machines; however, the eccentric resistances decreased with an increase in velocity. In summary, the WBM machine, a piece of innovative eco-fitness equipment, has unique resistance characteristics and expansibility.

  18. The use of spirometry to evaluate pulmonary function in olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) with positive buoyancy disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Todd L; Munns, Suzanne; Adams, Lance; Hicks, James

    2013-09-01

    This study utilized computed spirometry to compare the pulmonary function of two stranded olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) presenting with a positive buoyancy disorder with two healthy captive olive ridley sea turtles held in a large public aquarium. Pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements demonstrated that the metabolic cost of breathing was much greater for animals admitted with positive buoyancy than for the normal sea turtles. Positively buoyant turtles had higher tidal volumes and significantly lower breathing-frequency patterns with significantly higher expiration rates, typical of gasp-type breathing. The resulting higher energetic cost of breathing in the diseased turtles may have a significant impact on their long-term survival. The findings represent a method for clinical respiratory function analysis for an individual animal to assist with diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to evaluate objectively sea turtles presenting with positive buoyancy and respiratory disease using pulmonary function tests.

  19. Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    ABSTRACT Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage Rebecca Allen Geological CO2 storage is an engineering feat that has been undertaken around the world for more than two decades, thus accurate modeling of flow and transport behavior is of practical importance. Diffusive and convective transport are relevant processes for buoyancy-driven convection of CO2 into underlying fluid, a scenario that has received the attention of numerous modeling studies. While most studies focus on Darcy-scale modeling of this scenario, relatively little work exists at the pore-scale. In this work, properties evaluated at the pore-scale are used to investigate the transport behavior modeled at the Darcy-scale. We compute permeability and two different forms of tortuosity, namely hydraulic and diffusive. By generating various pore ge- ometries, we find hydraulic and diffusive tortuosity can be quantitatively different in the same pore geometry by up to a factor of ten. As such, we emphasize that these tortuosities should not be used interchangeably. We find pore geometries that are characterized by anisotropic permeability can also exhibit anisotropic diffusive tortuosity. This finding has important implications for buoyancy-driven convection modeling; when representing the geological formation with an anisotropic permeabil- ity, it is more realistic to also account for an anisotropic diffusivity. By implementing a non-dimensional model that includes both a vertically and horizontally orientated 5 Rayleigh number, we interpret our findings according to the combined effect of the anisotropy from permeability and diffusive tortuosity. In particular, we observe the Rayleigh ratio may either dampen or enhance the diffusing front, and our simulation data is used to express the time of convective onset as a function of the Rayleigh ratio. Also, we implement a lattice Boltzmann model for thermal convective flows, which we treat as an analog for

  20. Resolving the Mantle Heat Transfer Discrepancy by Reassessing Buoyancy Flux Estimates of Upwelling Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark; Parnell-Turner, Ross; White, Nicky

    2017-04-01

    The size and relative importance of mantle plumes is a controversial topic within the geodynamics community. Numerical experiments of mantle convection suggest a wide range of possible behaviours, from minor plumelets through to large scale, whole-mantle upwellings. In terms of observations, recent seismic tomographic models have identified many large, broad plume-like features within the lower mantle. In contrast, existing estimates of buoyancy flux calculated from plume swells have suggested that these upwellings transfer a relatively minor amount of material and heat into the uppermost mantle. Here, we revisit these calculations of buoyancy flux using a global map of plume swells based upon new observations of dynamic topography. Usually, plume flux is calculated from the cross-sectional area of a swell multiplied by either plate velocity or spreading rate. A key assumption is that plume head material flows laterally at or below the velocity of the overriding plate. Published results are dominated by contributions from the Pacific Ocean and suggest that a total of ˜ 2 TW of heat is carried by plumes into the uppermost mantle. An alternative approach exploits swell volume scaled by a characteristic decay time, which removes the reliance on plate velocities. The main assumption of this method is that plumes are in quasi-steady state. In this study, we have applied this volumetric approach in a new global analysis. Our results indicate that the Icelandic plume has a buoyancy flux of ˜ 27 ± 4 Mg s-1 and the Hawaiian plume is ˜ 2.9 ± 0.6 Mg s-1. These revised values are consistent with independent geophysical constraints from the North Atlantic Ocean and Hawaii. All magmatic and amagmatic swells have been included, suggesting that the total heat flux carried to the base of the plates is ˜ 10 ± 2 TW. This revised value is a five-fold increase compared with previous estimates and provides an improved match to published predictions of basal heat flux across the

  1. Effects of buoyancy-driven convection on nucleation and growth of protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N; Penkova, Anita; Chayen, Naomi

    2004-11-01

    Protein crystallization has been studied in presence or absence of buoyancy-driven convection. Gravity-driven flow was created, or suppressed, in protein solutions by means of vertically directed density gradients that were caused by generating suitable temperature gradients. The presence of enhanced mixing was demonstrated directly by experiments with crustacyanin, a blue-colored protein, and other materials. Combined with the vertical tube position the enhanced convection has two main effects. First, it reduces the number of nucleated hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals, as compared with those in a horizontal capillary. By enabling better nutrition from the protein in the solution, convection results in growth of fewer larger HEWL crystals. Second, we observe that due to convection, trypsin crystals grow faster. Suppression of convection, achieved by decreasing solution density upward in the capillary, can to some extent mimic conditions of growth in microgravity. Thus, impurity supply, which may have a detrimental effect on crystal quality, was avoided.

  2. Buoyancy driven flow in a hot water tank due to standby heat loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal behavior in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank due to standby heat loss of the tank are presented. The effect of standby heat loss on temperature distribution in the tank is investigated experimentally on a slim 150l tank...... show that the CFD model predicts satisfactorily water temperatures at different levels of the tank during cooling by standby heat loss. It is elucidated how the downward buoyancy driven flow along the tank wall is established by the heat loss from the tank sides and how the natural convection flow...... with a height to diameter ratio of 5. A tank with uniform temperatures and with thermal stratification is studied. A detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the tank is developed to calculate the natural convection flow in the tank. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different...

  3. Solving problems to learn concepts, how does it happen? A case for buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteler, Laura; Coleoni, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    Problem solving is a preferred activity teachers choose to help students learn concepts. At the same time, successful problem solving is widely regarded as a very good indicator of conceptual learning. Many studies have provided evidence that problem solving often improves students' chances of learning concepts. Still, the question remains relatively unexplored as to how this activity is useful to promote concept learning. In this study we explore this question in the setting of three university students solving a problem on hydrostatics, in which the concept of buoyancy is involved. We use coordination class theory to study how these students progress on their conceptual understanding. We were able to describe how this progress is related to contextual traits, as well as to students' particular epistemic stances. Finally, we discuss some implications for research and for teaching.

  4. Modeling the Effects of Buoyancy on the Evolution of Geophysical Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Eric; Caponi, Enrique A.

    1992-10-01

    A simple modeling based on the Imperial College k-ɛ turbulence description is shown to be capable of describing the highly anisotropic phenomena associated with the strong buoyancy effects encountered in upper ocean (and atmospheric boundary layer) environments. Both diurnal stratification and transition to buoyant mixing (from that driven by wind shear) are described in considerable detail, provided that the modeling of the turbulent Prandtl number and of the buoyant generation term in the ɛ model equation are evaluated in a suitably realistic and consistent way. The resulting model equations are suitable for simulating the evolution of the ensemble-averaged properties of the oceanic mixed layer in response to a specified history of interfacial shear stress and heat flux. The model is tested by comparing the predicted mixed layer evolution with the dissipation rate measurements of Shay and Gregg.

  5. Buoyancy effects on thermal behavior of a flat-plate solar collector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the flow and temperature distribution in a 12.53 m(2) solar collector panel with an absorber consisting of two vertical manifolds interconnected by 16 parallel horizontal fins have been carried out. The investigations are focused on overheating...... and the influence of the buoyancy effects are considered in the investigations. Further experimental investigations of the solar collector panel are carried out. The flow distribution through the absorber is evaluated by means of temperature measurements on the back of the absorber tubes. The measured temperatures....... The CFD calculations elucidate the flow and temperature distribution in the collector panels of different designs. Based on the investigations, recommendations are given in order to avoid overheating or boiling problems in the solar collector panel....

  6. Velocity intermittency in a buoyancy subrange in a two-dimensional soap film convection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wu, X L

    2005-06-17

    In a two-dimensional soap film convection experiment, the velocity fields are found to be strongly intermittent in the buoyancy subrange, which was reported to be nonintermittent in a recent numerical simulation. The structure functions Sq(l)(= ) exhibit self-similar structures and can be described by power laws l(zetaq) for integers 8 > or = q < or = 1. By extending Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypothesis to our system, an analytical form is derived for the scaling exponent zeta(q) = q/2 + (mu/18)(3q - q2). Our measurements yield mu = 0.42, which is significantly greater than 0.2 found in high Reynolds number turbulence in wind tunnels.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Buoyancy-driven Bubble Motion Using Level Set Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, A.; Ghosh Moulic, S.

    2010-06-01

    This paper discusses the numerical simulation of buoyancy-driven bubbles in various shape regimes using level set method. The effects of both inertia and viscous forces are considered in the mathematical model. Surface tension force at the fluid interface is implemented through the CSF model of Brackbill et al. [2]. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved on a finite volume based staggered grid using an explicit projection method. Although the level set method offers an elegant way of computing multiphase flows, it is often plagued by mass conservation problems. In the present work, the level set method is augmented with a volume-reinitialization scheme, which helps preserve the individual fluid masses within gas and liquid phases. This enabled us to compute the motion of bubbles in all important shape regimes on a relatively coarse grid.

  8. Influence of rheology on buoyancy driven instabilities of miscible displacements in 2D micromodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Angelo, M V; Rosen, M [University Buenos Aires, CONICET. Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de IngenierIa, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos-Aires (Argentina); Auradou, H; Hulin, J P, E-mail: vdangelo@fi.uba.a, E-mail: auradou@fast.u-psud.f [University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, University Paris-Sud, CNRS. Lab. FAST, Bat 502, Campus Universitaire, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2009-05-01

    The stability of miscible displacements of Newtonian and shear-thinning fluids of slightly different densities (DELTArho/rho approx 3x 10{sup -4}) with a mean flow velocity U is investigated in a 2D transparent network of channels (average width = 0.33 mm). Concentration maps providing information at both the global and local scale are obtained through optical absorption measurements and compared in gravitationally stable and unstable vertical flow configurations; the influence of buoyant flows of typical velocity U{sub g} is characterized by the gravity number N{sub g} = U{sub g}/|U|. For N{sub g} < 0.2, the spreading of the mean relative concentration profile is diffusive for both types of rheologies and characterized by a single dispersivity value l{sub d} = D/U. For the Newtonian water-glycerol solution, l{sub d} is only the same in the stable and unstable configurations for |N{sub g}| < 0.01. For 0.01 < N{sub g} < 0.2, l{sub d} is increased by buoyancy in the unstable configuration and increasingly large front structures are observed on the concentration maps; for N{sub g} > 0.2, front spreading is not diffusive any more. In the stable configuration, in contrast, the front is flattened by buoyancy for N{sub g} < -0.01 and l{sub d} reaches values of the order of the length of individual channels. For the shear thinning water-polymer solution, both the concentration maps and the value of l{sub d} are the same in the stable and unstable configurations over the full range of U values investigated: this stabilization is explained by their high effective viscosity at low shear rates keeping N{sub g} below the instability threshold even at the lowest velocities.

  9. Predicting the buoyancy, equilibrium and potential swimming ability of giraffes by computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Donald M; Naish, Darren

    2010-07-21

    Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) are often stated to be unable to swim, and while few observations supporting this have ever been offered, we sought to test the hypothesis that giraffes exhibited a body shape or density unsuited for locomotion in water. We assessed the floating capability of giraffes by simulating their buoyancy with a three-dimensional mathematical/computational model. A similar model of a horse (Equus caballus) was used as a control, and its floating behaviour replicates the observed orientations of immersed horses. The floating giraffe model has its neck sub-horizontal, and the animal would struggle to keep its head clear of the water surface. Using an isometrically scaled-down giraffe model with a total mass equal to that of the horse, the giraffe's proportionally larger limbs have much higher rotational inertias than do those of horses, and their wetted surface areas are 13.5% greater relative to that of the horse, thus making rapid swimming motions more strenuous. The mean density of the giraffe model (960 gm/l) is also higher than that of the horse (930 gm/l), and closer to that causing negative buoyancy (1000 gm/l). A swimming giraffe - forced into a posture where the neck is sub-horizontal and with a thorax that is pulled downwards by the large fore limbs - would not be able to move the neck and limbs synchronously as giraffes do when moving on land, possibly further hampering the animal's ability to move its limbs effectively underwater. We found that a full-sized, adult giraffe will become buoyant in water deeper than 2.8m. While it is not impossible for giraffes to swim, we speculate that they would perform poorly compared to other mammals and are hence likely to avoid swimming if possible. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of buoyancy on the motion of long bubbles in horizontal tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasi, Omer; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Scheid, Benoit; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-09-01

    As a confined long bubble translates along a horizontal liquid-filled tube, a thin film of liquid is formed on the tube wall. For negligible inertial and buoyancy effects, respectively, small Reynolds (Re) and Bond (Bo) numbers, the thickness of the liquid film depends only on the flow capillary number (Ca). However, buoyancy effects are no longer negligible as the diameter of the tube reaches millimeter length scales, which corresponds to finite values of Bo. We perform experiments and theoretical analysis for a long bubble in a horizontal tube to investigate the effect of Bond number (0.05 theory for the film thickness at the front of the bubble in a two-dimensional geometry at low capillary numbers Ca<10-3 and finite Bo to account for the effect of larger Ca. The resulting model shows very good agreement with the present experimental measurements. (ii) Due to the asymmetry in the liquid film thickness and the consequent drainage of the liquid from the top to the bottom of the tube, the bubble is inclined relative to the channel centerline and our side-view visualizations allow direct quantification of the inclination angle, which increases with both Bo and Ca. While the inclination angle at the top is smaller than that at the bottom of the tube, the average of these two values follows the predictions of a mass balance analysis in the central region of the bubble. (iii) The inclination of the bubble causes the thickness of the thin film at the back of the bubble to depend on the length of the bubble, whereas the thickness at the front of the bubble does not depend on the bubble length.

  11. Academic Buoyancy Mediates Academic Anxiety's Effects on Learning Strategies: An Investigation of English- and Chinese-Speaking Australian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Rebecca J.; Ginns, Paul; Martin, Andrew J.; Papworth, Brad

    2017-01-01

    A primary goal our study was to explore whether relations between academic anxiety and students' use of a range of learning strategies (memorisation, elaboration, personal best [PB] goals and cooperation) were mediated by academic buoyancy. We were also interested in extending knowledge of anxiety and its role in students' learning strategy use.…

  12. A Closer Look at Boundary Layer Inversion in Large-Eddy Simulations and Bulk Models: Buoyancy-Driven Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentine, P.; Ballon, Gilles; Heerwaarden, van C.C.

    2015-01-01

    The inversion layer (IL) of a clear-sky, buoyancy-driven convective boundary layer is investigated using large-eddy simulations covering a wide range of convective Richardson numbers. A new model of the IL is suggested and tested. The model performs better than previous first-order models of the

  13. Experimental aspects of buoyancy correction in measuring reliable high-pressure excess adsorption isotherms using the gravimetric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong Giang T.; Horn, Jarod C.; Thommes, Matthias; van Zee, Roger D.; Espinal, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Addressing reproducibility issues in adsorption measurements is critical to accelerating the path to discovery of new industrial adsorbents and to understanding adsorption processes. A National Institute of Standards and Technology Reference Material, RM 8852 (ammonium ZSM-5 zeolite), and two gravimetric instruments with asymmetric two-beam balances were used to measure high-pressure adsorption isotherms. This work demonstrates how common approaches to buoyancy correction, a key factor in obtaining the mass change due to surface excess gas uptake from the apparent mass change, can impact the adsorption isotherm data. Three different approaches to buoyancy correction were investigated and applied to the subcritical CO2 and supercritical N2 adsorption isotherms at 293 K. It was observed that measuring a collective volume for all balance components for the buoyancy correction (helium method) introduces an inherent bias in temperature partition when there is a temperature gradient (i.e. analysis temperature is not equal to instrument air bath temperature). We demonstrate that a blank subtraction is effective in mitigating the biases associated with temperature partitioning, instrument calibration, and the determined volumes of the balance components. In general, the manual and subtraction methods allow for better treatment of the temperature gradient during buoyancy correction. From the study, best practices specific to asymmetric two-beam balances and more general recommendations for measuring isotherms far from critical temperatures using gravimetric instruments are offered.

  14. Social Support, Academic Adversity and Academic Buoyancy: A Person-Centred Analysis and Implications for Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Rebecca J.; Martin, Andrew J.; Bottrell, Dorothy; Armstrong, Derrick; Ungar, Michael; Liebenberg, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The present study employed person-centred analyses that enabled identification of groups of students separated on the basis of their perceptions of social support (home and community), academic support, academic adversity and academic buoyancy. Among a sample of 249 young people, including many from high-needs communities, cluster analysis…

  15. Penguin lungs and air sacs: implications for baroprotection, oxygen stores and buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, P J; St Leger, J; Scadeng, M

    2015-03-01

    The anatomy and volume of the penguin respiratory system contribute significantly to pulmonary baroprotection, the body O2 store, buoyancy and hence the overall diving physiology of penguins. Therefore, three-dimensional reconstructions from computerized tomographic (CT) scans of live penguins were utilized to measure lung volumes, air sac volumes, tracheobronchial volumes and total body volumes at different inflation pressures in three species with different dive capacities [Adélie (Pygoscelis adeliae), king (Aptenodytes patagonicus) and emperor (A. forsteri) penguins]. Lung volumes scaled to body mass according to published avian allometrics. Air sac volumes at 30 cm H2O (2.94 kPa) inflation pressure, the assumed maximum volume possible prior to deep dives, were two to three times allometric air sac predictions and also two to three times previously determined end-of-dive total air volumes. Although it is unknown whether penguins inhale to such high volumes prior to dives, these values were supported by (a) body density/buoyancy calculations, (b) prior air volume measurements in free-diving ducks and (c) previous suggestions that penguins may exhale air prior to the final portions of deep dives. Based upon air capillary volumes, parabronchial volumes and tracheobronchial volumes estimated from the measured lung/airway volumes and the only available morphometry study of a penguin lung, the presumed maximum air sac volumes resulted in air sac volume to air capillary/parabronchial/tracheobronchial volume ratios that were not large enough to prevent barotrauma to the non-collapsing, rigid air capillaries during the deepest dives of all three species, and during many routine dives of king and emperor penguins. We conclude that volume reduction of airways and lung air spaces, via compression, constriction or blood engorgement, must occur to provide pulmonary baroprotection at depth. It is also possible that relative air capillary and parabronchial volumes are

  16. Importance of initial buoyancy field on evolution of mantle thermal structure: Implications of surface boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Glišović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there has been significant progress in the seismic imaging of mantle heterogeneity, the outstanding issue that remains to be resolved is the unknown distribution of mantle temperature anomalies in the distant geological past that give rise to the present-day anomalies inferred by global tomography models. To address this question, we present 3-D convection models in compressible and self-gravitating mantle initialised by different hypothetical temperature patterns. A notable feature of our forward convection modelling is the use of self-consistent coupling of the motion of surface tectonic plates to the underlying mantle flow, without imposing prescribed surface velocities (i.e., plate-like boundary condition. As an approximation for the surface mechanical conditions before plate tectonics began to operate we employ the no-slip (rigid boundary condition. A rigid boundary condition demonstrates that the initial thermally-dominated structure is preserved, and its geographical location is fixed during the evolution of mantle flow. Considering the impact of different assumed surface boundary conditions (rigid and plate-like on the evolution of thermal heterogeneity in the mantle we suggest that the intrinsic buoyancy of seven superplumes is most-likely resolved in the tomographic images of present-day mantle thermal structure. Our convection simulations with a plate-like boundary condition reveal that the evolution of an initial cold anomaly beneath the Java-Indonesian trench system yields a long-term, stable pattern of thermal heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle that resembles the present-day Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs, especially below the Pacific. The evolution of subduction zones may be, however, influenced by the mantle-wide flow driven by deeply-rooted and long-lived superplumes since Archean times. These convection models also detect the intrinsic buoyancy of the Perm Anomaly that has been identified as a unique

  17. SIMULATION OF FREE CURRENT FLOWS IN BUOYANCY-DRIVEN VENTILATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Abramkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to analyse the effect of the design and methods for heating the ventilation duct of a buoyancy- driven system on the formation of free convective air currents in it.Methods. The study of free convection under the conditions of interior problem was carried out using the CFD software, based on  the finite volume method with unstructured grid. Ansys Fluent software was used as a calculation tool in the study, due to its having a high convergence of numerical solutions offering full-scale  measurements of convective currents.To evaluate the reliability of  the results obtained, a validation procedure was carried out, allowing us to determine how accurately the selected conceptual model describes the investigated flow through a comparison of experimental and numerical data.Results. The results of numerical modelling of free convective currents occurring in the heated channel of the ventilation system of  the top floor of a multi-storey residential building are presented in  the article. In the course of the study, the air velocity at the entrance to the ventilation duct was found to depend on the calculated  temperature difference θ ˚C for various heating methods. A gradual  increase in the discrepancy between the numerical simulation and  experimental results is observed if the calculated temperature  difference > 20 ° C. This phenomenon is due to the fact that with  increased duct temperature, it is quite difficult to achieve even  heating under actual conditions; this is especially noticeable when  considering the variant when the vertical part of the vent duct and the take-off are both heated. The maximum deviation of the  results is 4.4%. The obtained velocity profiles in the calculated  sections indicate the impact of the ventilation take-off on the nature  of the air flow motion.Conclusion. One of the drawbacks of the existing systems of natural ventilation of residential

  18. Magma buoyancy and volatile ascent driving autocyclic eruptivity at Hekla Volcano (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautmann, Stefanie; Sacks, I. Selwyn; Linde, Alan T.; Roberts, Matthew J.

    2017-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions are typically accompanied by ground deflation due to the withdrawal of magma from depth and its effusion at the surface. Here, based on continuous high-resolution borehole strain data, we show that ground deformation was absent during the major effusion phases of the 1991 and 2000 eruptions of Hekla Volcano, Iceland. This lack of surface deformation challenges the classic model of magma intrusion/withdrawal as source for volcanic ground uplift/subsidence. We incorporate geodetic and geochemical observables into theoretical models of magma chamber dynamics in order to constrain quantitatively alternative co- and intereruptive physical mechanisms that govern magma propagation and system pressurization. We find the lack of surface deformation during lava effusion to be linked to chamber replenishment from below whilst magma migrates as a buoyancy-driven flow from the magma chamber towards the surface. We further demonstrate that intereruptive pressure build-up is likely to be generated by volatile ascent within the chamber rather than magma injection. Our model explains the persistent periodic eruptivity at Hekla throughout historic times with self-initiating cycles and is conceptually relevant to other volcanic systems.

  19. Wall effects on the cross-buoyancy around a square cylinder in the steady regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Dhiman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of blockage ratio on the combined free and forced convection from a long heated square obstacle confined in a horizontal channel are investigated in this work. The numerical computations are performed in the steady regime for Reynolds number = 1 - 30, Richardson number = 0 - 1 for blockage ratios of 0.125 and 0.25 for the fixed Prandtl number of 0.7 (air. The governing equations, along with appropriate boundary conditions, are solved by using a semi-explicit finite volume method implemented on the collocated grid arrangement. The total drag and lift coefficients, local and average Nusselt numbers and the representative streamline, vorticity and isotherm patterns are presented to elucidate the role of blockage ratio on the cross-buoyancy across a confined square cylinder. The asymmetry in the flow and temperature fields decreases with increasing value of the blockage ratio. Similar to forced convection, the total drag coefficient increases with increasing value of the blockage ratio for the fixed values of the Reynolds and Richardson numbers.

  20. A modified emulsion gelation technique to improve buoyancy of hydrogel tablets for floating drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, Ortal; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2015-10-01

    The use of buoyant or floating hydrogel tablets is of particular interest in the sustained release of drugs to the stomach. They have an ability to slow the release rates of drugs by prolonging their absorption window in the upper part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study we synthesized bioactive hydrogels that have sustainable release rates for drugs in the stomach based on a hydrogel preparation technique that employs emulsifying surfactants. The emulsion gelation technique, which encapsulates oil droplets within the hydrogels during crosslinking, was used to decrease their specific gravity in aqueous environments, resulting in floating drug release depots. Properties such as swelling, buoyancy, density and drug release were manipulated by changing the polymer concentrations, surfactant percentages and the oil:polymer ratios. The relationship between these properties and the hydrogel's floating lag time was documented. The potential for this material to be used as a floating drug delivery system was demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Interaction between a surface quasi-geostrophic buoyancy anomaly jet and internal vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinaud, J. N.; Dritschel, D. G.; Carton, X.

    2017-08-01

    This paper addresses the dynamical coupling of the ocean's surface and the ocean's interior. In particular, we investigate the dynamics of an oceanic surface jet and its interaction with vortices at depth. The jet is induced by buoyancy (density) anomalies at the surface. We first focus on the jet alone. The linear stability indicates there are two modes of instability: the sinuous and the varicose modes. When a vortex in present below the jet, it interacts with it. The velocity field induced by the vortex perturbs the jet and triggers its destabilisation. The jet also influences the vortex by pushing it under a region of co-operative shear. Strong jets may also partially shear out the vortex. We also investigate the interaction between a surface jet and a vortex dipole in the interior. Again, strong jets may partially shear out the vortex structure. The jet also modifies the trajectory of the dipole. Dipoles travelling towards the jet at shallow incidence angles may be reflected by the jet. Vortices travelling at moderate incidence angles normally cross below the jet. This is related to the displacement of the two vortices of the dipole by the shear induced by the jet. Intense jets may also destabilise early and form streets of billows. These billows can pair with the vortices and separate the dipole.

  2. Plate coupling across the northern Manila subduction zone deduced from mantle lithosphere buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Liang; Doo, Wen-Bin; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Hsu, Shu-Kun

    2017-12-01

    The Manila subduction zone is located at the plate boundary where the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) moves northwestward toward the Eurasian plate (EU) with a high convergence rate. However, historically, no large earthquakes greater than Mw7 have been observed across the northern Manila subduction zone. The poorly understood plate interaction between these two plates in this region creates significant issues for evaluating the seismic hazard. Therefore, the variation of mantle lithospheric buoyancy is calculated to evaluate the plate coupling status across the northern Manila subduction zone, based on recently published forward gravity modeling constrained by the results of the P-wave seismic crustal structure of the TAIGER (Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research) project. The results indicate weak plate coupling between the PSP and EU, which could be related to the release of the overriding PSP from the descending EU's dragging force, which was deduced from the higher elevation of the Luzon arc and the fore-arc basin northward toward the Taiwan orogen. Moreover, serpentinized peridotite is present above the plate boundary and is distributed more widely and thickly closer to offshore southern Taiwan orogen. We suggest that low plate coupling may facilitate the uplifting of serpentinized mantle material up to the plate boundary.

  3. Hypergravity to Explore the Role of Buoyancy in Boiling in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioumbas, John S.; Krause, Jutta; Karapantsios, Thodoris D.

    2013-02-01

    Boiling in porous media is an active topic of research since it is associated with various applications, e.g. microelectronics cooling, wetted porous media as thermal barriers, food frying. Theoretical expressions customary scale boiling heat and mass transfer rates with the value of gravitational acceleration. Information obtained at low gravity conditions show a deviation from the above scaling law but refers exclusively to non-porous substrates. In addition, the role of buoyancy in boiling at varying gravitational levels (i.e. from microgravity—important to satellites and future Lunar and Martial missions, to high-g body forces—associated with fast aerial maneuvers) is still unknown since most experiments were conducted over a limited range of g-value. The present work aims at providing evidence regarding boiling in porous media over a broad range of hypergravity values. For this, a special device has been constructed for studying boiling inside porous media in the Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC at ESA/ESTEC). LDC offers the unique opportunity to cancel the shear stresses and study only the effect of increased normal forces on boiling in porous media. The device permits measurement of the temperature field beneath the surface of the porous material and video recordings of bubble activity over the free surface of the porous material. The preliminary results presented from experiments conducted at terrestrial and hypergravity conditions, reveal for the first time the influence of increased levels of gravity on boiling in porous media.

  4. Dispersion and dissolution of a buoyancy driven gas plume in a layered permeable rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Andrew W.; Norris, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Using a series of simplified models, we explore the controls on the migration, dispersion and eventual dissolution of a plume of hydrogen gas which may, in principle, rise under buoyancy through a layered permeable rock if released from a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). We show that the presence of low permeability shale barriers causes the gas to spread laterally as it rises. Averaging over the length scale of the barriers, we use expressions for the Darcy velocity of the gas to describe the dispersion of a tracer and illustrate the effect with a new experiment using a baffled Hele-Shaw cell. While the plume is flowing, a large volume of gas may build up beneath the barriers. If the gas flux subsequently wanes, much of the gas will drain upward through the formation and spread on the upper impermeable boundary of the formation. However, a significant capillary-trapped wake of gas may develop beneath each barrier. Owing to the low solubility of hydrogen in water and assuming relatively slow groundwater flow rates, this trapped hydrogen may require a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years to dissolve and form a cloud of hydrogen rich water. Although simplified, these models provide a framework to assess the possible travel times and pathways of such a gas plume.

  5. Buoyancy and Pressure Induced Flow of Hot Gases in Vertical Shafts with Natural and Forced Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaluria, Yogesh; Tamm, Gunnar Olavi

    2014-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study buoyancy and pressure induced flow of hot gases in vertical shafts to model smoke propagation in elevator and ventilation shafts of high rise building fires. Various configurations were tested with regard to natural and forced ventilation imposed at the upper and lower surfaces of the vertical shaft. The aspect ratio was taken at a typical value of 6. From a lower vent, the inlet conditions for smoke and hot gases were varied in terms of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers. The forced ventilation at the upper or lower boundary was of the same order as the bulk shaft flow. Measurements were taken within the shaft to allow a detailed study of the steady state flow and thermal fields established for various shaft configurations and inlet conditions, from which optimal means for smoke alleviation in high rise building fires may be developed. Results indicated a wall plume as the primary transport mechanism for smoke propagating from the inlet towards the exhaust region. Recirculation and entrainment dominated at high inlet Grashof number flows, while increased inlet Reynolds numbers allowed greater mixing in the shaft. The development and stability of these flow patterns and their effects on the smoke behavior were assessed for several shaft configurations with different inlet conditions. The comparisons indicated that the fastest smoke removal and lowest overall shaft temperatures occur for a configuration with natural ventilation at the top surface and forced ventilation up from the shaft bottom.

  6. Buoyancy Effects on the Development of the Leading Vortex Ring in a Starting Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marugan-Cruz, Carolina; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos

    2008-11-01

    The initial development of negatively buoyant jets has been investigated experimental and numerically, more specifically the role played by gravity in the development of the leading vortex ring. A classical piston-cylinder arrangement has been used to produce the negatively buoyant jets. Under the experimental conditions considered in this work, the Froude number, Fr, which compares the jet momentum and the buoyancy flux is the most important parameter characterizing the dynamics of the flow. When the value of this parameter is sufficiently small the initial vortex ring generated at the start of the motion is pushed upwards by the gravity force before it can entrain enough vorticity to acquire a self induced velocity. However when the Froude number exceeds a critical value, Frc ˜ 1, the vortex ring can travel downwards and entrainins vorticity from the trailing jet during a longer time. Total and vortex circulation, as well as the trajectory of the leading vortex have been measured to clarify the effect of gravity on the distribution of vorticity during the initial development of negatively buoyant jets.

  7. Three-dimensional buoyancy-driven convection structures in thermohaline stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Jun Gong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on three-dimensional convection structures in thermohaline stratification with the high Rayleigh number RaT = 7 ⋅ 107, the diffusion ratio δ = 0.01 and various initial density stability ratios R = 0.5, 0.8, and 1.1. According to the classification of buoyancy-driven instability in the parameter space (R, δ, the three cases are referred to follow the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT mode, the mixed mode (MM and the diffusive-layer convection (DCL mode, respectively. Whether the shape of the peak is a finger under the RT mode or a spike under the MM/DLC mode, the 3D view of the interface is likely to be a rolling mountain with a doughnut-shaped vortex around the peak and a banded vortex above the ridge. The doughnut-shaped vortex is maintained around the peak if its growth continues under RT convection; otherwise, the vortex sheds off and moves upward from the peak under the DLC mode. Additionally, we have observed the previously unreported vortex stratification by the contact interface due to the differential diffusion effect.

