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Sample records for buoyancy driven natural

  1. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... quite well with the Epstein's formula but in other cases the measured data show clear deviations from the Epstein's formula. Thus, revised formulas for natural ventilation are proposed....

  2. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... quite well with the Epstein's formula ratio are presented. In some cases the measured airflow rates fit quite well with the Epstein's formula but in other cases the measured data show clear deviations from the Epstein's formula. Thus, revised formulas for natural ventilation are proposed....

  3. Experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. Measurements were made for opening ratios L/D range from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length and the diameter of the opening, respectiv...

  4. Experimental Study of Wind-Opposed Buoyancy-Driven Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A.; Bjerre, M.; Chen, Z. D.

    Natural ventilation driven by natural forces, i.e. wind and thermal buoyancy, is an environmentally friendly system for buildings and has been increasingly used around the world in recent years to mitigate the impact on the global environment due to the significant energy consumption by heating...

  5. Rigorous buoyancy driven bubble mixing for centrifugal microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, S; Schulz, M; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2016-01-21

    We present batch-mode mixing for centrifugal microfluidics operated at fixed rotational frequency. Gas is generated by the disk integrated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to liquid water (H2O) and gaseous oxygen (O2) and inserted into a mixing chamber. There, bubbles are formed that ascent through the liquid in the artificial gravity field and lead to drag flow. Additionaly, strong buoyancy causes deformation and rupture of the gas bubbles and induces strong mixing flows in the liquids. Buoyancy driven bubble mixing is quantitatively compared to shake mode mixing, mixing by reciprocation and vortex mixing. To determine mixing efficiencies in a meaningful way, the different mixers are employed for mixing of a lysis reagent and human whole blood. Subsequently, DNA is extracted from the lysate and the amount of DNA recovered is taken as a measure for mixing efficiency. Relative to standard vortex mixing, DNA extraction based on buoyancy driven bubble mixing resulted in yields of 92 ± 8% (100 s mixing time) and 100 ± 8% (600 s) at 130g centrifugal acceleration. Shake mode mixing yields 96 ± 11% and is thus equal to buoyancy driven bubble mixing. An advantage of buoyancy driven bubble mixing is that it can be operated at fixed rotational frequency, however. The additional costs of implementing buoyancy driven bubble mixing are low since both the activation liquid and the catalyst are very low cost and no external means are required in the processing device. Furthermore, buoyancy driven bubble mixing can easily be integrated in a monolithic manner and is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as injection moulding or thermoforming. We consider buoyancy driven bubble mixing an excellent alternative to shake mode mixing, in particular if the processing device is not capable of providing fast changes of rotational frequency or if the low average rotational frequency is challenging for the other integrated fluidic operations.

  6. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-08-25

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov\\'s spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)∼k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  7. Semi-Empirical Models for Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager Andersen, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A literature study is presented on the theories and models dealing with buoyancy-driven ventilation in rooms. The models are categorised into four types according to how the physical process is conceived: column model, fan model, neutral plane model and pressure model. These models are analysed...

  8. A Review of Some Recent Studies on Buoyancy Driven Flows in an Urban Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodhisatta Hajra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some recent studies (after 2000 pertaining to buoyancy driven flows in nature and thier use in reducing air pollution levels in a city (city ventilation. Natural convection flows occur due to the heating and cooling of various urban surfaces (e.g., mountain slopes, leading to upslope and downslope flows. Such flows can have a significant effect on city ventilation which has been the subject of study in the recent times due to increased pollution levels in a city. A major portion of the research reviewed here consists of natural convection flows occurring along mountain slopes, with a few studies devoted to flows along building walls. The studies discussed here primarily include field measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD models. This review shows that for densely populated cities with high pollution levels, natural convection flows (mountain slope or building walls can significantly aid the dispersion of pollutants. Additional studies in this area using CFD and water channel measurements can explain the physical processes involved in such flows and help improve CFD modelling. Future research should focus on a complete understanding of the mechanisms of buoyancy flows in nature and developing design guidelines for better planning of cities.

  9. Pressure evolution in shallow magma chambers upon buoyancy-driven replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papale, P.; Montagna, C. P.; Longo, A.

    2017-03-01

    The invasion of active magma chambers by primitive magma of deeper provenance is a frequent occurrence in volcanic systems, and it is commonly associated with pressurization. Chamber replenishment is driven by pressure and buoyancy forces that cause magma ascent towards shallow depths. We examine the end-member case of pure buoyancy-driven (natural) convection in crustal reservoirs deriving from the presence of degassed, dense magma at shallow level, that can originate a gravitational instability. Space-time-dependent numerical simulations of magma dynamics in composite underground systems reveal highly nonlinear pressure evolution dominated by decompression at shallow depths. This counterintuitive result originates from the compressible nature of multiphase magmas and their complex convection and mixing dynamics. Shallow magma chamber decompression on replenishment is favored by large volatile contents of the uprising magma, resulting in large density contrasts among the resident and the incoming components. These results show that the intuitive concept of magma chamber pressurization upon replenishment may not always hold in real situations dominated by buoyancy, and provide new perspectives for the interpretation of geophysical records at active volcanoes.Plain Language SummaryA common process at active volcanoes worldwide is the arrival of magma from depth of tens of kilometers into shallower (depths of some km) reservoirs ("magma chambers"), containing themselves magma that can be different in terms of gas content and composition. We present numerical simulations that describe this process, with particular reference to the Campi Flegrei volcano in Italy. Our results show that, depending on the specific conditions and the gas contents of the two magma types, this process can lead to a decrease in pressure of the shallow chamber. When interpreting ground deformation signals, very often magma rise toward shallow depths is linked to inflation, caused by pressure

  10. Buoyancy driven flow in a hot water tank due to standby heat loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal behavior in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank due to standby heat loss of the tank are presented. The effect of standby heat loss on temperature distribution in the tank is investigated experimentally on a slim 150l tank...... show that the CFD model predicts satisfactorily water temperatures at different levels of the tank during cooling by standby heat loss. It is elucidated how the downward buoyancy driven flow along the tank wall is established by the heat loss from the tank sides and how the natural convection flow...... with a height to diameter ratio of 5. A tank with uniform temperatures and with thermal stratification is studied. A detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the tank is developed to calculate the natural convection flow in the tank. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different...

  11. Floating rings in vertical soap films : capillary driven bidimensional buoyancy

    CERN Document Server

    Adami, N

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the motion of buoyant rings in vertical soap films. Thickness differences and related bi-dimensional densities are considered as the motor leading to bi-dimensional buoyancy. We show how this effect can be re-interpreted thanks to surface tension profiles in soap films. We propose a model involving surface tension profiles in order to describe the motion of buoyant particles in vertical soap films, and compare it to experimental data.

  12. Buoyancy driven acceleration in a hospital operating room indoor environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, James; Hertzberg, Jean; Zhai, John

    2011-11-01

    In hospital operating rooms, centrally located non-isothermal ceiling jets provide sterile air for protecting the surgical site from infectious particles in the room air as well as room cooling. Modern operating rooms are requiring larger temperature differences to accommodate increasing cooling loads for heat gains from medical equipment. This trend may lead to significant changes in the room air distribution patterns that may sacrifice the sterile air field across the surgical table. Quantitative flow visualization experiments using laser sheet illumination and RANS modeling of the indoor environment were conducted to demonstrate the impact of the indoor environment thermal conditions on the room air distribution. The angle of the jet shear layer was studied as function of the area of the vena contracta of the jet, which is in turn dependent upon the Archimedes number of the jet. Increases in the buoyancy forces cause greater air velocities in the vicinity of the surgical site increasing the likelihood of deposition of contaminants in the flow field. The outcome of this study shows the Archimedes number should be used as the design parameter for hospital operating room air distribution in order to maintain a proper supply air jet for covering the sterile region. This work is supported by ASHRAE.

  13. Validation of buoyancy driven spectral tensor model using HATS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, A.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous spectral tensor model for wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, driven by mean vertical shear and mean temperature gradient. Results from the model, including one-dimensional velocity and temperature spectra and the associated co-spectra, are shown in this paper. Th...... is described via five parameters: the dissipation rate (ε), length scale of energy-containing eddies (L), a turbulence anisotropy parameter (Γ), gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing the atmospheric stability and the rate of destruction of temperature variance (ηθ)....

  14. SIMULATION OF FREE CURRENT FLOWS IN BUOYANCY-DRIVEN VENTILATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Abramkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to analyse the effect of the design and methods for heating the ventilation duct of a buoyancy- driven system on the formation of free convective air currents in it.Methods. The study of free convection under the conditions of interior problem was carried out using the CFD software, based on  the finite volume method with unstructured grid. Ansys Fluent software was used as a calculation tool in the study, due to its having a high convergence of numerical solutions offering full-scale  measurements of convective currents.To evaluate the reliability of  the results obtained, a validation procedure was carried out, allowing us to determine how accurately the selected conceptual model describes the investigated flow through a comparison of experimental and numerical data.Results. The results of numerical modelling of free convective currents occurring in the heated channel of the ventilation system of  the top floor of a multi-storey residential building are presented in  the article. In the course of the study, the air velocity at the entrance to the ventilation duct was found to depend on the calculated  temperature difference θ ˚C for various heating methods. A gradual  increase in the discrepancy between the numerical simulation and  experimental results is observed if the calculated temperature  difference > 20 ° C. This phenomenon is due to the fact that with  increased duct temperature, it is quite difficult to achieve even  heating under actual conditions; this is especially noticeable when  considering the variant when the vertical part of the vent duct and the take-off are both heated. The maximum deviation of the  results is 4.4%. The obtained velocity profiles in the calculated  sections indicate the impact of the ventilation take-off on the nature  of the air flow motion.Conclusion. One of the drawbacks of the existing systems of natural ventilation of residential

  15. CO$_2$ dissolution controlled by buoyancy driven shear dispersion in a background hydrological flow

    CERN Document Server

    Unwin, H Juliette T; Woods, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of the long-time flow which controls the dissolution of a plume of CO$_2$ following injection into an anticline structure in a deep saline aquifer of finite vertical extent. Over times of tens to thousands of years, some of the CO$_2$ will dissolve into the underlying groundwater to produce a region of relatively dense, CO$_2$ saturated water directly below the plume of CO$_2$. Continued dissolution then requires the supply of CO$_2$ unsaturated aquifer water. This may be provided by a background hydrological flow or buoyancy driven flow caused by the density contrast between the CO$_2$ saturated and unsaturated water in the aquifer. At long times, the interaction of the cross-layer diffusive mixing with the buoyancy, leads to buoyancy driven shear dispersion of the CO$_2$. With a background hydrological flow, the upstream transport of dissolved CO$_2$ by this dispersion becomes balanced by the oncoming hydrological flow so that CO$_2$ rich water can only spread a ...

  16. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer with Thermal Radiation in an Enclosure in Case of Buoyancy Driven Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hochenauer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate state of the art approaches and their accuracy to compute heat transfer including radiation inside a closed cavity whereas buoyancy is the only driving force. This research is the first step of an all-embracing study dealing with underhood airflow and thermal management of vehicles. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD simulation results of buoyancy driven flow inside a simplified engine compartment are compared to experimentally gained values. The test rig imitates idle condition without any working fan. Thus, the airflow is only driven by natural convection. A conventional method used for these applications is to compute the convective heat transfer coefficient and air temperature using CFD and calculate the wall temperature separately by performing a thermal analysis. The final solution results from coupling two different software tools. In this paper thermal conditions inside the enclosure are computed by the use of CFD only. The impact of the turbulence model as well as the results of various radiation models are analyzed and compared to the experimental data.

  17. Effects of buoyancy-driven convection on nucleation and growth of protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanev, Christo N; Penkova, Anita; Chayen, Naomi

    2004-11-01

    Protein crystallization has been studied in presence or absence of buoyancy-driven convection. Gravity-driven flow was created, or suppressed, in protein solutions by means of vertically directed density gradients that were caused by generating suitable temperature gradients. The presence of enhanced mixing was demonstrated directly by experiments with crustacyanin, a blue-colored protein, and other materials. Combined with the vertical tube position the enhanced convection has two main effects. First, it reduces the number of nucleated hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) crystals, as compared with those in a horizontal capillary. By enabling better nutrition from the protein in the solution, convection results in growth of fewer larger HEWL crystals. Second, we observe that due to convection, trypsin crystals grow faster. Suppression of convection, achieved by decreasing solution density upward in the capillary, can to some extent mimic conditions of growth in microgravity. Thus, impurity supply, which may have a detrimental effect on crystal quality, was avoided.

  18. Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    ABSTRACT Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage Rebecca Allen Geological CO2 storage is an engineering feat that has been undertaken around the world for more than two decades, thus accurate modeling of flow and transport behavior is of practical importance. Diffusive and convective transport are relevant processes for buoyancy-driven convection of CO2 into underlying fluid, a scenario that has received the attention of numerous modeling studies. While most studies focus on Darcy-scale modeling of this scenario, relatively little work exists at the pore-scale. In this work, properties evaluated at the pore-scale are used to investigate the transport behavior modeled at the Darcy-scale. We compute permeability and two different forms of tortuosity, namely hydraulic and diffusive. By generating various pore ge- ometries, we find hydraulic and diffusive tortuosity can be quantitatively different in the same pore geometry by up to a factor of ten. As such, we emphasize that these tortuosities should not be used interchangeably. We find pore geometries that are characterized by anisotropic permeability can also exhibit anisotropic diffusive tortuosity. This finding has important implications for buoyancy-driven convection modeling; when representing the geological formation with an anisotropic permeabil- ity, it is more realistic to also account for an anisotropic diffusivity. By implementing a non-dimensional model that includes both a vertically and horizontally orientated 5 Rayleigh number, we interpret our findings according to the combined effect of the anisotropy from permeability and diffusive tortuosity. In particular, we observe the Rayleigh ratio may either dampen or enhance the diffusing front, and our simulation data is used to express the time of convective onset as a function of the Rayleigh ratio. Also, we implement a lattice Boltzmann model for thermal convective flows, which we treat as an analog for

  19. Numerical Simulation of Buoyancy-driven Bubble Motion Using Level Set Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, A.; Ghosh Moulic, S.

    2010-06-01

    This paper discusses the numerical simulation of buoyancy-driven bubbles in various shape regimes using level set method. The effects of both inertia and viscous forces are considered in the mathematical model. Surface tension force at the fluid interface is implemented through the CSF model of Brackbill et al. [2]. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved on a finite volume based staggered grid using an explicit projection method. Although the level set method offers an elegant way of computing multiphase flows, it is often plagued by mass conservation problems. In the present work, the level set method is augmented with a volume-reinitialization scheme, which helps preserve the individual fluid masses within gas and liquid phases. This enabled us to compute the motion of bubbles in all important shape regimes on a relatively coarse grid.

  20. A Closer Look at Boundary Layer Inversion in Large-Eddy Simulations and Bulk Models: Buoyancy-Driven Case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gentine, P.; Ballon, Gilles; Heerwaarden, van C.C.

    2015-01-01

    The inversion layer (IL) of a clear-sky, buoyancy-driven convective boundary layer is investigated using large-eddy simulations covering a wide range of convective Richardson numbers. A new model of the IL is suggested and tested. The model performs better than previous first-order models of the

  1. Three-dimensional buoyancy-driven convection structures in thermohaline stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye-Jun Gong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on three-dimensional convection structures in thermohaline stratification with the high Rayleigh number RaT = 7 ⋅ 107, the diffusion ratio δ = 0.01 and various initial density stability ratios R = 0.5, 0.8, and 1.1. According to the classification of buoyancy-driven instability in the parameter space (R, δ, the three cases are referred to follow the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT mode, the mixed mode (MM and the diffusive-layer convection (DCL mode, respectively. Whether the shape of the peak is a finger under the RT mode or a spike under the MM/DLC mode, the 3D view of the interface is likely to be a rolling mountain with a doughnut-shaped vortex around the peak and a banded vortex above the ridge. The doughnut-shaped vortex is maintained around the peak if its growth continues under RT convection; otherwise, the vortex sheds off and moves upward from the peak under the DLC mode. Additionally, we have observed the previously unreported vortex stratification by the contact interface due to the differential diffusion effect.

  2. Characteristics of Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhigang

    Air flow through horizontal openings is an important issue of mass and energy transfer between different zones in buildings. This kind of mass and energy transfer have important implications regarding energy saving, thermal comfort, control of contaminants, micro-organisms and spread of fire...

  3. Large eddy simulation of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume dispersion in an urban street canyon under perpendicular wind flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L H; Huo, R; Yang, D

    2009-07-15

    The dispersion of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume in and above an idealized street canyon of 18 m (width) x 18 m (height) x 40 m (length) with a wind flow perpendicular to its axis was investigated by Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Former studies, such as that by Oka [T.R. Oke, Street design and urban canopy layer climate, Energy Build. 11 (1988) 103-113], Gayev and Savory [Y.A. Gayev, E. Savory, Influence of street obstructions on flow processes within street canyons. J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn. 82 (1999) 89-103], Xie et al. [S. Xie, Y. Zhang, L. Qi, X. Tang, Spatial distribution of traffic-related pollutant concentrations in street canyons. Atmos. Environ. 37 (2003) 3213-3224], Baker et al. [J. Baker, H. L. Walker, X. M. Cai, A study of the dispersion and transport of reactive pollutants in and above street canyons--a large eddy simulation, Atmos. Environ. 38 (2004) 6883-6892] and Baik et al. [J.-J. Baik, Y.-S. Kang, J.-J. Kim, Modeling reactive pollutant dispersion in an urban street canyon, Atmos. Environ. 41 (2007) 934-949], focus on the flow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the street canyon with no buoyancy effect. Results showed that with the increase of the wind flow velocity, the dispersion pattern of a buoyant plume fell into four regimes. When the wind flow velocity increased up to a certain critical level, the buoyancy driven upward rising plume was re-entrained back into the street canyon. This is a dangerous situation as the harmful fire smoke will accumulate to pollute the environment and thus threaten the safety of the people in the street canyon. This critical re-entrainment wind velocity, as an important parameter to be concerned, was further revealed to increase asymptotically with the heat/buoyancy release rate of the fire.

  4. Non-isothermal buoyancy-driven exchange flows in inclined pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, B.; Shariatnia, S.; Ghasemi, H.; Alba, K.

    2017-06-01

    We study non-isothermal buoyancy-driven exchange flow of two miscible Newtonian fluids in an inclined pipe experimentally. The heavy cold fluid is released into the light hot one in an adiabatic small-aspect-ratio pipe under the Boussinesq limit (small Atwood number). At a fixed temperature, the two fluids involved have the same viscosity. Excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement is first found against rather recent studies in literature on isothermal flows where the driving force of the flow comes from salinity as opposed to temperature difference. The degree of flow instability and mixing enhances as the pipe is progressively inclined towards vertical. Similar to the isothermal limit, maximal rate of the fluids interpenetration in the non-isothermal case occurs at an intermediate angle, β . The interpenetration rate increases with the temperature difference. The degree of fluids mixing and diffusivity is found to increase in the non-isothermal case compared to the isothermal one. There has also been observed a novel asymmetric behavior in the flow, never reported before in the isothermal limit. The cold finger appears to advance faster than the hot one. Backed by meticulously designed supplementary experiments, this asymmetric behavior is hypothetically associated with the wall contact and the formation of a warm less-viscous film of the fluid lubricating the cold more-viscous finger along the pipe. On the other side of the pipe, a cool more-viscous film forms decelerating the hot less-viscous finger. Double diffusive effects associated with the diffusion of heat and mass (salinity) are further investigated. In this case and for the same range of inclination angles and density differences, the level of flow asymmetry is found to decrease. The asymmetric behaviour of the flow is quantified over the full range of experiments. Similar to the study of Salort et al. ["Turbulent velocity profiles in a tilted heat pipe," Phys. Fluids 25(10), 105110

  5. Buoyancy-driven flow in a peat moss layer as a mechanism for solute transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappoldt, C.; Pieters, G.J.J.M.; Adema, E.B.; Baaijens, G.J.; Grootjans, A.P.; Duijn, van C.J.

    2003-01-01

    Transport of nutrients, CO2, methane, and oxygen plays an important ecological role at the surface of wetland ecosystems. A possibly important transport mechanism in a water-saturated peat moss layer (usually Sphagnum cuspidatum) is nocturnal buoyancy flow, the downward flow of relatively cold

  6. Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation Generated by the Double-Skin Façade of a High-Rise Building in Tropical Climate: Case Study Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziiz Akhlish Diinal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-rise buildings in tropical region is identical to the use of mechanical Air Conditioning in massive scale. Nevertheless, there is an encouragement to high-rise buildings to reduce its energy consumptions, since they consume quite large amount of energy. This challenge can be overcome with various of strategies, one of them, by means of reducing the cooling load of mechanical Air Conditioning in high-rise building. Prospects come from the modern tall building design strategies, for example the use of double-skin façade to give addition of building skin which could provide indoor temperature protection from outside. Double-skin façade system has continued to increase in buildings in a tropical region such as in Indonesia. However, there is another potential of double skin façade, which is the possibility to increase the buoyancy effect in the air gap between the skin and building envelope. The possibility needs to be studied in order to give a proper way in designing double-skin façade of a high-rise building, especially on Bandung-Indonesia tropical climate. This paper explores the potential of double-skin façade in driving the air inside the façade to generate natural ventilation for a high-rise building in Bandung climate condition. Two parameters are used in exploring the buoyancy force, the width of double-skin façade and the temperature of the skin façade. In general, double-skin façade of a high-rise building in tropical climate can generate buoyancy driven ventilation for the building, it relates strongly to the distance between of the double-skin façade and the building envelope.

  7. Influence of rheology on buoyancy driven instabilities of miscible displacements in 2D micromodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Angelo, M V; Rosen, M [University Buenos Aires, CONICET. Grupo de Medios Porosos, Facultad de IngenierIa, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos-Aires (Argentina); Auradou, H; Hulin, J P, E-mail: vdangelo@fi.uba.a, E-mail: auradou@fast.u-psud.f [University Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, University Paris-Sud, CNRS. Lab. FAST, Bat 502, Campus Universitaire, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    2009-05-01

    The stability of miscible displacements of Newtonian and shear-thinning fluids of slightly different densities (DELTArho/rho approx 3x 10{sup -4}) with a mean flow velocity U is investigated in a 2D transparent network of channels (average width = 0.33 mm). Concentration maps providing information at both the global and local scale are obtained through optical absorption measurements and compared in gravitationally stable and unstable vertical flow configurations; the influence of buoyant flows of typical velocity U{sub g} is characterized by the gravity number N{sub g} = U{sub g}/|U|. For N{sub g} < 0.2, the spreading of the mean relative concentration profile is diffusive for both types of rheologies and characterized by a single dispersivity value l{sub d} = D/U. For the Newtonian water-glycerol solution, l{sub d} is only the same in the stable and unstable configurations for |N{sub g}| < 0.01. For 0.01 < N{sub g} < 0.2, l{sub d} is increased by buoyancy in the unstable configuration and increasingly large front structures are observed on the concentration maps; for N{sub g} > 0.2, front spreading is not diffusive any more. In the stable configuration, in contrast, the front is flattened by buoyancy for N{sub g} < -0.01 and l{sub d} reaches values of the order of the length of individual channels. For the shear thinning water-polymer solution, both the concentration maps and the value of l{sub d} are the same in the stable and unstable configurations over the full range of U values investigated: this stabilization is explained by their high effective viscosity at low shear rates keeping N{sub g} below the instability threshold even at the lowest velocities.

  8. It takes three to tango: 1. Simulating buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, Jenny; Nave, Jean-Christophe; Hager, Bradford H.

    2010-07-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow is of fundamental importance for numerous geodynamic phenomena. Since the equations of motion governing multiphase flow are rarely amenable to analytical solutions, numerical simulations provide a compelling alternative. They offer the ability to carefully analyze flow phenomena under differing regimes, initial conditions, and flow dynamics. The three key challenges in these computations are (1) the accurate solution of the equations of motion in the presence of large viscosity contrasts, (2) the representation of strongly deforming interfaces between different fluids, and (3) the accurate coupling of fluid and interface solver. In three dimensions, these challenges become even more intricate, and the appropriate choice of numerical scheme has a profound influence on the tractability, accuracy, robustness, and efficiency of the computational simulation. This is the first paper of two that examine numerical simulations of buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts. In this paper, we present our numerical approach which tackles the above three main challenges through a combination of three numerical methods, namely, (1) an extended ghost fluid type discretization which we developed specifically for the Stokes regime, (2) the level set method, and (3) the extension velocity technique. We find that all three components are crucial to obtain a versatile numerical tool for simulating complex structures in evolving flow. We validate our code by reproducing four benchmark problems in two and three dimensions. We devote special attention to comparing our method to other existing techniques, detailing the advantages of this approach. Finally, we highlight several types of geophysical flow problems for which we believe our method to be well suited.

  9. Dispersion and dissolution of a buoyancy driven gas plume in a layered permeable rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Andrew W.; Norris, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Using a series of simplified models, we explore the controls on the migration, dispersion and eventual dissolution of a plume of hydrogen gas which may, in principle, rise under buoyancy through a layered permeable rock if released from a Geological Disposal Facility (GDF). We show that the presence of low permeability shale barriers causes the gas to spread laterally as it rises. Averaging over the length scale of the barriers, we use expressions for the Darcy velocity of the gas to describe the dispersion of a tracer and illustrate the effect with a new experiment using a baffled Hele-Shaw cell. While the plume is flowing, a large volume of gas may build up beneath the barriers. If the gas flux subsequently wanes, much of the gas will drain upward through the formation and spread on the upper impermeable boundary of the formation. However, a significant capillary-trapped wake of gas may develop beneath each barrier. Owing to the low solubility of hydrogen in water and assuming relatively slow groundwater flow rates, this trapped hydrogen may require a period of tens to hundreds of thousands of years to dissolve and form a cloud of hydrogen rich water. Although simplified, these models provide a framework to assess the possible travel times and pathways of such a gas plume.

  10. Buoyancy and Pressure Induced Flow of Hot Gases in Vertical Shafts with Natural and Forced Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaluria, Yogesh; Tamm, Gunnar Olavi

    2014-11-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study buoyancy and pressure induced flow of hot gases in vertical shafts to model smoke propagation in elevator and ventilation shafts of high rise building fires. Various configurations were tested with regard to natural and forced ventilation imposed at the upper and lower surfaces of the vertical shaft. The aspect ratio was taken at a typical value of 6. From a lower vent, the inlet conditions for smoke and hot gases were varied in terms of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers. The forced ventilation at the upper or lower boundary was of the same order as the bulk shaft flow. Measurements were taken within the shaft to allow a detailed study of the steady state flow and thermal fields established for various shaft configurations and inlet conditions, from which optimal means for smoke alleviation in high rise building fires may be developed. Results indicated a wall plume as the primary transport mechanism for smoke propagating from the inlet towards the exhaust region. Recirculation and entrainment dominated at high inlet Grashof number flows, while increased inlet Reynolds numbers allowed greater mixing in the shaft. The development and stability of these flow patterns and their effects on the smoke behavior were assessed for several shaft configurations with different inlet conditions. The comparisons indicated that the fastest smoke removal and lowest overall shaft temperatures occur for a configuration with natural ventilation at the top surface and forced ventilation up from the shaft bottom.

  11. Buoyancy-driven leakage of oil from a ruptured submarine pipeline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1983-01-01

    The rupture of a submarine oil pipeline starts various mechanisms leading to an oil spill. Among these mechanisms the leakage of oil driven by the difference in specific gravities of oil and sea-water is difficult to estimate. A simple mathematical model has been developed and laboratory experiments

  12. Surface tension and buoyancy-driven flow in a non-isothermal liquid bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Alexander, J. I. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations governing the transport of momentum, mass and heat in a nonisothermal liquid bridge with a temperature-dependent surface tension are solved using a vorticity-stream-function formulation together with a nonorthogonal coordinate transformation. The equations are discretized using a pseudo-unsteady semi-implicit finite difference scheme and are solved by the ADI method. A Picard-type iteration is adopted which consists of inner and outer iterative processes. The outer iteration is used to update the shape of the free surface. Two schemes have been used for the outer iteration; both use the force balance normal to the free surface as the distinguished boundary condition. The first scheme involves successive approximation by the direct solution of the distinguished boundary condition. The second scheme uses the artificial force imbalance between the fluid pressure, viscous and capillary forces at the free surface which arises when the boundary condition for force balance normal to the surface is not satisfied. This artificial imbalance is then used to change the surface shape until the distinguished boundary condition is satisfied. These schemes have been used to examine a variety of model liquid bridge situations including purely thermocapillary-driven flow situations and mixed thermocapillary- and bouyancy-driven flow.

  13. Experimental and numerical study of buoyancy-driven single bubble dynamics in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Klaasen, Bart; Degrève, Jan; Blanpain, Bart; Verhaeghe, Frederik

    2014-12-01

    Buoyancy-driven single bubble behaviour in a vertical Hele-Shaw cell with various gap Reynolds numbers Re(h/d)2 has been studied. Two gap thicknesses, h = 0.5 mm (Re(h/d)2 = 1.0-8.5) and 1 mm (Re(h/d)2 = 6.0-50) were used to represent low and high gap Reynolds number flow. Periodic shape oscillation and path vibration were observed once the gap Reynolds number exceeds the critical value of 8.5. The bubble behaviour was also numerically simulated by taking a two-dimensional volume of fluid method coupled with a continuum surface force model and a wall friction model in the commercial computational fluid dynamics package Fluent. By adjusting the viscous resistance values, the bubble dynamics in the two gap thicknesses can be simulated. For the main flow properties including shape, path, terminal velocity, horizontal vibration, and shape oscillation, good agreement is obtained between experiment and simulation. The estimated terminal velocity is 10%-50% higher than the observed one when the bubble diameter d ≤ 5 mm, h = 0.5 mm and 9% higher when d ≤ 18 mm, h = 1.0 mm. The estimated oscillation frequency is 50% higher than the observed value. Three-dimensional effects and spurious vortices are most likely the reason for this inaccuracy. The simulation confirms that the thin liquid films between gas bubbles and the cell walls have a limited effect on the bubble dynamics.

  14. Second-law analysis for buoyancy-driven hydromagnetic couple stress fluid flow through a porous channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem, Semiu O.; Adesanya, Samuel O.; Vincent, Uchechukwu E.

    2016-08-01

    This paper examines the combined effects of the buoyancy force and of the magnetic field on the entropy generation rate in the flow of a couple stress fluid through a porous vertical channel. The flow's dynamical equations were non-dimensionalised and solved via the application of the Adomian decomposition method (ADM). Variations of some thermo-physical parameters were conducted and discussed, with regard to the physics of the fluid. Our result shows that the entropy generation rate increases as the buoyancy increases in the fluid. In addition, the irreversibility in the flow system results mainly from the fluid's viscosity, ohmic heating, and the buoyancy.

  15. Developing Buoyancy Driven Flow of a Nanofluid in a Vertical Channel Subject to Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal C. Sacheti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The developing natural convective flow of a nanofluid in an infinite vertical channel with impermeable bounding walls has been investigated. It is assumed that the nanofluid is dominated by two specific slip mechanisms and that the channel walls are subject to constant heat flux and isothermal temperature, respectively. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations coupling different transport processes have been solved numerically. The variations of velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration have been discussed in relation to a number of physical parameters. It is seen that the approach to the steady-state profiles of velocity and temperature in the present work is different from the ones reported in a previous study corresponding to isothermal wall conditions.

  16. Numerical investigation of double diffusive buoyancy forces induced natural convection in a cavity partially heated and cooled from sidewalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Nikbakhti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a numerical investigation of double-diffusive natural convective heat and mass transfer in a cavity filled with Newtonian fluid. The active parts of two vertical walls of the cavity are maintained at fixed but different temperatures and concentrations, while the other two walls, as well as inactive areas of the sidewalls, are considered to be adiabatic and impermeable to mass transfer. The length of the thermally active part equals half of the height. The non-dimensional forms of governing transport equations that describe double-diffusive natural convection for two-dimensional incompressible flow are functions of temperature or energy, concentration, vorticity, and stream-function. The coupled differential equations are discretized via FDM (Finite Difference Method. The Successive-Over-Relaxation (SOR method is used in the solution of the stream function equation. The analysis has been done for an enclosure with different aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 11 for three different combinations of partially active sections. The results are presented graphically in terms of streamlines, isotherms and isoconcentrations. In addition, the heat and mass transfer rate in the cavity is measured in terms of the average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers for various parameters including thermal Grashof number, Lewis number, buoyancy ratio and aspect ratio. It is revealed that the placement order of partially thermally active walls and the buoyancy ratio influence significantly the flow pattern and the corresponding heat and mass transfer performance in the cavity.

  17. Buoyancy-Induced, Columnar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Mark; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Free buoyancy-induced, columnar vortices (dust devils) that are driven by thermal instabilities of ground-heated, stratified air in areas with sufficient insolation convert the potential energy of low-grade heat in the surface air layer into a vortex flow with significant kinetic energy. A variant of the naturally-occurring vortex is deliberately triggered and anchored within an azimuthal array of vertical, stator-like flow vanes that form an open-top enclosure and impart tangential momentum to the radially entrained air. This flow may be exploited for power generation by coupling the vortex to a vertical-axis turbine. The fundamental mechanisms associated with the formation, evolution, and dynamics of an anchored, buoyancy-driven columnar vortex within such a facility are investigated experimentally using a heated ground plane. Specific emphasis is placed on the manipulation of the vortex formation and structure and the dependence of the vorticity production and sustainment mechanisms on the thermal resources and characteristic scales of the anchoring flow vanes using stereo-PIV. It is shown that manipulation of the formation and advection of vorticity concentrations within the enclosure can be exploited for increasing the available kinetic energy. Supported by ARPA-E.

  18. Buoyancy-driven mixing of fluids in a confined geometry; Melange gravitationnel de fluides en geometrie confinee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallez, Y

    2007-12-15

    The present work based on Direct Numerical Simulations is devoted to the study of mixing between two miscible fluids of different densities. The movement of these fluids is induced by buoyancy. Three geometries are considered: a cylindrical tube, a square channel and a plane two-dimensional flow. For cylindrical tubes, the results of numerical simulations fully confirm previous experimental findings by Seon et al., especially regarding the existence of three different flow regimes, depending on the tilt angle. The comparison of the various geometries shows that tridimensional flows in tubes or channels are similar, whereas the two-dimensional model fails to give reliable information about real 3D flows, either from a quantitative point of view or for a phenomenological understanding. A peculiar attention is put on a joint analysis of the concentration and vorticity fields and allows us to explain several subtle aspects of the mixing dynamics. (author)

  19. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  20. Flows and Stratification of an Enclosure Containing Both Localised and Vertically Distributed Sources of Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jamie; Linden, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We examine the flows and stratification established in a naturally ventilated enclosure containing both a localised and vertically distributed source of buoyancy. The enclosure is ventilated through upper and lower openings which connect the space to an external ambient. Small scale laboratory experiments were carried out with water as the working medium and buoyancy being driven directly by temperature differences. A point source plume gave localised heating while the distributed source was driven by a controllable heater mat located in the side wall of the enclosure. The transient temperatures, as well as steady state temperature profiles, were recorded and are reported here. The temperature profiles inside the enclosure were found to be dependent on the effective opening area A*, a combination of the upper and lower openings, and the ratio of buoyancy fluxes from the distributed and localised source Ψ =Bw/Bp . Industrial CASE award with ARUP.

  1. Impulsive nature in collisional driven reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takaya; Sato, Tetsuya

    1995-11-01

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulation is carried out in order to investigate energy relaxation process of the driven magnetic reconnection in an open finite system through a long time calculation. It is found that a very impulsive energy release occurs in an intermittent fashion through magnetic reconnection for a continuous magnetic flux injection on the boundary. In the impulsive phase, the reconnection rate is remarkably enhanced up to more than ten times of the driving rate on the boundary. (author).

  2. An Integrated Capillary, Buoyancy, and Viscous-Driven Model for Brine/CO2Relative Permeability in a Compositional and Parallel Reservoir Simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, X.

    2012-11-03

    The effectiveness of CO2 storage in the saline aquifers is governed by the interplay of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. Recent experimental study reveals the impact of pressure, temperature, and salinity on interfacial tension (IFT) between CO2 and brine. The dependence of CO2-brine relative permeability and capillary pressure on pressure (IFT) is also clearly evident in published experimental results. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control the migration and trapping of CO2 in subsurface is crucial to design future storage projects that warrant long-term and safe containment. Simulation studies ignoring the buoyancy and also variation in interfacial tension and the effect on the petrophysical properties such as trapped CO2 saturations, relative permeability, and capillary pressure have a poor chance of making accurate predictions of CO2 injectivity and plume migration. We have developed and implemented a general relative permeability model that combines effects of pressure gradient, buoyancy, and IFT in an equation of state (EOS) compositional and parallel simulator. The significance of IFT variations on CO2 migration and trapping is assessed.

  3. Numerical exploration of a non-Newtonian Carreau fluid flow driven by catalytic surface reactions on an upper horizontal surface of a paraboloid of revolution, buoyancy and stretching at the free stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L. Animasaun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometrically, the upper pointed surface of an aircraft and bonnet of a car are examples of upper horizontal surfaces of a paraboloid of revolution (uhspr. The motion of these objects strongly depends on the boundary layer that is formed within the immediate space on it. However, each of these surfaces is neither a horizontal/vertical nor cone/wedge and neither a cone nor a wedge. This article presents the motion of 2-dimensional Blasius flow of Carreau fluid on the surface of such object. The case in which the reaction between the Carreau fluid and catalyst at the surface produces significant temperature differences which consequently set up buoyancy-driven flows within the boundary layer is investigated. Single first-order Arrhenius kinetics is adopted to model the reaction on the surface of the catalyst situated on uhspr which initiates the free convection. Suitable similarity variables are applied to non-dimensionalized, parameterized and reduce the governing partial differential equations to a coupled ordinary differential equations (BVP. The BVP is solved numerically using the shooting technique. Temperature distribution in the flow of viscoelastic Carreau fluid is greater than that of a Newtonian fluid. Local heat transfer rate decreases faster when the Carreau fluid is characterized as shear-thinning. Maximum concentration is guaranteed at a small value of power-law index n and large value of thickness parameter. Keywords: Viscoelastic-Carreau fluid, Catalitic surface, Paraboloid of revolution, Numerical method, Uhspr, Boundary layer analysis

  4. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  5. Investigation of Heat Transfer Enhancement or Deterioration of Variable Properties Al2O3-EG-water Nanofluid in Buoyancy Driven Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khorasanizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the natural convection heat transfer of variable properties Al2O3-EG-water nanofluid in a differentially heated rectangular cavity has been investigated numerically. The governing equations, for a Newtonian fluid, have been solved numerically with a finite volume approach. The influences of the pertinent parameters such as Ra in the range of 103-107 and volume fraction of nanoparticles from 0 to 0.04 on heat transfer characteristics have been studied. The results verified by making overall comparison with some existing experimental results have shown that for Ra=103, for which conduction heat transfer is dominant, the average Nusselt number increases as volume fraction of nanoparticles increases, but for higher Ra numbers in contradiction with the constant properties cases it decreases. This reduction, which is associated with increased viscosity, is more severe at Ra of 104 compared to higher Ra numbers such that the least deterioration in heat transfer occurs for Ra=107. This is due to the fact that as Ra increases, the Brownian motion enhances; thus conductivity improves and becomes more important than viscosity increase. An scale analysis, performed to clarify the contradictory reports in the literature on the natural convection heat transfer enhancement or deterioration of nanofluids, showed that different kinds of evaluating the base fluid Rayleigh number has led to such a difference.

  6. Buoyancy-driven convection heat transfer of copper–water nanofluid in a square enclosure under the different periodic oscillating boundary temperature waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xilian Han

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates natural convective heat transfer of copper–water nanofluids in a square enclosure with alternating temperature at one vertical wall, relatively low temperature at the opposite sidewall and adiabatic at the other walls. The transport equations are solved numerically with finite volume approach using SIMPLEC algorithm. Calculations are performed for nanoparticle volume fractions from 0 to 0.2 and dimensionless amplitude from 0 to 1.0 with consideration of three typical alternating waves (trapezoid wave, sine wave and triangle wave. Results show the utilization of nanoparticles enhances heat transfer and the percentage increase in the time-averaged Nusselt number is around 38% d from ϕ=0 to ϕ=0.2 under the certain conditions. The oscillating waveform has a degree effect on the heat transfer enhancement and the trapezoid wave is more conducive to the enhancement of heat transfer than sine and triangle waves. And the oscillating area is introduced to combine the oscillating waveform and its amplitude and the percentage increase in the time-averaged Nusselt number is around 14.5% from S=0 to S=0.075. In the end, the regression equation about the time-averaged Nusselt number is obtained as parameters of the solid volume fraction and the oscillating area.

  7. Nonconsumptive predator-driven mortality causes natural selection on prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepielski, Adam M; Wang, Jason; Prince, Garrett

    2014-03-01

    Predators frequently exert natural selection through differential consumption of their prey. However, predators may also cause prey mortality through nonconsumptive effects, which could cause selection if different prey phenotypes are differentially susceptible to this nonconsumptive mortality. Here we present an experimental test of this hypothesis, which reveals that nonconsumptive mortality imposed by predatory dragonflies causes selection on their damselfly prey favoring increased activity levels. These results are consistent with other studies of predator-driven selection, however, they reveal that consumption alone is not the only mechanism by which predators can exert selection on prey. Uncovering this mechanism also suggests that prey defensive traits may represent adaptations to not only avoid being consumed, but also for dealing with other sources of mortality caused by predators. Demonstrating selection through both consumptive and nonconsumptive predator mortality provides us with insight into the diverse effects of predators as an evolutionary force. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. The Solar Vortex: Electric Power Generation using Anchored, Buoyancy-Induced Columnar Vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, Ari

    2015-04-01

    Naturally-occurring, buoyancy-driven columnar vortices (``dust devils'') that are driven by the instability of thermally stratified air layers and sustained by the entrainment of ground- heated air, occur spontaneously in the natural environment with core diameters of 1-50 m and heights up to 1 km. These vortices convert low-grade waste heat in the air layer overlying the warm surface into a solar-induced wind with significant kinetic energy. Unlike dust devil vortices that are typically free to wander laterally, the Solar Vortex (SoV) is deliberately triggered and anchored within a cylindrical domain bounded by an azimuthal array of stationary ground-mounted vertical vanes and sustained by continuous entrainment of the ground-heated air through these vanes. The mechanical energy of the anchored vortex is exploited for power generation by coupling the vortex to a vertical-axis turbine. This simple, low-cost electric power generating unit is competitive in cost, intermittency, and capacity factor with traditional solar power technologies. The considerable kinetic energy of the vortex column cannot be explained by buoyancy alone, and the fundamental mechanisms associated with the formation, evolution, and dynamics of an anchored, buoyancy-driven columnar vortex were investigated experimentally and numerically with specific emphasis on flow manipulation for increasing the available kinetic energy and therefore the generated power. These investigations have also considered the dependence of the vortex scaling and strength on the thermal resources and on the flow enclosure in the laboratory and in the natural environment. Preliminary outdoor tests of a two-meter scale prototype successfully demonstrated the ability to engender and anchor a columnar vortex using only solar radiation and couple the flow to a vertical axis wind turbine. A kilowatt-scale outer door prototype will be tested during the summer of 2015.

  9. Role of buoyancy and heat release in fire modeling, propagation, and instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid M. Mughal; Yousuff M. Hussaini; Scott L. Goodrick; Philip Cunningham

    2007-01-01

    In an investigation of the dynamics of coupled fluid-combustion-buoyancy driven problems, an idealised model formulation is used to investigate the role of buoyancy and heat release in an evolving boundary layer, with particular emphasis on examining underlying fluid dynamics to explain observed phenomena arising in forest fire propagation. The role played by the...

  10. EFFECTS OF BUOYANCY RATIO ON CONVECTIVE HEAT AND SOLUTE TRANSFER IN NEWTONIAN FLUID SATURATED INCLINED POROUS CAVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A LATRECHE

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes a numerical study of the effects of buoyancy ratio on double-diffusive natural convection in square inclined cavity filled with fluid saturated porous media. Transverse gradients of heat and solute are applied on the two horizontal walls of the cavity, while the other two walls are impermeable and adiabatic. The Darcy model with the Boussinesq approximation is used to solve the governing equations. The flow is driven by a combined buoyancy effect due to both temperature and concentration variations. A finite volume approach has been used to solve the non-dimensional governing equations. The results are presented in streamline, isothermal, iso-concentration, Nusselt and Sherwood contours for different values of the non-dimensional governing parameters.

  11. Wave Dragon Buoyancy Regulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jens; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    Wave Dragon is a wave energy converter, which was deployed offshore at Nissum Bredning in Denmark in 2003. The experience gained from operating Wave Dragon during 2003 and 2004 has shown that the buoyancy regulation system can be improved in a number of ways. This study describes the current...... situation, and proposes a number of activities in order to improve the buoyancy regulation system. This work was performed under EU ENERGIE contract no. ENK5-CT-2002-00603, and is a contribution to WP 2.3/2.4 and D40/D41....

  12. Buoyancy effects on smoldering combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, S.; Peterson, J.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Pagni, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of buoyancy on the rate of spread of a concurrent smolder reaction through a porous combustible material is investigated theoretically and experimentally. In the experiments, buoyant forces are controlled by varying the density difference, and the smolder rate spread through porous alpha cellulose (0.83 void fraction) is measured as a function of the ambient air pressure. The smolder velocity is found to increase with the ambient pressure; extinction occurs when the buoyancy forces cannot overcome the drag forces, indicating that diffusion by itself cannot support the spread of a smolder reaction. Theoretical predictions are found to be in good qualitative agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei

    OpenAIRE

    Itsumi Nakamura; Carl G. Meyer; Katsufumi Sato

    2015-01-01

    We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two specie...

  14. Pharmacophore-driven identification of PPARγ agonists from natural sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, R. K.; Christensen, Kathrine Bisgaard; Assimopoulou, A. N.

    2011-01-01

    In a search for more effective and safe anti-diabetic compounds, we developed a pharmacophore model based on partial agonists of PPARγ. The model was used for the virtual screening of the Chinese Natural Product Database (CNPD), a library of plant-derived natural products primarily used in folk m...

  15. Stability research on a natural circulation driven SCWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T' Joen, C.; Kam, F.; Rohde, M. [Delft Univ. of Tech., Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    To improve the thermal efficiency of nuclear reactors, a concept design using supercritical water has been proposed. As an inherent safety feature, natural circulation could be applied, driving the flow with the strong density changes. Such natural circulation flows can however experience instabilities (density wave oscillations). To study the stability, an experimental facility representing the HPLWR was designed using a scaling fluid (R23). In parallel a computational tool was developed which uses a transient analysis technique. This paper will present a comparison of the experimental measurements and numerical predictions for the stability of a supercritical loop, showing good agreement. (author)

  16. Experimental study on a natural circulation driven HPLWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T' Joen, C.; Rohde, M. [Delft Univ. of Tech., Delft (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    The large density change through the core of a supercritical water reactor could be used as the driving force for circulating the coolant. To study such a natural circulation system, a scaled experimental setup was developed using Freon R23. This paper presents the first power-flow measurements for single core heating as well as 3 core heating (HPLWR power distribution) indicating that natural circulation occurs. A numerical model was developed to further study the impact of geometric and system parameters. This model shows good qualitative agreement with the experiment. By further refining the proposed model to include the pressure drop over the heat exchanger, a better quantitative agreement could be obtained. (author)

  17. Pharmacophore-driven identification of PPARγ agonists from natural sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Rasmus K.; Christensen, Kathrine B.; Assimopoulou, Andreana N.; Fretté, Xavier; Papageorgiou, Vassilios P.; Kristiansen, Karsten; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene

    2011-02-01

    In a search for more effective and safe anti-diabetic compounds, we developed a pharmacophore model based on partial agonists of PPARγ. The model was used for the virtual screening of the Chinese Natural Product Database (CNPD), a library of plant-derived natural products primarily used in folk medicine. From the resulting hits, we selected methyl oleanonate, a compound found, among others, in Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia oleoresin (Chios mastic gum). The acid of methyl oleanonate, oleanonic acid, was identified as a PPARγ agonist through bioassay-guided chromatographic fractionations of Chios mastic gum fractions, whereas some other sub-fractions exhibited also biological activity towards PPARγ. The results from the present work are two-fold: on the one hand we demonstrate that the pharmacophore model we developed is able to select novel ligand scaffolds that act as PPARγ agonists; while at the same time it manifests that natural products are highly relevant for use in virtual screening-based drug discovery.

  18. Natural Ventilation Driven by Wind and Temperature Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen

    Natural ventilation is a commonly used principle when buildings are being ventilated. It can be controlled by openings in the building envelope, which open or close depending on the need of air inside the building. It can also be the simple action of just opening a door or a window to let the fresh...... air in. In both cases it is often necessary to have an idea of the amount of air coming through the window. Therefore, expressions for this prediction have been developed through the last decades. In cross-ventilation, the expressions are rather well defined and here the difficulty lies within...... the definition of the discharge coefficient that describes the characteristics of the opening, since it seems to fluctuate depending on the incidence angle of the wind. In single-sided ventilation where openings only exist in one side of the building, the flow through the opening is harder to predict. The main...

  19. Tidal tomography constrains Earth’s deep-mantle buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Harriet C. P.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Davis, James L.; Tromp, Jeroen; Yang, Hsin-Ying; Al-Attar, David

    2017-11-01

    Earth’s body tide—also known as the solid Earth tide, the displacement of the solid Earth’s surface caused by gravitational forces from the Moon and the Sun—is sensitive to the density of the two Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs) beneath Africa and the Pacific. These massive regions extend approximately 1,000 kilometres upward from the base of the mantle and their buoyancy remains actively debated within the geophysical community. Here we use tidal tomography to constrain Earth’s deep-mantle buoyancy derived from Global Positioning System (GPS)-based measurements of semi-diurnal body tide deformation. Using a probabilistic approach, we show that across the bottom two-thirds of the two LLSVPs the mean density is about 0.5 per cent higher than the average mantle density across this depth range (that is, its mean buoyancy is minus 0.5 per cent), although this anomaly may be concentrated towards the very base of the mantle. We conclude that the buoyancy of these structures is dominated by the enrichment of high-density chemical components, probably related to subducted oceanic plates or primordial material associated with Earth’s formation. Because the dynamics of the mantle is driven by density variations, our result has important dynamical implications for the stability of the LLSVPs and the long-term evolution of the Earth system.

