WorldWideScience

Sample records for buoyancy driven flows

  1. Turbulent mixed buoyancy driven flow and heat transfer in lid driven enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Sharma, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent mixed buoyancy driven flow and heat transfer of air in lid driven rectangular enclosure has been investigated for Grashof number in the range of 10 8 to 10 11 and for Richardson number 0.1, 1 and 10. Steady two dimensional Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes equations and conservation equations of mass and energy, coupled with the Boussinesq approximation, are solved. The spatial derivatives in the equations are discretized using the finite-element method. The SIMPLE algorithm is used to resolve pressure-velocity coupling. Turbulence is modeled with the k-ω closure model with physical boundary conditions along with the Boussinesq approximation, for the flow and heat transfer. The predicted results are validated against benchmark solutions reported in literature. The results include stream lines and temperature fields are presented to understand flow and heat transfer characteristics. There is a marked reduction in mean Nusselt number (about 58%) as the Richardson number increases from 0.1 to 10 for the case of Ra=10 10 signifying the effect of reduction of top lid velocity resulting in reduction of turbulent mixing. (author)

  2. Release of radon contaminants from Yucca Mountain: The role of buoyancy driven flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.M.; Pescatore, C.

    1994-02-01

    The potential for the repository heat source to promote buoyancy driven flow and thereby cause release of radon gas out of Yucca Mountain has been examined through a critical review of the theoretical and experimental studies of this process. The review indicates that steady-state buoyancy enhanced release of natural radon and other contaminant gases should not be a major concern at Yucca Mountain. Barometric pumping and wind pumping are identified as two processes that will have a potentially greater effect on surface releases of gases

  3. A Review of Some Recent Studies on Buoyancy Driven Flows in an Urban Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Bodhisatta Hajra

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews some recent studies (after 2000) pertaining to buoyancy driven flows in nature and thier use in reducing air pollution levels in a city (city ventilation). Natural convection flows occur due to the heating and cooling of various urban surfaces (e.g., mountain slopes), leading to upslope and downslope flows. Such flows can have a significant effect on city ventilation which has been the subject of study in the recent times due to increased pollution levels in a city. A major...

  4. Flow rate measurement of buoyancy-driven exchange flow by laser Doppler velocimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out for the buoyancy-driven exchange flow in a narrow vented cylinder concerning the air ingress process during a standing pipe rupture in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. In the present study, the evaluation method of exchange flow was developed by measuring the velocity distribution in the cylinder using a laser Doppler velocimeter. The experiments were performed under atmospheric pressure with nitrogen as a working fluid. Rayleigh numbers ranged from 2.0x10 4 to 2.1x10 5 . The exchange flow fluctuated irregularly with time and space in the cylinder. It was found that the exchange velocity distribution along the horizontal axis changed from one-hump to two-hump distribution with increasing Rayleigh number. In the case that the hemisphere wall was cooler than the heated disk, the volumetric exchange flow rate was smaller than that in the case where the hemisphere wall and the heated disk were at the same temperature. (author)

  5. Semi-Empirical Models for Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager Andersen, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A literature study is presented on the theories and models dealing with buoyancy-driven ventilation in rooms. The models are categorised into four types according to how the physical process is conceived: column model, fan model, neutral plane model and pressure model. These models are analysed...... and compared with a reference model. Discrepancies and differences are shown, and the deviations are discussed. It is concluded that a reliable buoyancy model based solely on the fundamental flow equations is desirable....

  6. Numerical Study of the Buoyancy-Driven Flow in a Four-Electrode Rectangular Electrochemical Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhanyu; Agafonov, Vadim; Rice, Catherine; Bindler, Jacob

    2009-11-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is done on the buoyancy-driven flow in a four-electrode rectangular electrochemical cell. Two kinds of electrode layouts, the anode-cathode-cathode-anode (ACCA) and the cathode-anode-anode-cathode (CAAC) layouts, are studied. In the ACCA layout, the two anodes are placed close to the channel outlets while the two cathodes are located between the two anodes. The CAAC layout can be converted from the ACCA layout by applying higher electric potential on the two middle electrodes. Density gradient was generated by the electrodic reaction I3^-+2e^- =3I^-. When the electrochemical cell is accelerated axially, buoyancy-driven flow occurs. In our model, electro-neutrality is assumed except at the electrodes. The Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and the Nernst-Planck equations are employed to model the momentum and mass transports, respectively. It is found that under a given axial acceleration, the electrolyte density between the two middle electrodes determines the bulk flow through the electrochemical cell. The cathodic current difference is found to be able to measure the applied acceleration. Other important electro-hydrodynamic characteristics are also discussed.

  7. A numerical study on buoyancy-driven flow in an inclined square enclosure heated and cooled on adjacent walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydin, O.; Uenal, A.; Ayhan, T.

    1999-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven flows in enclosures play a vital role in many engineering applications such as double glazing, ventilation of rooms, nuclear reactor insulation, solar energy collection, cooling of electronic components, and crystal growth in liquids. Here, numerical study on buoyancy-driven laminar flow in an inclined square enclosure heated from one side and cooled from the adjacent side is conducted using finite difference methods. The effect of inclination angle on fluid flow and heat transfer is investigated by varying the angle of inclination between 0 degree and 360degree, and the results are presented in the form of streamlines and isotherms for different inclination angles and Rayleigh numbers. On the basis of the numerical data, the authors determine the critical values of the inclination angle at which the rate of the transfer within the enclosure is either maximum or minimum

  8. Numerical modeling of buoyancy-driven turbulent flows in enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, K.J.; Lien, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    Modeling turbulent natural convection in enclosures with differentially heated vertical walls is numerically challenging, in particular, when low-Reynolds-number (low-Re) models are adopted. When the turbulence level in the core region of cavity is low, most low-Re models, particular those showing good performance for bypass transitional flows, tend to relaminarize the flow and, as a consequence, significantly underpredict the near-wall turbulence intensities and boundary-layer thickness. Another challenge associated with low-turbulence buoyancy-driven flows in enclosures is its inherent unsteadiness, which can pose convergence problems when a steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation is solved. In the present study, an unsteady RANS approach in conjunction with the low-Re k-ε model of Lien and Leschziner [Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 12 (1999) 1] is initially adopted and the predicted flow field is found effectively relaminarized. To overcome this difficulty, likely caused by the low-Re functions in the ε-equation, the two-layer approach is attempted, in which ε is prescribed algebraically using the one-equation k-l model of Wolfshtein [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 12 (1969) 301]. The two-layer approach combined with a quadratic stress-strain relation gives overall the best performance in terms of mean velocities, temperature and turbulence quantities

  9. Large eddy simulation of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume dispersion in an urban street canyon under perpendicular wind flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, L.H., E-mail: hlh@ustc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Huo, R.; Yang, D. [State Key Laboratory of Fire Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2009-07-15