  8. EFFECTS OF BUOYANCY RATIO ON CONVECTIVE HEAT AND SOLUTE TRANSFER IN NEWTONIAN FLUID SATURATED INCLINED POROUS CAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A LATRECHE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes a numerical study of the effects of buoyancy ratio on double-diffusive natural convection in square inclined cavity filled with fluid saturated porous media. Transverse gradients of heat and solute are applied on the two horizontal walls of the cavity, while the other two walls are impermeable and adiabatic. The Darcy model with the Boussinesq approximation is used to solve the governing equations. The flow is driven by a combined buoyancy effect due to both temperature and concentration variations. A finite volume approach has been used to solve the non-dimensional governing equations. The results are presented in streamline, isothermal, iso-concentration, Nusselt and Sherwood contours for different values of the non-dimensional governing parameters.

  9. Rise and fall of toxic benthic freshwater cyanobacteria (Anabaena spp.) in the Eel river: Buoyancy and dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma-Gregson, Keith; Power, Mary E; Bormans, Myriam

    2017-06-01

    Benthic cyanobacteria in rivers produce cyanotoxins and affect aquatic food webs, but knowledge of their ecology lags behind planktonic cyanobacteria. The buoyancy of benthic Anabaena spp. mats was studied to understand implications for Anabaena dispersal in the Eel River, California. Field experiments were used to investigate the effects of oxygen bubble production and dissolution on the buoyancy of Anabaena dominated benthic mats in response to light exposure. Samples of Anabaena dominated mats were harvested from the South Fork Eel River and placed in settling columns to measure floating and sinking velocities, or deployed into in situ ambient and low light treatments to measure the effect of light on flotation. Floating and sinking occurred within minutes and were driven by oxygen bubbles produced during photosynthesis, rather than intracellular changes in carbohydrates or gas vesicles. Light experiment results showed that in a natural ambient light regime, mats remained floating for at least 4days, while in low light mats begin to sink in <24h. Floating Anabaena samples were collected from five sites in the watershed and found to contain the cyanotoxins anatoxin-a and microcystin, with higher concentrations of anatoxin-a (median 560, max 30,693ng/gDW) than microcystin (median 30, max 37ng/gDW). The ability of Anabaena mats to maintain their buoyancy will markedly increase their downstream dispersal distances. Increased buoyancy also allows toxin-containing mats to collect along shorelines, increasing threats to human and animal public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Large eddy simulation of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume dispersion in an urban street canyon under perpendicular wind flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L H; Huo, R; Yang, D

    2009-07-15

    The dispersion of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume in and above an idealized street canyon of 18 m (width) x 18 m (height) x 40 m (length) with a wind flow perpendicular to its axis was investigated by Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Former studies, such as that by Oka [T.R. Oke, Street design and urban canopy layer climate, Energy Build. 11 (1988) 103-113], Gayev and Savory [Y.A. Gayev, E. Savory, Influence of street obstructions on flow processes within street canyons. J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn. 82 (1999) 89-103], Xie et al. [S. Xie, Y. Zhang, L. Qi, X. Tang, Spatial distribution of traffic-related pollutant concentrations in street canyons. Atmos. Environ. 37 (2003) 3213-3224], Baker et al. [J. Baker, H. L. Walker, X. M. Cai, A study of the dispersion and transport of reactive pollutants in and above street canyons--a large eddy simulation, Atmos. Environ. 38 (2004) 6883-6892] and Baik et al. [J.-J. Baik, Y.-S. Kang, J.-J. Kim, Modeling reactive pollutant dispersion in an urban street canyon, Atmos. Environ. 41 (2007) 934-949], focus on the flow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the street canyon with no buoyancy effect. Results showed that with the increase of the wind flow velocity, the dispersion pattern of a buoyant plume fell into four regimes. When the wind flow velocity increased up to a certain critical level, the buoyancy driven upward rising plume was re-entrained back into the street canyon. This is a dangerous situation as the harmful fire smoke will accumulate to pollute the environment and thus threaten the safety of the people in the street canyon. This critical re-entrainment wind velocity, as an important parameter to be concerned, was further revealed to increase asymptotically with the heat/buoyancy release rate of the fire.

  11. Effects of buoyancy and thermal radiation on MHD flow over a stretching porous sheet using homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya Shagaiya Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the theoretical influence of buoyancy and thermal radiation on MHD flow over a stretching porous sheet. The model which constituted highly nonlinear governing equations is transformed using similarity solution and then solved using homotopy analysis method (HAM. The analysis is carried out up to the 5th order of approximation and the influences of different physical parameters such as Prandtl number, Grashof number, suction/injection parameter, thermal radiation parameter and heat generation/absorption coefficient and also Hartman number on dimensionless velocity, temperature and the rate of heat transfer are investigated and discussed quantitatively with the aid of graphs. Numerical results obtained are compared with the previous results published in the literature and are found to be in good agreement. It was found that when the buoyancy parameter and the fluid velocity increase, the thermal boundary layer decreases. In case of the thermal radiation, increasing the thermal radiation parameter produces significant increases in the thermal conditions of the fluid temperature which cause more fluid in the boundary layer due to buoyancy effect, causing the velocity in the fluid to increase. The hydrodynamic boundary layer and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as a result of increase in radiation.

  12. Influence of various aspects of low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models on predicting in-tube buoyancy affected heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Zhen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Pei-Xue, E-mail: jiangpx@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of CO_2 Utilization and Reduction Technology/Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bo, Han-Liang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Understanding of the mechanism of buoyancy effect on supercritical heat transfer. • Turbulence related parameters in upward and downward flows were compared. • Turbulent Prandtl number affected the prediction insignificantly. • Buoyancy production was insignificant compared with shear production. • Damping function had the greatest effect and is a priority for further modification. - Abstract: Heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids was modeled for normal and buoyancy affected conditions using several low Reynolds number k-ε models, including the Launder and Sharma, Myong and Kasagi, and Abe, Kondoh and Nagano, with the predictions compared with experimental data. All three turbulence models accurately predicted the cases without heat transfer deterioration, but failed to accurately predict the cases with heat transfer deterioration although the general trends were captured, indicating that further improvements and modifications are needed for the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to better predict buoyancy deteriorated heat transfer. Further investigations studied the influence of various aspects of the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models, including the turbulent Prandtl number, the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy, and the damping function to provide guidelines for model development to more precisely predict buoyancy affected heat transfer. The results show that the turbulent Prandtl number and the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy have little influence on the predictions for cases in this study, while new damping functions with carefully selected control parameters are needed in the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to correctly predict the buoyancy effect for heat transfer simulations in various applications such as supercritical pressure steam generators (SPSGs) in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) and the supercritical pressure water reactor (SCWR).

  13. The Phoenix inner core - potential geomagnetic implications of an asymmetric buoyancy flux (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboussiere, T.; Deguen, R.; Melzani, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth's inner core is notoriously asymmetric and we propose that this could be due to an internal mode of thermal convection (Nature, 466, 2010). That mode is characterized by melting on the eastern hemisphere and crystallization on the western hemisphere, at approximately the same rate that can be significantly larger than the average growth rate of the radius of the inner core. In addition to its impact on the internal structure of the inner core, such a convection mode has implications for the outer core. From the point of view of convection in the outer core, the buoyancy flux generated at the inner core boundary is excessively asymmetric, positive on the western side, negative on the eastern side. Contrary to a previously proposed scenario (Aubert et al., Nature, 454, 2008) whereby convection in the outer core (driven by heat flux heterogeneity at the core-mantle boundary) would affect the structure of the inner core, our model suggests that the opposite might be possible: inner core convection could affect convection in the outer core through asymmetric forcing. In this talk, we shall examine to what extent this mechanism is active and we shall try to convince researchers in the field of geomagnetism to investigate the plausibility and consequences of our model of inner core convection. There are however a few hints pointing to the fact that convection in the inner core and in the outer core may be more intimately related. First, our convection model for the inner core depends on the ability of convection in the outer core to supply or extract latent heat at the inner core boundary. Secondly, the orientation of this convection can be shown to lie preferentially along the longest axis of the inner core ellipsoid: the East-West direction coincides with the direction of the degree two mass distribution of the Earth which itself can be related to plate tectonics hence heat flux at the core-mantle boundary. That coincidence shows that convection in the inner

  14. Developing students’ learning achievement and experimental skills on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law through experimental sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokchai, Jaewijarn; Khanti, Toedtanya; Sura, Wuttiprom

    2017-09-01

    The purposes of this research were: to construct packages of operations on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law, to enhance achievement score of students on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law, to enhance experimental skills on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law and to evaluate students’ attitude towards the packages of operations on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law using inquiry method. The samples were 42 grade 11 students in academic year 2016 at Hatyaiwittayalai School, Hatyai, Songkhla. The research method was one group pretest-posttest design. The research tools consisted of experimental set on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law, the learning achievement test on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law and the students’ attitude questionnaires. The experimental skills of most students was in a good level . The satisfaction of most students was in a good level. The research showed the learning achievement after instruction higher than that before instruction using experimental set at the significant level of 0.05 and the class average normalized gain is in the medium gain

  15. Thermo capillary and buoyancy flows instabilities; Instabilites d`ecoulements thermocapillaires et de thermogravite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, J.F.

    1997-10-22

    Fluid flows in which liquid layers are submitted to temperature gradient applied horizontally are studied. The thermo capillary and buoyancy effects are thus described. In the experiments, the form of the cell which contains the fluid is different and the fluid heating position too. Each of these experiments reveals a different aspect of the mechanism which is responsible of the flow instability. In the first experiment, the fluid is contained in a rectangular cell longer than larger and whose two longer vertical walls are differentially heated. The waves lengths, frequencies, propagation directions and instability thresholds of stationary, unsteady or oscillating modes obtained theoretically are compared to the structures observed experimentally. The instability mechanisms are essentially bound to the temperature vertical profile in the fluid and the heat exchanges between the fluid and the ambient air are particularly described. In the second experiment, the fluid is contained in an annular cell whose vertical cylindrical walls are differentially heated. The results obtained in the rectangular cell can be transposed to the annular cell substituting the constant thermal gradient of the rectangular geometry by those of the annular geometry, inversely proportional to the radial distance. The introduction of local parameters allows to show that the instability is developed at first near the inside cylinder. In the last experiment, the fluid layer is heated by an electric wire immersed in a parallel direction to the free surface. The development of an ascending vertical flow above the wire induces a deformation of the free surface which can be added to the instability mechanisms of the previous cells. (O.M.) 58 refs.

  16. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  17. Neutral Buoyancy Test NB-15, Scientific Airlock Contingency Operations - test subject Astronaut Paul

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  18. Performance enhancement of a Lorentz force velocimeter using a buoyancy-compensated magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, R.; Leineweber, J.; Resagk, C.

    2015-07-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a highly feasible method for measuring flow rate in a pipe or a duct. This method has been established for liquid metal flows but also for electrolytes such as saltwater. A decrease in electrical conductivity of the medium causes a decrease of the Lorentz force which needs to be resolved, affecting the accuracy of the measurement. We use an electrical force compensation (EFC) balance for the determination of the tiny force signals in a test channel filled with electrolyte solution. It is used in a 90°-rotated orientation with a magnet system hanging vertically on its load bar. The thin coupling elements of its parallel guiding system limit the mass of the magnets to 1 kg. To overcome this restriction, which limits the magnetic flux density and hence the Lorentz forces, a weight force compensation mechanism is developed. Therefore, different methods such as air bearing are conceivable, but for the elimination of additional horizontal force components which would disturb the force signal, only compensation by lift force provided by buoyancy is reasonable. We present a swimming body setup that will allow larger magnet systems than before, because a large amount of the weight force will be compensated by this lift force. Thus the implementation of this concept has to be made with respect to hydrodynamical and mechanical stability. This is necessary to avoid overturning of the swimming body setup and to prevent inelastic deformation. Additionally, the issue will be presented and discussed whether thermal convection around the lifting body diminishes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) significantly or not.

  19. Non-isothermal buoyancy-driven exchange flows in inclined pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, B.; Shariatnia, S.; Ghasemi, H.; Alba, K.

    2017-06-01

    We study non-isothermal buoyancy-driven exchange flow of two miscible Newtonian fluids in an inclined pipe experimentally. The heavy cold fluid is released into the light hot one in an adiabatic small-aspect-ratio pipe under the Boussinesq limit (small Atwood number). At a fixed temperature, the two fluids involved have the same viscosity. Excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement is first found against rather recent studies in literature on isothermal flows where the driving force of the flow comes from salinity as opposed to temperature difference. The degree of flow instability and mixing enhances as the pipe is progressively inclined towards vertical. Similar to the isothermal limit, maximal rate of the fluids interpenetration in the non-isothermal case occurs at an intermediate angle, β . The interpenetration rate increases with the temperature difference. The degree of fluids mixing and diffusivity is found to increase in the non-isothermal case compared to the isothermal one. There has also been observed a novel asymmetric behavior in the flow, never reported before in the isothermal limit. The cold finger appears to advance faster than the hot one. Backed by meticulously designed supplementary experiments, this asymmetric behavior is hypothetically associated with the wall contact and the formation of a warm less-viscous film of the fluid lubricating the cold more-viscous finger along the pipe. On the other side of the pipe, a cool more-viscous film forms decelerating the hot less-viscous finger. Double diffusive effects associated with the diffusion of heat and mass (salinity) are further investigated. In this case and for the same range of inclination angles and density differences, the level of flow asymmetry is found to decrease. The asymmetric behaviour of the flow is quantified over the full range of experiments. Similar to the study of Salort et al. ["Turbulent velocity profiles in a tilted heat pipe," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 105110

  20. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer with Thermal Radiation in an Enclosure in Case of Buoyancy Driven Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hochenauer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate state of the art approaches and their accuracy to compute heat transfer including radiation inside a closed cavity whereas buoyancy is the only driving force. This research is the first step of an all-embracing study dealing with underhood airflow and thermal management of vehicles. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD simulation results of buoyancy driven flow inside a simplified engine compartment are compared to experimentally gained values. The test rig imitates idle condition without any working fan. Thus, the airflow is only driven by natural convection. A conventional method used for these applications is to compute the convective heat transfer coefficient and air temperature using CFD and calculate the wall temperature separately by performing a thermal analysis. The final solution results from coupling two different software tools. In this paper thermal conditions inside the enclosure are computed by the use of CFD only. The impact of the turbulence model as well as the results of various radiation models are analyzed and compared to the experimental data.

  1. Numerical investigation of double diffusive buoyancy forces induced natural convection in a cavity partially heated and cooled from sidewalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Nikbakhti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a numerical investigation of double-diffusive natural convective heat and mass transfer in a cavity filled with Newtonian fluid. The active parts of two vertical walls of the cavity are maintained at fixed but different temperatures and concentrations, while the other two walls, as well as inactive areas of the sidewalls, are considered to be adiabatic and impermeable to mass transfer. The length of the thermally active part equals half of the height. The non-dimensional forms of governing transport equations that describe double-diffusive natural convection for two-dimensional incompressible flow are functions of temperature or energy, concentration, vorticity, and stream-function. The coupled differential equations are discretized via FDM (Finite Difference Method. The Successive-Over-Relaxation (SOR method is used in the solution of the stream function equation. The analysis has been done for an enclosure with different aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 11 for three different combinations of partially active sections. The results are presented graphically in terms of streamlines, isotherms and isoconcentrations. In addition, the heat and mass transfer rate in the cavity is measured in terms of the average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers for various parameters including thermal Grashof number, Lewis number, buoyancy ratio and aspect ratio. It is revealed that the placement order of partially thermally active walls and the buoyancy ratio influence significantly the flow pattern and the corresponding heat and mass transfer performance in the cavity.

  2. Heart Rate Responses to Unaided Orion Side Hatch Egress in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kirk L.; Hwang Emma Y.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Kelly, Cody; Walker, Thomas; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion capsule as a vehicle for transporting crewmembers to and from the International Space Station (ISS) and for future human space exploration missions. Orion and other commercial vehicles are designed to splash down in the ocean where nominally support personnel will assist crewmembers in egressing the vehicle. However, off-nominal scenarios will require crewmembers to egress the vehicle unaided, deploy survival equipment, and ingress a life raft. PURPOSE: To determine the heart rate (HR) responses to unaided Orion side hatch egress and raft ingress as a part of the NASA Crew Survival Engineering Team's evaluation of the PORT Orion mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). METHODS: Nineteen test subjects, including four astronauts (N=19, 14 males/5 females, 38.6+/-8.4 y, 174.4+/-9.6 cm, 75.7+/-13.1 kg), completed a graded maximal test on a cycle ergometer to determine VO2peak and HRpeak and were divided into five crews of four members each; one subject served on two crews. Each crew was required to deploy a life raft, egress the Orion vehicle from the side hatch, and ingress the life raft with two 8 kg emergency packs per crew. Each crew performed this activity one to three times; a total of ten full egresses were completed. Subjects wore a suit that was similar in form, mass, and function to the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) including helmet, gloves, boots, supplemental O2 bottles, and a CO2-inflated life preserver (approx.18 kg); subjects began each trial seated supine in the PORT Orion mockup with seat belts and mockup O2 and communication connections and ended each trial with all four crewmembers inside the life raft. RESULTS: VO2peak was 40.8+/-6.8 mL/kg/min (3.1+/-0.7 L/min); HRpeak was 181+/-10 bpm. Total egress time across trials was 5.0+/-1.6 min (range: 2.8-8.0 min); all subjects were able to successfully complete all trials. Average maximum HR at activity start, at the hatch opening, in the water, and in the

  3. Buoyancy-driven mixing of fluids in a confined geometry; Melange gravitationnel de fluides en geometrie confinee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallez, Y

    2007-12-15

    The present work based on Direct Numerical Simulations is devoted to the study of mixing between two miscible fluids of different densities. The movement of these fluids is induced by buoyancy. Three geometries are considered: a cylindrical tube, a square channel and a plane two-dimensional flow. For cylindrical tubes, the results of numerical simulations fully confirm previous experimental findings by Seon et al., especially regarding the existence of three different flow regimes, depending on the tilt angle. The comparison of the various geometries shows that tridimensional flows in tubes or channels are similar, whereas the two-dimensional model fails to give reliable information about real 3D flows, either from a quantitative point of view or for a phenomenological understanding. A peculiar attention is put on a joint analysis of the concentration and vorticity fields and allows us to explain several subtle aspects of the mixing dynamics. (author)

  4. Spatio-temporal variability in western Baltic cod early life stage survival mediated by egg buoyancy, hydrography and hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, H-H.; Hüssy, K.; Huwer, B.

    2012-01-01

    spatial (within and between different spawning areas) and temporal (interannual and seasonal) dynamics. A spatially and temporally highly-resolved biophysical model of the Baltic Sea was used to describe mortalities and survival success of eggs and yolk-sac larvae—represented by individual, virtual......Spatio-temporal variability in western Baltic cod early life stage survival mediated by egg buoyancy, hydrography and hydrodynamics. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 69: 1744–1752.To disentangle the effects of different drivers on recruitment variability of marine fish, a spatially and temporally...... drifters—as predicted proportions of drifters that either died due to bottom contact or lethal temperatures, or that survived up to the end of the yolk-sac larval stage. The environmental conditions allowing survival of cod and yolk-sac larvae indicate that favourable conditions predominately occurred...

  5. It takes three to tango: 1. Simulating buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, Jenny; Nave, Jean-Christophe; Hager, Bradford H.

    2010-07-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow is of fundamental importance for numerous geodynamic phenomena. Since the equations of motion governing multiphase flow are rarely amenable to analytical solutions, numerical simulations provide a compelling alternative. They offer the ability to carefully analyze flow phenomena under differing regimes, initial conditions, and flow dynamics. The three key challenges in these computations are (1) the accurate solution of the equations of motion in the presence of large viscosity contrasts, (2) the representation of strongly deforming interfaces between different fluids, and (3) the accurate coupling of fluid and interface solver. In three dimensions, these challenges become even more intricate, and the appropriate choice of numerical scheme has a profound influence on the tractability, accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the computational simulation. This is the first paper of two that examine numerical simulations of buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts. In this paper, we present our numerical approach which tackles the above three main challenges through a combination of three numerical methods, namely, (1) an extended ghost fluid type discretization which we developed specifically for the Stokes regime, (2) the level set method, and (3) the extension velocity technique. We find that all three components are crucial to obtain a versatile numerical tool for simulating complex structures in evolving flow. We validate our code by reproducing four benchmark problems in two and three dimensions. We devote special attention to comparing our method to other existing techniques, detailing the advantages of this approach. Finally, we highlight several types of geophysical flow problems for which we believe our method to be well suited.

  6. The influence of different salinity conditions on egg buoyancy and development and yolk sac larval survival and morphometric traits of Baltic Sea sprat (Sprattus sprattus balticus Schneider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Petereit

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The small pelagic sprat (Sprattus sprattus is a key ecologic player in the Baltic Sea. However, there is long-term variability in recruitment which is thought to be influenced by fluctuations in abiotic and biotic conditions experienced during the early life stages. This study concentrates on the influence of different ambient salinities on sprat egg development, egg buoyancy and survival as well as early yolk sac larval morphometric traits. Egg buoyancy significantly decreased with increasing salinity experienced during fertilization and/or incubation experiments. Field egg buoyancy measurements in 2007 and 2008 exhibited annual and seasonal differences in specific gravity, potentially associated with changes in adult sprat vertical distribution. Neither egg development time nor the duration of the yolk sac phase differed among salinity treatments. At eye pigmentation, larval standard length exhibited high variance among individuals but did not differ among treatments. The largest ecological impact of salinity experienced during spawning was the modification the buoyancy of eggs and yolk sac larvae, which determines their vertical habitat in the Baltic Sea. There are strong thermo- and oxyclines in the Baltic Sea, and thus salinity can indirectly impact the survival of these early life stages by modifying the ambient temperatures and oxygen conditions experienced.

  7. On the relative importance of thermal and chemical buoyancy in regular and impact-induced melting in a Mars-like planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas, Thomas; Breuer, Doris

    2017-07-01

    We ran several series of two-dimensional numerical mantle convection simulations representing in idealized form the thermochemical evolution of a Mars-like planet. In order to study the importance of compositional buoyancy of melting mantle, the models were set up in pairs of one including all thermal and compositional contributions to buoyancy and one accounting only for the thermal contributions. In several of the model pairs, single large impacts were introduced as causes of additional strong local anomalies, and their evolution in the framework of the convecting mantle was tracked. The models confirm that the additional buoyancy provided by the depletion of the mantle by regular melting can establish a global stable stratification of the convecting mantle and throttle crust production. Furthermore, the compositional buoyancy is essential in the stabilization and preservation of local compositional anomalies directly beneath the lithosphere and offers a possible explanation for the existence of distinct, long-lived reservoirs in the Martian mantle. The detection of such anomalies by geophysical means is probably difficult, however; they are expected to be detected by gravimetry rather than by seismic or heat flow measurements. The results further suggest that the crustal thickness can be locally overestimated by up to ˜20 km if impact-induced density anomalies in the mantle are neglected.

  8. Coexisting contraction-extension consistent with buoyancy of the crust and upper mantle in North-Central Italy

    CERN Document Server

    Aoudia, A; Ismail-Zadeh, A T; Panza, G F; Pontevivo, A

    2002-01-01

    The juxtaposed contraction and extension observed in the crust of the Italian Apennines and elsewhere has, for a long time, attracted the attention of geoscientists and is a long-standing enigmatic feature. Several models, invoking mainly external forces, have been put forward to explain the close association of these two end-member deformation mechanisms clearly observed by geophysical and geological investigations. These models appeal to interactions along plate margins or at the base of the lithosphere such as back-arc extension or shear tractions from mantle flow or to subduction processes such as slab roll back, retreat or pull and detachment. We present here a revisited crust and upper mantle model that supports delamination processes beneath North-Central Italy and provides a new background for the genesis and age of the recent magmatism in Tuscany. Although external forces must have been important in the building up of the Apennines, we show that internal buoyancy forces solely can explain the coexist...

  9. Experimental and numerical study of buoyancy-driven single bubble dynamics in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Klaasen, Bart; Degrève, Jan; Blanpain, Bart; Verhaeghe, Frederik

    2014-12-01

    Buoyancy-driven single bubble behaviour in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell with various gap Reynolds numbers Re(h/d)2 has been studied. Two gap thicknesses, h = 0.5 mm (Re(h/d)2 = 1.0-8.5) and 1 mm (Re(h/d)2 = 6.0-50) were used to represent low and high gap Reynolds number flow. Periodic shape oscillation and path vibration were observed once the gap Reynolds number exceeds the critical value of 8.5. The bubble behaviour was also numerically simulated by taking a two-dimensional volume of fluid method coupled with a continuum surface force model and a wall friction model in the commercial computational fluid dynamics package Fluent. By adjusting the viscous resistance values, the bubble dynamics in the two gap thicknesses can be simulated. For the main flow properties including shape, path, terminal velocity, horizontal vibration, and shape oscillation, good agreement is obtained between experiment and simulation. The estimated terminal velocity is 10%-50% higher than the observed one when the bubble diameter d ≤ 5 mm, h = 0.5 mm and 9% higher when d ≤ 18 mm, h = 1.0 mm. The estimated oscillation frequency is 50% higher than the observed value. Three-dimensional effects and spurious vortices are most likely the reason for this inaccuracy. The simulation confirms that the thin liquid films between gas bubbles and the cell walls have a limited effect on the bubble dynamics.

  10. Large-Eddy Simulation of Oil Slicks from Deep Water Blowouts: Effects of Droplet Buoyancy and Langmuir Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Yang, D.; Meneveau, C. V.

    2013-12-01

    Deep water blowouts generate plumes of oil droplets that rise through, and interact with various layers of the ocean. When plumes reach the ocean mixed layer (OML), the interactions among oil droplet plume, Ekman Spiral and Langmuir turbulence strongly affect the final rates of dilution and bio-degradation. The present study aims at developing a large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for the study of the physical distribution and dispersion of oil droplets under the action of physical oceanographic processes in the OML. In the current LES approach, the velocity and temperature fields are simulated using a hybrid pseudo-spectral and finite-difference scheme; the oil field is described by an Eulerian concentration field and it is simulated using a bounded finite-volume scheme. Fluid accelerations induced by buoyancy of the oil plume are included, and a number of subgrid-scale models for the flow solver are implemented and tested. The LES capability is then applied to the simulation of oil plume dispersion in the OML. Graphical visualization of the LES results shows surface oil slick distribution consistent with the satellite and aerial images of surface oil slicks reported in the literature. Different combinations of Lamgmuir turbulence and droplet size lead to different oil slick patterns at the surface and significantly impact oil concentration. Possible effects for bio-degradation are also discussed. Funding from the GoMRI RFP-II is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Upshot of binary chemical reaction and activation energy on carbon nanotubes with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux and buoyancy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dianchen; Ramzan, M.; Ahmad, Shafiq; Chung, Jae Dong; Farooq, Umer

    2017-12-01

    A mathematical model is framed to discuss the flow of carbon nanotube-suspended nanofluids with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux and binary chemical reaction. The flow analysis is performed in attendance of heat generation/absorption, energy activation, and buoyancy effects past a nonlinear stretched surface embedded in a non-Darcy permeable medium. A combination of varied nanotubes with base fluids is also taken into account. The Runge-Kutta fifth-order Fehlberg technique is engaged to find the numerical solution of a highly nonlinear problem. The impact of sundry parameters on involved distributions is illustrated graphically with requisite discussion keeping in view their physical aspects. Different tables that comprise numerically calculated values of numerous sundry parameters highlighting their physical significance are also erected. It is witnessed that velocity and temperature profiles are enhanced for mounting values of nanoparticle volume fraction parameters. Further, it is seen that for enhancing the value of the Prandtl number, the temperature profile decreases rapidly for single-walled carbon nanotubes than multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  12. Experimental Research on Thermocapillary-Buoyancy Migration Interaction of Axisymmetric Two Drops by Using Digital Holographic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuoting; Duan, Li; Kang, Qi

    2017-12-01

    The migration and interaction of axisymmetric two drops in a vertical temperature gradient is investigated experimentally on the ground. A silicon oil is used as the continuous phase, and a water-ethanol mixture is used as the drop phase, respectively. The migration and interaction of two drops, under the combined effects of buoyancy and thermocapillary, is recorded by a digital holographic interferometry measurement in the experiment to analyse the velocities and temperature distribution of the drops. As a result, when two drops migrate together, the drop affects the other drop by perturbing the temperature field around itself. For the leading drop, the velocity is faster than the one of the isolated drop, and the maximum of the interfacial temperature distribution is larger than the one of the isolated drop. For the trailing drop, the velocity is slower than the one of the isolated drop, and the maximum of the interfacial temperature distribution is less than the one of the isolated drop. The influence of the dimensionless initial distance between the drop centres to the drop migration is discussed in detail in this study.

  13. Thermo capillary and buoyancy convection in a fluid locally heated on its free surface; Convection thermocapillaire et thermogravitaire dans un fluide chauffe localement sur sa surface libre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, E.

    1997-09-26

    coupled buoyancy and thermo-capillary convection lead to a convective motion of the interface liquid/gas which drastically changes the heat and mass transfer across the liquid layer. Two experiments were considered, depending on the fluid: oil or mercury. The liquid is set in a cooled cylindrical vessel, and heated by a heat flux across the center of the free surface. The basic flow, in the case of oil, is a torus. When the heat parameter increases, a stationary flow appears as petals or rays when the aspect ratio. The lateral confinement selects the azimuthal wavelength. In the case of petals-like flow, a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation is underlined. The turbulence is found to be `weak`, even for the largest values of the Marangoni number (Ma = 1.3 10{sup 5}). In the case of mercury, the thermo-capillary effect is reduced to zero to impurities at the surface which have special trajectories we describe and compare to a simpler experiment. Only the buoyancy forces induce a unstationary, weakly turbulent flow as soon as the heating power exceeds 4W (Ra = 4.5 10{sup 3}, calculated with h = 1 mm). The past part concerns the analysis of the effect on the flow of the boundary conditions, the geometry, the Prandtl number and the buoyancy force with the help of the literature. Results concerning heat transfer, in particular the exponent of the law Nusselt number vs. heating power, were compared with available data. (author) 115 refs.

  14. An Integrated Capillary, Buoyancy, and Viscous-Driven Model for Brine/CO2Relative Permeability in a Compositional and Parallel Reservoir Simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, X.

    2012-11-03

    The effectiveness of CO2 storage in the saline aquifers is governed by the interplay of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. Recent experimental study reveals the impact of pressure, temperature, and salinity on interfacial tension (IFT) between CO2 and brine. The dependence of CO2-brine relative permeability and capillary pressure on pressure (IFT) is also clearly evident in published experimental results. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control the migration and trapping of CO2 in subsurface is crucial to design future storage projects that warrant long-term and safe containment. Simulation studies ignoring the buoyancy and also variation in interfacial tension and the effect on the petrophysical properties such as trapped CO2 saturations, relative permeability, and capillary pressure have a poor chance of making accurate predictions of CO2 injectivity and plume migration. We have developed and implemented a general relative permeability model that combines effects of pressure gradient, buoyancy, and IFT in an equation of state (EOS) compositional and parallel simulator. The significance of IFT variations on CO2 migration and trapping is assessed.

  15. The characteristics of mantle lithosphere buoyancy revealed from the northern Manila subduction zone to the active collision in Taiwan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Liang; Doo, Wen-Bin; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2017-04-01

    It has been widely studied on the complexity tectonic structure in the active Taiwan orogenesis, since the converging between the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) and the Eurasian plate (EU) along with the Manila subduction zone extended from the Philippine to offshore the southern Taiwan and the Ryukyu subduction zone in the east. Considering the separate contribution of the crust and the mantle lithosphere to the topography, we try to examine the mantle lithosphere buoyancy (Hm) behavior from the northern Manila subduction zone to the active collision in Taiwan region. In this study, we present several Hm profiles across the northern Manila subduction zone and the Taiwan island. In order to calculate the Hm, the crust structures are constrained by the forward gravity modeling, in which the density is provided from the multi-channel seismic data and on land seismic data (thanks to the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research (TAIGER) project). The result shows that the Hm across the northern Manila subduction zone displays apparent undulations, and undulates more drastic approaching the north end of the subduction zone. It implies that the plate coupling between the PSP and the EU here is weak. The Hm across the southern Taiwan undulates still, but the amplitudes are smaller with relative gentle undulations. This reflects the contribution from the slab underneath while the initial collision occurs in south Taiwan. Into the central Taiwan, the Hm pattern behaves undulating mild comparing with that across the subduction zone because the slab structure effects not obvious. Besides, the Hm in the central Taiwan primarily is affects by both the thickening crust and high elevation caused by the strong lateral external compression stress.