  20. Rise and fall of toxic benthic freshwater cyanobacteria (Anabaena spp.) in the Eel river: Buoyancy and dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma-Gregson, Keith; Power, Mary E; Bormans, Myriam

    2017-06-01

    Benthic cyanobacteria in rivers produce cyanotoxins and affect aquatic food webs, but knowledge of their ecology lags behind planktonic cyanobacteria. The buoyancy of benthic Anabaena spp. mats was studied to understand implications for Anabaena dispersal in the Eel River, California. Field experiments were used to investigate the effects of oxygen bubble production and dissolution on the buoyancy of Anabaena dominated benthic mats in response to light exposure. Samples of Anabaena dominated mats were harvested from the South Fork Eel River and placed in settling columns to measure floating and sinking velocities, or deployed into in situ ambient and low light treatments to measure the effect of light on flotation. Floating and sinking occurred within minutes and were driven by oxygen bubbles produced during photosynthesis, rather than intracellular changes in carbohydrates or gas vesicles. Light experiment results showed that in a natural ambient light regime, mats remained floating for at least 4days, while in low light mats begin to sink in <24h. Floating Anabaena samples were collected from five sites in the watershed and found to contain the cyanotoxins anatoxin-a and microcystin, with higher concentrations of anatoxin-a (median 560, max 30,693ng/gDW) than microcystin (median 30, max 37ng/gDW). The ability of Anabaena mats to maintain their buoyancy will markedly increase their downstream dispersal distances. Increased buoyancy also allows toxin-containing mats to collect along shorelines, increasing threats to human and animal public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Exact equations of motion for natural orbitals of strongly driven two-electron systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rapp, J; Bauer, D

    2014-01-01

    Natural orbital theory is a computationally useful approach to the few and many-body quantum problem. While natural orbitals are known and applied since many years in electronic structure applications, their potential for time-dependent problems is being investigated only since recently. Correlated two-particle systems are of particular importance because the structure of the two-body reduced density matrix expanded in natural orbitals is known exactly in this case. However, in the time-dependent case the natural orbitals carry time-dependent phases that allow for certain time-dependent gauge transformations of the first kind. Different phase conventions will, in general, lead to different equations of motion for the natural orbitals. A particular phase choice allows us to derive the exact equations of motion for the natural orbitals of any (laser-) driven two-electron system explicitly, i.e., without any dependence on quantities that, in practice, require further approximations. For illustration, we solve th...

  2. Short-term airing by natural ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perino, Marco; Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    traditional mechanical ventilation components with natural ventilation devices, such as motorized windows and louvers. Among the various ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates...... that was aimed at developing and validating numerical models for the analysis of buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation systems. Once validated, these models can be used to optimize control strategies in order to achieve satisfactory indoor comfort conditions and IAQ.......The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. This kind of system frequently integrates...

  3. Thermal buoyancy on Venus - Underthrusting vs subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Jeffrey D.; Head, James W.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal and buoyancy consequences of the subduction endmember are modeled in an attempt to evaluate the conditions distinguishing underthrusting and subduction. Thermal changes in slabs subducting into the Venusian mantle with a range of initial geotherms are used to predict density changes and, thus, slab buoyancy. Based on a model for subduction-induced mantle flow, it is then argued that the angle of the slab dip helps differentiate between underthrusting and subduction. Mantle flow applies torques to the slab which, in combination with torques due to slab buoyancy, act to change the angle of slab dip.

  4. Evaluation of Discharge Coefficients for Window Openings in Wind Driven Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Sandberg, Mats

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the classical approach for calculation of wind driven airflow through large openings in buildings and discusses the fulfilment of the limiting assumptions. It is demonstrated that the limiting assumptions are not fulfilled for large openings in buildings for cross ventilation...... cannot be regarded as a constant and it is very difficult to estimate correct values resulting in less accuracy of prediction of natural ventilation.......This paper describes the classical approach for calculation of wind driven airflow through large openings in buildings and discusses the fulfilment of the limiting assumptions. It is demonstrated that the limiting assumptions are not fulfilled for large openings in buildings for cross ventilation......, and therefore, the classical approach is not appropriate for prediction of airflow through large openings in buildings in the cross ventilation case. Using the approach for real openings and estimating the discharge coefficient for window openings has also not been very successful. The discharge coefficient...

  5. Late clinical events after drug-eluting stents: the interplay between stent-related and natural history-driven events

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leon, Martin B; Allocco, Dominic J; Dawkins, Keith D; Baim, Donald S

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the relative contributions of drug-eluting stent-specific and background natural history-driven causes for adverse clinical events between 1 and 5 years, in the paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES...

  6. Geodynamic modelling of low-buoyancy thermo-chemical plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Earth's biggest magmatic events that form Large Igneous Provinces are believed to originate from massive melting when hot mantle plumes rising from the lowermost mantle reach the base of the lithosphere. Classical models of thermal mantle plumes predict a flattening of the plume head to a disk-like structure, a kilometer-scale surface uplift just before the initiation of LIPs and thin plume tails. However, there are seismic observations and paleo-topography data that are difficult to explain with this classical approach. Here, using numerical models, we show that the issue can be resolved if major mantle plumes are thermo-chemical rather than purely thermal. It has been suggested a long time ago that subducted oceanic crust could be recycled by mantle plumes; and based on geochemical data, they may contain up to 15-20% of this recycled material in the form of dense eclogite, which drastically decreases their buoyancy and makes it depth-dependent. We perform numerical experiments in a 3D spherical shell geometry to investigate the dynamics of the plume ascent, the interaction between plume- and plate-driven flow and the dynamics of melting in a plume head. For this purpose, we use the finite-element code ASPECT, which allows for complex temperature-, pressure- and composition-dependent material properties. Moreover, our models incorporate phase transitions (including melting) with the accompanying rheological and density changes, Clapeyron slopes and latent heat effects for both peridotite and eclogite, mantle compressibility and a strong temperature- and depth-dependent viscosity. We demonstrate that despite their low buoyancy, such plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Conditions for this ascent are high plume volume and moderate lower mantle subadiabaticity. While high plume buoyancy results in plumes directly advancing to the base of the lithosphere, plumes with slightly lower buoyancy pond in a depth of 300-400 km

  7. Supersymmetry with Radiatively-Driven Naturalness: Implications for WIMP and Axion Searches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Jung Bae

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available By insisting on naturalness in both the electroweak and quantum chromodynamics (QCD sectors of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM, the portrait for dark matter production is seriously modified from the usual weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP miracle picture. In supersymmetry (SUSY models with radiatively-driven naturalness (radiative natural SUSY or radiative natural SUSY (RNS which include a Dine–Fischler–Srednicki–Zhitnitsky (DFSZ-like solution to the strong charge-conjugation-parity (CP and SUSY \\(\\mu\\ problems, dark matter is expected to be an admixture of both axions and higgsino-like WIMPs. The WIMP/axion abundance calculation requires simultaneous solution of a set of coupled Boltzmann equations which describe quasi-stable axinos and saxions. In most of parameter space, axions make up the dominant contribution of dark matter although regions of WIMP dominance also occur. We show the allowed range of Peccei-Quinn (PQ scale \\(f_a\\ and compare to the values expected to be probed by the axion dark matter search experiment (ADMX axion detector in the near future. We also show WIMP detection rates, which are suppressed from usual expectations, because now WIMPs comprise only a fraction of the total dark matter. Nonetheless, ton-scale noble liquid detectors should be able to probe the entirety of RNS parameter space. Indirect WIMP detection rates are less propitious since they are reduced by the square of the depleted WIMP abundance.

  8. Natural noise and external wakefield seeding in a proton-driven plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Lotov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate description of noise levels is of crucial importance for the correct simulation of instability-driven processes, such as the density modulation of a long proton bunch traversing a plasma. To insure that the correct instability develops, a seed field must be larger than the cumulative shot noise. We develop an analytical theory of the noise field and compare it with multidimensional simulations. We find that the natural noise wakefield generated in a plasma by the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron bunches is very low, at the level of 10  kV/m. This fortunate fact eases the requirements on the seed. Our three-dimensional simulations show that even a few tens MeV electron bunch precursor of a very moderate intensity is sufficient to seed the proton bunch self-modulation in plasma.

  9. A Model of Secondary Hydrocarbon Migration As a Buoyancy-Driven Separate Phase Flow Un modèle de migration secondaire des hydrocarbures considéré comme un écoulement en phases séparées régi par la poussée d'Archimède

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehner F. K.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of secondary migration is described which permits the prediction of hydrocarbon migration and accumulation patterns in a sedimentary basin, if source rock expulsion rates and geometrical and hydraulic properties of major carrier systems are known through geological time. In this model, secondary migration is treated as buoyancy-driven, segregated flow of hydrocarbons in hydrostatic aquifers. Lateral, updip migration is conceived as a Boussinesq-type, free-surface flow, with source and sink terms representing supply from source rocks and leakage through cap rocks and faults. This permits a two-dimensional, map-view mathematical description of a three-dimensional, time-dependent secondary migration system. A nine-point finite difference approximation has been developed to minimize numerical dispersion, and upstream-weighting is used to obtain stable solutions. Example computations for simple, single carrier bed structures are presented. L'article décrit un modèle mathématique de migration secondaire prédisant la migration des hydrocarbures et leur accumulation dans un bassin sédimentaire, lorsque les taux d'expulsion des roches mères et les propriétés géométriques et hydrauliques des principaux systèmes de drainage sont connus à l'échelle du temps géologique. Dans ce modèle, la migration secondaire est traitée comme un écoulement des hydrocarbures en phase séparée, contrôlé par la poussée d'Archimède, dans des aquifères hydrostatiques. La migration latérale est considérée comme un écoulement de type Boussinesq, à surface libre, avec des termes sources et puits représentant les apports venant des roches mères et les fuites à travers les couvertures et les failles. Ceci permet une description mathématique bidimensionnelle cartographiable d'un système de migration secondaire tridimensionnel et dépendant du temps. On utilise une approximation type différences finies à neuf points pour minimiser

  10. Using the computer-driven VR environment to promote experiences of natural world immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Lisa A.

    2013-03-01

    In December, 2011, over 800 people experienced the exhibit, :"der"//pattern for a virtual environment, created for the fully immersive CAVETM at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. This exhibition took my nature-based photographic work and reinterpreted it for virtual reality (VR).Varied responses such as: "It's like a moment of joy," or "I had to see it twice," or "I'm still thinking about it weeks later" were common. Although an implied goal of my 2D artwork is to create a connection that makes viewers more aware of what it means to be a part of the natural world, these six VR environments opened up an unexpected area of inquiry that my 2D work has not. Even as the experience was mediated by machines, there was a softening at the interface between technology and human sensibility. Somehow, for some people, through the unlikely auspices of a computer-driven environment, the project spoke to a human essence that they connected with in a way that went beyond all expectations and felt completely out of my hands. Other interesting behaviors were noted: in some scenarios some spoke of intense anxiety, acrophobia, claustrophobia-even fear of death when the scene took them underground. These environments were believable enough to cause extreme responses and disorientation for some people; were fun, pleasant and wonder-filled for most; and were liberating, poetic and meditative for many others. The exhibition seemed to promote imaginative skills, creativity, emotional insight, and environmental sensitivity. It also revealed the CAVETM to be a powerful tool that can encourage uniquely productive experiences. Quite by accident, I watched as these nature-based environments revealed and articulated an essential relationship between the human spirit and the physical world. The CAVETM is certainly not a natural space, but there is clear potential to explore virtual environments as a path to better and deeper connections between people and nature. We've long associated contact

  11. Lithospheric buoyancy and continental intraplate stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoback, M.L.; Mooney, W.D.

    2003-01-01

    Lithospheric buoyancy, the product of lithospheric density and thickness, is an important physical property that influences both the long-term stability of continents and their state of stress. We have determined lithospheric buoyancy by applying the simple isostatic model of Lachenbruch and Morgan (1990). We determine the crustal portion of lithospheric buoyancy using the USGS global database of more than 1700 crustal structure determinations (Mooney et al., 2002), which demonstrates that a simple relationship between crustal thickness and surface elevation does not exist. In fact, major regions of the crust at or near sea level (0-200 m elevation) have crustal thicknesses that vary between 25 and 55 km. Predicted elevations due to the crustal component of buoyancy in the model exceed observed elevations in nearly all cases (97% of the data), consistent with the existence of a cool lithospheric mantle lid that is denser than the asthenosphere on which it floats. The difference between the observed and predicted crustal elevation is assumed to be equal to the decrease in elevation produced by the negative buoyancy of the mantle lid. Mantle lid thickness was first estimated from the mantle buoyancy and a mean lid density computed using a basal crust temperature determined from extrapolation of surface heat flow, assuming a linear thermal gradient in the mantle lid. The resulting values of total lithosphere thickness are in good agreement with thicknesses estimated from seismic data, except beneath cratonic regions where they are only 40-60% of the typical estimates (200-350 km) derived from seismic data. This inconsistency is compatible with petrologic data and tomography and geoid analyses that have suggested that cratonic mantle lids are ??? 1% less dense than mantle lids elsewhere. By lowering the thermally determined mean mantle lid density in cratons by 1%, our model reproduces the observed 200-350+ km cratonic lithospheric thickness. We then computed

  12. An experimental study of naturally driven heated air flow in a vertical pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimi, Mostafa; Bayat, Mohammad Mehdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Specifications of warm air flow within a vertical pipe which is induced by the buoyancy effect were investigated in this study. Air from surroundings was directed into a heating chamber connected to a vertical pipe to establish a flow within the pipe. The temperature and the velocity were measured at different points within the stable flow and the mean values of these parameters were computed. Mass flow rate of air was evaluated using ideal gas assumption. In order to investigate the effect of the thermal boundary condition of the pipe, two tests were conducted; once for the pipe exposed to the surroundings and then for the pipe with a thermal insulation. A model for predicting the induced flow rate of warm air was developed and the predictions of the model were compared with the experimental data over the tested range of the parameters. (author)

  13. Gluino reach and mass extraction at the LHC in radiatively-driven natural SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard; Savoy, Michael; Sengupta, Dibyashree [University of Oklahoma, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Norman, OK (United States); Barger, Vernon [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Gainer, James S.; Tata, Xerxes [University of Hawaii, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Honolulu, HI (United States); Huang, Peisi [University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); HEP Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Texas A and M University, Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Radiatively-driven natural SUSY (RNS) models enjoy electroweak naturalness at the 10% level while respecting LHC sparticle and Higgs mass constraints. Gluino and top-squark masses can range up to several TeV (with other squarks even heavier) but a set of light Higgsinos are required with mass not too far above m{sub h} ∝ 125 GeV. Within the RNS framework, gluinos dominantly decay via g → tt{sub 1}{sup *}, anti tt{sub 1} → t anti tZ{sub 1,2} or t anti bW{sub 1}{sup -} + c.c., where the decay products of the higgsino-like W{sub 1} and Z{sub 2} are very soft. Gluino pair production is, therefore, signaled by events with up to four hard b-jets and large E{sub T}. We devise a set of cuts to isolate a relatively pure gluino sample at the (high-luminosity) LHC and show that in the RNS model with very heavy squarks, the gluino signal will be accessible for m{sub g} < 2400 (2800) GeV for an integrated luminosity of 300 (3000) fb{sup -1}. We also show that the measurement of the rate of gluino events in the clean sample mentioned above allows for a determination of m{sub g} with a statistical precision of 2-5% (depending on the integrated luminosity and the gluino mass) over the range of gluino masses where a 5σ discovery is possible at the LHC. (orig.)

  14. Study of Buoyancy Effects in Diffusion Flames Using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Gollahalli, Subramanyam R.; Griffin, DeVon

    1997-01-01

    Diffusion flames are extensively encountered in many domestic and industrial processes. Even after many decades of research, a complete understanding of the diffusion flame structure is not available. The structure and properties of the flames are governed by the mixing (laminar or turbulent), chemical kinetics, radiation and soot processes. Another important phenomenon that affects flame structure in normal gravity is buoyancy. The presence of buoyancy has long hindered the rational understanding of many combustion processes. In gas jet diffusion flames, buoyancy affects the structure of the shear layer, the development of fluid instabilities, and formation of the coherent structures in the near nozzle region of the gas jets. The buoyancy driven instabilities generate vorticial structures outside the flame resulting in flame flicker. The vortices also strongly interact with the small-scale structures in the jet shear layer. This affects the transitional and turbulence characteristics of the flame. For a fundamental understanding of diffusion flames it is essential to isolate the effects of buoyancy. This is the primary goal of the experiments conducted in microgravity. Previous investigations, have shown dramatic differences between the jet flames in microgravity and normal gravity. It has been observed that flames in microgravity are taller and more sooty than in normal gravity. The fuels used in these experiments were primarily hydrocarbons. In the absence of buoyancy the soot resides near the flame region, which adversely affects the entrainment of reactants. It is very important to eliminate the interference of soot on flame characteristics in microgravity. The present work, therefore, focuses on the changes in the flame structure due to buoyancy without the added complexities of heterogeneous reactions. Clean burning hydrogen is used as the fuel to avoid soot formation and minimize radiative losses. Because of the low luminosity of hydrogen flames, we use

  15. Naturally driven variability in the global secondary organic aerosol over a decade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tsigaridis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the variability of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA distributions and budget and provide a measure for the robustness of the conclusions on human induced changes of SOA, a global 3-dimensional chemistry transport model describing both the gas and the particulate phase chemistry of the troposphere has been applied. The response of the global budget of SOA to temperature and moisture changes as well as to biogenic emission changes over a decade (1984-1993 has been evaluated. The considered emissions of biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC are driven by temperature, light and vegetation. They vary between 756 and 810 Tg Cy-1 and are therefore about 5.5 times higher than the anthropogenic VOC emissions. All secondary aerosols (sulphuric, nitrates and organics are computed on-line together with the aerosol associated water. Over the studied decade, the computed natural variations (8% in the chemical SOA production from biogenic VOC oxidation equal the chemical SOA production from anthropogenic VOC oxidation. Maximum values are calculated for 1990 (warmer and drier and minimum values for 1986 (colder and wetter. The SOA computed variability results from a 7% increase in biogenic VOC emissions from 1986 to 1990 combined with 8.5% and 6% increases in the wet and dry deposition of SOA and leads to about 11.5% increase in the SOA burden of biogenic origin. The present study also demonstrates the importance of the hydrological cycle in determining the built up and fate of SOA in the atmosphere. It also reveals the existence of significant positive and negative feedback mechanisms in the atmosphere responsible for the non linear relationship between emissions of biogenic VOC and SOA burden.

  16. Buoyancy induced Couette-Poiseuille flow in a vertical microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahari, M.

    2017-10-01

    The fully developed buoyancy-induced (natural convective) Couette-Poiseuille flow in a vertical microchannel is investigated with the velocity slip and temperature jump boundary conditions. Closed form analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields are obtained. The effects of the fluid-wall interaction parameter, wall-ambient temperature difference ratio, Knudsen number, mixed convection parameter, and the dimensionless pressure gradient on the velocity, temperature, volume flow rate, heat flux between the plates and the Nusselt number have been discussed in detail through graphs. The outcomes of the investigation indicate that the volume flow rate increases with increasing values of mixed convection parameter, wall-ambient temperature difference ratio, and Knudsen number.

  17. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Itsumi; Meyer, Carl G; Sato, Katsufumi

    2015-01-01

    We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two species of deep-sea sharks (bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a prickly shark, Echinorhinus cookei) in their natural habitat, we used accelerometer-magnetometer data loggers to measure their swimming performance. Both species of deep-sea sharks showed similar diel vertical migrations: they swam at depths of 200-300 m at night and deeper than 500 m during the day. Ambient water temperature was around 15°C at 200-300 m but below 7°C at depths greater than 500 m. During vertical movements, all deep-sea sharks showed higher swimming efforts during descent than ascent to maintain a given swimming speed, and were able to glide uphill for extended periods (several minutes), indicating that these deep-sea sharks are in fact positively buoyant in their natural habitats. This positive buoyancy may adaptive for stealthy hunting (i.e. upward gliding to surprise prey from underneath) or may facilitate evening upward migrations when muscle temperatures are coolest, and swimming most sluggish, after spending the day in deep, cold water. Positive buoyancy could potentially be widespread in fish conducting daily vertical migration in deep-sea habitats.

  18. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsumi Nakamura

    Full Text Available We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two species of deep-sea sharks (bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a prickly shark, Echinorhinus cookei in their natural habitat, we used accelerometer-magnetometer data loggers to measure their swimming performance. Both species of deep-sea sharks showed similar diel vertical migrations: they swam at depths of 200-300 m at night and deeper than 500 m during the day. Ambient water temperature was around 15°C at 200-300 m but below 7°C at depths greater than 500 m. During vertical movements, all deep-sea sharks showed higher swimming efforts during descent than ascent to maintain a given swimming speed, and were able to glide uphill for extended periods (several minutes, indicating that these deep-sea sharks are in fact positively buoyant in their natural habitats. This positive buoyancy may adaptive for stealthy hunting (i.e. upward gliding to surprise prey from underneath or may facilitate evening upward migrations when muscle temperatures are coolest, and swimming most sluggish, after spending the day in deep, cold water. Positive buoyancy could potentially be widespread in fish conducting daily vertical migration in deep-sea habitats.

  19. Buoyancy under control: underwater locomotor performance in a deep diving seabird suggests respiratory strategies for reducing foraging effort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants--as in other families of diving seabirds--of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control.

  20. On the Anisotropic Nature of MRI-driven Turbulence in Astrophysical Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Gareth; Pessah, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) is thought to play an important role in enabling accretion in sufficiently ionized astrophysical disks. The rate at which MRI-driven turbulence transports angular momentum is intimately related to both the strength of the amplitudes of the fluctuations...

  1. Sub-natural linewidth resonances in coherently-driven double Λ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    - driven four-level Λ system with two closely spaced excited common levels, thereby forming a double Λ system. Using the master equation approach, analytical results are obtained for the absorption spectrum of a weak probe in the presence ...

  2. Wind-driven rain and its implications for natural hazard management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzen, Miriam; Iserloh, Thomas; de Lima, João L. M. P.; Fister, Wolfgang; Ries, Johannes B.

    2017-04-01

    Prediction and risk assessment of hydrological extremes are great challenges. Following climate predictions, frequent and violent rainstorms will become a new hazard to several regions in the medium term. Particularly agricultural soils will be severely threatened due to the combined action of heavy rainfall and accompanying winds on bare soil surfaces. Basing on the general underestimation of the effect of wind on rain erosion, conventional soil erosion measurements and modeling approaches lack related information to adequately calculate its impact. The presented experimental-empirical approach shows the powerful impact of wind on the erosive potential of rain. The tested soils had properties that characterise three different environments 1. Silty loam of semi-arid Mediterranean dryfarming and fallow, 2. clayey loam of humid agricultural sites and 3. cohesionless sandy substrates as found at coasts, dune fields and drift-sand areas. Erosion was found to increase by a factor of 1.3 to 7.1, depending on site characteristics. Complementary tests with a laboratory procedure were used to quantify explicitly the effect of wind on raindrop erosion as well as the influence of substrate, surface structure and slope on particle displacement. These tests confirmed the impact of wind-driven rain on total erosion rates to be of great importance when compared to all other tested factors. To successfully adapt soil erosion models to near-future challenges of climate change induced rain storms, wind-driven rain is supposed to be introduced into the hazard management agenda.

  3. Influence of input data on airflow network accuracy in residential buildings with natural wind- and stack-driven ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt, Krzysztof; Krzaczek, Marek; Tejchman, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    The airflow network (AFN) modeling approach provides an attractive balance between the accuracy and computational demand for naturally ventilated buildings. Its accuracy depends on input parameters such as wind pressure and opening discharge coefficients. In most cases, these parameters...... is still poor. In this paper, the influence of wind pressure data on the accuracy of a coupled AFN-BES model for a real building with natural wind- and stack-driven ventilation was analyzed. The results of 8 computation cases with different wind pressure data from secondary sources were compared...... are obtained from secondary sources which are solely representative for very simplified buildings, i.e. for buildings without facade details. Although studies comparing wind pressure coefficients or discharge coefficients from different sources exist, the knowledge regarding the effect of input data on AFN...

  4. Microgravity Flow Regime Data: Buoyancy and Mixing Apparatus Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Adam; Best, Frederick

    2010-01-01

    Zero-g two-phase flow data set qualification and flight experiment design have not been standardized and as a result, agreement among researchers has not been reached regarding what experimental conditions adequately approximate those of microgravity. The effects of buoyancy forces and mixing apparatus on the flow regime transitions are presented in this study. The gravity conditions onboard zero-g aircraft are at best 10-3 g which is used to approximate the 10-5 g conditions of microgravity, thus the buoyancy forces present on zero-g aircraft can become significantly large and unrepresentative of microgravity. When buoyancy forces approach those of surface tension forces, buoyancy induced coalescence occurs. When discussing flow regime transitions, these large buoyancy forces lead to flow regime transitions which otherwise would not occur. The buoyancy attributes of the two-phase flow data sets available in the literature are evaluated to determine which data sets exhibit buoyancy induced transitions. Upon comparison of the representative data sets, the affects of different mixing apparatus can be seen in the superficial velocity flow regime maps.

  5. Dynamics of Change in Human-Driven and Natural Systems: Fast Forward, Slow Motion, Same Movie? A Case Study from Plant Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Andrivon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary biology and evolutionary ecology deal with change in species and ecosystems over time, and propose mechanisms to explain and predict these. In particular, they look for generic elements that will drive any organism or phylum to adaptive changes or to extinction. This paper, using examples from the field of plant protection against pests and diseases, shows that the patterns of change observed in natural and in human-driven systems are comparable, and proposes that their similarities result from the same mechanisms operating at different paces. Human-driven systems can thus be seen simply as ‘fast-forward’ versions of natural systems, making them tractable tools to test and predict elements from evolutionary theory. Conversely, the convergence between natural and human-driven systems opens opportunities for a more widespread use of evolutionary theory when analyzing and optimizing any human-driven system, or predicting its adaptability to changing conditions.

  6. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator- NB38 -Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory. It was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, the HST was finally designed and built becoming operational in the 1990s. The HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. Pictured is MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) that served as the test center for shuttle astronauts training for Hubble related missions. Shown are astronauts Bruce McCandless and Sharnon Lucid being fitted for their space suits prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  7. Sub-natural linewidth resonances in coherently-driven double Λ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is shown that the absorption spectrum consists of a triplet, of which one resonance is of sub-natural linewidth depending on the atom–field interaction parameters. ... Homi Bhabha National Institute, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, ...

  8. The Phoenix inner core - potential geomagnetic implications of an asymmetric buoyancy flux (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboussiere, T.; Deguen, R.; Melzani, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth's inner core is notoriously asymmetric and we propose that this could be due to an internal mode of thermal convection (Nature, 466, 2010). That mode is characterized by melting on the eastern hemisphere and crystallization on the western hemisphere, at approximately the same rate that can be significantly larger than the average growth rate of the radius of the inner core. In addition to its impact on the internal structure of the inner core, such a convection mode has implications for the outer core. From the point of view of convection in the outer core, the buoyancy flux generated at the inner core boundary is excessively asymmetric, positive on the western side, negative on the eastern side. Contrary to a previously proposed scenario (Aubert et al., Nature, 454, 2008) whereby convection in the outer core (driven by heat flux heterogeneity at the core-mantle boundary) would affect the structure of the inner core, our model suggests that the opposite might be possible: inner core convection could affect convection in the outer core through asymmetric forcing. In this talk, we shall examine to what extent this mechanism is active and we shall try to convince researchers in the field of geomagnetism to investigate the plausibility and consequences of our model of inner core convection. There are however a few hints pointing to the fact that convection in the inner core and in the outer core may be more intimately related. First, our convection model for the inner core depends on the ability of convection in the outer core to supply or extract latent heat at the inner core boundary. Secondly, the orientation of this convection can be shown to lie preferentially along the longest axis of the inner core ellipsoid: the East-West direction coincides with the direction of the degree two mass distribution of the Earth which itself can be related to plate tectonics hence heat flux at the core-mantle boundary. That coincidence shows that convection in the inner

  9. Buoyancy effect on atmospheric surface layer: measurements from the East Coast of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Z.; Reda, E.; Zulkifli, Rozli

    2017-04-01

    The nature and evolution of the atmospheric surface layer is still unresolved completely. Many questions regarding the existence of the z-less layer and trend of the cross correlations still remain open. This research analyzes some of the surface layer ambiguities. In this research temperature, velocity and turbulence data were collected from a weather station facility located in the Marine Ecosystem Research Centre (EKOMAR) Mersing on the East Coast of Malaysia. Two high resolution hotwires were utilized at 3 m and 12 m heights above ground. Both gradient Richardson number and Obukhov stability parameter were calculated. Turbulence spectra were plotted at different stability conditions. The results does not show the existence of the z-less layer at deep stable condition. The buoyancy force, under unstable condition, was found responsible for the increase of vertical correlation factor. The fingerprint of the buoyancy force was detected in the spectra at low frequencies.

  10. Buoyancy Limitation of Filamentous Cyanobacteria under Prolonged Pressure due to the Gas Vesicles Collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeynayaka, Helayaye Damitha Lakmali; Asaeda, Takashi; Kaneko, Yasuko

    2017-08-01

    Freshwater cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena galeata were cultured in chambers under artificially generated pressures, which correspond to the hydrostatic pressures at deep water. Variations occurred in gas vesicles volume, and buoyancy state of cells under those conditions were analyzed at different time intervals (5 min, 1 day, and 5 days). Variations in gas vesicles morphology of cells were observed by transmission electron microscopy images. Settling velocity ( Vs) of cells which governs the buoyancy was observed with the aid of a modified optical microscope. Moreover, effects of the prolonged pressure on cell ballast composition (protein and polysaccharides) were examined. Elevated pressure conditions reduced the cell ballast and caused a complete disappearance of gas vesicles in Pseudanabaena galeata cells. Hence cyanobacteria cells were not able to float within the study period. Observations and findings of the study indicate the potential application of hydrostatic pressure, which naturally occurred in hypolimnion of lakes, to inhibit the re-suspension of cyanobacteria cells.

  11. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, Buoyancy Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Buoyancy Flux data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  12. Data-Driven NPR Illustrations of Natural Flows in Chinese Painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Chi; Chen, Bo-An; Chen, Kuo-Wei; Si, Wei-Lin; Yao, Chih-Yuan; Zhang, Eugene

    2017-12-01

    Introducing motion into existing static paintings is becoming a field that is gaining momentum. This effort facilitates keeping artworks current and translating them to different forms for diverse audiences. Chinese ink paintings and Japanese Sumies are well recognized in Western cultures, yet not easily practiced due to the years of training required. We are motivated to develop an interactive system for artists, non-artists, Asians, and non-Asians to enjoy the unique style of Chinese paintings. In this paper, our focus is on replacing static water flow scenes with animations. We include flow patterns, surface ripples, and water wakes which are challenging not only artistically but also algorithmically. We develop a data-driven system that procedurally computes a flow field based on stroke properties extracted from the painting, and animate water flows artistically and stylishly. Technically, our system first extracts water-flow-portraying strokes using their locations, oscillation frequencies, brush patterns, and ink densities. We construct an initial flow pattern by analyzing stroke structures, ink dispersion densities, and placement densities. We cluster extracted strokes as stroke pattern groups to further convey the spirit of the original painting. Then, the system automatically computes a flow field according to the initial flow patterns, water boundaries, and flow obstacles. Finally, our system dynamically generates and animates extracted stroke pattern groups with the constructed field for controllable smoothness and temporal coherence. The users can interactively place the extracted stroke patterns through our adapted Poisson-based composition onto other paintings for water flow animation. In conclusion, our system can visually transform a static Chinese painting to an interactive walk-through with seamless and vivid stroke-based flow animations in its original dynamic spirits without flickering artifacts.

  13. Variable Nature of Magnetically-Driven X-Ray Disk-Winds in XRB/AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Keigo; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Behar, Ehud; Tombesi, Francesco; shrader, Chris

    2018-01-01

    With an increasing number of high-S/N spectroscopic data available, it is being speculated that certain types of ionized winds detected in X-ray may be exhibiting characteristic correlations among (1) X-ray spectral state, (2) ionizing luminosity and (3) absorber's property. For example, in the case of luminous quasars such as PDS456, ionizing X-ray luminosity may be correlated to the wind kinematics (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) as expected from radiative-driven scenario. On the other hand, in the case of black hole XRBs such as GRS1915+105, harder SED during the so called low/hard state is thought to turn off X-ray winds. While these are phenomena across different mass-scale, one might argue that the reported correlations may be related to the intense radiation field. In this presentation, we discuss, based on the ideal MHD framework, that these interesting trends suggested in X-ray analyses may well be reconciled self-consistently with magnetic origin as well. In this view, ionized winds are intrinsically always present magnetically launched from the disk, while its large-scale ionization structure will respond to various physical changes due mainly to the underlying radiation field (i.e. hardness and/or luminosity) and wind structure (i.e. density gradient). The primary aim of the current theoretical study is to better understand a potential coupling between wind's condition and ionizing luminosity/spectral state by fully exploiting the recent MHD wind models that we are proposing, which can allow us to further identify the fundamental launching process. We show, as a preliminary work, a unique predictable signature of absorption spectra calculated from the model to probe expected correlations.

  14. Single-sided natural ventilation driven by wind pressure and temperature difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    -scale wind tunnel experiments have been made with the aim of making a new expression for calculation of the airflow rate in single-sided natural ventilation. During the wind tunnel experiments it was found that the dominating driving force differs between wind speed and temperature difference depending......Even though opening a window for ventilation of a room seems very simple, the flow that occurs in this situation is rather complicated. The amount of air going through the window opening will depend on the wind speed near the building, the temperatures inside and outside the room, the wind...

  15. Buoyancy-generated variable-density turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandoval, D.L.; Clark, T.T.; Riley, J.J.

    1996-07-01

    Because of the importance of turbulence mixing in many applications, a number of turbulence mixing models have been proposed for variable- density flows. These engineering models (one- point statistical models) typically include the transport of the turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent energy dissipation rate (i.e., k - {epsilon} models). The model presented by Besnard, Harlow, Rauenzahn and Zemach (1992) (herein referred to as BHRZ) is a one-point model intended to describe variable-density turbulent flows. Transport equations for the Reynolds stress tensor, R{sub ij}, and the turbulent energy dissipation rate, the density-velocity correlation, a{sub i}, and the density-specific volume correlation, b are derived. This model employs- techniques and concepts from incompressible, constant- density turbulence modeling and incorporates ideas from two-phase flow models. Clark and Spitz (1994) present a two-point model for variable-density turbulence. Their derivation is based on transport equations that, are based 0481 on two-point- generalizations of R{sub ij}, a{sub ij}, and b. These equations are Fourier transformed with respect to the separation distance between the two points. Transport equations are derived for R{sub ij}, a{sub i}, b. As in the one-point model, this model contains many ad-hoc assumptions and unknown model coefficients that must be determined by comparison with experimental and numerical data. However, the two-point formalism requires fewer equilibrium assumptions then does a single-point model. Our primary concern in this paper lies in the nonlinear processes of turbulence and the influence of large density variations (not within the Boussinesq limit) on these processes. To. isolate the effects of variable-density on the turbulence we restrict our flow to be incompressible, statistically homogeneous buoyancy-generated. turbulence. To our knowledge there have not been any simulations reported for this problem.

  16. Neutral Buoyancy Test - Large Space Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  17. Solar driven production of toxic halogenated and nitroaromatic compounds in natural seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calza, Paola [Dipartimento di Chimica Analitica, Universita di Torino, via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy)], E-mail: paola.calza@unito.it; Massolino, Cristina; Pelizzetti, Ezio; Minero, Claudio [Dipartimento di Chimica Analitica, Universita di Torino, via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2008-07-15

    Natural seawater (NSW) sampled in March and June 2007 in the Gulf of Trieste, Italy, has been spiked with phenol and irradiated in a device simulating solar light spectrum and intensity. Opposite to the case of artificial seawater, for which phenol is slightly degraded by direct photolysis, in NSW the phenol degradation mediated by natural photosensitizers occurs, forming several secondary pollutants, including hydroxyderivatives (1,4-benzoquinone, resorcinol), three chlorophenol isomers, 2,3-dichlorophenol, 2- and 4-bromophenol, 2- and 4-nitrophenol, and several condensed products (2 and 4-phenoxyphenol, 2,2'-, 4,4'- and 2,4-bisphenol). These compounds are toxic to bacteria and other living organisms. Ecotoxicologic effect has been evaluated by using the Vibrio Fischeri luminescent bacteria assay. This technique uses marine organisms, and it is therefore well suited for the study on marine samples. A correlation exists between the intermediates evolution and the toxicity profile, as the largest toxicity is observed when compounds with the lower EC50 (halophenols, phenoxyphenols) are formed at higher concentration.

  18. Researcher-driven Campaigns Engage Nature's Notebook Participants in Scientific Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, Theresa M.; Elmore, Andrew J.; Huete, Alfredo; Keller, Stephen; Levetin, Estelle; Luvall, Jeffrey; Meyers, Orrin; Stylinski, Cathlyn D.; Van De Water, Peter K.; Vukovic, Ana

    2013-01-01

    One of the many benefits of citizen science projects is the capacity they hold for facilitating data collection on a grand scale and thereby enabling scientists to answer questions they would otherwise not been able to address. Nature's Notebook, the plant and animal phenology observing program of the USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN) suitable for scientists and non-scientists alike, offers scientifically-vetted data collection protocols and infrastructure and mechanisms to quickly reach out to hundreds to thousands of potential contributors. The USA-NPN has recently partnered with several research teams to engage participants in contributing to specific studies. In one example, a team of scientists from NASA, the New Mexico Department of Health, and universities in Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and California are using juniper phenology observations submitted by Nature's Notebookparticipants to improve predictions of pollen release and inform asthma and allergy alerts. In a second effort, researchers from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science are engaging Nature's Notebookparticipants in tracking leafing phenophases of poplars across the U.S. These observations will be compared to information acquired via satellite imagery and used to determine geographic areas where the tree species are most and least adapted to predicted climate change. Researchers in these partnerships receive benefits primarily in the form of ground observations. Launched in 2010, the juniper pollen effort has engaged participants in several western states and has yielded thousands of observations that can play a role in model ground validation. Periodic evaluation of these observations has prompted the team to improve and enhance the materials that participants receive, in an effort to boost data quality. The poplar project is formally launching in spring of 2013 and will run for three years; preliminary findings from 2013 will be presented. Participants in these

  19. Single-sided Natural Ventilation Driven by a Combination of Wind Pressure and Temperature Difference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen; Heiselberg, Per

    2007-01-01

    . In both situations the aim is to obtain a good indoor environment but to control the amount of air, some basic knowledge of the flow through an opening is necessary. The amount of air going through the window opening in single-sided ventilation will depend on the wind speed near the building......, which make the prediction difficult. From earlier work, a few design expressions for single-sided ventilation already exist, but none of these include the wind direction, which here is an important parameter. Therefore several wind tunnel experiments are made in this work to find a new design expression......Natural ventilation is a commonly used principle when ventilation systems for buildings are designed. The ventilation can either be obtained by automatically controlled openings in the building envelope, or it can just be the simple action of opening a door or a window to let the fresh air in...

  20. Coming down from the trees: Is terrestrial activity in Bornean orangutans natural or disturbance driven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancrenaz, Marc; Sollmann, Rahel; Meijaard, Erik; Hearn, Andrew J.; Ross, Joanna; Samejima, Hiromitsu; Loken, Brent; Cheyne, Susan M.; Stark, Danica J.; Gardner, Penny C.; Goossens, Benoit; Mohamed, Azlan; Bohm, Torsten; Matsuda, Ikki; Nakabayasi, Miyabi; Lee, Shan Khee; Bernard, Henry; Brodie, Jedediah; Wich, Serge; Fredriksson, Gabriella; Hanya, Goro; Harrison, Mark E.; Kanamori, Tomoko; Kretzschmar, Petra; Macdonald, David W.; Riger, Peter; Spehar, Stephanie; Ambu, Laurentius N.; Wilting, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The orangutan is the world's largest arboreal mammal, and images of the red ape moving through the tropical forest canopy symbolise its typical arboreal behaviour. Records of terrestrial behaviour are scarce and often associated with habitat disturbance. We conducted a large-scale species-level analysis of ground-based camera-trapping data to evaluate the extent to which Bornean orangutans Pongo pygmaeus come down from the trees to travel terrestrially, and whether they are indeed forced to the ground primarily by anthropogenic forest disturbances. Although the degree of forest disturbance and canopy gap size influenced terrestriality, orangutans were recorded on the ground as frequently in heavily degraded habitats as in primary forests. Furthermore, all age-sex classes were recorded on the ground (flanged males more often). This suggests that terrestrial locomotion is part of the Bornean orangutan's natural behavioural repertoire to a much greater extent than previously thought, and is only modified by habitat disturbance. The capacity of orangutans to come down from the trees may increase their ability to cope with at least smaller-scale forest fragmentation, and to cross moderately open spaces in mosaic landscapes, although the extent of this versatility remains to be investigated. PMID:24526001

  1. Buoyancy effect on the flow pattern and the thermal performance of an array of circular cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Fornarelli, Francesco; Oresta, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we found, by means of numerical simulations, a transition in the oscillatory character of the flow field for a particular combination of buoyancy and spacing in an array of six circular cylinders at a Reynolds number of 100 and Prandtl number of 0.7. The cylinders are iso-thermal and they are aligned with the Earth acceleration (g). According to the array orientation, an aiding or an opposing buoyancy is considered. The effect of natural convection with respect to the forced convection is modulated with the Richardson number, Ri, ranging between -1 and 1. Two values of center to center spacing (s=3.6d - 4d) are considered. The effects of buoyancy and spacing on the flow pattern in the near and far field are described. Several transitions in the flow patterns are found and a parametric analysis of the dependence of the force coefficients and Nusselt number with respect to the Richardson number is reported. For Ri=-1, the change of spacing ratio from 3.6 to 4 induces a transition in the standard d...

  2. Future ocean hypercapnia driven by anthropogenic amplification of the natural CO2 cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Ben I; Sasse, Tristan P

    2016-01-21

    High carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in sea-water (ocean hypercapnia) can induce neurological, physiological and behavioural deficiencies in marine animals. Prediction of the onset and evolution of hypercapnia in the ocean requires a good understanding of annual variations in oceanic CO2 concentration, but there is a lack of relevant global observational data. Here we identify global ocean patterns of monthly variability in carbon concentration using observations that allow us to examine the evolution of surface-ocean CO2 levels over the entire annual cycle under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We predict that the present-day amplitude of the natural oscillations in oceanic CO2 concentration will be amplified by up to tenfold in some regions by 2100, if atmospheric CO2 concentrations continue to rise throughout this century (according to the RCP8.5 scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). The findings from our data are broadly consistent with projections from Earth system climate models. Our predicted amplification of the annual CO2 cycle displays distinct global patterns that may expose major fisheries in the Southern, Pacific and North Atlantic oceans to hypercapnia many decades earlier than is expected from average atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We suggest that these ocean 'CO2 hotspots' evolve as a combination of the strong seasonal dynamics of CO2 concentration and the long-term effective storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the oceans that lowers the buffer capacity in these regions, causing a nonlinear amplification of CO2 concentration over the annual cycle. The onset of ocean hypercapnia (when the partial pressure of CO2 in sea-water exceeds 1,000 micro-atmospheres) is forecast for atmospheric CO2 concentrations that exceed 650 parts per million, with hypercapnia expected in up to half the surface ocean by 2100, assuming a high-emissions scenario (RCP8.5). Such extensive ocean hypercapnia has detrimental implications for

  3. Future ocean hypercapnia driven by anthropogenic amplification of the natural CO2 cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, B.

    2016-02-01

    Elevated carbon dioxide concentrations in seawater (hypercapnia) can induce neurological, physiological and behavioural deficiencies in marine animals. Prediction of the onset and evolution of hypercapnia in the ocean requires a good understanding of annual oceanic carbon dioxide variability, but relevant global observational data are sparse. Here we diagnose global ocean patterns of monthly carbon variability based on observations that allow us to examine the evolution of surface ocean CO2 levels over the entire annual cycle under increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We find that some oceanic regions undergo an up to 10-fold amplification of the natural cycle of CO2 by 2100, if atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations continue to rise throughout this century (RCP8.5). Projections from a suite of Earth System Climate Models are broadly consistent with the findings from our data based approach. Our predicted amplification in the annual CO2 cycle displays distinct global patterns that may expose major fisheries in the Southern, Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans to high CO2 events many decades earlier than expected from average atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We suggest that these ocean 'CO2 hotspots' evolve as a combination of the strong seasonal dynamics of CO2 and the long-term effective storage of anthropogenic CO2 that lowers the buffer capacity in those regions, causing a non-linear CO2 amplification over the annual cycle. The onset of ocean hypercapnia events (pCO2 >1000 µatm) is forecast for atmospheric CO2 concentrations that exceed 650 ppm, with hypercapnia spreading to up to one half of the surface ocean by the year 2100 under a high-emissions scenario (RCP8.5) with potential implications for fisheries over the coming century.

  4. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Test - Scientific Airlock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. Pictured is Astronaut Paul Weitz training on a mock-up of Spacelab's airlock-hatch cover. Training was also done on the use of foot restraints which had recently been developed to help astronauts maintain their positions during space walks rather than having their feet float out from underneath them while they tried to perform maintenance and repair operations. Every aspect of every space mission was researched and demonstrated in the NBS. Using the airlock hatch cover and foot restraints were

  5. Computational and Experimental Investigation for an Optimal Design of Industrial Windows to Allow Natural Ventilation during Wind-Driven Rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritana Prueksakorn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With an increased awareness of sustainability issues, natural ventilation has become an elegant method for reducing the costs and environmental effects of the energy that is used to maintain comfortable indoor air quality rather than using mechanical ventilation. The windows in many industrial buildings are continuously open to exhaust pollutants and intake fresh air. Though windows are functional and efficient for natural ventilation, rainwater is able to penetrate through the windows during wind-driven rain. For industries in which the moisture content affects the quality of the product, the intrusion of a large amount of rainwater through windows must be prevented without compromising the effective ventilation. The aim of this research is to determine an innovative design for windows to accomplish the optimum of high ventilation and low rain penetration. For this purpose, windows are variously innovated and tested in full-scale measurements, reduced-scale wind-tunnel measurements and computational fluid dynamics (CFD. An artificial rain and wind velocity to mimic the average of the maximum values in Korea are created. The maximum reduction in rain penetration of over 98% compared to basic 90° open windows is attained with only a 4%–9% decrement of ventilation efficiency in the two recommended designs.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Inter-Flat Air Cross-Contamination under the Condition of Single-Sided Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoping; Niu, Jianlei; Perino, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the mechanism of inter-flat airborne disease transmission under the condition of single-sided natural ventilation. The focus is on one of the typical designs in residential buildings with a rectangular plan layout and having a common corridor separating...... the two sides, each of which has a flat fa ade with openable windows. When the wind speed is extremely low, with doors closed and windows opened, the flats become single-sided naturally ventilated driven by buoyancy effects. The air pollutants can travel from a lower flat to a vertically adjacent upper...... flat through open windows, caused by indoor/outdoor temperature-difference induced buoyancy. Computational fluid dynamics is employed to explore the characteristics of this process. Based on the comparison with experimental data about the air flow distribution in and around a single-sided naturally...

  7. A case-study of ontology-driven semantic mediation of flower-visiting data from heterogeneous data-stores in three South African natural history collections

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Coetzer, W

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 First International Workshop on Semantics for Biodiversity, Montpellier, France, 26-27 May 2013 A Case-Study of Ontology-Driven Semantic Mediation of Flower-Visiting Data from Heterogeneous Data-Stores in Three South African Natural History...

  8. Buoyancy-stirring interactions in a subtropical embayment: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... were ~2–3 °C higher than those observed. The model also underestimated the intensity of stratification in the wet season. These shortcomings all suggest an overestimate of vertical mixing by the model's turbulence closure scheme. Keywords: buoyancy; density gradient; Maputo Bay; seasonal variation; subtropical zone; ...

  9. Using Surface Integrals for Checking Archimedes' Law of Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. M. S.

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical derivation of the force exerted by an "inhomogeneous" (i.e. compressible) fluid on the surface of an "arbitrarily shaped" body immersed in it is not found in the literature, which may be attributed to our trust in Archimedes' law of buoyancy. However, this law, also known as Archimedes' principle (AP), does not yield the force…

  10. Effects of Relative SG Tube Pitches on the Performance Characteristics of a Small Modular Reactor driven by Natural Circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Youngjin; Yi, Kunwoo; Lee, Byungjin [KEPCO Engineering and Construction, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this research, the capacity and basic dimensions for SMRs driven by a natural circulation are preliminarily assumed to determine the SMR configuration for the conceptual design, and each of the pre-set values is explained below. Firstly, the PZR configuration is not considered because it is not included to the main flow of the primary coolant. One of the SMR requirements is that SMR shall carry on the road. Hence, the vehicle geometrical limits are 15 meters for the length, and 3.5 meters for the height, approximately. With these limits for the dimensions of the SMR, RV length is assumed about 13.8 meters and RV diameter about 2.5 meters. In IAEA definition for SMRs, the capacity of electric power is no more than 300 MWe. If the efficiency of SMR power plant is assumed to 33% compared to the commercial power plant, the core power is below 1,000 MWth. In this research, the core power is assumed to 200 MWth arbitrarily during normal operation. The primary coolant passes through the outside of tubes, and the heat is transfer to the secondary feedwater. The secondary feedwater passes through the inside of tubes, and the heat from the primary coolant is received to generate the superheated steam. The present work carries out numerical simulations to get an insight for the effects of the diameters of the reactor vessel and riser using the parameters such as the steam generator tube pitches. To sum up, the calculation results show a good agreement with the theoretical equation and the uniform diameter loop has a more uniform temperature distribution and larger mass flow rate.

  11. Redirecting photosynthetic electron flow into light-driven synthesis of alternative products including high-value bioactive natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Lærke Münter; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Ziersen, Bibi; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2014-01-17

    Photosynthesis in plants, green algae, and cyanobacteria converts solar energy into chemical energy in the form of ATP and NADPH, both of which are used in primary metabolism. However, often more reducing power is generated by the photosystems than what is needed for primary metabolism. In this review, we discuss the development in the research field, focusing on how the photosystems can be used as synthetic biology building blocks to channel excess reducing power into light-driven production of alternative products. Plants synthesize a large number of high-value bioactive natural compounds. Some of the key enzymes catalyzing their biosynthesis are the cytochrome P450s situated in the endoplasmic reticulum. However, bioactive compounds are often synthesized in low quantities in the plants and are difficult to produce by chemical synthesis due to their often complex structures. Through a synthetic biology approach, enzymes with a requirement for reducing equivalents as cofactors, such as the cytochrome P450s, can be coupled directly to the photosynthetic energy output to obtain environmentally friendly production of complex chemical compounds. By relocating cytochrome P450s to the chloroplasts, reducing power can be diverted toward the reactions catalyzed by the cytochrome P450s. This provides a sustainable production method for high-value compounds that potentially can solve the problem of NADPH regeneration, which currently limits the biotechnological uses of cytochrome P450s. We describe the approaches that have been taken to couple enzymes to photosynthesis in vivo and to photosystem I in vitro and the challenges associated with this approach to develop new green production platforms.

  12. Modeling the Effects of Buoyancy on the Evolution of Geophysical Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Eric; Caponi, Enrique A.

    1992-10-01

    A simple modeling based on the Imperial College k-ɛ turbulence description is shown to be capable of describing the highly anisotropic phenomena associated with the strong buoyancy effects encountered in upper ocean (and atmospheric boundary layer) environments. Both diurnal stratification and transition to buoyant mixing (from that driven by wind shear) are described in considerable detail, provided that the modeling of the turbulent Prandtl number and of the buoyant generation term in the ɛ model equation are evaluated in a suitably realistic and consistent way. The resulting model equations are suitable for simulating the evolution of the ensemble-averaged properties of the oceanic mixed layer in response to a specified history of interfacial shear stress and heat flux. The model is tested by comparing the predicted mixed layer evolution with the dissipation rate measurements of Shay and Gregg.