    The dispersion of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume in and above an idealized street canyon of 18 m (width) x 18 m (height) x 40 m (length) with a wind flow perpendicular to its axis was investigated by Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Former studies, such as that by Oka [T.R. Oke, Street design and urban canopy layer climate, Energy Build. 11 (1988) 103-113], Gayev and Savory [Y.A. Gayev, E. Savory, Influence of street obstructions on flow processes within street canyons. J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn. 82 (1999) 89-103], Xie et al. [S. Xie, Y. Zhang, L. Qi, X. Tang, Spatial distribution of traffic-related pollutant concentrations in street canyons. Atmos. Environ. 37 (2003) 3213-3224], Baker et al. [J. Baker, H. L. Walker, X. M. Cai, A study of the dispersion and transport of reactive pollutants in and above street canyons-a large eddy simulation, Atmos. Environ. 38 (2004) 6883-6892] and Baik et al. [J.-J. Baik, Y.-S. Kang, J.-J. Kim, Modeling reactive pollutant dispersion in an urban street canyon, Atmos. Environ. 41 (2007) 934-949], focus on the flow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the street canyon with no buoyancy effect. Results showed that with the increase of the wind flow velocity, the dispersion pattern of a buoyant plume fell into four regimes. When the wind flow velocity increased up to a certain critical level, the buoyancy driven upward rising plume was re-entrained back into the street canyon. This is a dangerous situation as the harmful fire smoke will accumulate to pollute the environment and thus threaten the safety of the people in the street canyon. This critical re-entrainment wind velocity, as an important parameter to be concerned, was further revealed to increase asymptotically with the heat/buoyancy release rate of the fire.

  10. Large eddy simulation of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume dispersion in an urban street canyon under perpendicular wind flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L H; Huo, R; Yang, D

    2009-07-15

    The dispersion of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume in and above an idealized street canyon of 18 m (width) x 18 m (height) x 40 m (length) with a wind flow perpendicular to its axis was investigated by Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Former studies, such as that by Oka [T.R. Oke, Street design and urban canopy layer climate, Energy Build. 11 (1988) 103-113], Gayev and Savory [Y.A. Gayev, E. Savory, Influence of street obstructions on flow processes within street canyons. J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn. 82 (1999) 89-103], Xie et al. [S. Xie, Y. Zhang, L. Qi, X. Tang, Spatial distribution of traffic-related pollutant concentrations in street canyons. Atmos. Environ. 37 (2003) 3213-3224], Baker et al. [J. Baker, H. L. Walker, X. M. Cai, A study of the dispersion and transport of reactive pollutants in and above street canyons--a large eddy simulation, Atmos. Environ. 38 (2004) 6883-6892] and Baik et al. [J.-J. Baik, Y.-S. Kang, J.-J. Kim, Modeling reactive pollutant dispersion in an urban street canyon, Atmos. Environ. 41 (2007) 934-949], focus on the flow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the street canyon with no buoyancy effect. Results showed that with the increase of the wind flow velocity, the dispersion pattern of a buoyant plume fell into four regimes. When the wind flow velocity increased up to a certain critical level, the buoyancy driven upward rising plume was re-entrained back into the street canyon. This is a dangerous situation as the harmful fire smoke will accumulate to pollute the environment and thus threaten the safety of the people in the street canyon. This critical re-entrainment wind velocity, as an important parameter to be concerned, was further revealed to increase asymptotically with the heat/buoyancy release rate of the fire.

  11. Large eddy simulation of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume dispersion in an urban street canyon under perpendicular wind flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, L.H.; Huo, R.; Yang, D.

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion of fire-induced buoyancy driven plume in and above an idealized street canyon of 18 m (width) x 18 m (height) x 40 m (length) with a wind flow perpendicular to its axis was investigated by Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS), Large Eddy Simulation (LES). Former studies, such as that by Oka [T.R. Oke, Street design and urban canopy layer climate, Energy Build. 11 (1988) 103-113], Gayev and Savory [Y.A. Gayev, E. Savory, Influence of street obstructions on flow processes within street canyons. J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn. 82 (1999) 89-103], Xie et al. [S. Xie, Y. Zhang, L. Qi, X. Tang, Spatial distribution of traffic-related pollutant concentrations in street canyons. Atmos. Environ. 37 (2003) 3213-3224], Baker et al. [J. Baker, H. L. Walker, X. M. Cai, A study of the dispersion and transport of reactive pollutants in and above street canyons-a large eddy simulation, Atmos. Environ. 38 (2004) 6883-6892] and Baik et al. [J.-J. Baik, Y.-S. Kang, J.-J. Kim, Modeling reactive pollutant dispersion in an urban street canyon, Atmos. Environ. 41 (2007) 934-949], focus on the flow pattern and pollutant dispersion in the street canyon with no buoyancy effect. Results showed that with the increase of the wind flow velocity, the dispersion pattern of a buoyant plume fell into four regimes. When the wind flow velocity increased up to a certain critical level, the buoyancy driven upward rising plume was re-entrained back into the street canyon. This is a dangerous situation as the harmful fire smoke will accumulate to pollute the environment and thus threaten the safety of the people in the street canyon. This critical re-entrainment wind velocity, as an important parameter to be concerned, was further revealed to increase asymptotically with the heat/buoyancy release rate of the fire.

  12. Homogeneous purely buoyancy driven turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Jaywant; Cholemari, Murali; Pawar, Shashikant

    2010-11-01

    An unstable density difference across a long vertical tube open at both ends leads to convection that is axially homogeneous with a linear density gradient. We report results from such tube convection experiments, with driving density caused by salt concentration difference or temperature difference. At high enough Rayleigh numbers (Ra) the convection is turbulent with zero mean flow and zero mean Reynolds shear stresses; thus turbulent production is purely by buoyancy. We observe different regimes of turbulent convection. At very high Ra the Nusselt number scales as the square root of the Rayleigh number, giving the so-called "ultimate regime" of convection predicted for Rayleigh-Benard convection in limit of infinite Ra. Turbulent convection at intermediate Ra, the Nusselt number scales as Ra^0.3. In both regimes, the flux and the Taylor scale Reynolds number are more than order of magnitude larger than those obtained in Rayleigh-Benard convection. Absence of a mean flow makes this an ideal flow to study shear free turbulence near a wall.

  13. Buoyancy driven flow in a hot water tank due to standby heat loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal behavior in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank due to standby heat loss of the tank are presented. The effect of standby heat loss on temperature distribution in the tank is investigated experimentally on a slim 150l tank...... show that the CFD model predicts satisfactorily water temperatures at different levels of the tank during cooling by standby heat loss. It is elucidated how the downward buoyancy driven flow along the tank wall is established by the heat loss from the tank sides and how the natural convection flow...... with a height to diameter ratio of 5. A tank with uniform temperatures and with thermal stratification is studied. A detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the tank is developed to calculate the natural convection flow in the tank. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different...