  16. Buoyancy Can-Can

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Jane Bray

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a discrepant event is used to initiate a learning cycle lesson to help students develop an understanding of the concept and equation for buoyant force. The data are gathered using readily available equipment and then graphically analyzed using a four-step analysis consistent with the modeling instructional approach. This laboratory…

  17. Experiment Clarifies Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ayse; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a simple activity using Archimedes' principle that helps students to develop their scientific thinking and also to identify and correct their misconceptions. The exercise consists of linear and reverse processes.

  18. Carbon Sinks in a Changing Climate: Relative Buoyancy and Sinking Potentials of Various Antarctic Phytoplankton and Ice Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmel, S.; Selz, V.

    2016-12-01

    Polar phytoplankton play instrumental roles in global biogeochemical cycles, sometimes serving as massive carbon sinks via the biological pump. In addition to phytoplankton, sea ice supports a significant amount of ice algae, the essential primary producers for the ecosystem in winter and early spring. While sea ice habitat declines on regional scales, the fate of sea ice algae post-ice melt remains relatively unknown, despite its importance in understanding how the biological pump might be affected by sea ice loss. Through a series of settling column experiments on the icebreaker Nathaniel B. Palmer, we aimed to address the question: What controls the fate of the carbon-rich ice algae across the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) during ice melt? We focused on whether species composition affects the sinking potential of ice algal communities. Using FlowCAM imagery, we classified samples collected from the buoyant, neutral, and negatively buoyant portions of the settling columns into genus-level taxonomic classes. We used image parameters and geometric shape equations to calculate the biovolume of each taxonomic group. We further explored relationships between taxa-specific sinking potentials, environmental parameters (temperature and nutrients), and physiological properties of associated algal communities (as described by Fast Rate Repetition fluorometry). Results indicate that colonial Phaeocystis antarctica tends to dominate lower regions of the settling column. Moreover, we observe strong correlations between geographic location and both nutrients and phytoplankton physiology. We found that these three factors are indeed related to taxa-specific buoyancy and sinking indices. An understanding of these relationships sheds more light on the role P. antarctica (a carbon-rich bloom-forming genus) plays in the biological pump; higher sinking rates suggest greater carbon export to depth, while lower sinking rates increase the likelihood of carbon being respired back

  19. Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation Generated by the Double-Skin Façade of a High-Rise Building in Tropical Climate: Case Study Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziiz Akhlish Diinal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-rise buildings in tropical region is identical to the use of mechanical Air Conditioning in massive scale. Nevertheless, there is an encouragement to high-rise buildings to reduce its energy consumptions, since they consume quite large amount of energy. This challenge can be overcome with various of strategies, one of them, by means of reducing the cooling load of mechanical Air Conditioning in high-rise building. Prospects come from the modern tall building design strategies, for example the use of double-skin façade to give addition of building skin which could provide indoor temperature protection from outside. Double-skin façade system has continued to increase in buildings in a tropical region such as in Indonesia. However, there is another potential of double skin façade, which is the possibility to increase the buoyancy effect in the air gap between the skin and building envelope. The possibility needs to be studied in order to give a proper way in designing double-skin façade of a high-rise building, especially on Bandung-Indonesia tropical climate. This paper explores the potential of double-skin façade in driving the air inside the façade to generate natural ventilation for a high-rise building in Bandung climate condition. Two parameters are used in exploring the buoyancy force, the width of double-skin façade and the temperature of the skin façade. In general, double-skin façade of a high-rise building in tropical climate can generate buoyancy driven ventilation for the building, it relates strongly to the distance between of the double-skin façade and the building envelope.

  20. Effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on a boundary layer over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition

    OpenAIRE

    Tasawar Hayat; Awatif A. Hendi; Jacob A. Gbadeyan; Philip O. Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on the laminar boundary layer about a vertical plate in a uniform stream of fluid under a convective surface boundary condition. In the analysis, we assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid whilst a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the right surface; the heat source decays exponentially outwards from the surface of the plate. The similarity variable m...

  1. Combined effect of buoyancy and thermo capillarity convections in a low dilatable fluid; L`effet combine de deux convections gravitaire et thermocapillaire dans un fluide faiblement dilatable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenfeld, L.; Soubbaramayer

    1995-12-31

    This work deals with the combined effect of buoyancy and thermo capillarity convections in a low dilatable fluid. A scale law for the Nusselt number in function of the Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, showing a high non linear coupling between the two convections has been established. This calculation describes a laminar stationary flow. The Navier-Stokes equations system for a law distorted fluid has been resolved in utilizing the Boussinesq approximation. For the case of a turbulent flow, the scale law has been calculated by a correlation method in adjusting experimental data on cerium evaporation by an axisymmetric beam of 5 kw. (O.L.). 10 figs.

  2. Body armour and lateral-plate reduction in freshwater three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus: adaptations to a different buoyancy regime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, F; Klepaker, T

    2009-11-01

    Several factors related to buoyancy were compared between one marine and two freshwater populations of three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus. Fish from all three populations had buoyancy near to neutral to the ambient water. This showed that neither marine nor freshwater G. aculeatus used swimming and hydrodynamic lift to prevent sinking. Comparing the swimbladder volumes showed that freshwater completely plated G. aculeatus had a significantly larger swimbladder volume than both completely plated marine and low-plated freshwater G. aculeatus. Furthermore, body tissue density was lower in low-plated G. aculeatus than in the completely plated marine and freshwater fish. The results show that G. aculeatus either reduce tissue density or increase swimbladder volume to adapt to lower water density. Mass measurements of lateral plates and pelvis showed that loss of body armour in low-plated G. aculeatus could explain the tissue density difference between low-plated and completely plated G. aculeatus. This suggests that the common occurrence of plate and armour reduction in freshwater G. aculeatus populations can be an adaptation to a lower water density.

  3. Seasonal trends in adenylate nucleotide content in eggs of recruit and repeat spawning Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) and implications for egg quality and buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Mi; Svardal, Asbjørn M.; Eide, Torunn; Thorsen, Anders; Kjesbu, Olav Sigurd

    2012-10-01

    Seasonal and ontogenetic variation in egg buoyancy (egg specific gravity; ρ) (n = 63) and nucleotide content (n = 46) were examined for wild-caught Atlantic (Barents Sea) cod (Gadus morhua) held in captivity over two successive spawning seasons, i.e. each female (n = 5) was studied both as recruit and repeat spawner. All eggs were naturally spawned and fertilized, and incubated under optimal condition in flow-through aquaria. Egg diameter and egg dry weight declined steadily during the spawning period, while stage-specific ρ was approximately constant between egg batches (typically around 15 in total). Within each egg batch, i.e. during egg incubation, ρ significantly decreased from the time of gastrulation to before hatching, accompanied by increased contents of ATP and ADP. Altogether, we found that adenylate energy charge (EC) (EC = ([ATP] + 0.5 [ADP]) / ([ATP] + [ADP] + [AMP]) positively affected egg buoyancy (P = 0.013) in concert with egg developmental stage (P cod eggs in the field would show comparably similar trends in ρ and levels of nucleotides.

  4. Combined effect of buoyancy force and Navier slip on MHD flow of a nanofluid over a convectively heated vertical porous plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutuku-Njane, Winifred Nduku; Makinde, Oluwole Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic field on boundary layer flow of an incompressible electrically conducting water-based nanofluids past a convectively heated vertical porous plate with Navier slip boundary condition. A suitable similarity transformation is employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by employing fourth-order Runge-Kutta with a shooting technique. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper (Cu), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are taken into consideration. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to the influence of pertinent parameters, such as solid volume fraction of nanoparticles (φ), magnetic field parameter (Ha), buoyancy effect (Gr), Eckert number (Ec), suction/injection parameter (f w ), Biot number (Bi), and slip parameter ( β ), on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat transfer rate.

  5. Numerical investigation of combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection and entropy generation in 3D cavity filled with Al2O3 nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioua Kolsi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer, fluid flow and entropy generation due to combined buoyancy and thermocapillary forces in a 3D differentially heated enclosure containing Al2O3 nanofluid are carried out for different Marangoni numbers and different nanoparticles concentrations. The vector potential-vorticity formalism and the finite volume method are used respectively to formulate and to solve the governing equations and calculations were performed for Marangoni number from −103 to 103, volume fraction of nanoparticles from 0 to 0.2 and for a fixed Rayleigh number at 105. An intensification of the flow and an increase in heat transfer and of total entropy generation occur with the increase in nanoparticles volume fraction for all Marangoni numbers.

  6. Some Exact Solutions of Boundary Layer Flows along a Vertical Plate with Buoyancy Forces Combined with Lorentz Forces under Uniform Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios Pantokratoras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exact analytical solutions of boundary layer flows along a vertical porous plate with uniform suction are derived and presented in this paper. The solutions concern the Blasius, Sakiadis, and Blasius-Sakiadis flows with buoyancy forces combined with either MHD Lorentz or EMHD Lorentz forces. In addition, some exact solutions are presented specifically for water in the temperature range of 0∘C≤≤8∘C, where water density is nearly parabolic. Except for their use as benchmarking means for testing the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, the presented exact solutions with EMHD forces have use in flow separation control in aeronautics and hydronautics, whereas the MHD results have applications in process metallurgy and fusion technology. These analytical solutions are valid for flows with strong suction.

  7. The effects of lateral density gradients, slopes and buoyancy on channel flow: 1D analytical solutions and applications to the SE Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Félix; Ranalli, Giorgio

    2017-08-01

    We present 1D analytical solutions for channel flow in orogens driven by various types of pressure gradients. Our calculations demonstrate that lateral density gradients in the upper crust, such as would occur across a suture zone separating arc rocks from pericratonic sediments provide a driving force for Poiseuille flow as large as topographic gradients observed in modern mountain belts. For cases for which the gradients are external (topographic and lateral density gradients) and internal (e.g. partial melting of channel material) to the channel, inclination decreases and increases the Poiseuille component of the average flow-velocity within the channel by the cosine and sine of the slope, respectively. The magnitude of the pressure gradient consequent upon the buoyancy generated by partial melting of metapelites in a channel with a 30° slope, such as would occur above an underthrusting basement ramp, is similar to that of topographic or lateral density gradients. Channel flow up a ramp could thus constitute an important exhumation mechanism in large hot orogens. Our calculations indicate that mid-crustal channel flow was a highly likely process in the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene setting of the southeastern Canadian Cordillera. The flow was first driven by the lateral density contrast between pericratonic sediments and the arc-related Intermontane terrane, then by combined effect of topographic gradient and melt-induced buoyancy of the Lower Selkirk Allochthon (part of the Shuswap Complex). Flow up the underthrusting basement ramp resulted in exhumation from mid- to upper-crustal levels. Channel flow then migrated downward to involve basement and overlying cover sequence rocks. Our results indicate that syn-convergent channel flow was a viable and very likely process in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera.

  8. Effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on a boundary layer over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on the laminar boundary layer about a vertical plate in a uniform stream of fluid under a convective surface boundary condition. In the analysis, we assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid whilst a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the right surface; the heat source decays exponentially outwards from the surface of the plate. The similarity variable method was applied to the steady state governing non-linear partial differential equations, which were transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and were solved numerically by applying a shooting iteration technique together with a sixth-order Runge–Kutta integration scheme for better accuracy. The effects of the Prandtl number, the local Biot number, the internal heat generation parameter, thermal radiation and the local Grashof number on the velocity and temperature profiles are illustrated and interpreted in physical terms. A comparison with previously published results on similar special cases showed excellent agreement.

  9. A buoyancy-based screen of Drosophila larvae for fat-storage mutants reveals a role for Sir2 in coupling fat storage to nutrient availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Reis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has a strong genetic component, but few of the genes that predispose to obesity are known. Genetic screens in invertebrates have the potential to identify genes and pathways that regulate the levels of stored fat, many of which are likely to be conserved in humans. To facilitate such screens, we have developed a simple buoyancy-based screening method for identifying mutant Drosophila larvae with increased levels of stored fat. Using this approach, we have identified 66 genes that when mutated increase organismal fat levels. Among these was a sirtuin family member, Sir2. Sirtuins regulate the storage and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids by deacetylating key regulatory proteins. However, since mammalian sirtuins function in many tissues in different ways, it has been difficult to define their role in energy homeostasis accurately under normal feeding conditions. We show that knockdown of Sir2 in the larval fat body results in increased fat levels. Moreover, using genetic mosaics, we demonstrate that Sir2 restricts fat accumulation in individual cells of the fat body in a cell-autonomous manner. Consistent with this function, changes in the expression of metabolic enzymes in Sir2 mutants point to a shift away from catabolism. Surprisingly, although Sir2 is typically upregulated under conditions of starvation, Sir2 mutant larvae survive better than wild type under conditions of amino-acid starvation as long as sugars are provided. Our findings point to a Sir2-mediated pathway that activates a catabolic response to amino-acid starvation irrespective of the sugar content of the diet.

  10. Effect of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux on buoyancy MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of Joule heating and thermal radiation impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonchi, A. S.; Ganji, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, buoyancy MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of Joule heating and thermal radiation impacts, are studied. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model instead of conventional Fourier's law of heat conduction is applied to investigate the heat transfer characteristics. A similarity transformation is used to transmute the governing momentum and energy equations into non-linear ordinary differential equations with the appropriate boundary conditions. The obtained non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. The impacts of diverse active parameters such as the magnetic parameter, the radiation parameter, the buoyancy parameter, the heat source parameter, the volume fraction of nanofluid and the thermal relaxation parameter are examined on the velocity and temperature profiles. In addition, the value of the Nusselt number is calculated and presented through figures. The results demonstrate that the temperature profile is lower in the case of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model as compared to Fourier's law. Moreover, the Nusselt number raises with the raising volume fraction of nanofluid and it abates with the ascending the radiation parameter.

  11. Effect of fixed separation points on wake oscillation and surface character in suppression of the Karman vortex street due to positive buoyancy from a cylinder; Hakuriten kotei buttai kara no seifuryoku ni yoru karman uzuretsu no hokai shometsu deno koryu shindo to hyomen tokusei no tokucho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noto, K.; Nakajima, T. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Egneineering; Fujimoto, K. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)

    2000-05-25

    To elucidate an effect of fixed separation points on the wake oscillation and surface character in the suppression of the Karman vortex street due to positive buoyancy, a wake with positive buoyancy from a heated elliptic cylinder submerged in an upward air mainstream is calculated by numerical analysis. Numerical results agree well with the previous result for the isothermal wake, and show that separation points are exactly fixed with time and do not move by buoyancy. The critical Richardson number Ri{sub c} is much larger than that in a circular cylinder wake. This means that the wake vorticity is larger and harder to disappear than that in the circular cylinder wake. With an increase of the Richardson number, the local Nusselt number and wall shear stress vary with time between separation points, and the mean Nusselt number decreases near Ri{sub c}, which dose not occur in a circular cylinder wake. (author)

  12. Effects of Buoyancy Forces on Immiscible Water/Oil Displacements in a Vertically Oriented Porous Medium Effets des facteurs de flottabilité sur les déplacements non-miscibles eau/huile dans un milieu poreux vertical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirunavu S. R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of buoyancy forces on liquid-liquid displacement processes occurring in porous media are important in a variety of practical situations, in particular during the displacement of oil from partially-depleted underground reservoirs by means of aqueous solutions. Most previous studies involving the visualization of water/oil displacements in porous media have been undertaken in horizontal two-dimensional porous medium cells. The objective of the present work was to determine the effects of buoyancy forces; on the fingering pattern and oil recovery by conducting immiscible displacement experiments in two-dimensional consolidated porous medium cells aligned in the vertical plane. In order to obtain a clear understanding of the favourable and unfavourable effects of buoyancy forces, experiments were carried out in three different flow modes, namely horizontal, vertical upward, and vertical downward. As the effects of buoyancy forces are negligible for two-dimensional porous media in the horizontal flow mode, the recoveries obtained in this mode were used as a reference for comparison with those obtained in the two vertical modes. Displacements using five different density ratios were studied. The breakthrough time and percentage oil recovery were measured in each case. The effects of buoyancy forces, viscous forces, and capillary forces, as well as the injection flow rate, were also recorded. The results obtained indicate that the effects of buoyancy forces are very pronounced at low flow rates and low oil/water density ratios, and that even a slight increase in the flow rate causes the buoyancy forces to rapidly become less significant. Les facteurs de flottabilité exercent un effet important sur les déplacements liquide/liquide en milieu poreux dans toute une gamme de situations pratiques, en particulier lorsqu'on veut déplacer l'huile de roches réservoirs partiellement épuisées à l'aide de solutions aqueuses. La plupart des

  13. Effect of evaporative weathering and oil-sediment interactions on the fate and behavior of diluted bitumen in marine environments. Part 1. Spill-related properties, oil buoyancy, and oil-particulate aggregates characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yujuan; Mirnaghi, Fatemeh S; Yang, Zeyu; Hollebone, Bruce P; Brown, Carl E

    2018-01-01

    The fate and behavior of diluted bitumen spilled in marine conditions has recently become a topic of much interest, yet, only limited knowledge is available. One of the major issues of a diluted bitumen spill on water is whether the product will sink, especially when suspended sediment is present in the water column. This study demonstrated how weathering processes influenced the key spill-related properties of a diluted bitumen product (Cold Lake Blend-Winter), and how interaction of diluted bitumen with sediment affected its tendency to float or sink in water. This study showed that the weathering states of the oils as well as the size of sediment are important factors influencing oil-sediment interactions and the tendency of the formed oil-particulate aggregates for buoyancy. When mixing with fine- and medium-sized sediments, the fresh to moderately weathered oils formed oil-particulate aggregates and sank in saltwater, while the very heavily-weathered oil formed discrete free-floating tarballs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Numerical exploration of a non-Newtonian Carreau fluid flow driven by catalytic surface reactions on an upper horizontal surface of a paraboloid of revolution, buoyancy and stretching at the free stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L. Animasaun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometrically, the upper pointed surface of an aircraft and bonnet of a car are examples of upper horizontal surfaces of a paraboloid of revolution (uhspr. The motion of these objects strongly depends on the boundary layer that is formed within the immediate space on it. However, each of these surfaces is neither a horizontal/vertical nor cone/wedge and neither a cone nor a wedge. This article presents the motion of 2-dimensional Blasius flow of Carreau fluid on the surface of such object. The case in which the reaction between the Carreau fluid and catalyst at the surface produces significant temperature differences which consequently set up buoyancy-driven flows within the boundary layer is investigated. Single first-order Arrhenius kinetics is adopted to model the reaction on the surface of the catalyst situated on uhspr which initiates the free convection. Suitable similarity variables are applied to non-dimensionalized, parameterized and reduce the governing partial differential equations to a coupled ordinary differential equations (BVP. The BVP is solved numerically using the shooting technique. Temperature distribution in the flow of viscoelastic Carreau fluid is greater than that of a Newtonian fluid. Local heat transfer rate decreases faster when the Carreau fluid is characterized as shear-thinning. Maximum concentration is guaranteed at a small value of power-law index n and large value of thickness parameter. Keywords: Viscoelastic-Carreau fluid, Catalitic surface, Paraboloid of revolution, Numerical method, Uhspr, Boundary layer analysis

  15. Titan Montgolfiere Buoyancy Modulation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Titan is ideally suited for balloon exploration due to its low gravity and dense atmosphere. Current NASA mission architectures baseline Montgolfiere balloon...

  16. Topology Optimization including Inequality Buoyancy Constraints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picelli, R.; Van Dijk, R.; Vicente, W.M.; Pavanello, R.; Langelaar, M.; Van Keuen, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an evolutionary topology optimization method for applications in design of completely submerged buoyant devices with design-dependent fluid pressure loading. This type of structures aid rig installations and pipeline transportation in all water depths in offshore structural

  17. Análise da absorção de água em dois polímeros expandidos: desenvolvimento do módulo de flutuabilidade de um mini-robô submarino Study of expanded polymers water absorption for buoyancy modulus development of a submarine mini-robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège Bouchonneau

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polímeros expandidos são bastante competitivos para serem utilizados como materiais de flutuabilidade, devido a sua baixa densidade. Em particular, eles se apresentam muito eficientes no desenvolvimento de módulos de flutuabilidade de robôs submarinos do tipo ROV (Remote Operated Vehicle. Este trabalho descreve um estudo da absorção de água em dois diferentes tipos de polímeros expandidos (poliuretano e poliestireno expandido, em diferentes meios aquosos (água do mar e água destilada. Estudo sobre o efeito da geometria das amostras com relação à cinética de absorção de água demonstrou que as amostras com maior área de contato com a água se apresentam mais susceptíveis à absorção de água. Os estudos também revelaram que o poliuretano expandido sofreu uma importante perda de material devido ao seu manuseio durante os ensaios de absorção. A influência do meio aquoso foi também bastante notável para este material, no qual apresentou uma maior taxa de absorção nos ensaios com água destilada em comparação com os ensaios utilizando água do mar. Os resultados das análises demonstraram que o melhor material para ser utilizado como módulo de flutuabilidade do robô submarino é o poliestireno expandido, pois este material não apresentou uma notável degradação e perda de material durante os ensaios de absorção.Owing to the low density and relative low price, expanded polymers appear to be competitive for buoyancy systems. Expanded polymers are particularly efficient to develop buoyancy modules of submarine robots such as ROV (Remote Operated Vehicle. This work describes water absorption mechanisms of two expanded polymers (expanded polyurethane and expanded polystyrene, in various aqueous media (seawater and distilled water. The influence of the samples geometry on the water absorption kinetics was studied. The samples with a larger contact area with water were found to be more susceptible to water absorption

  18. SIEGEL GMR [DECADE PRE-Fert] -> Diffusive-MR -> Magnetic-H-Valve -> HINDENBURG-EFFECT -> FLYING-WATER Makes New H2O in New Places, TERRAFORMING via ONLY H MAX-Buoyancy on Geomorphology: H-Up; H2O-Down: Renewables-H-H2O: ONLY H IS FLYING-WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward

    2008-03-01

    ``G/CMR'' 2007 Physics Nobel/Wolf/Japan-Prizes ``a tad'' PREdated by SIEGEL[www.flickr.com; search on GMR]@:WAPD/PSEG/IAEA/ABB(1973-77)[J.Mag.Mag.Mtls.,7,312 & 334(1978); -``mysteriously'' ``not yet scanned'' by Elsevier!?; A.Mayo, Village Voice,p.40(Aug.21,1978) in (so miscalled)``super''alloys:[Ni-based & Fe-based stainless-steels: ANY/ALL!!!] generic endemic: Wigner's[JAP,17,857(1946)]-disease/Ostwald-ripening/ spinodal-decomposition/overageing-embrittlement/thermo-mechanical-INstability[Daniel Horner, www.Platts.com or LexisNexis.com; or www.animatedsoftware.com's nuc"elär sector: rhoffman@animatedsoftware.com; 760-720-7261]. Enabled Ertl-Radd-Youdelis-Herring-Alefeld-Siegel[Intl..Conf. Alt.-Energy, Bal Harbor; Hemisphere/ Springer(1980)-vol.5,page 459!; W Sci. Talent-Search(1957)] H-ion/proton-band diffusive-magnetoresistance enabled magnetic-H-valve enabled HINDENBURG-EFFECT(H-up; H2O-down) enabled FLYING-WATER, enables in new places making new water/glaciers(only possible way!) & rebaseifying now acidifying-(dying)-oceans [U.McFarling, L.A. Times,Aug.3(2006))]and TERRAFORMING [D.Biello,Sci.Am.News(Mar.9,2007); D.Rosenfeld, Science 315,1396(Mar.9,2007) (http:/earth.huji.ac.il/research.asp)]a drought-parched Earth via ONLY HYDROGEN MAXIMAL Archimedes-buoyancy's geomorphology/ gravitational-potential-energy differences: WATER!!!

  19. Positive-Buoyancy Rover for Under Ice Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichty, John M.; Klesh, Andrew T.; Berisford, Daniel F.; Matthews, Jaret B.; Hand, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    A buoyant rover has been developed to traverse the underside of ice-covered lakes and seas. The rover operates at the ice/water interface and permits direct observation and measurement of processes affecting freeze- over and thaw events in lake and marine environments. Operating along the 2- D ice-water interface simplifies many aspects of underwater exploration, especially when compared to submersibles, which have difficulty in station-keeping and precision mobility. The buoyant rover consists of an all aluminum body with two aluminum sawtooth wheels. The two independent body segments are sandwiched between four actuators that permit isolation of wheel movement from movement of the central tether spool. For normal operations, the wheels move while the tether spool feeds out line and the cameras on each segment maintain a user-controlled fixed position. Typically one camera targets the ice/water interface and one camera looks down to the lake floor to identify seep sources. Each wheel can be operated independently for precision turning and adjustments. The rover is controlled by a touch- tablet interface and wireless goggles enable real-time viewing of video streamed from the rover cameras. The buoyant rover was successfully deployed and tested during an October 2012 field campaign to investigate methane trapped in ice in lakes along the North Slope of Alaska.

  20. Heat Transfer in Boiling Dilute Emulsion with Strong Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeburg, Eric Thomas

    Little attention has been given to the boiling of emulsions compared to that of boiling in pure liquids. The advantages of using emulsions as a heat transfer agent were first discovered in the 1970s and several interesting features have since been studied by few researchers. Early research focuses primarily on pool and flow boiling and looks to determine a mechanism by which the boiling process occurs. This thesis looks at the boiling of dilute emulsions in fluids with strong buoyant forces. The boiling of dilute emulsions presents many favorable characteristics that make it an ideal agent for heat transfer. High heat flux electronics, such as those seen in avionics equipment, produce high heat fluxes of 100 W/cm2 or more, but must be maintained at low temperatures. So far, research on single phase convection and flow boiling in small diameter channels have yet to provide an adequate solution. Emulsions allow the engineer to tailor the solution to the specific problem. The fluid can be customized to retain the high thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the continuous phase while enhancing the heat transfer coefficient through boiling of the dispersed phase component. Heat transfer experiments were carried out with FC-72 in water emulsions. FC-72 has a saturation temperature of 56 °C, far below that of water. The parameters were varied as follows: 0% ≤ epsilon ≤ 1% and 1.82 x 1012 ≤ RaH ≤ 4.42 x 1012. Surface temperatures along the heated surface reached temperature that were 20 °C in excess of the dispersed phase saturation temperature. An increase of ˜20% was seen in the average Nusselt numbers at the highest Rayleigh numbers. Holography was used to obtain images of individual and multiple FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface. The droplet diameters ranged from 0.5 mm to 1.3 mm. The Magnus effect was observed when larger individual droplets were injected into the boundary layer, causing the droplets to be pushed outside the boundary layer. Vaporization of FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface was not observed.

  1. Validation of buoyancy driven spectral tensor model using HATS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, A.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous spectral tensor model for wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, driven by mean vertical shear and mean temperature gradient. Results from the model, including one-dimensional velocity and temperature spectra and the associated co-spectra, are shown in this paper. Th...... is described via five parameters: the dissipation rate (ε), length scale of energy-containing eddies (L), a turbulence anisotropy parameter (Γ), gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing the atmospheric stability and the rate of destruction of temperature variance (ηθ)....

  2. Surface tension and buoyancy in vertical soap films

    OpenAIRE

    Adami, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    This manuscrit presents our experimental works about maintained vertical soap films. The purpose of this thesis was to realize experiments on vertical soap films. We designed a setup which allows to maintain vertical soap films on large timescales. The thickness profiles of those films were characterized using an infrared absorption method. We then designed an elastic sensor in order to probe the surface tension profiles in our films. Simple mechanical considerations allowed us to draw a s...

  3. Characteristics of Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhigang

    Air flow through horizontal openings is an important issue of mass and energy transfer between different zones in buildings. This kind of mass and energy transfer have important implications regarding energy saving, thermal comfort, control of contaminants, micro-organisms and spread of fire...

  4. Uplift, Feedback, and Buoyancy: Radio Lobe Dynamics in NGC 4472

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron-Marsolais, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Bogdan, A.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Su, Y.; Nulsen, P.; Randall, S. W.; Roediger, E.

    2017-10-01

    We present results from deep (380 ks) Chandra observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) outburst in the massive early-type galaxy NGC 4472. We detect cavities in the gas coincident with the radio lobes and estimate the eastern and western lobe enthalpy to be (1.1+/- 0.5)× {10}56 erg and (3+/- 1)× {10}56 erg and the average power required to inflate the lobes to be (1.8+/- 0.9)× {10}41 erg s-1 and (6+/- 3)× {10}41 erg s-1, respectively. We also detect enhanced X-ray rims around the radio lobes with sharp surface brightness discontinuities between the shells and the ambient gas. The temperature of the gas in the shells is less than that of the ambient medium, suggesting that they are not AGN-driven shocks but rather gas uplifted from the core by the buoyant rise of the radio bubbles. We estimate the energy required to lift the gas to be up to (1.1+/- 0.3)× {10}56 erg and (3+/- 1)× {10}56 erg for the eastern and western rims, respectively, constituting a significant fraction of the total outburst energy. A more conservative estimate suggests that the gas in the rim was uplifted at a smaller distance, requiring only 20%-25% of this energy. In either case, if a significant fraction of this uplift energy is thermalized via hydrodynamic instabilities or thermal conduction, our results suggest that it could be an important source of heating in cool core clusters and groups. We also find evidence for a central abundance drop in NGC 4472. The iron abundance profile shows that the region along the cavity system has a lower metallicity than the surrounding undisturbed gas, similar to the central region. This also shows that bubbles have lifted low-metallicity gas from the center.

  5. A Model of Secondary Hydrocarbon Migration As a Buoyancy-Driven Separate Phase Flow Un modèle de migration secondaire des hydrocarbures considéré comme un écoulement en phases séparées régi par la poussée d'Archimède

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehner F. K.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of secondary migration is described which permits the prediction of hydrocarbon migration and accumulation patterns in a sedimentary basin, if source rock expulsion rates and geometrical and hydraulic properties of major carrier systems are known through geological time. In this model, secondary migration is treated as buoyancy-driven, segregated flow of hydrocarbons in hydrostatic aquifers. Lateral, updip migration is conceived as a Boussinesq-type, free-surface flow, with source and sink terms representing supply from source rocks and leakage through cap rocks and faults. This permits a two-dimensional, map-view mathematical description of a three-dimensional, time-dependent secondary migration system. A nine-point finite difference approximation has been developed to minimize numerical dispersion, and upstream-weighting is used to obtain stable solutions. Example computations for simple, single carrier bed structures are presented. L'article décrit un modèle mathématique de migration secondaire prédisant la migration des hydrocarbures et leur accumulation dans un bassin sédimentaire, lorsque les taux d'expulsion des roches mères et les propriétés géométriques et hydrauliques des principaux systèmes de drainage sont connus à l'échelle du temps géologique. Dans ce modèle, la migration secondaire est traitée comme un écoulement des hydrocarbures en phase séparée, contrôlé par la poussée d'Archimède, dans des aquifères hydrostatiques. La migration latérale est considérée comme un écoulement de type Boussinesq, à surface libre, avec des termes sources et puits représentant les apports venant des roches mères et les fuites à travers les couvertures et les failles. Ceci permet une description mathématique bidimensionnelle cartographiable d'un système de migration secondaire tridimensionnel et dépendant du temps. On utilise une approximation type différences finies à neuf points pour minimiser

  6. CFD Analysis of the Effect on Buoyancy Due to Terrain Temperature Based on an Integrated DEM and Landsat Infrared Imagery Análisis CFD de vientos convectivos naturales debidos a la temperatura de un terreno basado en un modelo DEM integrado con imágenes infrarrojas Landsat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Giraldo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the influence of concrete structures on atmospheric temperatureand the convection winds generated in the Aburra Valley in Medell´ın,Colombia. This area is characterised by low wind velocities with a high industrydensity. A digital elevation model was used from the Radar ShuttleTopography Mission and post-processed in order to obtain a valid volumetricCFD domain. The construction process includes hole-filling due to imperfectionsin the original radar data, decimation of the original cloud-of-points to reduce the excess of detail in regions with low curvature, and the introductionof a volume of air over the terrain surface (CFD domain. Landsat satellitedata was used to set the terrain temperatures for various material compositions.The converted infrared image was then registered into the CFD domainusing an interpolation technique.Navier–Stokes Equations were solved for buoyant, turbulent flow of compressiblefluids accounting for convection and heat transfer effects. Simulationincludes buoyancy and turbulence flow through the k–epsilon model using thehigh-performance computing facilities of Westgrid (Western Canada ResearchGrid. Preliminary results show wind distributions that compare to the oneobserved at low–altitude in the region.El presente trabajo estudia la influencia de estructuras de concreto en la temperatura atmosférica y los vientos convectivos generados en el Valle de Aburrá en Medellín, Colombia. Esta zona se caracteriza por vientos de bajas velocidades con alta densidad industrial. Un modelo de elevación digital fue obtenido de la misión topográfica del radar Shuttle y post-procesado en aras de obtener un dominio volumétrico CFD válido. El proceso de construcción incluye el parchado de agujeros debidos a imperfectos en los datos originarios del radar, decimación de la nube de puntos original para reducir el exceso de detalle en regiones con baja curvatura y la generación de un volumen de

  7. Composition, Buoyancy Regulation and Fate of Ice Algal Aggregates in the Central Arctic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez-Mendez, Mar; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Peeken, Ilka

    2014-01-01

    Sea-ice diatoms are known to accumulate in large aggregates in and under sea ice and in melt ponds. There is recent evidence from the Arctic that such aggregates can contribute substantially to particle export when sinking from the ice. The role and regulation of microbial aggregation in the highly...... Arctic Ocean. Spherical aggregates densely packed with pennate diatoms, as well as filamentous aggregates formed by Melosira arctica showed sign of different stages of degradation and physiological stoichiometries, with carbon to chlorophyll a ratios ranging from 110 to 66700, and carbon to nitrogen...