  13. Wind Extraction for Natural Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, Tadeu; Yaghoobian, Neda; Kumar, Rajan; Ordonez, Juan

    2017-11-01

    Due to the depletion of energy resources and the environmental impact of pollution and unsustainable energy resources, energy consumption has become one of the main concerns in our rapidly growing world. Natural ventilation, a traditional method to remove anthropogenic and solar heat gains, proved to be a cost-effective, alternative method to mechanical ventilation. However, while natural ventilation is simple in theory, its detailed design can be a challenge, particularly for wind-driven ventilation, which its performance highly involves the buildings' form, surrounding topography, turbulent flow characteristics, and climate. One of the main challenges with wind-driven natural ventilation schemes is due to the turbulent and unpredictable nature of the wind around the building that impose complex pressure loads on the structure. In practice, these challenges have resulted in founding the natural ventilation mainly on buoyancy (rather than the wind), as the primary force. This study is the initial step for investigating the physical principals of wind extraction over building walls and investigating strategies to reduce the dependence of the wind extraction on the incoming flow characteristics and the target building form.

  14. On the thermally-driven ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjermundsen, Ada; LaCasce, Joseph Henry; Denstad, Liv

    2017-04-01

    How will the ocean circulation respond to extensive temperature change? Warming over the Arctic Ocean due to the loss of sea ice and snow cover will impact the surface air temperature (Serreze and Farncis, 2006; Screen and Simmonds, 2010) and thereby the Northern Hemisphere (NH) temperature gradient. The ocean circulation will respond, but freshwater from ice melting and shifting storm tracks make it hard to determine the ocean response to temperature changes alone. Attempts have been made to separate the impact of wind, thermal and freshwater forcings on the large scale ocean circulation (Cai, 1994; Saenko et al., 2002; Nycander et al. 2007), but our understanding remains incomplete. Here we examine numerical solutions of the global circulation with realistic bathymetry, driven solely by surface buoyancy forcing. Explicit wind forcing is excluded, although vertical mixing is retained. The character of the resulting flow is consistent in many ways with the observed ocean circulation,with inflow to and sinking in the Nordic Seas, baroclinic western boundary currents and an overturning streamfunction which closely resembles those obtained in full GCMs and in observations. The overturning circulation exhibits two thermally-driven cells: one in the Southern Ocean (SO) and one in the Atlantic. We investigate the inter-basin transports, the relative importance of the two overturning cells for the global ocean circulation, as well as the sensitivity of the ocean circulation to changes in buoyancy forcing. We find that reduced Atlantic overturning accelerates the SO circulation, while a reduced SO circulation strengthens the Atlantic overturning considerably. References: Cai, W. (1994). Circulation driven by observed surface thermohaline fields in a coarse resolution ocean general circulation model. J. Geophys. Res.: Oceans, 99, 10163-10181. Nycander, J. et al. (2007). Thermodynamic Analysis of Ocean Circulation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 37, 2038-2052. Saenko, O. A. et al

  15. Doubly diffusive magnetic buoyancy instability in the solar interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Rosner, R.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the buoyancy of diffuse magnetic fields has shown that in the presence of rotation, static equilibrium configurations of the toroidal magnetic field and ambient plasma can exist. In that case, the escape of toroidal magnetic flux from the solar interior may be determined by the growth of instabilities which the equilibrium configuration may be subject to. In connection with the present investigation, it is assumed that in the region of toroidal magnetic flux amplification, the magnetic field has not as yet filamented into flux ropes, and is therefore 'diffuse'. A study is conducted of the MHD stability of an electrically conducting and differentially rotating gas in the presence of a toroidal magnetic field, an external constant gravitational field, and radiance pressure. The full dispersion relation for the magnetic buoyancy problem is developed, and the solutions of the dispersion relation are discussed.

  16. Experimental parameterisation of principal physics in buoyancy variations of marine teleost eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Mi Jung

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the high buoyancy of pelagic marine eggs is due to substantial influx of water across the cell membrane just before ovulation. Here we further develop the theoretical basis by applying laboratory observations of the various components of the fertilized egg in first-principle equations for egg specific gravity (ρ(egg followed by statistical validation. We selected Atlantic cod as a model animal due to the affluent amount of literature on this species, but also undertook additional dedicated experimental works. We found that specific gravity of yolk plus embryo is central in influencing ρ(egg and thereby the buoyancy. However, our established framework documents the effect on ρ(egg of the initial deposition of the heavy chorion material in the gonad prior to spawning. Thereafter, we describe the temporal changes in ρ(egg during incubation: Generally, the eggs showed a slight rise in ρ(egg from fertilization to mid-gastrulation followed by a gradual decrease until full development of main embryonic organs just before hatching. Ontogenetic changes in ρ(egg were significantly associated with volume and mass changes of yolk plus embryo. The initial ρ(egg at fertilization appeared significantly influenced by the chorion volume fraction which is determined by the combination of the final chorion volume of the oocyte and of the degree of swelling (hydrolyzation prior to spawning. The outlined principles and algorithms are universal in nature and should therefore be applicable to fish eggs in general.

  17. Short Term Airing by Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Perino, M.

    2010-01-01

    that are currently available, buoyancy driven, single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates for temperature and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) control. However, to promote a wider distribution of these systems an improvement in the knowledge of their working......The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. Among the available ventilation strategies...... principles is necessary. The present study analyses and presents the results of an experimental evaluation of airing performance in terms of ventilation characteristics, IAQ and thermal comfort. It includes investigations of the consequences of opening time, opening frequency, opening area and expected...

  18. Longitudinal modelling of academic buoyancy and motivation: do the '5Cs' hold up over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J; Colmar, Susan H; Davey, Louise A; Marsh, Herbert W

    2010-09-01

    Academic buoyancy is students' ability to successfully deal with setbacks and challenges that are typical of academic life. The present study extends previous preliminary cross-sectional work that tentatively identified five motivational predictors of academic buoyancy - referred to as the '5Cs' of academic buoyancy: confidence (self-efficacy), coordination (planning), commitment (persistence), composure (low anxiety), and control (low uncertain control). The study seeks to more clearly ascertain the effects of motivation (and its mediating role) on academic buoyancy over and above prior academic buoyancy. The study comprised N=1,866 high school students from six schools. Longitudinal data were collected (1 year apart) and the hypothesized model exploring longitudinal effects was tested using structural equation modelling. After controlling for prior variance in academic buoyancy, the 5Cs were significant predictors of subsequent academic buoyancy. Furthermore, over and above the direct effects of prior academic buoyancy on subsequent academic buoyancy, the 5Cs significantly mediated this relationship. The study concludes with a discussion of the substantive, applied, and methodological implications for researchers and practitioners seeking to investigate and address the academic buoyancy of students who require the capacity to effectively function in an ever-challenging school environment.

  19. Short-term airing by natural ventilation - modeling and control strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, M; Heiselberg, P

    2009-10-01

    The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. This kind of system frequently integrates traditional mechanical ventilation components with natural ventilation devices, such as motorized windows and louvers. Among the various ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates for temperature and IAQ control. However, in order to promote a wider applications of these systems, an improvement in the knowledge of their working principles and the availability of new design and simulation tools is necessary. In this context, the paper analyses and presents the results of a research that was aimed at developing and validating numerical models for the analysis of buoyancy driven single-sided natural ventilation systems. Once validated, these models can be used to optimize control strategies in order to achieve satisfactory indoor comfort conditions and IAQ. Practical Implications Numerical and experimental analyses have proved that short-term airing by intermittent ventilation is an effective measure to satisfactorily control IAQ. Different control strategies have been investigated to optimize the capabilities of the systems. The proposed zonal model has provided good performances and could be adopted as a design tool, while CFD simulations can be profitably used for detailed studies of the pollutant concentration distribution in a room and to address local discomfort problems.

  20. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Low-Density Inertial Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    Effects of buoyancy on transition from laminar to turbulent flow are presented for momentum-dominated helium jet injected into ambient air. The buoyancy was varied in a 2.2-sec drop tower facility without affecting the remaining operating parameters. The jet flow in Earth gravity and microgravity was visualized using the rainbow schlieren deflectometry apparatus. Results show significant changes in the flow structure and transition behavior in the absence of buoyancy.

  1. Buoyancy effect on heat transfer in rotating smooth square U-duct at high rotation number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The buoyancy effect on heat transfer in a rotating, two-pass, square channel is experimentally investigated in current work. The classical copper plate technique is performed to measure the regional averaged heat transfer coefficients. In order to perform a fundamental research, all turbulators are removed away. Two approaches of altering Buoyancy numbers are selected: varying rotation number from 0 to 2.08 at Reynolds number ranges of 10000 to 70000, and varying inlet density ratio from 0.07 to 0.16 at Reynolds number of 10000. And thus, Buoyancy numbers range from 0 to 12.9 for both cases. According to the experimental results, the relationships between heat transfer and Buoyancy numbers are in accord with those obtained under different rotation numbers. For both leading and trailing surface, a critical Buoyancy number exists for each X/D location. Before the critical point, the effect of Buoyancy number on heat transfer is limited; but after that, the Nusselt number ratios show different increase rate. Given the same rotation number, higher wall temperature ratios with its corresponding higher Buoyancy numbers substantially enhance heat transfer on both passages. And the critical exceed-point that heat transfer from trailing surface higher than leading surface happens at the same Buoyancy number for different wall temperature ratios in the second passage. Thus, the stronger buoyancy effect promotes heat transfer enhancement at high rotation number condition.

  2. How gas buoyancy creates shallow-zone geopressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkommer, M.A. (Petrospec Computer Corp., Richardson, TX (United States))

    1993-10-01

    Within a buried formation, the difference between pore pressure in the top and the bottom of the zone is less if the formation contains gas than if it is liquid-filled. Consequently, if the zone is sufficiently thick, the driller can encounter gas pressures significantly higher than expected, when drilling into the top of the zone. Because this pressure would exceed that generated by a normal liquid pressure gradient for the well, the upper portion of the zone is thus geopressured. If unexpectedly encountered at shallow depths, such geopressures can create serious well control problems. This phenomenon is due to the lower density of gas, compared to liquid. It is the same principle which makes the surface pressure of a gas well much closer to bottomhole pressure than if the tubing were full of liquid. This article describes it as the buoyancy effect caused by the gas displacing, and thus floating upon, the formation liquid. The following discussion illustrates the effects with depth and formation thickness, and introduces computer-based methods for estimating and preparing for potential well control problems in shallow gas zones. For shallow gas reservoirs, correcting for buoyancy effect in an existing geopressure estimate by analyzing petrophysical and geophysical data can help optimize use of drilling mud, as well as improve casing design. Safety, economic and environmental risks related to loss of control, struck pipe and lost circulation are significant enough to warrant the cost of thorough geopressure estimation.

  3. Transient numerical simulation of buoyancy driven flow adjacent to an elliptic tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahfouz, F.M.; Kocabiyik, Serpil

    2003-12-01

    In this paper the problem of laminar, transient, two-dimensional free convective heat transfer from the surface of a horizontal elliptic tube is considered. The tube, whose surface is suddenly subjected to uniform heat flux, is placed in a quiescent Boussinesq Newtonian fluid with its major axis horizontal. The details of both flow and thermal fields are obtained by solving the full governing Navier-Stokes and energy equations. These equations, expressed in terms of stream function, vorticity and temperature, are numerically solved using an implicit spectral finite difference procedure. The parameters involved are the modified Rayleigh number, Prandtl number and axis-ratio. The investigation covers a Rayleigh number range up to 10{sup 7}. The minor-major axis ratio of elliptic cylinder ranges between 0.05 and 0.998 and Prandtl number ranges between 0.1 and 10. The effects of these parameters on the surface temperature distribution and heat transfer coefficients are determined and the different aspects of the results are discussed for some selected cases.

  4. Dispersion of a passive tracer in buoyancy- and shear-driven boundary layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dosio, A.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Builtjes, P.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    By means of finescale modeling [large-eddy simulation (LES)], the combined effect of thermal and mechanical forcing on the dispersion of a plume in a convective boundary layer is investigated. Dispersion of a passive tracer is studied in various atmospheric turbulent flows, from pure convective to

  5. Multidisciplinary design approach and safety analysis of ADSR cooled by buoyancy driven flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceballos Castillo, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Transmutation is useful to reduce the storing time and the amount of nuclear waste to be stored in the geological repository. Transmutation can be achieved in all types of reactors: thermal systems, fast systems, critical and subcritical systems. Fast spectrum systems have significant advantages

  6. Coarsening in the buoyancy-driven instability of a reaction-diffusion front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böckmann, Martin; Müller, Stefan C

    2004-10-01

    When propagating in a vertical direction an autocatalytic reaction front associated with a change in density can become buoyantly unstable, leading to the formation of a fingerlike pattern. Later on these fingers start to interact. Their temporal evolution is studied experimentally by tracking the horizontal and vertical locations of the extrema of the front pattern. A proceeding development towards larger spatial scales is found. This is reflected in the differences in the vertical speed of neighboring fingers: continually some fingers start to decelerate and vanish finally in the neighboring ones which show a simultaneous acceleration. In addition, weak lateral movements of fingers towards gaps are observed, but there is no evidence for a correlation with the extinction of fingers.

  7. Seasonal dynamics of fish assemblages on breakwaters and natural rocky reefs in a temperate estuary: consistent assemblage differences driven by sub-adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley M Fowler

    Full Text Available Development of infrastructure around cities is rapidly increasing the amount of artificial substrate (termed artificial reef, 'AR' in coastal marine habitats. However, effects of ARs on marine communities remain unknown, because it is unclear whether ARs can maintain similar communities to natural reefs. We investigated whether well-established (> 30 years old breakwaters could consistently approximate fish assemblages on interspersed rocky reefs in a temperate estuary over 6 consecutive seasons using regular visual surveys between June 2009 (winter and November 2010 (spring. We examined whether assemblage differences between reef types were driven by differences in juvenile recruitment, or were related to differences in older life-stages. Assemblages on both reef types were dominated by juveniles (61% of individuals and sub-adults (34% of individuals. Seasonal fluctuations in assemblage parameters (species richness, diversity, sub-adult abundance were similar between reef types, and levels of species diversity and assemblage composition were generally comparable. However, abundance and species richness were consistently higher (1.9-7.6 and 1.3-2.6 times, respectively on breakwaters. These assemblage differences could not be explained by differences in juvenile recruitment, with seasonal patterns of recruitment and juvenile species found to be similar between reef types. In contrast, abundances of sub-adults were consistently higher (1.1-12 times at breakwaters, and assemblage differences appeared to be driven by this life-stage. Our results indicate that breakwaters in temperate estuaries are capable of supporting abundant and diverse fish assemblages with similar recruitment process to natural reefs. However, breakwaters may not approximate all aspects of natural assemblage structure, with differences maintained by a single-life stage in some cases.

  8. Academic buoyancy and academic outcomes: towards a further understanding of students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), students without ADHD, and academic buoyancy itself.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Academic buoyancy is students' capacity to successfully overcome setback and challenge that is typical of the ordinary course of everyday academic life. It may represent an important factor on the psycho-educational landscape assisting students who experience difficulties in school and schoolwork. This study investigated the role of academic buoyancy in the achievement and cognitive, affective and behavioural engagement of (1) students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and (2) 'regular' (or 'general') students residing in the same classrooms and schools. The study also sought to extend prior research into academic buoyancy by including previously neglected and potentially influential factors such as personality and socio-economic status. Participants were n = 87 high school students with ADHD, n = 3374 non-ADHD peers, and n = 87 randomly drawn non-ADHD students. Survey-based data were analysed using multigroup (ADHD, non-ADHD, randomly weighted non-ADHD) multivariate (multiple independent/covariate and dependent variables) path analysis. The findings revealed a significant and positive association between academic buoyancy and outcomes for students with ADHD that generalized to non-ADHD groups. On occasion where academic buoyancy effects differed between the groups, effects favoured students with ADHD. Furthermore, academic buoyancy explained significant variance in outcomes for both groups of students after covariates (age, gender, parent education, language background, socio-economic status, personality) were entered. It is concluded that there is merit in widely promoting and fostering academic buoyancy among ADHD and non-ADHD students alike - and that academic buoyancy explains variance in outcomes beyond major intrapersonal factors such as personality, socio-economic status, ethnicity, and the like. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Variable buoyancy system for unmanned multi-domain vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Marc; Bryant, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the system design, construction, and testing of an active variable buoyancy system (VBS) actuator with applications to unmanned multi-domain vehicles. Unmanned multi-domain vehicles require nontraditional VBS designs because of their unique operation requirements. We present a VBS actuator design that targets multi-domain vehicle design objectives of high endurance, stealth, and underwater loitering. The design features a rigid ballast tank with an inner elastic bladder connected to a hydraulic pump and a proportionally controlled vent valve. The system working fluid is obtained from the ambient surrounding water and the elastic bladder separates the water from pressurized gas, thus preventing any gas from escaping during a venting operation. An analytic model of the VBS characterizing the system dynamics is derived. Ballast tank prototype design and construction is discussed. A VBS test platform vehicle is presented, featuring two ballast tanks, motor, pump, and RF receiver for control.

  10. Nonlinear dynamics of a buoyancy-induced turbulent fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kazushi; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Isao T.; Miyano, Takaya

    2017-11-01

    We conduct a numerical study on the dynamic behavior of a buoyancy-induced turbulent fire from the viewpoints of symbolic dynamics, complex networks, and statistical complexity. Here, we consider two classes of entropies: the permutation entropy and network entropy in ɛ -recurrence networks, both of which evaluate the degree of randomness in the underlying dynamics. These entropies enable us to capture the significant changes in the dynamic behavior of flow velocity fluctuations. The possible presence of two important dynamics, low-dimensional deterministic chaos in the near field dominated by the motion of large-scale vortices and high-dimensional chaos in the far field forming a well-developed turbulent plume, is clearly identified by the multiscale complexity-entropy causality plane.

  11. Modeling the Buoyancy System of a Wave Energy Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom S.; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model of the buoyancy system in a wave energy power plant is presented. The plant ("Wave Dragon") is a floating device using the potential energy in overtopping waves to produce power. A water reservoir is placed on top of the WD, and hydro turbines lead the water to the sea...... producing electrical power. Through air chambers it is possible to control the level of the WD. It is important to control the level in order to maximize the power production in proportion to the wave height, here the amount of overtopping water and the amount of potential energy is conflicting....... The pressures in the air chambers may be individually controlled by an air fan through an array of valves. The paper presents a model describing the dynamics from the air inlet to the level. Results from validation of the model against plant data are presented....

  12. Magma buoyancy and volatile ascent driving autocyclic eruptivity at Hekla Volcano (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautmann, Stefanie; Sacks, I. Selwyn; Linde, Alan T.; Roberts, Matthew J.

    2017-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions are typically accompanied by ground deflation due to the withdrawal of magma from depth and its effusion at the surface. Here, based on continuous high-resolution borehole strain data, we show that ground deformation was absent during the major effusion phases of the 1991 and 2000 eruptions of Hekla Volcano, Iceland. This lack of surface deformation challenges the classic model of magma intrusion/withdrawal as source for volcanic ground uplift/subsidence. We incorporate geodetic and geochemical observables into theoretical models of magma chamber dynamics in order to constrain quantitatively alternative co- and intereruptive physical mechanisms that govern magma propagation and system pressurization. We find the lack of surface deformation during lava effusion to be linked to chamber replenishment from below whilst magma migrates as a buoyancy-driven flow from the magma chamber towards the surface. We further demonstrate that intereruptive pressure build-up is likely to be generated by volatile ascent within the chamber rather than magma injection. Our model explains the persistent periodic eruptivity at Hekla throughout historic times with self-initiating cycles and is conceptually relevant to other volcanic systems.

  13. Niche-driven evolution of metabolic and life-history strategies in natural and domesticated populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sicard Delphine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation of resource supply is one of the key factors that drive the evolution of life-history strategies, and hence the interactions between individuals. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two life-history strategies related to different resource utilization have been previously described in strains from different industrial origins. In this work, we analyzed metabolic traits and life-history strategies in a broader collection of yeast strains sampled in various ecological niches (forest, human body, fruits, laboratory and industrial environments. Results By analysing the genetic and plastic variation of six life-history and three metabolic traits, we showed that S. cerevisiae populations harbour different strategies depending on their ecological niches. On one hand, the forest and laboratory strains, referred to as extreme "ants", reproduce quickly, reach a large carrying capacity and a small cell size in fermentation, but have a low reproduction rate in respiration. On the other hand, the industrial strains, referred to as extreme "grasshoppers", reproduce slowly, reach a small carrying capacity but have a big cell size in fermentation and a high reproduction rate in respiration. "Grasshoppers" have usually higher glucose consumption rate than "ants", while they produce lower quantities of ethanol, suggesting that they store cell resources rather than secreting secondary products to cross-feed or poison competitors. The clinical and fruit strains are intermediate between these two groups. Conclusions Altogether, these results are consistent with a niche-driven evolution of S. cerevisiae, with phenotypic convergence of populations living in similar habitat. They also revealed that competition between strains having contrasted life-history strategies ("ants" and "grasshoppers" seems to occur at low frequency or be unstable since opposite life-history strategies appeared to be maintained in distinct ecological niches.

  14. Large eddy simulation of a buoyancy-aided flow in a non-uniform channel – Buoyancy effects on large flow structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); He, S., E-mail: s.he@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Buoyancy may greatly redistribute the flow in a non-uniform channel. • Flow structures in the narrow gap are greatly changed when buoyancy is strong. • Large flow structures exist in wider gap, which is enhanced when heat is strong. • Buoyancy reduces mixing factor caused by large flow structures in narrow gap. - Abstract: It has been a long time since the ‘abnormal’ turbulent intensity distribution and high inter-sub-channel mixing rates were observed in the vicinity of the narrow gaps formed by the fuel rods in nuclear reactors. The extraordinary flow behaviour was first described as periodic flow structures by Hooper and Rehme (1984). Since then, the existences of large flow structures were demonstrated by many researchers in various non-uniform flow channels. It has been proved by many authors that the Strouhal number of the flow structure in the isothermal flow is dependent on the size of the narrow gap, not the Reynolds number once it is sufficiently large. This paper reports a numerical investigation on the effect of buoyancy on the large flow structures. A buoyancy-aided flow in a tightly-packed rod-bundle-like channel is modelled using large eddy simulation (LES) together with the Boussinesq approximation. The behaviour of the large flow structures in the gaps of the flow passage are studied using instantaneous flow fields, spectrum analysis and correlation analysis. It is found that the non-uniform buoyancy force in the cross section of the flow channel may greatly redistribute the velocity field once the overall buoyancy force is sufficiently strong, and consequently modify the large flow structures. The temporal and axial spatial scales of the large flow structures are influenced by buoyancy in a way similar to that turbulence is influenced. These scales reduce when the flow is laminarised, but start increasing in the turbulence regeneration region. The spanwise scale of the flow structures in the narrow gap remains more or

  15. Importance of initial buoyancy field on evolution of mantle thermal structure: Implications of surface boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Glišović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there has been significant progress in the seismic imaging of mantle heterogeneity, the outstanding issue that remains to be resolved is the unknown distribution of mantle temperature anomalies in the distant geological past that give rise to the present-day anomalies inferred by global tomography models. To address this question, we present 3-D convection models in compressible and self-gravitating mantle initialised by different hypothetical temperature patterns. A notable feature of our forward convection modelling is the use of self-consistent coupling of the motion of surface tectonic plates to the underlying mantle flow, without imposing prescribed surface velocities (i.e., plate-like boundary condition. As an approximation for the surface mechanical conditions before plate tectonics began to operate we employ the no-slip (rigid boundary condition. A rigid boundary condition demonstrates that the initial thermally-dominated structure is preserved, and its geographical location is fixed during the evolution of mantle flow. Considering the impact of different assumed surface boundary conditions (rigid and plate-like on the evolution of thermal heterogeneity in the mantle we suggest that the intrinsic buoyancy of seven superplumes is most-likely resolved in the tomographic images of present-day mantle thermal structure. Our convection simulations with a plate-like boundary condition reveal that the evolution of an initial cold anomaly beneath the Java-Indonesian trench system yields a long-term, stable pattern of thermal heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle that resembles the present-day Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs, especially below the Pacific. The evolution of subduction zones may be, however, influenced by the mantle-wide flow driven by deeply-rooted and long-lived superplumes since Archean times. These convection models also detect the intrinsic buoyancy of the Perm Anomaly that has been identified as a unique

  16. Studies of heat source driven natural convection. Ph.D. Thesis. Technical Report, Jul. 1974 - Aug. 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulacki, F. A.; Emara, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    Natural convection energy transport in a horizontal layer of internally heated fluid was measured for Rayleigh numbers from 1890 to 2.17 x 10 to the 12th power. The fluid layer is bounded below by a rigid zero-heat-flux surface and above by a rigid constant-temperature surface. Joule heating by an alternating current passing horizontally through the layer provides the uniform volumetric energy source. The overall steady-state heat transfer coefficient at the upper surface was determined by measuring the temperature difference across the layer and power input to the fluid. The correlation between the Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for the data of the present study and the data of the Kulacki study is given.

  17. Sensitivity of free radicals production in acoustically driven bubble to the ultrasonic frequency and nature of dissolved gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merouani, Slimane; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-01-01

    Central events of ultrasonic action are the bubbles of cavitation that can be considered as powered microreactors within which high-energy chemistry occurs. This work presents the results of a comprehensive numerical assessment of frequency and saturating gases effects on single bubble sonochemistry. Computer simulations of chemical reactions occurring inside a bubble oscillating in liquid water irradiated by an ultrasonic wave have been performed for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies (213-1100kHz) under different saturating gases (O2, air, N2 and H2). For O2 and H2 bubbles, reactions mechanism consisting in 25 reversible chemical reactions were proposed for studying the internal bubble-chemistry whereas 73 reversible reactions were taken into account for air and N2 bubbles. The numerical simulations have indicated that radicals such as OH, H, HO2 and O are created in the bubble during the strong collapse. In all cases, hydroxyl radical (OH) is the main oxidant created in the bubble. The production rate of the oxidants decreases as the driving ultrasonic frequency increases. The production rate of OH radical followed the order O2>air>N2>H2 and the order becomes more remarkable at higher ultrasonic frequencies. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on single bubble sonochemistry was attributed to its significant impact on the cavitation process whereas the effects of gases were attributed to the nature of the chemistry produced in the bubble at the strong collapse. It was concluded that, in addition to the gas solubility, the nature of the internal bubble chemistry is another parameter of a paramount importance that controls the overall sonochemical activity in aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Thermophysical effects of water driven copper nanoparticles on MHD axisymmetric permeable shrinking sheet: Dual-nature study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Haq, Rizwan; Rajotia, D; Noor, N F M

    2016-03-01

    The present study is dedicated to analyze the dual-nature solutions of the axisymmetric flow of a magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) nanofluid over a permeable shrinking sheet. In those phenomena where the fluid flow is due to the shrinking surface, some reverse behaviors of the flow arise because of vorticity effects. Despite of heat transfer analysis, the main purpose of the present study is to attain the solutions of the complex nature problem that appear in reverse flow phenomena. Thermophysical properties of both base fluid (water) and nanoparticles (copper) are also taken into account. By means of similarity transformation, partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations and then solved via the Runge-Kutta method. These results are divided separately into two cases: the first one is the unidirectional shrinking along the surface (m = 1) and the other one is for axisymmetric shrinking phenomena (m = 2) . To enhance the thermal conductivity of base fluid, nanoparticle volume fractions (0≤φ ≤ 0.2)) are incorporated within the base fluid. The numerical investigation explores the condition of existence, non-existence and the duality of similarity solution depends upon the range of suction parameter (S) and Hartmann number (M). The reduced skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are plotted to analyze the fluid flow and heat transfer at the surface of the shrinking sheet. Streamlines and isotherms are also plotted against the engineering control parameters to analyze the flow behavior and heat transfer within the whole domain. Throughout this analysis it is found that both nanoparticle volume fraction and Hartmann number are increasing functions of both skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number.

  19. Cytomegalovirus-Driven Adaptive-Like Natural Killer Cell Expansions Are Unaffected by Concurrent Chronic Hepatitis Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. G. Malone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive-like expansions of natural killer (NK cell subsets are known to occur in response to human cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. These expansions are typically made up of NKG2C+ NK cells with particular killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR expression patterns. Such NK cell expansion patterns are also seen in patients with viral hepatitis infection. Yet, it is not known if the viral hepatitis infection promotes the appearance of such expansions or if effects are solely attributed to underlying CMV infection. In sizeable cohorts of CMV seropositive hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and hepatitis delta virus (HDV infected patients, we analyzed NK cells for expression of NKG2A, NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory KIRs to assess the appearance of NK cell expansions characteristic of what has been seen in CMV seropositive healthy individuals. Adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in viral hepatitis patients were strongly associated with CMV seropositivity. The number of subjects with these expansions did not differ between CMV seropositive viral hepatitis patients and corresponding healthy controls. Hence, we conclude that adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in HBV, HCV, and/or HDV infected individuals are not caused by the chronic hepatitis infections per se, but rather are a consequence of underlying CMV infection.

  20. Frustration-driven C4symmetric order in a naturally-heterostructured superconductor Sr2VO3FeAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Jong Mok; Baek, S-H; Hoch, C; Kremer, R K; Park, S Y; Ji, Sungdae; Büchner, B; Park, J-H; Hyun, S I; Shim, J H; Bang, Yunkyu; Moon, E G; Mazin, I I; Kim, Jun Sung

    2017-12-18

    A subtle balance between competing interactions in iron-based superconductors (FeSCs) can be tipped by additional interfacial interactions in a heterostructure, often inducing exotic phases with unprecedented properties. Particularly when the proximity-coupled layer is magnetically active, rich phase diagrams are expected in FeSCs, but this has not been explored yet. Here, using high-accuracy 75 As and 51 V nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we investigate an electronic phase that emerges in the FeAs layer below T 0  ~ 155 K of Sr 2 VO 3 FeAs, a naturally assembled heterostructure of an FeSC and a Mott-insulating vanadium oxide. We find that frustration of the otherwise dominant Fe stripe and V Neel fluctuations via interfacial coupling induces a charge/orbital order in the FeAs layers, without either static magnetism or broken C 4 symmetry, while suppressing the Neel antiferromagnetism in the SrVO 3 layers. These findings demonstrate that the magnetic proximity coupling stabilizes a hidden order in FeSCs, which may also apply to other strongly correlated heterostructures.

  1. Latitudinal and climate-driven variation in the strength and nature of biological interactions in New England salt marshes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertness, Mark D; Ewanchuk, Patrick J

    2002-08-01

    We examined the linkage between climate and interspecific plant interactions in New England salt marshes. Because harsh edaphic conditions in marshes can be ameliorated by neighboring plants, plant neighbors can have net competitive or facilitative interactions, depending on ambient physical stresses. In particular, high soil salinities, which are largely controlled by solar radiation and the evaporation of marsh porewater, can be ameliorated by plant neighbors under stressful conditions leading to facilitative interactions. Under less stressful edaphic conditions, these same neighbors may be competitors. In this paper, we use this mechanistic understanding of marsh plant interactions to examine the hypothesis that latitudinal and inter-annual variation in climate can influence the nature and strength of marsh plant species interactions. We quantified the relationship between climate and species interactions by transplanting marsh plants into ambient vegetation and unvegetated bare patches at sites north and south of Cape Cod, a major biogeographic barrier on the east coast of North America. We hypothesized that the cooler climate north of Cape Cod would lead to fewer positive interactions among marsh plants. We found both latitudinal and inter-annual variation in the neighbor relations of marsh plants that paralleled latitudinal differences in temperature and salinity. South of Cape Cod, plant neighbor interactions tended to be more facilitative, whereas north of Cape Cod, plant neighbor interactions were more competitive. At all sites, soil salinity increased and plant neighbor interactions were more facilitative in warmer versus cooler years. Our results show that interspecific interactions can be strikingly linked to climate, but also reveal that because the sensitivity of specific species interactions to climatic variation is highly variable, predicting how entire communities will respond to climate change will be difficult, even in relatively simple, well

  2. Inherent and Tumor-Driven Immune Tolerance in the Prostate Microenvironment Impairs Natural Killer Cell Antitumor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasero, Christine; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Guerin, Mathilde; Granjeaud, Samuel; Thomassin-Piana, Jeanne; Rocchi, Palma; Paciencia-Gros, Maria; Poizat, Flora; Bentobji, Mélanie; Azario-Cheillan, Francine; Walz, Jochen; Salem, Naji; Brunelle, Serge; Moretta, Alessandro; Olive, Daniel

    2016-04-15

    The field of immunotherapy for solid tumors, such as prostate cancer, has been recently focusing on therapies that can counter tumor-mediated immunosuppression. Precise quantification and characterization of the immune infiltrates in tumors is crucial to improve treatment efficacy. Natural killer (NK) cells, major components of the antitumor immune system, have never been isolated from prostate tumors, despite their suspected role in disease progression. Here, we examined the frequency, phenotype, and functions of NK cells infiltrating control and tumor prostate tissues. NK cell infiltrates in prostate tissues were mainly CD56 (NCAM1)-positive and displayed an unexpected immature, but activated, phenotype with low or no cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we show that TGFβ1 (TGFB1) is highly secreted into the prostate environment and partly mediates the immunosuppressive effects on NK cells. In addition to this basal level of immunotolerance to NK cells, the prostate environment became further resistant to NK cell-mediated immunity upon cancer cell infiltration. Coculture experiments revealed that prostate cancer cells induced the expression of inhibitory receptor (ILT2/LILRB1) and downregulated the expression of activating receptors NKp46 (NCR1), NKG2D (KLRK1), and CD16 (FCGR3) by NK cells, thus preventing their recognition of tumor cells. Notably, blood levels of NKp46 were also decreased in prostate cancer patients and were inversely correlated with levels of prostate-specific antigen, the main prognostic factor in prostate cancer. Our study shows that a strong immunosuppressive environment impairs NK cell function at multiple levels in prostate cancer and provides a rationale for the design of therapies that restore NK cell efficiency in the prostate tumor microenvironment. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2153-65. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Climate-driven increase of natural wetland methane emissions offset by human-induced wetland reduction in China over the past three decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Liu, Jinxun; Jiang, Hong; Fang, Xiuqin; Chen, Huai; Niu, Zhichun; Gong, Peng; Lin, Guanghui; Wang, Meng; Yang, Yanzheng; Chang, Jie; Ge, Ying; Xiang, Wenhua; Deng, Xiangwen; He, Jin-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Both anthropogenic activities and climate change can affect the biogeochemical processes of natural wetland methanogenesis. Quantifying possible impacts of changing climate and wetland area on wetland methane (CH4) emissions in China is important for improving our knowledge on CH4 budgets locally and globally. However, their respective and combined effects are uncertain. We incorporated changes in wetland area derived from remote sensing into a dynamic CH4 model to quantify the human and climate change induced contributions to natural wetland CH4 emissions in China over the past three decades. Here we found that human-induced wetland loss contributed 34.3% to the CH4 emissions reduction (0.92 TgCH4), and climate change contributed 20.4% to the CH4 emissions increase (0.31 TgCH4), suggesting that decreasing CH4 emissions due to human-induced wetland reductions has offset the increasing climate-driven CH4 emissions. With climate change only, temperature was a dominant controlling factor for wetland CH4 emissions in the northeast (high latitude) and Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (high altitude) regions, whereas precipitation had a considerable influence in relative arid north China. The inevitable uncertainties caused by the asynchronous for different regions or periods due to inter-annual or seasonal variations among remote sensing images should be considered in the wetland CH4 emissions estimation.

  4. Statistical Change Detection for Diagnosis of Buoyancy Element Defects on Moored Floating Vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Fang, Shaoji; Galeazzi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    . After residual generation, statistical change detection scheme is derived from mathematical models supported by experimental data. To experimentally verify loss of an underwater buoyancy element, an underwater line breaker is designed to create realistic replication of abrupt faults. The paper analyses......Floating platforms with mooring systems are used extensively in off-shore operations. Part of the mooring systems are underwater buoyancy elements that are attached to the mooring lines. Loss or damage of a buoyancy element is invisible but changes the characteristics of the mooring system...

  5. Self-similar evolution of the nonlinear magnetic buoyancy instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, K.; Tajima, T.; Matsumoto, R.

    1990-01-01

    A new type of self-similar solution of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the nonlinear stage of the undular model (k parallel to B) of the magnetic buoyancy instability (the ballooning instability in fusion plasma physics or the Parker instability in astrophysics) is found through MHD simulation and theory. The linear theory developed agrees well with the simulation in the early (linear) stage. The nonlinear stages of the instability in the simulation show the self-similar evolution. One of the solutions obtained from the nonlinear analysis has the characteristics of nonlinear instability in Lagrangian coordinates; the fluid velocity and the Alfven speed on each magnetic loop increase exponentially with time, because the loop is evacuated by the field-aligned motion of matter resulting from gravitational acceleration. In the later stage of the nonlinear evolution, the solution property changes from exponential to power-law time dependence. The latter corresponds to a force-free expansion solution. The later saturation of the velocity increment is also discussed.

  6. Capillary and Gas Trapping Controls on Pumice Buoyancy in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauria, K. E.; Manga, M.; Wei, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Pumice can float on water for months to years. The longevity of pumice floatation is unexpected, however, because pumice pores are highly connected and water wets volcanic glass. As a result, observations of long floating times have not been reconciled with predictions of rapid sinking. We propose a mechanism to resolve this paradox - the trapping of gas bubbles by water within the pumice. Gas trapping refers to the isolation of gas by water within pore throats such that the gas becomes disconnected from the atmosphere and unable to escape. We use X-ray microtomography images of partially saturated pumice to demonstrate that gas trapping occurs in both ambient-temperature and hot (500°C) pumice. Furthermore, we show that the distribution of trapped gas clusters matches percolation theory predictions. Finally, we propose that diffusion out of trapped gaseous bubbles determines pumice floatation time. Experimental measurements of pumice floatation support a diffusion control on pumice buoyancy and we find that floatation time scales like τ L2/(Dθ2) where is the floatation time, L is the characteristic length of the pumice, D is the gas-water diffusion coefficient, and θ is pumice water saturation.

  7. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator - NB32 - Large Space Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a cooperative program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) to operate a long-lived space-based observatory; it was the flagship mission of NASA's Great Observatories program. The HST program began as an astronomical dream in the 1940s. During the 1970s and 1980s, HST was finally designed and built; and it finally became operational in the 1990s. HST was deployed into a low-Earth orbit on April 25, 1990 from the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31). The design of the HST took into consideration its length of service and the necessity of repairs and equipment replacement by making the body modular. In doing so, subsequent shuttle missions could recover the HST, replace faulty or obsolete parts and be re-released. MSFC's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator served as the training facility for shuttle astronauts for Hubble related missions. Shown is astronaut Sharnon Lucid having her life support system being checked prior to entering the NBS to begin training on the space telescope axial scientific instrument changeout.

  8. Using surface integrals for checking the Archimedes' law of buoyancy

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, F M S

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical derivation of the force exerted by an \\emph{inhomogeneous} (i.e., compressible) fluid on the surface of an \\emph{arbitrarily-shaped} body immersed in it is not found in literature, which may be attributed to our trust on Archimedes' law of buoyancy. However, this law, also known as Archimedes' principle (AP), does not yield the force observed when the body is in contact to the container walls, as is more evident in the case of a block immersed in a liquid and in contact to the bottom, in which a \\emph{downward} force that \\emph{increases with depth} is observed. In this work, by taking into account the surface integral of the pressure force exerted by a fluid over the surface of a body, the general validity of AP is checked. For a body fully surrounded by a fluid, homogeneous or not, a gradient version of the divergence theorem applies, yielding a volume integral that simplifies to an upward force which agrees to the force predicted by AP, as long as the fluid density is a \\emph{continuous func...

  9. Temporal Genetic Variance and Propagule-Driven Genetic Structure Characterize Naturalized Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from a Patagonian Lake Impacted by Trout Farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Javiera N; Seeb, Lisa W; Seeb, James E; Arismendi, Ivan; Hernández, Cristián E; Gajardo, Gonzalo; Galleguillos, Ricardo; Cádiz, Maria I; Musleh, Selim S; Gomez-Uchida, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the genetic underpinnings of invasions-a theme addressed by invasion genetics as a discipline-is still scarce amid well documented ecological impacts of non-native species on ecosystems of Patagonia in South America. One of the most invasive species in Patagonia's freshwater systems and elsewhere is rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). This species was introduced to Chile during the early twentieth century for stocking and promoting recreational fishing; during the late twentieth century was reintroduced for farming purposes and is now naturalized. We used population- and individual-based inference from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to illuminate three objectives related to the establishment and naturalization of Rainbow Trout in Lake Llanquihue. This lake has been intensively used for trout farming during the last three decades. Our results emanate from samples collected from five inlet streams over two seasons, winter and spring. First, we found that significant intra- population (temporal) genetic variance was greater than inter-population (spatial) genetic variance, downplaying the importance of spatial divergence during the process of naturalization. Allele frequency differences between cohorts, consistent with variation in fish length between spring and winter collections, might explain temporal genetic differences. Second, individual-based Bayesian clustering suggested that genetic structure within Lake Llanquihue was largely driven by putative farm propagules found at one single stream during spring, but not in winter. This suggests that farm broodstock might migrate upstream to breed during spring at that particular stream. It is unclear whether interbreeding has occurred between "pure" naturalized and farm trout in this and other streams. Third, estimates of the annual number of breeders (Nb) were below 73 in half of the collections, suggestive of genetically small and recently founded populations that might experience substantial

  10. Buoyancy Regulation and the Energetics of Diving in Dolphins Seals, Sea Lions and Sea Otters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    We examined swim speed and ascent descent rates in sea lions and elephant seals in order to make comparisons in their diving strategies and how these may be effected by different strategies of buoyancy regulation...

  11. Buoyancy package for self-contained acoustic doppler current profiler mooring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Krishnakumar, V.

    A buoyancy package for self-contained Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler(SC-ADCP 1200 RD instruments USA) was designed and fabricated indigenously, for subsurface mooring in coastal waters. The system design is discussed. The design to keep SC...

  12. Annual and seasonal mean buoyancy fluxes for the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.

    INSAT-derived monthly mean precipitation, combined with estimates of evaporation from COADS, are used to prepare the annual mean and seasonal distributions of evaporation-precipitation (E-P)) and buoyancy fluxes for the tropical Indian Ocean...

  13. Effects of body condition on buoyancy in endangered North Atlantic right whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nousek-McGregor, Anna E; Miller, Carolyn A; Moore, Michael J; Nowacek, Douglas P

    2014-01-01

    Buoyancy is an important consideration for diving marine animals, resulting in specific ecologically relevant adaptations. Marine mammals use blubber as an energy reserve, but because this tissue is also positively buoyant, nutritional demands have the potential to cause considerable variation in buoyancy. North Atlantic right whales Eubalaena glacialis are known to be positively buoyant as a result of their blubber, and the thickness of this layer varies considerably, but the effect of this variation on buoyancy has not been explored. This study compared the duration and rate of ascending and descending glides, recorded with an archival tag, with blubber thickness, measured with an ultrasound device, in free-swimming right whales. Ascending whales with thicker blubber had shorter portions of active propulsion and longer passive glides than whales with thinner blubber, suggesting that blubber thickness influences buoyancy because the buoyant force is acting in the same direction as the animal's movement during this phase. Whales with thinner layers also used similar body angles and velocities when traveling to and from depth, while those with thicker layers used shallower ascent angles but achieved higher ascent velocities. Such alterations in body angle may help to reduce the cost of transport when swimming against the force of buoyancy in a state of augmented positive buoyancy, which represents a dynamic response to reduce the energetic consequences of physiological changes. These results have considerable implications for any diving marine animal during periods of nutritional stress, such as during seasonal migrations and annual variations in prey availability.

  14. Neutral Buoyancy Simultor (NBS) NB-1 Large Mass Transfer simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Pictured is a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) student working in a spacesuit on the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) project which was developed as a joint effort between MFSC and MIT. The EASE experiment required that crew members assemble small components to form larger components, working from the payload bay of the space shuttle.

  15. Gravitaxis of Euglena gracilis depends only partially on passive buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Peter R.; Schuster, Martin; Lebert, Michael; Streb, Christine; Häder, Donat-Peter

    In darkness, the unicellular freshwater flagellate Euglena gracilis shows a pronounced negative gravitactic behavior, and the cells swim actively upward in the water column. Up to now it was unclear whether this behavior is based on a passive (physical) alignment mechanism (e.g., buoyancy due to a fore-aft asymmetry of the cell body) or on an active physiological mechanism. A sounding rocket experiment was performed in which the effect of sub-1g-accelerations (0.05, 0.08, 0.12, and 0.2g) on untreated living cells and immobilized (fixation with liquid nitrogen) cells was observed. By means of computerized image analysis the angles of the cells long axis with respect to the acceleration vector were analyzed in order to calculate and compare the reorientation kinetics of the immobilized cells versus that of the controls. In both groups, the reorientation kinetics depended on the dose, but the reorientation of the living cells was about five times faster than that of the immobilized cells. This indicates that in young cells gravitaxis can be explained by a physical mechanism only to a small extend. In older cultures, in which the cells often have a drop shaped cell body, the physical reorientation is considerably faster, and a more pronounced influence of passive alignment caused by fore/aft asymmetry (drag-gravity model) can not be excluded. In addition to these results, Euglena gracilis cells seem to respond very sensitively to small accelerations when they are applied after a longer microgravity period. The data indicate that gravitactic orientation occurred at an acceleration as low as 0.05g.

  16. Neutral Buoyancy Test - NB-18 - Large Space Structure Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  17. Planetary dynamos driven by helical waves - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, P. A.; Ranjan, A.

    2015-09-01

    In most numerical simulations of the Earth's core the dynamo resides outside the tangent cylinder and may be crudely classified as being of the α2 type. In this region the flow comprises a sea of thin columnar vortices aligned with the rotation axis, taking the form of alternating cyclones and anticyclones. The dynamo is thought to be driven by these columnar vortices within which the flow is observed to be highly helical, helicity being a crucial ingredient of planetary dynamos. As noted in Davidson, one of the mysteries of this dynamo cartoon is the origin of the helicity, which is observed to be positive in the south and negative in the north. While Ekman pumping at the mantle can induce helicity in some of the overly viscous numerical simulations, it is extremely unlikely to be a significant source within planets. In this paper we return to the suggestion of Davidson that the helicity observed in the less viscous simulations owes its existence to helical wave packets, launched in and around the equatorial plane where the buoyancy flux is observed to be strong. Here we show that such wave packets act as a potent source of planetary helicity, constituting a simple, robust mechanism that yields the correct sign for h north and south of the equator. Since such a mechanism does not rely on the presence of a mantle, it can operate within both the Earth and the gas giants. Moreover, our numerical simulations show that helical wave packets dispersing from the equator produce a random sea of thin, columnar cyclone/anticyclone pairs, very like those observed in the more strongly forced dynamo simulations. We examine the local dynamics of helical wave packets dispersing from the equatorial regions, as well as the overall nature of an α2-dynamo driven by such wave packets. Our local analysis predicts the mean emf induced by helical waves, an analysis that rests on a number of simple approximations which are consistent with our numerical experiments, while our global

  18. Academic Buoyancy and Academic Outcomes: Towards a Further Understanding of Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Students without ADHD, and Academic Buoyancy Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Academic buoyancy is students' capacity to successfully overcome setback and challenge that is typical of the ordinary course of everyday academic life. It may represent an important factor on the psycho-educational landscape assisting students who experience difficulties in school and schoolwork. Aims: This study investigated the…

  19. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer

  20. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  1. The argonaut shell: gas-mediated buoyancy control in a pelagic octopus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Julian K.; Norman, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Argonauts (Cephalopoda: Argonautidae) are a group of rarely encountered open-ocean pelagic octopuses with benthic ancestry. Female argonauts inhabit a brittle ‘paper nautilus’ shell, the role of which has puzzled naturalists for millennia. The primary role attributed to the shell has been as a receptacle for egg deposition and brooding. Our observations of wild argonauts have revealed that the thin calcareous shell also functions as a hydrostatic structure, employed by the female argonaut to precisely control buoyancy at varying depths. Female argonauts use the shell to ‘gulp’ a measured volume of air at the sea surface, seal off the captured gas using flanged arms and forcefully dive to a depth where the compressed gas buoyancy counteracts body weight. This process allows the female argonaut to attain neutral buoyancy at depth and potentially adjust buoyancy to counter the increased (and significant) weight of eggs during reproductive periods. Evolution of this air-capture strategy enables this negatively buoyant octopus to survive free of the sea floor. This major shift in life mode from benthic to pelagic shows strong evolutionary parallels with the origins of all cephalopods, which attained gas-mediated buoyancy via the closed-chambered shells of the true nautiluses and their relatives. PMID:20484241

  2. Effect of bioadhesion on initial in vitro buoyancy of effervescent floating matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin HCL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeetendra Singh Negi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate effect of bioadhesion on the initial in vitro buoyancy behaviour of effervescent matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin HCl (CIPRO. Tablets were prepared by direct compression using HPMC K4M and Carbopol 971P as hydrophilic-controlled release polymers, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 as gas-generating agent, polyplasdone XL, Explotab and Ac-Di-Sol as swelling agents. Tablets were evaluated for normal and modified initial in vitro floating behavior, floating duration, swelling behavior and in vitro drug release studies. A modified buoyancy lag time for tablets was determined in order to include the effect of bioadhesion on initial buoyancy. The initial buoyancy was found depended on bioadhesion ability of tablets. The lowest modified buoyancy lag time of 20 seconds was obtained for Formulation F7 having both NaHCO 3 and polyplasdone XL. The floating duration was also found dependent on concentration of NaHCO 3 and swelling agents. The drug release of F7 was also sustained up to 12-hr duration with anomalous drug transport mechanism.

  3. Effect of bioadhesion on initial in vitro buoyancy of effervescent floating matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin HCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Jeetendra Singh; Trivedi, Abhinav; Khanduri, Praveen; Negi, Vandana; Kasliwal, Nikhil

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effect of bioadhesion on the initial in vitro buoyancy behaviour of effervescent matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin HCl (CIPRO). Tablets were prepared by direct compression using HPMC K4M and Carbopol 971P as hydrophilic-controlled release polymers, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) as gas-generating agent, polyplasdone XL, Explotab and Ac-Di-Sol as swelling agents. Tablets were evaluated for normal and modified initial in vitro floating behavior, floating duration, swelling behavior and in vitro drug release studies. A modified buoyancy lag time for tablets was determined in order to include the effect of bioadhesion on initial buoyancy. The initial buoyancy was found depended on bioadhesion ability of tablets. The lowest modified buoyancy lag time of 20 seconds was obtained for Formulation F7 having both NaHCO(3) and polyplasdone XL. The floating duration was also found dependent on concentration of NaHCO(3) and swelling agents. The drug release of F7 was also sustained up to 12-hr duration with anomalous drug transport mechanism.

  4. Ceramic Spheres—A Novel Solution to Deep Sea Buoyancy Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic-based hollow spheres are considered a great driving force for many applications such as offshore buoyancy modules due to their large diameter to wall thickness ratio and uniform wall thickness geometric features. We have developed such thin-walled hollow spheres made of alumina using slip casting and sintering processes. A diameter as large as 50 mm with a wall thickness of 0.5–1.0 mm has been successfully achieved in these spheres. Their material and structural properties were examined by a series of characterization tools. Particularly, the feasibility of these spheres was investigated with respect to its application for deep sea (>3000 m buoyancy modules. These spheres, sintered at 1600 °C and with 1.0 mm of wall thickness, have achieved buoyancy of more than 54%. As the sphere’s wall thickness was reduced (e.g., 0.5 mm, their buoyancy reached 72%. The mechanical performance of such spheres has shown a hydrostatic failure pressure above 150 MPa, corresponding to a rating depth below sea level of 5000 m considering a safety factor of 3. The developed alumina-based ceramic spheres are feasible for low cost and scaled-up production and show great potential at depths greater than those achievable by the current deep-sea buoyancy module technologies.