  14. SIMULATION OF FREE CURRENT FLOWS IN BUOYANCY-DRIVEN VENTILATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Abramkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study is to analyse the effect of the design and methods for heating the ventilation duct of a buoyancy- driven system on the formation of free convective air currents in it.Methods. The study of free convection under the conditions of interior problem was carried out using the CFD software, based on  the finite volume method with unstructured grid. Ansys Fluent software was used as a calculation tool in the study, due to its having a high convergence of numerical solutions offering full-scale  measurements of convective currents.To evaluate the reliability of  the results obtained, a validation procedure was carried out, allowing us to determine how accurately the selected conceptual model describes the investigated flow through a comparison of experimental and numerical data.Results. The results of numerical modelling of free convective currents occurring in the heated channel of the ventilation system of  the top floor of a multi-storey residential building are presented in  the article. In the course of the study, the air velocity at the entrance to the ventilation duct was found to depend on the calculated  temperature difference θ ˚C for various heating methods. A gradual  increase in the discrepancy between the numerical simulation and  experimental results is observed if the calculated temperature  difference > 20 ° C. This phenomenon is due to the fact that with  increased duct temperature, it is quite difficult to achieve even  heating under actual conditions; this is especially noticeable when  considering the variant when the vertical part of the vent duct and the take-off are both heated. The maximum deviation of the  results is 4.4%. The obtained velocity profiles in the calculated  sections indicate the impact of the ventilation take-off on the nature  of the air flow motion.Conclusion. One of the drawbacks of the existing systems of natural ventilation of residential

  15. Radiative effects on turbulent buoyancy-driven air flow in open square cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamora, B.; Kaiser, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the radiative effects and the air variable properties (density, viscosity and thermal conductivity) on the buoyancy-driven flows established in open square cavities are investigated. Two-dimensional, laminar, transitional and turbulent simulations are obtained, considering both uniform wall temperature and uniform heat flux heating conditions. In transitional and turbulent cases, the low- Reynolds k-ω turbulence model is employed. The average Nusselt number and the dimensionless mass-flow rate have been obtained for a wide range of the Rayleigh number varying from 10 3 to 10 16 . The results obtained taking into account the variable thermophysical properties of air are compared to those calculated assuming constant properties and the Boussinesq approximation. In addition, the influence of considering surface radiative effects on the differences reached for the Nusselt number and the mass flow rate obtained with several intensities of heating is studied; specifically, the effects of thermal radiation on the appearance of the burnout phenomenon is analyzed. The changes produced in the flow patterns into the cavity when the radiative heat transfer and the effects of variation of properties are relevant, are also shown. (authors)

  16. Mixing driven by transient buoyancy flows. I. Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Zhong, H.; Batur, C.

    2018-05-01

    Mixing of two miscible liquids juxtaposed inside a cavity initially separated by a divider, whose buoyancy-driven motion is initiated via impulsive perturbation of divider motion that can generate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, is investigated experimentally. The measured Lagrangian history of interface motion that contains the continuum mechanics of mixing shows self-similar nearly Gaussian length stretch distribution for a wide range of control parameters encompassing an approximate Hele-Shaw cell to a three-dimensional cavity. Because of the initial configuration of the interface which is parallel to the gravitational field, we show that at critical initial potential energy mixing occurs through the stretching of the interface, which shows frontogenesis, and folding, owing to an overturning motion that results in unstable density stratification and produces an ideal condition for the growth of the single wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The initial perturbation of the interface and flow field generates the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and causes kinks at the interface, which grow into deep fingers during overturning motion and unfold into local whorl structures that merge and self-organize into the Rayleigh-Taylor morphology (RTM) structure. For a range of parametric space that yields two-dimensional flows, the unfolding of the instability through a supercritical bifurcation yields an asymmetric pairwise structure exhibiting smooth RTM that transitions to RTM fronts with fractal structures that contain small length scales for increasing Peclet numbers. The late stage of the RTM structure unfolds into an internal breakwave that breaks down through wall and internal collision and sets up the condition for self-induced sloshing that decays exponentially as the two fluids become stably stratified with a diffusive region indicating local molecular diffusion.

  17. Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer with Thermal Radiation in an Enclosure in Case of Buoyancy Driven Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hochenauer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate state of the art approaches and their accuracy to compute heat transfer including radiation inside a closed cavity whereas buoyancy is the only driving force. This research is the first step of an all-embracing study dealing with underhood airflow and thermal management of vehicles. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD simulation results of buoyancy driven flow inside a simplified engine compartment are compared to experimentally gained values. The test rig imitates idle condition without any working fan. Thus, the airflow is only driven by natural convection. A conventional method used for these applications is to compute the convective heat transfer coefficient and air temperature using CFD and calculate the wall temperature separately by performing a thermal analysis. The final solution results from coupling two different software tools. In this paper thermal conditions inside the enclosure are computed by the use of CFD only. The impact of the turbulence model as well as the results of various radiation models are analyzed and compared to the experimental data.

  18. Experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. Measurements were made for opening ratios L/D range from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The bidirectional air flow rate was measured using constant injection tracer gas technique. Smoke visualizations showed that the air flow patterns are highly transient, unstable and complex, and ...

  19. Stereo Imaging Velocimetry of Mixing Driven by Buoyancy Induced Flow Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, W. M. B.; Jacqmin, D.; Bomani, B. M.; Alexander, I. J.; Kassemi, M.; Batur, C.; Tryggvason, B. V.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2000-01-01

    Mixing of two fluids generated by steady and particularly g-jitter acceleration is fundamental towards the understanding of transport phenomena in a microgravity environment. We propose to carry out flight and ground-based experiments to quantify flow fields due to g-jitter type of accelerations using Stereo Imaging Velocimetry (SIV), and measure the concentration field using laser fluorescence. The understanding of the effects of g-jitter on transport phenomena is of great practical interest to the microgravity community and impacts the design of experiments for the Space Shuttle as well as the International Space Station. The aim of our proposed research is to provide quantitative data to the community on the effects of g-jitter on flow fields due to mixing induced by buoyancy forces. The fundamental phenomenon of mixing occurs in a broad range of materials processing encompassing the growth of opto-electronic materials and semiconductors, (by directional freezing and physical vapor transport), to solution and protein crystal growth. In materials processing of these systems, crystal homogeneity, which is affected by the solutal field distribution, is one of the major issues. The understanding of fluid mixing driven by buoyancy forces, besides its importance as a topic in fundamental science, can contribute towards the understanding of how solutal fields behave under various body forces. The body forces of interest are steady acceleration and g-jitter acceleration as in a Space Shuttle environment or the International Space Station. Since control of the body force is important, the flight experiment will be carried out on a tunable microgravity vibration isolation mount, which will permit us to precisely input the desired forcing function to simulate a range of body forces. To that end, we propose to design a flight experiment that can only be carried out under microgravity conditions to fully exploit the effects of various body forces on fluid mixing. Recent

  20. Experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. Measurements were made for opening ratios L/D range from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length and the diameter of the opening......, respectively. The bidirectional air flow rate was measured using constant injection tracer gas technique. Smoke visualizations showed that the air flow patterns are highly transient, unstable and complex, and that air flow rates oscillate with time. Correlations between the Froude number Fr and the L/D ratio...