  8. The Role of Magnetic Buoyancy in a Babcock-Leighton Type Solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    The review by Choudhuri (2000) in these proceedings points out the recent resurgence of interest in Babcock-Leighton (BL) type solar dynamos, in which the poloidal field is assumed to be generated near the solar surface due to the decay of active regions. (Choudhuri et al. 1995; Durney 1997; Dikpati & Charbonneau ...

  9. Channel flow past bluff-body: outlet boundary condition, vortex shedding and effects of buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbassi, H.; Turki, S.; Nasrallah, S. Ben

    Structure of laminar flow and heat transfer, in a two-dimensional horizontal plane channel differentially heated, with a built-in triangular prism is investigated from the numerical solutions of complete Navier-Stokes and energy equations. Results are obtained for Reynolds and Grashof numbers ranging respectively from 30 to 200 and from 0 to 1.5×104 at Pr=0.71. In forced convection, results are specially presented to show how the vortex shedding at downstream affects the upstream. Also, two correlations giving the Strouhal and the averaged Nusselt numbers as functions of the Reynolds number are proposed. In mixed convection, the superposition of Von Karman street and convective cells is discussed.

  10. In-situ Production of Hydrogen for Buoyancy on Titan Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on current observations Titan is believed to have a rich, dense atmosphere. If the findings of the Cassini and Huygens missions corroborate this, the next...

  11. Surface tension and buoyancy-driven flow in a non-isothermal liquid bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Alexander, J. I. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations governing the transport of momentum, mass and heat in a nonisothermal liquid bridge with a temperature-dependent surface tension are solved using a vorticity-stream-function formulation together with a nonorthogonal coordinate transformation. The equations are discretized using a pseudo-unsteady semi-implicit finite difference scheme and are solved by the ADI method. A Picard-type iteration is adopted which consists of inner and outer iterative processes. The outer iteration is used to update the shape of the free surface. Two schemes have been used for the outer iteration; both use the force balance normal to the free surface as the distinguished boundary condition. The first scheme involves successive approximation by the direct solution of the distinguished boundary condition. The second scheme uses the artificial force imbalance between the fluid pressure, viscous and capillary forces at the free surface which arises when the boundary condition for force balance normal to the surface is not satisfied. This artificial imbalance is then used to change the surface shape until the distinguished boundary condition is satisfied. These schemes have been used to examine a variety of model liquid bridge situations including purely thermocapillary-driven flow situations and mixed thermocapillary- and bouyancy-driven flow.

  12. The Role of Magnetic Buoyancy in a Babcock-Leighton Type Solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since January 2016, the Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy has moved to Continuous Article Publishing (CAP) mode. This means that each accepted article is being published immediately online with DOI and article citation ID with starting page number 1. Articles are also visible in Web of Science immediately.

  13. Rubber Balloons, Buoyancy and the Weight of Air: A Look Inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calza, G.; Gratton, L. M.; Lopez-Arias, T.; Oss, S.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss three methods of measuring the density of air most commonly used in a teaching context. Emphasis is put on the advantages and/or difficulties of each method. In particular, we show that the 'rubber balloon' method can still be performed with meaningful physical insight, but it requires a very careful approach. (Contains 4 figures and 3…

  14. High Speed Marine Craft Threat: Buoyancy and Stability Requirements for a Sub-Launched Weapon System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lowery, John

    1999-01-01

    ...) that would be used for coastal infiltration. The most practical scenario would utilize a torpedo stow for a weapon system that would be tube launched, thus ensuring the maximum cruise missile capability of the submarine with a minimal sacrifice...

  15. Instabilities of thermocapillary–buoyancy convection in open rectangular liquid layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huan; Duan, Li; Kang, Qi

    2017-10-01

    Not Available Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences: SJ-10 Recoverable Scientific Experiment Satellite (Grant Nos. XDA04020405 and XDA04020202-05), the China Manned Space Engineering program (TG-2), Cooperative Research Project between China and Russia, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11372328).

  16. Transient numerical simulation of buoyancy driven flow adjacent to an elliptic tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahfouz, F.M.; Kocabiyik, Serpil

    2003-12-01

    In this paper the problem of laminar, transient, two-dimensional free convective heat transfer from the surface of a horizontal elliptic tube is considered. The tube, whose surface is suddenly subjected to uniform heat flux, is placed in a quiescent Boussinesq Newtonian fluid with its major axis horizontal. The details of both flow and thermal fields are obtained by solving the full governing Navier-Stokes and energy equations. These equations, expressed in terms of stream function, vorticity and temperature, are numerically solved using an implicit spectral finite difference procedure. The parameters involved are the modified Rayleigh number, Prandtl number and axis-ratio. The investigation covers a Rayleigh number range up to 10{sup 7}. The minor-major axis ratio of elliptic cylinder ranges between 0.05 and 0.998 and Prandtl number ranges between 0.1 and 10. The effects of these parameters on the surface temperature distribution and heat transfer coefficients are determined and the different aspects of the results are discussed for some selected cases.

  17. Tidal Mixing and Buoyancy Advection: Joint Influences on Lobster Distribution in Coastal Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Eastern Maine Coastal Current (EMCC) flows southwestward from the mouth of the Bay of Fundy to Penobscot Bay on the central Maine coast. Maximum non-tidal surface speeds reach 20-30 cm/s about 20 km offshore during April-May when the outflow from the Saint John River is strongest. Vigorous tides cause strong vertical and horizontal mixing, so that dispersal of neutral particles is influenced both by advection and tidal mixing. To survive, planktonic lobsters carried southwestward in the surface flow must settle to a nearshore cobble substrate. Larvae hatched near the Bay of Fundy can be advected to the central coast in 2-3 weeks, roughly the time needed to reach settlement stage. Over the same period, transverse tidal mixing is sufficient to raise nearshore larval concentrations to about half that offshore in the axis of the EMCC. Both processes may be necessary to explain the observed lobster distribution, which exhibits a distinct maximum in the central coastal region. The seasonal development of the EMCC is also influenced by winds and the larger circulation of the Gulf of Maine. This work is part of a multidisciplinary synthesis study funded by the NOAA Coastal Ocean Program.

  18. Buoyancy effects on upward brine displacement caused by CO2 injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Rinaldi, A.

    2010-01-15

    Upward displacement of brine from deep reservoirs driven by pressure increases resulting from CO{sub 2} injection for geologic carbon sequestration may occur through improperly sealed abandoned wells, through permeable faults, or through permeable channels between pinch-outs of shale formations. The concern about upward brine flow is that, upon intrusion into aquifers containing groundwater resources, the brine may degrade groundwater. Because both salinity and temperature increase with depth in sedimentary basins, upward displacement of brine involves lifting fluid that is saline but also warm into shallower regions that contain fresher, cooler water. We have carried out dynamic simulations using TOUGH2/EOS7 of upward displacement of warm, salty water into cooler, fresher aquifers in a highly idealized two-dimensional model consisting of a vertical conduit (representing a well or permeable fault) connecting a deep and a shallow reservoir. Our simulations show that for small pressure increases and/or high-salinity-gradient cases, brine is pushed up the conduit to a new static steady-state equilibrium. On the other hand, if the pressure rise is large enough that brine is pushed up the conduit and into the overlying upper aquifer, flow may be sustained if the dense brine is allowed to spread laterally. In this scenario, dense brine only contacts the lower-most region of the upper aquifer. In a hypothetical case in which strong cooling of the dense brine occurs in the upper reservoir, the brine becomes sufficiently dense that it flows back down into the deeper reservoir from where it came. The brine then heats again in the lower aquifer and moves back up the conduit to repeat the cycle. Parameter studies delineate steady-state (static) and oscillatory solutions and reveal the character and period of oscillatory solutions. Such oscillatory solutions are mostly a curiosity rather than an expected natural phenomenon because in nature the geothermal gradient prevents the cooling in the upper aquifer that occurs in the model. The expected effect of upward brine displacement is either establishment of a new hydrostatic equilibrium or sustained upward flux into the bottom-most region of the upper aquifer.

  19. Developing Buoyancy Driven Flow of a Nanofluid in a Vertical Channel Subject to Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal C. Sacheti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The developing natural convective flow of a nanofluid in an infinite vertical channel with impermeable bounding walls has been investigated. It is assumed that the nanofluid is dominated by two specific slip mechanisms and that the channel walls are subject to constant heat flux and isothermal temperature, respectively. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations coupling different transport processes have been solved numerically. The variations of velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration have been discussed in relation to a number of physical parameters. It is seen that the approach to the steady-state profiles of velocity and temperature in the present work is different from the ones reported in a previous study corresponding to isothermal wall conditions.

  20. Buoyancy-driven leakage of oil from a ruptured submarine pipeline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1983-01-01

    The rupture of a submarine oil pipeline starts various mechanisms leading to an oil spill. Among these mechanisms the leakage of oil driven by the difference in specific gravities of oil and sea-water is difficult to estimate. A simple mathematical model has been developed and laboratory experiments

  1. Dispersion of a passive tracer in buoyancy- and shear-driven boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dosio, A.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Builtjes, P.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    By means of finescale modeling [large-eddy simulation (LES)], the combined effect of thermal and mechanical forcing on the dispersion of a plume in a convective boundary layer is investigated. Dispersion of a passive tracer is studied in various atmospheric turbulent flows, from pure convective to

  2. CONSEQUENCES OF NON-LINEAR DENSITY EFFECTS ON BUOYANCY AND PLUME BEHAVIOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic plumes, as turbulent streams, grow by entraining ambient water. Buoyant plumes rise and dense ones sink, but, non-linear kinetic effects can reverse the buoyant force in mid-phenomenon. The class of nascent-density plumes begin as buoyant, upwardly accelerating plumes tha...

  3. Design of a Lighter Than Air Vehicle That Achieves Positive Buoyancy in Air Using a Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Hindenburg was actually designed to carry helium, but due to the US policy of hoarding helium in anticipation of World War II, the US refused to sell...helium. Unfortunately, if helium is unavailable as in the case of the Hindenburg , there are few lifting gas alternatives. This is a strong argument...Vehicles, Air Force Institute of Technology, 2005. [9] D. Grossman, "Airships: The Hindenburg and other Zeppelins," 2008. [Online]. Available: http

  4. Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence via Rapid Distortion Theory: Spectral Tensor of Velocity and Buoyancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate epsilon, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter Gamma, gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing...

  5. Removing a sheet from the surface of a melt using elasticity and buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, Peter L.; Sun, Dawei; Helenbrook, Brian; Harvey, David S.

    2014-07-01

    Embodiments related to sheet production are disclosed. A melt of a material is cooled to form a sheet of the material on the melt. The sheet is formed in a first region at a first sheet height. The sheet is translated to a second region such that it has a second sheet height higher than the first sheet height. The sheet is then separated from the melt. A seed wafer may be used to form the sheet.

  6. Multidisciplinary design approach and safety analysis of ADSR cooled by buoyancy driven flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceballos Castillo, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Transmutation is useful to reduce the storing time and the amount of nuclear waste to be stored in the geological repository. Transmutation can be achieved in all types of reactors: thermal systems, fast systems, critical and subcritical systems. Fast spectrum systems have significant advantages

  7. The selective advantage of buoyancy provided by gas vesicles for planktonic cyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walsby, A.E.; Hayes, P.K.; Boje, R.; Stal, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Observations were made on the vertical distribution of colonies of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae for 9 d at a drift-station east of Bornholm Island in the Baltic Sea. The buoyant colonies were dispersed in the upper layers of the water column during periods of wind-induced mixing but floated up during

  8. Onshore Wind Stress and Buoyancy Flux Observed on a Dissipative Mediterranean Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    There are a few people I’d be remiss if I did not thank personally. On the oceanography side, to Mr. Keith Wyckoff for his enthusiasm and for...1610, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-12-0173.1. Fairall, C. W., E. F. Bradley, J. E. Hare , A. A. Grachev, and J. B. Edson, 2003: Bulk parameterization of air–sea...doi:10.1029/93JC01439. Grachev, A., C. Fairall, J. Hare , J. Edson, and S. Miller, 2003: Wind stress vector over ocean waves. J. Phys. Oceanogr

  9. Response of the Atlantic overturning circulation to South Atlantic sources of buoyancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, W.; Ruijter, W.P.M. de; Sterl, A.; Drijfhout, S.

    2001-01-01

    The heat and salt input from the Indian to Atlantic Oceans by Agulhas Leakage is found to influence the Atlantic overturning circulation in a low-resolution Ocean General Circulation Model. The model used is the Hamburg Large-Scale Geostrophic (LSG) model, which is forced by mixed boundary

  10. In-Situ Production of Hydrogen for Buoyancy on Titan Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Resupply of materials in space applications is a significant logistical problem. Historically the replacement materials have been carried with the spacecraft. This...

  11. Floating along buoyancy levels: dispersal and survival of western Baltic fish eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petereit, C.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Franke, A.

    2014-01-01

    Vertical distribution is an important feature of pelagic fish eggs and yolk sac larvae impacting their survival and dispersal, especially in heterogeneous and highly variable estuarine environments like the Baltic Sea. Egg densities determining the vertical distribution pattern were experimentally...... ascertained for cod (Gadus morhua), plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) and flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the western Baltic Sea. Plaice eggs floated at lower mean (± standard deviation) density range (1.0136 ± 0.0007 g cm-3) compared to cod (1.0146 ± 0.0009 g cm-3) and flounder eggs (1.0160 ± 0.0015 g cm-3......), which floated on the highest density level. In flounder egg diameter was significantly related to egg density and in cod a weak correlation could be found between egg dry weight and density. All other relationships between female size, egg size, egg dry weight and egg density were not significant...

  12. Psycho-Educational Factors in the Prediction of Academic Buoyancy in Second Life®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Cheril C.

    2013-01-01

    Academic resilience has been widely researched in traditional and online educational settings, but it has not been sufficiently studied in three-dimensional (3D) virtual learning environments (VLEs). This inferential research used multiple regression to quantitatively investigate the extent to which psycho-educational factors including academic…

  13. Recruitment of benthic Microcystis (Cyanophyceae) to the water column: internal buoyancy changes or resuspension?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspagen, J.M.H.; Snelder, E.O.F.M.; Visser, P.M.; Huisman, J.; Mur, L.R.; Ibelings, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    In some lakes, large amounts of the potentially toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis overwinter in the sediment. This overwintering population might inoculate the water column in spring and promote the development of dense surface blooms of Microcystis during summer. In the Dutch Lake Volkerak, we found

  14. Effects of root mat buoyancy and heterogeneity on floating fen hydrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stofberg, S.F.; van Engelen, Joeri; Witte, J.P.M.; van der Zee, S.E.A.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Floating fen ecosystems are home to several protected habitats and species. Their development and conservation require special attention regarding water management. Although they are known to be heterogeneous and partially buoyant, their root mats are simulated in hydrological models as homogeneous,

  15. Effects of root mat buoyancy and heterogeneity on floating fen hydrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stofberg, S.F.; Engelen, van Joeri; Witte, J.Ph.M.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Floating fen ecosystems are home to several protected habitats and species. Their development and conservation require special
    attention regarding water management. Although they are known to be heterogeneous and partially buoyant, their root mats are
    simulated in hydrological models as

  16. 40 CFR 1065.690 - Buoyancy correction for PM sample media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.690... Where: p abs = absolute pressure in balance environment. M mix = molar mass of air in balance environment. R = molar gas constant. T amb = absolute ambient temperature of balance environment. Example: p...

  17. Coarsening in the buoyancy-driven instability of a reaction-diffusion front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckmann, Martin; Müller, Stefan C

    2004-10-01

    When propagating in a vertical direction an autocatalytic reaction front associated with a change in density can become buoyantly unstable, leading to the formation of a fingerlike pattern. Later on these fingers start to interact. Their temporal evolution is studied experimentally by tracking the horizontal and vertical locations of the extrema of the front pattern. A proceeding development towards larger spatial scales is found. This is reflected in the differences in the vertical speed of neighboring fingers: continually some fingers start to decelerate and vanish finally in the neighboring ones which show a simultaneous acceleration. In addition, weak lateral movements of fingers towards gaps are observed, but there is no evidence for a correlation with the extinction of fingers.

  18. Influence of Orientation and Radiative Heat Transfer on Aluminum Foams in Buoyancy-Induced Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijn Billiet

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Two differently-produced open-cell aluminum foams were compared to a commercially available finned heat sink. Further, an aluminum plate and block were tested as a reference. All heat sinks have the same base plate dimensions of four by six inches. The first foam was made by investment casting of a polyurethane preform and has a porosity of 0.946 and a pore density of 10 pores per linear inch. The second foam is manufactured by casting over a solvable core and has a porosity of 0.85 and a pore density of 2.5 pores per linear inch. The effects of orientation and radiative heat transfer are experimentally investigated. The heat sinks are tested in a vertical and horizontal orientation. The effect of radiative heat transfer is investigated by comparing a painted/anodized heat sink with an untreated one. The heat flux through the heat sink for a certain temperature difference between the environment and the heat sink’s base plate is used as the performance indicator. For temperature differences larger than 30 °C, the finned heat sink outperforms the in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink on average by 17%. Furthermore, the in-house-made aluminum foam dissipates on average 12% less heat than the other aluminum foam for a temperature difference larger than 40 °C. By painting/anodizing the heat sinks, the heat transfer rate increased on average by 10% to 50%. Finally, the thermal performance of the horizontal in-house-made aluminum foam heat sink is up to 18% larger than the one of the vertical aluminum foam heat sink.

  19. Large eddy simulations of targeted electromagnetic control of buoyancy-driven turbulent flow in a slender enclosure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a large eddy simulation (LES) of a locally applied electromagnetic control of turbulent thermal convection of an electrically conductive fluid (electrolyte solution) inside of a slender enclosure. Generic configurations, consisting of two or three magnets of opposite polarities located

  20. Direct measurement of the heat exchanges in a buoyancy driven two-phase flow; application to the planets core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacheul, Jean-Baptiste; Le Bars, Michael; Ecoulement tournant et geophysique Team

    2016-11-01

    Telluric planet formation involved the settling of large amounts of liquid iron coming from impacting planetesimals into a viscous magma ocean as deep as thousands of kilometers. During this "iron rain", the initial state of planets was mostly determined by exchanges of heat and elements between the two phases. Most models of planet formation simply assume that the metal rapidly equilibrated with the whole mantle. Here we report the results of experiments on which we performed measurements of the diffusive exchanges integrated during the fall, in addition to measuring the dynamical variables of the flow on high speed videos recordings. Using a balloon filled with liquid gallium alloy as an analogue for the iron core of the impactor and a viscous fluid as an analogue for the silicate magma, we were able to produce flows matching the dynamical regime of the geophysical inspiration. We find that the early representations of this flow as an iron "rain" is far from the experiments, both in terms of fluid mechanics and diffusive exchanges during the phase where most of the equilibration is accomplished. Indeed, the equilibration coefficient at a given depth depends both on the size of the metal diapir and on the viscosity of the ambient fluid, whereas the falling speed is only controlled by the size. Various scalings chosen in the literature for the diffusive exchanges, and we find good agreement with the hypothesis and scaling of a turbulent thermal.

  1. Negative gravitactic behavior of Euglena gracilis can not be described by the mechanism of buoyancy-oriented upward swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebert, Michael; Häder, Donat-Peter

    1999-01-01

    Gravitactic behavior of microorganisms has been known for more than a hundred years. Euglena gracilis serves as a model system for gravity-triggered behavioral responses. Two basic mechanisms are discussed for gravitaxis: one is based on a physical mechanism where an asymmetric mass distribution pulls the cell passively in the correct orientation and, in contrast, the involvement of an active sensory system. A recently developed high-resolution motion-tracking system allows the analysis of single tracks during reorientation. The results are compared to a model developed by Fukui and Asai (1985) which describes gravitaxis of Paramecium caudatum on the basis of a physical mechanism. Taking into account the different size, different density, different mass distribution as well as the different velocity, results of the adapted model description of Paramecium were applied to measured data of Euglena. General shapes as well as the time scale of the predicted reorientational movement compared to measurements were different. The analysis clearly rules out the possibility that gravitaxis of Euglena gracilis is based on a pure physical phenomenon, and gives further support to the involvement of an active reorientational system. In addition, it could be shown that cell form changes during reorientation, even in an initial period where no angular change was observed.

  2. Effects of salinity and sea salt type on egg activation, fertilization, buoyancy and early embryology of European eel, Anguilla anguilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sune Riis; Butts, Ian; Munk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Improper activation and swelling of in vitro produced eggs of European eel, Anguilla anguilla, has been shown to negatively affect embryonic development and hatching. We investigated this phenomenon by examining the effects of salinity and sea salt type on egg dimensions, cell cleavage patterns a...

  3. Personal Best (PB) and "Classic" Achievement Goals in the Chinese Context: Their Role in Predicting Academic Motivation, Engagement and Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Martin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior research has shown personal best (PB) goals to be significantly related to students' motivation, engagement and achievement. However, research thus far has investigated PB goals only among Western samples and it is unclear to what extent PB goals hold academic merit in the Asian context. It is also unclear whether PB goals explain variance…

  4. Two-length-scale turbulence model for self-similar buoyancy-, shock-, and shear-driven mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brandon E.; Schilling, Oleg; Hartland, Tucker A.

    2018-01-01

    The three-equation k -L -a turbulence model [B. Morgan and M. Wickett, Three-equation model for the self-similar growth of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities, Phys. Rev. E 91, 043002 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.043002] is extended by the addition of a second length scale equation. It is shown that the separation of turbulence transport and turbulence destruction length scales is necessary for simultaneous prediction of the growth parameter and turbulence intensity of a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer when model coefficients are constrained by similarity analysis. Constraints on model coefficients are derived that satisfy an ansatz of self-similarity in the low-Atwood-number limit and allow the determination of model coefficients necessary to recover expected experimental behavior. The model is then applied in one-dimensional simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor, reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov, Kelvin-Helmholtz, and combined Rayleigh-Taylor-Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mixing layers to demonstrate that the expected growth rates are recovered numerically. Finally, it is shown in the case of combined instability that the model predicts a mixing width that is a linear combination of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz mixing processes.

  5. Influence of fluctuating thermal and mass diffusion on unsteady MHD buoyancy-driven convection past a vertical surface with chemical reaction and Soret effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dulal; Talukdar, Babulal

    2012-04-01

    The influence of thermal radiation and first-order chemical reaction on unsteady MHD convective flow, heat and mass transfer of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past a semi-infinite vertical flat plate in the presence of transverse magnetic field under oscillatory suction and heat source in slip-flow regime is studied. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation are formulated and solved analytically using two-term harmonic and non-harmonic functions. Comparisons with previously published work on special cases of the problem are performed and results are found to be in excellent agreement. A parametric study illustrating the effects of various physical parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration fields as well as skin-friction coefficient, the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers in terms of amplitude and phase is conducted. The numerical results of this parametric study are presented graphically and in tabular form to highlight the physical aspects of the problem.

  6. Investigation of four problems on the units of Force and Motion with Pressure and Buoyancy in the secondary school physics textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavcar, Nevzat; Kaya, Uǧur

    2017-02-01

    In the study the four problems defined on three units in the textbooks in accordance with the 2013 Secondary School Physics Curriculum have been investigated. The study carried out in the Spring semester of education year 2015 - 2016, within the scope of an undergraduate course. Method of the study is the descriptive model based on qualitative research technics. The data collection instruments were textbook evaluation reports prepared by the participants and pre -service teachers, and presentations reflecting teachers' and pre-service teachers' ideas on the textbooks. A document analysis was conducted by means of these data collection tools. It has been concluded that in the related units a significant shortcoming is not found regarding being student-centered, activity-based and contex-based approximations. However, some shortcomings were found in activity-gain concordance with assessment and evaluation applications. On the basis of the collected data, some recommendations for improving the textbooks have been presented.

  7. Reply to "Basal buoyancy and fast-moving glaciers: in defense of analytic force balance" by C. J. van der Veen (2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Terence J.

    2017-07-01

    Two approaches to ice-sheet modeling are available. Analytical modeling is the traditional approach (Van der Veen, 2016). It solves the force (momentum), mass, and energy balances to obtain three-dimensional solutions over time, beginning with the Navier-Stokes equations for the force balance. Geometrical modeling employs simple geometry to solve the force and mass balance in one dimension along ice flow (Hughes, 2012a). It is useful primarily to provide the first-order physical basis of ice-sheet modeling for students with little background in mathematics. The geometric approach uses changes in ice-bed coupling along flow to calculate changes in ice elevation and thickness, using a floating fraction ϕ along a flow line or flow band, where ϕ = 0 for sheet flow, 0 < ϕ < 1 for stream flow, and ϕ = 1 for shelf flow. An attempt is made to reconcile the two approaches.

  8. Deadzones, Dying Eddies, and the Loop Current: Stability, Ventilation, and Heat Content from Buoyancy Glider Observations in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico in Spring and Summer 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, S. F.; Knap, A. H.; Wang, Z.; Walpert, J.; Dreger, K.

    2016-02-01

    The northwestern Gulf of Mexico is host to a myriad of physical and biochemical processes, which govern the exchange and transport of material and volume between the coastal and offshore environments. We report on five G2 Slocum glider deployments in the northwestern Gulf during the spring and summer of 2015. The gliders were deployed in shallow (20 m) and deep (greater than 1000 m) water for a total of about 200 days. During this time, the gliders encountered a variety of environmental conditions that impact the circulation, biology, chemistry of the shelf and slope. The shallow gliders encountered coastal waters influenced by extensive flooding in terrestrial Texas that vertically stratified the water-column and was coincident with sub-pycnocline low dissolved oxygen concentration, at times below the hypoxic threshold of 2 mg/L, and elevated CDOM concentrations. These gliders also reveal high spatial variability with bottom boundary oxygen and biomass scales on the order of a few kilometers. The deep gliders were tasked to investigate shelf/slope exchange at two locations 94W and 91W. The western glider encountered a mature mesoscale circulation eddy that was actively weakening. The eastern glider simultaneously encountered a freshly separated Loop Current eddy. The vertical structure of hydrographic and dissolved oxygen parameters shows significant and distinguishable variability in each feature. The vertical structure of both features show significant departures from that which is expected based on sea surface height determined from satellite altimetry. Additionally, glider observations are compared to operational high-resolution regional numerical model output. These observations emphasize the importance of direct observations over satellite-derived products for applications that include upper ocean heat content for hurricane intensification and vertical mixing and ventilation of the oceanic interior.

  9. CFD study on rise and deformation characteristics of buoyancy-driven spheroid bubbles in stagnant Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollakota, Anjani R. K.; Kishore, Nanda

    2017-06-01

    The bubbles are almost ubiquitous in many chemical and processing industries; and many of the polymeric solutions obey non-Newtonian rheological characteristics. Therefore, in this work the rise and deformation characteristics of spheroid bubbles in Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids are numerically investigated using a level set method. To demonstrate the validity of the moving bubble interface, the present simulations are compared with existing numerical and experimental results available in the literature; and for these comparisons, the computational geometries are considered same as reported in corresponding literatures. The present bubble deformation characteristics are satisfactorily agreeing with their literature counterparts. After establishing the validity of the numerical solution procedure, the same method is applied to obtain the deformation characteristics of an air bubble in Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids. Further, the results in terms of the volume fraction images, streamlines, and viscosity profiles around the deforming bubbles are presented as function of the bubble rise time.

  10. Buoyancy-driven convection heat transfer of copper–water nanofluid in a square enclosure under the different periodic oscillating boundary temperature waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xilian Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates natural convective heat transfer of copper–water nanofluids in a square enclosure with alternating temperature at one vertical wall, relatively low temperature at the opposite sidewall and adiabatic at the other walls. The transport equations are solved numerically with finite volume approach using SIMPLEC algorithm. Calculations are performed for nanoparticle volume fractions from 0 to 0.2 and dimensionless amplitude from 0 to 1.0 with consideration of three typical alternating waves (trapezoid wave, sine wave and triangle wave. Results show the utilization of nanoparticles enhances heat transfer and the percentage increase in the time-averaged Nusselt number is around 38% d from ϕ=0 to ϕ=0.2 under the certain conditions. The oscillating waveform has a degree effect on the heat transfer enhancement and the trapezoid wave is more conducive to the enhancement of heat transfer than sine and triangle waves. And the oscillating area is introduced to combine the oscillating waveform and its amplitude and the percentage increase in the time-averaged Nusselt number is around 14.5% from S=0 to S=0.075. In the end, the regression equation about the time-averaged Nusselt number is obtained as parameters of the solid volume fraction and the oscillating area.

  11. Investigation of Heat Transfer Enhancement or Deterioration of Variable Properties Al2O3-EG-water Nanofluid in Buoyancy Driven Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khorasanizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the natural convection heat transfer of variable properties Al2O3-EG-water nanofluid in a differentially heated rectangular cavity has been investigated numerically. The governing equations, for a Newtonian fluid, have been solved numerically with a finite volume approach. The influences of the pertinent parameters such as Ra in the range of 103-107 and volume fraction of nanoparticles from 0 to 0.04 on heat transfer characteristics have been studied. The results verified by making overall comparison with some existing experimental results have shown that for Ra=103, for which conduction heat transfer is dominant, the average Nusselt number increases as volume fraction of nanoparticles increases, but for higher Ra numbers in contradiction with the constant properties cases it decreases. This reduction, which is associated with increased viscosity, is more severe at Ra of 104 compared to higher Ra numbers such that the least deterioration in heat transfer occurs for Ra=107. This is due to the fact that as Ra increases, the Brownian motion enhances; thus conductivity improves and becomes more important than viscosity increase. An scale analysis, performed to clarify the contradictory reports in the literature on the natural convection heat transfer enhancement or deterioration of nanofluids, showed that different kinds of evaluating the base fluid Rayleigh number has led to such a difference.