  5. Buoyancy increase and drag-reduction through a simple superhydrophobic coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gi Byoung; Patir, Adnan; Page, Kristopher; Lu, Yao; Allan, Elaine; Parkin, Ivan P

    2017-06-08

    A superhydrophobic paint was fabricated using 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOTES), TiO 2 nanoparticles and ethanol. The paint has potential for aquatic application of a superhydrophobic coating as it induces increased buoyancy and drag reduction. Buoyance testing showed that the reduction of surface energy by superhydrophobic coating made it feasible that glass, a high density material, was supported by the surface tension of water. In a miniature boat sailing test, it was shown that the low energy surface treatment decreased the adhesion of water molecules to the surface of the boat resulting in a reduction of the drag force. Additionally, a robust superhydrophobic surface was fabricated through layer-by-layer coating using adhesive double side tape and the paint, and after a 100 cm abrasion test with sand paper, the surface still retained its water repellency, enhanced buoyancy and drag reduction.

  6. Investigating Students' Ideas About Buoyancy and the Influence of Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, James; Borland, David

    2016-04-01

    While haptics (simulated touch) represents a potential breakthrough technology for science teaching and learning, there is relatively little research into its differential impact in the context of teaching and learning. This paper describes the testing of a haptically enhanced simulation (HES) for learning about buoyancy. Despite a lifetime of everyday experiences, a scientifically sound explanation of buoyancy remains difficult to construct for many. It requires the integration of domain-specific knowledge regarding density, fluid, force, gravity, mass, weight, and buoyancy. Prior studies suggest that novices often focus on only one dimension of the sinking and floating phenomenon. Our HES was designed to promote the integration of the subconcepts of density and buoyant forces and stresses the relationship between the object itself and the surrounding fluid. The study employed a randomized pretest-posttest control group research design and a suite of measures including an open-ended prompt and objective content questions to provide insights into the influence of haptic feedback on undergraduate students' thinking about buoyancy. A convenience sample (n = 40) was drawn from a university's population of undergraduate elementary education majors. Two groups were formed from haptic feedback (n = 22) and no haptic feedback (n = 18). Through content analysis, discernible differences were seen in the posttest explanations sinking and floating across treatment groups. Learners that experienced the haptic feedback made more frequent use of "haptically grounded" terms (e.g., mass, gravity, buoyant force, pushing), leading us to begin to build a local theory of language-mediated haptic cognition.

  7. Influence of Buoyancy Control Performance on Power Production by the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Tedd, James; Friis-Madsen, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the real sea performance of the buoyancy control system of Wave Dragon, a floating wave energy converter using the overtopping principle. The device operates with the full independent control system which has been tested during three years of operation. The impact...

  8. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe : Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference

  9. Low-buoyancy thermochemical plumes resolve controversy of classical mantle plume concept

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dannberg, Juliane; Sobolev, Stephan V

    2015-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that, despite their low buoyancy, large enough thermochemical plumes can rise through the whole mantle causing only negligible surface uplift. Their tails are bulky (>200 km radius) and remain in the upper mantle for 100 millions of years....

  10. Consistent Two-Equation Closure Modelling for Atmospheric Research: Buoyancy and Vegetation Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Kelly, Mark C.; Leclerc, Monique Y.

    2012-01-01

    A self-consistent two-equation closure treating buoyancy and plant drag effects has been developed, through consideration of the behaviour of the supplementary equation for the length-scale-determining variable in homogeneous turbulent flow. Being consistent with the canonical flow regimes of gri...

  11. Buoyancy effects in vertical rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field and single sided heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostichev, P. I.; Poddubnyi, I. I.; Razuvanov, N. G.

    2017-11-01

    In some DEMO blanket designs liquid metal flows in vertical ducts of rectangular cross-section between ceramic breeder units providing their cooling. Heat exchange in these conditions is governed by the influence of magnetic field (coplanar) and by buoyancy effects that depend on the flow orientation to the gravity vector (downward and upward flow). Magnetohydrodynamic and heat transfer of liquid metal in vertical rectangular ducts is not well researched. Experimental study of buoyancy effects in rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field for one-sided heat load and downward and upward flowsis presented in this paper. The detail research with has been done on mercury MHD close loop with using of the probe technique allow to discover several advantageous and disadvantageous effects. The intensive impact of buoyancy force has been observed in a few regime of downward flow which has been laminarized by magnetic field. Due to the development in the flow of the secondary large-scale vortices heat transfer improved and the temperature fluctuations of the abnormally high intensity have been fixed. On the contrary, in the upward flow the buoyancy force stabilized the flow which lead to decreasing of the turbulence heat transfer ratio and, consequently, deterioration of heat transfer.

  12. Teaching Archimedes' Principle to Sixth Graders without Teaching Mass, Density, Pressure, Volume or Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Neeraja

    2017-01-01

    Flotation is usually taught in Indian schools after students have been introduced to the concepts of mass, density, pressure, volume and buoyancy. This paper describes an attempt to teach the principle of flotation to a class of sixth graders--who had not yet been taught these concepts--so they could understand (and perhaps, arrive at) Archimedes'…

  13. Teaching Archimedes' Principle to Sixth Graders without Teaching Mass, Density, Pressure, Volume or Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Neeraja

    Flotation is usually taught in Indian schools after students have been introduced to the concepts of mass, density, pressure, volume and buoyancy. This paper describes an attempt to teach the principle of flotation to a class of sixth graders--who had not yet been taught these concepts--so they could understand (and perhaps, arrive at) Archimedes'…

  14. Non-Uniqueness of the Point of Application of the Buoyancy Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliava, Janis; Megel, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Even though the buoyancy force (also known as the Archimedes force) has always been an important topic of academic studies in physics, its point of application has not been explicitly identified yet. We present a quantitative approach to this problem based on the concept of the hydrostatic energy, considered here for a general shape of the…

  15. On the influence of buoyancy and suction/injection In Heat and Mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we examined the influence of buoyancy and suction/injection in the problem of unsteady convection with chemical reaction and radiative heat transfer past a flat porous plate moving through a binary mixture in an optically thin environment is presented. The dimensionless governing equations for this ...

  16. Academic Buoyancy in Secondary School: Exploring Patterns of Convergence in English, Mathematics, Science, and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, Lars-Erik; Hall, James; Martin, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Past research into the ability of students to "bounce back" from everyday academic setback (academic buoyancy) has lacked sensitivity to the contexts in which children demonstrate this behavior. Here we aimed to contextualize past findings by reporting the results of an exploratory investigation that featured: (1) repeated measurement of…

  17. Stability analysis of hybrid-driven underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wen-dong; Wang, Shu-xin; Wang, Yan-hui; Song, Yang; Zhu, Ya-qiang

    2017-10-01

    Hybrid-driven underwater glider is a new type of unmanned underwater vehicle, which combines the advantages of autonomous underwater vehicles and traditional underwater gliders. The autonomous underwater vehicles have good maneuverability and can travel with a high speed, while the traditional underwater gliders are highlighted by low power consumption, long voyage, long endurance and good stealth characteristics. The hybrid-driven underwater gliders can realize variable motion profiles by their own buoyancy-driven and propeller propulsion systems. Stability of the mechanical system determines the performance of the system. In this paper, the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider developed by Tianjin University is selected as the research object and the stability of hybrid-driven underwater glider unitedly controlled by buoyancy and propeller has been targeted and evidenced. The dimensionless equations of the hybrid-driven underwater glider are obtained when the propeller is working. Then, the steady speed and steady glide path angle under steady-state motion have also been achieved. The steady-state operating conditions can be calculated when the hybrid-driven underwater glider reaches the desired steady-state motion. And the steadystate operating conditions are relatively conservative at the lower bound of the velocity range compared with the range of the velocity derived from the method of the composite Lyapunov function. By calculating the hydrodynamic coefficients of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider, the simulation analysis has been conducted. In addition, the results of the field trials conducted in the South China Sea and the Danjiangkou Reservoir of China have been presented to illustrate the validity of the analysis and simulation, and to show the feasibility of the method of the composite Lyapunov function which verifies the stability of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider.

  18. Uplift, Feedback, and Buoyancy: Radio Lobe Dynamics in NGC 4472

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron-Marsolais, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Bogdan, A.; Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Su, Y.; Nulsen, P.; Randall, S. W.; Roediger, E.

    2017-10-01

    We present results from deep (380 ks) Chandra observations of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) outburst in the massive early-type galaxy NGC 4472. We detect cavities in the gas coincident with the radio lobes and estimate the eastern and western lobe enthalpy to be (1.1+/- 0.5)× {10}56 erg and (3+/- 1)× {10}56 erg and the average power required to inflate the lobes to be (1.8+/- 0.9)× {10}41 erg s-1 and (6+/- 3)× {10}41 erg s-1, respectively. We also detect enhanced X-ray rims around the radio lobes with sharp surface brightness discontinuities between the shells and the ambient gas. The temperature of the gas in the shells is less than that of the ambient medium, suggesting that they are not AGN-driven shocks but rather gas uplifted from the core by the buoyant rise of the radio bubbles. We estimate the energy required to lift the gas to be up to (1.1+/- 0.3)× {10}56 erg and (3+/- 1)× {10}56 erg for the eastern and western rims, respectively, constituting a significant fraction of the total outburst energy. A more conservative estimate suggests that the gas in the rim was uplifted at a smaller distance, requiring only 20%-25% of this energy. In either case, if a significant fraction of this uplift energy is thermalized via hydrodynamic instabilities or thermal conduction, our results suggest that it could be an important source of heating in cool core clusters and groups. We also find evidence for a central abundance drop in NGC 4472. The iron abundance profile shows that the region along the cavity system has a lower metallicity than the surrounding undisturbed gas, similar to the central region. This also shows that bubbles have lifted low-metallicity gas from the center.

  19. The effects of lateral density gradients, slopes and buoyancy on channel flow: 1D analytical solutions and applications to the SE Canadian Cordillera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Félix; Ranalli, Giorgio

    2017-08-01

    We present 1D analytical solutions for channel flow in orogens driven by various types of pressure gradients. Our calculations demonstrate that lateral density gradients in the upper crust, such as would occur across a suture zone separating arc rocks from pericratonic sediments provide a driving force for Poiseuille flow as large as topographic gradients observed in modern mountain belts. For cases for which the gradients are external (topographic and lateral density gradients) and internal (e.g. partial melting of channel material) to the channel, inclination decreases and increases the Poiseuille component of the average flow-velocity within the channel by the cosine and sine of the slope, respectively. The magnitude of the pressure gradient consequent upon the buoyancy generated by partial melting of metapelites in a channel with a 30° slope, such as would occur above an underthrusting basement ramp, is similar to that of topographic or lateral density gradients. Channel flow up a ramp could thus constitute an important exhumation mechanism in large hot orogens. Our calculations indicate that mid-crustal channel flow was a highly likely process in the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene setting of the southeastern Canadian Cordillera. The flow was first driven by the lateral density contrast between pericratonic sediments and the arc-related Intermontane terrane, then by combined effect of topographic gradient and melt-induced buoyancy of the Lower Selkirk Allochthon (part of the Shuswap Complex). Flow up the underthrusting basement ramp resulted in exhumation from mid- to upper-crustal levels. Channel flow then migrated downward to involve basement and overlying cover sequence rocks. Our results indicate that syn-convergent channel flow was a viable and very likely process in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera.

  20. Effect of the Wavy permeable Interface on Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Partially Porous Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mehdaoui

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional, double diffusion, natural convection in a partially porous cavity satured with a binary fluid is investigated numerically. Multiple motions are driven by the external temperature and concentration differences imposed across vertical walls. The wavy interface between fluid and porous layer is horizontal. The equations which describe the fluid flow and heat and mass transfer are described by the Navier-Stokes equations (fluid region, Darcy-Brinkman equation (porous region and energy and mass equations. The finite element method was applied to solve the governing equations. The fluid flow and heat and mass transfer has been investigated for different values of the amplitude and the wave number of the interface and the buoyancy ratio. The results obtained in the form of isotherms, stream lines, isoconcentrations and the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers; show that the wavy interface has a significant effect on the flow and heat and mass transfer.

  1. Temperature and velocity fields in natural convection by PIV and LIF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Westergaard, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Natural convection in a cubical cavity (L = 250 mm) filled with water is created by heating a square plate (0.5 L) centred in the bottom wall and by cooling the sidewalls, while the remaining walls are insulated. The Rayleigh number based on cavity side length and temperature difference between...... plate and cooled walls is 1.4×10^10. The flow is turbulent and is similar to some indoor room flows. Combined Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Light Induced Fluorescence (LIF) are used to measure local velocities and temperatures. Data measured in a symmetry plane parallel to a sidewall...... are presented in terms of mean velocities and temperature and in terms turbulent quantities including Reynolds fluxes. The flow consists a plume rising above the heated plate into an almost stagnant fluid with a weakly stratified temperature field, as well as thin buoyancy driven boundary layers down...

  2. Academic buoyancy, student's achievement, and the linking role of control: A cross-lagged analysis of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Rebecca J; Martin, Andrew J; Malmberg, Lars-Erik; Hall, James; Ginns, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Previous research has indicated that although academic buoyancy and student's achievement are associated, the relationship is relatively modest. We sought to determine whether another construct might link academic buoyancy and student's achievement. Based on prior theoretical and empirical work, we examined a sense of control as one possible linking mechanism. The study analysed data from 2,971 students attending 21 Australian high schools. We conducted a cross-lagged panel design as a first means of disentangling the relative salience of academic buoyancy, control, and achievement (Phase 1). Based upon these results, we proceeded with follow-up analyses of an ordered process model linking the constructs over time (Phase 2). Findings showed that buoyancy and achievement were associated with control over time, but not with one another (Phase 1). In addition, control appeared to play a role in how buoyancy influenced achievement and that a cyclical process may operate among the three factors over time (Phase 2). The findings suggest that control may play an important role in linking past experiences of academic buoyancy and achievement to subsequent academic buoyancy and achievement. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  3. The Principles of Buoyancy in Marine Fish Eggs and Their Vertical Distributions across the World Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby, Svein; Kristiansen, Trond

    2015-01-01

    Buoyancy acting on plankton, i.e. the difference in specific gravity between plankton and the ambient water, is a function of salinity and temperature. From specific gravity measurements of marine fish eggs salinity appears to be the only determinant of the buoyancy indicating that the thermal expansions of the fish egg and the ambient seawater are equal. We analyze the mechanisms behind thermal expansion in fish eggs in order to determine to what extent it can be justified to neglect the effects of temperature on buoyancy. Our results confirm the earlier assumptions that salinity is the basic determinant on buoyancy in marine fish eggs that, in turn, influence the vertical distributions and, consequently, the dispersal of fish eggs from the spawning areas. Fish populations have adapted accordingly by producing egg specific gravities that tune the egg buoyancy to create specific vertical distributions for each local population. A wide variety of buoyancy adaptations are found among fish populations. The ambient physical conditions at the spawning sites form a basic constraint for adaptation. In coastal regions where salinity increases with depth, and where the major fraction of the fish stocks spawns, pelagic and mesopelagic egg distributions dominate. However, in the larger part of worlds' oceans salinity decreases with depth resulting in different egg distributions. Here, the principles of vertical distributions of fish eggs in the world oceans are presented in an overarching framework presenting the basic differences between regions, mainly coastal, where salinity increases with depth and the major part of the world oceans where salinity decreases with depth. We show that under these latter conditions, steady-state vertical distribution of mesopelagic fish eggs cannot exist as it does in most coastal regions. In fact, a critical spawning depth must exist where spawning below this depth threshold results in eggs sinking out of the water column and become lost for

  4. Large eddy simulations of targeted electromagnetic control of buoyancy-driven turbulent flow in a slender enclosure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a large eddy simulation (LES) of a locally applied electromagnetic control of turbulent thermal convection of an electrically conductive fluid (electrolyte solution) inside of a slender enclosure. Generic configurations, consisting of two or three magnets of opposite polarities located

  5. Direct measurement of the heat exchanges in a buoyancy driven two-phase flow; application to the planets core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacheul, Jean-Baptiste; Le Bars, Michael; Ecoulement tournant et geophysique Team

    2016-11-01

    Telluric planet formation involved the settling of large amounts of liquid iron coming from impacting planetesimals into a viscous magma ocean as deep as thousands of kilometers. During this "iron rain", the initial state of planets was mostly determined by exchanges of heat and elements between the two phases. Most models of planet formation simply assume that the metal rapidly equilibrated with the whole mantle. Here we report the results of experiments on which we performed measurements of the diffusive exchanges integrated during the fall, in addition to measuring the dynamical variables of the flow on high speed videos recordings. Using a balloon filled with liquid gallium alloy as an analogue for the iron core of the impactor and a viscous fluid as an analogue for the silicate magma, we were able to produce flows matching the dynamical regime of the geophysical inspiration. We find that the early representations of this flow as an iron "rain" is far from the experiments, both in terms of fluid mechanics and diffusive exchanges during the phase where most of the equilibration is accomplished. Indeed, the equilibration coefficient at a given depth depends both on the size of the metal diapir and on the viscosity of the ambient fluid, whereas the falling speed is only controlled by the size. Various scalings chosen in the literature for the diffusive exchanges, and we find good agreement with the hypothesis and scaling of a turbulent thermal.

  6. Two-length-scale turbulence model for self-similar buoyancy-, shock-, and shear-driven mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brandon E.; Schilling, Oleg; Hartland, Tucker A.

    2018-01-01

    The three-equation k -L -a turbulence model [B. Morgan and M. Wickett, Three-equation model for the self-similar growth of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities, Phys. Rev. E 91, 043002 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.91.043002] is extended by the addition of a second length scale equation. It is shown that the separation of turbulence transport and turbulence destruction length scales is necessary for simultaneous prediction of the growth parameter and turbulence intensity of a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear layer when model coefficients are constrained by similarity analysis. Constraints on model coefficients are derived that satisfy an ansatz of self-similarity in the low-Atwood-number limit and allow the determination of model coefficients necessary to recover expected experimental behavior. The model is then applied in one-dimensional simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor, reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov, Kelvin-Helmholtz, and combined Rayleigh-Taylor-Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mixing layers to demonstrate that the expected growth rates are recovered numerically. Finally, it is shown in the case of combined instability that the model predicts a mixing width that is a linear combination of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz mixing processes.

  7. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Hydrogen Gas Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Burt W.; Agrawal, Ajay K.; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed in earth-gravity to determine how buoyancy affected transition from laminar to turbulent flow in hydrogen gas jet diffusion flames. The jet exit Froude number characterizing buoyancy in the flame was varied from 1.65 x 10(exp 5) to 1.14 x 10(exp 8) by varying the operating pressure and/or burner inside diameter. Laminar fuel jet was discharged vertically into ambient air flowing through a combustion chamber. Flame characteristics were observed using rainbow schlieren deflectometry, a line-of-site optical diagnostic technique. Results show that the breakpoint length for a given jet exit Reynolds number increased with increasing Froude number. Data suggest that buoyant transitional flames might become laminar in the absence of gravity. The schlieren technique was shown as effective in quantifying the flame characteristics.

  8. Numerical and Experimental Study on Negative Buoyance Induced Vortices in N-Butane Jet Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-07-26

    Near nozzle flow field in flickering n-butane diffusion jet flames was investigated with a special focus on transient flow patterns of negative buoyance induced vortices. The flow structures were obtained through Mie scattering imaging with seed particles in a fuel stream using continuous-wave (CW) Argon-ion laser. Velocity fields were also quantified with particle mage velocimetry (PIV) system having kHz repetition rate. The results showed that the dynamic motion of negative buoyance induced vortices near the nozzle exit was coupled strongly with a flame flickering instability. Typically during the flame flickering, the negative buoyant vortices oscillated at the flickering frequency. The vortices were distorted by the flickering motion and exhibited complicated transient vortical patterns, such as tilting and stretching. Numerical simulations were also implemented based on an open source C++ package, LaminarSMOKE, for further validations.

  9. Schlieren Measurements of Buoyancy Effects on Flow Transition in Low-Density Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap S.; Agrawal, Ajay K.

    2005-01-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent flow in helium jets discharged into air was studied using Rainbow Schlieren Deflectometry technique. In particular, the effects of buoyancy on jet oscillations and flow transition length were considered. Experiments to simulate microgravity were conducted in the 2.2s drop tower at NASA Glenn Research Center. The jet Reynolds numbers varied from 800 to1200 and the jet Richardson numbers ranged between 0.01 and 0.004. Schlieren images revealed substantial variations in the flow structure during the drop. Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of the data obtained in Earth gravity experiments revealed the existence of a discrete oscillating frequency in the transition region, which matched the frequency in the upstream laminar regime. In microgravity, the transition occurred farther downstream indicating laminarization of the jet in the absence of buoyancy. The amplitude of jet oscillations was reduced by up to an order of magnitude in microgravity. Results suggest that jet oscillations were buoyancy induced and that the brief microgravity period may not be sufficient for the oscillations to completely subside.

  10. On the relative importance of thermal and chemical buoyancy in impact-induced melting on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas, T.; Breuer, D.

    2017-09-01

    We ran series of 2D numerical mantle convection simulations of the thermochemical evolution of a Mars-like planet. In order to study the importance of compositional buoyancy of melting mantle, the models were set up in pairs of one including all thermal and compositional contributions to buoyancy and one accounting only for the thermal contributions. Single large impacts were introduced as causes of additional strong local anomalies, and their evolution in the framework of the convecting mantle was tracked. They confirm that the additional buoyancy provided by the depletion of melting mantle can establish a global stable stratification of the convecting mantle and throttle crust production. Furthermore, it is essential in the stabilization and preservation of local compositional anomalies directly beneath the lithosphere and offers a possible explanation for the existence of distinct, long-lived reservoirs in the martian mantle. Such anomalies will be detected by gravimetry rather than by seismic or heat flow measurements. The crustal thickness can be locally overestimated by up to 15-22 km if impact-induced density anomalies in the mantle are neglected.

  11. Seasonal trends in adenylate nucleotide content in eggs of recruit and repeat spawning Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) and implications for egg quality and buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Mi; Svardal, Asbjørn M.; Eide, Torunn; Thorsen, Anders; Kjesbu, Olav Sigurd

    2012-10-01

    Seasonal and ontogenetic variation in egg buoyancy (egg specific gravity; ρ) (n = 63) and nucleotide content (n = 46) were examined for wild-caught Atlantic (Barents Sea) cod (Gadus morhua) held in captivity over two successive spawning seasons, i.e. each female (n = 5) was studied both as recruit and repeat spawner. All eggs were naturally spawned and fertilized, and incubated under optimal condition in flow-through aquaria. Egg diameter and egg dry weight declined steadily during the spawning period, while stage-specific ρ was approximately constant between egg batches (typically around 15 in total). Within each egg batch, i.e. during egg incubation, ρ significantly decreased from the time of gastrulation to before hatching, accompanied by increased contents of ATP and ADP. Altogether, we found that adenylate energy charge (EC) (EC = ([ATP] + 0.5 [ADP]) / ([ATP] + [ADP] + [AMP]) positively affected egg buoyancy (P = 0.013) in concert with egg developmental stage (P cod eggs in the field would show comparably similar trends in ρ and levels of nucleotides.

  12. A novel method for calculating and measuring the second-order buoyancy experienced by a magnet immersed in magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Hao, Du; Li, Decai

    2018-01-01

    The phenomenon whereby an object whose density is greater than magnetic fluid can be suspended stably in magnetic fluid under the magnetic field is one of the peculiar properties of magnetic fluids. Examples of applications based on the peculiar properties of magnetic fluid are sensors and actuators, dampers, positioning systems and so on. Therefore, the calculation and measurement of magnetic levitation force of magnetic fluid is of vital importance. This paper concerns the peculiar second-order buoyancy experienced by a magnet immersed in magnetic fluid. The expression for calculating the second-order buoyancy was derived, and a novel method for calculating and measuring the second-order buoyancy was proposed based on the expression. The second-order buoyancy was calculated by ANSYS and measured experimentally using the novel method. To verify the novel method, the second-order buoyancy was measured experimentally with a nonmagnetic rod stuck on the top surface of the magnet. The results of calculations and experiments show that the novel method for calculating the second-order buoyancy is correct with high accuracy. In addition, the main causes of error were studied in this paper, including magnetic shielding of magnetic fluid and the movement of magnetic fluid in a nonuniform magnetic field.

  13. Investigation of Transient, Turbulent Natural Convection in Vertical Tubes for Thermal Energy Storage in Supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei Lakeh, Reza; Lavine, Adrienne S.; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Wirz, Richard E.

    2013-11-01

    Heat transfer can be a limiting factor in the operation of thermal energy storage, including sensible heat and latent heat storage systems. Poor heat transfer between the energy storage medium and the container walls impairs the functionality of the thermal storage unit by requiring excessively long times to charge or discharge the system. In this study, the effect of turbulent, unsteady buoyancy-driven flow on heat transfer in vertical storage tubes containing supercritical CO2 as the storage medium is investigated computationally. The heat transfer from a constant-temperature wall to the storage fluid is studied during the charge cycle. The results of this study show that turbulent natural convection dominates the heat transfer mechanism and significantly reduces the required time for charging compared to pure conduction. Changing the L/D ratio of the storage tube has a major impact on the charge time. The charge time shows a decreasing trend with RaL. The non-dimensional model of the problem shows that Nusselt number and non-dimensional mean temperature of the storage fluid in different configurations of the tube is a function Buoyancy-Fourier number defined as of FoL * RaLm* L/D. This study was supported by award No. DE-AR0000140 granted by U.S. Department of Energy under Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) and by award No. 5660021607 granted by Southern California Gas Company.

  14. The Design and Simulation of Natural Personalised Ventilation (NPV System for Multi-Bed Hospital Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adequate ventilation is necessary for thermal comfort and reducing risks from infectious bio-aerosols in hospital wards, but achieving this with mechanical ventilation has carbon and energy implications. Natural ventilation is often limited to window-based designs whose dilution/mixing effectiveness are subject to constraints of wind speed, cross ventilation, and in the case of hospital wards, proximity of patients to external walls. A buoyancy-driven natural ventilation system capable of achieving dilution/mixing was shown to be feasible in a preceding study of novel system called natural personalised ventilation (NPV. This system combined both architecture and airflow engineering principles of space design and buoyancy and was tested and validated (salt-bath experiment for a single bed ward. This research extends the previous work and is proof-of-concept on the feasibility of NPV system for multi-bed wards. Two different four-bed ward types were investigated of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations under wind-neutral conditions. Results predict that NPV system could deliver fresh air to multiple patients, including those located 10 m away from external wall, with absolute flow rates of between 32 L·s−1 and 54 L·s−1 for each patient/bed. Compared to same wards simulated using window design, ingress of airborne contaminants into patients’ breathing zone and summer overheating potential were minimised, while overall ward dilution was maximised. Findings suggest the NPV has potentials for enabling architects and building service engineers to decouple airflow delivery from the visualisation and illumination responsibilities placed upon windows.

  15. Shift in community structure in an early-successional Mediterranean shrubland driven by long-term experimental warming and drought and natural extreme droughts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daijun; Estiarte, Marc; Ogaya, Romà; Yang, Xiaohong; Peñuelas, Josep

    2017-10-01

    Global warming and recurring drought are expected to accelerate water limitation for plant communities in semiarid Mediterranean ecosystems and produce directional shifts in structure and composition that are not easily detected, and supporting evidence is scarce. We conducted a long-term (17 years) nocturnal-warming (+0.6°C) and drought (-40% rainfall) experiments in an early-successional Mediterranean shrubland to study the changes in community structure and composition, contrasting functional groups and dominant species, and the superimposed effects of natural extreme drought. Species richness decreased in both the warming and drought treatments. Responses to the moderate warming were associated with decreases in herb abundance, and responses to the drought were associated with decreases in both herb and shrub abundances. The drought also significantly decreased community diversity and evenness. Changes in abundance differed between herbs (decreases) and shrubs (increases or no changes). Both warming and drought, especially drought, increased the relative species richness and abundance of shrubs, favoring the establishment of shrubs. Both warming and drought produced significant shifts in plant community composition. Experimental warming shifted the community composition from Erica multiflora toward Rosmarinus officinalis, and drought consistently shifted the composition toward Globularia alypum. The responses in biodiversity (e.g., community biodiversity, changes of functional groups and compositional shifts) were also strongly correlated with atmospheric drought (SPEI) in winter-spring and/or summer, indicating sensitivity to water limitation in this early-successional Mediterranean ecosystem, especially to natural extreme droughts. Our results suggest that the shifts in species assembles and community diversity and composition are accelerated by the long-term nocturnal-warming and drought, combined with natural severe droughts, and that the magnitude of the

  16. Transient natural and surface-tension-driven convection in a two-layer gas-and-liquid enclosure with nonuniform radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramzon, B.; Edwards, D. K.; Sirignano, W. A.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of transient heat transfer and fluid flow in a cylindrical enclosure containing a two-layer gas-and-liquid system. The geometric configuration and the boundary conditions of the problem are relevant to the analysis of the preignition processes during the fire accident situation involving a pool of liquid fuel in the vicinity of an ignition source. It is demonstrated that the effects of the natural and thermocapillary convection, radiative transfer, thermal inertia and conduction of the walls bounding the enclosure, as well as, the magnitude of the gravity field play important roles in the development of the temperature and velocity fields in the container.

  17. Numerical simulations of a mixed momentum-driven and buoyancy-driven jet in a large enclosure for nuclear reactor severe accident analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carasik, Lane B., E-mail: lcarasik@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States); Sebilleau, Frédéric, E-mail: Frederic.sebilleau11@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Mechanical Engineering Department, London SW7 SBX (United Kingdom); Walker, Simon P., E-mail: s.p.walker@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, Mechanical Engineering Department, London SW7 SBX (United Kingdom); Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Simulations of thermal stratification in large enclosures using different turbulence models. • The recent elliptic blending k–ε was implemented in this work. • Direct comparisons of experimental temperature measurements to CFD predictions. • Spurious prediction of jet stabilisation and diffuse stratification by both low-Re k–ε and SST k–ω. - Abstract: An ability to predict the behavior of buoyant jets entering a large body of relatively stationary fluid is important in analysis of a wide variety of nuclear accidents, including for example the use of large tanks of water as heat sinks, or the release of hot gases into the secondary containment. In particular, the degree to which temperature stratification occurs is important, as it can affect markedly the effectiveness of the body of fluid as a heat sink. In this paper, we report the results of measurements on an experimental facility designed to exhibit such behavior, and the results of attempts to predict this experiment using CFD. In particular, we here investigate the effectiveness of three alternative turbulence models for this analysis; low-Re k–e, elliptic-blended k–e and Shear Stress Transport k–ω models. Both the degree of thermal stratification and the stability of the jet that were predicted differed markedly between the three models. Two of the models, the low-Re k–e and the Shear Stress Transport k–ω, tend to predict, wrongly, significant turbulent intensity in regions where fluid velocities are essentially zero. This spurious high turbulent intensity in turn causes (i) a high turbulent viscosity to be applied, wrongly stabilizing the jet, and (ii) increased turbulent diffusion of heat, causing too deep and diffuse a stratification to be predicted.

  18. Bottlenecks in Geospatial Data-Driven Decision-Making for Natural Disaster Management: A Case Study of Forest Fire Prevention and Control in Guatemala's Maya Biosphere Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenter, J. S.; Mueller, J. M.; Morrison, I.

    2016-12-01

    of support systems for use of Earth observation data is thus required to maximize the value of data-driven forest fire management in the MBR. Findings further validate a need for continued cooperation between scientific and governance institutions to disseminate and integrate geospatial data into environmental decision-making.

  19. Study on an antagonist differentiated heated lid driven-cavity enclosing a tube: lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Pellerin, Nicolas; Reggio, Marcelo; Bennacer, Rachid

    2017-05-01

    The method of lattice-Boltzmann multiple relaxation time (MRT) is commonly applied to study the conversion system consisting in a combination of forced convection and natural convection occurred in a cavity. Moving the top surface horizontally at a fixed speed, while two vertical walls are applied with constant different temperatures, assuming adiabatic case on both bottom and top walls. We consider a "non-cooperating" situation, where dynamics and buoyancy forces counterbalance. The cavity contains a circular cylinder placed at various positions. Boundary conditions for velocity and temperature have been applied to handle the non-Cartesian boundary of the cylinder. In lattice Boltzmann methods we adopt the double distribution model for calculating both the thermal and hydrodynamic fields. The D2Q5 and D2Q9 lattice are chosen to perform the simulations for a wide range of Reynolds and Rayleigh numbers. By calculating the average Nusselt number, we also investigated the influence of different obstacle positions on characteristics of flow and heat transfer. The results show the influence of the obstacle position on the dimensionless numbers, so as to effect the heat transfer behaviors inside the cavity. It is also indicates that the governing parameters are also related to driven power for the upper surface sliding. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy harvesting, conversion and storage II (ICOME 2016)", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  20. A coastal cline in sodium accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana is driven by natural variation of the sodium transporter AtHKT1;1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Baxter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, like many plant species, experiences a range of edaphic conditions across its natural habitat. Such heterogeneity may drive local adaptation, though the molecular genetic basis remains elusive. Here, we describe a study in which we used genome-wide association mapping, genetic complementation, and gene expression studies to identify cis-regulatory expression level polymorphisms at the AtHKT1;1 locus, encoding a known sodium (Na(+ transporter, as being a major factor controlling natural variation in leaf Na(+ accumulation capacity across the global A. thaliana population. A weak allele of AtHKT1;1 that drives elevated leaf Na(+ in this population has been previously linked to elevated salinity tolerance. Inspection of the geographical distribution of this allele revealed its significant enrichment in populations associated with the coast and saline soils in Europe. The fixation of this weak AtHKT1;1 allele in these populations is genetic evidence supporting local adaptation to these potentially saline impacted environments.

  1. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    OpenAIRE

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference between the core and the annular layer, is counterbalanced. From earlier studies it is known that at the interface between the annular layer and the core waves are present that move with respect to the ...

  2. Dynamic effects of plate-buoyancy subduction at Manila Trench, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.; Zhan, W.; Sun, J.; Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    Bathymetric map of SCS plate shows two subducting buoyancies, the fossil ridge and the oceanic plateau, which are supposed to impact slab segmentation into the north from Taiwan to 18°N, and the south from 17°N to Mindoro. Hypocenter distribution show that slab dip angle turns lower southwards from 45° to 30° in the north segment, and relatively equals ~45° in the south segment at the depth of 100km. Moreover, volcano distribution can be segmented into Miocene WVC, Quaternary EVC in the north and combined SVC in the south (Fig. A). We found that WVC and SVC mostly locate in a parallel belt ~50km apart to Manila trench, however EVC turn father southwards from 50km to 100km (Fig. B). Above characters congruously indicate that SCS plate kept equal dip angle in Miocene; then the north segment shallowed at 18°N and developed northwards in Quaternary, resulting in lower dip angle than the invariant south segment. To check the transformation of slab dip angle from 45° to 30° between 17~18°N, focal mechanism solution nearby 17°N are found 90° in rake and dip angle, strike parallel to the fossil ridge, indicating a slab tear located coincident with the ridge, where is a weak zone of higher heat flow and lower plate coupling ratio than the adjacent zones and slab can be easily tore as an interface for SCS plate segmentation. Subduction of the two buoyancies within SCS plate is supposed as influential dynamic factor: It caused the trench retreat rate reduced, forming a cusp and a flat convex of Manila trench shape; Moreover, the buoyancies resisted subduction, resulting in shear stress heterogeneity of SCS plate, in consequence the fossil ridge as a fragile belt potentially became stress concentration zone that easily tore; Then the buoyant oceanic plateau might lead to shallowing of the northern SCS plate. To examine the hypothesis, dynamic effects of the two subducting buoyancies are being respectively investigated based on numerical models. (Grt. 41376063, 2013

  3. The impact of the weather conditions on the cooling performance of the heat pump driven by an internal natural gas combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janovcová Martina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Market with sources of heat and cold offers unlimited choice of different power these devices, design technology, efficiency and price categories. New progressive technologies are constantly discovering, about which is still little information, which include heat pumps powered by a combustion engine running on natural gas. A few pieces of these installations are in Slovakia, but no studies about their work and effectiveness under real conditions. This article deals with experimental measurements of gas heat pump efficiency in cooling mode. Since the gas heat pump works only in system air – water, air is the primary low – energy source, it is necessary to monitor the impact of the climate conditions for the gas heat pump performance.

  4. Behavior of a wave-driven buoyant surface jet on a coral reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdman, Liv; Hench, James L.; Fringer, Oliver; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2017-01-01

    A wave-driven surface buoyant jet exiting a coral reef was studied in order to quantify the amount of water re-entrained over the reef crest. Both moored observations and Lagrangian drifters were used to study the fate of the buoyant jet. To investigate in detail the effects of buoyancy and along-shore flow variations, we developed an idealized numerical model of the system. Consistent with previous work, the ratio of along-shore velocity to jet-velocity and the jet internal Froude number were found to be important determinants of the fate of the jet. In the absence of buoyancy, the entrainment of fluid at the reef crest, creates a significant amount of retention, keeping 60% of water in the reef system. However, when the jet is lighter than the ambient ocean-water, the net effect of buoyancy is to enhance the separation of the jet from shore, leading to a greater export of reef water. Matching observations, our modeling predicts that buoyancy limits retention to 30% of the jet flow for conditions existing on the Moorea reef. Overall, the combination of observations and modeling we present here shows that reef-ocean temperature gradients can play an important role in reef-ocean exchanges.

  5. Finding the factors of reduced genetic diversity on X chromosomes of Macaca fascicularis: male-driven evolution, demography, and natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Naoki; Nakagome, Shigeki; Mano, Shuhei; Kameoka, Yosuke; Takahashi, Ichiro; Terao, Keiji

    2013-11-01

    The ratio of genetic diversity on X chromosomes relative to autosomes in organisms with XX/XY sex chromosomes could provide fundamental insight into the process of genome evolution. Here we report this ratio for 24 cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) originating in Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. The average X/A diversity ratios in these samples was 0.34 and 0.20 in the Indonesian-Malaysian and Philippine populations, respectively, considerably lower than the null expectation of 0.75. A Philippine population supposed to derive from an ancestral population by founding events showed a significantly lower ratio than the parental population, suggesting a demographic effect for the reduction. Taking sex-specific mutation rate bias and demographic effect into account, expected X/A diversity ratios generated by computer simulations roughly agreed with the observed data in the intergenic regions. In contrast, silent sites in genic regions on X chromosomes showed strong reduction in genetic diversity and the observed X/A diversity ratio in the genic regions cannot be explained by mutation rate bias and demography, indicating that natural selection also reduces the level of polymorphism near genes. Whole-genome analysis of a female cynomolgus monkey also supported the notion of stronger reduction of genetic diversity near genes on the X chromosome.

  6. A Six-DOF Buoyancy Tank Microgravity Test Bed with Active Drag Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chong; Chen, Shiyu; Yuan, Jianping; Zhu, Zhanxia

    2017-10-01

    Ground experiment under microgravity is very essential because it can verify the space enabling technologies before applied in space missions. In this paper, a novel ground experiment system that can provide long duration, large scale and high microgravity level for the six degree of freedom (DOF) spacecraft trajectory tracking is presented. In which, the most gravity of the test body is balanced by the buoyancy, and the small residual gravity is offset by the electromagnetic force. Because the electromagnetic force on the test body can be adjusted in the electromagnetic system, it can significantly simplify the balancing process using the proposed microgravity test bed compared to the neutral buoyance system. Besides, a novel compensation control system based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method is developed to estimate and compensate the water resistance online, in order to improve the fidelity of the ground experiment. A six-DOF trajectory tracking in the microgravity system is applied to testify the efficiency of the proposed compensation controller, and the experimental simulation results are compared to that obtained using the classic proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method. The simulation results demonstrated that, for the six-DOF motion ground experiment, the microgravity level can reach to 5 × 10-4 g. And, because the water resistance has been estimated and compensated, the performance of the presented controller is much better than the PID controller. The presented ground microgravity system can be applied in on-orbit service and other related technologies in future.

  7. A turbulence spectral model for sound propagation in the atmosphere that incorporates shear and buoyancy forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson

    2000-11-01

    A three-dimensional model for turbulent velocity fluctuations in the atmospheric boundary layer is developed and used to calculate scattering of sound. The model, which is based on von Karman's spectrum, incorporates separate contributions from shear- and buoyancy-forced turbulence. New equations are derived from the model that predict the strength and diffraction parameters for scattering of sound as a function of height from the ground and atmospheric conditions. The need is demonstrated for retaining two distinct scattering length scales, one associated with scattering strength and the other with diffraction. These length scales are height dependent and vary substantially with the relative proportions of shear and buoyancy forcing. The turbulence model predicts that for forward-scattered waves the phase variance is much larger than the log-amplitude variance, a behavior borne out by experimental data. A new method for synthesizing random fields, based on empirical orthogonal functions, is developed to accommodate the height dependence of the turbulence model. The method is applied to numerical calculations of scattering into an acoustic shadow zone, yielding good agreement with previous measurements.

  8. Simulation of buoyancy-induced turbulent flow from a hot horizontal jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    Experimental visualizations and numerical simulations of a horizontal hot water jet entering cold water into a rectangular storage tank are described. Three different temperature differences and their corresponding Reynolds numbers are considered. Both experimental visualization and numerical computations are carried out for the same flow and thermal conditions. The realizable k - ε model is used for modeling the turbulent flow while the buoyancy is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation. Polynomial approximations of the water properties are used to compare with the Boussinesq approximation. Numerical solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while pressure, velocity, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank as well as the Froude number are analyzed. The experimental visualizations are performed at intervals of five seconds for all different cases. The simulated results are compared with the visualized results, and both of them show the stratification phenomena and buoyancy force effects due to temperature difference and density variation. After certain times, depending on the case condition, the flow tends to reach a steady state. © 2014 Publishing House for Journal of Hydrodynamics.

  9. Resistance characteristics of innovative eco-fitness equipment: a water buoyancy muscular machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Han; Liu, Ya-Chen; Tai, Hsing-Hao; Liu, Chiang

    2018-03-01

    This paper propose innovative eco-fitness equipment-a water buoyancy muscular machine (WBM machine) in which resistance is generated by buoyancy and fluid resistance. The resistance characteristics during resistance adjustment and under isometric, concentric, eccentric and isokinetic conditions were investigated and compared to a conventional machine with metal weight plates. The results indicated that the isometric, concentric and eccentric resistances could be adjusted by varying the water volume; the maximum resistances under isometric, concentric and eccentric conditions were 163.8, 338.5 and 140.9 N, respectively. The isometric resistances at different positions remained constant in both machines; however the isometric resistance was lower for WBM machine when at a position corresponding to a 5% total displacement. The WBM machine has lower resistance under eccentric conditions and higher resistance under concentric conditions. Although the conventional machine has an identical trend, the variation was minor (within 4 N). In the WBM machine, the eccentric resistance was approximately 30-45% of the concentric resistance. Concentric resistances increased with an increase in velocity in both machines; however, the eccentric resistances decreased with an increase in velocity. In summary, the WBM machine, a piece of innovative eco-fitness equipment, has unique resistance characteristics and expansibility.

  10. The use of spirometry to evaluate pulmonary function in olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) with positive buoyancy disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Todd L; Munns, Suzanne; Adams, Lance; Hicks, James

    2013-09-01

    This study utilized computed spirometry to compare the pulmonary function of two stranded olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) presenting with a positive buoyancy disorder with two healthy captive olive ridley sea turtles held in a large public aquarium. Pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements demonstrated that the metabolic cost of breathing was much greater for animals admitted with positive buoyancy than for the normal sea turtles. Positively buoyant turtles had higher tidal volumes and significantly lower breathing-frequency patterns with significantly higher expiration rates, typical of gasp-type breathing. The resulting higher energetic cost of breathing in the diseased turtles may have a significant impact on their long-term survival. The findings represent a method for clinical respiratory function analysis for an individual animal to assist with diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to evaluate objectively sea turtles presenting with positive buoyancy and respiratory disease using pulmonary function tests.

  11. Work(er)-Driven Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The focus on innovation as a foundational element of enhanced organisational performance has led to the promoting and valuing of greater levels of employee participation in innovation processes. An emergent concept of employee-driven innovation could be argued to have hindered understandings of the creative and transformative nature of…

  12. Short-term airing by natural ventilation - implication on IAQ and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiselberg, P; Perino, M

    2010-04-01

    The need to improve the energy efficiency of buildings requires new and more efficient ventilation systems. It has been demonstrated that innovative operating concepts that make use of natural ventilation seem to be more appreciated by occupants. Among the available ventilation strategies that are currently available, buoyancy driven, single-sided natural ventilation has proved to be very effective and can provide high air change rates for temperature and Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) control. However, to promote a wider distribution of these systems an improvement in the knowledge of their working principles is necessary. The present study analyses and presents the results of an experimental evaluation of airing performance in terms of ventilation characteristics, IAQ and thermal comfort. It includes investigations of the consequences of opening time, opening frequency, opening area and expected airflow rate, ventilation efficiency, thermal comfort and dynamic temperature conditions. A suitable laboratory test rig was developed to perform extensive experimental analyses of the phenomenon under controlled and repeatable conditions. The results showed that short-term window airing is very effective and can provide both acceptable IAQ and thermal comfort conditions in buildings. Practical Implications This study gives the necessary background and in-depth knowledge of the performance of window airing by single-sided natural ventilation necessary for the development of control strategies for window airing (length of opening period and opening frequency) for optimum IAQ and thermal comfort in naturally ventilated buildings.

  13. Resolving the Mantle Heat Transfer Discrepancy by Reassessing Buoyancy Flux Estimates of Upwelling Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark; Parnell-Turner, Ross; White, Nicky

    2017-04-01

    The size and relative importance of mantle plumes is a controversial topic within the geodynamics community. Numerical experiments of mantle convection suggest a wide range of possible behaviours, from minor plumelets through to large scale, whole-mantle upwellings. In terms of observations, recent seismic tomographic models have identified many large, broad plume-like features within the lower mantle. In contrast, existing estimates of buoyancy flux calculated from plume swells have suggested that these upwellings transfer a relatively minor amount of material and heat into the uppermost mantle. Here, we revisit these calculations of buoyancy flux using a global map of plume swells based upon new observations of dynamic topography. Usually, plume flux is calculated from the cross-sectional area of a swell multiplied by either plate velocity or spreading rate. A key assumption is that plume head material flows laterally at or below the velocity of the overriding plate. Published results are dominated by contributions from the Pacific Ocean and suggest that a total of ˜ 2 TW of heat is carried by plumes into the uppermost mantle. An alternative approach exploits swell volume scaled by a characteristic decay time, which removes the reliance on plate velocities. The main assumption of this method is that plumes are in quasi-steady state. In this study, we have applied this volumetric approach in a new global analysis. Our results indicate that the Icelandic plume has a buoyancy flux of ˜ 27 ± 4 Mg s-1 and the Hawaiian plume is ˜ 2.9 ± 0.6 Mg s-1. These revised values are consistent with independent geophysical constraints from the North Atlantic Ocean and Hawaii. All magmatic and amagmatic swells have been included, suggesting that the total heat flux carried to the base of the plates is ˜ 10 ± 2 TW. This revised value is a five-fold increase compared with previous estimates and provides an improved match to published predictions of basal heat flux across the

  14. Solving problems to learn concepts, how does it happen? A case for buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buteler, Laura; Coleoni, Enrique

    2016-12-01

    Problem solving is a preferred activity teachers choose to help students learn concepts. At the same time, successful problem solving is widely regarded as a very good indicator of conceptual learning. Many studies have provided evidence that problem solving often improves students' chances of learning concepts. Still, the question remains relatively unexplored as to how this activity is useful to promote concept learning. In this study we explore this question in the setting of three university students solving a problem on hydrostatics, in which the concept of buoyancy is involved. We use coordination class theory to study how these students progress on their conceptual understanding. We were able to describe how this progress is related to contextual traits, as well as to students' particular epistemic stances. Finally, we discuss some implications for research and for teaching.

  15. Buoyancy effects on thermal behavior of a flat-plate solar collector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the flow and temperature distribution in a 12.53 m(2) solar collector panel with an absorber consisting of two vertical manifolds interconnected by 16 parallel horizontal fins have been carried out. The investigations are focused on overheating...... and the influence of the buoyancy effects are considered in the investigations. Further experimental investigations of the solar collector panel are carried out. The flow distribution through the absorber is evaluated by means of temperature measurements on the back of the absorber tubes. The measured temperatures....... The CFD calculations elucidate the flow and temperature distribution in the collector panels of different designs. Based on the investigations, recommendations are given in order to avoid overheating or boiling problems in the solar collector panel....

  16. Velocity intermittency in a buoyancy subrange in a two-dimensional soap film convection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Wu, X L

    2005-06-17

    In a two-dimensional soap film convection experiment, the velocity fields are found to be strongly intermittent in the buoyancy subrange, which was reported to be nonintermittent in a recent numerical simulation. The structure functions Sq(l)(= ) exhibit self-similar structures and can be described by power laws l(zetaq) for integers 8 > or = q < or = 1. By extending Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypothesis to our system, an analytical form is derived for the scaling exponent zeta(q) = q/2 + (mu/18)(3q - q2). Our measurements yield mu = 0.42, which is significantly greater than 0.2 found in high Reynolds number turbulence in wind tunnels.

  17. Predicting the buoyancy, equilibrium and potential swimming ability of giraffes by computational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Donald M; Naish, Darren

    2010-07-21

    Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) are often stated to be unable to swim, and while few observations supporting this have ever been offered, we sought to test the hypothesis that giraffes exhibited a body shape or density unsuited for locomotion in water. We assessed the floating capability of giraffes by simulating their buoyancy with a three-dimensional mathematical/computational model. A similar model of a horse (Equus caballus) was used as a control, and its floating behaviour replicates the observed orientations of immersed horses. The floating giraffe model has its neck sub-horizontal, and the animal would struggle to keep its head clear of the water surface. Using an isometrically scaled-down giraffe model with a total mass equal to that of the horse, the giraffe's proportionally larger limbs have much higher rotational inertias than do those of horses, and their wetted surface areas are 13.5% greater relative to that of the horse, thus making rapid swimming motions more strenuous. The mean density of the giraffe model (960 gm/l) is also higher than that of the horse (930 gm/l), and closer to that causing negative buoyancy (1000 gm/l). A swimming giraffe - forced into a posture where the neck is sub-horizontal and with a thorax that is pulled downwards by the large fore limbs - would not be able to move the neck and limbs synchronously as giraffes do when moving on land, possibly further hampering the animal's ability to move its limbs effectively underwater. We found that a full-sized, adult giraffe will become buoyant in water deeper than 2.8m. While it is not impossible for giraffes to swim, we speculate that they would perform poorly compared to other mammals and are hence likely to avoid swimming if possible. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of buoyancy on the motion of long bubbles in horizontal tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasi, Omer; Khodaparast, Sepideh; Scheid, Benoit; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-09-01

    As a confined long bubble translates along a horizontal liquid-filled tube, a thin film of liquid is formed on the tube wall. For negligible inertial and buoyancy effects, respectively, small Reynolds (Re) and Bond (Bo) numbers, the thickness of the liquid film depends only on the flow capillary number (Ca). However, buoyancy effects are no longer negligible as the diameter of the tube reaches millimeter length scales, which corresponds to finite values of Bo. We perform experiments and theoretical analysis for a long bubble in a horizontal tube to investigate the effect of Bond number (0.05 theory for the film thickness at the front of the bubble in a two-dimensional geometry at low capillary numbers Ca<10-3 and finite Bo to account for the effect of larger Ca. The resulting model shows very good agreement with the present experimental measurements. (ii) Due to the asymmetry in the liquid film thickness and the consequent drainage of the liquid from the top to the bottom of the tube, the bubble is inclined relative to the channel centerline and our side-view visualizations allow direct quantification of the inclination angle, which increases with both Bo and Ca. While the inclination angle at the top is smaller than that at the bottom of the tube, the average of these two values follows the predictions of a mass balance analysis in the central region of the bubble. (iii) The inclination of the bubble causes the thickness of the thin film at the back of the bubble to depend on the length of the bubble, whereas the thickness at the front of the bubble does not depend on the bubble length.