  1. Large eddy simulation of a buoyancy-aided flow in a non-uniform channel – Buoyancy effects on large flow structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); He, S., E-mail: s.he@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Buoyancy may greatly redistribute the flow in a non-uniform channel. • Flow structures in the narrow gap are greatly changed when buoyancy is strong. • Large flow structures exist in wider gap, which is enhanced when heat is strong. • Buoyancy reduces mixing factor caused by large flow structures in narrow gap. - Abstract: It has been a long time since the ‘abnormal’ turbulent intensity distribution and high inter-sub-channel mixing rates were observed in the vicinity of the narrow gaps formed by the fuel rods in nuclear reactors. The extraordinary flow behaviour was first described as periodic flow structures by Hooper and Rehme (1984). Since then, the existences of large flow structures were demonstrated by many researchers in various non-uniform flow channels. It has been proved by many authors that the Strouhal number of the flow structure in the isothermal flow is dependent on the size of the narrow gap, not the Reynolds number once it is sufficiently large. This paper reports a numerical investigation on the effect of buoyancy on the large flow structures. A buoyancy-aided flow in a tightly-packed rod-bundle-like channel is modelled using large eddy simulation (LES) together with the Boussinesq approximation. The behaviour of the large flow structures in the gaps of the flow passage are studied using instantaneous flow fields, spectrum analysis and correlation analysis. It is found that the non-uniform buoyancy force in the cross section of the flow channel may greatly redistribute the velocity field once the overall buoyancy force is sufficiently strong, and consequently modify the large flow structures. The temporal and axial spatial scales of the large flow structures are influenced by buoyancy in a way similar to that turbulence is influenced. These scales reduce when the flow is laminarised, but start increasing in the turbulence regeneration region. The spanwise scale of the flow structures in the narrow gap remains more or

  2. Studies of heat transfer having relevance to nuclear reactor containment cooling by buoyancy-driven air flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J. D.; Li, J.; Wang, J. [The Univ., of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-01

    Two separate effects experiments concerned with buoyancy-influenced convective heat transfer in vertical passages which have relevance to the problem of nuclear reactor containment cooling by means of buoyancy-driven airflow are described. A feature of each is that local values of heat transfer coefficient are determined on surfaces maintained at uniform temperature. Experimental results are presented which highlight the need for buoyancy-induced impairment of turbulent convective heat transfer to be accounted for in the design of such passive cooling systems. A strategy is presented for predicting the heat removal by combined convective and radiative heat transfer from a full scale nuclear reactor containment shell using such experimental results.

  3. Characteristics of Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zhigang

    through horizontal openings. Two cases of full-scale measurements of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through horizontal openings are performed: one horizontal opening and one horizontal opening combined with one vertical opening. For the case of one horizontal opening, the measurements are made....... Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to study these two air flow cases. The air flow rate and air flow pattern are predicted and compared with the full-scale measurements. The measurement data are used to compare two CFD models: standard k- ε model and large eddy simulation (LES) model. The cases...... transient, unstable and complex, and the air flow rates oscillate with time. Correlations between the Froude number Fr and the opening ratio L/D are obtained, which is reasonable agreement with Epstein's formula derived from brine-water measurements, but the obtained Fr values show considerable deviations...

  4. Flows and Stratification of an Enclosure Containing Both Localised and Vertically Distributed Sources of Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jamie; Linden, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We examine the flows and stratification established in a naturally ventilated enclosure containing both a localised and vertically distributed source of buoyancy. The enclosure is ventilated through upper and lower openings which connect the space to an external ambient. Small scale laboratory experiments were carried out with water as the working medium and buoyancy being driven directly by temperature differences. A point source plume gave localised heating while the distributed source was driven by a controllable heater mat located in the side wall of the enclosure. The transient temperatures, as well as steady state temperature profiles, were recorded and are reported here. The temperature profiles inside the enclosure were found to be dependent on the effective opening area A*, a combination of the upper and lower openings, and the ratio of buoyancy fluxes from the distributed and localised source Ψ =Bw/Bp . Industrial CASE award with ARUP.

  5. Buoyancy-driven mean flow in a long channel with a hydraulically constrained exit condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Th.; Maxworthy, T.

    1999-11-01

    Convection plays a major role in a variety of natural hydrodynamic systems. Those in which convection drives exchange flows through a lateral contraction and/or over a sill form a special class with typical examples being the Red and Mediterranean Seas, the Persian Gulf, and the fjords that indent many coastlines. The present work focuses on the spatial distribution and scaling of the density difference between the inflowing and outflowing fluid layers. Using a long water-filled channel, fitted with buoyancy sources at its upper surface, experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of the geometry of the strait and the channel as well as the magnitude of the buoyancy flux. Two different scaling laws, one by Phillips (1966), and one by Maxworthy (1994, 1997) were compared with the experimental results. It has been shown that a scaling law for which g[prime prime or minute] = kB02/3x/h4/3 best describes the distribution of the observed density difference along the channel, where B0 is the buoyancy flux, x the distance from the closed end of the channel, h its height at the open end (sill) and k a constant that depends on the details of the channel geometry and flow conditions. This result holds for the experimental results and appears to be valid for a number of natural systems as well.

  6. DNS of buoyancy-driven flows and Lagrangian particle tracking in a square cavity at high Rayleigh numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puragliesi, R.; Dehbi, A.; Leriche, E.; Soldati, A.; Deville, M.O.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 2D study of micro-size particle depletion driven by chaotic natural convective flows in square domains. → Description of velocity and temperature first and second moments with changing in the Rayleigh number. → Strong decoupling between the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. → Particle recirculation sustained by the vertical hot boundary layer. → Deposition mostly induced by gravity, thermophoretic and lift forces are negligible. - Abstract: In this work we investigate numerically particle deposition in the buoyancy driven flow of the differentially heated cavity (DHC). We consider two values of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 10 9 , 10 10 ) and three values of the particle diameter (d p = 15, 25, 35 [μm]). We consider the cavity filled with air and particles with the same density of water ρ w = 1000 [kg/m 3 ] (aerosol). We use direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the continuous phase, and we solve transient Navier-Stokes and energy transport equations written in an Eulerian framework, under the Boussinesq approximation, for the viscous incompressible Newtonian fluid with constant Prandtl number (Pr = 0.71). First- and second-order statistics are presented for the continuous phase as well as important quantities like turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and temperature variance with the associated production and dissipation fields. The TKE production shows different behaviour at the two Rayleigh numbers. The Lagrangian approach has been chosen for the dispersed phase description. The forces taken into account are drag, gravity, buoyancy, lift and thermophoresis. A first incursion in the sedimentation mechanisms is presented. Current results indicate that the largest contribution to particle deposition is caused by gravitational settling, but a strong recirculating zone, which liftoffs and segregates particles, contributes to decrease settling. Deposition takes place mostly at the bottom wall. The influence of lift and thermophoretic