  12. Climatology and reconstruction of runoff time series in northwest Iberia: influence in the shelf buoyancy budget off Ría de Vigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Otero

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available River runoff off northwest Iberia generates a low-density buoyant structure with a strong influence on shelf and coastal circulation. This study estimates the runoff to the shelf of the ten largest rivers in the region based on the furthest downstream gauge records available, and also takes into account the basin area downstream from the station (22% of the basin area for the entire study region. Monthly statistics were computed to obtain mean values for each river to cover the recurrent lack of runoff data in the region. In order to reconstruct gaps in the time series on a daily scale, a method based on the observed discharge of a nearby river basin was used. In addition, the influence of runoff on the shelf was analyzed using monthly CTD data sampled during a 12-year period in the Ría de Vigo and the adjacent shelf. The CTD series shows the existence of a buoyant structure with maximum growth during winter and with large variability of its thermal anomaly. The salinity anomaly correlated significantly with mean winter monthly values of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO index. This atmospheric index integrates both the influence of precipitation —and therefore runoff— and the predominant winds during winter that contribute to the accumulation of fresh water over the shelf.

  13. Numerical simulations of a mixed momentum-driven and buoyancy-driven jet in a large enclosure for nuclear reactor severe accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carasik, Lane B., E-mail: lcarasik@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States); Sebilleau, Frédéric, E-mail: Frederic.sebilleau11@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Mechanical Engineering Department, London SW7 SBX (United Kingdom); Walker, Simon P., E-mail: s.p.walker@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Mechanical Engineering Department, London SW7 SBX (United Kingdom); Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Simulations of thermal stratification in large enclosures using different turbulence models. • The recent elliptic blending k–ε was implemented in this work. • Direct comparisons of experimental temperature measurements to CFD predictions. • Spurious prediction of jet stabilisation and diffuse stratification by both low-Re k–ε and SST k–ω. - Abstract: An ability to predict the behavior of buoyant jets entering a large body of relatively stationary fluid is important in analysis of a wide variety of nuclear accidents, including for example the use of large tanks of water as heat sinks, or the release of hot gases into the secondary containment. In particular, the degree to which temperature stratification occurs is important, as it can affect markedly the effectiveness of the body of fluid as a heat sink. In this paper, we report the results of measurements on an experimental facility designed to exhibit such behavior, and the results of attempts to predict this experiment using CFD. In particular, we here investigate the effectiveness of three alternative turbulence models for this analysis; low-Re k–e, elliptic-blended k–e and Shear Stress Transport k–ω models. Both the degree of thermal stratification and the stability of the jet that were predicted differed markedly between the three models. Two of the models, the low-Re k–e and the Shear Stress Transport k–ω, tend to predict, wrongly, significant turbulent intensity in regions where fluid velocities are essentially zero. This spurious high turbulent intensity in turn causes (i) a high turbulent viscosity to be applied, wrongly stabilizing the jet, and (ii) increased turbulent diffusion of heat, causing too deep and diffuse a stratification to be predicted.

  14. Study for the numerical resolution of conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy to be applied on buoyancy-driven flows in enclosed cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Menéndez Melgoso, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    El presente estudio introduce al lector en el campo de los intercambiadores de calor. Estos serán definidos y clasificados, presentando los tipos más comunes en el sector industrial y describiendo sus principios y funcionamiento. Dado que la base de este estudio es el CFD, se ha escogido como caso de interés relacionado con los intercambiadores de calor el problema de la Differentially heated cavity. Este es un problema de referencia dentro del campo del CFD. El caso será introducido y se pro...

  15. A Lot of Good Physics in the Cartesian Diver

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Roberto; Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The Cartesian diver experiment certainly occupies a place of honour in old physics textbooks as a vivid demonstration of Archimedes' buoyancy. The original experiment, as described in old textbooks, shows Archimedes buoyancy qualitatively: when the increased weight of the diver is not counterbalanced by Archimedes' buoyancy, the diver sinks. When…

  16. 46 CFR 160.010-7 - Methods of sampling, inspections and tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... manufacturer— (1) Uses the same plastic buoyancy foam used in previous production lots, (2) Determines that the... plastic buoyancy foam controls permitted as an alternative to the buoyancy test in paragraph (e) of this... Vessels § 160.010-7 Methods of sampling, inspections and tests. (a) General. Production tests must be...

  17. Academically buoyant students are less anxious about and perform better in high-stakes examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, David W; Daly, Anthony L; Chamberlain, Suzanne; Sadreddini, Shireen

    2015-09-01

    Prior research has shown that test anxiety is negatively related to academic buoyancy, but it is not known whether test anxiety is an antecedent or outcome of academic buoyancy. Furthermore, it is not known whether academic buoyancy is related to performance on high-stakes examinations. To test a model specifying reciprocal relations between test anxiety and academic buoyancy and to establish whether academic buoyancy is related to examination performance. A total of 705 students in their final year of secondary education (Year 11). Self-report data for test anxiety and academic buoyancy were measured in two waves in Year 11. Examination performance was taken from the mean English, mathematics, and science scores from the high-stakes General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) examinations taken at the end of Year 11. Measurement invariance was demonstrated for test anxiety and academic buoyancy across both waves of measurement. The worry component of test anxiety, but not the tension component, showed reciprocal relations with academic buoyancy. Worry predicted lower mean GCSE score and academic buoyancy predicted a higher mean GCSE score. Tension did not predict mean GCSE score. Academic buoyancy protects against the appraisal of examinations as threatening by influencing self-regulative processes and enables better examination performance. Worry, but not tension, shows a negative feedback loop to academic buoyancy. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Role of gas vesicles and intra-colony spaces during the process of algal bloom formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongsheng; Zheng, Binghui; Jiang, Xia; Zheng, Hao

    2013-06-01

    Aggregation morphology, vertical distribution, and algal density were analyzed during the algal cell floating process in three environments. The role of gas vesicles and intra-colony spaces was distinguished by algal blooms treated with ultrasonic waves and high pressure. Results demonstrated that the two buoyancy providers jointly provide buoyancy for floating algal cells. The results were also confirmed by force analysis. In the simulation experiment, the buoyancy acting on algal cells was greater than its gravity at sample ports 2 and 3 of a columnar-cultivated cell vessel, and intra-colony spaces were not detected. In Taihu Lake, gas vesicle buoyancy was notably less than total algal cell gravity. Buoyancy provided by intra-colony spaces exceeded total algal cell gravity at the water surface, but not at other water depths. In the Daning River, total buoyancies provided by the two buoyancy providers were less than total algal cell gravity at different water depths.

  19. Technical Feasibility of Loitering Lighter-Than-Air Near-Space Maneuvering Vehicles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moomey, Eric R

    2005-01-01

    .... Lighter-than-air maneuvering vehicles, or airships, using the principle of buoyancy can take advantage of this region to become potential platforms for precision navigation, environmental monitoring...

  20. 46 CFR 160.077-23 - Production tests and inspections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... selected must be complete, unless otherwise specified in paragraph (h) of this section. (3) Each adult test... retention Every device in the lot Buoyancy and inflation media retention 1 2 3 4 6 8 Tensile strength(4) 1 1... Air retention 1 1 2 2 3 4 Buoyancy and inflation media retention 1 1 2 2 3 4 Tensile strength 2 1 1 1...

  1. Episodic Alcohol Consumption by Youths

    OpenAIRE

    Pereverzev, Vladimir Alexeevich

    2015-01-01

    AbstractThis paper presents evidence that even rare episodic alcohol consumption by young people is not harmless. Unsafe rare episodic alcohol consumption by youths (students) was reflected in the reduced attention concentration and lower academic buoyancy, compared to those who completely abstain from alcohol. Key Words: Alcohol, youth, students, attention concentration, academic buoyancy 

  2. Episodic Alcohol Consumption by Youths

    OpenAIRE

    Pereverzev, Vladimir Alexeevich

    2014-01-01

    AbstractThis paper presents evidence that even rare episodic alcohol consumption by young people is not harmless. Unsafe rare episodic alcohol consumption by youths (students) was reflected in the reduced attention concentration and lower academic buoyancy, compared to those who completely abstain from alcohol. Key Words: Alcohol, youth, students, attention concentration, academic buoyancy 

  3. Some consequences of the subduction of young slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    England, P.; Wortel, R.

    The negative buoyancy force exerted by a subducting oceanic slab depends on its descent velocity, and strongly on its age. For lithosphere close to thermal equilibrium, this force dominates by a large margin the resisting forces arising from friction on the plate boundary and compositional buoyancy.

  4. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    owing to the increase in buoyancy force which disrupts the static equilibrium. Elementary Explanation. Consider a ... increases, it results in an increased density difference between the packet and the surroundings which ... In reality, when the fluid packet is displaced into cooler surroundings due to the buoyancy force, this ...

  5. Imperfections of the thermohaline circulation: latitudinal asymmetry and preferred northern sinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, H.A.; Neelin, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The present Atlantic thermohaline circulation is dominated by deep water formation in the north despite the fact that surface buoyancy forcing has relatively modest latitudinal asymmetry.Many studies have shown that even with buoyancy forcing that is symmetric about the equator,spontaneous

  6. Analysis of the effect of shrinkage on macrosegregation in alloy solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, Matthew John M.; Incropera, Frank P.

    1995-09-01

    Numerical calculations based on a continuum model are used to examine the effects of solidification shrinkage on the redistribution of solute in a Pb-19.2 pct Sn mixture which is convectively cooled at a sidewall. For each of three different cooling rates, separate calculations are performed for shrinkage and buoyancy-induced flows, as well as for the combined influence of shrinkage and buoyancy effects. The calculations reveal that flow and macrosegregation patterns are more strongly influenced by buoyancy effects over a wide range of solidification rates. Although extremely large solidification rates yield small regions near the chilled wall in which shrinkage-induced flows control the redis-tribution of solute, the overall effect on macrosegregation is small relative to that associated with buoyancy. Scaling analysis of the governing equations produces reference shrinkage and buoyancy velocities which can be used to extend the current numerical results to other binary systems.

  7. Sink fast and swim harder! Round-trip cost-of-transport for buoyant divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patrick J O; Biuw, Martin; Watanabe, Yuuki Y; Thompson, Dave; Fedak, Mike A

    2012-10-15

    Efficient locomotion between prey resources at depth and oxygen at the surface is crucial for breath-hold divers to maximize time spent in the foraging layer, and thereby net energy intake rates. The body density of divers, which changes with body condition, determines the apparent weight (buoyancy) of divers, which may affect round-trip cost-of-transport (COT) between the surface and depth. We evaluated alternative predictions from external-work and actuator-disc theory of how non-neutral buoyancy affects round-trip COT to depth, and the minimum COT speed for steady-state vertical transit. Not surprisingly, the models predict that one-way COT decreases (increases) when buoyancy aids (hinders) one-way transit. At extreme deviations from neutral buoyancy, gliding at terminal velocity is the minimum COT strategy in the direction aided by buoyancy. In the transit direction hindered by buoyancy, the external-work model predicted that minimum COT speeds would not change at greater deviations from neutral buoyancy, but minimum COT speeds were predicted to increase under the actuator disc model. As previously documented for grey seals, we found that vertical transit rates of 36 elephant seals increased in both directions as body density deviated from neutral buoyancy, indicating that actuator disc theory may more closely predict the power requirements of divers affected by gravity than an external work model. For both models, minor deviations from neutral buoyancy did not affect minimum COT speed or round-trip COT itself. However, at body-density extremes, both models predict that savings in the aided direction do not fully offset the increased COT imposed by the greater thrusting required in the hindered direction.

  8. Similarity and analytical solutions of free convective flow of dilatant nanofluid in a Darcian porous medium with multiple convective boundary conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uddin, M.J; Rostami, B; Rashid, M.M; Rostami, P

    ...–conduction, convection–diffusion, Lewis number, buoyancy ratio, and power-law) on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction, friction and heat transfer rates are plotted...

  9. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG101 during Iceland Faroe Ridge 12 November 06 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2006-11-12 to 2007-02-18 (NODC Accession 0117310)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  10. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG103 during Iceland Faroe Ridge November 2007 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2007-11-13 to 2008-02-12 (NODC Accession 0117352)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  11. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG016 during Iceland Faroe Ridge June 2009 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2009-06-05 to 2009-07-31 (NODC Accession 0117068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  12. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG101 during Iceland Scotland Ridge June 2007 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2007-06-09 to 2007-08-31 (NODC Accession 0117292)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  13. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG034 during Rapid-Mocha San Juan 28 January 2011 in the Caribbean Sea deployed from 2011-01-28 to 2011-02-16 (NCEI Accession 0162313)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  14. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG104 during Iceland-Scotland Ridge, 14 February 2008 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2008-02-14 to 2008-03-14 (NODC Accession 0117355)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  15. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG014 during Faroe Shetland Channel 14 Feb 2008 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2008-02-14 to 2008-02-28 (NODC Accession 0117041)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  16. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG033 during Rapid/Mocha San Juan 29 July 2010 in the Caribbean Sea deployed from 2010-07-29 to 2010-08-09 (NCEI Accession 0162304)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  17. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Washington Coast, 8 November 2006 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2006-11-09 to 2007-03-15 (NCEI Accession 0155980)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  18. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG038 during Bermuda / Hydrostation S / BATS 3 July 2015 in the NW Atlantic deployed from 2015-07-03 to 2015-11-13 (NCEI Accession 0162343)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  19. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG016 during Labrador Sea, April 2005 in the Labrador Sea deployed from 2005-04-06 to 2006-01-01 (NODC Accession 0111845)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  20. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG036 during Bermuda / Hydrostation S / BATS 3 July 2015 in the NW Atlantic deployed from 2015-07-03 to 2015-10-09 (NCEI Accession 0162331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  1. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG015 during Labrador Sea September 2004 in the Labrador Sea deployed from 2004-09-24 to 2005-03-31 (NODC Accession 0111844)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  2. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Iceland Scotland Ridge June 2008 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2008-06-06 to 2008-08-29 (NODC Accession 0117036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  3. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG189 during Cuddy Survey in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2014-01-16 to 2014-04-27 (NCEI Accession 0162344)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  4. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG030 during Cascadia 17 January 2008 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2008-01-17 to 2008-01-22 (NCEI Accession 0156178)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  5. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during WA Coast June 2005 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2005-06-08 to 2005-11-16 (NCEI Accession 0155972)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  6. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG035 during Bermuda / Hydrostation S / BATS 20 March 2014 in the NW Atlantic deployed from 2014-03-20 to 2014-06-17 (NCEI Accession 0162366)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  7. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Iceland-Scotland Ridge Aug 2009 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2009-08-29 to 2009-11-07 (NODC Accession 0117039)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  8. 77 FR 73434 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... to their buoyancy. The model outputs high-resolution air gun pressure signatures for each air gun... be equivalent to a single pulse with a received level of approximately 181 to 186 dB re 1 Pa (rms...

  9. Formulation and evaluation of oil entrapped gastroretentive floating gel beads of loratadine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mishra, Shashi Kiran; Pathak, Kamla

    2008-01-01

    ... (pectin/sodium alginate) by mass, 15% (m/V) of oil (mineral oil or castor oil) and 0.45 mol L-1 calcium chloride solution as the optimized processing conditions for the desired buoyancy and physical stability...

  10. Time-dependent stratification in the Gauthami-Godavari Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, T.V.N.

    and least around the high water slacks. The formation of stratification relaxes viscous constraints and a buoyancy circulation rapidly develops. The breakdown of stratification drastically modifies the circulation and largely removes the vertical shear...

  11. Interannual variability of the tropical Indian Ocean mixed layer depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Keerthi, M.G.; Lengaigne, M.; Vialard, J.; Montegut, C.deB.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    MLD deepening in the southern Arabian Sea in summer. Finally, positive Indian Ocean Subtropical Dipoles are associated with a MLD deepening between 15 and 30 degrees S. Buoyancy fluxes generally appear to dominate MLD interannual variations except...

  12. Effect of wind turbine on TLP flating platform response

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chodnekar, Y.P.; Mandal, S.; Rao, K.B.

    ). The metacentric height improves drastically after adding weight to concrete ballast. Higher reserve buoyancy helps reduce surge, sway, roll and yaw. The direction of the incident wave and wind does not affect heave response and remains same when incident wave...

  13. Seasonal mixed layer heat balance of the southwestern tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Foltz, G.R.; Vialard, J.; PraveenKumar, B.; McPhaden, M.J.

    the remainder of the year. Vertical turbulent mixing, estimated as a residual in the heat balance, also undergoes a significant seasonal cycle. Cooling from this term is strongest in boreal summer, when surface wind and buoyancy forcing are strongest...

  14. Spectra of currents and temperature off Godavari (east coast of India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, M.S.S; Rao, L.V.G.

    Time series data of currents and temperature obtained from a mooring of current meters off Godavari (East Coast of India) during September 1980 are analysed to study the space scales of semidiurnal and internal oscillations in the range of buoyancy...

  15. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG011 during Gulf of Alaska 30 Dec 2004 in the Gulf of Alaska deployed from 2004-12-30 to 2005-02-02 (NCEI Accession 0162284)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  16. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG012 during WA Coast November 2005 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2005-11-16 to 2006-03-04 (NCEI Accession 0156521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  17. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG103 during Iceland Scotland Ridge February 2007 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2007-02-18 to 2007-06-09 (NODC Accession 0117336)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  18. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG102 during Iceland Faroe Ridge 12 November 06 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2006-11-12 to 2007-02-17 (NODC Accession 0117323)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  19. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG020 during Hawaii Ocean Timeseries May 2005 in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii deployed from 2005-05-22 to 2005-07-25 (NCEI Accession 0162288)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  20. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG103 during Faroes Feb 09 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2009-02-23 to 2009-06-05 (NODC Accession 0117349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  1. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG030 during Washington Coast 8 November 2006 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2006-11-09 to 2006-12-17 (NCEI Accession 0156188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  2. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG012 during Washington Coast, December 2004 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2004-12-23 to 2005-01-25 (NCEI Accession 0156003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  3. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG021 during HOT August 2005 in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii deployed from 2005-08-15 to 2005-11-13 (NCEI Accession 0162289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  4. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG030 during Cascadia September 2008 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2008-09-15 to 2008-09-19 (NCEI Accession 0156193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  5. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG004 during Labrador Sea, October 2003 in the Labrador Sea deployed from 2003-10-02 to 2004-02-10 (NODC Accession 0112863)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  6. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG014 during Labrador Sea September 2004 in the Labrador Sea deployed from 2004-09-24 to 2005-04-29 (NODC Accession 0111843)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  7. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG101 during WA Coast, April 2008 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2008-04-01 to 2008-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0156172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  8. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG008 during Labrador Sea, October 2003 in the Labrador Sea deployed from 2003-10-02 to 2004-01-29 (NODC Accession 0111841)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  9. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG016 during Alaska Stream August 2004 in the Gulf of Alaska deployed from 2004-08-21 to 2004-12-30 (NCEI Accession 0162272)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  10. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Washington Coast, September 2002 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2002-09-11 to 2002-11-03 (NCEI Accession 0155983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  11. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG021 during Hawaii Ocean Timeseries, November 2004 in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii deployed from 2004-11-24 to 2004-12-02 (NCEI Accession 0162303)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  12. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Washington Coast, 10 September 2007 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2007-09-10 to 2008-01-17 (NCEI Accession 0155995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  13. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG014 during Washington Coast, 15 March 2007 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2007-03-15 to 2007-09-10 (NCEI Accession 0156140)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  14. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG016 during Faroe Shetland Channel, 12 November 2006 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2006-11-12 to 2006-12-06 (NODC Accession 0117074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  15. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG009 during Blying Sound, October 2002 in the Gulf of Alaska deployed from 2002-10-23 to 2002-11-23 (NCEI Accession 0162282)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  16. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG002 during Washington Coast, December 2004 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2004-12-23 to 2004-12-30 (NCEI Accession 0155944)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  17. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG144 during Ocean Station PAPA June 2008 in the North Pacific Ocean, Gulf of Alaska deployed from 2008-06-08 to 2008-08-30 (NCEI Accession 0155762)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  18. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Washington Coast August 2003 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2003-08-21 to 2004-01-20 (NCEI Accession 0155930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  19. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Washington Coast June 2004 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2004-06-24 to 2004-07-28 (NCEI Accession 0155971)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  20. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG119 during WA Coast September 2008 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2008-09-15 to 2009-01-07 (NCEI Accession 0156194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  1. Physical, chemical, and bio-optical data collected from Seaglider SG157 during IOOS OSU sampling on Trinidad Head Line in the North Pacific Ocean deployed from 2014-11-16 to 2015-03-09 (NODC Accession 0125046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  2. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG002 during Washington Coast, January 2004 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2004-01-20 to 2004-06-24 (NCEI Accession 0155959)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  3. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG033 during Rapid-Mocha San Juan 3 September 2010 in the Caribbean Sea deployed from 2010-09-03 to 2010-09-07 (NCEI Accession 0162305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  4. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Iceland Scotland Ridge November 2008 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2008-11-06 to 2009-02-23 (NODC Accession 0117038)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  5. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG101 during Faroes Nov08 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2008-11-08 to 2009-01-04 (NODC Accession 0117320)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  6. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG014 during Faroes Aug08 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2008-08-29 to 2008-10-31 (NODC Accession 0117058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  7. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during WA Coast August 2004 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2004-08-30 to 2004-12-23 (NCEI Accession 0155941)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  8. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG014 during WA Coast April 2006 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2006-04-24 to 2006-11-09 (NCEI Accession 0156076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  9. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG010 during Alaska Stream November 03 in the Gulf of Alaska deployed from 2003-11-05 to 2003-12-23 (NCEI Accession 0162273)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  10. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG005 during Washington Coast, February 2003 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2003-02-08 to 2003-02-12 (NCEI Accession 0155963)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  11. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG012 during Washington Coast, launched 07 February 2005 in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2005-02-07 to 2005-06-08 (NCEI Accession 0156075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  12. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG011 during Gulf of Alaska in the Gulf of Alaska deployed from 2004-03-17 to 2004-08-21 (NCEI Accession 0162287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  13. CLIVAR Mode Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE), Fall 2006 R/V Oceanus Voyage 434, November 16, 2006-December 3, 2006

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bigorre, Sebastien; Weller, Robert; Lord, Jeff; Lund, John; Palter, Jaime; Tupper, George

    2007-01-01

    ... and dissipation of North Atlantic subtropical mode water also called Eighteen Degree Water (EDW). Among these processes, the amount of buoyancy loss at the ocean-atmosphere interface is still uncertain and needs to be accurately quantified...

  14. Measurements of laminar mixed convection flow adjacent to an inclined surface with uniform wall heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Mulaweh, H.I. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Purdue University at Fort Wayne, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., 46805, Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of laminar mixed convection flow adjacent to an inclined heated flat plate with uniform wall heat flux are reported. Laser-doppler velocimeter and cold wire anemometer were used to measure simultaneously the velocity and temperature distributions, respectively. Measurements of the air velocity and temperature distributions are presented for a range of buoyancy parameters 0{<=}{xi}{<=}2.91. It was found that both the mixed convection local Nusselt number and local friction coefficient increase as the buoyancy force increases (under the buoyancy assisting condition). The velocity field was found to be more sensitive to the buoyancy force than the thermal field. Predictions from both local similarity and local non-similarity models agree well with the experimental results for the thermal field, but only the predictions from the local non-similarity model agree favorably with the measured values for the flow field. (authors)

  15. Factors contributing to the resilience of middle-adolescents in a South African township : insights from a resilience questionnaire

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mampane, Motlalepule Ruth

    2014-01-01

    .... Respondents attributed their buoyancy to individual and environmental factors, such as self-confidence, an internal locus of control, a tough personality, commitment, being achievement-oriented, as well as positive identification of and access to social support.

  16. Documentation for University of Washington Seaglider records archived at NODC (NODC Accession 0092291)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seagliders are small (1.8m hull), reusable, long-range, and buoyancy-driven autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) designed to glide from the ocean surface to as deep...

  17. The sensitivity of primary productivity to intra-seasonal mixed layer variability in the sub-Antarctic Zone of the Atlantic Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Joubert, WR

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal cycle of primary productivity is impacted by seasonal and intra-seasonal dynamics of the mixed layer through the changing balance between mixing and buoyancy forcing, which regulates nutrient supply and light availability. Of particular...

  18. A Multipurpose Experiment with an Electronic Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganci, S.

    2008-01-01

    This short article describes some useful and quick applications of a cooking electronic balance. Newton's third law, Archimedes buoyancy and an estimate of relative density are accomplished in a very simple way. (Contains 1 figure.)

  19. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG195 during Cuddy Survey in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2013-10-25 to 2014-02-22 (NCEI Accession 0162357)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  20. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG144 during Ocean Station PAPA June 2009 in the North Pacific Ocean, Gulf of Alaska deployed from 2009-06-14 to 2010-04-02 (NCEI Accession 0155879)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  1. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG021 during Hawaii Ocean Timeseries, February 2005 in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii deployed from 2005-02-16 to 2005-05-22 (NCEI Accession 0162292)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  2. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG102 during Iceland Faroe Ridge November 2007 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2007-11-13 to 2008-02-13 (NODC Accession 0117333)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  3. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG104 during Iceland Scotland Ridge, 31 August 2007 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2007-09-01 to 2007-11-13 (NODC Accession 0117368)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  4. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG037 during Bermuda / Hydrostation S / BATS 23 August 2015 in the NW Atlantic deployed from 2015-08-28 to 2016-02-06 (NCEI Accession 0162332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  5. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG120 during Ocean Station PAPA August 2008 in the North Pacific Ocean, Gulf of Alaska deployed from 2008-08-30 to 2009-06-04 (NCEI Accession 0155598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  6. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG194 during Cuddy Survey in the North Pacific Ocean, Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon deployed from 2013-10-25 to 2014-05-10 (NCEI Accession 0162349)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  7. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG035 during Bermuda / Hydrostation S / BATS 30 January 2015 in the NW Atlantic deployed from 2015-01-30 to 2015-11-05 (NCEI Accession 0162319)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  8. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG016 during Iceland Scotland Ridge June 2008 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2008-06-07 to 2008-08-29 (NODC Accession 0117062)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  9. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG012 during Iceland Scotland Ridge, 31 August 2007 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2007-08-31 to 2007-10-04 (NODC Accession 0117040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  10. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG016 during Iceland Faroes Ridge November 2007 in the North Atlantic Ocean deployed from 2007-11-13 to 2008-02-14 (NODC Accession 0117290)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  11. Physical data collected from Seaglider SG033 during Rapid/Mocha San Juan 27 May 2010 in the Caribbean Sea deployed from 2010-05-18 to 2010-05-26 (NCEI Accession 0162306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider is a buoyancy driven autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) developed by scientists and engineers at the University of Washington's School of Oceanography and...

  12. Building Policy Research Capacity for Rural Governance and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    They will endeavor to determine whether decentralization increases fiscal buoyancy, reduces systemic inequalities, empowers women and other disadvantaged groups, and positively impacts affirmative action. They will determine whether service delivery through decentralized forms of government is relatively more ...

  13. 46 CFR 160.010-3 - Inflatable buoyant apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the buoyancy tubes are not vivid reddish orange, vivid yellow, or a fluorescent color of a similar hue... temperature of −18 °C (0 °F). (b) Production inspections and tests. Production inspections and tests for...

  14. On the Stability Criterion in a Saturated Atmosphere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richiardone, R; Giusti, F

    2001-01-01

      The expression of the moist buoyancy frequency indicated that it is not completely correct ot use the moist adiabatic lapse rate as a static stability parameter of a saturated atmosphere, because...

  15. Role of the TGF‐β pathway in dedifferentiation of human mature adipocytes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Côté, Julie Anne; Lessard, Julie; Pelletier, Mélissa; Marceau, Simon; Lescelleur, Odette; Fradette, Julie; Tchernof, André

    2017-01-01

    .... Adipocytes can dedifferentiate into precursor cells to acquire a fibroblast‐like phenotype using ceiling culture, in which the buoyancy of fat cells is exploited to allow them to adhere to the inner surface of a container...

  16. 76 FR 20721 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... simulated dives in pressure chambers or on buoyancy-swim speed calculations during dives at sea. Therefore... evaluation and interpretation off data obtained with indirect techniques at sea for the three species. This...

  17. 76 FR 20721 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... simulated dives in pressure chambers or on buoyancy-swim speed calculations during dives at sea. Therefore... evaluation and interpretation of data obtained with indirect techniques at sea for the three species. This is...

  18. Transient natural convection heat and mass transfer in a rectangular enclosure - A numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Samuel S.; Schafer, Charles F.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient heat and solute transport across a rectangular cavity with combined horizontal temperature and concentration gradients is performed by a numerical method based on the SIMPLE. Numerical results show that the average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers both decrease markedly when the solutal and thermal buoyancy forces act in the opposite directions. When the solutal and thermal buoyancy forces act in the same directions, however, the average Sherwood number increases significantly and yet the average Nusselt number decreases slightly.

  19. Locating Noctiluca miliaris in the Arabian Sea: An optical proxy approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thibodeau, P.S.; Roesler, C.S.; Drapeau, S.L.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Goes, J.I.; Werdell, P.J.

    vertical migrator, N. miliaris is highly buoyant because of its ability to secrete ammonia into the cytoplasm and maintain positive buoyancy (Furuya et al. 2006; Lirdwitayaprasit et al. 2012). Despite being relatively immobile, N. miliaris intercepts its... food through passive migration (Kahn and Swift 1978). The high buoyancy often causes N. miliaris blooms to accumulate at the surface, forming noticeably discolored waters (Kiørboe and Titelman 1998). N. miliaris is able to tolerate moderate fluctuations...

  20. Mechanical design and development aspects of a small AUV - Maya

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhan, R.; Desa, E.S.; Prabhudesai, S.; Sebastiao, L.; Pascoal, A.; Desa, E.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Maurya, P.; Navelkar, G.S.; Afzulpurkar, S.; Khalap, S.

    buoyancy changes arising from entrapped air between the spaces of the multiple pressure units, more interconnecting cables, more power consumption, and multiple pressure seals. After considering several hybrid variants, it was decided that a... connectors could be mounted for connecting to external science sensors, DC motor and communications antennae (GPS & RF). This simple approach offers built-in safety, provides a large buoyancy contribution from the hull volume, reduces cabling...

  1. Investigation of temperature- and pressure effects on drilling fluid properties and related downhole torque and drag calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Tveiterå, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering Increasing temperature and pressure with depth, affects the properties of drilling fluid. The effect of temperature and pressure on the density and viscosity of drilling fluid is of great importance. This is because, among several reasons, it affects the calculation of downhole pressure and the buoyancy factor for the well. Correct pressure estimation, could pose a great concern regarding well integrity. The buoyancy factor would affect the effectiv...

  2. The minimum air volume kept in diving Adelie penguins : evidence for regulation of air volume in the respiratory system

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Katsufumi; Watanuki, Yutaka; Naito, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Penguins are outstanding divers. Particularly intriguing is the observation that they seem to dive on inspiration, which contributes to increasing oxygen stores but which increases their buoyancy. It has been concluded that buoyancy is a major factor in determining the energetics of shallow diving birds and there is a positive correlation between estimated air volume in the body (respiratory system and feathers) and the maximum depth in the dive of free-ranging penguins. However, it is not kn...

  3. The effects of flow multiplicity on GaN deposition in a rotating disk CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkinis, P. A.; Aviziotis, I. G.; Koronaki, E. D.; Gakis, G. P.; Boudouvis, A. G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of gas flow multiplicity, i.e. the possibility of two very different flow regimes prevailing at random in a rotating disk metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactor, on the deposited GaN film is investigated. A transport model coupled with a system of chemical reactions in the gas phase and on the wafer where the film is formed, is implemented in the parameter regions where multiple flows are possible. In the region of multiplicity where either plug flow, imposed by forced convection, or buoyancy-dominated flow is possible, the results in the latter case indicate high deposition rate and decreased uniformity. In the former case, increasing the pressure and the rotation rate has a favorable effect on the deposition rate without sacrificing uniformity. In the parameter window of multiplicity where either rotation or combined rotation/buoyancy may prevail, the effects of buoyancy lead to higher deposition rate at the center of the wafer and reduced uniformity. The Arrhenius plots in the regions of multiplicity for exactly the same operating conditions reveal that the system operates in a diffusion-limited regime in the plug flow and in the rotation-dominated flow, in the first and second region of multiplicity respectively. In contrast, in the buoyancy-dominated flow and the combined rotation/buoyancy flow (first and second region of multiplicity respectively) the process shifts into the kinetics-limited regime.