  19. Academic Buoyancy Mediates Academic Anxiety's Effects on Learning Strategies: An Investigation of English- and Chinese-Speaking Australian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Rebecca J.; Ginns, Paul; Martin, Andrew J.; Papworth, Brad

    2017-01-01

    A primary goal our study was to explore whether relations between academic anxiety and students' use of a range of learning strategies (memorisation, elaboration, personal best [PB] goals and cooperation) were mediated by academic buoyancy. We were also interested in extending knowledge of anxiety and its role in students' learning strategy use.…

  20. Experimental aspects of buoyancy correction in measuring reliable high-pressure excess adsorption isotherms using the gravimetric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong Giang T.; Horn, Jarod C.; Thommes, Matthias; van Zee, Roger D.; Espinal, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Addressing reproducibility issues in adsorption measurements is critical to accelerating the path to discovery of new industrial adsorbents and to understanding adsorption processes. A National Institute of Standards and Technology Reference Material, RM 8852 (ammonium ZSM-5 zeolite), and two gravimetric instruments with asymmetric two-beam balances were used to measure high-pressure adsorption isotherms. This work demonstrates how common approaches to buoyancy correction, a key factor in obtaining the mass change due to surface excess gas uptake from the apparent mass change, can impact the adsorption isotherm data. Three different approaches to buoyancy correction were investigated and applied to the subcritical CO2 and supercritical N2 adsorption isotherms at 293 K. It was observed that measuring a collective volume for all balance components for the buoyancy correction (helium method) introduces an inherent bias in temperature partition when there is a temperature gradient (i.e. analysis temperature is not equal to instrument air bath temperature). We demonstrate that a blank subtraction is effective in mitigating the biases associated with temperature partitioning, instrument calibration, and the determined volumes of the balance components. In general, the manual and subtraction methods allow for better treatment of the temperature gradient during buoyancy correction. From the study, best practices specific to asymmetric two-beam balances and more general recommendations for measuring isotherms far from critical temperatures using gravimetric instruments are offered.

  1. Social Support, Academic Adversity and Academic Buoyancy: A Person-Centred Analysis and Implications for Academic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collie, Rebecca J.; Martin, Andrew J.; Bottrell, Dorothy; Armstrong, Derrick; Ungar, Michael; Liebenberg, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The present study employed person-centred analyses that enabled identification of groups of students separated on the basis of their perceptions of social support (home and community), academic support, academic adversity and academic buoyancy. Among a sample of 249 young people, including many from high-needs communities, cluster analysis…

  2. Hydrogen Production by Steam Reforming of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Over Nickel-Phosphorus-Alumina Xerogel Catalyst Prepared by a Carbon-Templating Epoxide-Driven Sol-Gel Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Yongju; Park, Seungwon; Han, Seung Ju; Yoo, Jaekyeong; Choi, Jung Ho; Kang, Tae Hun; Lee, Jinwon; Song, In Kyu

    2016-05-01

    A nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was prepared by a carbon-templating epoxide-driven sol-gel method (denoted as CNPA catalyst), and it was applied to the hydrogen production by steam reforming of liquefied natural gas (LNG). For comparison, a nickel-phosphorus-alumina xerogel catalyst was also prepared by a similar method in the absence of carbon template (denoted as NPA catalyst). The effect of carbon template addition on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the catalysts in the steam reforming of LNG was investigated. Both CNPA and NPA catalysts showed excellent textural properties with well-developed mesoporous structure. However, CNPA catalyst retained a more reducible nickel aluminate phase than NPA catalyst. XRD analysis of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts revealed that nickel sintering on the CNPA catalyst was suppressed compared to that on the NPA catalyst. From H2-TPD and CH4-TPD measurements of the reduced CNPA and NPA catalysts, it was also revealed that CNPA catalyst with large amount of hydrogen uptake and strong hydrogen-binding sites showed larger amount of methane adsorption than NPA catalyst. In the hydrogen production by steam reforming of LNG, CNPA catalyst with large methane adsorption capacity showed a better catalytic activity than NPA catalyst.

  3. Penguin lungs and air sacs: implications for baroprotection, oxygen stores and buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponganis, P J; St Leger, J; Scadeng, M

    2015-03-01

    The anatomy and volume of the penguin respiratory system contribute significantly to pulmonary baroprotection, the body O2 store, buoyancy and hence the overall diving physiology of penguins. Therefore, three-dimensional reconstructions from computerized tomographic (CT) scans of live penguins were utilized to measure lung volumes, air sac volumes, tracheobronchial volumes and total body volumes at different inflation pressures in three species with different dive capacities [Adélie (Pygoscelis adeliae), king (Aptenodytes patagonicus) and emperor (A. forsteri) penguins]. Lung volumes scaled to body mass according to published avian allometrics. Air sac volumes at 30 cm H2O (2.94 kPa) inflation pressure, the assumed maximum volume possible prior to deep dives, were two to three times allometric air sac predictions and also two to three times previously determined end-of-dive total air volumes. Although it is unknown whether penguins inhale to such high volumes prior to dives, these values were supported by (a) body density/buoyancy calculations, (b) prior air volume measurements in free-diving ducks and (c) previous suggestions that penguins may exhale air prior to the final portions of deep dives. Based upon air capillary volumes, parabronchial volumes and tracheobronchial volumes estimated from the measured lung/airway volumes and the only available morphometry study of a penguin lung, the presumed maximum air sac volumes resulted in air sac volume to air capillary/parabronchial/tracheobronchial volume ratios that were not large enough to prevent barotrauma to the non-collapsing, rigid air capillaries during the deepest dives of all three species, and during many routine dives of king and emperor penguins. We conclude that volume reduction of airways and lung air spaces, via compression, constriction or blood engorgement, must occur to provide pulmonary baroprotection at depth. It is also possible that relative air capillary and parabronchial volumes are

  4. Buoyancy effects on upward brine displacement caused by CO2 injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Rinaldi, A.

    2010-01-15

    Upward displacement of brine from deep reservoirs driven by pressure increases resulting from CO{sub 2} injection for geologic carbon sequestration may occur through improperly sealed abandoned wells, through permeable faults, or through permeable channels between pinch-outs of shale formations. The concern about upward brine flow is that, upon intrusion into aquifers containing groundwater resources, the brine may degrade groundwater. Because both salinity and temperature increase with depth in sedimentary basins, upward displacement of brine involves lifting fluid that is saline but also warm into shallower regions that contain fresher, cooler water. We have carried out dynamic simulations using TOUGH2/EOS7 of upward displacement of warm, salty water into cooler, fresher aquifers in a highly idealized two-dimensional model consisting of a vertical conduit (representing a well or permeable fault) connecting a deep and a shallow reservoir. Our simulations show that for small pressure increases and/or high-salinity-gradient cases, brine is pushed up the conduit to a new static steady-state equilibrium. On the other hand, if the pressure rise is large enough that brine is pushed up the conduit and into the overlying upper aquifer, flow may be sustained if the dense brine is allowed to spread laterally. In this scenario, dense brine only contacts the lower-most region of the upper aquifer. In a hypothetical case in which strong cooling of the dense brine occurs in the upper reservoir, the brine becomes sufficiently dense that it flows back down into the deeper reservoir from where it came. The brine then heats again in the lower aquifer and moves back up the conduit to repeat the cycle. Parameter studies delineate steady-state (static) and oscillatory solutions and reveal the character and period of oscillatory solutions. Such oscillatory solutions are mostly a curiosity rather than an expected natural phenomenon because in nature the geothermal gradient prevents the

  5. Wall effects on the cross-buoyancy around a square cylinder in the steady regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Dhiman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of blockage ratio on the combined free and forced convection from a long heated square obstacle confined in a horizontal channel are investigated in this work. The numerical computations are performed in the steady regime for Reynolds number = 1 - 30, Richardson number = 0 - 1 for blockage ratios of 0.125 and 0.25 for the fixed Prandtl number of 0.7 (air. The governing equations, along with appropriate boundary conditions, are solved by using a semi-explicit finite volume method implemented on the collocated grid arrangement. The total drag and lift coefficients, local and average Nusselt numbers and the representative streamline, vorticity and isotherm patterns are presented to elucidate the role of blockage ratio on the cross-buoyancy across a confined square cylinder. The asymmetry in the flow and temperature fields decreases with increasing value of the blockage ratio. Similar to forced convection, the total drag coefficient increases with increasing value of the blockage ratio for the fixed values of the Reynolds and Richardson numbers.

  6. A modified emulsion gelation technique to improve buoyancy of hydrogel tablets for floating drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, Ortal; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2015-10-01

    The use of buoyant or floating hydrogel tablets is of particular interest in the sustained release of drugs to the stomach. They have an ability to slow the release rates of drugs by prolonging their absorption window in the upper part of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study we synthesized bioactive hydrogels that have sustainable release rates for drugs in the stomach based on a hydrogel preparation technique that employs emulsifying surfactants. The emulsion gelation technique, which encapsulates oil droplets within the hydrogels during crosslinking, was used to decrease their specific gravity in aqueous environments, resulting in floating drug release depots. Properties such as swelling, buoyancy, density and drug release were manipulated by changing the polymer concentrations, surfactant percentages and the oil:polymer ratios. The relationship between these properties and the hydrogel's floating lag time was documented. The potential for this material to be used as a floating drug delivery system was demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Interaction between a surface quasi-geostrophic buoyancy anomaly jet and internal vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinaud, J. N.; Dritschel, D. G.; Carton, X.

    2017-08-01

    This paper addresses the dynamical coupling of the ocean's surface and the ocean's interior. In particular, we investigate the dynamics of an oceanic surface jet and its interaction with vortices at depth. The jet is induced by buoyancy (density) anomalies at the surface. We first focus on the jet alone. The linear stability indicates there are two modes of instability: the sinuous and the varicose modes. When a vortex in present below the jet, it interacts with it. The velocity field induced by the vortex perturbs the jet and triggers its destabilisation. The jet also influences the vortex by pushing it under a region of co-operative shear. Strong jets may also partially shear out the vortex. We also investigate the interaction between a surface jet and a vortex dipole in the interior. Again, strong jets may partially shear out the vortex structure. The jet also modifies the trajectory of the dipole. Dipoles travelling towards the jet at shallow incidence angles may be reflected by the jet. Vortices travelling at moderate incidence angles normally cross below the jet. This is related to the displacement of the two vortices of the dipole by the shear induced by the jet. Intense jets may also destabilise early and form streets of billows. These billows can pair with the vortices and separate the dipole.

  8. Plate coupling across the northern Manila subduction zone deduced from mantle lithosphere buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Liang; Doo, Wen-Bin; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Hsu, Shu-Kun

    2017-12-01

    The Manila subduction zone is located at the plate boundary where the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) moves northwestward toward the Eurasian plate (EU) with a high convergence rate. However, historically, no large earthquakes greater than Mw7 have been observed across the northern Manila subduction zone. The poorly understood plate interaction between these two plates in this region creates significant issues for evaluating the seismic hazard. Therefore, the variation of mantle lithospheric buoyancy is calculated to evaluate the plate coupling status across the northern Manila subduction zone, based on recently published forward gravity modeling constrained by the results of the P-wave seismic crustal structure of the TAIGER (Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research) project. The results indicate weak plate coupling between the PSP and EU, which could be related to the release of the overriding PSP from the descending EU's dragging force, which was deduced from the higher elevation of the Luzon arc and the fore-arc basin northward toward the Taiwan orogen. Moreover, serpentinized peridotite is present above the plate boundary and is distributed more widely and thickly closer to offshore southern Taiwan orogen. We suggest that low plate coupling may facilitate the uplifting of serpentinized mantle material up to the plate boundary.

  9. Hypergravity to Explore the Role of Buoyancy in Boiling in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioumbas, John S.; Krause, Jutta; Karapantsios, Thodoris D.

    2013-02-01

    Boiling in porous media is an active topic of research since it is associated with various applications, e.g. microelectronics cooling, wetted porous media as thermal barriers, food frying. Theoretical expressions customary scale boiling heat and mass transfer rates with the value of gravitational acceleration. Information obtained at low gravity conditions show a deviation from the above scaling law but refers exclusively to non-porous substrates. In addition, the role of buoyancy in boiling at varying gravitational levels (i.e. from microgravity—important to satellites and future Lunar and Martial missions, to high-g body forces—associated with fast aerial maneuvers) is still unknown since most experiments were conducted over a limited range of g-value. The present work aims at providing evidence regarding boiling in porous media over a broad range of hypergravity values. For this, a special device has been constructed for studying boiling inside porous media in the Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC at ESA/ESTEC). LDC offers the unique opportunity to cancel the shear stresses and study only the effect of increased normal forces on boiling in porous media. The device permits measurement of the temperature field beneath the surface of the porous material and video recordings of bubble activity over the free surface of the porous material. The preliminary results presented from experiments conducted at terrestrial and hypergravity conditions, reveal for the first time the influence of increased levels of gravity on boiling in porous media.

  10. Buoyancy Effects on the Development of the Leading Vortex Ring in a Starting Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marugan-Cruz, Carolina; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos

    2008-11-01

    The initial development of negatively buoyant jets has been investigated experimental and numerically, more specifically the role played by gravity in the development of the leading vortex ring. A classical piston-cylinder arrangement has been used to produce the negatively buoyant jets. Under the experimental conditions considered in this work, the Froude number, Fr, which compares the jet momentum and the buoyancy flux is the most important parameter characterizing the dynamics of the flow. When the value of this parameter is sufficiently small the initial vortex ring generated at the start of the motion is pushed upwards by the gravity force before it can entrain enough vorticity to acquire a self induced velocity. However when the Froude number exceeds a critical value, Frc ˜ 1, the vortex ring can travel downwards and entrainins vorticity from the trailing jet during a longer time. Total and vortex circulation, as well as the trajectory of the leading vortex have been measured to clarify the effect of gravity on the distribution of vorticity during the initial development of negatively buoyant jets.

  11. Active tectonics and drainage evolution in the Tunisian Atlas driven by interaction between crustal shortening and slab pull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camafort, Miquel; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Pérez-Peña, Jose Vicente; Melki, Fetheddine; Gracia, Eulalia; Azañón, Jose Miguel; Ranero, César R.

    2017-04-01

    Active tectonics in North Africa is fundamentally driven by NW-SE directed slow convergence between the Nubia and Eurasia plates, leading to a region of thrust and strike-slip faulting. In this paper we analyze the morphometric characteristics of the little-studied northern Tunisia sector. The study aimed at identifying previously unknown active tectonic structures, and to further understand the mechanisms that drive the drainage evolution in this region of slow convergence. The interpretation of morphometric data was supported with a field campaign of a selection of structures. The analysis indicates that recent fluvial captures have been the main factor rejuvenating drainage catchments. The Medjerda River, which is the main catchment in northern Tunisia, has increased its drainage area during the Quaternary by capturing adjacent axial valleys to the north and south of its drainage divide. These captures are probably driven by gradual uplift of adjacent axial valleys by reverse/oblique faults or associated folds like El Alia-Teboursouk and Dkhila faults. Our fieldwork found that these faults cut Holocene colluvial fans containing seismites like clastic dikes and sand volcanoes, indicating recent seismogenic faulting. The growth and stabilization of the axial Medjerda River against the natural tendency of transverse drainages might be caused by a combination of dynamic topography and transpressive tectonics. The orientation of the large axial Medjerda drainage that runs from eastern Algeria towards northeastern Tunisia into the Gulf of Tunis, might be the associated to negative buoyancy caused by the underlying Nubia slab at its mouth, together with uplift of the Medjerda headwaters along the South Atlassic dextral transfer zone.

  12. Effects of buoyancy and thermal radiation on MHD flow over a stretching porous sheet using homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya Shagaiya Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the theoretical influence of buoyancy and thermal radiation on MHD flow over a stretching porous sheet. The model which constituted highly nonlinear governing equations is transformed using similarity solution and then solved using homotopy analysis method (HAM. The analysis is carried out up to the 5th order of approximation and the influences of different physical parameters such as Prandtl number, Grashof number, suction/injection parameter, thermal radiation parameter and heat generation/absorption coefficient and also Hartman number on dimensionless velocity, temperature and the rate of heat transfer are investigated and discussed quantitatively with the aid of graphs. Numerical results obtained are compared with the previous results published in the literature and are found to be in good agreement. It was found that when the buoyancy parameter and the fluid velocity increase, the thermal boundary layer decreases. In case of the thermal radiation, increasing the thermal radiation parameter produces significant increases in the thermal conditions of the fluid temperature which cause more fluid in the boundary layer due to buoyancy effect, causing the velocity in the fluid to increase. The hydrodynamic boundary layer and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as a result of increase in radiation.

  13. Large-eddy simulation of bubble-driven plume in stably stratified flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Di; Chen, Bicheng; Socolofsky, Scott; Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between a bubble-driven plume and stratified water column plays a vital role in many environmental and engineering applications. As the bubbles are released from a localized source, they induce a positive buoyancy flux that generates an upward plume. As the plume rises, it entrains ambient water, and when the plume rises to a higher elevation where the stratification-induced negative buoyancy is sufficient, a considerable fraction of the entrained fluid detrains, or peels, to form a downward outer plume and a lateral intrusion layer. In the case of multiphase plumes, the intrusion layer may also trap weakly buoyant particles (e.g., oil droplets in the case of a subsea accidental blowout). In this study, the complex plume dynamics is studied using large-eddy simulation (LES), with the flow field simulated by hybrid pseudospectral/finite-difference scheme, and the bubble and dye concentration fields simulated by finite-volume scheme. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the buoyant plume are studied, with a focus on the effects of different bubble buoyancy levels. The LES data provide useful mean plume statistics for evaluating the accuracy of 1-D engineering models for entrainment and peeling fluxes. Based on the insights learned from the LES, a new continuous peeling model is developed and tested. Study supported by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  14. Influence of various aspects of low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models on predicting in-tube buoyancy affected heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Zhen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Pei-Xue, E-mail: jiangpx@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of CO_2 Utilization and Reduction Technology/Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bo, Han-Liang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Understanding of the mechanism of buoyancy effect on supercritical heat transfer. • Turbulence related parameters in upward and downward flows were compared. • Turbulent Prandtl number affected the prediction insignificantly. • Buoyancy production was insignificant compared with shear production. • Damping function had the greatest effect and is a priority for further modification. - Abstract: Heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids was modeled for normal and buoyancy affected conditions using several low Reynolds number k-ε models, including the Launder and Sharma, Myong and Kasagi, and Abe, Kondoh and Nagano, with the predictions compared with experimental data. All three turbulence models accurately predicted the cases without heat transfer deterioration, but failed to accurately predict the cases with heat transfer deterioration although the general trends were captured, indicating that further improvements and modifications are needed for the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to better predict buoyancy deteriorated heat transfer. Further investigations studied the influence of various aspects of the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models, including the turbulent Prandtl number, the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy, and the damping function to provide guidelines for model development to more precisely predict buoyancy affected heat transfer. The results show that the turbulent Prandtl number and the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy have little influence on the predictions for cases in this study, while new damping functions with carefully selected control parameters are needed in the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to correctly predict the buoyancy effect for heat transfer simulations in various applications such as supercritical pressure steam generators (SPSGs) in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) and the supercritical pressure water reactor (SCWR).

  15. Understanding Climate Change and Manifestation of its Driven ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the nature and manifestation of climate change driven impacts on the agrarian districts of Kongwa and Bahi in the semi arid areas of Dodoma region in Tanzania. A Survey of 398 households in the study area was undertaken to elicit information on the nature and manifestation of climate change driven ...

  16. Developing students’ learning achievement and experimental skills on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law through experimental sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokchai, Jaewijarn; Khanti, Toedtanya; Sura, Wuttiprom

    2017-09-01

    The purposes of this research were: to construct packages of operations on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law, to enhance achievement score of students on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law, to enhance experimental skills on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law and to evaluate students’ attitude towards the packages of operations on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law using inquiry method. The samples were 42 grade 11 students in academic year 2016 at Hatyaiwittayalai School, Hatyai, Songkhla. The research method was one group pretest-posttest design. The research tools consisted of experimental set on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law, the learning achievement test on buoyancy and the involvement of Newton’s third law and the students’ attitude questionnaires. The experimental skills of most students was in a good level . The satisfaction of most students was in a good level. The research showed the learning achievement after instruction higher than that before instruction using experimental set at the significant level of 0.05 and the class average normalized gain is in the medium gain

  17. Thermo capillary and buoyancy flows instabilities; Instabilites d`ecoulements thermocapillaires et de thermogravite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercier, J.F.

    1997-10-22

    Fluid flows in which liquid layers are submitted to temperature gradient applied horizontally are studied. The thermo capillary and buoyancy effects are thus described. In the experiments, the form of the cell which contains the fluid is different and the fluid heating position too. Each of these experiments reveals a different aspect of the mechanism which is responsible of the flow instability. In the first experiment, the fluid is contained in a rectangular cell longer than larger and whose two longer vertical walls are differentially heated. The waves lengths, frequencies, propagation directions and instability thresholds of stationary, unsteady or oscillating modes obtained theoretically are compared to the structures observed experimentally. The instability mechanisms are essentially bound to the temperature vertical profile in the fluid and the heat exchanges between the fluid and the ambient air are particularly described. In the second experiment, the fluid is contained in an annular cell whose vertical cylindrical walls are differentially heated. The results obtained in the rectangular cell can be transposed to the annular cell substituting the constant thermal gradient of the rectangular geometry by those of the annular geometry, inversely proportional to the radial distance. The introduction of local parameters allows to show that the instability is developed at first near the inside cylinder. In the last experiment, the fluid layer is heated by an electric wire immersed in a parallel direction to the free surface. The development of an ascending vertical flow above the wire induces a deformation of the free surface which can be added to the instability mechanisms of the previous cells. (O.M.) 58 refs.

  18. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator: MSFC-Langley joint test of large space structures component assembly:

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  19. Neutral Buoyancy Test NB-15, Scientific Airlock Contingency Operations - test subject Astronaut Paul

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  20. Performance enhancement of a Lorentz force velocimeter using a buoyancy-compensated magnet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, R.; Leineweber, J.; Resagk, C.

    2015-07-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV) is a highly feasible method for measuring flow rate in a pipe or a duct. This method has been established for liquid metal flows but also for electrolytes such as saltwater. A decrease in electrical conductivity of the medium causes a decrease of the Lorentz force which needs to be resolved, affecting the accuracy of the measurement. We use an electrical force compensation (EFC) balance for the determination of the tiny force signals in a test channel filled with electrolyte solution. It is used in a 90°-rotated orientation with a magnet system hanging vertically on its load bar. The thin coupling elements of its parallel guiding system limit the mass of the magnets to 1 kg. To overcome this restriction, which limits the magnetic flux density and hence the Lorentz forces, a weight force compensation mechanism is developed. Therefore, different methods such as air bearing are conceivable, but for the elimination of additional horizontal force components which would disturb the force signal, only compensation by lift force provided by buoyancy is reasonable. We present a swimming body setup that will allow larger magnet systems than before, because a large amount of the weight force will be compensated by this lift force. Thus the implementation of this concept has to be made with respect to hydrodynamical and mechanical stability. This is necessary to avoid overturning of the swimming body setup and to prevent inelastic deformation. Additionally, the issue will be presented and discussed whether thermal convection around the lifting body diminishes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) significantly or not.

  1. Wind-driven Modulation of Cross-shelf Exchange Driven by Gravitational Relaxation on a Shelf During Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Stephen; Seim, Harvey

    2015-04-01

    A field program was conducted during the Winter of 2012 at Long Bay, off the coast of South Carolina, USA. Previous studies have shown that this region has unusually high wintertime productivity. During winter, the water on this shallow shelf (shelf break at approximately 60m depth) is often well-mixed, characterized by nearly vertical isotherms and a horizontal density gradient. Interestingly, we observed several wintertime stratification events. Integrating data from several sources (gliders, moorings, towed body, weather buoy, satellite), we implemented an energetics analysis to quantify the various physical processes that influence stratification. The analysis shows the importance of the horizontal advection of buoyancy, driven by downwelling favorable winds and Gulf Stream filaments.

  2. Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence via Rapid Distortion Theory: Spectral Tensor of Velocity and Buoyancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Abhijit S.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2017-01-01

    the eddy lifetime parameterization of Mann to make the model stationary. The buoyant spectral tensor model is driven via five parameters: the viscous dissipation rate epsilon, length scale of energy-containing eddies L, a turbulence anisotropy parameter Gamma, gradient Richardson number (Ri) representing...

  3. Subglacial discharge-driven renewal of tidewater glacier fjords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Dustin; Sutherland, David A.; Shroyer, Emily L.; Nash, Jonathan D.; Catania, Ginny A.; Stearns, Leigh A.

    2017-08-01

    The classic model of fjord renewal is complicated by tidewater glacier fjords, where submarine melt and subglacial discharge provide substantial buoyancy forcing at depth. Here we use a suite of idealized, high-resolution numerical ocean simulations to investigate how fjord circulation driven by subglacial plumes, tides, and wind stress depends on fjord width, grounding line depth, and sill height. We find that the depth of the grounding line compared to the sill is a primary control on plume-driven renewal of basin waters. In wide fjords the plume exhibits strong lateral recirculation, increasing the dilution and residence time of glacially-modified waters. Rapid drawdown of basin waters by the subglacial plume in narrow fjords allows for shelf waters to cascade deep into the basin; wide fjords result in a thin, boundary current of shelf waters that flow toward the terminus slightly below sill depth. Wind forcing amplifies the plume-driven exchange flow; however, wind-induced vertical mixing is limited to near-surface waters. Tidal mixing over the sill increases in-fjord transport of deep shelf waters and erodes basin stratification above the sill depth. These results underscore the first-order importances of fjord-glacier geometry in controlling circulation in tidewater glacier fjords and, thus, ocean heat transport to the ice.

  4. Mixed convection in a double lid-driven cubic cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasreddine, Ouertatania; Nader, Ben Cheikha; Brahim, Ben Beyaa; Taieb, Lilia [Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Dept. de Physique (Tunisia); Campo, A. [University of Texas at San Antonio, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2009-07-15

    To study the intricate three-dimensional flow structures and the companion heat transfer rates in double lid-driven cubic cavity heated from the top and cooled from below, a numerical methodology based on the finite volume method and a full multigrid acceleration is utilized in this paper. The four remaining walls forming the cubic cavity are adiabatic. The working fluid is air so that the Prandtl number equates to 0.71. Numerical solutions are generated for representative combinations of the controlling Reynolds number inside 100 {<=} Re {<=} 1000 and the Richardson numbers inside 0.001 {<=} Ri {<=} 10. Typical sets of streamlines and isotherms are presented to analyze the tortuous circulatory flow patterns set up by the competition between the forced flow created by the double driven walls and the buoyancy force of the fluid. For extreme combinations of high Ri and low Re, the heat transfer is essentially dominated by conduction. On the other hand, for extreme combinations of small Ri and high Re, the heat transfer becomes convective dominating. Numerical values of the overall Nusselt number in harmony with the Re- and Ri-intervals are presented and they are compared afterward against the standard case of a single lid driven cavity. It is discovered that a remarkable heat transfer improvement of up to 76% can be reached for the particular combination of Re=400 and Ri=1. (authors)

  5. Query Driven Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buddelmeijer, H.; Valentijn, E. A.; Ballester, P.; Egret, D.; Lorente, N.P.F.

    The request driven way of deriving data in Astro-WISE is extended to a query driven way of visualization. This allows scientists to focus on the science they want to perform, because all administration of their data is automated. This can be done over an abstraction layer that enhances control and

  6. A numerical study on the influence of slope and curvature on smoke flow in special section tunnel with natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhou; Zhou, Xianping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Ya; Liu, Wanfu; Hong, Li

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a special section tunnel model was established by using FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator). The influences of lope and curvature on smoke flow under natural ventilation have been studied. The results showed that under the condition of natural ventilation, the slope has some influences on the smoke flow in special section tunnel. The smoke spreading speed is accelerated along the upstream direction and decrease along the downstream direction due to buoyancy effect of slope. The steeper the tunnel, the more obvious the buoyancy effect. The curvature has little effect on the flow of flue gas.

  7. Analysis of natural convection flow characteristics in a square cavity with internal elliptic shape block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Golam; Munshi, M. Jahirul Haque; Hossain, Sumon; Ali, M.

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of hydro-magnetic natural convection flow in a square cavity with internal elliptic shape cold block at the centre with Prandtl number of 0.711 has been investigated numerically. The governing equations, mass, momentum, energy and induction equations are applied to the cavity. The governing differential equations are solved by using finite element method (Galerkin weighted residual method). The top wall, left wall, right wall and elliptic obstacle are kept at cold Tc. The bottom wall is kept at heated Th. The study is performed for different Rayleigh numbers(103 ≤ Ra ≥ 106) and Hartmann numbers(0 ≤ Ha ≥ 100). A cold elliptic block is located at the centre of the cavity. The object of this study is to describe the effects of MHD on the field of buoyancy-driven and flow in presence of such cold block by visualization of graph. The obtained results showed that temperature distribution and flow pattern inside the cavity depend on both strength of the magnetic field and Rayleigh number. For all cases, two or more counter rotating eddies were formed inside the cavity. The results are illustrated with the streamlines, isotherms, velocity and temperature fields. Numerical results show good accuracy and stability of the proposal strategy.

  8. Heart Rate Responses to Unaided Orion Side Hatch Egress in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Kirk L.; Hwang Emma Y.; Ryder, Jeffrey W.; Kelly, Cody; Walker, Thomas; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is developing the Orion capsule as a vehicle for transporting crewmembers to and from the International Space Station (ISS) and for future human space exploration missions. Orion and other commercial vehicles are designed to splash down in the ocean where nominally support personnel will assist crewmembers in egressing the vehicle. However, off-nominal scenarios will require crewmembers to egress the vehicle unaided, deploy survival equipment, and ingress a life raft. PURPOSE: To determine the heart rate (HR) responses to unaided Orion side hatch egress and raft ingress as a part of the NASA Crew Survival Engineering Team's evaluation of the PORT Orion mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL). METHODS: Nineteen test subjects, including four astronauts (N=19, 14 males/5 females, 38.6+/-8.4 y, 174.4+/-9.6 cm, 75.7+/-13.1 kg), completed a graded maximal test on a cycle ergometer to determine VO2peak and HRpeak and were divided into five crews of four members each; one subject served on two crews. Each crew was required to deploy a life raft, egress the Orion vehicle from the side hatch, and ingress the life raft with two 8 kg emergency packs per crew. Each crew performed this activity one to three times; a total of ten full egresses were completed. Subjects wore a suit that was similar in form, mass, and function to the Modified Advanced Crew Escape Suit (MACES) including helmet, gloves, boots, supplemental O2 bottles, and a CO2-inflated life preserver (approx.18 kg); subjects began each trial seated supine in the PORT Orion mockup with seat belts and mockup O2 and communication connections and ended each trial with all four crewmembers inside the life raft. RESULTS: VO2peak was 40.8+/-6.8 mL/kg/min (3.1+/-0.7 L/min); HRpeak was 181+/-10 bpm. Total egress time across trials was 5.0+/-1.6 min (range: 2.8-8.0 min); all subjects were able to successfully complete all trials. Average maximum HR at activity start, at the hatch opening, in the water, and in the

  9. Influence of fluctuating thermal and mass diffusion on unsteady MHD buoyancy-driven convection past a vertical surface with chemical reaction and Soret effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dulal; Talukdar, Babulal

    2012-04-01

    The influence of thermal radiation and first-order chemical reaction on unsteady MHD convective flow, heat and mass transfer of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past a semi-infinite vertical flat plate in the presence of transverse magnetic field under oscillatory suction and heat source in slip-flow regime is studied. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation are formulated and solved analytically using two-term harmonic and non-harmonic functions. Comparisons with previously published work on special cases of the problem are performed and results are found to be in excellent agreement. A parametric study illustrating the effects of various physical parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration fields as well as skin-friction coefficient, the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers in terms of amplitude and phase is conducted. The numerical results of this parametric study are presented graphically and in tabular form to highlight the physical aspects of the problem.

  10. CFD study on rise and deformation characteristics of buoyancy-driven spheroid bubbles in stagnant Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollakota, Anjani R. K.; Kishore, Nanda

    2017-06-01

    The bubbles are almost ubiquitous in many chemical and processing industries; and many of the polymeric solutions obey non-Newtonian rheological characteristics. Therefore, in this work the rise and deformation characteristics of spheroid bubbles in Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids are numerically investigated using a level set method. To demonstrate the validity of the moving bubble interface, the present simulations are compared with existing numerical and experimental results available in the literature; and for these comparisons, the computational geometries are considered same as reported in corresponding literatures. The present bubble deformation characteristics are satisfactorily agreeing with their literature counterparts. After establishing the validity of the numerical solution procedure, the same method is applied to obtain the deformation characteristics of an air bubble in Carreau model non-Newtonian fluids. Further, the results in terms of the volume fraction images, streamlines, and viscosity profiles around the deforming bubbles are presented as function of the bubble rise time.

  11. Study for the numerical resolution of conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy to be applied on buoyancy-driven flows in enclosed cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Menéndez Melgoso, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    El presente estudio introduce al lector en el campo de los intercambiadores de calor. Estos serán definidos y clasificados, presentando los tipos más comunes en el sector industrial y describiendo sus principios y funcionamiento. Dado que la base de este estudio es el CFD, se ha escogido como caso de interés relacionado con los intercambiadores de calor el problema de la Differentially heated cavity. Este es un problema de referencia dentro del campo del CFD. El caso será introducido y se pro...

  12. A tensegrity driven DNA nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, O; Calmet, P; Alves, I; Lecomte, S; Raoux, M; Cullin, C; Elezgaray, J

    2017-07-13

    Control of transport across membranes, whether natural or synthetic, is fundamental in many biotechnology applications, including sensing and drug release. Mutations of naturally existing protein channels, such as hemolysin, have been explored in the past. More recently, DNA channels with conductivities in the nanosiemens range have been designed. Regulating transport across DNA channels in response to external stimuli remains an important challenge. Previous designs relied on steric hindrance to control the inner diameter of the channel, which resulted in unstable electric signatures. In this paper we introduce a new design to control electric channel conductance of a DNA nanopore. The tensegrity driven mechanism inhibits the flux of small analytes while keeping a tightly controlled ionic transport modulated by the addition of specific DNA sequences. Current signals are clearly defined, with no sign of gating, opening new perspectives in single molecule DNA sensing.

  13. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Naturally Ventilated Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elashmawy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, heat transfer and fluid flow in naturally ventilated greenhouses are studied numerically for tow configuration according to the number and positions of the opening. The equations governing the phenomenon are developed using the stream function-vorticity formalism and solved using the finite volume method. The aim of the study is to investigate how buoyancy forces influence airflow and temperature patterns inside the greenhouse. Rayleigh number is the main parameter which changes from 103 to 106 and Prandtl number is fixed at Pr=0.71. Results are reported in terms of stream function, isotherms and average Nusselt number. It is found that the flow structure is sensitive to the value of Rayleigh number and the number of openings. Also, that using asymmetric opening positions improve the natural ventilation and facilitate the occurrence of buoyancy induced upward cross-airflow inside the greenhouse.

  14. Periodically driven holographic superconductor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Wei-Jia; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Hongbao

    2013-01-01

    .... As a result, our holographic superconductor is driven to the final oscillating state, where the condensate is suppressed and the oscillation frequency is controlled by twice of the driving frequency...

  15. Discovery Driven Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Per Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august......Anmeldelse af Discovery Driven Growh : A breakthrough process to reduce risk and seize opportunity, af Rita G. McGrath & Ian C. MacMillan, Boston: Harvard Business Press. Udgivelsesdato: 14 august...

  16. Computations of wind-driven ocean-induced magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachl, Libor; Einspigel, David; Martinec, Zdenek

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of computations of the secondary magnetic field induced by ocean motions. Ocean velocities are computed using the baroclinic ocean model LSOMG. The velocities are then used to determine the Lorentz force which is plugged into the magnetic induction code TLAM as a principal forcing. The TLAM is a 2D magnetic induction code based on the thin-shell approximation (Vivier et al., 2004; Tyler et al., 1997). In this approximation, the equation of magnetic induction simplifies significantly, time derivatives of main and induced magnetic fields are neglected as well as the self-induction term. The price for simplification of governing equations is the limited applicability of the resulting system. It is only suitable for slowly evolving processes. In order to meet the condition, we restrict ourselves to the wind (buoyancy) driven ocean circulation, although the LSOMG model is able to model both tidally- and wind-driven circulations. We assess the accuracy of thin-shell approximation in our setup by comparing the results with the Swarm satellite magnetic data. References Tyler, R. H., Mysak, L. A., and Oberhuber, J. M, 1997. Electromagnetic fields generated by a three dimensional global ocean circulation. J. Geophys. Res., 102, 5531-5551. Vivier, F., Meier-Reimer, E., and Tyler, R. H., 2004. Simulations of magnetic fields generated by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current at satellite altitude: Can geomagnetic measurements be used to monitor the flow? Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L10306, doi:10.1029/2004GL019804.

  17. User-driven innovation in tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalager, Anne-Mette; Nordin, Sara

    2011-01-01

    This literature study reviews user-driven innovation and establishes a typology of its forms in a tourism context. Sixteen methods are distinguishable. They comprise situations where users are actively involved and methods where information is collected without direct user involvement. The nature...... and intensity of the dialogue between companies and their customers are addressed. Drawing on this existing research, the article concludes that there is still little comprehensive follow-up on user-driven innovation in tourism and its impact on quality improvements and assurance. Key areas for future studies...

  18. Numerical simulation of velocity and temperature fields in natural circulation loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukomel, L. A.; Kaban’kov, O. N.

    2017-11-01

    Low flow natural circulation regimes are realized in many practical applications and the existence of the reliable engineering and design calculation methods of flows driven exclusively by buoyancy forces is an actual problem. In particular it is important for the analysis of start up regimes of passive safety systems of nuclear power plants. In spite of a long year investigations of natural circulation loops no suitable predicting recommendations for heat transfer and friction for the above regimes have been proposed for engineering practice and correlations for forced flow are commonly used which considerably overpredicts the real flow velocities. The 2D numerical simulation of velocity and temperature fields in circular tubes for laminar flow natural circulation with reference to the laboratory experimental loop has been carried out. The results were compared with the 1D modified model and experimental data obtained on the above loop. The 1D modified model was still based on forced flow correlations, but in these correlations the physical properties variability and the existence of thermal and hydrodynamic entrance regions are taken into account. The comparison of 2D simulation, 1D model calculations and the experimental data showed that even subject to influence of liquid properties variability and entrance regions on heat transfer and friction the use of 1D model with forced flow correlations do not improve the accuracy of calculations. In general, according to 2D numerical simulation the wall shear stresses are mainly affected by the change of wall velocity gradient due to practically continuous velocity profiles deformation along the whole heated zone. The form of velocity profiles and the extent of their deformation in its turn depend upon the wall heat flux density and the hydraulic diameter.

  19. Spatio-temporal variability in western Baltic cod early life stage survival mediated by egg buoyancy, hydrography and hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichsen, H-H.; Hüssy, K.; Huwer, B.

    2012-01-01

    spatial (within and between different spawning areas) and temporal (interannual and seasonal) dynamics. A spatially and temporally highly-resolved biophysical model of the Baltic Sea was used to describe mortalities and survival success of eggs and yolk-sac larvae—represented by individual, virtual......Spatio-temporal variability in western Baltic cod early life stage survival mediated by egg buoyancy, hydrography and hydrodynamics. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 69: 1744–1752.To disentangle the effects of different drivers on recruitment variability of marine fish, a spatially and temporally...... drifters—as predicted proportions of drifters that either died due to bottom contact or lethal temperatures, or that survived up to the end of the yolk-sac larval stage. The environmental conditions allowing survival of cod and yolk-sac larvae indicate that favourable conditions predominately occurred...

  20. Natural Colorants: Food Colorants from Natural Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdson, Gregory T; Tang, Peipei; Giusti, M Mónica

    2017-02-28

    The color of food is often associated with the flavor, safety, and nutritional value of the product. Synthetic food colorants have been used because of their high stability and low cost. However, consumer perception and demand have driven the replacement of synthetic colorants with naturally derived alternatives. Natural pigment applications can be limited by lower stability, weaker tinctorial strength, interactions with food ingredients, and inability to match desired hues. Therefore, no single naturally derived colorant can serve as a universal alternative for a specified synthetic colorant in all applications. This review summarizes major environmental and biological sources for natural colorants as well as nature-identical counterparts. Chemical characteristics of prevalent pigments, including anthocyanins, carotenoids, betalains, and chlorophylls, are described. The possible applications and hues (warm, cool, and achromatic) of currently used natural pigments, such as anthocyanins as red and blue colorants, and possible future alternatives, such as purple violacein and red pyranoanthocyanins, are also discussed.

  1. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  2. The influence of different salinity conditions on egg buoyancy and development and yolk sac larval survival and morphometric traits of Baltic Sea sprat (Sprattus sprattus balticus Schneider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Petereit

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The small pelagic sprat (Sprattus sprattus is a key ecologic player in the Baltic Sea. However, there is long-term variability in recruitment which is thought to be influenced by fluctuations in abiotic and biotic conditions experienced during the early life stages. This study concentrates on the influence of different ambient salinities on sprat egg development, egg buoyancy and survival as well as early yolk sac larval morphometric traits. Egg buoyancy significantly decreased with increasing salinity experienced during fertilization and/or incubation experiments. Field egg buoyancy measurements in 2007 and 2008 exhibited annual and seasonal differences in specific gravity, potentially associated with changes in adult sprat vertical distribution. Neither egg development time nor the duration of the yolk sac phase differed among salinity treatments. At eye pigmentation, larval standard length exhibited high variance among individuals but did not differ among treatments. The largest ecological impact of salinity experienced during spawning was the modification the buoyancy of eggs and yolk sac larvae, which determines their vertical habitat in the Baltic Sea. There are strong thermo- and oxyclines in the Baltic Sea, and thus salinity can indirectly impact the survival of these early life stages by modifying the ambient temperatures and oxygen conditions experienced.

  3. On the relative importance of thermal and chemical buoyancy in regular and impact-induced melting in a Mars-like planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas, Thomas; Breuer, Doris

    2017-07-01

    We ran several series of two-dimensional numerical mantle convection simulations representing in idealized form the thermochemical evolution of a Mars-like planet. In order to study the importance of compositional buoyancy of melting mantle, the models were set up in pairs of one including all thermal and compositional contributions to buoyancy and one accounting only for the thermal contributions. In several of the model pairs, single large impacts were introduced as causes of additional strong local anomalies, and their evolution in the framework of the convecting mantle was tracked. The models confirm that the additional buoyancy provided by the depletion of the mantle by regular melting can establish a global stable stratification of the convecting mantle and throttle crust production. Furthermore, the compositional buoyancy is essential in the stabilization and preservation of local compositional anomalies directly beneath the lithosphere and offers a possible explanation for the existence of distinct, long-lived reservoirs in the Martian mantle. The detection of such anomalies by geophysical means is probably difficult, however; they are expected to be detected by gravimetry rather than by seismic or heat flow measurements. The results further suggest that the crustal thickness can be locally overestimated by up to ˜20 km if impact-induced density anomalies in the mantle are neglected.

  4. Instabilities of thermocapillary–buoyancy convection in open rectangular liquid layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huan; Duan, Li; Kang, Qi

    2017-10-01

    Not Available Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program on Space Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences: SJ-10 Recoverable Scientific Experiment Satellite (Grant Nos. XDA04020405 and XDA04020202-05), the China Manned Space Engineering program (TG-2), Cooperative Research Project between China and Russia, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11372328).

  5. Crystallization Driven Responsive Janus Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hao; Mei, Shan; Li, Christopher; Soft Materials Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    Responsive and dynamic nanostructures are ubiquitous in Nature, and they are also utter importance for applications such as sensing and drug delivery. Herein we report a series of hierarchical block copolymer nanostructure that is able to undergo 2D (sheet-like) to 3D (bowl-like) shape changing upon specific external stimuli. Freestanding Janus nanosheets were prepared via crystallization-driven self-assembly of poly(ɛ-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (PCL-b-PAA) and subsequent crosslinking and disassembly process. Due to the mechanical contrast between the two layers, and the chemical responsiveness of the PAA layer, such Janus nanosheets transform a mechanically stable nanobowl upon pH change. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy results confirmed the Janus structure and bending behavior. Detailed structural characterization and shape changing mechanisms will be discussed.

  6. Data-driven storytelling

    CERN Document Server

    Henry Riche, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    This book is an accessible introduction to data-driven storytelling, resulting from discussions between data visualization researchers and data journalists. This book will be the first to define the topic, present compelling examples and existing resources, as well as identify challenges and new opportunities for research.

  7. Community Driven Development

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    Poverty has remained stubbornly high in Africa for decades. Top-down plans and donor driven investment programs have been less than successful. Past experience suggests that decentralization will not work without vibrant, participatory communities. And enhanced participation will at some point need a local government structure for sustainability. The two can evolve together dynamically, st...

  8. Light-driven cytochrome P450 hydroxylations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Jensen, Poul Erik; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2011-01-01

    Plants are light-driven "green" factories able to synthesize more than 200,000 different bioactive natural products, many of which are high-value products used as drugs (e.g., artemisinin, taxol, and thapsigargin). In the formation of natural products, cytochrome P450 (P450) monooxygenases play...... a key role in catalyzing regio- and stereospecific hydroxylations that are often difficult to achieve using the approaches of chemical synthesis. P450-catalyzed monooxygenations are dependent on electron donation typically from NADPH catalyzed by NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CPR......). The consumption of the costly cofactor NADPH constitutes an economical obstacle for biotechnological in vitro applications of P450s. This bottleneck has been overcome by the design of an in vitro system able to carry out light-driven P450 hydroxylations using photosystem I (PSI) for light harvesting...

  9. Test-driven programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, are presented some possibilities concerning the implementation of a test-driven development as a programming method. Here is offered a different point of view for creation of advanced programming techniques (build tests before programming source with all necessary software tools and modules respectively). Therefore, this nontraditional approach for easier programmer's work through building tests at first is preferable way of software development. This approach allows comparatively simple programming (applied with different object-oriented programming languages as for example JAVA, XML, PYTHON etc.). It is predictable way to develop software tools and to provide help about creating better software that is also easier to maintain. Test-driven programming is able to replace more complicated casual paradigms, used by many programmers.

  10. Gas-driven microturbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

    1996-06-27

    This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

  11. Privacy driven internet ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Trinh, Tuan Anh; Gyarmati, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    The dominant business model of today's Internet is built upon advertisements; users can access Internet services while the providers show ads to them. Although significant efforts have been made to model and analyze the economic aspects of this ecosystem, the heart of the current status quo, namely privacy, has not received the attention of the research community yet. Accordingly, we propose an economic model of the privacy driven Internet ecosystem where privacy is handled as an asset that c...

  12. Affinity driven social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

  13. Design of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...... as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low...

  14. Modelling of Natural and Hybrid Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    as well as influence the air content (dust, pollution etc.). Architects and engineers need to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about the interactions between building characteristics and natural ventilation in order to design buildings and systems consistent with a passive low......The effectiveness of natural ventilation, i.e. its ability to ensure indoor air quality and passive cooling in a building, depends greatly on the design process. Mechanical ventilation systems can be designed separately from the design of the building in which they are installed. They can also...... be installed in existing buildings after a few modifications. In contrast, ventilation systems using only natural forces such as wind and thermal buoyancy need to be designed together with the building, since the building itself and its components are the elements that can reduce or increase air movement...

  15. Coexisting contraction-extension consistent with buoyancy of the crust and upper mantle in North-Central Italy

    CERN Document Server

    Aoudia, A; Ismail-Zadeh, A T; Panza, G F; Pontevivo, A

    2002-01-01

    The juxtaposed contraction and extension observed in the crust of the Italian Apennines and elsewhere has, for a long time, attracted the attention of geoscientists and is a long-standing enigmatic feature. Several models, invoking mainly external forces, have been put forward to explain the close association of these two end-member deformation mechanisms clearly observed by geophysical and geological investigations. These models appeal to interactions along plate margins or at the base of the lithosphere such as back-arc extension or shear tractions from mantle flow or to subduction processes such as slab roll back, retreat or pull and detachment. We present here a revisited crust and upper mantle model that supports delamination processes beneath North-Central Italy and provides a new background for the genesis and age of the recent magmatism in Tuscany. Although external forces must have been important in the building up of the Apennines, we show that internal buoyancy forces solely can explain the coexist...

  16. Large-Eddy Simulation of Oil Slicks from Deep Water Blowouts: Effects of Droplet Buoyancy and Langmuir Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamecki, M.; Yang, D.; Meneveau, C. V.

    2013-12-01

    Deep water blowouts generate plumes of oil droplets that rise through, and interact with various layers of the ocean. When plumes reach the ocean mixed layer (OML), the interactions among oil droplet plume, Ekman Spiral and Langmuir turbulence strongly affect the final rates of dilution and bio-degradation. The present study aims at developing a large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for the study of the physical distribution and dispersion of oil droplets under the action of physical oceanographic processes in the OML. In the current LES approach, the velocity and temperature fields are simulated using a hybrid pseudo-spectral and finite-difference scheme; the oil field is described by an Eulerian concentration field and it is simulated using a bounded finite-volume scheme. Fluid accelerations induced by buoyancy of the oil plume are included, and a number of subgrid-scale models for the flow solver are implemented and tested. The LES capability is then applied to the simulation of oil plume dispersion in the OML. Graphical visualization of the LES results shows surface oil slick distribution consistent with the satellite and aerial images of surface oil slicks reported in the literature. Different combinations of Lamgmuir turbulence and droplet size lead to different oil slick patterns at the surface and significantly impact oil concentration. Possible effects for bio-degradation are also discussed. Funding from the GoMRI RFP-II is gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Upshot of binary chemical reaction and activation energy on carbon nanotubes with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux and buoyancy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dianchen; Ramzan, M.; Ahmad, Shafiq; Chung, Jae Dong; Farooq, Umer

    2017-12-01

    A mathematical model is framed to discuss the flow of carbon nanotube-suspended nanofluids with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux and binary chemical reaction. The flow analysis is performed in attendance of heat generation/absorption, energy activation, and buoyancy effects past a nonlinear stretched surface embedded in a non-Darcy permeable medium. A combination of varied nanotubes with base fluids is also taken into account. The Runge-Kutta fifth-order Fehlberg technique is engaged to find the numerical solution of a highly nonlinear problem. The impact of sundry parameters on involved distributions is illustrated graphically with requisite discussion keeping in view their physical aspects. Different tables that comprise numerically calculated values of numerous sundry parameters highlighting their physical significance are also erected. It is witnessed that velocity and temperature profiles are enhanced for mounting values of nanoparticle volume fraction parameters. Further, it is seen that for enhancing the value of the Prandtl number, the temperature profile decreases rapidly for single-walled carbon nanotubes than multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  18. Experimental Research on Thermocapillary-Buoyancy Migration Interaction of Axisymmetric Two Drops by Using Digital Holographic Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuoting; Duan, Li; Kang, Qi

    2017-12-01

    The migration and interaction of axisymmetric two drops in a vertical temperature gradient is investigated experimentally on the ground. A silicon oil is used as the continuous phase, and a water-ethanol mixture is used as the drop phase, respectively. The migration and interaction of two drops, under the combined effects of buoyancy and thermocapillary, is recorded by a digital holographic interferometry measurement in the experiment to analyse the velocities and temperature distribution of the drops. As a result, when two drops migrate together, the drop affects the other drop by perturbing the temperature field around itself. For the leading drop, the velocity is faster than the one of the isolated drop, and the maximum of the interfacial temperature distribution is larger than the one of the isolated drop. For the trailing drop, the velocity is slower than the one of the isolated drop, and the maximum of the interfacial temperature distribution is less than the one of the isolated drop. The influence of the dimensionless initial distance between the drop centres to the drop migration is discussed in detail in this study.