  7. DNS of buoyancy-driven flows and Lagrangian particle tracking in a square cavity at high Rayleigh numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puragliesi, R., E-mail: riccardo.puragliesi@psi.ch [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratoire d' Ingenierie Numerique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dehbi, A., E-mail: abdel.dehbi@psi.ch [Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Department, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Leriche, E., E-mail: emmanuel.leriche@univ-st-etienne.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, LMFA-UJM St-Etienne, CNRS UMR 5509 Universite de St-Etienne, 23 rue Docteur Paul Michelon, F-42023 Saint-Etienne (France); Soldati, A., E-mail: soldati@uniud.it [Dipartimento di Energetica e Macchine, Universita di Udine, Via delle Scienze 208, IT-33100 Udine (Italy); Deville, M.O., E-mail: michel.deville@epfl.ch [Laboratoire d' Ingenierie Numerique, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > 2D study of micro-size particle depletion driven by chaotic natural convective flows in square domains. > Description of velocity and temperature first and second moments with changing in the Rayleigh number. > Strong decoupling between the turbulent kinetic energy and the dissipation rate. > Particle recirculation sustained by the vertical hot boundary layer. > Deposition mostly induced by gravity, thermophoretic and lift forces are negligible. - Abstract: In this work we investigate numerically particle deposition in the buoyancy driven flow of the differentially heated cavity (DHC). We consider two values of the Rayleigh number (Ra = 10{sup 9}, 10{sup 10}) and three values of the particle diameter (d{sub p} = 15, 25, 35 [{mu}m]). We consider the cavity filled with air and particles with the same density of water {rho}{sub w} = 1000 [kg/m{sup 3}] (aerosol). We use direct numerical simulations (DNS) for the continuous phase, and we solve transient Navier-Stokes and energy transport equations written in an Eulerian framework, under the Boussinesq approximation, for the viscous incompressible Newtonian fluid with constant Prandtl number (Pr = 0.71). First- and second-order statistics are presented for the continuous phase as well as important quantities like turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and temperature variance with the associated production and dissipation fields. The TKE production shows different behaviour at the two Rayleigh numbers. The Lagrangian approach has been chosen for the dispersed phase description. The forces taken into account are drag, gravity, buoyancy, lift and thermophoresis. A first incursion in the sedimentation mechanisms is presented. Current results indicate that the largest contribution to particle deposition is caused by gravitational settling, but a strong recirculating zone, which liftoffs and segregates particles, contributes to decrease settling. Deposition takes place mostly at the bottom wall. The influence of lift

  8. Buoyancy flow in fractures intersecting a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.S.Y.; Tsang, C.F.

    1980-07-01

    The thermally induced buoyancy flow in fractured rocks around a nuclear waste repository is of major concern in the evaluation of the regional, long-term impact of nuclear waste disposal in geological formation. In this study, buoyancy flow and the development of convective cells are calculated in vertical fractures passing through or positioned near a repository. Interaction between buoyancy flow and regional hydraulic gradient is studied as a function of time, and the interference of intersecting fractures with each other is also discussed

  9. Numerical investigations of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in a simple three-storey atrium building and thermal comfort evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Oosthuizen, Patrick H.

    2013-01-01

    The numerical investigations of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation and thermal comfort evaluation in a simple three-storey atrium building as a part of the passive ventilation strategy was undertaken using a validated Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) model. The Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) modeling approach with the SST-k–ω turbulence model and the discrete transfer radiation model (DTRM) was used for the numerical investigations. The steady-state governing equations were solved using a commercial solver FLUENT©. Various flow situations of the buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in the building during day and night time were examined. The numerical results obtained for the airflow rates, airflow patterns and temperature distributions inside the building are presented in this paper. Using the numerical results, the well-known thermal comfort indices PMV (predicted mean vote) and PPD (predicted percentage of dissatisfied) were calculated for the evaluation of the thermal comfort conditions in the occupied regions of the building. It was noticed that thermal conditions prevailing in the occupied areas of the building as a result of using the buoyancy-driven ventilation were mostly in comfort zone. From the study of the night time ventilation, it was found that hot water (80 °C) circulation (heated by solar collectors during daytime) along the chimney walls during night time and heat sources present in the building can be useful in inducing night ventilation airflows in the building as a part of the passive ventilation strategy. -- Highlights: • A simple three-storey atrium building. • Numerical modeling of buoyancy-driven ventilation flow in the building. • Effect of solar intensity and geographical location on ventilation. • CFD predictions were used to calculate thermal comfort indices. • Evaluation of thermal comfort conditions for the occupants

  10. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-08-25

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov\\'s spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)∼k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  11. Optimal design and control of buoyancy-driven ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager Andersen, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Relationships between airflow rates and opening areas of importance for design and control are analysed for buoyancy-driven ventilation in a room with two openings and uniform temperature. The optimal ratio between the inlet and outlet areas is found. The consequences of deviations from the optimum...

  12. Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    ABSTRACT Modeling Diffusion and Buoyancy-Driven Convection with Application to Geological CO2 Storage Rebecca Allen Geological CO2 storage is an engineering feat that has been undertaken around the world for more than two decades, thus accurate modeling of flow and transport behavior is of practical importance. Diffusive and convective transport are relevant processes for buoyancy-driven convection of CO2 into underlying fluid, a scenario that has received the attention of numerous modeling studies. While most studies focus on Darcy-scale modeling of this scenario, relatively little work exists at the pore-scale. In this work, properties evaluated at the pore-scale are used to investigate the transport behavior modeled at the Darcy-scale. We compute permeability and two different forms of tortuosity, namely hydraulic and diffusive. By generating various pore ge- ometries, we find hydraulic and diffusive tortuosity can be quantitatively different in the same pore geometry by up to a factor of ten. As such, we emphasize that these tortuosities should not be used interchangeably. We find pore geometries that are characterized by anisotropic permeability can also exhibit anisotropic diffusive tortuosity. This finding has important implications for buoyancy-driven convection modeling; when representing the geological formation with an anisotropic permeabil- ity, it is more realistic to also account for an anisotropic diffusivity. By implementing a non-dimensional model that includes both a vertically and horizontally orientated 5 Rayleigh number, we interpret our findings according to the combined effect of the anisotropy from permeability and diffusive tortuosity. In particular, we observe the Rayleigh ratio may either dampen or enhance the diffusing front, and our simulation data is used to express the time of convective onset as a function of the Rayleigh ratio. Also, we implement a lattice Boltzmann model for thermal convective flows, which we treat as an analog for

  13. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions...

  14. The Competition Between a Localised and Distributed Source of Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jamie; Linden, Paul

    2012-11-01

    We propose a new mathematical model to study the competition between localised and distributed sources of buoyancy within a naturally ventilated filling box. The main controlling parameters in this configuration are the buoyancy fluxes of the distributed and local source, specifically their ratio Ψ. The steady state dynamics of the flow are heavily dependent on this parameter. For large Ψ, where the distributed source dominates, we find the space becomes well mixed as expected if driven by an distributed source alone. Conversely, for small Ψ we find the space reaches a stable two layer stratification. This is analogous to the classical case of a purely local source but here the lower layer is buoyant compared to the ambient, due to the constant flux of buoyancy emanating from the distributed source. The ventilation flow rate, buoyancy of the layers and also the location of the interface height, which separates the two layer stratification, are obtainable from the model. To validate the theoretical model, small scale laboratory experiments were carried out. Water was used as the working medium with buoyancy being driven directly by temperature differences. Theoretical results were compared with experimental data and overall good agreement was found. A CASE award project with Arup.