  4. A numerical study of the Magellan Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Elbio D.; Matano, Ricardo P.

    2012-05-01

    In this modeling study we investigate the dynamical mechanisms controlling the spreading of the Magellan Plume, which is a low-salinity tongue that extends along the Patagonian Shelf. Our results indicate that the overall characteristics of the plume (width, depth, spreading rate, etc.) are primarily influenced by tidal forcing, which manifests through tidal mixing and tidal residual currents. Tidal forcing produces a homogenization of the plume's waters and an offshore displacement of its salinity front. The interaction between tidal and wind-forcing reinforces the downstream and upstream buoyancy transports of the plume. The influence of the Malvinas Current on the Magellan Plume is more dominant north of 50°S, where it increases the along-shelf velocities and generates intrusions of saltier waters from the outer shelf, thus causing a reduction of the downstream buoyancy transport. Our experiments also indicate that the northern limit of the Magellan Plume is set by a high salinity discharge from the San Matias Gulf. Sensitivity experiments show that increments of the wind stress cause a decrease of the downstream buoyancy transport and an increase of the upstream buoyancy transport. Variations of the magnitude of the discharge produce substantial modifications in the downstream penetration of the plume and buoyancy transport. The Magellan discharge generates a northeastward current in the middle shelf, a recirculation gyre south of the inlet and a region of weak currents father north.

  5. Gastroretentive extended release of metformin from methacrylamide-g-gellan and tamarind seed gum composite matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Rosy; Nandi, Gouranga; Changder, Abhijit; Chowdhury, Sailee; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Ghosh, Lakshmi Kanta

    2016-02-10

    Formulation of a gastroretentive extended release tablet of metformin based on polymethacrylamide-g-gellan (Pmaa-g-GG)-tamarind seed gum (TSG) composite matrix is the main purpose of this study. Tablets were prepared employing wet granulation method taking amount of Pmaa-g-GG, TSG and NaHCO3 (SBC, buoyancy contributor) as independent formulation variables. The tablets were then evaluated for in vitro drug release, buoyancy, ex vivo mucoadhesion, swelling and surface morphology. Compatibility between drug and excipients was checked by DSC, FTIR and XRD analysis. Buoyancy-lag-time, mucoadhesive strength, % drug release and release-rate constant were statistically analyzed using Design-Expert software (version 9.0.4.1) and the formulation was then numerically optimized to obtain USP-reference release profile. The optimized formulation showed excellent buoyancy over a 10h period with buoyancy lag time of 2.76min, significant mucoadhesion and drug release over a period of 10h with f2=71.58. Kinetic modeling unveiled anomalous non-Fickian transport based drug release mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Heat transfer in a smooth-walled reciprocating anti-gravity open thermosyphon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.W. [Thermal Fluids Laboratory, National Kaohsiung Institute of Marine Technology, Post code: 811, ROC, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Su, L.M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tung Fang Institute of Technology, ROC, Taiwan (China); Morris, W.D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wales Swansea, Singleton Park, SA28PP, Swansea (United Kingdom); Liou, T.M. [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, ROC, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes an experimental investigation of heat transfer in a smooth-walled reciprocating anti-gravity open thermosyphon with relevance to the 'shaker' cooling system for the pistons of marine propulsive diesel engines. A selection of experimental results illustrates the interactive effects of inertial, reciprocating and buoyancy forces on heat transfer. It is demonstrated that the gravitational and reciprocating buoyancy effects, respectively, improve heat transfer in the static and reciprocating anti-gravity open thermosyphon. The individual pulsating force effect impairs heat transfer in the axial region with 5 hydraulic diameter length measured from the entrance of thermosyphon (region I). In the vicinity of sealed end of reciprocating thermosyphon with one hydraulic diameter from the sealed surface (region II), the individual pulsating force effect improves heat transfer at low pulsating number range, over which range a subsequent heat transfer reduction in this axial region is followed. The synergistic effects of inertial force, reciprocating force and buoyancy interaction in the reciprocating anti-gravity open thermosyphon could, respectively, impede or improve the regional heat transfers in the axial regions I and II from the static references of zero-buoyancy. A set of empirical correlations, which is physically consistent, was developed that permits the individual and interactive effects of inertial, reciprocating and buoyancy forces on heat transfer to be evaluated. (authors)

  7. Investigation on the dynamic response and strength of very long floating structures by beam modeling on an elastic foundation; Dansei shishojo no hari model ni yoru chodai futai kozo no doteki tawami kyodo tokusei ni kansuru kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubogo, T.; Okada, H. [University of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-08-01

    A very large floating structure was replaced with the beam on an elastic foundation to examine the response characteristics in waves. Another evidence was regularly and numerically given for the basic characteristics of a very large floating body Suzuki found. New information was also obtained. The frequency response is mainly classified into a wave number control area and proper frequency control area when buoyancy elasticity exists. When the buoyancy structure is long and flexible, the proper frequency becomes continuous and the frequency control area becomes a resonance area. In the wave number control area, the Suzuki`s characteristic wave number becomes a control parameter, and various characteristic values are indicated by characteristic wave numbers. The response in the wave number control area becomes quasi-static when the distribution mass of buoyancy is fully small. The design in which the distribution mass of buoyancy is fully large must be avoided. In the displacement amplitude, the mass on the free end is severest. The proper frequency of vertical vibration relatively moves to the high-frequency side when buoyancy is considered as an elastic foundation. Attention must be thus paid to the proper frequency of vibration on the horizontal surface. 9 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A numerical study of transient heat and mass transfer in crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Samuel Bang-Moo

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient heat and solute transport across a rectangular cavity is performed. Five nonlinear partial differential equations which govern the conservation of mass, momentum, energy and solute concentration related to crystal growth in solution, are simultaneously integrated by a numerical method based on the SIMPLE algorithm. Numerical results showed that the flow, temperature and solute fields are dependent on thermal and solutal Grashoff number, Prandtl number, Schmidt number and aspect ratio. The average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers evaluated at the center of the cavity decrease markedly when the solutal buoyancy force acts in the opposite direction to the thermal buoyancy force. When the solutal and thermal buoyancy forces act in the same direction, however, Sherwood number increases significantly and yet Nusselt number decreases. Overall effects of convection on the crystal growth are seen to be an enhancement of growth rate as expected but with highly nonuniform spatial growth variations.

  9. Influence of Rayleigh-Bénard convection on electrokinetic instability in overlimiting current conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Valença, Joeri C.; Kurniawan, Aziz; Wagterveld, R. Martijn; Wood, Jeffery A.; Lammertink, Rob G. H.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the influence of buoyancy on electroconvection at an ion-exchange membrane in an aqueous electrolyte solution. Electrokinetic instabilities (EKIs) and Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection are both known to mix the appearing concentration gradient layer and overcome the limiting current arising from diffusional limitations. The different physics, as well as the interplay between them, are investigated by electrical, flow, and concentration characterization. In the buoyancy stable orientation, an EKI mixing layer, having a low concentration, grows till saturated size. In the buoyancy unstable orientation, RB occurs and dominates the advective transport due to the large system size. When current density i 5 ilim EKI starts before RB and hastens the onset of RB. Upon onset of RB, EKI is suppressed while the overall resistance is still decreased. The onset times of EKI and RB could be predicted using a simple diffusion-migration model based on Fick's second law.

  10. A Quantitative Investigation of Entrainment and Detrainment in Numerically Simulated Convective Clouds. Pt. 2; Simulations of Cumulonimbus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Deep cumulonimbus clouds are simulated using a model that makes accurate diagnoses of entrainment and detrainment rates and of the properties of entrained and detrained air. Clouds generated by a variety of initial thermodynamic soundings are compared. In the simulations, updraft entrainment rates are large near and above cloud base, through the entire depth of the conditionally unstable layer. Stronger updrafts in a more unstable environment are better able to entrain relatively undisturbed environmental air, while weaker updrafts can entrain only air that has been modified by the clouds. When the maximum buoyancy is large, the updraft includes parcels with a wide range of buoyancies, while weaker clouds are more horizontally uniform. Strong downdrafts originate from levels at which updrafts detrain, and their mass flux depends on the mass flux of the updraft. The magnitude of mixing between cloud and environment, not the entrainment rate, varies inversely with the cloud radius. How much of the mixed air is entrained depends on the buoyancy.

  11. Vertical structure of turbulence in offshore flow during RASEX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Edson, J.

    2001-01-01

    with height and downward transport of turbulence energy toward the surface. With flow of cool air over a warmer sea surface, a convective internal boundary layer develops downstream from the coast. An overlying relatively thick layer of downward buoyancy flux (virtual temperature flux) is sometimes maintained......-Sea Experiment. The characteristics of offshore flow are studied in terms of case studies and inter-variable relationships for the entire one-month data set. A turbulent kinetic energy budget is constructed for each case study. The buoyancy generation of turbulence is small compared to shear generation...... and dissipation. However, weakly stable and weakly unstable cases exhibit completely different vertical structure. With flow of warm air from land over cooler water, modest buoyancy destruction of turbulence and reduced shear generation of turbulence over the less rough sea surface cause the turbulence to rapidly...

  12. High-Speed Rainbow Schlieren Visualization of an Oscillating Helium Jet Undergoing Gravitational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leptuch, Peter A.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Rainbow schlieren deflectometry combined with high-speed digital imaging was used to study buoyancy effects on flow structure of a helium jet discharged vertically into air. The experimental data were taken using the 2.2-sec drop tower facility at the NASA John H. Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The test conditions pertained to jet Reynolds number of 490 and jet Richardson number of 0.11, for which buoyancy is often considered unimportant. Experimental results show global oscillations at a frequency of 27 Hz in Earth gravity. In microgravity, the jet oscillations vanished and the jet width increased. Results provide a direct physical evidence of the importance of buoyancy on the flow structure of low-density gas jets at a Richardson number considered too small to account for gravity.

  13. Chemical differentiation of a convecting planetary interior - Consequences for a one plate planet such as Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, E. M.; Hess, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    Simple models of the thermal and chemical evolution of a planetary interior are developed to explore the possible consequences of a chemically buoyant depleted mantle layer for planetary evolution. As the depleted layer thickens the melting temperature at the top of the underlying convecting mantle also increases and the degree of partial melting of the mantle added to the depleted layer decreases. As the less depleted mantle with less positive compositional buoyancy is added, the negative thermal buoyancy of the layer eventually exceeds its positive compositional buoyancy. The depleted layer then sinks into and mixes with the convecting interior. On Venus the population of impact craters is indistinguishable from a random distribution over the surface and gives a surface age of about 500 Myr. It is suggested that the above mechanism may explain this episodic global resurfacing of Venus.

  14. Arctic sea-ice decline weakens the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sévellec, Florian; Fedorov, Alexey V.; Liu, Wei

    2017-08-01

    The ongoing decline of Arctic sea ice exposes the ocean to anomalous surface heat and freshwater fluxes, resulting in positive buoyancy anomalies that can affect ocean circulation. In this study, we use an optimal flux perturbation framework and comprehensive climate model simulations to estimate the sensitivity of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) to such buoyancy forcing over the Arctic and globally, and more generally to sea-ice decline. It is found that on decadal timescales, flux anomalies over the subpolar North Atlantic have the largest impact on the AMOC, while on multi-decadal timescales (longer than 20 years), flux anomalies in the Arctic become more important. These positive buoyancy anomalies spread to the North Atlantic, weakening the AMOC and its poleward heat transport. Therefore, the Arctic sea-ice decline may explain the suggested slow-down of the AMOC and the `Warming Hole’ persisting in the subpolar North Atlantic.

  15. Numerical simulation and global linear stability analysis of low-Re flow past a heated circular cylinder

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-31

    We perform two-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes simulation and global linear stability analysis of flow past a heated circular cylinder to investigate the effect of aided buoyancy on the stabilization of the flow. The Reynolds number of the incoming flow is fixed at 100, and the Richardson number characterizing the buoyancy is varied from 0.00 (buoyancy-free case) to 0.10 at which the flow is still unsteady. We investigate the effect of aided buoyancy in stabilizing the wake flow, identify the temporal and spatial characteristics of the growth of the perturbation, and quantify the contributions from various terms comprising the perturbed kinetic energy budget. Numerical results reveal that the increasing Ri decreases the fluctuation magnitude of the characteristic quantities monotonically, and the momentum deficit in the wake flow decays rapidly so that the flow velocity recovers to that of the free-stream; the strain on the wake flow is reduced in the region where the perturbation is the most greatly amplified. Global stability analysis shows that the temporal growth rate of the perturbation decreases monotonically with Ri, reflecting the stabilization of the flow due to aided buoyancy. The perturbation grows most significantly in the free shear layer separated from the cylinder. As Ri increases, the location of maximum perturbation growth moves closer to the cylinder and the perturbation decays more rapidly in the far wake. The introduction of the aided buoyancy alters the base flow, and destabilizes the near wake shear layer mainly through the strain-induced transfer term and the pressure term of the perturbed kinetic energy, whereas the flow is stabilized in the far wake as the strain is alleviated. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Buoyant subduction on Venus: Implications for subduction around coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Potentially low lithospheric densities, caused by high Venus surface and perhaps mantle temperatures, could inhibit the development of negative buoyancy-driven subduction and a global system of plate tectonics/crustal recycling on that planet. No evidence for a global plate tectonic system was found so far, however, specific features strongly resembling terrestrial subduction zones in planform and topographic cross-section were described, including trenches around large coronae and chasmata in eastern Aphrodite Terra. The cause for the absence, or an altered expression, of plate tectonics on Venus remains to be found. Slab buoyancy may play a role in this difference, with higher lithospheric temperatures and a tendency toward positive buoyancy acting to oppose the descent of slabs and favoring under thrusting instead. The effect of slab buoyancy on subduction was explored and the conditions which would lead to under thrusting versus those allowing the formation of trenches and self-perpetuating subduction were defined. Applying a finite element code to assess the effects of buoyant forces on slabs subducting into a viscous mantle, it was found that mantle flow induced by horizontal motion of the convergent lithosphere greatly influences subduction angle, while buoyancy forces produce a lesser effect. Induced mantle flow tends to decrease subduction angle to near an under thrusting position when the subducting lithosphere converges on a stationary overriding lithosphere. When the overriding lithosphere is in motion, as in the case of an expanding corona, subduction angles are expected to increase. An initial stage involved estimating the changes in slab buoyancy due to slab healing and pressurization over the course of subduction. Modeling a slab, descending at a fixed angle and heated by conduction, radioactivity, and the heat released in phase changes, slab material density changes due to changing temperature, phase, and pressure were derived.

  17. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis in perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    Buoyancy alters the flow in continuous flow electrophoresis chambers through the mechanism of hydrodynamic instability and, when the instability is supressed by careful cooling of the chamber boundaries, by restructuring the axial flow. The expanded roles of buoyancy follow upon adapting the size of the chamber and the electric field so as to fractionate certain sorts of cell populations. Scale-up problems, hydrodynamic stability and the altered flow fields are discussed to show how phenomena overlooked in the design and operations of narrow-gap devices take on an overwhelming importance in wide-gap chambers

  18. Sea level changes induced by local winds on the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mehra, P.; Tsimplis, M.N.; Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A.; Shaw, A.G.P.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Cipollini, P.

    s -1 ; one expects η=0.013 W in meters in this region. 8 3.3 Local Surface Buoyancy Forcing The residuals have significant variations because of the seasonal character of oceanic surface buoyancy fluxes (heat and freshwater flux). The time... and Niiler P P (1973) The theory of the seasonal variability in the ocean. Deep Sea Res 20: 141–177. Hasternrath S and Lamb P J (1979) Climate atlas of the Indian Ocean. Part I: surface climate and atmospheric circulation. Wisconsin University Press...

  19. Observed internal tides and near-inertial waves on the continental shelf and slope off Jaigarh, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subeesh, M.P.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    derived and ship acoustic sounding bathymetry (ftp://edcsgs9.cr.usgs.gov/pub/data/srtm/SRTM30). The buoyancy frequencies across the shelf-slope were calculated from the 13 CTD observations available in April (Fig. 11a). The 13 CTD data were averaged...- cies ranging from the buoyancy frequency (N = (g/ρ0)δρ/δz; where ρ is the density and g is the acceleration due to gravity) to Coriolis frequency (f = 2ωsinφ; where φ is the latitude and ω is the angular frequency of rotation of the earth). The internal...

  20. Vertical propagation of baroclinic Kelvin waves along the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nethery, D.; Shankar, D.

    ; monsoon current; equatorial oceanography; remote forcing; modelling; monsoons; oceanography. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 116, No. 4, August 2007, pp. 331?339 ? Printed in India. 331 332 D Nethery and D Shankar Figure 1. The stability or buoyancy frequency squared... approximation is assumed and the equations of motion are linearised about a background stable density profile rhob(z) with asso- ciated buoyancy or Brunt-V? ? a frequency Nb(z) (figure 1, left and centre). The background density profile is chosen to resemble...

  1. A multi-sensor autonomous platform for fast ocean observation studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Afzulpurkar, S.; Navelkar, G.S.; Desa, E.; Madhan, R.; Dabholkar, N.A.; Prabhudesai, S.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Maurya, P.

    the center of gravity (CG) and center of buoyancy (CB) ensuring that the profiler body is always vertical in water. This has been achieved by placing the heavy batteries and other subsystems in the lower half while the lighter electronics and system... sensors are placed in the top half. A net buoyancy is built in the design that makes AVP to float up when no power is applied. Typically this is adjusted to about 400 gm and is sufficient for all operations for current configuration . Any changes need...

  2. Investigation of the generation and propagation of low frequency internal waves: A case study for the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, A.D.; Babu, S.V.; Prasad, K.V.S.R.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sadhuram, Y.; Mahapatra, D.K.

    position, and therefore internal waves have periods much longer than surface gravity waves. Internal waves have periods between the inertial period (2g83/f, where f is the Coriolis parameter) and the local buoyancy period (2g83/N, where N is the buoyancy... from a stationary ship (La Fond and Rao, 1954). The presence of internal waves off Hooghly-Brahmaputra delta and in the eastern Andaman Sea during April 1963 from observations was reported earlier (La Fond and La Fond, 1968). Till 1980, most...

  3. Vertical distribution of pelagic fish eggs in relation to species, spawning behaviour and wind conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Solemdal, Per; Sundby, Svein

    1981-01-01

    1. The mean reduction of egg diameter from March to April is from 1.45 to 1.39 mm and 1.44 to 1.38 mm for artificially and naturally spawned eggs of Arcto-Norwegian cod, respectively. This means a reduction of volume of about 11%. 2. The neutral buoyancy of cod eggs ranges from 29.5-33.0°/oo salinity. Eggs of captive fish show a tendency of higher specific gravity. 3. The neutral buoyancy of the cod eggs is not correlated to egg size, but to the weight of the eggshell. 4. Computed as...

  4. Single-mode theory of diffusive layers in thermohaline convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, D. O.; Toomre, J.

    1982-01-01

    A two-layer configuration of thermohaline convection is studied, with the principal aim of explaining the observed independence of the buoyancy-flux ratio on the stability parameter when the latter is large. Temperature is destabilizing and salinity is stabilizing, so diffusive interfaces separate the convecting layers. The convection is treated in the single-mode approximation, with a prescribed horizontal planform and wavenumber. Surveys of numerical solutions are presented for a selection of Rayleigh numbers R, stability parameters lambda and horizontal wavenumbers. The solutions yield a buoyancy flux ratio chi that is insensitive to lambda, in accord with laboratory experiments. However chi increases with increasing R, in contradiction to laboratory observations.

  5. Numerical Analysis on the Calandria Tubes in the Moderator of a Heavy Water Reactor Using OpenFOAM and Other Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Se-Myong; Kim, Hyoung Tae

    2014-06-01

    CANDU, a prototype of heavy water reactor is modeled for the moderator system with porous media buoyancy-effect heat-transfer turbulence model. OpenFOAM, a set of C++ classes and libraries developed under the object-oriented concept, is selected as the tool of numerical analysis. The result from this computational code is compared with experiments and other commercial code data through ANSYS-CFX and COMSOL Multi-physics. The three-dimensional code concerning buoyancy force, turbulence, and heat transfer is tested and shown to be successful for the analysis of thermo-hydraulic system of heavy water reactors.

  6. Stagnation-Point Flow towards a Stretching Vertical Sheet with Slip Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairy Zaimi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of partial slip on stagnation-point flow and heat transfer due to a stretching vertical sheet is investigated. Using a similarity transformation, the governing partial differential equations are reduced into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The resulting equations are solved numerically using a shooting method. The effect of slip and buoyancy parameters on the velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient and the local Nusselt number are graphically presented and discussed. It is found that dual solutions exist in a certain range of slip and buoyancy parameters. The skin friction coefficient decreases while the Nusselt number increases as the slip parameter increases.

  7. Analysis and Optimation Hydrofoil Supported Catamaran (HYSUCAT Size 25 Meter based on CFD Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Prastowo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the field of transportation, ship is relatively cheap then others transportation. However, the ship still has constraints on speed and fuel consumption. Therefore, the ship has many variations of shape to achieve optimal condition. For example the body of ships with double hulls (catamaran or three (trimaran, that using foil to make ship can have a smaller resistance to achieve optimal efficiency. The purpose of this research in order to plan the maximum foil shape which can produce high force of buoyance on the catamaran boat (25 meters and also to determine the type of hydrofoil that produces maximum buoyance force using CFD method.

  8. A numerical study on the influence of slope and curvature on smoke flow in special section tunnel with natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhou; Zhou, Xianping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Ya; Liu, Wanfu; Hong, Li

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a special section tunnel model was established by using FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator). The influences of lope and curvature on smoke flow under natural ventilation have been studied. The results showed that under the condition of natural ventilation, the slope has some influences on the smoke flow in special section tunnel. The smoke spreading speed is accelerated along the upstream direction and decrease along the downstream direction due to buoyancy effect of slope. The steeper the tunnel, the more obvious the buoyancy effect. The curvature has little effect on the flow of flue gas.

  9. Controllable Buoys and Networked Buoy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, Faranak (Inventor); Davoudi, Farhooman (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Buoyant sensor networks are described, comprising floating buoys with sensors and energy harvesting capabilities. The buoys can control their buoyancy and motion, and can organize communication in a distributed fashion. Some buoys may have tethered underwater vehicles with a smart spooling system that allows the vehicles to dive deep underwater while remaining in communication and connection with the buoys.

  10. Doppler Sonar Observations of the Kuroshio in ASIAEX 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-30

    Figure 2.Depth-time maps of cross-shelf vertical shear for the 30-h yoyo station. a) Cross-shelf shear fluctuations, normalized by the buoyancy...the top panel (arrow shows yoyo station). (c) The effective inertial frequency as a function of depth and cross-shelf distance. The temperature

  11. Series

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    benefit analysis favours this slight negative buoyancy. Calculating a Péclet number casts serious doubt on this view, doubt first raised (with an equivalent argument) by. Munk and Riley (1952). For a diatom about 10 µm in diameter, that sinking rate ...

  12. African Journal of Science and Technology (AJST) ALTERNATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NORBERT OPIYO AKECH

    The mass and energy conservation equations were solved to determine ... efficiency. Fiebig et al. (1988) showed that when the annulus was oriented vertically, as a result of the buoyancy effect, the deposition efficiency tended to increase for a smaller ratio of inner to outer tube ... automobile exhaust pipes. Therefore, it is ...

  13. Concentration waves in dilute bubble/liquid mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijngaarden, L.; van Wijngaarden, L.; Kapteyn, C.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we consider a uniform gas bubble-liquid mixture rising under buoyancy. When the gas volume flux is decreased, while keeping bubble size constant, a smooth transition is formed between the region of lower concentration by volume and the region of initial concentration. This transition

  14. Some Recent Developments in Solar Dynamo Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We discuss the current status of solar dynamo theory and describe the dynamo model developed by our group. The toroidal magnetic field is generated in the tachocline by the strong differential rotation and rises to the solar surface due to magnetic buoyancy to create active regions. The decay of these ...

  15. Formulation of Fast-Release Gastroretentive Solid Dispersion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further aging studies were carried out for the samples. Results: PXRD showed that glibenclamide was present in SD in an amorphous form while FTIR spectroscopy revealed the presence of hydrogen bonding in the SDs. In vitro buoyancy was found for 11 h and there was improvement in solubility and dissolution rate for ...

  16. From inflation to flotation: contribution of the swimbladder to whole-body density and swimming depth during development of the zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Benjamin W; Smith, Frank M; Croll, Roger P

    2010-03-01

    Teleost fishes have body tissues that are denser than water, causing them to sink. Many teleosts therefore possess a gas-filled swimbladder that provides lift, allowing fish to attain neutral buoyancy. The importance of the swimbladder as a buoyancy aid during changing body sizes over ontogeny and its role in determining the swimming depth of fish remain unclear. In this study, we have used the zebrafish (Danio rerio) to investigate changes in the size and shape of the swimbladder during development and examine whether these changes affect the hydrostatic contribution of the swimbladder during swimming. Our results showed that swim-up behavior is critical for larvae to first inflate their swimbladder, decrease body density, and attain neutral buoyancy. Following inflation, we found a strong linear correlation between fish volume and swimbladder volume over ontogeny. This trend was supported by measures of the density of zebrafish, which was conserved within a narrow range between 1.00 +/- 0.001 and 0.996 +/- 0.001 g/cm(3) despite an increase in the swimming depth of zebrafish, which occurred upon transition to a double-chambered organ. Finally, we demonstrated that the contribution of the swimbladder keeps the fish within 1.7% of neutral buoyancy throughout larval development.

  17. Probabilistic analysis of soil : Diaphragm wall friction used for value engineering of deep excavation, north/south metro Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buykx, S.M.; Delfgaauw, S.; Bosch, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The excavation of deep building pits often requires a check against failure by uplift of low permeability ground layers below excavation level. Whenever the weight of these soil layers is less than the pore-water pressure underneath, measures to resist buoyancy are to be considered. The measures

  18. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory a study on surface dispersion of buoyant plumes in open channel turbulence in made, where the buoyancy is due to both salinity and heat. The measured parameters are the downstream derivative of a plume width and height, which are integral-characteristics of the distributions of density...

  19. Fluid Statics and Archimedes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluid Statics and Archimedes. Jaywant H Arakeri C Dharuman. General Article Volume 11 Issue 10 October 2006 pp 28- ... Keywords. Fluid statics; buoyancy; stratification; instability. Author Affiliations. Jaywant H Arakeri1 C Dharuman1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 ...

  20. Deciphering the flow structure of Czochralski melt using Partially ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudeep Verma

    2018-02-05

    Feb 5, 2018 ... Abstract. Czochralski melt flow is an outcome of complex interactions of centrifugal, buoyancy, coriolis and surface tension forces, which act at different length and time scales. As a consequence, the characteristic flow structures that develop in the melt are delineated in terms of recirculating flow cells typical ...

  1. Quantifying the net slab pull force as a driving mechanism for plate tectonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2004-01-01

    It has remained unclear how much of the negative buoyancy force of the slab (FB) is used to pull the trailing plate at the surface into the mantle. Here I present three-dimensional laboratory experiments to quantify the net slab pull force (FNSP) with respect to FB during subduction. Results show

  2. Principles of Naval Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    Fundamentals of shipboard machinery, equipment, and engineering plants are presented in this text prepared for engineering officers. A general description is included of the development of naval ships, ship design and construction, stability and buoyancy, and damage and casualty control. Engineering theories are explained on the background of ship…

  3. Modelling the feasibility of retrofitting hydropower to existing South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Achieving the primary objective required an in-depth study of the theory and literature related to the current electricity situation in South Africa as well as .... ship is that the potential power output is directly proportional to the flow through the .... location, cavitation, buoyancy forces, water forces due to water striking the turbine ...

  4. Mixed convection flow and heat transfer in a vertical wavy channel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Buoyancy effects distort the velocity and temperature profiles relative to the forced convection case. This phenomenon is of ... temperatures and stability of the flow. Convective heat ... vaporization in combustion chambers, the finishing of painted walls and in reducing friction of drag on the hulls of ships and submarines.

  5. Simulation of marine boundary layer characteristics using a 1-D PBL ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The ship took its course from Paradip on 11th August to reach. Chennai on 31st August 1999. Three cases are marked based on the surface synoptic observa- ..... sible for various processes in the boundary layer such as entrainment, stability and effective trans- port of fluxes under low wind conditions (due to buoyancy).

  6. Intraseasonal variability of mixed layer depth in the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Keerthi, M.G.; Lengaigne, M.; Drushka, K.; Vialard, J.; de Boyer, M.C.; Pous, S.; Levy, M.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    of continental temperature anomalies from the northern end of the basin. In all the aforementioned regions, peak-to-peak MLD variations usually reach 10 m, but can exceed 20 m for the largest events. Buoyancy flux and wind stirring contribute to intraseasonal MLD...

  7. 46 CFR 160.171-17 - Approval testing for adult size immersion suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... if the oversize adult suit is of the same design as the adult suit except for extra material to... from the pool onto the liferaft using only the hands placed on top of the liferaft as an aid and... water, without the use of any auxiliary means of buoyancy, takes a deep breath, assumes a face-down...

  8. A review on rising bubble dynamics in viscosity-stratified fluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kirti Chandra Sahu

    found in various natural phenomena and industrial applications, including food processing, oil extraction, waste processing and biochemical ... The fluid dynamics of a gas bubble rising due to buoyancy in a surrounding liquid (as shown ..... sidered, such as power-law and Bingham plastic fluids,. 0. 2. 4. 6. 8. 10 t. 10. 11. 12.

  9. Reducing Test Anxiety among School-Aged Adolescents: A Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, Dave; Chamberlain, Suzanne; Daly, Anthony L.; Sadreddini, Shireen

    2014-01-01

    This paper evaluates the effectiveness of a multimodal and information technology (IT)-delivered intervention for test anxiety. Participants were randomly allocated to an intervention or waiting list group. Test anxiety was measured pre- and post-intervention and academic buoyancy, a construct that refers to students' capacity to withstand…

  10. Estimates of the temperature flux-temperature gradient relation above a sea floor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cimatoribus, A.; van Haren, H.

    2016-01-01

    The relation between the ux of temperature (or buoyancy), the verti-cal temperature gradient and the height above the bottom, is investigatedin an oceanographic context, using high-resolution temperature measure-ments. The model for the evolution of a strati?ed layer by Balmforthet al. (1998) is

  11. 46 CFR 160.048-4 - Construction and workmanship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... provide buoyancy to aid a person in keeping afloat in the water. No hooks, snaps, or other means shall be... finished edges. t = Thickness of boxing or gusset of finished cushion in inches. (d) Pad covers for buoyant... not less than 8 pounds when one inch strips cut across and perpendicular to the seams are pulled apart...

  12. The generation of MHD waves by forced turbulence in a weakly magnetized fluid. [in solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; Musielak, Z. E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the fluctuating buoyancy force on wave generation in a weakly magnetized plasma is considered. As expected, the efficiency of MHD wave generation is enhanced by including this force. However, it remains true that the observed variation of coronal emission at fixed spectral type cannot be accounted for by a wave generation process of the type discussed here.

  13. Convective mixing by internal waves in the Puerto Rico Trench

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haren, H.; Gostiaux, L.

    2016-01-01

    A2.4 km long deep-sea mooringwas deployed for 14 months in the Puerto Rico Trench, the deepestpart of the Atlantic Ocean. Below its top buoyancy package, the mooring line held a 200 m long stringof high-resolution temperature sensors and a current meter. Over the instrumented range between6,004 and

  14. UNCONSTRAINED MELTING AND SOLIDIFICATION INSIDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... capsule), cylinder (shell and tube heat exchanger) and rectangular enclosure. Khodadadi and. Zhang [21] studied the effect of buoyancy-driven convection on constrained melting of PCM in a spherical container numerically. They showed the rate of melting at the top region of sphere is faster than at the ...

  15. On the levitation force in horizontal core-annular flow with a large viscosity ratio and small density ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Beerens, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of horizontal core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference between

  16. Evaluation of dietary soy sensitivity in snake river cutthroat trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchery-cultured cutthroat trout fed some commercially available rainbow trout feeds display slow growth and increased mortality. Feed characteristics such as buoyancy and texture alter feed acceptance in some fish species but their effects have not been adequately addressed in cutthroat trout. Th...

  17. Survival in Cold Waters: Staying Alive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    For the sur- vivor at sea additional buoyancy is required to take account of the following: weight of waterlogged clothing and footwear possible...Suits. Specification No. 19, Issue 1. 15 April 1991. • Air Standardization Coordination Committee. ASCC Standard 61/12 ( Methodology for Evaluation of

  18. Spatial structure of tidal and residual currents as observed over the shelf break in the Bay of Biscay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, F.P.A.; Maas, L.R.M.; Gerkema, T.