  19. Constellations-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a science and technology studies and actor-network-theory inspired approach to understanding the development and ongoing re-didactication and re-design of a Danish developed presentation tool called the Theme Board (Tematavlen.dk). It is argued that this approach provides a par...... a particularly useful point of departure for engaging in researching innovation and didactic design of digital teaching and learning instruments such as the Theme Board that are programmed and serviced 'in the sky'. I call this approach: constellation-driven innovations....

  20. Current driven by electromagnetic ETG turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen; Wang, Lu; Peng, Shuitao

    2017-10-01

    Recently, there has been intensive investigation of turbulence induced spontaneous rotation in tokamak. Naturally, current driven by turbulence has also been considered such as the electron temperature gradient (ETG) instability with a fluid mode. The electrostatic gyrokinetic simulation shows that the ETG turbulence driven current density corresponds to 20% of the local bootstrap current density. In this paper, the quasilinear version of the current evolution equation in the presence of electromagnetic (EM) ETG turbulence is presented using EM gyrokinetic equation. There are two types of current driving mechanisms. The first type is the divergence of stress, while the second type is called turbulent acceleration source. Finally, we compare the turbulent driven current to the background bootstrap current. The results demonstrate that the EM effect is important for the turbulent driven current. And the source term contributes a little to the total current. The modification of the current due to EM ETG turbulence is not dramatic in today's tokamak. However, it may play a significant role in future device.

  1. Thermo capillary and buoyancy convection in a fluid locally heated on its free surface; Convection thermocapillaire et thermogravitaire dans un fluide chauffe localement sur sa surface libre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, E.

    1997-09-26

    coupled buoyancy and thermo-capillary convection lead to a convective motion of the interface liquid/gas which drastically changes the heat and mass transfer across the liquid layer. Two experiments were considered, depending on the fluid: oil or mercury. The liquid is set in a cooled cylindrical vessel, and heated by a heat flux across the center of the free surface. The basic flow, in the case of oil, is a torus. When the heat parameter increases, a stationary flow appears as petals or rays when the aspect ratio. The lateral confinement selects the azimuthal wavelength. In the case of petals-like flow, a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation is underlined. The turbulence is found to be `weak`, even for the largest values of the Marangoni number (Ma = 1.3 10{sup 5}). In the case of mercury, the thermo-capillary effect is reduced to zero to impurities at the surface which have special trajectories we describe and compare to a simpler experiment. Only the buoyancy forces induce a unstationary, weakly turbulent flow as soon as the heating power exceeds 4W (Ra = 4.5 10{sup 3}, calculated with h = 1 mm). The past part concerns the analysis of the effect on the flow of the boundary conditions, the geometry, the Prandtl number and the buoyancy force with the help of the literature. Results concerning heat transfer, in particular the exponent of the law Nusselt number vs. heating power, were compared with available data. (author) 115 refs.

  2. Heat driven pulse pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steve M (Inventor); Martins, Mario S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A heat driven pulse pump includes a chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port, two check valves, a wick, and a heater. The chamber may include a plurality of grooves inside wall of the chamber. When heated within the chamber, a liquid to be pumped vaporizes and creates pressure head that expels the liquid through the outlet port. As liquid separating means, the wick, disposed within the chamber, is to allow, when saturated with the liquid, the passage of only liquid being forced by the pressure head in the chamber, preventing the vapor from exiting from the chamber through the outlet port. A plurality of grooves along the inside surface wall of the chamber can sustain the liquid, which is amount enough to produce vapor for the pressure head in the chamber. With only two simple moving parts, two check valves, the heat driven pulse pump can effectively function over the long lifetimes without maintenance or replacement. For continuous flow of the liquid to be pumped a plurality of pumps may be connected in parallel.

  3. The characteristics of mantle lithosphere buoyancy revealed from the northern Manila subduction zone to the active collision in Taiwan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Liang; Doo, Wen-Bin; Kuo-Chen, Hao; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Lin, Jing-Yi

    2017-04-01

    It has been widely studied on the complexity tectonic structure in the active Taiwan orogenesis, since the converging between the Philippine Sea plate (PSP) and the Eurasian plate (EU) along with the Manila subduction zone extended from the Philippine to offshore the southern Taiwan and the Ryukyu subduction zone in the east. Considering the separate contribution of the crust and the mantle lithosphere to the topography, we try to examine the mantle lithosphere buoyancy (Hm) behavior from the northern Manila subduction zone to the active collision in Taiwan region. In this study, we present several Hm profiles across the northern Manila subduction zone and the Taiwan island. In order to calculate the Hm, the crust structures are constrained by the forward gravity modeling, in which the density is provided from the multi-channel seismic data and on land seismic data (thanks to the Taiwan Integrated Geodynamic Research (TAIGER) project). The result shows that the Hm across the northern Manila subduction zone displays apparent undulations, and undulates more drastic approaching the north end of the subduction zone. It implies that the plate coupling between the PSP and the EU here is weak. The Hm across the southern Taiwan undulates still, but the amplitudes are smaller with relative gentle undulations. This reflects the contribution from the slab underneath while the initial collision occurs in south Taiwan. Into the central Taiwan, the Hm pattern behaves undulating mild comparing with that across the subduction zone because the slab structure effects not obvious. Besides, the Hm in the central Taiwan primarily is affects by both the thickening crust and high elevation caused by the strong lateral external compression stress.

  4. Input-driven versus turnover-driven controls of simulated changes in soil carbon due to land-use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyawira, Sylvia; Nabel, Julia; Brovkin, Victor; Pongratz, Julia

    2017-04-01

    Modelling studies estimate a global loss in soil carbon caused by land-use changes (LUCs) over the last century. Although it is known that this loss stems from the changes in quantity of litter inputs from the vegetation to the soil (input-driven) and the changes in turnover of carbon in the soil (turnover-driven) associated with LUC, the individual contribution of these two controls to the total changes have not been assessed. Using the dynamic global vegetation model JSBACH, we apply a factor separation approach to isolate the contribution of the input-driven and turnover-driven changes, as well as their synergies, to the total changes in soil carbon from LUC. To assess how land management through crop and wood harvest influences the controls, we compare our results for simulations with and without land management. Our results reveal that for the afforested regions both the input-driven and turnover-driven changes generally result in soil carbon gain, whereas deforested regions exhibit a loss. However, for regions where croplands have increased at the expense of grasslands and pastures, the input-driven changes result in a loss that is partly offset by a gain via the turnover-driven changes. This gain stems from a decrease in the fire-related carbon losses when grasslands or pastures are replaced with croplands. Omitting land management reduces the carbon losses in regions where natural vegetation has been converted to croplands and enhances the gain in afforested regions. The global simulated losses are substantially reduced from 54.0 Pg C to 22.0 Pg C, with the input-driven losses reducing from 54.7 Pg C to 24.9 Pg C. Our study shows that the dominating control of soil carbon losses is through the input-driven changes, which are more directly influenced by human management than the turnover-driven ones.

  5. Employee-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to outline the “grand structure” of the phenomenon in order to identify both the underlying processes and core drivers of employee-driven innovation (EDI). Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual paper. It particularly applies the insights...... of contemporary research on routine and organizational decision making to the specific case of EDI. Findings – The main result of the paper is that, from a theoretical point of view, it makes perfect sense to involve ordinary employees in innovation decisions. However, it is also outlined that naıve or ungoverned...... participation is counterproductive, and that it is quite difficult to realize the hidden potential in a supportive way. Research limitations/implications – The main implication is that basic mechanisms for employee participation also apply to innovation decisions, although often in a different way. However...

  6. Muscle-driven nanogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong L [Marietta, GA; Yang, Rusen [Atlanta, GA

    2011-03-01

    In a method of generating electricity, a plurality of living cells are grown on an array of piezoelectric nanowires so that the cells engage the piezoelectric nanowires. Induced static potentials are extracted from at least one of the piezoelectric nanowires when at least one of the cells deforms the at least one of the piezoelectric nanowires. A cell-driven electrical generator that includes a substrate and a plurality of spaced-apart piezoelectric nanowires disposed on the substrate. A plurality of spaced-apart conductive electrodes interact with the plurality of piezoelectric nanowires. A biological buffer layer that is configured to promote growth of cells is disposed on the substrate so that cells placed on the substrate will grow and engage the piezoelectric nanowires.

  7. Buoyancy Can-Can

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jim; Nelson, Jane Bray

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a discrepant event is used to initiate a learning cycle lesson to help students develop an understanding of the concept and equation for buoyant force. The data are gathered using readily available equipment and then graphically analyzed using a four-step analysis consistent with the modeling instructional approach. This laboratory…

  8. Experiment Clarifies Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Ayse; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a simple activity using Archimedes' principle that helps students to develop their scientific thinking and also to identify and correct their misconceptions. The exercise consists of linear and reverse processes.

  9. Optimality of contraction-driven crawling

    CERN Document Server

    Recho, P; Truskinovsky, L

    2014-01-01

    We study a model of cell motility where the condition of optimal trade-off between performance and metabolic cost can be made precise. In this model a steadily crawling fragment is represented by a layer of active gel placed on a frictional surface and driven by contraction only. We find analytically the distribution of contractile elements (pullers) ensuring that the efficiency of self-propulsion is maximal. We then show that natural assumptions about advection and diffusion of pullers produce a distribution that is remarkably close to the optimal one and is qualitatively similar to the one observed in experiments on fish keratocytes.

  10. Digitally-Driven Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette Bier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The shift from mechanical to digital forces architects to reposition themselves: Architects generate digital information, which can be used not only in designing and fabricating building components but also in embedding behaviours into buildings. This implies that, similar to the way that industrial design and fabrication with its concepts of standardisation and serial production influenced modernist architecture, digital design and fabrication influences contemporary architecture. While standardisa­tion focused on processes of rationalisation of form, mass-customisation as a new paradigm that replaces mass-production, addresses non-standard, complex, and flexible designs. Furthermore, knowledge about the designed object can be encoded in digital data pertaining not just to the geometry of a design but also to its physical or other behaviours within an environment. Digitally-driven architecture implies, therefore, not only digitally-designed and fabricated architecture, it also implies architecture – built form – that can be controlled, actuated, and animated by digital means. In this context, this sixth Footprint issue examines the influence of digital means as prag­matic and conceptual instruments for actuating architecture. The focus is not so much on computer-based systems for the development of architectural designs, but on architecture incorporating digital control, sens­ing, actuating, or other mechanisms that enable buildings to inter­act with their users and surroundings in real time in the real world through physical or sensory change and variation.

  11. Invention-driven marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, William E.

    1994-01-01

    Suppose you have just created a revolutionary bicycle suspension which allows a bike to be ridden over rough terrain at 60 miles per hour. In addition, suppose that you are deeply concerned about the plight of hungry children. Which should you do: be sure all hungry children have bicycles; transfer the technology for your new suspension to bicycle manufacturers worldwide; or start a company to supply premium sports bicycle based on your patented technology, and donate the profits to a charity which feeds hungry children? Woven through this somewhat trivial example is the paradox of technology transfer - the supplier (owner) may want to transfer technology; but to succeed, he or she must reformulate the problem as a user need for which there is a new and better solution. Successful technology transfer is little more than good marketing applied to an existing invention, process, or capability. You must identify who needs the technology, why they need it, why the new technology is better than alternatives, how much the customers are willing and able to pay for these benefits, and how to distribute products based on the technology tc the target customers. In market-driven development, the term 'technology transfer' is rarely used. The developers focus on studying user needs and designing solution They may have technology needs, but they don't have technology in search of a use.

  12. Digitally-Driven Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henriette Bier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The shift from mechanical to digital forces architects to reposition themselves: Architects generate digital information, which can be used not only in designing and fabricating building components but also in embedding behaviours into buildings. This implies that, similar to the way that industrial design and fabrication with its concepts of standardisation and serial production influenced modernist architecture, digital design and fabrication influences contemporary architecture. While standardisation focused on processes of rationalisation of form, mass-customisation as a new paradigm that replaces mass-production, addresses non-standard, complex, and flexible designs. Furthermore, knowledge about the designed object can be encoded in digital data pertaining not just to the geometry of a design but also to its physical or other behaviours within an environment. Digitally-driven architecture implies, therefore, not only digitally-designed and fabricated architecture, it also implies architecture – built form – that can be controlled, actuated, and animated by digital means.In this context, this sixth Footprint issue examines the influence of digital means as pragmatic and conceptual instruments for actuating architecture. The focus is not so much on computer-based systems for the development of architectural designs, but on architecture incorporating digital control, sens­ing, actuating, or other mechanisms that enable buildings to inter­act with their users and surroundings in real time in the real world through physical or sensory change and variation.

  13. Natural Childbirth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cold, ice Cold, Ice, and Snow Safety Natural Childbirth KidsHealth > For Parents > Natural Childbirth Print A A ... the pain, extremely empowering and rewarding. About Natural Childbirth Natural childbirth is a "low-tech" way of ...

  14. Carbon Sinks in a Changing Climate: Relative Buoyancy and Sinking Potentials of Various Antarctic Phytoplankton and Ice Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmel, S.; Selz, V.

    2016-12-01

    Polar phytoplankton play instrumental roles in global biogeochemical cycles, sometimes serving as massive carbon sinks via the biological pump. In addition to phytoplankton, sea ice supports a significant amount of ice algae, the essential primary producers for the ecosystem in winter and early spring. While sea ice habitat declines on regional scales, the fate of sea ice algae post-ice melt remains relatively unknown, despite its importance in understanding how the biological pump might be affected by sea ice loss. Through a series of settling column experiments on the icebreaker Nathaniel B. Palmer, we aimed to address the question: What controls the fate of the carbon-rich ice algae across the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) during ice melt? We focused on whether species composition affects the sinking potential of ice algal communities. Using FlowCAM imagery, we classified samples collected from the buoyant, neutral, and negatively buoyant portions of the settling columns into genus-level taxonomic classes. We used image parameters and geometric shape equations to calculate the biovolume of each taxonomic group. We further explored relationships between taxa-specific sinking potentials, environmental parameters (temperature and nutrients), and physiological properties of associated algal communities (as described by Fast Rate Repetition fluorometry). Results indicate that colonial Phaeocystis antarctica tends to dominate lower regions of the settling column. Moreover, we observe strong correlations between geographic location and both nutrients and phytoplankton physiology. We found that these three factors are indeed related to taxa-specific buoyancy and sinking indices. An understanding of these relationships sheds more light on the role P. antarctica (a carbon-rich bloom-forming genus) plays in the biological pump; higher sinking rates suggest greater carbon export to depth, while lower sinking rates increase the likelihood of carbon being respired back

  15. Driven by Nature: The Future of the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Nils

    2014-01-01

    In a turbulent and fast-changing world we need innovations and breakthroughs to advance our wellbeing and achieve a sustainable society. Together with our international network of leaders, entrepreneurs and scholars, we present a wide range of case studies in which we examine the mechanisms that ...... that lead to genuine breakthroughs.We look at the worlds of business, philanthropy, diplomacy, economics, investing, geopolitics, media, agriculture, logistics, technology and healthcare.These fascinating studies and interviews reveal how innovations and breakthroughs succeed or fail....

  16. Numerical Study of Natural Convection in Vertical Enclosures Utilizing Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alipanah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancement of buoyancy-driven convection heat transfer within vertical cavities containing nanofluids subjected to different side wall temperatures and various aspect ratios is investigated. The computations are based on an iterative, finitevolume numerical procedure (SIMPLE that incorporates the Boussinesq approximation to simulate the buoyancy term. With the base fluid being water, three different nanoparticles (Cu, TiO2, and Al2O3 are considered as the nanofluids. This study has been carried out for the pertinent parameters in the following ranges: the Rayleigh number, Raf = 105–107 and the volumetric fraction of nanoparticle between 0 and 5 percent. The results are presented for different length-to-height ratios varying from 0.1 to 1.0. The comparisons show that the mean Nusselt numbers and velocity magnitudes increase with volume fraction for the whole range of the Rayleigh numbers. The predictions show a noticeable heat transfer enhancement compared to pure fluid. It is also found that the heat transfer enhancement utilizing nanofluid is more pronounced at low aspect ratios than high aspect ratios. Moreover, the results depict that the addition of nanoparticles to the pure fluid has more effects at lower Rayleigh numbers.

  17. Effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on a boundary layer over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition

    OpenAIRE

    Tasawar Hayat; Awatif A. Hendi; Jacob A. Gbadeyan; Philip O. Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on the laminar boundary layer about a vertical plate in a uniform stream of fluid under a convective surface boundary condition. In the analysis, we assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid whilst a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the right surface; the heat source decays exponentially outwards from the surface of the plate. The similarity variable m...

  18. Combined effect of buoyancy and thermo capillarity convections in a low dilatable fluid; L`effet combine de deux convections gravitaire et thermocapillaire dans un fluide faiblement dilatable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenfeld, L.; Soubbaramayer

    1995-12-31

    This work deals with the combined effect of buoyancy and thermo capillarity convections in a low dilatable fluid. A scale law for the Nusselt number in function of the Rayleigh and Marangoni numbers, showing a high non linear coupling between the two convections has been established. This calculation describes a laminar stationary flow. The Navier-Stokes equations system for a law distorted fluid has been resolved in utilizing the Boussinesq approximation. For the case of a turbulent flow, the scale law has been calculated by a correlation method in adjusting experimental data on cerium evaporation by an axisymmetric beam of 5 kw. (O.L.). 10 figs.

  19. A light-driven artificial flytrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Owies M.; Zeng, Hao; Priimagi, Arri

    2017-05-01

    The sophistication, complexity and intelligence of biological systems is a continuous source of inspiration for mankind. Mimicking the natural intelligence to devise tiny systems that are capable of self-regulated, autonomous action to, for example, distinguish different targets, remains among the grand challenges in biomimetic micro-robotics. Herein, we demonstrate an autonomous soft device, a light-driven flytrap, that uses optical feedback to trigger photomechanical actuation. The design is based on light-responsive liquid-crystal elastomer, fabricated onto the tip of an optical fibre, which acts as a power source and serves as a contactless probe that senses the environment. Mimicking natural flytraps, this artificial flytrap is capable of autonomous closure and object recognition. It enables self-regulated actuation within the fibre-sized architecture, thus opening up avenues towards soft, autonomous small-scale devices.

  20. Thermodynamics of chemical Marangoni-driven engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechetnikov, Rouslan

    2017-07-19

    The goal of this paper is to perform a general thermodynamic study of Marangoni-driven engines in which chemical energy is directly transformed into mechanical motion. Given that this topic has not been discussed before, we will explore here the most basic and fundamental aspects of the phenomena at work, which leads to a number of interesting observations typical of controversies in classical thermodynamics. Starting with a discussion of a few key motivating examples of chemical Marangoni-driven phenomena - tears of wine, an oscillating pendant droplet, "beating" oil lens, and traveling waves in a circular container - and contrasting homogeneous versus inhomogeneous thermodynamic systems we naturally arrive at alternative ways of storing and generating energy with the help of inhomogeneities in the bulk and surface properties of the working media. Of particular interest here are systems with interfaces - hence, in this context we discuss the nature and efficiency of the corresponding thermodynamic cycles leading to work done as a result of a non-uniform distribution of surface tension, which is in turn induced by a non-uniform surface active substance (surfactant) distribution, for both soluble and insoluble surfactants. Based on the relevant physical parameters of the working medium we can also evaluate the isothermality, i.e. temperature variations, dissipative losses, energy output and efficiency, entropy generation, and the period of such cycles in real processes. The role of singularity formation at the interface for the existence of such thermodynamic cycles is unraveled as well. Finally the discussion is concluded with a few ideas for potential applications of Marangoni-driven engines.

  1. Performance of Gas-Engine Driven Heat Pump Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdi Zaltash; Randy Linkous; Randall Wetherington; Patrick Geoghegan; Ed Vineyard; Isaac Mahderekal; Robert Gaylord

    2008-09-30

    Air-conditioning (cooling) for buildings is the single largest use of electricity in the United States (U.S.). This drives summer peak electric demand in much of the U.S. Improved air-conditioning technology thus has the greatest potential impact on the electric grid compared to other technologies that use electricity. Thermally-activated technologies (TAT), such as natural gas engine-driven heat pumps (GHP), can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. GHP offers an attractive opportunity for commercial building owners to reduce electric demand charges and operating expenses. Engine-driven systems have several potential advantages over conventional single-speed or single-capacity electric motor-driven units. Among them are variable speed operation, high part load efficiency, high temperature waste heat recovery from the engine, and reduced annual operating costs (SCGC 1998). Although gas engine-driven systems have been in use since the 1960s, current research is resulting in better performance, lower maintenance requirements, and longer operating lifetimes. Gas engine-driven systems are typically more expensive to purchase than comparable electric motor-driven systems, but they typically cost less to operate, especially for commercial building applications. Operating cost savings for commercial applications are primarily driven by electric demand charges. GHP operating costs are dominated by fuel costs, but also include maintenance costs. The reliability of gas cooling equipment has improved in the last few years and maintenance requirements have decreased (SCGC 1998, Yahagi et al. 2006). Another advantage of the GHP over electric motor-driven is the ability to use the heat rejected from the engine during heating operation. The recovered heat can be used to supplement the vapor compression cycle during heating or to supply other process loads, such as water heating. The use of the engine waste heat results in greater

  2. Conceptual models of the wind-driven and thermohaline circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, S.S.; Marshall, D.P.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2013-01-01

    Conceptual models are a vital tool for understanding the processes that maintain the global ocean circulation, both in nature and in complex numerical ocean models. In this chapter we provide a broad overview of our conceptual understanding of the wind-driven circulation, the thermohaline

  3. Architecture-Driven Requirements Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsman, W.; Jonkers, Henk; Franken, H.M.; Franken, Henry M.; Iacob, Maria Eugenia; Proper, Erik; Harmsen, Frank; Dietz, Jan L.G.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an architecture driven requirements engineering method. We will demonstrate how to integrate requirements engineering in architecture design and we will demonstrate how to use enterprise architectures during solution realization projects. We will demonstrate how architecture can

  4. Economics-driven software architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Mistrik, Ivan; Kazman, Rick; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Economics-driven Software Architecture presents a guide for engineers and architects who need to understand the economic impact of architecture design decisions: the long term and strategic viability, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of applications and systems. Economics-driven software development can increase quality, productivity, and profitability, but comprehensive knowledge is needed to understand the architectural challenges involved in dealing with the development of large, architecturally challenging systems in an economic way. This book covers how to apply economic consider

  5. Body armour and lateral-plate reduction in freshwater three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus: adaptations to a different buoyancy regime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, F; Klepaker, T

    2009-11-01

    Several factors related to buoyancy were compared between one marine and two freshwater populations of three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus. Fish from all three populations had buoyancy near to neutral to the ambient water. This showed that neither marine nor freshwater G. aculeatus used swimming and hydrodynamic lift to prevent sinking. Comparing the swimbladder volumes showed that freshwater completely plated G. aculeatus had a significantly larger swimbladder volume than both completely plated marine and low-plated freshwater G. aculeatus. Furthermore, body tissue density was lower in low-plated G. aculeatus than in the completely plated marine and freshwater fish. The results show that G. aculeatus either reduce tissue density or increase swimbladder volume to adapt to lower water density. Mass measurements of lateral plates and pelvis showed that loss of body armour in low-plated G. aculeatus could explain the tissue density difference between low-plated and completely plated G. aculeatus. This suggests that the common occurrence of plate and armour reduction in freshwater G. aculeatus populations can be an adaptation to a lower water density.

  6. Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment-2 (STDCE-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, J.; Kamotani, Y.; Ostrach, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thermocapillary flows are known to become oscillatory (time-periodic), but how and when they become oscillatory in containers of unit-order aspect ratio are not yet fully understood. The present work is a part of our continuous effort to obtain a better understanding of the phenomenon. Thermocapillary flow experiments in normal gravity are limited to a narrow parametric range in order to minimize gravity and buoyancy effects, which is an important reason for our lack of full understanding of the oscillation phenomenon. One important unanswered question is what role, if any, free surface deformation plays in the oscillation mechanism. For that reason we performed thermocapillary flow experiments, called the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment-2 (STDCE-2), aboard the USML-2 Spacelab in 1995. The main objectives of the experiments were to investigate oscillatory thermocapillary flows in microgravity and to clarify the importance of free surface deformation in such flows. Steady and oscillatory thermocapillary flows were generated in cylindrical containers by employing two heating modes. A CO2 laser with adjustable power and beam diameter was used in the Constant Flux (CF) configuration to heat the free surface. The other configuration investigated in STDCE-2 was the Constant Temperature (CT) configuration in which a submerged cylindrical cartridge heater placed at the symmetry (axial) axis of the test container heated the fluid. Both heating modes cause non-uniform temperature distributions on the free surface, which generates thermocapillary flow. The flow field was investigated by flow visualization, and the temperature field was measured by thermistors and an infrared imager. The free surface shape and motion were measured by a Ronchi system. The hardware performed well and we were able to conduct more tests than originally planned. From the successful experiments a large amount of data was acquired. The analysis of the data is now nearly complete. Some

  7. The Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A R

    2008-05-27

    Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role throughout the evolution of supernovae from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of the stellar systems. We consider the simpler and fundamental hydrodynamic instability problem of a material interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a divergent central Taylor-Sedov blast wave. The existence of unified solutions at high Mach number and small density ratio suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models modified to include the effects of divergence and radial velocity gradients. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Raleigh-Taylor, but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth picture. Loss of memory of initial conditions can occur in the quasi-self-similar model, but requires initial mode numbers higher than those predicted for pre-explosion interfaces in Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is likely strongly influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low-modes are dominant, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes are present in the initial conditions, the contribution to the perturbation growth from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is significant or dominant compared to Rayleigh-Taylor. Such Richtmyer-Meshkov growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in the Tycho. Laser-driven high-energy-density laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making

  8. Robust control of a class of chaotic and hyperchaotic driven systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes new conditions which are sufficient for robust control of a class of chaotic and hyperchaotic driven systems. The drive–driven systems are characterized by non-identical uncertain complex dynamics where complexities are mainly introduced by the switching nature of their vector fields.

  9. Rotationally-driven axisymmetric oscillatory convection in a semitransparent Czochralski melt model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiez, Reza; Rezaei, Yazdan

    2017-01-01

    A numerical study was carried out to investigate the effect of surface tension-driven convection on the transition of flow modes in an axisymmetric Czochralski oxide melt model. Computational results were obtained over a reasonably wide range of the crystal dummy rotation rate for the cases with and without Marangoni effect. The transition of the flow from steady-state to an axisymmetric oscillatory one was found to be occurred at a threshold value of the ratio between buoyancy and the rotationally-driven forces, which is considerably smaller in the presence of the Marangoni flow. This was shown that, in the presence of thermocapillary forces, the descending cold plume has a larger impact on the thermal field if compared to the case in which the Marangoni effect was ignored. Depending on the circumstances, each of the two different mechanisms, i.e., the rotating Rayleigh-Benard instability and the baroclinic instability, may play a dominant role in the steady-oscillatory flow transition. Thermocapillary effect on the mechanism of instability giving rise to the transition of the convective flow was studied.

  10. Pattern Driven Stress Localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croll, Andrew; Crosby, Alfred

    2010-03-01

    The self-assembly of patterns from isotropic initial states is a major driver of modern soft-matter research. This avenue of study is directed by the desire to understand the complex physics of the varied structures found in Nature, and by technological interest in functional materials that may be derived through biomimicry. In this work we show how a simple striped phase can respond with significant complexity to an appropriately chosen perturbation. In particular, we show how a buckled elastic plate transitions into a state of stress localization using a simple, self-assembled variation in surface topography. The collection of topographic boundaries act in concert to change the state from isotropic sinusoidal wrinkles, to sharp folds or creases separated by relatively flat regions. By varying the size of the imposed topographic pattern or the wavelength of the wrinkles, we construct a state diagram of the system. The localized state has implications for both biological systems, and for the control of non-linear pattern formation.

  11. Data Driven Dark Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Stefan

    If physics is the experimental science of matter that interacts through the four basic interactions, the science of complex systems is its natural extension, where the concepts of matter and interactions are generalized. Matter can be anything that is capable of interacting, interactions can be anything that is able to change states of the constituents of a system. Complex systems are made from many constituents (parts) that interact through interaction networks. These parts are characterized by states that change over time. At the same time the interaction networks may change over time. What makes a system complex is that the states of the parts change as a function F of the interaction network (and the states), and, simultaneously, the interaction networks change as another function G of the states of the nodes (and the networks). Physics is about the predictive understanding of the dynamics and changes of states once the interactions and initial and boundary conditions are specified. In complex systems interactions also change over time, and to make things really complicated, these changes are coupled to the dynamics of the state-changes. States co-evolve with the interaction networks. In this sense complex systems often are chicken-egg problems. They are evolutionary, show emergent behavior, can be self-organized critical, show power laws, etc...

  12. Designing Data-Driven Battery Prognostic Approaches for Variable Loading Profiles: Some Lessons Learned

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Among various approaches for implementing prognostic algorithms data-driven algorithms are popular in the industry due to their intuitive nature and relatively fast...

  13. Numerical simulation of losses along a natural circulation helium loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knížat, Branislav, E-mail: branislav.knizat@stuba.sk; Urban, František, E-mail: frantisek.urban@stuba.sk; Mlkvik, Marek, E-mail: marek.mlkvik@stuba.sk; Ridzoň, František, E-mail: frantisek.ridzon@stuba.sk; Olšiak, Róbert, E-mail: robert.olsiak@stuba.sk [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Nám. slobody 17, 812 31 Bratislava, Slovak Republik (Slovakia)

    2016-06-30

    A natural circulation helium loop appears to be a perspective passive method of a nuclear reactor cooling. When designing this device, it is important to analyze the mechanism of an internal flow. The flow of helium in the loop is set in motion due to a difference of hydrostatic pressures between cold and hot branch. Steady flow at a requested flow rate occurs when the buoyancy force is adjusted to resistances against the flow. Considering the fact that the buoyancy force is proportional to a difference of temperatures in both branches, it is important to estimate the losses correctly in the process of design. The paper deals with the calculation of losses in branches of the natural circulation helium loop by methods of CFD. The results of calculations are an important basis for the hydraulic design of both exchangers (heater and cooler). The analysis was carried out for the existing model of a helium loop of the height 10 m and nominal heat power 250 kW.

  14. Data-driven batch schuduling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denehy, Tim [GOOGLE; Arpaci - Dusseau, Remzi [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Livny, Miron [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Arpaci - Dusseau, Andrea C [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop data-driven strategies for batch computing schedulers. Current CPU-centric batch schedulers ignore the data needs within workloads and execute them by linking them transparently and directly to their needed data. When scheduled on remote computational resources, this elegant solution of direct data access can incur an order of magnitude performance penalty for data-intensive workloads. Adding data-awareness to batch schedulers allows a careful coordination of data and CPU allocation thereby reducing the cost of remote execution. We offer here new techniques by which batch schedulers can become data-driven. Such systems can use our analytical predictive models to select one of the four data-driven scheduling policies that we have created. Through simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our predictive models and show how they can reduce time to completion for some workloads by as much as 80%.

  15. Hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hernández-Lemus

    Full Text Available In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue.

  16. Hysteresis in Pressure-Driven DNA Denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Nicasio-Collazo, Luz Adriana; Castañeda-Priego, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    In the past, a great deal of attention has been drawn to thermal driven denaturation processes. In recent years, however, the discovery of stress-induced denaturation, observed at the one-molecule level, has revealed new insights into the complex phenomena involved in the thermo-mechanics of DNA function. Understanding the effect of local pressure variations in DNA stability is thus an appealing topic. Such processes as cellular stress, dehydration, and changes in the ionic strength of the medium could explain local pressure changes that will affect the molecular mechanics of DNA and hence its stability. In this work, a theory that accounts for hysteresis in pressure-driven DNA denaturation is proposed. We here combine an irreversible thermodynamic approach with an equation of state based on the Poisson-Boltzmann cell model. The latter one provides a good description of the osmotic pressure over a wide range of DNA concentrations. The resulting theoretical framework predicts, in general, the process of denaturation and, in particular, hysteresis curves for a DNA sequence in terms of system parameters such as salt concentration, density of DNA molecules and temperature in addition to structural and configurational states of DNA. Furthermore, this formalism can be naturally extended to more complex situations, for example, in cases where the host medium is made up of asymmetric salts or in the description of the (helical-like) charge distribution along the DNA molecule. Moreover, since this study incorporates the effect of pressure through a thermodynamic analysis, much of what is known from temperature-driven experiments will shed light on the pressure-induced melting issue. PMID:22496765

  17. Magnetically driven quantum heat engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Peña, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    We studied the efficiency of two different schemes for a magnetically driven quantum heat engine, by considering as the "working substance" a single nonrelativistic particle trapped in a cylindrical potential well, in the presence of an external magnetic field. The first scheme is a cycle, composed of two adiabatic and two isoenergetic reversible trajectories in configuration space. The trajectories are driven by a quasistatic modulation of the external magnetic-field intensity. The second scheme is a variant of the former, where the isoenergetic trajectories are replaced by isothermal ones, along which the system is in contact with macroscopic thermostats. This second scheme constitutes a quantum analog of the classical Carnot cycle.

  18. Flux-driven simulations of turbulence collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Rhee, T. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); CASS and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Using three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of tokamak turbulence, we show that an edge transport barrier (ETB) forms naturally once input power exceeds a threshold value. Profiles, turbulence-driven flows, and neoclassical coefficients are evolved self-consistently. A slow power ramp-up simulation shows that ETB transition is triggered by the turbulence-driven flows via an intermediate phase which involves coherent oscillation of turbulence intensity and E×B flow shear. A novel observation of the evolution is that the turbulence collapses and the ETB transition begins when R{sub T} > 1 at t = t{sub R} (R{sub T}: normalized Reynolds power), while the conventional transition criterion (ω{sub E×B}>γ{sub lin} where ω{sub E×B} denotes mean flow shear) is satisfied only after t = t{sub C} ( >t{sub R}), when the mean flow shear grows due to positive feedback.

  19. Combined effect of buoyancy force and Navier slip on MHD flow of a nanofluid over a convectively heated vertical porous plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutuku-Njane, Winifred Nduku; Makinde, Oluwole Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of magnetic field on boundary layer flow of an incompressible electrically conducting water-based nanofluids past a convectively heated vertical porous plate with Navier slip boundary condition. A suitable similarity transformation is employed to reduce the governing partial differential equations into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which are solved numerically by employing fourth-order Runge-Kutta with a shooting technique. Three different water-based nanofluids containing copper (Cu), aluminium oxide (Al2O3), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) are taken into consideration. Graphical results are presented and discussed quantitatively with respect to the influence of pertinent parameters, such as solid volume fraction of nanoparticles (φ), magnetic field parameter (Ha), buoyancy effect (Gr), Eckert number (Ec), suction/injection parameter (f w ), Biot number (Bi), and slip parameter ( β ), on the dimensionless velocity, temperature, skin friction coefficient, and heat transfer rate.

  20. Numerical investigation of combined buoyancy-thermocapillary convection and entropy generation in 3D cavity filled with Al2O3 nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioua Kolsi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer, fluid flow and entropy generation due to combined buoyancy and thermocapillary forces in a 3D differentially heated enclosure containing Al2O3 nanofluid are carried out for different Marangoni numbers and different nanoparticles concentrations. The vector potential-vorticity formalism and the finite volume method are used respectively to formulate and to solve the governing equations and calculations were performed for Marangoni number from −103 to 103, volume fraction of nanoparticles from 0 to 0.2 and for a fixed Rayleigh number at 105. An intensification of the flow and an increase in heat transfer and of total entropy generation occur with the increase in nanoparticles volume fraction for all Marangoni numbers.

  1. Some Exact Solutions of Boundary Layer Flows along a Vertical Plate with Buoyancy Forces Combined with Lorentz Forces under Uniform Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios Pantokratoras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exact analytical solutions of boundary layer flows along a vertical porous plate with uniform suction are derived and presented in this paper. The solutions concern the Blasius, Sakiadis, and Blasius-Sakiadis flows with buoyancy forces combined with either MHD Lorentz or EMHD Lorentz forces. In addition, some exact solutions are presented specifically for water in the temperature range of 0∘C≤≤8∘C, where water density is nearly parabolic. Except for their use as benchmarking means for testing the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, the presented exact solutions with EMHD forces have use in flow separation control in aeronautics and hydronautics, whereas the MHD results have applications in process metallurgy and fusion technology. These analytical solutions are valid for flows with strong suction.

  2. Fluid-driven fractures in brittle hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Niall; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a process in which fluid is injected deep underground at high pressures that can overcome the strength of the surrounding matrix. This results in an increase of surface area connected to the well bore and thus allows extraction of natural gas previously trapped in a rock formation. We experimentally study the physical mechanisms of these fluid-driven fractures in low permeability reservoirs where the leak-off of fracturing fluid is considered negligible. This is done through the use of small scale experiments on transparent and brittle, heavily cross-linked hydrogels. The propagation of these fractures can be split into two distinct regimes depending on whether the dominant energy dissipation mechanism is viscous flow or material toughness. We will analyse crack growth rates, crack thickness and tip shape in both regimes. Moreover, PIV techniques allow us to explore the flow dynamics within the fracture, which is crucial in predicting transport of proppants designed to prevent localisation of cracks.

  3. Noise-driven attractor switching device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Naoki; Hotta, Yasushi; Kanki, Teruo; Kawai, Tomoji; Tabata, Hitoshi

    2009-02-01

    Problems with artificial neural networks originate from their deterministic nature and inevitable prior learnings, resulting in inadequate adaptability against unpredictable, abrupt environmental change. Here we show that a stochastically excitable threshold unit can be utilized by these systems to partially overcome the environmental change. Using an excitable threshold system, attractors were created that represent quasiequilibrium states into which a system settles until disrupted by environmental change. Furthermore, noise-driven attractor stabilization and switching were embodied by inhibitory connections. Noise works as a power source to stabilize and switch attractors, and endows the system with hysteresis behavior that resembles that of stereopsis and binocular rivalry in the human visual cortex. A canonical model of the ring network with inhibitory connections composed of class 1 neurons also shows properties that are similar to the simple threshold system.

  4. Statistical mechanics of driven diffusive systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schmittmann, B

    1995-01-01

    Far-from-equilibrium phenomena, while abundant in nature, are not nearly as well understood as their equilibrium counterparts. On the theoretical side, progress is slowed by the lack of a simple framework, such as the Boltzmann-Gbbs paradigm in the case of equilibrium thermodynamics. On the experimental side, the enormous structural complexity of real systems poses serious obstacles to comprehension. Similar difficulties have been overcome in equilibrium statistical mechanics by focusing on model systems. Even if they seem too simplistic for known physical systems, models give us considerable insight, provided they capture the essential physics. They serve as important theoretical testing grounds where the relationship between the generic physical behavior and the key ingredients of a successful theory can be identified and understood in detail. Within the vast realm of non-equilibrium physics, driven diffusive systems form a subset with particularly interesting properties. As a prototype model for these syst...

  5. Investigation of Current Driven Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Knott, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Current driven loudspeakers have previously been investigated but the literature is limited and the advantages and disadvantages are yet to be fully identified. This paper makes use of a non-linear loudspeaker model to analyse loudspeakers with distinct non-linear characteristics under voltage...

  6. Synchrotron-driven spallation sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, P J

    1996-01-01

    The use of synchrotrons for pulsed neutron spallation sources is an example of scientific and technological spin-off from the accelerator development for particle physics. Accelerator-driven sources provide an alternative to the continuous-flux, nuclear reactors that currently furnish the majority of neutrons for research and development. Although the present demand for neutrons can be adequately met by the existing reactors, this situation is unlikely to continue due to the increasing severity of safety regulations and the declared policies of many countries to close down their reactors within the next decade or so. Since the demand for neutrons as a research tool is, in any case,expected to grow, there has been a corresponding interest in sources that are synchrotron-driven or linac-driven with a pulse compression ring and currently several design studies are being made. These accelerator-driven sources also have the advantage of a time structure with a high peak neutron flux. The basic requirement is for a...

  7. Effects-Driven IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We present effects-driven IT development as an instrument for pursuing and reinforcing Participatory Design (PD) when it is applied in commercial information technology (IT) projects. Effects-driven IT development supports the management of a sustained PD process throughout design and organizatio......We present effects-driven IT development as an instrument for pursuing and reinforcing Participatory Design (PD) when it is applied in commercial information technology (IT) projects. Effects-driven IT development supports the management of a sustained PD process throughout design...... and organizational implementation. The focus is on the effects to be achieved by users through their adoption and use of a system. The overall idea is to (a) specify the purpose of a system as effects that are both measurable and meaningful to the users, and (b) evaluate the absence or presence of these effects......, and effects assessment of an electronic patient record. Effects concerning, among other things, clinicians’ mental workload were specified and measured, but apart from the planned changes associated with these effects the pilot implementation also gave rise to emergent, opportunity-based, and curtailed...

  8. PLURALIZING NATURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2014-01-01

    not necessary mean planning for a one common nature. As exemplified by the River Aire Re-naturalization Project (2002-2015), landscape architecture might provide an alternative approach to nature restoration that is more site specific and allows for multiple interpretations to coexist. In the presentation...

  9. In situ insights into shock-driven reactive flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2017-06-01

    Shock-driven reactions are commonplace. Examples include the detonation of high explosives, shock-driven dissociation of polymers, and transformation of carbon from graphite to diamond phases. The study of shock-driven chemical reactions is important for understanding reaction thresholds, their mechanisms and rates, and associated state sensitivities under the extreme conditions generated by shock compression. Reactions are distinguished by their thermicity - e.g. the volume and enthalpy changes along the reaction coordinate. A survey of the hallmarks of shock-driven reactivity for a variety of simple molecules and polymers will be presented, including benzene, acetylenes and nitriles, and formic acid. Many of the examples will illustrate the nature of the reactive flow through particle velocity wave profiles measured by in situ electromagnetic gauging in gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. General trends will be presented linking molecular moieties, shock temperatures, and reaction state sensitivities. Progress in applying bond-specific diagnostics will also be presented, including time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, and recent results of in situ x-ray diffraction of carbon at the Linac Coherent Light Souce (LCLS) free electron laser.

  10. Singing-driven gene expression in the developing songbird brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Frank; Whitney, Osceola

    2005-10-15

    Neural and behavioral development arises from an integration of genetic and environmental influences, yet specifying the nature of this interaction remains a primary problem in neuroscience. Here, we review molecular and behavioral studies that focus on the role of singing-driven gene expression during neural and vocal development in the male zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), a songbird that learns a species-typical vocal pattern during juvenile development by imitating an adult male tutor. A primary aim of our lab has been to identify naturally-occurring environmental influences that shape the propensity to sing. This ethological approach underlies our theoretical perspective, which is to integrate the significance of singing-driven gene expression into a broader ecological context.

  11. Natural Disasters and Nontuberculous Mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Jon N.; Chan, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases acquired by survivors of large-scale natural disasters complicate the recovery process. During events such as tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornados and well into the recovery period, victims often are exposed to water-soil mixtures that have relocated with indigenous microbes. Because nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous in water and soil, there is potential for increased exposure to these organisms during natural disasters. In this hypothesis-driven commentary, we discuss the rise in NTM lung disease and natural disasters and examine the geographic overlap of NTM infections and disaster frequencies in the United States. Moreover, we show an increased number of positive NTM cultures from Louisiana residents in the years following three of the relatively recent epic hurricanes and posit that such natural disasters may help to drive the increased number of NTM infections. Finally, we advocate for increased environmental studies and surveillance of NTM infections before and after natural disasters. PMID:25644904

  12. Effects-Driven IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    For customers information technology (IT) is a means to an end. This tight association between IT systems and their use is, however, often absent during their development and implementation, resulting in systems that may fail to produce desired ends. Effects-driven IT development aims to avoid...... the chasm between development and implementation through a sustained focus on the effects to be achieved by users through their adoption and use of a system. This involves iteratively (a) specifying the purpose of the system in terms of effects, (b) developing an IT system and associated organizational...... change that realize the specified effects, and (c) measuring the absence or presence of the specified effects during pilot use of the system while also remaining alert to the emergence of beneficial but hitherto unspecified effects. In this paper we explore effects-driven IT development and discuss...

  13. Schematic driven silicon photonics design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrostowski, Lukas; Lu, Zeqin; Flückiger, Jonas; Pond, James; Klein, Jackson; Wang, Xu; Li, Sarah; Tai, Wei; Hsu, En Yao; Kim, Chan; Ferguson, John; Cone, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Electronic circuit designers commonly start their design process with a schematic, namely an abstract representation of the physical circuit. In integrated photonics on the other hand, it is very common for the design to begin at the physical component level. In order to build large integrated photonic systems, it is crucial to design using a schematic-driven approach. This includes simulations based on schematics, schematic-driven layout, layout versus schematic verification, and post-layout simulations. This paper describes such a design framework implemented using Mentor Graphics and Lumerical Solutions design tools. In addition, we describe challenges in silicon photonics related to manufacturing, and how these can be taken into account in simulations and how these impact circuit performance.

  14. Singing-driven gene expression in the developing songbird brain

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Frank; Whitney, Osceola

    2005-01-01

    Neural and behavioral development arises from an integration of genetic and environmental influences, yet specifying the nature of this interaction remains a primary problem in neuroscience. Here, we review molecular and behavioral studies that focus on the role of singing-driven gene expression during neural and vocal development in the male zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), a songbird that learns a species-typical vocal pattern during juvenile development by imitating an adult male tutor. ...

  15. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  16. Track guided self-driven container wagon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, I.A.

    1999-01-01

    The linear motor consists of a series of stator coils (2) located along the Track guided self-driven container wagon Track guided self-driven container wagon track and a reaction rail (3) fitted under the wagon chassis (4).

  17. Security and policy driven computing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Security and Policy Driven Computing covers recent advances in security, storage, parallelization, and computing as well as applications. The author incorporates a wealth of analysis, including studies on intrusion detection and key management, computer storage policy, and transactional management.The book first describes multiple variables and index structure derivation for high dimensional data distribution and applies numeric methods to proposed search methods. It also focuses on discovering relations, logic, and knowledge for policy management. To manage performance, the text discusses con

  18. Cable Driven Devices for Telemanipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraresi, Carlo; Pescarmona, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Cable driven robotic devices present peculiar aspects, requiring the solution of very specific problems. As regards the determination of the main operational characteristics, like the workspace, it is necessary to consider that such devices are often parallel and redundant structures. Moreover, cables can only exert traction forces. As a consequence, the development of such structures requires coping with two main aspects: (a) the solution of forward kinematics and inverse statics, necessary ...

  19. Temporal naturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  20. Dissonant Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2013-01-01

    Nature restoration is far from being a neural undertaking. Just like any other type of heritage production it can be the source of dissonance – ‘our’ nature is not necessary ‘their’ nature. Often this dissonance is managed in ways, which are not particular sensitive to site-specificity. As exempl...... and allows for multiple interpretations to coexist. Evidence can be found in the Re-naturalization of River Aire (2002-2015), a restoration project, which reveals approaches that could be labelled landscape architecture specific....

  1. Simulating Supernovae Driven Outflows in Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jaimee-Ian

    2018-01-01

    Galactic outflows, or winds, prove to be a necessary input for galactic simulations to produce results comparable to observation, for it solves issues caused by what previous literature dubbed the “angular momentum catastrophe.” While it is known that the nature of outflows depends on the nature of the Interstellar Medium (ISM), the mechanisms behind outflows are still not completely understood. We investigate the driving force behind galactic outflows and the factors that influence their behavior, hypothesizing that supernovae within the galaxy drive these winds. We study isolated, high-resolution, smooth particle hydrodynamic simulations, focusing specifically on dwarf galaxies due to their shallow potential wells, which allow for more significant outflows. We find that outflows follow star formation (and associated supernovae) suggesting the causal relationship between the two. Furthermore, simulations with higher diffusivity differ little in star formation rate, but show significantly lower outflow rates, suggesting that environmental factors that have little effect on regulating star formation can greatly influence outflows, and so efficient outflows can be driven by a constant rate of supernovae, depending on ISM behavior. We are currently analyzing disk morphology and ambient density in order to comprehend the effect of supernovae on the immediate interstellar gas. By attaining greater understanding of the origin of galactic outflows, we will be able to not only improve the accuracy of simulations, we will also be able to gain greater insight into galactic formation and evolution, as outflows and resultant inflows may be vital to the regulation of galaxies throughout their lifetimes.

  2. Perceived Effectiveness of Community-driven Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The failure of Top-down approach and Donor-driven development projects in Nigeria had necessitated a new approach that is community driven. This paper reports the perceived effectiveness of Community Driven Development CDD approach to Community and Social Development Projects CSDP execution in Oyo state.

  3. The Myths of Data-Driven Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan

    2005-01-01

    The most recent attempt by educators to emulate the "sound principles" and methods of business and science is to become data-driven. The leaders in a data-driven school are able to demonstrate how some number, preferably scores on standardized tests, has moved upward as a result of some program they have initiated. Data-driven schools also possess…

  4. Is "Market-Driven" Good Enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Discusses marketing and management strategies and evaluates the path most traveled; going beyond market-driven; proactive and reactive organizational positioning; ways to manage human and physical resources to make both market-driven and market-making contributions; and values necessary for an organization to move from market-driven to…

  5. Matematica Natural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Patricia; Medearis, Linda

    Matematica Natural (Natural Mathematics) is a mathematics curriculum for young children based on the assumption that they learn mathematics through concrete, real life, relevant experiences and that educational differences rather than cultural differences influence math achievement. The curriculum uses hands-on materials and activities to teach…

  6. Framing nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis is about communication concerning nature in the Netherlands. The purpose of this exploratory study is to take both a theoretical and an empirical look at whether (implicit) religious elements play a role in this communication about nature in the Netherlands.   In this PhD thesis

  7. Natur formet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søberg, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Malene Hauxner, "Fra naturlig natur til SUPERNATUR – Europæisk landskabsarkitektur 1967-2007 set fra Danmark", Risskov: Ikaros Press, 2011.......Anmeldelse af Malene Hauxner, "Fra naturlig natur til SUPERNATUR – Europæisk landskabsarkitektur 1967-2007 set fra Danmark", Risskov: Ikaros Press, 2011....