  15. Kinetic energy and scalar spectra in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Shashikant S.; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2016-06-01

    Kinetic energy and scalar spectra from the measurements in high Rayleigh number axially homogeneous buoyancy driven turbulent flow are presented. Kinetic energy and concentration (scalar) spectra are obtained from the experiments wherein density difference is created using brine and fresh water and temperature spectra are obtained from the experiments in which heat is used. Scaling of the frequency spectra of lateral and longitudinal velocity near the tube axis is closer to the Kolmogorov-Obukhov scaling, while the scalar spectra show some evidence of dual scaling, Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling followed by Obukhov-Corrsin scaling. These scalings are also observed in the corresponding second order spatial structure functions of velocity and concentration fluctuations.

  16. Experimental Study of Wind-Opposed Buoyancy-Driven Natural Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, A.; Bjerre, M.; Chen, Z. D.; Heiselberg, Per; Li, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Natural ventilation driven by natural forces, i.e. wind and thermal buoyancy, is an environmentally friendly system for buildings and has been increasingly used around the world in recent years to mitigate the impact on the global environment due to the significant energy consumption by heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HV AC). There is a need for the understanding and development of theories and tools related to the design, operation and control of natural ventilation systems.

  17. Experimental Study of Wind-Opposed Buoyancy-Driven Natural Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A.; Bjerre, M.; Chen, Z. D.

    Natural ventilation driven by natural forces, i.e. wind and thermal buoyancy, is an environmentally friendly system for buildings and has been increasingly used around the world in recent years to mitigate the impact on the global environment due to the significant energy consumption by heating......, ventilation and air-conditioning (HV AC). There is a need for the understanding and development of theories and tools related to the design, operation and control of natural ventilation systems....

  18. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Li, Zhigang

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... quite well with the Epstein's formula but in other cases the measured data show clear deviations from the Epstein's formula. Thus, revised formulas for natural ventilation are proposed....

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF BUOYANCY ON FLOW AND POLLUTANT DISPERSION IN STREET CANYONS

    OpenAIRE

    Buccolieri, Riccardo; Pulvirenti, Beatrice; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Britter, Rex

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, the effect of buoyancy on flow and pollutant dispersion within street canyons is studied by means of computational fluid dynamics simulations. We consider a neutral boundary layer approaching a 3D street canyon assuming a wind direction perpendicular to the street canyon. The Boussinesq hypothesis for incompressible fluids is chosen for modelling buoyancy. We distinguish three cases: leeward, ground and windward wall heating. Thermal effects on both the flow ...

  20. Level-set simulations of buoyancy-driven motion of single and multiple bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcázar, Néstor; Lehmkuhl, Oriol; Jofre, Lluís; Oliva, Assensi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A conservative level-set method is validated and verified. • An extensive study of buoyancy-driven motion of single bubbles is performed. • The interactions of two spherical and ellipsoidal bubbles is studied. • The interaction of multiple bubbles is simulated in a vertical channel. - Abstract: This paper presents a numerical study of buoyancy-driven motion of single and multiple bubbles by means of the conservative level-set method. First, an extensive study of the hydrodynamics of single bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid is performed, including its shape, terminal velocity, drag coefficients and wake patterns. These results are validated against experimental and numerical data well established in the scientific literature. Then, a further study on the interaction of two spherical and ellipsoidal bubbles is performed for different orientation angles. Finally, the interaction of multiple bubbles is explored in a periodic vertical channel. The results show that the conservative level-set approach can be used for accurate modelling of bubble dynamics. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the present method is numerically stable for a wide range of Morton and Reynolds numbers.

  1. Influence of the variable thermophysical properties on the turbulent buoyancy-driven airflow inside open square cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Blas; Kaiser, Antonio S.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the air variable properties (density, viscosity and thermal conductivity) on the buoyancy-driven flows established in open square cavities are investigated, as well as the influence of the stated boundary conditions at open edges and the employed differencing scheme. Two-dimensional, laminar, transitional and turbulent simulations are obtained, considering both uniform wall temperature and uniform heat flux heating conditions. In transitional and turbulent cases, the low-Reynolds k - ω turbulence model is employed. The average Nusselt number and the dimensionless mass-flow rate have been obtained for a wide and not yet covered range of the Rayleigh number varying from 103 to 1016. The results obtained taking into account variable properties effects are compared with those calculated assuming constant properties and the Boussinesq approximation. For uniform heat flux heating, a correlation for the critical heating parameter above which the burnout phenomenon can be obtained is presented, not reported in previous works. The effects of variable properties on the flow patterns are analyzed.

  2. Buoyancy Driven Natural Ventilation through Horizontal Openings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study of the phenomenon of buoyancy driven natural ventilation through single-sided horizontal openings was performed in a full-scale laboratory test rig. The measurements were made for opening ratios L/D ranging from 0.027 to 4.455, where L and D are the length of the opening...... and the diameter of the opening, respectively. The basic nature of airflow through single-sided openings, including airflow rate, air velocity, temperature difference between the rooms and the dimensions of the horizontal openings, were measured. A bi-directional airflow rate was measured using the constant...... quite well with the Epstein's formula ratio are presented. In some cases the measured airflow rates fit quite well with the Epstein's formula but in other cases the measured data show clear deviations from the Epstein's formula. Thus, revised formulas for natural ventilation are proposed....

  3. Buoyancy-driven instability in a vertical cylinder: Binary fluids with Soret effect. I - General theory and stationary stability results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, G. R.; Sani, R. L.; Henry, D.; Roux, B.

    1990-01-01

    The buoyancy-driven instability of a monocomponent or binary fluid completely contained in a vertical circular cylinder is investigated, including the influence of the Soret effect for the binary mixture. The Boussinesq approximation is used, and the resulting linear stability problem is solved using a Galerkin technique. The analysis considers fluid mixtures ranging from gases to liquid metals. The flow structure is found to depend strongly on both the cylinder aspect ratio and the magnitude of the Soret effect. The predicted stability limits are shown to agree closely with experimental observations.

  4. On buoyancy-driven natural ventilation of a room with a heated floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladstone, Charlotte; Woods, Andrew W.

    2001-08-01

    The natural ventilation of a room, both with a heated floor and connected to a cold exterior through two openings, is investigated by combining quantitative models with analogue laboratory experiments. The heated floor generates an areal source of buoyancy while the openings allow displacement ventilation to operate. When combined, these produce a steady state in which the air in the room is well-mixed, and the heat provided by the floor equals the heat lost by displacement. We develop a quantitative model describing this process, in which the advective heat transfer through the openings is balanced with the heat flux supplied at the floor. This model is successfully tested with observations from small-scale analogue laboratory experiments. We compare our results with the steady-state flow associated with a point source of buoyancy: for a given applied heat flux, an areal source produces heated air of lower temperature but a greater volume flux of air circulates through the room. We generalize the model to account for the effects of (i) a cooled roof as well as a heated floor, and (ii) an external wind or temperature gradient. In the former case, the direction of the flow through the openings depends on the temperature of the exterior air relative to an averaged roof and floor temperature. In the latter case, the flow is either buoyancy dominated or wind dominated depending on the strength of the pressure associated with the wind. Furthermore, there is an intermediate multiple-solution regime in which either flow regime may develop.