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical and laboratory models show that internal-wave energy in continuously stratified fluids propagates in the vertical plane, at an angle set by the wave, buoyancy and Coriolis frequencies. Repeated Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations on three transects, crossing the shelf edge,

  19. Behavior of a wave-driven buoyant surface jet on a coral reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdman, Liv; Hench, James L.; Fringer, Oliver; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2017-01-01

    A wave-driven surface buoyant jet exiting a coral reef was studied in order to quantify the amount of water re-entrained over the reef crest. Both moored observations and Lagrangian drifters were used to study the fate of the buoyant jet. To investigate in detail the effects of buoyancy and along-shore flow variations, we developed an idealized numerical model of the system. Consistent with previous work, the ratio of along-shore velocity to jet-velocity and the jet internal Froude number were found to be important determinants of the fate of the jet. In the absence of buoyancy, the entrainment of fluid at the reef crest, creates a significant amount of retention, keeping 60% of water in the reef system. However, when the jet is lighter than the ambient ocean-water, the net effect of buoyancy is to enhance the separation of the jet from shore, leading to a greater export of reef water. Matching observations, our modeling predicts that buoyancy limits retention to 30% of the jet flow for conditions existing on the Moorea reef. Overall, the combination of observations and modeling we present here shows that reef-ocean temperature gradients can play an important role in reef-ocean exchanges.

  20. Deep origin and hot melting of an Archaean orogenic peridotite massif in Norway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spengler, D.; Van Roermund, H.L.M.; Drury, M.R.; Ottolini, L.; Mason, P.R.D.; Davies, G.R.

    2006-01-01

    The buoyancy and strength of sub-continental lithospheric mantle is thought to protect the oldest continental crust (cratons) from destruction by plate tectonic processes. The exact origin of the lithosphere below cratons is controversial, but seems clearly to be a residue remaining after the

  1. Dynamic behaviour of a flexible membrane tsunami Barrier with Dyneema®

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; Marissen, R.; Bergsma, O.K.

    2016-01-01

    Proof-of-concept model tests on a novel self-deploying on-shore tsunami barrier were executed. The tsunami barrier consists of a membrane, floater and cables that are stored underground. Due to buoyancy the barrier self-deploys when struck by a tsunami. The membrane and cables consist of the strong,

  2. Magnetoconvection and the Solar Dynamo A. Nordlund1, S. Β. F ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    In summary it seems as if the "buoyancy dilemma" may have been solved, or, to put it differently, that it may have never existed; stratified convection is able to keep a toroidal flux system inside the convection zone while differential rotation is working on increasing its field strength. The effect is an unavoidable consequence ...

  3. Dispersion of Contaminants in Indoor Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    on the location of the contamination source and in practice also on the supplied air flow rate and the contaminant density. The results showed that it is important for the removal of contaminants in a room that the ventilation system is working in the same direction as the existing buoyancy forces....

  4. Enhancing Science Kits with the Driving Question Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, Jeff; Torres, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the driving question board (DQB), a visual organizer that supports inquiry-based instruction through the use of guiding questions. The DQB is a teaching aid designed to increase student engagement alongside science kits. Information is provided on its application to a lesson on buoyancy, highlighting how it improved…

  5. Parameter-free symmetry-preserving regularization modeling of a turbulent differentially heated cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trias, F.X.; Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Gorobets, A.; Soria, M.; Oliva, A.

    2010-01-01

    Since direct numerical simulations of buoyancy driven flows cannot be computed at high Rayleigh numbers, a dynamically less complex mathematical formulation is sought. In the quest for such a formulation, we consider regularizations (smooth approximations) of the non-linearity: the convective term

  6. Effects of energy release on near field flow structure of gas jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Gollahalli, Subramanyam R.; Griffin, Devon

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective is to understand how buoyancy affects the structure of the shear layer, the development of fluid dynamic instabilities, and formation of the coherent structures in the near-nozzle regions of gas jets. The secondary objectives are to study the role of buoyancy in lifting and reattachment process of diffusion flames, to evaluate the scaling behavior of diffusion flames, and to aid development and/or validation of theoretical models by providing quantitative data in the absence of buoyancy. Fast reacting hydrogen or hydrogen-inert fuels are used to isolate the effects of buoyancy on fluid dynamics without masking the flame behavior by soot and radiative heat transfer. This choice of fuel also permits an evaluation of simulating low gravity in low pressure ground experiments because the similarity constraints are relaxed for the fast reacting, nonsooting diffusion flames. The diagnostics consists primarily of a color schlieren system coupled with computer generated rainbow filters, video recording, and image analysis. The project involves (1) drop tower experiments, (2) ground experiments, and (3) theoretical analysis.

  7. The "Family Tree" of Air Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2011-01-01

    that all the known types of air distribution systems are interconnected in a “family tree”. The influence of supplied momentum flow versus buoyancy forces is discussed, and geometries for high ventilation effectiveness are indicated as well as geometries for fully mixed flow. The paper will also show...

  8. Plant dispersal in a lowland stream in relation to occurrence and three specific life-history traits of the species in the species pool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boedeltje, G; Bakker, JP; Bekker, RM; Van Groenendael, JM; Soesbergen, M

    2003-01-01

    1 The diversity and abundance of viable diaspores trapped at the downstream end of a 15-km lowland stream were quantified and related to five potentially predicting variables: species' occurrence in the species pool, distance to the nearest stand and the life-history traits seed buoyancy, seed

  9. 46 CFR 160.171-11 - Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance. 160.171-11 Section 160.171-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Immersion Suits § 160.171-11 Performance. (a) Buoyancy. Each...

  10. Rifabutin-loaded Floating Gellan Gum Beads: Effect of Calcium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To formulate rifabutin-loaded floating gel beads for stomach-specific release. Methods: Rifabutin-loaded floating gellan gum beads were prepared by ionotropic calcium-induced gelation in acidic medium. In-vitro buoyancy and drug release studies were performed using a USP dissolution apparatus type II in ...

  11. New Generation Strategic Submarine Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    FUNCTION C. Buoyancy (Cont’d) 6. Trim Priming Pomp * Provides the capability to remove air from the trim system piping, in order to insure a positive...resubmnerge. 001 The Diving Officer of the Watch shall cart pressure air will nat be used and the ship will degree to 5 degree up angle. cow The Chid of the

  12. land- and water-based exercises in rheumatoid arthritis patients: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrotherapy has been shown to increase muscle strength, increase joint range of motion, improve aerobic capacity, reduce pain and improve function. 12. The buoyancy of water and the ability to control its temperature make it favourable for patients with muscular and joint disease. Although most research conducted ...

  13. Think I t Over

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mecheng.iisc.ernet.in dharuman@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in. Keywords. Floating bodies, immersed bod- ies. Floating and ... for each problem with clear explanation will be published. QI. ... What is the buoyancy force on a block sitting at the bottom.

  14. The energetics of rotating wind-forced horizontal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskova, Varvara; White, Brian; Scotti, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    We present numerical results for rotating, wind-forced horizontal convection as a simple model for the Southern Ocean branch of the Meridional Overturning Circulation. The flow is driven by differential buoyancy forcing applied at the top surface, with cooling at one end (to represent the pole) and warming at the other (the equatorial region) and a zonally re-entrant channel to represent the Antarctic Circumpolar Current. Zonal wind forcing is applied with a similar pattern to the westerlies and with varying magnitude relative to the buoyancy forcing. The problem is solved numerically using a 3D DNS model based on a finite-volume solver for the Boussinesq Navier-Stokes equations with rotation. The overall dynamics, such as large-scale overturning, baroclinic eddying, turbulent mixing, and energy cascades are investigated using the local Available Potential Energy framework introduced in [Scotti and White, JFM, 2014]. We find that the magnitude and shape of the zonal wind stress profile are important to the spatial pattern of the overturning circulation. However, the essential circulation and the energetics in cases with wind are similar to the base case with buoyancy forcing alone, suggesting that surface APE generation by buoyancy forcing is dominant in setting the circulation. This research is part of the Blue Waters sustained-petascale computing project, supported by the NSF (awards OCI-0725070, ACI-1238993 and ACI-14-44747) and the state of Illinois.

  15. Page 1 26 K Muralidhar fundamental change in flow pattern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rates. The size of the jump can be expected to reduce for large aspect ratios since the enhancement in heat transfer described above is restricted to Small values of z. In the configuration of the vertical annulus described above, buoyancy aids mean flow and there is an increase in heat transfer rate from the heated wall over ...

  16. Tornado lift

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanchin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that one of the causes for tornado is Tornado Lift. At increasing vortex diameter its kinetic energy decreases to keep the moment of momentum constant. A kinetic energy gradient of such vortex is Tornado Lift. Evaluation shows that contribution of Tornado Lift in air lifting in a tornado is comparable to buoyancy according to the order of magnitude.

  17. Stability of the Atlantic overturning circulation: competition between Bering Strait freshwater flux and Agulhas heat and salt sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, W.; Ruijter, W.P.M. de; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    In this study we examine the role that is played by interocean fluxes of buoyancy in stabilizing the present-day overturning circulation of the Atlantic Ocean. A 2D model of the Atlantic overturning circulation is used, in which the interocean fluxes of heat and salt (via the Bering Strait, the

  18. The Weight of Iron and Feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendri, G.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the popular question concerning the difference in weight between 1 kg of iron and 1 kg of feathers, by taking into account the non-trivial aspect of the semantic interpretation of "weight" and the weighting procedure. The inclusion of air buoyancy makes the correct answer an interesting one. We describe and comment on the…

  19. Development and experimental verification of a model for an air jet penetrated by plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the fluid mechanics of a ventilation system formed by a momentum source and buoyancy sources. We investigate the interaction between plumes and a non-isothermal air jet for separate sources of buoyancy produced by the plume and the momentum of the air jet. The mathematical model represents the situation in which a plume rises from two heat sources causing buoyancy. The model is used to discuss the interactions involved. The effects of parameters such as the power of the source and the air-flow volume used in the mathematical-physical model are also discussed. An expression is deduced for the trajectory of the non-isothermal air jet penetrated by plumes. Experiments were also carried out to illustrate the effect on the flow of the air jet and to validate the theoretical work. The results show that the buoyancy source’s efforts to baffle the descent of the cold air have even been effective in reversing the direction of the trajectory. However, increasing the distance between the plumes can reduce the effect of the plumes on the jet curve. And it is apparent that when the velocity of the air supply increases, the interference caused by the plumes can be reduced.

  20. ρ µ κ ρ β ρ ρ ρ is

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    saturated porous medium heated from below is now regarded as a classical problem. But, buoyancy- ... a porous medium on the dependence of the Nusselt number on the Rayleigh number. However, in all these studies .... chosen in our case to be two dimensional waves in the horizontal plane),( yx . Each normal mode is.

  1. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The observations validated that observed propagation speed of the gust front was in close agreement with the calculated propagation speed by integrating the buoyancy term within the gust front depth. pp 177-185. Measurements of carbon dioxide and heat fluxes during monsoon-2011 season over rural site of India by ...

  2. Measuring the Coefficient of Restitution and More: A Simple Experiment to Promote Students' Critical Thinking and Autonomous Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Manuel Á.; González, Miguel Á.; Vegas, Jesús; Llamas, César

    2017-01-01

    A simple experiment on the determination of the coefficient of restitution of different materials is taken as the basis of an extendable work that can be done by students in an autonomous way. On the whole, the work described in this paper would involve concepts of kinematics, materials science, air drag and buoyancy, and would help students to…

  3. Atmospheric stability in CFD &NDASH; Representation of the diurnal cycle in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey

    ), for example the Coriolis force, buoyancy forces and heat transport, are mostly ignored in state-of-the-art CFD models. In order to decrease the uncertainty of wind resource assessment, especially in complex terrain, the effect of thermal stratification on the ABL should be included in such models. The present...

  4. Effect of viscous dissipation on mixed convection flow in a vertical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reference temperature of the external fluid is considered to be equal and different. The perturbation method which is valid for small values of perturbation parameter is used to find the combined effects of buoyancy forces and viscous dissipation. The limitation imposed on the perturbation parameter is relaxed by solving ...

  5. Tackling complex turbulent flows with transient RANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Hanjalic, K.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews some recent applications of the transient-Reynoldsaveraged Navier–Stokes (T-RANS) approach in simulating complex turbulent flows dominated by externally imposed body forces, primarily by thermal buoyancy and the Lorentz force. The T-RANS aims at numerical resolving unsteady

  6. THE MOVEMENT OF OIL UNDER NON-BREAKING WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combined effects of wave kinematics, turbulent diffusion, and buoyancy on the transport of oil droplets at sea were investigated in this work using random walk techniques in a Monte Carlo framework. Six hundred oil particles were placed at the water surface and tracked for 5...

  7. Theoretical and Numerical Study of Heat Transfer Deterioration in High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Palko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of the heat transfer deterioration (HTD phenomena is performed using the low-Re k-ω turbulence model. Steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved together with equations for the transport of enthalpy and turbulence. Equations are solved for the supercritical water flow at different pressures, using water properties from the standard IAPWS (International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam tables. All cases are extensively validated against experimental data. The influence of buoyancy on the HTD is demonstrated for different mass flow rates in the heated pipes. Numerical results prove that the RANS low-Re turbulence modeling approach is fully capable of simulating the heat transfer in pipes with the water flow at supercritical pressures. A study of buoyancy influence shows that for the low-mass flow rates of coolant, the influence of buoyancy forces on the heat transfer in heated pipes is significant. For the high flow rates, buoyancy influence could be neglected and there are clearly other mechanisms causing the decrease in heat transfer at high coolant flow rates.

  8. Efficiency of recycled wool-based nonwoven material for the removal of oils from water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radetic, M.; Ilic, V.; Radojevic, D.; Miladinovic, R.; Jocic, D.; Javancic, P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to highlight the potential use of recycled wool-based nonwoven material for the removal of diesel fuel, crude, base, vegetable and motor oil from water. Sorption capacity of the material in water and in oil without water, oil retention, sorbent reusability and buoyancy in

  9. analysis and computer simulation of a natural convective solar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model has been developed to predict the outlet air temperature and air flow rate from a solar collector based on the theory of thermal buoyancy. A high capacitance solar collector directly coupled to an animal building absorbs solar radiation, which heats up air and forces entry into the building by convection. In order to ...

  10. ANALYSIS AND COMPUTER SIMULATION OF A NATURAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model has been developed to predict the outlet air temperature and air flow rate from a solar collector based on the theory of thermal buoyancy. A high capacitance solar collector directly coupled to an animal building absorbs solar radiation, which heats up air and forces entry into the building by convection. In order to ...

  11. From convection rolls to finger convection in double-diffusive turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yantao; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Double-diffusive convection (DDC), which is the buoyancy-driven flow with fluid density depending on two scalar components, is ubiquitous in many natural and engineering environments. Of great interests are scalars’ transfer rate and flow structures. Here we systematically investigate DDC flow

  12. Drift diving by hooded seals (Cystophora cristata in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M Andersen

    Full Text Available Many pinniped species perform a specific dive type, referred to as a 'drift dive', where they drift passively through the water column. This dive type has been suggested to function as a resting/sleeping or food processing dive, and can be used as an indication of feeding success by calculating the daily change in vertical drift rates over time, which reflects the relative fluctuations in buoyancy of the animal as the proportion of lipids in the body change. Northwest Atlantic hooded seals perform drift dives at regular intervals throughout their annual migration across the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. We found that the daily change in drift rate varied with geographic location and the time of year and that this differed between sexes. Positive changes in buoyancy (reflecting increased lipid stores were evident throughout their migration range and although overlapping somewhat, they were not statistically associated with high use areas as indicated by First Passage Time (FPT. Differences in the seasonal fluctuations of buoyancy between males and females suggest that they experience a difference in patterns of energy gain and loss during winter and spring, associated with breeding. The fluctuations in buoyancy around the moulting period were similar between sexes.

  13. Presentation on Tropical Mesoscale convective Systems and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Exchange. Dynamics of deep convection. Microphysics of deep convection. Fountain. (Water Vapor). Intrusion. (Ozone). Circulation. Mass and Energy. Budget ... km (wet spell). 厂 Inversion more during dry spell. 厂 Buoyancy - more during the wet spell. Mon. Wea. Rev, 2010 & 2011. Convection in wet and dry spells.

  14. Structural analysis for shallow tunnels in soft soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Minh, N.; Broere, W.; Bosch, J.W.

    2017-01-01

    Generally, studies on structural design for bored tunnels focus on moderate to deep tunnels (cover-to-diameter ratio C/D ≥ 2). Such tunnel design methods cannot be used for shallow-situated bored tunnels because the influence of buoyancy is discounted, and actual loads on the tunnel lining are

  15. Analysis of Flow Evolution and Thermal Instabilities in the Near-Nozzle Region of a Free Plane Laminar Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Barrios-Piña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the evolution of a free plane laminar jet in the near-nozzle region. The jet is buoyant because it is driven by a continuous addition of both buoyancy and momentum at the source. Buoyancy is given by a temperature difference between the jet and the environment. To study the jet evolution, numerical simulations were performed for two Richardson numbers: the one corresponding to a temperature difference slightly near the validity of the Boussinesq approximation and the other one corresponding to a higher temperature difference. For this purpose, a time dependent numerical model is used to solve the fully dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Density variations are given by the ideal gas law and flow properties as dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity are considered nonconstant. Particular attention was paid to the implementation of the boundary conditions to ensure jet stability and flow rates control. The numerical simulations were also reproduced by using the Boussinesq approximation to find out more about its pertinence for this kind of flows. Finally, a stability diagram is also obtained to identify the onset of the unsteady state in the near-nozzle region by varying control parameters of momentum and buoyancy. It is found that, at the onset of the unsteady state, momentum effects decrease almost linearly when buoyancy effects increase.

  16. The Physics of Breath-Hold Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilella, Vicente; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcelo

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes physical features of breath-hold diving. Considers the diver's descent and the initial surface dive and presents examples that show the diver's buoyancy equilibrium varying with depth, the driving force supplied by finning, and the effect of friction between the water and the diver. (Author/JRH)

  17. Out with the Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydeen, James E.; Stofferahn, Terry; Lange, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Displacement ventilation (DV) units use the natural buoyancy of warm air to improve ventilation and comfort. Although relatively new to the United States, DV has been used in Scandinavian countries since the 1970s. Two types of DV can be used in a classroom: (1) Conventional displacement ventilation (CDV) units which are situated on an interior…

  18. Caecilita Wake & Donnelly, 2010 (Amphibia: Gymnophiona) is not lungless: implications for taxonomy and for understanding the evolution of lunglessness .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Kok, Philippe J R; Ahmed, Farah; Gower, David J

    2014-03-17

    According to current understanding, five lineages of amphibians, but no other tetrapods, are secondarily lungless and are believed to rely exclusively on cutaneous gas exchange. One explanation of the evolutionary loss of lungs interprets lunglessness as an adaptation to reduce buoyancy in fast-flowing aquatic environments, reasoning that excessive buoyancy in such an environment would cause organisms being swept away. While not uncontroversial, this hypothesis provides a plausible potential explanation of the evolution of lunglessness in four of the five lungless amphibian lineages. The exception is the most recently reported lungless lineage, the newly described Guyanan caecilian genus and species Caecilita iwokramae Wake & Donnelly, 2010, which is inconsistent with the reduced disadvantageous buoyancy hypothesis by virtue of it seemingly being terrestrial and having a terrestrial ancestry. Re-examination of the previously only known specimen of C. iwokramae and of recently collected additional material reveal that this species possesses a reasonably well-developed right lung and is a species of the pre-existing caecilian genus Microcaecilia Taylor, 1968. We therefore place Caecilita in the synonymy of Microcaecilia, and re-evaluate the plausibility of the reduced disadvantageous buoyancy hypothesis as a general explanation of the evolution of lunglessness.

  19. Infrared Sensing of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with laboratory experiments on buoyant surface plumes where heat is the source of buoyancy. Temperature distributions were measured at the water surface using infra-red sensing, and inside the waterbody a computer based measurement system was applied. The plume is described...

  20. CFD study of dominant effect in combined DTHT by using hypothetical boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietiadi, Yohanes Setiawan; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Addad, Yacine [KUSTAR, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-05-15

    KAIST MMR is a gas cooled fast reactor (GFR) using supercritical CO{sub 2} as a working fluid of reactor core and power cycle without intermediate heat exchanger which operates in higher pressure and higher temperature conditions compared to PWR. During a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), MMR needs to relay on passive Decay Heat Removal (DHR) system by using natural circulation of gas since passive decay heat removal using conduction and radiation is not providing sufficient decay heat removal. Very limited researches were conducted in the regime where both occur at the same time and in the same order of magnitude. Numerical analysis is done with v''2-f turbulence model to predict the physical phenomena for the future experimental work. The effects of buoyancy and acceleration were studied with CFD for designed cases to distinguish the dominant effect in the combined DTHT regime. Numerical results of the v''2-f turbulence model show that the model can predict the buoyancy induced DTHT phenomenon even when the acceleration parameter is greater than buoyancy parameter but there is no data that shows that acceleration induced DTHT dominates the DTHT phenomena at this moment. More numerical results in the combined DTHT regime will be obtained and studied to provide clearer view on strongly heated turbulent flow and its heat transfer deteriorating mechanism. Adjustment for v''2-f turbulence model to correct the prediction of buoyancy effect will be studied in the near future.

  1. Interpretation of discrete and continuum modes in a two-layer Eady model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H.; Opsteegh, J.D.

    2007-01-01

    The upper rigid lid of the conventional Eady model for baroclinic instability is replaced by a more realistic stratosphere with an increased buoyancy frequency and a different shear of the zonal wind. Previously reported results of a normal-mode stability analysis are re-interpreted using the

  2. The Airborne Transmission of Infection Between Flats in High-rise Residential Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, N. P.; Niu, J. L.; Perino, M.

    2009-01-01

    Several case clusters occurred in high-rise residential buildings in Hong Kong in the 2003 SARS (the severe acute respiratory syndrome) epidemic, which motivated a series of engineering investigations into the possible airborne transport routes. It is suspected that, driven by buoyancy force...

  3. Formulation and evaluation of floating matrix tablets of metformin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the results obtained, all formulated gastroretentive floating matrix (GRFM) granules were free flowing with angle of repose and Carr's index ≤ 30.2º and ≤ 11% respectively. The floating lag time for GRFM tablets formulated with Irvingia gabonesis was ≤ 850 s. The in vitro buoyancy times of GRFM tablets formulations ...

  4. Fine sediment transport by tidal asymmetry in the high-concentrated Ems River : Indications for a regime shift in response to channel deepening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winterwerp, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the observed up-river transport of fine sediments in the Ems River, Germany/Netherlands, using a 1DV POINT MODEL, accounting for turbulence-induced flocculation and sediment-induced buoyancy destruction. From this analysis, it is inferred that the net up-river

  5. Segregation in cast products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flow of interdendritic liquid is primarily natural convection due to thermal and solutal buoyancy, and partly forced convection due to suction by shrinkage cavity formation etc. The present paper briefly deals with fundamentals of the above and contains some recent studies as well. Experimental investigations in molten alloys ...

  6. Some Recent Developments in Solar Dynamo Theory Arnab Rai ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We discuss the current status of solar dynamo theory and describe the dynamo model developed by our group. The toroidal magnetic field is generated in the tachocline by the strong differential rotation and rises to the solar surface due to magnetic buoyancy to create active regions. The decay of these active ...

  7. How northern freshwater input can stabilise thermohaline circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Lambert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC carries heat and salt towards the Arctic. This circulation is partly sustained by buoyancy loss and is generally believed to be inhibited by northern freshwater input as indicated by the ‘box-model’ of Stommel (1961. The inferred freshwater-sensitivity of the THC, however, varies considerably between studies, both quantitatively and qualitatively. The northernmost branch of the Atlantic THC, which forms a double estuarine circulation in the Arctic Mediterranean, is one example where both buoyancy loss and buoyancy gain facilitate circulation. We have built on Stommel's original concept to examine the freshwater-sensitivity of a double estuarine circulation. The net inflow into the double estuary is found to be more sensitive to a change in the distribution of freshwater than to a change in the total freshwater input. A double estuarine circulation is more stable than a single overturning, requiring a larger amount and more localised freshwater input into regions of buoyancy loss to induce a thermohaline ‘collapse’. For the Arctic Mediterranean, these findings imply that the Atlantic inflow may be relatively insensitive to increased freshwater input. Complementing Stommel's thermal and haline flow regimes, the double estuarine circulation allows for a third: the throughflow regime. In this regime, a THC with warm poleward surface flow can be sustained without production of dense water; a decrease in high-latitude dense water formation does therefore not necessarily affect regional surface conditions as strongly as generally thought.

  8. Come On Down! Galapagos Rift Expedition--Grades 7-8. Overview: Ocean Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Rockville, MD.

    These activities are designed to teach about ocean exploration. Students are expected to research the development and implementation of a research vessel/vehicle used for deep ocean exploration, calculate the density of objects by determining the mass and volume, and construct a device that exhibits neutral buoyancy. The activity provides learning…

  9. Assessment of the thermal environment in a simulated aircraft cabin using thermal manikin exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Zukowska, Daria; Jama, Agnieszka

    2007-01-01

    The thermal environment in a full-scale 21-seat section of an aircraft cabin installed in a climate chamber was investigated. Fourteen heated cylinders and two thermal manikins were used to simulate the heat load, buoyancy flow and flow obstruction from passengers in the cabin. Measurements were ...

  10. Deciphering the flow structure of Czochralski melt using Partially ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Czochralski melt flow is an outcome of complex interactions of centrifugal, buoyancy, coriolis and surface tension forces, which act at different length and time scales. As a consequence, the characteristic flow structures that develop in the melt are delineated in terms of recirculating flow cells typical of rotating ...

  11. A Note on Two-Equation Closure Modelling of Canopy Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey

    2009-01-01

    The note presents a rational approach to modelling the source/sink due to vegetation or buoyancy effects that appear in the turbulent kinetic energy, E, equation and a supplementary equation for a length-scale determining variable, φ, when two-equation closure is applied to canopy and atmospheric...

  12. Exploring trends, causes, and consequences of declining lipids in Lake Superior lake trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of lake trout to forage in deepwater habitats is facilitated by high lipid content, which affords buoyancy. In Lake Superior, lean lake trout historically occupied depths < 80 m, and siscowet lake trout occupied depths > 80 m. Siscowets have been known f...

  13. Archimedes and the Golden Crown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Archimedes (287-212 BC) is well known for his explanation of buoyancy, and in particular for his "eureka" moment. This experiment uses his density measurement method to find the purity of gold, and additional confirmation of the findings are given by x-ray fluorescence. (Contains 4 figures and 1 table.)

  14. Ekman Spiral in Horizontally Inhomogeneous Ocean with Varying Eddy Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    between the atmosphere and deep-ocean and directly affects the air –sea exchange of heat, momentum, and moisture (Chu 1993). Effect of vertical...and/or freshening (P > E) and is comparable to the convection-generated turbulence by the upward buoyancy flux (B > 0) due to surface cooling (Q > 0

  15. Magnetic and velocity fields MHD flow of a stretched vertical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analytical solutions for heat and mass transfer by laminar flow of Newtonian, viscous, electrically conducting and heat generation/absorbing fluid on a continuously moving vertical permeable surface with buoyancy in the presence of a magnetic field and a first order chemical reaction are reported. The solutions for magnetic ...

  16. A numerical investigation of the interplay between fireline length, geometry, and rate of spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. M. Canfield; R. R. Linn; J. A. Sauer; M. Finney; J. Forthofer

    2014-01-01

    The current study focuses on coupled dynamics and resultant geometry of fireline segments of various ignition lengths. As an example, for ignition lines of length scales typical for field experiments, fireline curvature is the result of a competition between the head fire and the flanks of the fire. A number of physical features (i.e. buoyancy and wind field divergence...

  17. Production of floating pellets using appropriate methods | Suleiman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated into the use of floating materials like candle wax, yeast and baking powder to achieve pellet buoyancy. Ten diets were formulated with incorporation of floating agents; Diet I-YBCT- (yeast-baking powder in cold water -toasted), Diet II-YBCU- (yeast-baking powder in cold water -untoasted) Diet III ...

  18. Floating wind turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  19. Individually controlled localized chilled beam in conjunction with chilled ceiling: Part 1 – Physical environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arghand, Taha; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kosonen, Risto

    2016-01-01

    was 60 W/m2 (including simulation of solar radiation and miscellaneous heat loads). The results showed that uniform thermal conditions (differences smaller than 1 °K) were generated in the occupied zone with the studied system configurations. The LCBCC diminished the effect of the buoyancy flow from...... the simulated window and this resulted in more acceptable thermal conditions at the workstation....

  20. Dyamical Systems Theory and Lagrangian Data Assimilation in 4D Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    240(2), 166-179. Wang, P. and T. M. Ozgokmen, 2016. Spiral inertial waves radiated from geophysical vortices. Ocean Modelling, 99, 22-42. Wang, P...Environmental Buoyancy-Driven Flows, doi: 10.1007/s l 0652-016-9491-y. Wang, P. and T. M. Ozgokmen, 2015. How do hydrodynamic instabilities affect 3D

  1. A review of orange roughy Hoplostethus atlanticus fisheries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This unusual composition (resultant from the species' diet) ensures neutral buoyancy. Stock separation has been inferred mainly from biological studies, but genetic studies have also found differences among stocks within New Zealand and Australia. Deep-water habitat may be damaged by trawling operations and may ...

  2. High diving metabolic rate indicated by high-speed transit to depth in negatively buoyant long-finned pilot whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Kagari; Sato, Katsufumi; Isojunno, Saana; Narazaki, Tomoko; Miller, Patrick J O

    2017-10-15

    To maximize foraging duration at depth, diving mammals are expected to use the lowest cost optimal speed during descent and ascent transit and to minimize the cost of transport by achieving neutral buoyancy. Here, we outfitted 18 deep-diving long-finned pilot whales with multi-sensor data loggers and found indications that their diving strategy is associated with higher costs than those of other deep-diving toothed whales. Theoretical models predict that optimal speed is proportional to (basal metabolic rate/drag)1/3 and therefore to body mass0.05 The transit speed of tagged animals (2.7±0.3 m s-1) was substantially higher than the optimal speed predicted from body mass (1.4-1.7 m s-1). According to the theoretical models, this choice of high transit speed, given a similar drag coefficient (median, 0.0035) to that in other cetaceans, indicated greater basal metabolic costs during diving than for other cetaceans. This could explain the comparatively short duration (8.9±1.5 min) of their deep dives (maximum depth, 444±85 m). Hydrodynamic gliding models indicated negative buoyancy of tissue body density (1038.8±1.6 kg m-3, ±95% credible interval, CI) and similar diving gas volume (34.6±0.6 ml kg-1, ±95% CI) to those in other deep-diving toothed whales. High diving metabolic rate and costly negative buoyancy imply a 'spend more, gain more' strategy of long-finned pilot whales, differing from that in other deep-diving toothed whales, which limits the costs of locomotion during foraging. We also found that net buoyancy affected the optimal speed: high transit speeds gradually decreased during ascent as the whales approached neutral buoyancy owing to gas expansion. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Rotational effects on turbine blade cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govatzidakis, G.J.; Guenette, G.R.; Kerrebrock, J.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the influence of rotation on the heat transfer in a smooth, rectangular passage rotating in the orthogonal mode is presented. The passage simulates one of the cooling channels found in gas turbine blades. A constant heat flux is imposed on the model with either inward or outward flow. The effects of rotation and buoyancy on the Nusselt number were quantified by systematically varying the Rotation number, Density Ratio, Reynolds number, and Buoyancy parameter. The experiment utilizes a high resolution infrared temperature measurement technique in order to measure the wall temperature distribution. The experimental results show that the rotational effects on the Nusselt number are significant and proper turbine blade design must take into account the effects of rotation, buoyancy, and flow direction. The behavior of the Nusselt number distribution depends strongly on the particular side, axial position, flow direction, and the specific range of the scaling parameters. The results show a strong coupling between buoyancy and Corollas effects throughout the passage. For outward flow, the trailing side Nusselt numbers increase with Rotation number relative to stationary values. On the leading side, the Nusselt numbers tended to decrease with rotation near the inlet and subsequently increased farther downstream in the passage. The Nusselt numbers on the side walls generally increased with rotation. For inward flow, the Nusselt numbers generally improved relative to stationary results, but increases in the Nusselt number were relatively smaller than in the case of outward flow. For outward and inward flows, increasing the density ratio generally tended to decrease Nusselt numbers on the leading and trailing sides, but the exact behavior and magnitude depended on the local axial position and specific range of Buoyancy parameters.