  8. Ultrasonic Concentration in a Line-Driven Cylindrical Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, Gregory Russ [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The fractionation of particles from their suspending fluid or noninvasive micromanipulation of particles in suspension has many applications ranging from the recovery of valuable reagents from process flows to the fabrication of microelectromechanical devices. Techniques based on size, density, solubility, or electromagnetic properties exist for fulfilling these needs, but many particles have traits that preclude their use such as small size, neutral buoyancy, or uniform electromagnetic characteristics. While separation by those techniques may not be possible, often compressibility differences exist between the particle and fluid that would allow fractionation by acoustic forces. The potential of acoustic separation is known, but due to inherent difficulties in achieving and maintaining accurate alignment of the transduction system, it is rarely utilized. The objective of this project is to investigate the use of structural excitation as a potentially efficient concentration/fractionation method for particles in suspension. It is demonstrated that structural excitation of a cylindrically symmetric cavity, such as a tube, allows non-invasive, fast, and low power concentration of particles suspended in a fluid. The inherent symmetry of the system eliminates the need for careful alignment inherent in current acoustic concentration devices. Structural excitation distributes the acoustic field throughout the volume of the cavity, which also significantly reduces temperature gradients and acoustic streaming in the fluid; cavitation is no longer an issue. The lowest-order coupled modes of a long cylindrical glass tube and fluid-filled cavity, driven by a line contact, are tuned, via material properties and aspect ratio, to achieve a coupled dipolar vibration of the system, shown to generate efficient concentration of particles to the central axis of the tube. A two dimensional elastodynamic model of the system was developed and subsequently utilized to optimize particle

  9. The Lure of Extractive Natural Resource Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Lars; Kjær, Anne Mette; Therkildsen, Ole

    Natural resource-driven development in Africa has emerged as a hot topic. The hope is that extractive industries will generate foreign revenues, create jobs and boost economic growth – but how can the possibilities best be exploited for industrial development purposes?......Natural resource-driven development in Africa has emerged as a hot topic. The hope is that extractive industries will generate foreign revenues, create jobs and boost economic growth – but how can the possibilities best be exploited for industrial development purposes?...

  10. Modeling and simulations of radiative blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, Assaf; Huntington, Channing M.; Trantham, Matthew; Malamud, Guy; Elbaz, Yonatan; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility measured the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor RT instabilities driven by radiative blast waves, relevant to astrophysics and other HEDP systems. We constructed a new Buoyancy-Drag (BD) model, which accounts for the ablation effect on both bubble and spike. This ablation effect is accounted for by using the potential flow model ]Oron et al PoP 1998], adding another term to the classical BD formalism: βDuA / u , where β the Takabe constant, D the drag term, uA the ablation velocity and uthe instability growth velocity. The model results are compared with the results of experiments and 2D simulations using the CRASH code, with nominal radiation or reduced foam opacity (by a factor of 1000). The ablation constant of the model, βb / s, for the bubble and for the spike fronts, are calibrated using the results of the radiative shock experiments. This work is funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Measurement and analysis of self-noise in hybrid-driven underwater gliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hybrid-driven Underwater Glider (HUG is a new type of submersible vehicle which combines the functions of traditional Autonomous Underwater Vehicles(AUVand Autonomous Underwater Gliders(AUG. In order to study its noise source distribution and basic self-noise characteristics, a self-noise acquisition system based on the HUG was designed and developed, and a noise analysis test carried out in a free-field pool. In August 2016, the sea trial of the Petrel II glider was conducted in the South China Sea, with observation data at a depth range of 1 000 m as the research object. The self-noise data of the glider platform under different working conditions was obtained through the step-by-step operation method. The experimental analysis and results show that the self-noise acquisition system is stable. The contribution of mechanical noise to self-noise is greatest when the glider works in the gliding mode, while the self-noise band above 500 Hz is closely related to the work of the buoyancy adjustment unit, and peaks at 1 kHz. According to the analysis of the basic characteristics of self-noise, this provides some guidance for the implementation of vibration and noise reduction.

  12. Relationship between basement-linked and gravity-driven fault systems in the UKCS salt basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, S.A. [Amerada Hess Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Ruffell, A.H. [Queens Univ, Belfast (United Kingdom) School of Geosciences; Harvey, M.J. [Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)

    1997-08-01

    Extension of basement below significant detachment layers such as salt results in the formation of structures in the cover strata above the detachment layer in two ways. `Thick-skinned` cover structures evolve to balance basement stretching. These are linked to the basement faults via detachment in the salt layer, or are directly linked to the basement structure, depending on the amount of basement fault detachment relative to salt layer thickness. Basement extension also results in rotation of major basement fault blocks, tilting the detachment layer and precipitating gravity-driven, `thin-skinned` slip of the cover involving detached extensional faulting and folding. Detachment layers consisting specifically of salt play two roles in facilitating the development of thin-skinned systems: salt constitutes the detachment layer and also lends buoyancy to the cores of anticlonal folds, reducing resistance to shortening. The detachment layer may become tilted away from the basement fault scarp, resulting in `synthetic slip systems` with the same polarity as the underlying basement fault, or the detachment may be tilted toward the basement scarp, giving `antithetic slip systems`, of the opposite polarity. Examples from the Central Graben and Channel Basin are discussed. Examples of antithetic systems from the Irish Sea, Central Graben and a field example from the Bristol Channel Basin are discussed. (author)

  13. Employee-Driven Innovation (EDI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

      The responsibility to be innovative and think of useful ideas and the privilege of making decisions in processes of innovation are typically restricted to specifically assigned R&D functions and/or upper echelon managers. Given the importance of innovation to most organizations, it may seem...... illogical to reserve such a 'license' to so few individuals. This paper argues that some parts of that license should indeed be extended to include 'ordinary' employees, as they are potential drivers of innovation. Research on Employee Driven Innovation (EDI) is still at its beginnings. In the paper we...

  14. Data driven marketing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Semmelroth, David

    2013-01-01

    Embrace data and use it to sell and market your products Data is everywhere and it keeps growing and accumulating. Companies need to embrace big data and make it work harder to help them sell and market their products. Successful data analysis can help marketing professionals spot sales trends, develop smarter marketing campaigns, and accurately predict customer loyalty. Data Driven Marketing For Dummies helps companies use all the data at their disposal to make current customers more satisfied, reach new customers, and sell to their most important customer segments more efficiently. Identifyi

  15. Advanced modelling of the transport phenomena across horizontal clothing microclimates with natural convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, T S; Couto, S; Psikuta, A; Rossi, R M

    2015-12-01

    The ability of clothing to provide protection against external environments is critical for wearer's safety and thermal comfort. It is a function of several factors, such as external environmental conditions, clothing properties and activity level. These factors determine the characteristics of the different microclimates existing inside the clothing which, ultimately, have a key role in the transport processes occurring across clothing. As an effort to understand the effect of transport phenomena in clothing microclimates on the overall heat transport across clothing structures, a numerical approach was used to study the buoyancy-driven heat transfer across horizontal air layers trapped inside air impermeable clothing. The study included both the internal flow occurring inside the microclimate and the external flow occurring outside the clothing layer, in order to analyze the interdependency of these flows in the way heat is transported to/from the body. Two-dimensional simulations were conducted considering different values of microclimate thickness (8, 25 and 52 mm), external air temperature (10, 20 and 30 °C), external air velocity (0.5, 1 and 3 m s(-1)) and emissivity of the clothing inner surface (0.05 and 0.95), which implied Rayleigh numbers in the microclimate spanning 4 orders of magnitude (9 × 10(2)-3 × 10(5)). The convective heat transfer coefficients obtained along the clothing were found to strongly depend on the transport phenomena in the microclimate, in particular when natural convection is the most important transport mechanism. In such scenario, convective coefficients were found to vary in wavy-like manner, depending on the position of the flow vortices in the microclimate. These observations clearly differ from data in the literature for the case of air flow over flat-heated surfaces with constant temperature (which shows monotonic variations of the convective heat transfer coefficients, along the length of the surface). The flow

  16. Natural Propositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjernfelt, Frederik

    Preface -- Introduction -- The generality of signs -- Dicisigns -- Some consequences of the dicisign doctrine -- Dicisigns and cognition -- Natural propositions--the evolution of semiotic self-control -- Dicisigns beyond language -- Operational and optimal iconicity in Peirce's diagrammatology...

  17. Natural Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset shows the locations of known tracts of high quality natural communities in Kansas, generalized to the PLSS section. It is not a compehensive dataset of...

  18. Pluralising Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Thomas Juel

    2017-01-01

    Denmark is recognised for its democratic approach to planning, and for the idea of planning for the common good. This interest in the common good and in common values also seems to be reflected in the way that the restoration of nature is planned and managed, suggesting that there is one common...... “nature” that everyone can agree on. But nature restoration is far from being an unproblematic undertaking. As with any other type of heritage production, it can be the source of dissonance. As exemplified by the Skjern River Restoration Project, one perception of a landscape and its value as “nature” can...... suppress other valid perceptions, in conflict with the need for different groups of people to be able to identify with the same territory. However, planning for the common good, in the case of nature restoration, does not necessarily mean planning for one common nature. Understanding and working...

  19. Writing Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Asdal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of the Nordic Journal of Science and Technology Studies is interested in how nature, in different versions and forms, is invited into our studies, analyses, and stories. How is it that we “write nature”? How is it that we provide space for, and actually describe the actors, agents, or surroundings, in our stories and analyses? The articles in the issue each deal with different understandings of both the practices of writing and the introduction of various natures into these. In this introduction to the issue the editors engage with actor-network theory as a material semiotic resource for writing nature. We propose to foreground actor-network theory as a writing tool, at the expense of actor-network theory as a distinct vocabulary. In doing this and pointing out the semiotic origins to material-semiotics we also want to problematize a clear-cut material approach to writing nature.

  20. Effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on a boundary layer over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on the laminar boundary layer about a vertical plate in a uniform stream of fluid under a convective surface boundary condition. In the analysis, we assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid whilst a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the right surface; the heat source decays exponentially outwards from the surface of the plate. The similarity variable method was applied to the steady state governing non-linear partial differential equations, which were transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and were solved numerically by applying a shooting iteration technique together with a sixth-order Runge–Kutta integration scheme for better accuracy. The effects of the Prandtl number, the local Biot number, the internal heat generation parameter, thermal radiation and the local Grashof number on the velocity and temperature profiles are illustrated and interpreted in physical terms. A comparison with previously published results on similar special cases showed excellent agreement.

  1. Second Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Skjonsberg, Matthew; Geuze, Adriaan

    2015-01-01

    The idea of virgin nature is more metaphor than reality – a metaphor best represented by the fabled garden paradise from which Homo sapiens’ ancient forebears were exiled. Despite the fact that virtually every development site borders on an existing city or infrastructure, and that billboards or industry are visible in every panorama, contemporary planning and modern architecture have stubbornly continued to cherish the illusion of a nature that is authentic. In an increasingly urbanized worl...

  2. Natural aphrodisiacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloul, Rany

    2010-01-01

    The search for a remedy or a prescription that can enhance sexual function and/or treat male erectile dysfunction has been an obsession throughout known history. Whether it was an Eastern civilization or a Western one, religious or atheist, man's aspiration for a better or best "manhood" has been a history-time goal. This review will discuss the current research done on the most popular natural aphrodisiacs and examine the weight of evidence to support or discourage the use of any of these substances to enhance sexual desire and/or function. Review of the current evidence on the use of natural substances as aphrodisiacs. Efficacy of natural aphrodisiacs in enhancing sexual function in men and women. There is little evidence from literature to recommend the usage of natural aphrodisiacs for the enhancement of sexual desire and/or performance. Data on yohimbine's efficacy does not support the wide use of the drug, which has only mild effects in the treatment of psychogenic ED. Although there's a positive trend towards recommending ginseng as an effective aphrodisiac, however, more in depth studies involving large number of subjects and its mechanism of action are needed before definite conclusions could be reached. Data on the use of natural aphrodisiacs in women is limited. The current body of objective evidence does not support the use of any natural aphrodisiac as an effective treatment for male or female sexual dysfunctions. Potent men and men with ED will continue the search for natural aphrodisiacs despite the current disappointing data on their effectiveness. Care should be taken regarding the fraud addition of sildenafil analogues to natural aphrodisiacs.

  3. Natural double inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhionero, F.; Litterio, M.; Capozziello, S.; Amendola, L.

    The astronomical interest of double inflation stems from the possibility it gives of inserting a feature in an otherwise featureless (or scale invariant) perturbation spectrum, precisely at the scale (100 Mpc, say) that goes through the horizon at the (sharp) separations between the two successive inflations. Double inflation occurs when two scalar fields (or inflatons) dominate sequentially the cosmic expansion or when vacuum polarization — Ricci scalar R squared added to the Lagrangian — is taken into account and only one inflaton ψ is present. (This perhaps is more natural as it exploits quantum effects to reduce to one the number of the ad hoc ingredients.) In that case we know from Starobinsky's pioneering work that the first inflation is driven by R — rightly called then scalaron — under the rules of Fourth Order Gravity, (FOG), while the second is driven by ψ under the rules of ordinary General Relativity, (GR). Unfortunately most of the appeal of the scalaron-inflaton scenario in relation to the feature in the perturbation spectrum, is lost because a delicate fine tuning of the value of the (second) inflaton at the beginning of the second inflation is required, in the absence of which the two inflations merge in one and no scale is singled out. In order to overcome this difficulty, we introduce in the Lagrangian density a new scalar coupling between ψ and R2, analogous to the well known non minimal coupling between ψ and R of canonical GR. We show that in this way the two inflationary episodes of FOG and GR may be neatly distinguished from each other, regardless of the initial value of ψ. This is due to the influence of the coupling on the shape of the conformal potential, in which one can easily carve a channel of evolution, consisting in fact of two orthogonal valleys. Then, for most of phase space the attractor is this doubly inflationary trajectory that lies at the bottom of the two valleys (Fig. 1). In fact, in this case the Universe first

  4. 3D CFD simulations to study the effect of inclination of condenser tube on natural convection and thermal stratification in a passive decay heat removal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minocha, Nitin [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Nayak, Arun K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of three-dimensional natural convection and thermal stratification inside large water pool. • Effect of inclination (α) of condenser tube on fluid flow and heat transfer. • The heat transfer was found to be maximum for α = 90° and minimum for α = 15°. • Laminar-turbulent natural convection and heat transfer in the presence of longitudinal vortices. - Abstract: Many advanced nuclear reactors adopt methodologies of passive safety systems based on natural forces such as gravity. In one of such system, the decay heat generated from a reactor is removed by isolation condenser (ICs) submerged in a large water pool called the Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP). The objective of the present study was to design an IC for the passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS) for advanced nuclear reactor. First, the effect of inclination of IC tube on three dimensional temperature and flow fields was investigated inside a pilot scale (10 L) GDWP. Further, the knowledge of these fields has been used for the quantification of heat transfer and thermal stratification phenomenon. In a next step, the knowledge gained from the pilot scale GDWP has been extended to design an IC for real size GDWP (∼10,000 m{sup 3}). Single phase CFD simulation using open source CFD code [OpenFOAM-2.2] was performed for different tube inclination angles (α) (w.r.t. to vertical direction) in the range 0° ⩽ α ⩽ 90°. The results indicate that the heat transfer coefficient increases with increase in tube inclination angle. The heat transfer was found to be maximum for α = 90° and minimum for α = 15°. This behavior is due to the interaction between the primary flow (due to pressure gradient) and secondary flow (due to buoyancy force). The primary flow enhanced the fluid sliding motion at the tube top whereas the secondary flow resulted in enhancement in fluid motion along the circumference of tube. As the angle of inclination (α) of the tube was increased, the

  5. Mixed convection of nanofluids in a lid-driven rough cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhimeng; Wang, Jinyu; Mozumder, Aloke K.; Das, Prodip K.

    2017-06-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer and fluid flow of air, water or oil in enclosures have been studied extensively using experimental and numerical means for many years due to their ever-increasing applications in many engineering fields. In comparison, little effort has been given to the problem of mixed convection of nanofluids in spite of several applications in solar collectors, electronic cooling, lubrication technologies, food processing, and nuclear reactors. Mixed convection of nanofluids is a challenging problem due to the complex interactions among inertia, viscous, and buoyancy forces. In this study, mixed convection of nanofluids in a lid-driven square cavity with sinusoidal roughness elements at the bottom is studied numerically using the Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation. The numerical model is developed using commercial finite volume software ANSYS-FLUENT for Al2O3-water and CuO-water nanofluids inside a square cavity with various roughness elements. The effects of number and amplitude of roughness elements on the heat transfer and fluid flow are analysed for various volume concentrations of Al2O3 and CuO nanoparticles. The flow fields, temperature fields, and heat transfer rates are examined for different values of Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. The outcome of this study provides some important insight into the heat transfer behaviour of Al2O3-water and CuO-water nanofluids inside a lid-driven rough cavity. This knowledge can be further used in developing novel geometries with enhanced and controlled heat transfer for solar collectors, electronic cooling, and food processing industries.

  6. Emancipating Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The issue of riverine flooding in the UK is closely tied up with computer simulations. Arguably, these modelling practices are ripe with the anticipation of nature. They aspire to pre-empt it, hence expect it to be ‘out there’, and ultimately work through formalized distillations of it – hydrodyn......The issue of riverine flooding in the UK is closely tied up with computer simulations. Arguably, these modelling practices are ripe with the anticipation of nature. They aspire to pre-empt it, hence expect it to be ‘out there’, and ultimately work through formalized distillations...... of it – hydrodynamic equations – which have their own anticipations and place their own demands on their modellers. Through the experience of a flood modelling apprenticeship I argue that the taking-place of such anticipations paradoxically relies on the birth of a hybrid, the model-modeller, and thus on a nature...

  7. Knockout driven reactions in complex molecules and their clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatchell, Michael; Zettergren, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Energetic ions lose some of their kinetic energy when interacting with electrons or nuclei in matter. Here, we discuss combined experimental and theoretical studies on such impulse driven reactions in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), fullerenes, and pure or mixed clusters of these molecules. These studies show that the nature of excitation is important for how complex molecular systems respond to ion/atom impact. Rutherford-like nuclear scattering processes may lead to prompt atom knockout and formation of highly reactive fragments, while heating of the molecular electron clouds in general lead to formation of more stable and less reactive fragments. In this topical review, we focus on recent studies of knockout driven reactions, and present new calculations of the angular dependent threshold (displacement) energies for such processes in PAHs. The so-formed fragments may efficiently form covalent bonds with neighboring molecules in clusters. These unique molecular growth processes may be important in astrophysical environments such as low velocity shock waves.

  8. Data-driven approaches in the investigation of social perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphs, Ralph; Nummenmaa, Lauri; Todorov, Alexander; Haxby, James V

    2016-05-05

    The complexity of social perception poses a challenge to traditional approaches to understand its psychological and neurobiological underpinnings. Data-driven methods are particularly well suited to tackling the often high-dimensional nature of stimulus spaces and of neural representations that characterize social perception. Such methods are more exploratory, capitalize on rich and large datasets, and attempt to discover patterns often without strict hypothesis testing. We present four case studies here: behavioural studies on face judgements, two neuroimaging studies of movies, and eyetracking studies in autism. We conclude with suggestions for particular topics that seem ripe for data-driven approaches, as well as caveats and limitations. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Computational Analysis of Natural Ventilation Flows in Geodesic Dome Building in Hot Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Soleimani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available For centuries, dome roofs were used in traditional houses in hot regions such as the Middle East and Mediterranean basin due to its thermal advantages, structural benefits and availability of construction materials. This article presents the computational modelling of the wind- and buoyancy-induced ventilation in a geodesic dome building in a hot climate. The airflow and temperature distributions and ventilation flow rates were predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. The three-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations were solved using the CFD tool ANSYS FLUENT15. The standard k-epsilon was used as turbulence model. The modelling was verified using grid sensitivity and flux balance analysis. In order to validate the modelling method used in the current study, additional simulation of a similar domed-roof building was conducted for comparison. For wind-induced ventilation, the dome building was modelled with upper roof vents. For buoyancy-induced ventilation, the geometry was modelled with roof vents and also with two windows open in the lower level. The results showed that using the upper roof openings as a natural ventilation strategy during winter periods is advantageous and could reduce the indoor temperature and also introduce fresh air. The results also revealed that natural ventilation using roof vents cannot satisfy thermal requirements during hot summer periods and complementary cooling solutions should be considered. The analysis showed that buoyancy-induced ventilation model can still generate air movement inside the building during periods with no or very low wind.

  10. Natural aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Scorer, R S

    1958-01-01

    Natural Aerodynamics focuses on the mathematics of any problem in air motion.This book discusses the general form of the law of fluid motion, relationship between pressure and wind, production of vortex filaments, and conduction of vorticity by viscosity. The flow at moderate Reynolds numbers, turbulence in a stably stratified fluid, natural exploitation of atmospheric thermals, and plumes in turbulent crosswinds are also elaborated. This text likewise considers the waves produced by thermals, transformation of thin layer clouds, method of small perturbations, and dangers of extra-polation.Thi

  11. Provincialising Nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Provincialising Nature: Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Politics of the Environment in Latin America offers a timely analysis of some of the crucial challenges, contradictions and promises within current environmental discourses and practices in the region. This book shows both challenging...... scenarios and original perspectives that have emerged in Latin America in relation to the globally urgent issues of climate change and the environmental crisis. Two interconnected analytical frameworks guide the discussions in the book: the relationship between nature, knowledge and identity and their role...

  12. Income Driven Patterns of the Urban Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Gusso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the land surface temperature (LST distribution from thermal infrared data for analyzing the characteristics of surface coverage using the Vegetation–Impervious–Soil (VIS approach. A set of ten images, obtained from Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper, between 2001 and 2010, were used to study the urban environmental conditions of 47 neighborhoods of Porto Alegre city, Brazil. Porto Alegre has had the smallest population growth rate of all 27 state capitals in the last two decades in Brazil, with an increase of 11.55% in inhabitants from 1.263 million in 1991 to 1.409 million in 2010. We applied the environmental Kuznets curve (EKC theory in order to test the influence of the economically-related scenario on the spatial nature of social-environmental arrangement of the city at neighborhood scale. Our results suggest that the economically-related scenario exerts a non-negligible influence on the physically driven characteristics of the urban environmental conditions as predicted by EKC theory. The linear inverse correlation R2 between household income (HI and LST is 0.36 and has shown to be comparable to all other studied variables. Future research may investigate the relation between other economically-related indicators to specific land surface characteristics.

  13. A HYPOTHESIS-DRIVEN FRAMEWORK FOR ASSESSING ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding how climate change will alter the availability of coastal final ecosystem goods and services (FEGS; such as food provisioning from fisheries, property protection, and recreation) has significant implications for coastal planning and the development of adaptive management strategies to maximize sustainability of natural resources. The dynamic social and physical settings of these important resources means that there is not a “one-size-fits-all” model to predict the specific changes in coastal FEGS that will occur as a result of climate change. Instead, we propose a hypothesis-driven approach that builds on available literature to understand the likely effects of climate change on FEGS across coastal regions of the United States. We present an analysis for three FEGS: food provisioning from fisheries, recreation, and property protection. Hypotheses were restricted to changes precipitated by four prominent climate stressors projected in coastal areas: 1) sea-level rise, 2) ocean acidification, 3) increased temperatures, and 4) intensification of coastal storms. Our approach identified links between these stressors and the ecological processes that produce the FEGS, with the capacity to incorporate regional differences in FEGS availability. Linkages were first presented in a logic model to conceptualize the framework. For each region, we developed hypotheses regarding the effects of climate stressors on FEGS by examining case studies For example, w

  14. The nature of subslab slow velocity anomalies beneath South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, Daniel Evan; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Scire, Alissa

    2017-05-01

    Slow seismic velocity anomalies are commonly imaged beneath subducting slabs in tomographic studies, yet a unifying explanation for their distribution has not been agreed upon. In South America two such anomalies have been imaged associated with subduction of the Nazca Ridge in Peru and the Juan Fernández Ridge in Chile. Here we present new seismic images of the subslab slow velocity anomaly beneath Chile, which give a unique view of the nature of such anomalies. Slow seismic velocities within a large hole in the subducted Nazca slab connect with a subslab slow anomaly that appears correlated with the extent of the subducted Juan Fernández Ridge. The hole in the slab may allow the subslab material to rise into the mantle wedge, revealing the positive buoyancy of the slow material. We propose a new model for subslab slow velocity anomalies beneath the Nazca slab related to the entrainment of hot spot material.

  15. Multiscale computational modeling of a radiantly driven solar thermal collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuru, Koushik

    components of the device. We have used state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, Flow3D (www.flow3d.com) to model the effects of multiple coupled physical processes including buoyancy driven flow from local temperature differences within the plenums, fluid-solid momentum and heat transfer, and coupled radiation exchange between the aerogel, top glazing and environment. In addition, the CFD models include both convection and radiation exchange between the top glazing and the environment. Transient and steady-state thermal models have been constructed using COMSOL Multiphysics. The third level consists of a lumped-element system model, which enables rapid parametric analysis and helps to develop an understanding of the system behavior; the mathematical models developed and multiple CFD simulations studies focus on simultaneous solution of heat, momentum, mass and gas volume fraction balances and succeed in accurate state variable distributions confirmed by experimental measurements.

  16. Wonder-driven Entrepreneurship Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn Thorbjørn; Herholdt-Lomholdt, Sine Maria

    Contemporary research on creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship have now for a decade or more been focusing on social constructive, pragmatic, socio-cultural and socio-material dimensions of creative and innovative processes and entrepreneurship (Bager et al. 2010, Brinkmann & Tangaard 2010......- and entrepreneurship processes. In this paper we want to continue in line with this new framework of meaning- and wonder-driven innovation by focusing on the possible educational consequences of such an approach. Our empirical departure is our three-year phenomenological action research project called ‘Wonder......-based Entrepreneurship Teaching in Professional bachelor Education’. Ten senior lecturers in nursing and pedagogy participated. The purpose was to investigate whether and how Socratic and philosophical dialogues and different forms of phenomenological and existential reflections upon one´s own professional assumptions...

  17. Wonder-driven Entrepreneurship Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Finn Thorbjørn; Herholdt-Lomholdt, Sine Maria

    -based Entrepreneurship Teaching in Professional bachelor Education’. Ten senior lecturers in nursing and pedagogy participated. The purpose was to investigate whether and how Socratic and philosophical dialogues and different forms of phenomenological and existential reflections upon one´s own professional assumptions......- and entrepreneurship processes. In this paper we want to continue in line with this new framework of meaning- and wonder-driven innovation by focusing on the possible educational consequences of such an approach. Our empirical departure is our three-year phenomenological action research project called ‘Wonder...... in so-called ‘Wonder Labs’ could contribute to existing innovation- and entrepreneurship education in at least two ways: 1. To deeply and existential root students and educators in their profession and values 2. To bring students and educators on the edge of their knowledge into the field of “not...

  18. Segmentation-DrivenTomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas

    ), the classical reconstruction methods suffer from their inability to handle limited and/ or corrupted data. Form any analysis tasks computationally demanding segmentation methods are used to automatically segment an object, after using a simple reconstruction method as a first step. In the literature, methods...... such that the segmentation subsequently can be carried out by use of a simple segmentation method, for instance just a thresholding method. We tested the advantages of going from a two-stage reconstruction method to a one stage segmentation-driven reconstruction method for the phase contrast tomography reconstruction...... problem. The tests showed a clear improvement for realistic materials simulations and that the one-stage method was clearly more robust toward noise. The noise-robustness result could be a step toward making this method more applicable for lab-scale experiments. We have introduced a segmentation...

  19. Customer-driven Product Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Anita Friis

    2011-01-01

    look for new ways to gain competitive advantage. In competitive markets there is a tendency of shorter product life cycles, and thus a competitive factor is to keep at pace with the market or even driving the market by developing new products. This research study seeks to investigate Customer......-driven Product Development (CDPD) from a demand chain management perspective. CDPD is the counterpart to typical research and development processes, which has no direct customer involvement. The proposition is that letting customers initiate and participate in the product development process...... an insight into a new area of new product development and demand chain management, including the customer in the case study, which is rare in related research....

  20. Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Raluca Olga

    This dissertation treats system design, modeling of transient system response, and characterization of individual phenomena and demonstrates a framework for integration of these three activities early in the design process of a complex engineered system. A system analysis framework for prioritization of experiments, modeling, and development of detailed design is proposed. Two fundamental topics in thermal-hydraulics are discussed, which illustrate the integration of modeling and experimentation with nuclear reactor design and safety analysis: thermal-hydraulic modeling of heat generating pebble bed cores, and scaled experiments for natural circulation heat removal with Boussinesq liquids. The case studies used in this dissertation are derived from the design and safety analysis of a pebble bed fluoride salt cooled high temperature nuclear reactor (PB-FHR), currently under development in the United States at the university and national laboratories level. In the context of the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) methodology, new tools and approaches are proposed and demonstrated here, which are specifically relevant to technology in the early stages of development, and to analysis of passive safety features. A system decomposition approach is proposed. Definition of system functional requirements complements identification and compilation of the current knowledge base for the behavior of the system. Two new graphical tools are developed for ranking of phenomena importance: a phenomena ranking map, and a phenomena identification and ranking matrix (PIRM). The functional requirements established through this methodology were used for the design and optimization of the reactor core, and for the transient analysis and design of the passive natural circulation driven decay heat removal system for the PB-FHR. A numerical modeling approach for heat-generating porous media, with multi-dimensional fluid flow is presented. The application of this modeling

  1. Design Driven Testing Test Smarter, Not Harder

    CERN Document Server

    Stephens, M

    2010-01-01

    The groundbreaking book Design Driven Testing brings sanity back to the software development process by flipping around the concept of Test Driven Development (TDD) - restoring the concept of using testing to verify a design instead of pretending that unit tests are a replacement for design. Anyone who feels that TDD is "Too Damn Difficult" will appreciate this book. Design Driven Testing shows that, by combining a forward-thinking development process with cutting-edge automation, testing can be a finely targeted, business-driven, rewarding effort. In other words, you'll learn how to test

  2. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 3. Nature Watch: Symbiosis in Coastal Marine Communities. Neelam Pereira. Feature Article Volume 20 Issue 3 March 2015 pp 245-253. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 10. Nature Watch The Amazing Desert Gerbil. Ishwar Prakash. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 10 October 1997 pp 54-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/10/0054-0061 ...

  4. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Nature Watch - On Observing the Night Sky. P N Shankar B S Shylaja. Feature Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 89-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/07/0089-0096 ...

  5. Kritikkens natur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz-Jakobsen, Claus

    1999-01-01

    Artiklen introducerer det nye forskningsfelt inden for samtænkning af litteratur, kultur og natur, den såkaldt økologiske kritik, og kaster et kritisk blik på  dens brug af romantisk litteratur som proto-økologisk kanon....

  6. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 9. Nature Watch - Coral Reefs and their Fauna: An Underwater Fantasyland. Anuradha Bhat. Feature Article Volume 9 Issue 9 September 2004 pp 62-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Natural sweetener

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy University of Illinois at. Chicago USA. 2002; 18-39. 44. Ramesh K, Singh V and NW Megeji Cultivation of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert.): A comprehensive review. Rita Elkins MH. 1997. Stevia nature's sweetener (Eds). Stevia. Woodland Publishing, Inc. 2006; 160: 1-29.

  8. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nature Watch - Sociality in a Solitary Primate: How Gregarious is the Slender Loris? Sindhu Radhakrishna. Feature Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 64-81 ... Keywords. Primates; strepsirrhines; social organisation; slender loris.

  9. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Nature Watch - Singapore's Jurong BirdPark: A Study Model. Abraham Verghese. Feature Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 74-88. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 5. Nature Watch - Thinking Like a Tahr: When Males and Females go their Separate Ways. M D Madhusudan. Feature Article Volume 3 Issue 5 May 1998 pp 43-47 ...

  11. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 8. Nature Watch: On the Trail of Skinks of the Western Ghats. Anirudha Datta-Roy. Feature Article Volume 19 Issue 8 August 2014 pp 753-763. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Nature Watch: A Tale of Two Turtles. V Deepak. Feature Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 47-54. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/020/01/0047-0054. Keywords. Ecology ...

  13. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 8. Nature Watch - The Treasures of the Night Sky. P N Shankar B S Shylaja. Feature Article Volume 6 Issue 8 August 2001 pp 82-89. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/08/0082- ...

  14. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 8. Nature Watch - Hornbills – Giants Among the Forest Birds. T R Shankar Raman Divya Mudappa. Feature Article Volume 3 Issue 8 August 1998 pp 56-65. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Naturalizing Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley N. Salthe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Certain definitions of information can be seen to be compatible with each other if their relationships are properly understood as referring to different levels of organization in a subsumptive hierarchy. The resulting hierarchy, with thermodynamics subsuming information theory, and that in turn subsuming semiotics, amounts to a naturalizing of the information concept.

  16. of Natural

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cathy Egan

    natural resources throughout the country. www .idrc.ca/in_focus_comanagement. Learning together to share resources in the mountains of Bhutan. Researchers and villagers set an example for the nation. Tradition is strong among the mountain people of Bhutan. Often it is tradition that governs the sharing of resources, ...

  17. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 1. Nature Watch The Kokum Tree. M D Subash Chandran. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 86-89. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/01/0086-0089 ...

  18. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 10. Nature Watch - When Dragons Fly. K A Subramanian. Feature Article Volume 7 Issue 10 October 2002 pp 69-78. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/10/0069-0078 ...

  19. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 7. Nature Watch - The Odyssey of the Olive Ridley. Kartik Shanker. Feature Article Volume 4 Issue 7 July 1999 pp 68-78. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/07/0068-0078 ...

  20. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 8. Nature Watch - Secrets of the Shieldtails. Kartik Shanker. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 8 August 1996 pp 64-70. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/08/0064-0070 ...

  1. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 5. Nature Watch Will the Meek Inherit the Earth? Kartik Shanker. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 54-59. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/05/0054-0059 ...

  2. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. Nature Watch Decline of a Montane Ecosystem. Kartik Shanker. Feature Article Volume 2 Issue 2 February 1997 pp 75-82. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/02/0075-0082 ...

  3. Nature Watch

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Nature Watch - Sarus Crane: On its Way to Extinction. Alok Kumar Mishra. Feature ... Author Affiliations. Alok Kumar Mishra1. Azim Premji Foundation, 134, Doddakannelli, Next to Wipro Corporate Office, Sarjapur Road, Bangalore 560035.

  4. Natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caulfield

    2005-01-01

    The term “natural fibers” covers a broad range of vegetable, animal, and mineral fibers. However, in the composites industry, it usually refers to wood fiber and agrobased bast, leaf, seed, and stem fibers. These fibers often contribute greatly to the structural performance of the plant and, when used in plastic composites, can provide significant reinforcement. Below...

  5. Modelling of thermally driven groundwater flow in a facility for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsic, Nico; Grundfelt, Bertil [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    In this report calculations are presented of buoyancy driven groundwater flow caused by the emission of residual heat from spent nuclear fuel deposited in deep boreholes from the ground surface in combination with the natural geothermal gradient. This work has been conducted within SKB's programme for evaluation of alternative methods for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The basic safety feature of disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes is that the groundwater at great depth has a higher salinity, and hence a higher density, than more superficial groundwater. The result of this is that the deep groundwater becomes virtually stagnant. The study comprises analyses of the effects of different inter-borehole distances as well as the effect of different permeabilities in the backfill and sealing materials in the borehole and of different shapes of the interface between fresh and saline groundwater. The study is an update of a previous study published in 2006. In the present study, the facility design proposed by Sandia National Laboratories has been studied. In this design, steel canisters containing two BWR elements or one PWR element are stacked on top of each other between 3 and 5 kilometres depth. In order to host all spent fuel from the current Swedish nuclear programme, about 80 such holes are needed. The model used in this study comprises nine boreholes spaced 100 metres alternatively 50 metres apart in a 3{Chi}3 matrix. In one set of calculations the salinity in the groundwater was assumed to increase from zero above 700 metres depth to 10% by weight at 1500 metres depth and below. In another set, a sharper salinity gradient was applied in which the salinity increased from 0 to 10% between 1400 and 1500 metres depth. A geothermal gradient of 16 deg C/km was applied. The heat output from the spent fuel was assumed to decrease by time in manner consistent with the radioactive decay in the fuel. When the inter-borehole distance decreased from

  6. Generating natural language under pragmatic constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Hovy, Eduard H

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing that the generation of natural language is a goal- driven process, where many of the goals are pragmatic (i.e., interpersonal and situational) in nature, this book provides an overview of the role of pragmatics in language generation. Each chapter states a problem that arises in generation, develops a pragmatics-based solution, and then describes how the solution is implemented in PAULINE, a language generator that can produce numerous versions of a single underlying message, depending on its setting.

  7. A buoyancy-based screen of Drosophila larvae for fat-storage mutants reveals a role for Sir2 in coupling fat storage to nutrient availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Reis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has a strong genetic component, but few of the genes that predispose to obesity are known. Genetic screens in invertebrates have the potential to identify genes and pathways that regulate the levels of stored fat, many of which are likely to be conserved in humans. To facilitate such screens, we have developed a simple buoyancy-based screening method for identifying mutant Drosophila larvae with increased levels of stored fat. Using this approach, we have identified 66 genes that when mutated increase organismal fat levels. Among these was a sirtuin family member, Sir2. Sirtuins regulate the storage and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids by deacetylating key regulatory proteins. However, since mammalian sirtuins function in many tissues in different ways, it has been difficult to define their role in energy homeostasis accurately under normal feeding conditions. We show that knockdown of Sir2 in the larval fat body results in increased fat levels. Moreover, using genetic mosaics, we demonstrate that Sir2 restricts fat accumulation in individual cells of the fat body in a cell-autonomous manner. Consistent with this function, changes in the expression of metabolic enzymes in Sir2 mutants point to a shift away from catabolism. Surprisingly, although Sir2 is typically upregulated under conditions of starvation, Sir2 mutant larvae survive better than wild type under conditions of amino-acid starvation as long as sugars are provided. Our findings point to a Sir2-mediated pathway that activates a catabolic response to amino-acid starvation irrespective of the sugar content of the diet.

  8. Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco

    1998-04-01

    Nuclear waste from commercial power plants contains large quantities of plutonium, other fissionable actinides, and long-lived fission products that are potential proliferation concerns and create challenges for the long-term storage. Different strategies for dealing with nuclear waste are being followed by various countries because of their geologic situations and their views on nuclear energy, reprocessing and non-proliferation. The current United States policy is to store unprocessed spent reactor fuel in a geologic repository. Other countries are opting for treatment of nuclear waste, including partial utilization of the fissile material contained in the spent fuel, prior to geologic storage. Long-term uncertainties are hampering the acceptability and eventual licensing of a geologic repository for nuclear spent fuel in the US, and driving up its cost. The greatest concerns are with the potential for radiation release and exposure from the spent fuel for tens of thousands of years and the possible diversion and use of the actinides contained in the waste for weapons construction. Taking advantage of the recent breakthroughs in accelerator technology and of the natural flexibility of subcritical systems, the Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept offers the United States and other countries the possibility to greatly reduce plutonium, higher actinides and environmentally hazardous fission products from the waste stream destined for permanent storage. ATW does not eliminate the need for, but instead enhances the viability of permanent waste repositories. Far from being limited to waste destruction, the ATW concept also brings to the table new technologies that could be relevant for next-generation power producing reactors. In the ATW concept, spent fuel would be shipped to the ATW site where the plutonium, transuranics and selected long-lived fission products would be destroyed by fission or transmutation in their first and only pass through the

  9. Jagtens natur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerris, Mickey; Borkfelt, Sune; Gamborg, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Jagt kan ses som en konfrontation mellem menneskeverdenen og den vilde natur. I dag kan det dog være svært at få øje på det vilde i naturen i et land som Danmark, hvor over 60 % af det samlede areal anvendes til landbrug, og kun få pletter er overladt til sig selv. Ikke desto mindre spiller naturen...... en stor rolle for både jægerne og for de, der forholder sig kritisk til jagt. Der er stor enighed mellem disse parter om, at naturen er noget, vi skal tage vare på – men når det kommer til, hvilken natur der sigtes til, og hvordan vi skal tage vare på den, skilles vandene. Det skal bemærkes, at vi i...

  10. Advances in Optimizing Weather Driven Electric Power Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clack, C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Alexander, A.; Dunbar, A. D.; Xie, Y.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of weather-driven renewable energies for the United States (and global) energy portfolio is growing. The main perceived problems with weather-driven renewable energies are their intermittent nature, low power density, and high costs. The National Energy with Weather System Simulator (NEWS) is a mathematical optimization tool that allows the construction of weather-driven energy sources that will work in harmony with the needs of the system. For example, it will match the electric load, reduce variability, decrease costs, and abate carbon emissions. One important test run included existing US carbon-free power sources, natural gas power when needed, and a High Voltage Direct Current power transmission network. This study shows that the costs and carbon emissions from an optimally designed national system decrease with geographic size. It shows that with achievable estimates of wind and solar generation costs, that the US could decrease its carbon emissions by up to 80% by the early 2030s, without an increase in electric costs. The key requirement would be a 48 state network of HVDC transmission, creating a national market for electricity not possible in the current AC grid. These results were found without the need for storage. Further, we tested the effect of changing natural gas fuel prices on the optimal configuration of the national electric power system. Another test that was carried out was an extension to global regions. The extension study shows that the same properties found in the US study extend to the most populous regions of the planet. The extra test is a simplified version of the US study, and is where much more research can be carried out. We compare our results to other model results.

  11. Introducing Civic-Driven Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Fowler (Alan); K. Biekart (Kees)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground The CDC initiative started from a conviction that the mix and nature of today’s global problems requires a wider range of solutions than those coming from government and market. A missing story is one of people themselves acting as citizens to change the society they live

  12. Phonological Learning with Output-Driven Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    The concept of an output-driven map formally characterizes an intuitive notion about phonology: that disparities between the input and the output are introduced only to the extent necessary to satisfy restrictions on outputs. When all of the grammars definable in a phonological system are output-driven, the implied structure provides significant…

  13. Industry-driven sector roadmaps 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    Industri-driven sector roadmaps 2020: European Technology Platforms in wind and CCS. A new corporate trend on innovation in Europe, supported by The European Commission.......Industri-driven sector roadmaps 2020: European Technology Platforms in wind and CCS. A new corporate trend on innovation in Europe, supported by The European Commission....

  14. Model Driven Architecture - Foundations and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Warmer, J.

    Model-Driven Architecture, including model-driven approaches in general, holds the big promise of moving software development towards a higher level of abstraction. Given the challenges in the software industry of delivering more complex functionality with less effort, I am convinced that it isn’t a

  15. Disentangling Competition Among Platform Driven Strategic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric

    2015-01-01

    competition within platform-driven markets, we opted for the UK mobile payment market as our empirical setting. By embracing the theoretical lens of strategic groups and digital platforms, this study supplements prior research by deriving a taxonomy of platform-driven strategic groups that is grounded...

  16. A soft flying robot driven by a dielectric elastomer actuator (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingxi; Zhang, Hui; Godaba, Hareesh; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Zhu, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Modern unmanned aerial vehicles are gaining promising success because of their versatility, flexibility, and minimized risk of operations. Most of them are normally designed and constructed based on hard components. For example, the body of the vehicle is generally made of aluminum or carbon fibers, and electric motors are adopted as the main actuators. These hard materials are able to offer reasonable balance of structural strength and weight. However, they exhibit apparent limitations. For instance, such robots are fragile in even small clash with surrounding objects. In addition, their noise is quite high due to spinning of rotors or propellers. Here we aim to develop a soft flying robot using soft actuators. Due to its soft body, the robot can work effectively in unstructured environment. The robot may also exhibit interesting attributes, including low weight, low noise, and low power consumption. This robot mainly consists of a dielectric elastomer balloon made of two layers of elastomers. One is VHB (3M), and the other is natural rubber. The balloon is filled with helium, which can make the robot nearly neutral. When voltage is applied to either of the two dielectric elastomers, the balloon expands. So that the buoyance can be larger than the robot's weight, and the robot can move up. In this seminar, we will show how to harness the dielectric breakdown of natural rubber to achieve giant deformation of this soft robot. Based on this method, the robot can move up effectively in air.

  17. Lévy driven moving averages and semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas; Pedersen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to study the semimartingale property of continuous time moving averages driven by Lévy processes. We provide necessary and sufficient conditions on the kernel for the moving average to be a semimartingale in the natural filtration of the Lévy process, and when...... this is the case we also provide a useful representation. Assuming that the driving Lévy process is of unbounded variation, we show that the moving average is a semimartingale if and only if the kernel is absolutely continuous with a density satisfying an integrability condition....

  18. Coherent amplitude modulation of electron-beam-driven Langmuir waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Baumgärtel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A linear approach to the phenomenon of irregular amplitude modulation of beam-driven Langmuir waves, developed in a previous paper, is extended to explain periodic modulation as well. It comes about by beating of the fastest growing mode of the instability with beam-aligned plasma oscillations. They are naturally generated in a uniform domain of beam–plasma interaction prior to the onset of the instability. Particle-in-cell (PIC simulations support the results of the linear analysis.

  19. Electroweak baryogenesis driven by extra top Yukawa couplings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Fuyuto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We study electroweak baryogenesis driven by the top quark in a general two Higgs doublet model with flavor-changing Yukawa couplings, keeping the Higgs potential CP invariant. With Higgs sector couplings and the additional top Yukawa coupling ρtt all of O(1, one naturally has sizable CP violation that fuels the cosmic baryon asymmetry. Even if ρtt vanishes, the favor-changing coupling ρtc can still lead to successful baryogenesis. Phenomenological consequences such as t→ch, τ→μγ electron electric dipole moment, h→γγ, and hhh coupling are discussed.

  20. Electroweak baryogenesis driven by extra top Yukawa couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyuto, Kaori; Hou, Wei-Shu; Senaha, Eibun

    2018-01-01

    We study electroweak baryogenesis driven by the top quark in a general two Higgs doublet model with flavor-changing Yukawa couplings, keeping the Higgs potential CP invariant. With Higgs sector couplings and the additional top Yukawa coupling ρtt all of O(1), one naturally has sizable CP violation that fuels the cosmic baryon asymmetry. Even if ρtt vanishes, the favor-changing coupling ρtc can still lead to successful baryogenesis. Phenomenological consequences such as t → ch, τ → μγ electron electric dipole moment, h → γγ, and hhh coupling are discussed.

  1. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Joel B., E-mail: joel.b.stewart2.civ@mail.mil; Pecora, Collin, E-mail: collin.r.pecora.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.

  2. Flutter-driven triboelectrification for harvesting wind energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jihyun; Lee, Jeongsu; Kim, SeongMin; Ha, Jaewook; Lee, Byoung-Sun; Park, YoungJun; Choong, Chweelin; Kim, Jin-Baek; Wang, Zhong Lin; Kim, Ho-Young; Park, Jong-Jin; Chung, U-In

    2014-09-23

    Technologies to harvest electrical energy from wind have vast potentials because wind is one of the cleanest and most sustainable energy sources that nature provides. Here we propose a flutter-driven triboelectric generator that uses contact electrification caused by the self-sustained oscillation of flags. We study the coupled interaction between a fluttering flexible flag and a rigid plate. In doing so, we find three distinct contact modes: single, double and chaotic. The flutter-driven triboelectric generator having small dimensions of 7.5 × 5 cm at wind speed of 15 ms(-1) exhibits high-electrical performances: an instantaneous output voltage of 200 V and a current of 60 μA with a high frequency of 158 Hz, giving an average power density of approximately 0.86 mW. The flutter-driven triboelectric generation is a promising technology to drive electric devices in the outdoor environments in a sustainable manner.

  3. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Joel B.; Pecora, Collin

    2015-03-01

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs.

  4. Thermocapillary convection around gas bubbles: an important natural effect for the enhancement of heat transfer in liquids under microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, J; Straub, J

    2002-10-01

    In the presence of a temperature gradient at a liquid-gas or liquid-liquid interface, thermocapillary or Marangoni convection develops. This convection is a special type of natural convection that was not paid much attention in heat transfer for a long time, although it is strong enough to drive liquids against the direction of buoyancy on Earth. In a microgravity environment, however, it is the remaining mode of natural convection and supports heat and mass transfer. During boiling in microgravity it was observed at subcooled liquid conditions. Therefore, the question arises about its contribution to heat transfer without phase change. Thermocapillary convection was quantitatively studied at single gas bubbles in various liquids, both experimentally and numerically. A two-dimensional mathematical model described in this article was developed. The coupled mechanism of heat transfer and fluid flow in pure liquids around a single gas bubble was simulated with a control-volume FE-method. The simulation was accompanied and compared with experiments on Earth. The numerical results are in good accordance with the experiments performed on Earth at various Marangoni numbers using various alcohols of varying chain length and Prandtl numbers. As well as calculations on Earth, the numerical method also allows simulations at stationary spherical gas bubbles in a microgravity environment. The results demonstrate that thermocapillary convection is a natural heat transfer mechanism that can partially replace the buoyancy in a microgravity environment, if extreme precautions are taken concerning the purity of the liquids, because impurities accumulate predominantly at the interface. Under Earth conditions, an enhancement of the heat transfer in a liquid volume is even found in the case where thermocapillary flow is counteracted by buoyancy. In particular, the obstructing influence of surface active substances could be observed during the experiments on Earth in water and also in

  5. On fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagren, O (Uppsala Univ., Aangstroem laboratory, div. of electricity, Uppsala (Sweden)); Moiseenko, V.E. (Inst. of Plasma Physics, National Science Center, Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)); Noack, K. (Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany))

    2008-10-15

    This report gives a brief description of ongoing activities on fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive isotopes in the spent nuclear waste from fission reactors. Driven subcritical systems appears to be the only option for efficient minor actinide burning. Driven systems offer a possibility to increase reactor safety margins. A comparatively simple fusion device could be sufficient for a fusion-fission machine, and transmutation may become the first industrial application of fusion. Some alternative schemes to create strong fusion neutron fluxes are presented

  6. Fermi Acceleration in driven relativistic billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Rafael S., E-mail: rsoaresp@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Letelier, Patricio S. [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Computacao Cientifica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-29

    We show numerical experiments of driven billiards using special relativity. We have the remarkable fact that for the relativistic driven circular and annular concentric billiards, depending on initial conditions and parameters, we observe Fermi Acceleration, absent in the Newtonian case. The velocity for these cases tends to the speed of light very quickly. We find that for the annular eccentric billiard the initial velocity grows for a much longer time than the concentric annular billiard until it asymptotically reach c. -- Highlights: → Fermi Acceleration is studied for relativistic driven billiards. → We studied regular and chaotic billiards with different parameters. → Fermi Acceleration is present even for static regular billiards.

  7. DESIGN OF AN EFFICIENT GEAR DRIVEN BICYCLE

    OpenAIRE

    K. Rajasuthan*, G. Balaji, M. Palpandi

    2016-01-01

    In our project bicycle is driven with a series of spur gears which will increase the speed of bicycle and also the bicycles becomes more efficient than a conventional sprocket driven bicycle. Spur gears are used in series to transmit power from the pedal to the rear wheel of the bicycle. This bicycle enables us to put less effort for pedaling. For a very low input effort, we can get maximum output. Distance covered by this gear driven bicycle for few minutes of pedaling will also be 3-4 times...