  5. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to prevent a flow excursion from occurring in one or more of these parallel channels. During full-power operation, limits prevented a boiling flow excursion from taking place. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increases beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of historical levels

  6. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating heavy water moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to safeguard against a flow excursion in one of more of these parallel channels. During-full-power operation, limits safeguarded against a boiling flow excursion. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increased beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of the limiting power for previous long-term reactor operations

  7. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating heavy water moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to safeguard against a flow excursion in one of more of these parallel channels. During-full-power operation, limits safeguarded against a boiling flow excursion. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increased beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of the limiting power for previous long-term reactor operations.

  8. Density-ratio effects on buoyancy-driven variable-density turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2017-11-01

    Density-ratio effects on the turbulent mixing of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities subject to constant acceleration are studied by means of high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations. In a triply periodic domain, turbulence is generated by stirring in response to the differential buoyancy forces within the flow. Later, as the fluids become molecularly mixed, dissipation starts to overcome turbulence generation by bouyancy. Thus, the flow evolution includes both turbulence growth and decay, and it displays features present in the core region of the mixing layer of the Rayleigh-Taylor as well as Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. We extend the previous studies by investigating a broad range of density-ratio, from 1-14.4:1, corresponding to Atwood numbers of 0.05-0.87. Here, we focus on the Atwood number dependence of mixing-efficiency, that is defined based on the energy-conversion ratios from potential energy to total and turbulent kinetic energies, the decay characteristics of buoyancy-assisted variable-density homogeneous turbulence, and the effects of high density-ratios on the turbulence structure and mixing process. Authors acknowledge financial support from DOE-SSAA (DE-NA0003195) and NSF CAREER (#1453056) awards.

  9. Buoyancy-driven mixing of fluids in a confined geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallez, Y.

    2007-12-01

    The present work based on Direct Numerical Simulations is devoted to the study of mixing between two miscible fluids of different densities. The movement of these fluids is induced by buoyancy. Three geometries are considered: a cylindrical tube, a square channel and a plane two-dimensional flow. For cylindrical tubes, the results of numerical simulations fully confirm previous experimental findings by Seon et al., especially regarding the existence of three different flow regimes, depending on the tilt angle. The comparison of the various geometries shows that tridimensional flows in tubes or channels are similar, whereas the two-dimensional model fails to give reliable information about real 3D flows, either from a quantitative point of view or for a phenomenological understanding. A peculiar attention is put on a joint analysis of the concentration and vorticity fields and allows us to explain several subtle aspects of the mixing dynamics. (author)

  10. Simulation of buoyancy-induced turbulent flow from a hot horizontal jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    Experimental visualizations and numerical simulations of a horizontal hot water jet entering cold water into a rectangular storage tank are described. Three different temperature differences and their corresponding Reynolds numbers are considered. Both experimental visualization and numerical computations are carried out for the same flow and thermal conditions. The realizable k - ε model is used for modeling the turbulent flow while the buoyancy is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation. Polynomial approximations of the water properties are used to compare with the Boussinesq approximation. Numerical solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while pressure, velocity, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank as well as the Froude number are analyzed. The experimental visualizations are performed at intervals of five seconds for all different cases. The simulated results are compared with the visualized results, and both of them show the stratification phenomena and buoyancy force effects due to temperature difference and density variation. After certain times, depending on the case condition, the flow tends to reach a steady state. © 2014 Publishing House for Journal of Hydrodynamics.

  11. Numerical investigations of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in a simple atrium building and its effect on the thermal comfort conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Shafqat; Oosthuizen, Patrick H.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study use of solar-assisted buoyancy-driven natural ventilation in a simple atrium building is explored numerically with particular emphasis on the thermal comfort conditions in the building. Initially various geometric configurations of the atrium space were considered in order to investigate airflows and temperature distributions in the building using a validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) modelling approach with the SST-k–ω turbulence model and the Discrete Transfer Radiation Model (DTRM) was used for the investigations. The steady-state governing equations were solved using a commercial CFD solver FLUENT © . From the numerical results obtained, it was noted that an atrium space integrated with a solar chimney would be a relatively better option to be used in an atrium building. In the geometry selected, the performance of the building in response to various changes in design parameters was investigated. The produced airflows and temperature distributions were then used to evaluate indoor thermal comfort conditions in terms of the thermal comfort indices, i.e. the well-known predicted mean vote (PMV) index, its modifications especially for natural ventilation, predicted percent dissatisfied (PPD) index and Percent dissatisfied (PD) factor due to draft. It was found that the thermal conditions in the occupied areas of the building developed as a result of the use of solar-assisted buoyancy-driven ventilation for the particular values of the design parameters selected are mostly in the comfortable zone. Finally, it is demonstrated that the proposed methodology leads to reliable thermal comfort predictions, while the effect of various design variables on the performance of the building is easily recognized. - Highlights: ► Numerical investigations were carried for the use of buoyancy-driven displacement ventilation in a simple atrium building. ► Effect of various atrium

  12. Buoyancy and Pressure Driven Flow of Hot Gases in Vertical Shafts with Natural and Forced Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamm, Gunnar; Jaluria, Yogesh

    2003-11-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out on the buoyancy and pressure induced flow of hot gases in vertical shafts, in order to simulate the propagation of combustion products in elevator shafts due to fire in multilevel buildings. Various geometrical configurations are studied, with regard to natural and forced ventilation imposed at the top or bottom of the vertical shaft. The aspect ratio is taken at a fixed value of 6 and the inflow conditions for the hot gases, at a vent near the bottom, are varied in terms of the Reynolds and Grashof numbers. Temperature measurements within the shaft allow a detailed study of the steady state thermal fields, from which optimal means for smoke alleviation in high-rise building fires may be developed. Flow visualization is also used to study the flow characteristics. The results obtained indicate a wall plume as the primary transport mechanism. Flow recirculation dominates at high Grashof number flows, while increased Reynolds numbers gives rise to greater mixing in the shaft. The development and stability of the flow and its effect on the spread of smoke and hot gases are assessed for the different shaft configurations and inlet conditions. It is found that the fastest smoke removal and lowest shaft temperatures occur for a configuration with natural ventilation at the top and forced ventilation up from the shaft bottom. It is also shown that forced ventilation can be used to arrest smoke spread, as well as to dilute the effects of the fire.

  13. Influences of buoyancy and thermal boundary conditions on heat transfer with naturally-induced flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.; Li, J.