  4. Joint seismic-geodynamic-mineral physical modelling of African geodynamics: A reconciliation of deep-mantle convection with surface geophysical constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, A M; Quere, S; Moucha, R; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P; Mitrovica, J X; Rowley, D B

    2008-08-22

    Recent progress in seismic tomography provides the first complete 3-D images of the combined thermal and chemical anomalies that characterise the unique deep mantle structure below the African continent. With these latest tomography results we predict flow patterns under Africa that reveal a large-scale, active hot upwelling, or superplume, below the western margin of Africa under the Cape Verde Islands. The scale and dynamical intensity of this West African superplume (WASP) is comparable to that of the south African superplume (SASP) that has long been assumed to dominate the flow dynamics under Africa. On the basis of this new tomography model, we find the dynamics of the SASP is strongly controlled by chemical contributions to deep mantle buoyancy that significantly compensate its thermal buoyancy. In contrast, the WASP appears to be entirely dominated by thermal buoyancy. New calculations of mantle convection incorporating these two superplumes reveal that the plate-driving forces due to the flow generated by the WASP is as strong as that due to the SASP. We find that the chemical buoyancy of the SASP exerts a strong stabilising control on the pattern and amplitude of shallow mantle flow in the asthenosphere below the southern half of the African plate. The asthenospheric flow predictions provide the first high resolution maps of focussed upwellings that lie below the major centres of Late Cenozoic volcanism, including the Kenya domes and Hoggar massif that lies above a remnant plume head in the upper mantle. Inferences of sublithospheric deformation from seismic anisotropy data are shown to be sensitive to the contributions of chemical buoyancy in the SASP.

  5. Effects of g-Jitter on Diffusion in Binary Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Walter M. B.

    1999-01-01

    The microgravity environment offers the potential to measure the binary diffusion coefficients in liquids without the masking effects introduced by buoyancy-induced flows due to Earth s gravity. However, the background g-jitter (vibrations from the shuttle, onboard machinery, and crew) normally encountered in many shuttle experiments may alter the benefits of the microgravity environment and introduce vibrations that could offset its intrinsic advantages. An experiment during STS-85 (August 1997) used the Microgravity Vibration Isolation Mount (MIM) to isolate and introduce controlled vibrations to two miscible liquids inside a cavity to study the effects of g-jitter on liquid diffusion. Diffusion in a nonhomogeneous liquid system is caused by a nonequilibrium condition that results in the transport of mass (dispersion of the different kinds of liquid molecules) to approach equilibrium. The dynamic state of the system tends toward equilibrium such that the system becomes homogeneous. An everyday example is the mixing of cream and coffee (a nonhomogeneous system) via stirring. The cream diffuses into the coffee, thus forming a homogeneous system. At equilibrium the system is said to be mixed. However, during stirring, simple observations show complex flow field dynamics-stretching and folding of material interfaces, thinning of striation thickness, self-similar patterns, and so on. This example illustrates that, even though mixing occurs via mass diffusion, stirring to enhance transport plays a major role. Stirring can be induced either by mechanical means (spoon or plastic stirrer) or via buoyancy-induced forces caused by Earth s gravity. Accurate measurements of binary diffusion coefficients are often inhibited by buoyancy-induced flows. The microgravity environment minimizes the effect of buoyancy-induced flows and allows the true diffusion limit to be achieved. One goal of this experiment was to show that the microgravity environment suppresses buoyancy

  6. Numerical modeling of Bridgman growth of PbSnTe in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Minwu; Chait, Arnon; Fripp, Archibald L.; Debnam, William J.

    1995-01-01

    In this work we study heat and mass transport, fluid motion, and solid/liquid phase change in the process of steady Bridgman growth of Pb(.8)Sn(.2)Te (LTT) in an axially-imposed uniform magnetic field under terrestrial and microgravity conditions. In particular, this research is concerned with the interrelationships among segregation, buoyancy-driven convection, and magnetic damping in the LTT melt. The main objectives are to provide a quantitative understanding of the complex transport phenomena during solidification of the nondilute binary of LTT, to provide estimates of the strength of magnetic field required to achieve the desired diffusion-dominated growth, and to assess the role of magnetic damping for space and earth based control of the buoyancy-induced convection. The problem was solved by using FIDAP and numerical results for both vertical and horizontal growth configurations with respect to the acceleration of gravity vector are presented.

  7. Simulation of carbon reserve dynamics in Microcystis and its influence on vertical migration with Yoyo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabouille, Sophie; Thébault, Jean-Marc; Salençon, Marie-José

    2003-04-01

    Blue-green algae control their buoyancy depending upon the surrounding conditions. This process is essential for Cyanobacteria development and can account for their dominance in eutrophic waters in summer. In order to determine the main regulating factors of those movements, we developed a mechanistic and deterministic model, based on differential equations, that simulates the vertical migration of Microcystis sp. In Microcystis, buoyancy regulation results from the dynamics of the carbohydrate reserve metabolism during photosynthesis. These fundamental processes are modelled daily by this vertical 1-D model named Yoyo. It describes the movement of colonies with different sizes in response to variations of environmental conditions. This paper presents the model sensitivity analysis. We individually investigated the role of light and temperature upon algal migration with colonies of two different diameters. Under a daily light cycle and a temperature of 20 degrees C, the model described vertical migration on a 48 h rhythm in colonies with a 300-micron diameter.

  8. Effect of surfactant addition on removal of microbubbles using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hayashida, Yoshiyuki; Sano, Kazuki; Terasaka, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    It is difficult to control the bubble in a liquid by the external operation, because the behavior of the bubble is controlled in buoyancy and flow of liquid. On the other hand, microbubbles, whose diameter is several decades μm, stably disperse in static liquid because of their small buoyancy and electrical repulsion. When an ultrasound, whose frequency was 2.4 MHz, was irradiated, the milky white microbubbles suspended solution became rapidly clear. In this study, the effects of surfactant addition on the removal of microbubbles from a liquid in an ultrasonic field were investigated. The efficiency of removal of microbubbles decreased with surfactant addition. Surfactant type influenced the size of agglomerated microbubbles, and the efficiency of removal of microbubbles changed. The surface of microbubble was modified by surfactant adsorption, and the steric inhibition influenced the removal of microbubbles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Experimental study of combustion characteristics of isolated pockets of hydrogen-air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoubi, M.; LaFleche, M. [Univ. of Ottawa, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Liang, Z., E-mail: zhe.liang@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Radulescu, M. [Univ. of Ottawa, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    This paper examines the dynamics of unconfined hydrogen-air flames and the criterion for flame propagation between neighbouring pockets of reactive gas separated by air using the soap bubble technique. The combustion events were visualized using high-speed schlieren or large-scale shadowgraph systems. It was revealed that for sufficiently lean hydrogen-air mixtures characterized by low flame speeds, buoyancy effects become important at small scales. The critical radius of hemispherical flame that will rise due to buoyancy is highly sensitive to the hydrogen concentration. The test results demonstrate that for transition of a flame between neighbouring pockets, the separation distance between the bubbles is mainly determined by the expansion ratio for near stoichiometric mixture, but it becomes much smaller for leaner mixtures because the flame kernel rises due to buoyant effects before the flame can reach the second bubble, thus the separation distance is no longer governed by the expansion ratio. (author)

  10. Oscillating water column structural model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Guild [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bull, Diana L [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jepsen, Richard Alan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gordon, Margaret Ellen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    An oscillating water column (OWC) wave energy converter is a structure with an opening to the ocean below the free surface, i.e. a structure with a moonpool. Two structural models for a non-axisymmetric terminator design OWC, the Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) are discussed in this report. The results of this structural model design study are intended to inform experiments and modeling underway in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated Reference Model Project (RMP). A detailed design developed by Re Vision Consulting used stiffeners and girders to stabilize the structure against the hydrostatic loads experienced by a BBDB device. Additional support plates were added to this structure to account for loads arising from the mooring line attachment points. A simplified structure was designed in a modular fashion. This simplified design allows easy alterations to the buoyancy chambers and uncomplicated analysis of resulting changes in buoyancy.

  11. Purging of an air-filled vessel by horizontal injection of steam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.L.; Andreani, M

    2000-07-01

    Reported here are results from an idealised 2D problem in which cold air is purged from a large vessel by a steam jet. The focus of the study is the prediction of the evolution of the flow regimes resulting from changes in the relative importance of buoyancy and inertia forces, and time histories of the temperature and concentration fields. Global parameters of interest are the mixture concentration at the vessel outlet and the total time taken to purge the air. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code CFX-4 has been used to perform calculations for different inlet velocities, covering a range of (densimetric) Froude numbers from Fr=0.8 (buoyancy dominated) to Fr=7.1 (inertia dominated). Animations have been used to help understand the dynamics of the flow transitions, and temperature and concentration histories at specific monitoring points have been compared with coarse-mesh predictions obtained using the containment code GOTHIC. (authors)

  12. Numerical simulations of thermal instabilities in stratified gases. II - Exploration of the parameter space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, F.; Rosner, R.; Malagoli, A.; Peres, G.; Serio, S.

    1991-01-01

    The temporal evolution of density perturbations in an initially hydrostatic isothermal atmosphere consisting of an optically thin radiating compressible plasma is studied. Numerical techniques are used to describe the nonlinear evolution of the perturbations, and the relative equilibrium between dynamic and thermal instabilities as governed by three independent control parameters are examined, namely, the initial density contrast of the perturbation, the ratio of the local buoyancy oscillation period to the local radiative cooling time, and the ratio of the perturbation radius to the local scaleheight. Four orders of magnitude of initial density contrasts and ratios of buoyancy and cooling times, and one order of magnitude of the bubble dimensions are explored. Well-defined oscillations were found to occur in a limited parameter range, and thermal instability to occur even within secondary condensations deriving from the bubble fragmentation.

  13. Capturing gas in soft granular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMinn, Chris; Lee, Jeremy; Xu, Feng; Lee, Sungyon

    2017-11-01

    Bubble migration through soft granular materials involves a strong coupling between the bubble dynamics and the deformation of the material. This process is relevant to a variety of natural and industrial systems, from fluidized-bed reactors to the migration and venting of biogenic gas in sediments. Here, we study this process experimentally by injecting air into a quasi-2D, liquid-saturated packing of soft particles and measuring the morphology of the bubbles as they invade and then rise due to buoyancy. By systematically varying the confining stress, we show that the competition between buoyancy, capillarity, and elasticity leads to complex bubble-migration dynamics that transition from fluidization to pathway opening to pore invasion, with a strong and surprising impact on the amount of air trapped in the system. The authors are grateful for support from the Royal Society (IE150885), the John Fell Oxford University Press Research Fund, and the Maurice Lubbock Memorial Fund.

  14. Turbulence energetics in stably stratified geophysical flows: strong and weak mixing regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Zilitinkevich, S S; Kleeorin, N; Rogachevskii, I; Esau, I; Mauritsen, T; Miles, M W

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, turbulence energetics is characterized by turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and modelled using solely the TKE budget equation. In stable stratification, TKE is generated by the velocity shear and expended through viscous dissipation and work against buoyancy forces. The effect of stratification is characterized by the ratio of the buoyancy gradient to squared shear, called Richardson number, Ri. It is widely believed that at Ri exceeding a critical value, Ric, local shear cannot maintain turbulence, and the flow becomes laminar. We revise this concept by extending the energy analysis to turbulent potential and total energies (TPE and TTE = TKE + TPE), consider their budget equations, and conclude that TTE is a conservative parameter maintained by shear in any stratification. Hence there is no "energetics Ric", in contrast to the hydrodynamic-instability threshold, Ric-instability, whose typical values vary from 0.25 to 1. We demonstrate that this interval, 0.25>1, clarify principal difference betw...

  15. Stationary core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, G; Poesio, P

    2003-12-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity annular liquid layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a possible density difference between the core and the annular layer, is counterbalanced. From earlier studies it is known that at the core surface ripples are present that have the shape of "bamboo" waves or "snake" waves. They generate pressure variations and secondary flows in the annular layer that can cause a net hydrodynamic force on the core. Using hydrodynamic-lubrication theory (assuming the core to be rigid) it has been shown that for snake waves the lubrication force can counterbalance the buoyancy force. For bamboo waves that is not the case.

  16. A theoretical model for core-annular flow of a very viscous oil core and a water annulus through a horizontal pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, G.; Segal, A.; Vanderwess, A. J.; Oliemans, R. V. A.

    1982-07-01

    The mechanism by which the buoyancy force on the core, resulting from any density difference between oil and water, is counterbalanced in a theoretical model of core-annular flow of a viscous oil core and a water annulus through a pipe was analyzed. Oil viscosity was assumed to be so high that any flow in the core may be neglected, therefore there is no variation with time of the oil-water interface form. The core was assumed to be solid and the interface to be a solid-liquid interface. By means of the hydrodynamic lubrication theory, it is proved that, due to the movement of ripples present in the core surface with respect to the pipe wall, pressure variations occur in the annular layer, which exert a force on the core. This force can be so large that the buoyancy force is counterbalanced.

  17. How important are diapycnal mixing and geothermal heating for the deep circulation of the Western Mediterranean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferron, B.; Bouruet Aubertot, P.; Cuypers, Y.; Schroeder, K.; Borghini, M.

    2017-08-01

    The dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy ɛ and the associated diapycnal turbulent mixing is inferred from a set of microstructure observations collected over several cruises from year 2012 to 2014. The geographical distribution of ɛ highlights several regions of enhanced levels of turbulence ranging from 10-9 to 10-6 W kg-1: the Sicily Channel, the Corsica Channel, and the Ligurian Sea. Elsewhere, ɛ was small, often below 10-10 W kg-1. Below 1300 m, geothermal heating provides three-fold more buoyancy than small-scale turbulence. Geothermal heating and turbulent diffusion provide enough buoyancy to balance 15% to 50% of a mean yearly deep water formation rate of 0.9 to 0.3 sverdrup (106 m3/s), respectively. The remaining part has to eventually overflow through the Strait of Gibraltar.

  18. Medium fidelity modelling of loads in wind farms under non-neutral ABL stability conditions – a full-scale validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Larsen, Torben J.; Chougule, A.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability of medium fidelity modelling of wind turbine component fatigue loading, when the wind turbines are subjected to wake affected non-stationary flow fields under non-neutral atmospheric stability conditions. To accomplish this we combine...... the classical Dynamic Wake Meandering model with a fundamental conjecture stating: Atmospheric boundary layer stability affects primary wake meandering dynamics driven by large turbulent scales, whereas wake expansion in the meandering frame of reference is hardly affected. Inclusion of stability (i.e. buoyancy......) in description of both large- and small scale atmospheric boundary layer turbulence is facilitated by a generalization of the classical Mann spectral tensor, which consistently includes buoyancy effects. With non-stationary wind turbine inflow fields modelled as described above, fatigue loads are obtained using...

  19. 26Al production from magnetically induced extramixing in AGB stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmerini, S.; Busso, M.

    2008-10-01

    We discuss nucleosynthesis results obtained following the recent suggestion that extramixing phenomena in red giants might be driven by magnetic buoyancy. We explore for this model the production of the short-lived radioactive isotope 26Al and of stable light nuclei, considering both the case of the general buoyancy of flux tubes and that of the intermittent release of magnetized unstable structures. We show that abundant 26Al can be produced, up to, and above, the highest levels measured in presolar grains. This level would be also sufficient to explain the early solar system 26Al as coming from a nearby AGB star of low mass. The case of fast-moving instabilities is the most efficient, reaching almost the same effectiveness as hot bottom burning (HBB).

  20. Numerical Simulation of Inter-Flat Air Cross-Contamination under the Condition of Single-Sided Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoping; Niu, Jianlei; Perino, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the mechanism of inter-flat airborne disease transmission under the condition of single-sided natural ventilation. The focus is on one of the typical designs in residential buildings with a rectangular plan layout and having a common corridor separating...... the two sides, each of which has a flat fa ade with openable windows. When the wind speed is extremely low, with doors closed and windows opened, the flats become single-sided naturally ventilated driven by buoyancy effects. The air pollutants can travel from a lower flat to a vertically adjacent upper...... flat through open windows, caused by indoor/outdoor temperature-difference induced buoyancy. Computational fluid dynamics is employed to explore the characteristics of this process. Based on the comparison with experimental data about the air flow distribution in and around a single-sided naturally...

  1. Seismology of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Gough, D.; Toomre, J.

    1985-01-01

    The use of the sun's oscillations, caused by the constructive interference between internally reflected waves, to study the interior of the sun is examined. Pressure and buoyancy have the strongest influence on oscillations; pressure fluctuations at high frequency produce acoustic waves and at low frequency buoyancy produces internal gravity waves. The theory of acoustic wave frequency, which is used to determine measurements of sound speed and rate of rotation of the solar interior as well as the thickness of the convection zone, is presented. The classification of solar oscillations is described. The models for acoustic modes of low degree and intermediate degree are discussed. The effect of internal speed, gravity modes, and solar rotation on solar models is determined. The oscillation frequencies yield an He abundance that is consistent with cosmology, but they reinforce the severity of the neutrino problem.

  2. Transitional Gas Jet Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Alammar, Khalid; Gollahalli, S. R.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Drop tower experiments were performed to identify buoyancy effects in transitional hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry was utilized to optically visualize the flame and to measure oxygen concentration in the laminar portion of the flame. Test conditions consisted of atmospheric pressure flames burning in quiescent air. Fuel from a 0.3mm inside diameter tube injector was issued at jet exit Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1300 to 1700. Helium mole percentage in the fuel was varied from 0 to 40%. Significant effects of buoyancy were observed in near field of the flame even-though the fuel jets were momentum-dominated. Results show an increase of breakpoint length in microgravity. Data suggest that transitional flames in earth-gravity at Re<1300 might become laminar in microgravity.

  3. Computational Analysis of Gravitational Effects in Low-Density Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satti, Rajani P.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2004-01-01

    This study deals with the computational analysis of buoyancy-induced instability in the nearfield of an isothermal helium jet injected into quiescent ambient air environment. Laminar, axisymmetric, unsteady flow conditions were considered for the analysis. The transport equations of helium mass fraction coupled with the conservation equations of mixture mass and momentum were solved using a staggered grid finite volume method. The jet Richardson numbers of 1.5 and 0.018 were considered to encompass both buoyant and inertial jet flow regimes. Buoyancy effects were isolated by initiating computations in Earth gravity and subsequently, reducing gravity to simulate the microgravity conditions. Computed results concur with experimental observations that the periodic flow oscillations observed in Earth gravity subside in microgravity.

  4. CFD Modeling of Airflow in a Livestock Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li; Elhadidi, B.; Khalifa, H. E.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a 2D simulation for a typical livestock building is performed to assess the ammonia emission removal rate to the atmosphere. Two geometry models are used and compared in order to represent the slatted floor. In the first model the floor is modeled as a slatted floor and in the second...... the accuracy of the porous jump assumption by comparing the velocity, and ammonia concentration in a 2D simulation, heated solid bodies are added to represent the livestock in the following simulations. The results of simulations with heat source also indicate that modeling the slatted floor with slats...... is necessary. Furthermore, the combination of low inlet velocity and heated objects causes the flow to be buoyancy dominated and unsteady. This unsteadiness can be common in similar buoyancy induced flows for high Rayleigh number flow. The paper concludes with tradeoffs suggested for simulation of livestock...

  5. Effect of steady and time-harmonic magnetic fields on macrosegragation in alloy solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incropera, F.P.; Prescott, P.J. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Buoyancy-induced convection during the solidification of alloys can contribute significantly to the redistribution of alloy constituents, thereby creating large composition gradients in the final ingot. Termed macrosegregation, the condition diminishes the quality of the casting and, in the extreme, may require that the casting be remelted. The deleterious effects of buoyancy-driven flows may be suppressed through application of an external magnetic field, and in this study the effects of both steady and time-harmonic fields have been considered. For a steady magnetic field, extremely large field strengths would be required to effectively dampen convection patterns that contribute to macrosegregation. However, by reducing spatial variations in temperature and composition, turbulent mixing induced by a time-harmonic field reduces the number and severity of segregates in the final casting.

  6. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Naturally Ventilated Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elashmawy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, heat transfer and fluid flow in naturally ventilated greenhouses are studied numerically for tow configuration according to the number and positions of the opening. The equations governing the phenomenon are developed using the stream function-vorticity formalism and solved using the finite volume method. The aim of the study is to investigate how buoyancy forces influence airflow and temperature patterns inside the greenhouse. Rayleigh number is the main parameter which changes from 103 to 106 and Prandtl number is fixed at Pr=0.71. Results are reported in terms of stream function, isotherms and average Nusselt number. It is found that the flow structure is sensitive to the value of Rayleigh number and the number of openings. Also, that using asymmetric opening positions improve the natural ventilation and facilitate the occurrence of buoyancy induced upward cross-airflow inside the greenhouse.

  7. Defining the ecologically relevant mixed-layer depth for Antarctica's coastal seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Filipa; Kohut, Josh; Oliver, Matthew J.; Schofield, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    Mixed-layer depth (MLD) has been widely linked to phytoplankton dynamics in Antarctica's coastal regions; however, inconsistent definitions have made intercomparisons among region-specific studies difficult. Using a data set with over 20,000 water column profiles corresponding to 32 Slocum glider deployments in three coastal Antarctic regions (Ross Sea, Amundsen Sea, and West Antarctic Peninsula), we evaluated the relationship between MLD and phytoplankton vertical distribution. Comparisons of these MLD estimates to an applied definition of phytoplankton bloom depth, as defined by the deepest inflection point in the chlorophyll profile, show that the maximum of buoyancy frequency is a good proxy for an ecologically relevant MLD. A quality index is used to filter profiles where MLD is not determined. Despite the different regional physical settings, we found that the MLD definition based on the maximum of buoyancy frequency best describes the depth to which phytoplankton can be mixed in Antarctica's coastal seas.

  8. On the Sensitivity of the Diurnal Cycle in the Amazon to Convective Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itterly, Kyle; Taylor, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    This presentation uses publicly available CERES and radiosonde data to investigate the sensitivity of thetropical convective diurnal cycle to atmosphere state. Averaging surface observations into regimes of convective intensitydefined by satellite shows great promise for physical understandingof convection.• Convective processes in the Amazon are highly variable seasonallyand locally.• Buoyancy/CIN more important JJA– Mesoscale/synoptic features easier to separate– Length/depth of buoyancy layer very important in DJF (EL).• Moisture more important DJF, esp. UTH– Humidity of lower atmosphere significantly impacts LTS, LCL and abilityfor parcels to reach LFC.• Lower level jet strength/direction important• Convective initiation correlated with LTS, LR, LTH, EL• Duration/Phase better correlated with humidity variables• Surface Flux amplitude well correlated with convection

  9. The heads and tails of buoyant autocatalytic balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Michael C.; Morris, Stephen W.

    2012-09-01

    Buoyancy produced by autocatalytic reaction fronts can produce fluid flows that advect the front position, giving rise to interesting feedback between chemical and hydrodynamic effects. In this paper, we numerically investigate the evolution of autocatalytic iodate-arsenous acid reaction fronts initialized in spherical configurations. Deformation of these "autocatalytic balls" is driven by buoyancy produced by the reaction. In our simulations, we have found that depending on the initial ball radius, the reaction front will develop in one of three different ways. In an intermediate range of ball size, the flow can evolve much like an autocatalytic plume: the ball develops a reacting head and tail that is akin to the head and conduit of an autocatalytic plume. In the limit of large autocatalytic balls, however, growth of a reacting tail is suppressed and the resemblance to plumes disappears. Conversely, very small balls of product solution fail to initiate sustained fronts and eventually disappear.

  10. Combination volumetric and gravimetric sorption instrument for high accuracy measurements of methane adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Bethea, Donald; Troub, Brandon

    2017-05-01

    The accurate measurement of adsorbed gas up to high pressures (∼100 bars) is critical for the development of new materials for adsorbed gas storage. The typical Sievert-type volumetric method introduces accumulating errors that can become large at maximum pressures. Alternatively, gravimetric methods employing microbalances require careful buoyancy corrections. In this paper, we present a combination gravimetric and volumetric system for methane sorption measurements on samples between ∼0.5 and 1 g. The gravimetric method described requires no buoyancy corrections. The tandem use of the gravimetric method allows for a check on the highest uncertainty volumetric measurements. The sources and proper calculation of uncertainties are discussed. Results from methane measurements on activated carbon MSC-30 and metal-organic framework HKUST-1 are compared across methods and within the literature.

  11. Flow reversal of laminar mixed convection in the entry region of symmetrically heated, vertical plate channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desrayaud, G. [Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, INSSET, Lab. Modelisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME FRE 3160 CNRS, 02 - Saint-Quentin (France); Lauriat, G. [Universite Paris-Est, Lab. Modelisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME FRE 3160 CNRS, 77 - Marne-la-Vallee (France)

    2009-11-15

    The present numerical investigation is concerned with flow reversal phenomena for laminar, mixed convection of air in a vertical parallel-plate channel of finite length. Results are obtained for buoyancy-assisted flow in a symmetrically heated channel with uniform wall temperatures for various Grashof numbers and Reynolds numbers in the range 300 {<=} Re {<=} 1300. The effects of buoyancy forces on the flow pattern are investigated and the shapes of velocity and temperature profiles are discussed in detail. Flow reversals centred in the entrance of the channel are predicted. The strength of the cells decreases as the Reynolds number is increased, until they disappear. The regime of reversed flow is identified for high values of the Peclet number in a Pe-Gr/Re map. It is also shown that the channel length has no influence on the occurrence of the reversal flow provided that H/D {>=} 10. (authors)

  12. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  13. Floating solid cellulose nanofibre nanofoams for sustained release of the poorly soluble model drug furosemide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svagan, Anna Justina; Müllertz, Anette; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to prepare a furosemide-loaded sustained release cellulose nanofibre (CNF)-based nanofoams with buoyancy. METHODS: Dry foams consisting of CNF and the model drug furosemide at concentrations of 21% and 50% (w/w) have been prepared by simply foaming a CNF-drug suspension...... followed by drying. The resulting foams were characterized towards their morphology, solid state properties and dissolution kinetics. KEY FINDINGS: Solid state analysis of the resulting drug-loaded foams revealed that the drug was present as an amorphous sodium furosemide salt and in form of furosemide...... form I crystals embedded in the CNF foam cell walls. The foams could easily be shaped and were flexible, and during the drug release study, the foam pieces remained intact and were floating on the surface due to their positive buoyancy. Both foams showed a sustained furosemide release compared...

  14. Cryogenically enhanced magneto-Archimedes levitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherall, A T; Lopez-Alcaraz, P; Benedict, K A; King, P J; Eaves, L [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-01

    The application of both a strong magnetic field and magnetic field gradient to a diamagnetic body can produce a vertical force which is sufficient to counteract its weight due to gravity. By immersing the body in a paramagnetic fluid, an additional adjustable magneto-buoyancy force is generated which enhances the levitation effect. Here we show that cryogenic oxygen and oxygen-nitrogen mixtures in both gaseous and liquid form provide sufficient buoyancy to permit the levitation and flotation of a wide range of materials. These fluids may provide an alternative to synthetic ferrofluids for the separation of minerals. We also report the dynamics of corrugation instabilities on the surface of magnetized liquid oxygen.

  15. Combination volumetric and gravimetric sorption instrument for high accuracy measurements of methane adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burress, Jacob; Bethea, Donald; Troub, Brandon

    2017-05-01

    The accurate measurement of adsorbed gas up to high pressures (˜100 bars) is critical for the development of new materials for adsorbed gas storage. The typical Sievert-type volumetric method introduces accumulating errors that can become large at maximum pressures. Alternatively, gravimetric methods employing microbalances require careful buoyancy corrections. In this paper, we present a combination gravimetric and volumetric system for methane sorption measurements on samples between ˜0.5 and 1 g. The gravimetric method described requires no buoyancy corrections. The tandem use of the gravimetric method allows for a check on the highest uncertainty volumetric measurements. The sources and proper calculation of uncertainties are discussed. Results from methane measurements on activated carbon MSC-30 and metal-organic framework HKUST-1 are compared across methods and within the literature.

  16. Formulation of gastroretentive floating drug delivery system using hydrophilic polymers and its in vitro characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Srikanth Meka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research is to formulate and evaluate the gastroretentive floating drug delivery system of antihypertensive drug, propranolol HCl. Gastroretentive floating tablets (GRFT were prepared by using a synthetic hydrophilic polymer polyethylene oxide of different grades such as PEO WSR N-12 K and PEO 18 NF as release retarding polymers and calcium carbonate as gas generating agent. The GRFT were compressed by direct compression strategy and the tablets were evaluated for physico-chemical properties, in vitro buoyancy, swelling studies, in vitro dissolution studies and release mechanism studies. From the dissolution and buoyancy studies, F 9 was selected as an optimized formulation. The optimized formulation followed zero order rate kinetics with non-Fickian diffusion mechanism. The optimized formulation was characterised with FTIR studies and observed no interaction between the drug and the polymers.

  17. Free Fall Plasma-Arc Reactor for Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feinkema, D. A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperatures inside the plasma of a carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection which has an effect on the growth and morphology of the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). To study the effect of buoyancy on the arc process, a miniature carbon arc apparatus was designed and developed to synthesize SWNTs in a microgravity environment substantially free from buoyant convective flows. An arc reactor was operated in the 2.2- and 5.18-second drop towers at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The apparatus employed a 4 mm diameter anode and was powered by a portable battery pack capable of providing in excess of 300 amps at 30 volts to the arc for the duration of a 5-second drop. However, the principal result is that no dramatic difference in sample yield or composition was noted between normal gravity, 2.2-and 5-second long microgravity runs.

  18. Opposing flow in square porous annulus: Influence of Dufour effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athani, Abdulgaphur, E-mail: abbu.bec@gmail.com [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Anjuman Institute of Technology & Management, Bhatkal (India); Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A., E-mail: aa.alrashed@paaet.edu.kw [Dept. of Automotive and Marine Engineering Technology, College of Technological Studies, The Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (Kuwait); Khaleed, H. M. T., E-mail: khalid-tan@yahoo.com [Dept of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Islamic University, Madinah Munawwarra (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-21

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium is very important area of research which is also termed as double diffusive convection or thermo-solutal convection. The buoyancy ratio which is the ratio of thermal to concentration buoyancy can have negative values thus leading to opposing flow. This article is aimed to study the influence of Dufour effect on the opposing flow in a square porous annulus. The partial differential equations that govern the heat and mass transfer behavior inside porous medium are solved using finite element method. A three node triangular element is used to divide the porous domain into smaller elements. Results are presented with respect to geometric and physical parameters such as duct diameter ratio, Rayleigh number, radiation parameter etc. It is found that the heat transfer increase with increase in Rayleigh number and radiation parameter. It is observed that Dufour coefficient has more influence on velocity profile.

  19. Turbulent mixing and entrainment in a gravity current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Odier, Philippe [ENS-LYON, FRANCE; Chen, Jun [PURDUE UNIV.

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current. The turbulent transport of momentum and buoyancy can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and buoyancy are found to scale quadratically with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient is the square of the mixing lenth, approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow ({var_epsilon}/{partial_derivative}{sub z}u{sup 3}){sup 1/2}. We also study the fluctuations of the momentum and density turbulent fluxes, showing how they relate to the mixing phenomena, and to the entrainment/detrainment balance.

  20. Fault Monitooring and Fault Recovery Control for Position Moored Tanker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Shaoji; Blanke, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses fault tolerant control for position mooring of a shuttle tanker operating in the North Sea. A complete framework for fault diagnosis is presented but the loss of a sub-sea mooring line buoyancy element is given particular attention, since this fault could lead to line breakage...... and risky abortion of an oil-loading operation. With signicant drift forces from waves, non-Gaussian elements dominate in residuals and fault diagnosis need be designed using dedicated change detection for the type of distribution encountered. In addition to dedicated diagnosis, an optimal position...... algorithm is proposed to accommodate buoyancy element failure and keep the mooring system in a safe state. Detection properties and fault-tolerant control are demonstrated by high delity simulations...