  8. Natural inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, J.A.

    1991-02-01

    A pseduo-Nambu-Goldstone boson, with a potential of the form V({phi}) = {Lambda}{sup 4}(1 {plus minus} cos({phi}/f)), can naturally give rise to an epoch of inflation in the early universe. Successful inflation can be achieved if f {approximately} m{sub pl} and {Lambda} {approximately} m{sub GUT}. Such mass scales arise in particle physics models with a gauge group that becomes strongly interacting a the GUT scale, e.g., as is expected to happen in the hidden sector of superstring theories. The density fluctuation spectrum is a non-scale-invariant power law, with extra power on large scales. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  9. [Naturalizing empathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decety, J

    2002-01-01

    Empathy is the ability to share emotions with others. It is acknowledged to be a powerful means of tacit communication, a key ingredient in any therapeutic relationship as well as in psychotherapy. Empathy is the cornerstone in the humanist perspective (Ego-psychology) in clinical psychology. This approach is often considered as poorly grounded on scientific and objective evidence. It is however acknowledged that empathetic therapists are more effective than less empathetic therapists. I shall argue that this paradox, i.e. it is the least scientific and the less validated psychotherapeutic approach that is the most efficient, can be eliminated if one considers the nature of empathy, its biological foundation, its evolutionary origin and its cognitive architecture. In this paper I will suggest that empathy is based on specific information processing modules which have been designed by natural selection to cope with social regularities in expressing and reading emotional states. This has provided adaptive benefits to individuals living in large groups bestowing them with mechanisms for cooperativity, altruism and more generally various aspects of prosocial behaviour. The capacity to express emotions, and to read and understand emotions of others also ensures implicit communication with others and may be at the root of intersubjectivity. This perspective on empathy is then articulated with two concurrent hypotheses regarding theory of mind (the simulation and the theory-theory) which aim to explain the human capacity to understand that the behaviors of other intelligent agents are caused by intentions, desires and beliefs. In this context, empathy can be considered as a simulation (or analogical) process that is necessary to understand but not sufficient to interpret other people. This last issue is relevant to clinical practice.

  10. Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems - Editorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    The special issue of Ecological complexity journal on Fractal Modeling and Scaling in Natural Systems contains representative examples of the status and evolution of data-driven research into fractals and scaling in complex natural systems. The editorial discusses contributions to understanding rela...

  11. PC analysis of stochastic differential equations driven by Wiener noise

    KAUST Repository

    Le Maitre, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    A polynomial chaos (PC) analysis with stochastic expansion coefficients is proposed for stochastic differential equations driven by additive or multiplicative Wiener noise. It is shown that for this setting, a Galerkin formalism naturally leads to the definition of a hierarchy of stochastic differential equations governing the evolution of the PC modes. Under the mild assumption that the Wiener and uncertain parameters can be treated as independent random variables, it is also shown that the Galerkin formalism naturally separates parametric uncertainty and stochastic forcing dependences. This enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the process variance, and consequently identify contributions arising from the uncertainty in parameters, the stochastic forcing, and a coupled term. Insight gained from this decomposition is illustrated in light of implementation to simplified linear and non-linear problems; the case of a stochastic bifurcation is also considered.

  12. Changing Literacies and Civic Pathways: Multiliteracies in Inquiry-Driven Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seglem, Robyn; Garcia, Antero

    2018-01-01

    Reflecting on how "the very nature of language learning has changed"(New London Group [NLG], 1996, p. 64), this article describes an inquiry-driven teaching approach to middle school English. Looking at student outcomes utilizing Google's 20% approach, this study explored how mentorship, digital tools, and student interests provide…

  13. Using Rare Earth Elements (REE) to determine wind-driven soil dispersal from a point source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although erosion of soil by water is a predictably directional process, the erosion of soil by wind is determined by wind direction on an event-wise basis. The wind-driven dispersal patterns of chemical constituents including natural soil components and anthropogenic contaminants are not well under...

  14. Design criteria for driven piles in permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Past placment of structural foundation support piles in frozen soils generally has been performed using drilled and slurry backfill techniques. The early success of specially modified H-pile structural shapes driven into permafrost, and the promise o...

  15. Distributed simulation a model driven engineering approach

    CERN Document Server

    Topçu, Okan; Oğuztüzün, Halit; Yilmaz, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Backed by substantive case studies, the novel approach to software engineering for distributed simulation outlined in this text demonstrates the potent synergies between model-driven techniques, simulation, intelligent agents, and computer systems development.

  16. Data-Driven Problems in Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, S.; Müller, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2018-01-01

    We consider a new class of problems in elasticity, referred to as Data-Driven problems, defined on the space of strain-stress field pairs, or phase space. The problem consists of minimizing the distance between a given material data set and the subspace of compatible strain fields and stress fields in equilibrium. We find that the classical solutions are recovered in the case of linear elasticity. We identify conditions for convergence of Data-Driven solutions corresponding to sequences of approximating material data sets. Specialization to constant material data set sequences in turn establishes an appropriate notion of relaxation. We find that relaxation within this Data-Driven framework is fundamentally different from the classical relaxation of energy functions. For instance, we show that in the Data-Driven framework the relaxation of a bistable material leads to material data sets that are not graphs.

  17. Test-driven development with Django

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This book is for Django developers with little or no knowledge of test-driven development or testing in general. Familiarity with the command line, setting up a Python virtual environment, and starting a Django project are assumed.

  18. Metamaterial light sources driven by electron beams

    OpenAIRE

    ADAMO, G.; MacDonald, K. F.; De Angelis, F.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a new generation of free-space and fibre-coupled tuneable light sources based on nanostructured photonic metamaterials driven by free-electrons beams. Emission wavelengths are determined by metamaterial resonant modes and electron energies

  19. Value Driven Information Processing and Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Report Value Driven Information Processing and Fusion Award Number: W911NF1210383 Biao Chen ( PI ) Phone: (315)443-3332 Email: bichen@syr.edu Syracuse...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The objective of the project is to develop a general framework for value driven decentralized information processing...information value metrics as called for by different inference tasks. Major theoretical breakthroughs have been obtained under this effort

  20. Management Control and Employee-Driven Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    LI, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Organizations increasingly empower their employees to conduct local experimentation and generate innovation ideas. The aim of this dissertation is to understand the role of management control mechanisms in motivating and managing employee-driven innovation. Specifically, I provide empirical evidence – both quantitative and qualitative – on the specific channels and mechanisms through which employee-driven innovation is facilitated within real-world settings. In the first chapter of my di...

  1. Chaos driven by interfering memory

    CERN Document Server

    Perrard, Stéphane; Fort, Emmanuel; Couder, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The transmission of information can couple two entities of very different nature, one of them serving as a memory for the other. Here we study the situation in which information is stored in a wave field and serves as a memory that pilots the dynamics of a particle. Such a system can be implemented by a bouncing drop generating surface waves sustained by a parametric forcing. The motion of the resulting "walker" when confined in a harmonic potential well is generally disordered. Here we show that these trajectories correspond to chaotic regimes characterized by intermittent transitions between a discrete set of states. At any given time, the system is in one of these states characterized by a double quantization of size and angular momentum. A low dimensional intermittency determines their respective probabilities. They thus form an eigenstate basis of decomposition for what would be observed as a superposition of states if all measurements were intrusive.

  2. Differentiated heated lid driven cavity interacting with tube: A lattice Boltzmann study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennacer Rachid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple-relaxation-time (MRT lattice-Boltzmann method is implemented to investigate combined natural and forced convection occurring in a two-dimensional square cavity. The top wall slides to the right at constant speed, while the other three remain stationary. The solution is performed for a left vertical wall at a constant temperature, which is higher than of the right wall. This yields a “cooperating” case, in which dynamic and buoyancy forces are added together. The enclosure is filled with air and contains a heat conducting circular cylinder, which is placed at various positions. The double distribution model used in lattice Boltzmann methods has been adopted to simulate the hydrodynamic and thermal fields, with the D2Q9 and D2Q5 lattices selected to perform the corresponding computations. Simulations have been conducted over a wide range of Rayleigh (Ra and Reynolds (Re numbers, and the features of dynamic and thermal fields are presented for the spectra of this mixed convection phenomenon. The flow and heat transfer characteristics of the cylinder position are described and analyzed in terms of the average Nusselt number (Nu. The computed results show the influence of the cylinder on the corresponding heat transfer in the enclosure. It has been found that the power (i.e. shear stress needed to lid the upper surface will depend on the governing parameters.

  3. Effect of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux on buoyancy MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of Joule heating and thermal radiation impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonchi, A. S.; Ganji, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, buoyancy MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of Joule heating and thermal radiation impacts, are studied. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model instead of conventional Fourier's law of heat conduction is applied to investigate the heat transfer characteristics. A similarity transformation is used to transmute the governing momentum and energy equations into non-linear ordinary differential equations with the appropriate boundary conditions. The obtained non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. The impacts of diverse active parameters such as the magnetic parameter, the radiation parameter, the buoyancy parameter, the heat source parameter, the volume fraction of nanofluid and the thermal relaxation parameter are examined on the velocity and temperature profiles. In addition, the value of the Nusselt number is calculated and presented through figures. The results demonstrate that the temperature profile is lower in the case of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model as compared to Fourier's law. Moreover, the Nusselt number raises with the raising volume fraction of nanofluid and it abates with the ascending the radiation parameter.

  4. Ventilation Surge Techniques. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Whon Data Rntere), 20. The experimental program examined airflow patterns for both mechanically driven and thermally driven ventilation . Mechanical ...were used in the study. *The experimental program examined airflow patterns for both mechanically driven and thermally driven ventilation . Mechanical ... Ventilation can be supplied by mechanical means such as fans, blowers, and pumps or by natural forces such’as those created by wind or thermal buoyancy. The

  5. BUD31 and Lipid Metabolism: A New Potential Therapeutic Entry Point for Myc-Driven Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0039 TITLE: BUD31 and Lipid Metabolism: A New Potential Therapeutic Entry Point for Myc-Driven Breast Cancer...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER BUD31 and Lipid Metabolism: A New Potential Therapeutic Entry Point for Myc-Driven Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT...manuscript in Nature detailing a role for BUD31 in splicing and shown more broadly that splicing is a viable therapeutic intervention point for myc

  6. Nature and nature values in organic agriculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Noe, Egon; Højring, Katrine

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between agriculture and nature is a centra issue in the current agricultural debate. Organic farming has ambitions and a special potential in relation to nature. Consideration for nature is part of the guiding principals of organic farming and many organic farmers are committed...... to protecting natural qualities. However, the issue of nature, landscape, and land use is not straightforward. Nature is an ambiguous concept that involves multiple interests and actors reaching far beyond farmers. The Danish research project ......

  7. Effect of fixed separation points on wake oscillation and surface character in suppression of the Karman vortex street due to positive buoyancy from a cylinder; Hakuriten kotei buttai kara no seifuryoku ni yoru karman uzuretsu no hokai shometsu deno koryu shindo to hyomen tokusei no tokucho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noto, K.; Nakajima, T. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Egneineering; Fujimoto, K. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)

    2000-05-25

    To elucidate an effect of fixed separation points on the wake oscillation and surface character in the suppression of the Karman vortex street due to positive buoyancy, a wake with positive buoyancy from a heated elliptic cylinder submerged in an upward air mainstream is calculated by numerical analysis. Numerical results agree well with the previous result for the isothermal wake, and show that separation points are exactly fixed with time and do not move by buoyancy. The critical Richardson number Ri{sub c} is much larger than that in a circular cylinder wake. This means that the wake vorticity is larger and harder to disappear than that in the circular cylinder wake. With an increase of the Richardson number, the local Nusselt number and wall shear stress vary with time between separation points, and the mean Nusselt number decreases near Ri{sub c}, which dose not occur in a circular cylinder wake. (author)

  8. Current-driven and field-driven domain walls at nonzero temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314406913; van Driel, H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315885114; de Morais Smith, C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836346; Duine, R.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127

    2009-01-01

    We present a model for the dynamics of current-driven and field-driven domain-wall lines at nonzero temperature. We compute thermally averaged drift velocities from the Fokker-Planck equation that describes the nonzero-temperature dynamics of the domain wall. As special limits of this general

  9. Test-driven modeling of embedded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Allan; Madsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To benefit maximally from model-based systems engineering (MBSE) trustworthy high quality models are required. From the software disciplines it is known that test-driven development (TDD) can significantly increase the quality of the products. Using a test-driven approach with MBSE may have...... a similar positive effect on the quality of the system models and the resulting products and may therefore be desirable. To define a test-driven model-based systems engineering (TD-MBSE) approach, we must define this approach for numerous sub disciplines such as modeling of requirements, use cases......, scenarios, behavior, architecture, etc. In this paper we present a method that utilizes the formalism of timed automatons with formal and statistical model checking techniques to apply TD-MBSE to the modeling of system architecture and behavior. The results obtained from applying it to an industrial case...

  10. Taylor dispersion in wind-driven current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wang, Ping; Jiang, Wei-Quan; Zeng, Li; Li, Zhi; Chen, G. Q.

    2017-12-01

    Taylor dispersion associated with wind-driven currents in channels, shallow lakes and estuaries is essential to hydrological environmental management. For solute dispersion in a wind-driven current, presented in this paper is an analytical study of the evolution of concentration distribution. The concentration moments are intensively derived for an accurate presentation of the mean concentration distribution, up to the effect of kurtosis. The vertical divergence of concentration is then deduced by Gill's method of series expansion up to the fourth order. Based on the temporal evolution of the vertical concentration distribution, the dispersion process in the wind-driven current is concretely characterized. The uniform shear leads to a special symmetrical distribution of mean concentration free of skewness. The non-uniformity of vertical concentration is caused by convection and smeared out gradually by the effect of diffusion, but fails to disappear even at large times.

  11. Natural hydrocarbon seeps observation with underwater gliders and UV fluorescence sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochet, V.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrocarbons may leak to the near-surface from subsurface accumulations, from mature source rock, or by buoyancy along major cross-strata routes. The presence of migrating near-surface hydrocarbons can provide strong evidence for the presence of a working petroleum system, as well as valuable information on source, maturity, and migration pathways. Detection and characterization of hydrocarbons in the water column may then help to de-risk hydrocarbon plays at a very preliminary stage of an exploration program. In order to detect hydrocarbons in the water column, an underwater glider survey was conducted in an offshore frontier area. Driven by buoyancy variation, underwater gliders enable collecting data autonomously along the water column for weeks to months. Underwater gliders are regularly piloted from shore by satellite telemetry and do not require a surface supervising vessel resulting in substantial operational costs savings. The data compiled, over 700m depth of the water column, included temperature, salinity, pressure, dissolved oxygen and hydrocarbon components (phenanthrene and naphthalene) measured by "MINIFLUO" sensors to particularly target representative crude oil compounds Two gliders were deployed at sea, one from coast in shallow water and the other one offshore on the survey area. Both accurately squared the survey area following pre-defined lines and cross lines. Data files were transmitted by satellite telemetry in near real time during the performance of the mission for real time observations and appropriate re-positioning of the gliders. Using rechargeable underwater gliders increased reliability reducing the risk of leakage and associated logistics during operation at sea. Despite strong evidences of seabed seepages such as pockmarks, faults, etc, over the area of interest, no hydrocarbon indices were detected in the water column, which was confirmed later by seabed sample analysis. The use of glider platforms for hydrocarbon detection has

  12. 14 CFR 36.9 - Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. 36.9 Section 36.9 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL... AIRWORTHINESS CERTIFICATION General § 36.9 Acoustical change: Propeller-driven small airplanes and propeller-driven commuter category airplanes. For propeller-driven small airplanes in the primary, normal, utility...

  13. Semantic Web and Model-Driven Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Parreiras, Fernando S

    2012-01-01

    The next enterprise computing era will rely on the synergy between both technologies: semantic web and model-driven software development (MDSD). The semantic web organizes system knowledge in conceptual domains according to its meaning. It addresses various enterprise computing needs by identifying, abstracting and rationalizing commonalities, and checking for inconsistencies across system specifications. On the other side, model-driven software development is closing the gap among business requirements, designs and executables by using domain-specific languages with custom-built syntax and se

  14. User Driven Innovation in the Building Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansson, Per; Sørensen, Kristian Birch; Rødtness, Mette

    2008-01-01

    to introduction of advanced information and communication technology (ICT). The paper focuses on creative changes of the building process powered by user driven innovation activities. An overview of existing user driven innovation methodologies is given as well experiences from the ongoing Virtual Innovation...... in Construction (VIC) project. One important driving force for change is the opportunity for users to develop and articulate real needs concerning for example different functionalities of a building and its parts, but also on artifacts supporting the actual needs capture and requirements formulation during...... building design. A general methodological framework and meta ontology for Virtual Innovation in Construction is presented as well as findings from implementation of the method....

  15. Scripted Bodies and Spline Driven Animation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erleben, Kenny; Henriksen, Knud

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we will take a close look at the details and technicalities in applying spline driven animation to scripted bodies in the context of dynamic simulation. The main contributions presented in this paper are methods for computing velocities and accelerations in the time domain of the sp......In this paper we will take a close look at the details and technicalities in applying spline driven animation to scripted bodies in the context of dynamic simulation. The main contributions presented in this paper are methods for computing velocities and accelerations in the time domain...

  16. Advances in Electrically Driven Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Electrically Driven Thermal Management is a vibrant technology development initiative incorporating ISS based technology demonstrations, development of innovative fluid management techniques and fundamental research efforts. The program emphasizes high temperature high heat flux thermal management required for future generations of RF electronics and power electronic devices. This presentation reviews i.) preliminary results from the Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) Long Term Flight Demonstration launched on STP-H5 payload in February 2017 ii.) advances in liquid phase flow distribution control iii.) development of the Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment under the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program.

  17. Defining and Supporting Narrative-driven Recommendation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine; Koolen, Marijn

    2017-01-01

    of the user's past transactions as well as a narrative description of their current interest(s). Through an analysis of a set of real-world recommendation narratives from the LibraryThing forums, we demonstrate the uniqueness and richness of this scenario and highlight common patterns and properties......: evaluating recommended items never takes place in a vacuum, and it is often a single step in the user's more complex background task. In this paper, we define a specific type of recommendation scenario called narrative-driven recommendation, where the recommendation process is driven by both a log...... of such narratives....

  18. Test and Behaviour Driven Development with Python

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Experience has taught us that bugs are impossible to avoid when programming. Specially on continuous delivery processes where there are new versions that refactor or incorporate new modules to the project. Although, there are different tools which help us to ensure code quality by enabling developers to catch bugs while still in the development stage. In this talk, I will talk about Test-driven development(TDD) and Behaviour-Driven development (BDD) methodologies focused on web development. Also, I will present an overview of unit testing tools as Selenium or Behave, which help us to produce working software, with fewer bugs, quickly and consistently.

  19. Motor-Driven Giant Magnetostrictive Actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lihui; Xia, Yongming; Lu, Kaiyuan

    2015-01-01

    to produce the desired magnetic field when an output strain should be maintained. The GMA does not produce any mechanical power in this condition, but constant power is being consumed by the excitation coil. This paper presents a new type of motor-driven GMA (MDGMA), which works in a coil-free driven manner....... The magnetic field in the iron-gallium alloy (Galfenol), which is a type of magnetostrictive material, is periodically altered by rotating the permanent magnets instead of varying the coil current in the traditional GMA. The proposed MDGMA not only achieves continuous adjustment of the output strain, but can...

  20. Test-driven development with Mockito

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Sujoy

    2013-01-01

    This book is a hands-on guide, full of practical examples to illustrate the concepts of Test Driven Development.If you are a developer who wants to develop software following Test Driven Development using Mockito and leveraging various Mockito features, this book is ideal for you. You don't need prior knowledge of TDD, Mockito, or JUnit.It is ideal for developers, who have some experience in Java application development as well as a basic knowledge of unit testing, but it covers the basic fundamentals of TDD and JUnit testing to get you acquainted with these concepts before delving into them.

  1. Effects of Buoyancy Forces on Immiscible Water/Oil Displacements in a Vertically Oriented Porous Medium Effets des facteurs de flottabilité sur les déplacements non-miscibles eau/huile dans un milieu poreux vertical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirunavu S. R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of buoyancy forces on liquid-liquid displacement processes occurring in porous media are important in a variety of practical situations, in particular during the displacement of oil from partially-depleted underground reservoirs by means of aqueous solutions. Most previous studies involving the visualization of water/oil displacements in porous media have been undertaken in horizontal two-dimensional porous medium cells. The objective of the present work was to determine the effects of buoyancy forces; on the fingering pattern and oil recovery by conducting immiscible displacement experiments in two-dimensional consolidated porous medium cells aligned in the vertical plane. In order to obtain a clear understanding of the favourable and unfavourable effects of buoyancy forces, experiments were carried out in three different flow modes, namely horizontal, vertical upward, and vertical downward. As the effects of buoyancy forces are negligible for two-dimensional porous media in the horizontal flow mode, the recoveries obtained in this mode were used as a reference for comparison with those obtained in the two vertical modes. Displacements using five different density ratios were studied. The breakthrough time and percentage oil recovery were measured in each case. The effects of buoyancy forces, viscous forces, and capillary forces, as well as the injection flow rate, were also recorded. The results obtained indicate that the effects of buoyancy forces are very pronounced at low flow rates and low oil/water density ratios, and that even a slight increase in the flow rate causes the buoyancy forces to rapidly become less significant. Les facteurs de flottabilité exercent un effet important sur les déplacements liquide/liquide en milieu poreux dans toute une gamme de situations pratiques, en particulier lorsqu'on veut déplacer l'huile de roches réservoirs partiellement épuisées à l'aide de solutions aqueuses. La plupart des

  2. Fluid-driven origami-inspired artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuguang; Vogt, Daniel M.; Rus, Daniela; Wood, Robert J.

    2017-12-01

    Artificial muscles hold promise for safe and powerful actuation for myriad common machines and robots. However, the design, fabrication, and implementation of artificial muscles are often limited by their material costs, operating principle, scalability, and single-degree-of-freedom contractile actuation motions. Here we propose an architecture for fluid-driven origami-inspired artificial muscles. This concept requires only a compressible skeleton, a flexible skin, and a fluid medium. A mechanical model is developed to explain the interaction of the three components. A fabrication method is introduced to rapidly manufacture low-cost artificial muscles using various materials and at multiple scales. The artificial muscles can be programed to achieve multiaxial motions including contraction, bending, and torsion. These motions can be aggregated into systems with multiple degrees of freedom, which are able to produce controllable motions at different rates. Our artificial muscles can be driven by fluids at negative pressures (relative to ambient). This feature makes actuation safer than most other fluidic artificial muscles that operate with positive pressures. Experiments reveal that these muscles can contract over 90% of their initial lengths, generate stresses of ˜600 kPa, and produce peak power densities over 2 kW/kg—all equal to, or in excess of, natural muscle. This architecture for artificial muscles opens the door to rapid design and low-cost fabrication of actuation systems for numerous applications at multiple scales, ranging from miniature medical devices to wearable robotic exoskeletons to large deployable structures for space exploration.

  3. Semantic Model Driven Architecture Based Method for Enterprise Application Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minghui; Ying, Jing; Yan, Hui

    Enterprise applications have the requirements of meeting dynamic businesses processes and adopting lasted technologies flexibly, with to solve the problems caused by the nature of heterogeneous characteristic. Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) is becoming a leading paradigm for business process integration. This research work focuses on business process modeling, proposes a semantic model-driven development method named SMDA combined with the Ontology and Model-Driven Architecture (MDA) technologies. The architecture of SMDA is presented in three orthogonal perspectives. (1) Vertical axis is the MDA 4 layers, the focus is UML profiles in M2 (meta-model layer) for ontology modeling, and three abstract levels: CIM, PIM and PSM modeling respectively. (2) Horizontal axis is different concerns involved in the development: Process, Application, Information, Organization, and Technology. (3) Traversal Axis is referred to aspects that have influence on other models of the cross-cutting axis: Architecture, Semantics, Aspect, and Pattern. The paper also introduces the modeling and transformation process in SMDA, and describes dynamic service composition supports briefly.

  4. Towards the Development of a Hybrid Parser for Natural Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Jaf, Sardar F.; Ramsay, Allan

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand natural languages, we have to be able to determine the relations between words, in other words we have to be able to 'parse' the input text. This is a difficult task, especially for Arabic, which has a number of properties that make it particularly difficult to handle. There are two approaches to parsing natural languages: grammar-driven and data-driven. Each of these approaches poses its own set of problems, which we discuss in this paper. The goal of our work is t...

  5. Spatiotemporal neurodynamics underlying internally and externally driven temporal prediction: a high spatial resolution ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mento, Giovanni; Tarantino, Vincenza; Vallesi, Antonino; Bisiacchi, Patrizia Silvia

    2015-03-01

    Temporal prediction (TP) is a flexible and dynamic cognitive ability. Depending on the internal or external nature of information exploited to generate TP, distinct cognitive and brain mechanisms are engaged with the same final goal of reducing uncertainty about the future. In this study, we investigated the specific brain mechanisms involved in internally and externally driven TP. To this end, we employed an experimental paradigm purposely designed to elicit and compare externally and internally driven TP and a combined approach based on the application of a distributed source reconstruction modeling on a high spatial resolution electrophysiological data array. Specific spatiotemporal ERP signatures were identified, with significant modulation of contingent negative variation and frontal late sustained positivity in external and internal TP contexts, respectively. These different electrophysiological patterns were supported by the engagement of distinct neural networks, including a left sensorimotor and a prefrontal circuit for externally and internally driven TP, respectively.

  6. Design of video quality metrics with multi-way data analysis a data driven approach

    CERN Document Server

    Keimel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This book proposes a data-driven methodology using multi-way data analysis for the design of video-quality metrics. It also enables video- quality metrics to be created using arbitrary features. This data- driven design approach not only requires no detailed knowledge of the human visual system, but also allows a proper consideration of the temporal nature of video using a three-way prediction model, corresponding to the three-way structure of video. Using two simple example metrics, the author demonstrates not only that this purely data- driven approach outperforms state-of-the-art video-quality metrics, which are often optimized for specific properties of the human visual system, but also that multi-way data analysis methods outperform the combination of two-way data analysis methods and temporal pooling. .

  7. Order and Symmetry Breaking in the Fluctuations of Driven Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizón-Escamilla, N.; Pérez-Espigares, C.; Garrido, P. L.; Hurtado, P. I.

    2017-09-01

    Dynamical phase transitions (DPTs) in the space of trajectories are one of the most intriguing phenomena of nonequilibrium physics, but their nature in realistic high-dimensional systems remains puzzling. Here we observe for the first time a DPT in the current vector statistics of an archetypal two-dimensional (2D) driven diffusive system and characterize its properties using the macroscopic fluctuation theory. The complex interplay among the external field, anisotropy, and vector currents in 2D leads to a rich phase diagram, with different symmetry-broken fluctuation phases separated by lines of first- and second-order DPTs. Remarkably, different types of 1D order in the form of jammed density waves emerge to hinder transport for low-current fluctuations, revealing a connection between rare events and self-organized structures which enhance their probability.

  8. Visible light driven plasmonic photochemistry on nano-textured silver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Jaspreet; Guay, Jean-Michel; Krupin, Oleksiy; Variola, Fabio; Berini, Pierre; Weck, Arnaud

    2017-12-20

    Plasmon assisted generation of silver sulfate from dodecanethiol is demonstrated on a nano-textured silver substrate with a strong surface plasmon resonance in the visible range. The observed photo-physical processes are attributed to hot charge carriers that are generated from the excitation of surface plasmon resonances using 532 nm laser light. Excited charge carriers are responsible for cleaving the alkane chain, and for generating reactive oxygen species which rapidly photooxidize the exposed sulfur atoms. The ability to drive photochemical reactions with photon energies in the visible range rather than in the UV, on nano-textured silver surfaces, will enable researchers to study photochemical transformations for a wide variety of applications. The strong optical absorbance across the visible range, combined with the fact that the substrates can be fabricated over large areas, naturally makes them candidates for solar driven photochemical applications, and for large scale plasmonic reactors.

  9. Networks and emotion-driven user communities at popular blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, M.; Paltoglou, G.; Tadić, B.

    2010-10-01

    Online communications at web portals represents technology-mediated user interactions, leading to massive data and potentially new techno-social phenomena not seen in real social mixing. Apart from being dynamically driven, the user interactions via posts is indirect, suggesting the importance of the contents of the posted material. We present a systematic way to study Blog data by combined approaches of physics of complex networks and computer science methods of text analysis. We are mapping the Blog data onto a bipartite network where users and posts with comments are two natural partitions. With the machine learning methods we classify the texts of posts and comments for their emotional contents as positive or negative, or otherwise objective (neutral). Using the spectral methods of weighted bipartite graphs, we identify topological communities featuring the users clustered around certain popular posts, and underly the role of emotional contents in the emergence and evolution of these communities.

  10. Levels of processing and Eye Movements: A Stimulus driven approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvey, Fiona Bríd

    2014-01-01

    movements from the effect of the changing nature of the stimulus is difficult. Characterising and confirming the parameters of levels of processing in eye movements requires measures with the explicit intention of systematically varying task demands while also taking account of individual differences....... This series of studies attempts to provide explanatory information for previous findings that saccade amplitude and fixation duration are indicative of levels of processing and to isolate top down influences on eye movements with a stimulus driven approach. This approach involves developing measures suitable...... to investigate individual differences in levels of processing within the normal population using existing constructs and tests of cognitive style. Study 4 investigates these stimuli and the eye movements of a clinical group with known interruption to the dorsal stream of processing, and subsequent isolated...

  11. Polarization control at spin-driven ferroelectric domain walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Naëmi; Bergman, Anders; Cano, Andres; Poudel, Narayan; Lorenz, Bernd; Fiebig, Manfred; Meier, Dennis

    2015-04-14

    Unusual electronic states arise at ferroelectric domain walls due to the local symmetry reduction, strain gradients and electrostatics. This particularly applies to improper ferroelectrics, where the polarization is induced by a structural or magnetic order parameter. Because of the subordinate nature of the polarization, the rigid mechanical and electrostatic boundary conditions that constrain domain walls in proper ferroics are lifted. Here we show that spin-driven ferroelectricity promotes the emergence of charged domain walls. This provides new degrees of flexibility for controlling domain-wall charges in a deterministic and reversible process. We create and position a domain wall by an electric field in Mn0.95Co0.05WO4. With a magnetic field we then rotate the polarization and convert neutral into charged domain walls, while its magnetic properties peg the wall to its location. Using atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert simulations we quantify the polarization changes across the two wall types and highlight their general occurrence.

  12. Message framing and mammography screening: a theory-driven intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Lila J; Iannotti, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Although the rising incidence of breast cancer has prompted a surge of intervention strategies aimed at increasing women's use of mammography screening, the majority of patient-directed interventions have not been driven by relevant theoretical work on persuasive health communication. The authors evaluated an intervention derived from prospect theory that was designed to increase women's adherence to recommendations for annual mammography screening. They sent 1 of 3 reminder letters (positive frame, negative frame, or standard hospital prompt) to 929 randomly selected women who were due for mammography screening and had been identified as having either a positive or negative family history of breast cancer. The primary hypothesis that women with a positive history would be more responsive to negatively framed messages, whereas women with a negative history would be more responsive to positively framed letters, was not confirmed. The lack of support for predictions derived from prospect theory raises important questions about the generalizability of laboratory research to natural settings.

  13. WDDM - a wafer scale data driven multiprocessor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirazi, B.

    1985-01-01

    It has been shown that the existing von-Neumann design machines fail to meet the requirements of the real time scientific and 5th generation applications. A computer organization, such as data driven architecture, which embeds parallelism in its definition and underlying design is needed to satisfy such requirements. In this project, a new data driven multiprocessor is introduced which: (i) eliminates some of the problems of the existing data driven systems; (ii) takes advantage of state of the art technology; and (iii) takes advantage of state-of the art technology; and (iii) achieves parallelism at the data, instruction, and program block levels. This system consists of n processing modules, a host module, and a data structure module, connected via a double star network with the host and the data structure modules in the center of the stars. Processing modules are capable of the simultaneous execution of the independent program blocks in data driven fashion. The host module is responsible for memory management tasks, while the data structure module facilitates the manipulation of the data structures.

  14. Light-driven robotics for nanoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    2013-01-01

    The science fiction inspired shrinking of macro-scale robotic manipulation and handling down to the micro- and nanoscale regime opens new doors for exploiting the forces and torques of light for micro- and nanoscopic probing, actuation and control. Advancing light-driven micro-robotics requires...... and matter for robotically probing at the smallest biological length scales....

  15. Experience-Driven plasticity in binocular vision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, P. Christiaan; Brascamp, Jan W.; Blake, Randolph; van Wezel, Richard Jack Anton

    2010-01-01

    Experience-driven neuronal plasticity allows the brain to adapt its functional connectivity to recent sensory input. Here we use binocular rivalry [1], an experimental paradigm in which conflicting images are presented to the individual eyes, to demonstrate plasticity in the neuronal mechanisms that

  16. Experience-driven plasticity in binocular vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klink, P. Christiaan; Brascamp, Jan W.; Blake, Randolph; van Wezel, Richard J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Experience-driven neuronal plasticity allows the brain to adapt its functional connectivity to recent sensory input. Here we use binocular rivalry [1], an experimental paradigm where conflicting images are presented to the individual eyes, to demonstrate plasticity in the neuronal mechanisms that convert visual information from two separated retinas into single perceptual experiences. Perception during binocular rivalry tended to initially consist of alternations between exclusive representations of monocularly defined images, but upon prolonged exposure, mixture percepts became more prevalent. The completeness of suppression, reflected in the incidence of mixture percepts, plausibly reflects the strength of inhibition that likely plays a role in binocular rivalry [2]. Recovery of exclusivity was possible, but required highly specific binocular stimulation. Documenting the prerequisites for these observed changes in perceptual exclusivity, our experiments suggest experience-driven plasticity at interocular inhibitory synapses, driven by the (lack of) correlated activity of neurons representing the conflicting stimuli. This form of plasticity is consistent with a previously proposed, but largely untested, anti-Hebbian learning mechanism for inhibitory synapses in vision [3, 4]. Our results implicate experience-driven plasticity as one governing principle in the neuronal organization of binocular vision. PMID:20674360

  17. Quantitative system validation in model driven design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermanns, Hilger; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Raskin, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    The European STREP project Quasimodo1 develops theory, techniques and tool components for handling quantitative constraints in model-driven development of real-time embedded systems, covering in particular real-time, hybrid and stochastic aspects. This tutorial highlights the advances made, focus...

  18. Functionality-driven fractionation of lupin seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghout, J.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Functionality-driven fractionation of lupin seeds

    The growth in the world population requires an increase in the production of protein-rich foods from plant-based materials. Lupin seeds have potential to become a novel plant protein source for food products because they are

  19. Failure-probability driven dose painting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Håkansson, Katrin; Due, Anne K

    2013-01-01

    To demonstrate a data-driven dose-painting strategy based on the spatial distribution of recurrences in previously treated patients. The result is a quantitative way to define a dose prescription function, optimizing the predicted local control at constant treatment intensity. A dose planning study...

  20. Radical production inside an acoustically driven microbubble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stricker, L.; Lohse, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The chemical production of radicals inside acoustically driven bubbles is determined by the local temperature inside the bubbles and by their composition at collapse. By means of a previously validated ordinary differential equations (ODE) model [L. Stricker, A. Prosperetti, D. Lohse, Validation of

  1. Dynamics of a stochastically driven running sandpile

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, T; Eckhardt, B

    1994-01-01

    We analyze in detail a one-dimensional stochastically driven running sandpile. The dynamics shows three different phases, depending on the on-site relaxation rate and stochastic driving rate. Two phases are characterized by the presence of travelling waves. The third shows algebraic relaxation.

  2. Data-driven regionalization of housing markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbich, M.; Brunauer, W.; Hagenauer, J.; Leitner, M.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a data-driven framework for housing market segmentation. Local marginal house price surfaces are investigated by means of mixed geographically weighted regression and are reduced to a set of principal component maps, which in turn serve as input for spatial regionalization. The

  3. Kinetic energy driven pairing in cuprate superconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maier, TA; Jarrell, M; Macridin, A; Slezak, C

    2004-01-01

    Pairing occurs in conventional superconductors through a reduction of the electronic potential energy accompanied by an increase in kinetic energy. In the underdoped cuprates, optical experiments show that pairing is driven by a reduction of the electronic kinetic energy. Using the dynamical cluster

  4. Microfabrication of Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-04-07

    We discuss the potential for using microfabrication techniques for laser-driven accelerator construction. We introduce microfabrication processes in general, and then describe our investigation of a particular trial process. We conclude by considering the issues microfabrication raises for possible future structures.

  5. Evaluation of a Natural Ventilation Configuration at a Public Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papakonstantinou, K.; Belias, C.; Vlachakis, N.; Statharas, I.

    2007-12-01

    Wind is regarded as the popular passive cooling resource against hot climate in summer. It can transfer heat from human bodies, when the air temperature is lower than the skin temperature. This concept works indoors as well as outdoors. The present paper refers to the numerical simulation of air velocity and temperature concerning single—sided naturally ventilated buildings and more specifically the special case in which air from the external environment is brought inside the building through openings that have the same direction. The paper draws attention to the physical procedures governing air movement during the single—sided natural ventilation. The study presents a mathematical model, implemented in a general computer code, that can provide detailed information on velocity and temperature, prevailing in three-dimensional single—sided ventilated buildings with openings of any geometrical complexity, for given external meteorological conditions. The mathematical model involves the partial differential equations governing flow and heat transfer, in large enclosures. Turbulent flow is simulated and buoyancy effects are taken into account.

  6. Fragile fate of driven-dissipative XY phase in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrebi, Mohammad F.

    2017-11-01

    Driven-dissipative systems define a broad class of nonequilibrium systems where an external drive (e.g., laser) competes with a dissipative environment. The steady state of dynamics is generically distinct from a thermal state characteristic of equilibrium. As a representative example, a driven-dissipative system with a continuous symmetry is generically disordered in two dimensions in contrast with the well-known algebraic order in equilibrium XY phases. In this paper, we study a two-dimensional driven-dissipative model of weakly interacting bosons with a continuous U (1 ) symmetry. Our aim is twofold: First, we show that an effectively equilibrium XY phase emerges despite the driven nature of the model, and that it is protected by a natural Z2 symmetry of the dynamics. Second, we argue that this phase is unstable against symmetry-breaking perturbations as well as static disorder, whose mechanism in most cases has no analog in equilibrium. In the language of renormalization group theory, we find that, outside equilibrium, there are more relevant directions away from the XY phase.

  7. Stress-Driven Selection of Novel Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, George E.; Stepaov, Victor G.; Liu, Yamei

    2011-01-01

    A process has been developed that can confer novel properties, such as metal resistance, to a host bacterium. This same process can also be used to produce RNAs and peptides that have novel properties, such as the ability to bind particular compounds. It is inherent in the method that the peptide or RNA will behave as expected in the target organism. Plasmid-born mini-gene libraries coding for either a population of combinatorial peptides or stable, artificial RNAs carrying random inserts are produced. These libraries, which have no bias towards any biological function, are used to transform the organism of interest and to serve as an initial source of genetic variation for stress-driven evolution. The transformed bacteria are propagated under selective pressure in order to obtain variants with the desired properties. The process is highly distinct from in vitro methods because the variants are selected in the context of the cell while it is experiencing stress. Hence, the selected peptide or RNA will, by definition, work as expected in the target cell as the cell adapts to its presence during the selection process. Once the novel gene, which produces the sought phenotype, is obtained, it can be transferred to the main genome to increase the genetic stability in the organism. Alternatively, the cell line can be used to produce novel RNAs or peptides with selectable properties in large quantity for separate purposes. The system allows for easy, large-scale purification of the RNAs or peptide products. The process has been reduced to practice by imposing sub-inhibitory concentrations of NiCl2 on cells of the bacterium Escherichia coli that were transformed separately with the peptide library and RNA library. The evolved resistant clones were isolated, and sequences of the selected mini-gene variants were established. Clones resistant to NiCl2 were found to carry identical plasmid variants with a functional mini-gene that specifically conferred significant nickel

  8. Heat Driven Cooling in District Energy Systems; Vaermedriven Kyla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydstrand, Magnus; Martin, Viktoria; Westermark, Mats [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2004-07-01

    high costs. However heat sinks are unavoidable from a system perspective and there are potential cost savings since a low-pressure steam turbines will not be required if heat driven cooling is implemented. The fuel utilization for some technologies (not necessarily the best technology) was evaluated in two different scenarios: 1) with electricity production from coal; and 2) with electricity production from natural gas. It is shown in the scenarios that the heat driven cooling technologies give lower fuel consumption as compared producing electricity as an intermediate product before cooling is produced. Further it should be noted that electricity is produced, not consumed, if heat is used directly for the production of cooling. We claim that cost effective solutions for district heat driven chillers and/or combined production of electricity and district cooling can be found in all climates with high enough density of heating and cooling demands. It was found that district heat driven chillers can be very energy efficient in warm and humid climates since desiccant systems are an effective way of handling latent cooling loads. In dry climates, with low latent loads, water distributed cooling has a large potential and absorption cooling will give high fuel utilization seen from a system perspective. In climates where water shortage is a problem it is possible that the temperature lift of the conventional absorption chiller has to be increased in order to be able to use dry cooling towers. The temperature lift can be increased by changing the chiller design or by using a different working pair. Heat driven cooling can be integrated into an energy system in different ways. In USA and Japan, district heating is not well developed. Instead small, distributed combined heat and power (CHP) plants with high exhaust temperatures are widespread. Cooling is often produced, in these regions, through absorption cooling (using heat from CHP) or compression chillers depending on

  9. Using Two Different Approaches to Assess Dietary Patterns: Hypothesis-Driven and Data-Driven Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágatha Nogueira Previdelli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of dietary patterns to assess dietary intake has become increasingly common in nutritional epidemiology studies due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the diet. Currently, two main approaches have been widely used to assess dietary patterns: data-driven and hypothesis-driven analysis. Since the methods explore different angles of dietary intake, using both approaches simultaneously might yield complementary and useful information; thus, we aimed to use both approaches to gain knowledge of adolescents’ dietary patterns. Food intake from a cross-sectional survey with 295 adolescents was assessed by 24 h dietary recall (24HR. In hypothesis-driven analysis, based on the American National Cancer Institute method, the usual intake of Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised components were estimated. In the data-driven approach, the usual intake of foods/food groups was estimated by the Multiple Source Method. In the results, hypothesis-driven analysis showed low scores for Whole grains, Total vegetables, Total fruit and Whole fruits, while, in data-driven analysis, fruits and whole grains were not presented in any pattern. High intakes of sodium, fats and sugars were observed in hypothesis-driven analysis with low total scores for Sodium, Saturated fat and SoFAA (calories from solid fat, alcohol and added sugar components in agreement, while the data-driven approach showed the intake of several foods/food groups rich in these nutrients, such as butter/margarine, cookies, chocolate powder, whole milk, cheese, processed meat/cold cuts and candies. In this study, using both approaches at the same time provided consistent and complementary information with regard to assessing the overall dietary habits that will be important in order to drive public health programs, and improve their efficiency to monitor and evaluate the dietary patterns of populations.

  10. Using Two Different Approaches to Assess Dietary Patterns: Hypothesis-Driven and Data-Driven Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previdelli, Ágatha Nogueira; de Andrade, Samantha Caesar; Fisberg, Regina Mara; Marchioni, Dirce Maria

    2016-01-01

    The use of dietary patterns to assess dietary intake has become increasingly common in nutritional epidemiology studies due to the complexity and multidimensionality of the diet. Currently, two main approaches have been widely used to assess dietary patterns: data-driven and hypothesis-driven analysis. Since the methods explore different angles of dietary intake, using both approaches simultaneously might yield complementary and useful information; thus, we aimed to use both approaches to gain knowledge of adolescents’ dietary patterns. Food intake from a cross-sectional survey with 295 adolescents was assessed by 24 h dietary recall (24HR). In hypothesis-driven analysis, based on the American National Cancer Institute method, the usual intake of Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised components were estimated. In the data-driven approach, the usual intake of foods/food groups was estimated by the Multiple Source Method. In the results, hypothesis-driven analysis showed low scores for Whole grains, Total vegetables, Total fruit and Whole fruits), while, in data-driven analysis, fruits and whole grains were not presented in any pattern. High intakes of sodium, fats and sugars were observed in hypothesis-driven analysis with low total scores for Sodium, Saturated fat and SoFAA (calories from solid fat, alcohol and added sugar) components in agreement, while the data-driven approach showed the intake of several foods/food groups rich in these nutrients, such as butter/margarine, cookies, chocolate powder, whole milk, cheese, processed meat/cold cuts and candies. In this study, using both approaches at the same time provided consistent and complementary information with regard to assessing the overall dietary habits that will be important in order to drive public health programs, and improve their efficiency to monitor and evaluate the dietary patterns of populations. PMID:27669289

  11. Light-field-driven currents in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takuya; Heide, Christian; Ullmann, Konrad; Weber, Heiko B.; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2017-10-01

    The ability to steer electrons using the strong electromagnetic field of light has opened up the possibility of controlling electron dynamics on the sub-femtosecond (less than 10‑15 seconds) timescale. In dielectrics and semiconductors, various light-field-driven effects have been explored, including high-harmonic generation, sub-optical-cycle interband population transfer and the non-perturbative change of the transient polarizability. In contrast, much less is known about light-field-driven electron dynamics in narrow-bandgap systems or in conductors, in which screening due to free carriers or light absorption hinders the application of strong optical fields. Graphene is a promising platform with which to achieve light-field-driven control of electrons in a conducting material, because of its broadband and ultrafast optical response, weak screening and high damage threshold. Here we show that a current induced in monolayer graphene by two-cycle laser pulses is sensitive to the electric-field waveform, that is, to the exact shape of the optical carrier field of the pulse, which is controlled by the carrier-envelope phase, with a precision on the attosecond (10‑18 seconds) timescale. Such a current, dependent on the carrier-envelope phase, shows a striking reversal of the direction of the current as a function of the driving field amplitude at about two volts per nanometre. This reversal indicates a transition of light–matter interaction from the weak-field (photon-driven) regime to the strong-field (light-field-driven) regime, where the intraband dynamics influence interband transitions. We show that in this strong-field regime the electron dynamics are governed by sub-optical-cycle Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interference, composed of coherent repeated Landau–Zener transitions on the femtosecond timescale. Furthermore, the influence of this sub-optical-cycle interference can be controlled with the laser polarization state. These coherent electron

  12. Perceived importance and responsibility for market-driven pig welfare: Literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorslund, Cecilie A H; Aaslyng, Margit Dall; Lassen, Jesper

    2017-03-01

    This review explores barriers and opportunities for market-driven pig welfare in Europe. It finds, first, that consumers generally rank animal welfare as important, but they also rank it low relative to other societal problems. Second, consumers have a wide range of concerns about pig welfare, but they focus especially on naturalness. Third, pig welfare is seen as an important indicator of meat quality. Fourth, consumers tend to think that responsibility for pig welfare lies with several actors: farmers, governments and themselves. The paper concludes that there is an opportunity for the market-driven strategy to sell a narrative about naturalness supplemented with other attractive qualities (such as eating quality). It also emphasizes that pig welfare needs to be on the political/societal agenda permanently if it is to be viewed as an important issue by consumers and if consumers are to assume some sort of responsibility for it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Numerical simulation of natural convection in wedge-shaped domain with isothermal free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavtseva, N. A.; Ivanov, N. G.

    2017-11-01

    The contribution deals with 2D laminar unsteady natural convection in a wedge-shaped reservoir model induced by the isothermal surface heating of a water basin being colder than surrounding atmosphere. The problem formulation considered corresponds to large-scale convection development during a cloudy day when the solar radiation impact is negligible. Numerical simulation was performed using an in-house Navier-Stokes code SINF. The focus of the paper is on the accurate resolution of the initial period of the convective circulation pattern development. The dependence of the predicted convective structures on the computational domain size as well as on the boundary condition at the free surface is analysed. The influence of geometry on the buoyancy-induced flow formation is discussed.

  14. Interset: A natural language interface for teleoperated robotic assembly of the EASE space structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorsma, Daniel K.

    1989-01-01

    A teleoperated robot was used to assemble the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extra-vehicular activity (EASE) space structure under neutral buoyancy conditions, simulating a telerobot performing structural assembly in the zero gravity of space. This previous work used a manually controlled teleoperator as a test bed for system performance evaluations. From these results several Artificial Intelligence options were proposed. One of these was further developed into a real time assembly planner. The interface for this system is effective in assembling EASE structures using windowed graphics and a set of networked menus. As the problem space becomes more complex and hence the set of control options increases, a natural language interface may prove to be beneficial to supplement the menu based control strategy. This strategy can be beneficial in situations such as: describing the local environment, maintaining a data base of task event histories, modifying a plan or a heuristic dynamically, summarizing a task in English, or operating in a novel situation.

  15. ANALYSIS AND COMPUTER SIMULATION OF A NATURAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model has been developed to predict the outlet air temperature and air flow rate from a solar collector based on the theory of thermal buoyancy. A high capacitance solar collector directly coupled to an animal building absorbs solar radiation, which heats up air and forces entry into the building by convection. In order to ...

  16. Position Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Hargrave, B.; Pementer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, tendon-driven manipulators implement some force control scheme based on tension feedback. This feedback allows the system to ensure that the tendons are maintained taut with proper levels of tensioning at all times. Occasionally, whether it is due to the lack of tension feedback or the inability to implement sufficiently high stiffnesses, a position control scheme is needed. This work compares three position controllers for tendon-driven manipulators. A new controller is introduced that achieves the best overall performance with regards to speed, accuracy, and transient behavior. To compensate for the lack of tension feedback, the controller nominally maintains the internal tension on the tendons by implementing a two-tier architecture with a range-space constraint. These control laws are validated experimentally on the Robonaut-2 humanoid hand. I

  17. User driven innovation in mobile technologies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper Schultz; Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    by systems already in function. Stories of prior business successes can be an important tool to ensure further innovative investments since lack of enterprise strategies is often an obstacle for innovation, especially user driven. Both small and large software houses develops dedicated software for coupling......Developing dedicated mobile technology systems for AEC demands the introduction of user driven innovation. A Danish research project collected international examples and user-experiences of mobile and handheld ICT in the building industry i.a. by reading off the functionality of the mobile...... technology systems relying on the concept of affordance. This paper examines how innovation processes mediate between user orientations and technology offers. There is a great potential for mobile handheld ICT-systems to support numerous work processes in the AEC-industry and this can be substantiated...

  18. Mastering Technologies in Design-Driven Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dell'era, Claudio; Marchesi, Alessio; Verganti, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Only a few companies have mastered the design-driven approach to innovation. This paper examines what it means to make design a central part of the business process, able to add value to products and create new markets. More specifically, it focuses on the interplay between the functional...... and semantic dimensions of a product. Case studies of two leading Italian companies in the furniture industry--Kartell and Luceplan--illustrate two principal interpretations of the role of technology in radical design-driven innovation: technology as an enabler of new product meanings for the customer......, and the importance of supply networks that allow manufacturers to change product technologies quickly and experiment with new technologies....

  19. Noise-driven phenomena in hysteretic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dimian, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    Noise-Driven Phenomena in Hysteretic Systems provides a general approach to nonlinear systems with hysteresis driven by noisy inputs, which leads to a unitary framework for the analysis of various stochastic aspects of hysteresis. This book includes integral, differential and algebraic models that are used to describe scalar and vector hysteretic nonlinearities originating from various areas of science and engineering. The universality of the authors approach is also reflected by the diversity of the models used to portray the input noise, from the classical Gaussian white noise to its impulsive forms, often encountered in economics and biological systems, and pink noise, ubiquitous in multi-stable electronic systems. The book is accompanied by HysterSoft© - a robust simulation environment designed to perform complex hysteresis modeling – that can be used by the reader to reproduce many of the results presented in the book as well as to research both disruptive and constructive effects of noise in hysteret...

  20. Model Driven Development of Data Sensitive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Petur

    2014-01-01

    Model-driven development strives to use formal artifacts during the development process. Formal artifacts enables automatic analyses of some aspects of the system under development. This serves to increase the understanding of the (intended) behavior of the system as well as increasing error...... to the values of variables. This theses strives to improve model-driven development of such data-sensitive systems. This is done by addressing three research questions. In the first we combine state-based modeling and abstract interpretation, in order to ease modeling of data-sensitive systems, while allowing...... detection and pushing error detection to earlier stages of development. The complexity of modeling and the size of systems which can be analyzed is severely limited when introducing data variables. The state space grows exponentially in the number of variable and the domain size of the variables...