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental study is reported of heat transfer from a vertical heated tube to air which is induced naturally upwards through it by the action of buoyancy. Measurements of local heat transfer coefficient were made using a specially designed computer-controlled power supply and measurement system for conditions of uniform wall temperature and uniform wall heat flux. The effectiveness of heat transfer proved to be much lower than for conditions of forced convection. It was found that the results could be correlated satisfactorily when presented in terms of dimensionless parameters similar to those used for free convection heat transfer from vertical surfaces provided that the heat transfer coefficients were evaluated using local fluid bulk temperature calculated utilising the measured values of flow rate induced through the system. Additional experiments were performed' with pumped flow. These covered the entire mixed convection region. It was found that the data for naturally-induced flow mapped onto the pumped flow data when presented in terms of Nusselt number ratio (mixed to forced) and buoyancy parameter. Computational simulations of the experiments were performed using an advanced computer code which incorporated a buoyancy-influenced, variable property, developing wall shear flow formulation and a low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence model. These reproduced observed behaviour quite well. (author)

  14. The effect of buoyancy on flow and heat transfer in curved pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Mochizuki, Munekazu; Ishigaki, Hiroshi; 望月 宗和; 石垣 博

    1994-01-01

    Fully developed laminar flow in a heated horizontal curved pipe is studied numerically. The thermal boundary conditions at the wall are uniform wall heat flux axially and uniform wall temperature peripherally. Flow and heat transfer are governed by Dean number, Prandtl number and buoyancy number. Detailed prediction of the friction factor, average heat transfer rate, velocity profile, temperature profile and secondary-flow streamlines are given.

  15. An experimental and analytical study of a buoyancy driven cooling system for a particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, B.; Ranganathan, R.

    1993-05-01

    A buoyancy driven closed-loop cooling system that transports the heat generated in a particle accelerator to the ambient has been evaluated both through experiments performed earlier and analysis techniques developed elsewhere. Excellent comparisons between measurements and calculations have been obtained. The model illustrates the feasibility (from a heat transfer viewpoint) of such a cooling system for a particle accelerator

  16. An experimental and analytical study of a buoyancy driven cooling system for a particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, B.; Ranganathan, R.

    1993-01-01

    A buoyancy driven closed-loop cooling system that transports the heat generated in a particle accelerator to the ambient has been evaluated both through experiments performed earlier and analysis techniques developed elsewhere. Excellent comparisons between measurements and calculations have been obtained. The model illustrates the feasibility (from a heat transfer viewpoint) of such a cooling system for a particle accelerator

  17. Surface Buoyancy Fluxes and the Strength of the Subpolar Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, A. M.; Gayen, B.

    2017-12-01

    Midlatitude ocean gyres have long been considered to be driven by the mechanical wind stress on the ocean's surface (strictly speaking, the potential vorticity input from wind stress curl). However, surface buoyancy forcing (i.e. heating/cooling or freshening/salinification) also modifies the potential vorticity at the surface. Here, we present a simple argument to demonstrate that ocean gyres may (in principle) be driven by surface buoyancy forcing. This argument is derived in two ways: A Direct Numerical Simulation, driven purely by buoyancy forcing, which generates strong nonlinear gyers in the absence of wind stress; and A series of idealised eddy-resolving numerical ocean model simulations, in which wind stress and buoyancy flux are varied independently and together, are used to understand the relative importance of these two types of forcing. In these simulations, basin-scale gyres and western boundary currents with realistic magnitudes, remain even in the absence of mechanical forcing by surface wind stress. These results support the notion that surface buoyancy forcing can reorganise the potential vorticity in the ocean in such a way as to drive basin-scale gyres. The role of buoyancy is stronger in the subpolar gyre than in the subtropical gyre. We infer that surface buoyancy fluxes are likely to play a contributing role in governing the strength, variability and predictability of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre.

  18. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe : Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference

  19. Large eddy simulation of pollutant gas dispersion with buoyancy ejected from building into an urban street canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L H; Xu, Y; Zhu, W; Wu, L; Tang, F; Lu, K H

    2011-09-15

    The dispersion of buoyancy driven smoke soot and carbon monoxide (CO) gas, which was ejected out from side building into an urban street canyon with aspect ratio of 1 was investigated by large eddy simulation (LES) under a perpendicular wind flow. Strong buoyancy effect, which has not been revealed before, on such pollution dispersion in the street canyon was studied. The buoyancy release rate was 5 MW. The wind speed concerned ranged from 1 to 7.5m/s. The characteristics of flow pattern, distribution of smoke soot and temperature, CO concentration were revealed by the LES simulation. Dimensionless Froude number (Fr) was firstly introduced here to characterize the pollutant dispersion with buoyancy effect counteracting the wind. It was found that the flow pattern can be well categorized into three regimes. A regular characteristic large vortex was shown for the CO concentration contour when the wind velocity was higher than the critical re-entrainment value. A new formula was theoretically developed to show quantitatively that the critical re-entrainment wind velocities, u(c), for buoyancy source at different floors, were proportional to -1/3 power of the characteristic height. LES simulation results agreed well with theoretical analysis. The critical Froude number was found to be constant of 0.7. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of buoyancy on flow and heat transfer for a gas passing down a vertical pipe at low turbulent reynolds numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easby, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    For the analysis of low-flow situations in the core of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled reactor it is necessary to have a knowledge of the variation of pressure drop and heat transfer with flow and buoyancy influence. Nitrogen at 4 bar has been used to simulate the high pressure helium in the reactor and an experiment performed for downward flow in a heated vertical pipe. The measurements show that for the range of flow and buoyancy influence parameters investigated, (2000 6 ), friction factors are reduced by up to 20% compared with a correlation for isothermal flows and heat transfer is increased by up to 40% compared with a correlation for constant fluid properties. Agreement with the limit amount of previous data is quite satisfactory. The changes in heat transfer and friction factor with buoyancy influence can be attributed to distortion of the normally linear, radial shear stress profile. Simple equations have been determined to correlate the present results but extrapolation to conditions of high flow and buoyancy influence, where the interaction of forced and free convection may be different, is not advised. (author)

  1. Turbulence in two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, J.P.; Houze, R.N.; Buenger, D.E.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1981-01-01

    Hot film Anemometry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry have been employed in this work to study the turbulence characteristics of Bubbly and Stratified two-phase flows, respectively. Extensive consistency checks were made to establish the reliability and hence the utility of these experimental techniques for the measurement of turbulence in two-phase flows. Buoyancy-driven turbulence in vertical bubbly flows has been identified experimentally and correlated in terms of a shear velocity superposition approach. This approach provides a criterion for the demarcation of the buoyancy-driven turbulence region from the wall shear-generated turbulence region. Our data confirm the roughly isotropic behavior expected for buoyancy-driven turbulence. Upgrading of our experimental system will permit investigations of the wall-shear dominated regime (i.e., isotropy, superposition approach, etc.). The stratified flow data demonstrate clearly that the maximum in the mean velocity profile does not coincide with the zero shear plane, indicating the existence of a negative eddy viscosity region. Previous studies do not take into account this difference and thus they yield incorrect friction factor data in addition to certain puzzling behavior in the upper wall region. The conditioned turbulence data in the wavy region indicate interesting trends and that an appropriate normalization of intensities must take into account the shear velocity at the interfacial (wavy) region

  2. Validity of thermally-driven small-scale ventilated filling box models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jamie L.; Linden, P. F.

    2013-11-01

    The majority of previous work studying building ventilation flows at laboratory scale have used saline plumes in water. The production of buoyancy forces using salinity variations in water allows dynamic similarity between the small-scale models and the full-scale flows. However, in some situations, such as including the effects of non-adiabatic boundaries, the use of a thermal plume is desirable. The efficacy of using temperature differences to produce buoyancy-driven flows representing natural ventilation of a building in a small-scale model is examined here, with comparison between previous theoretical and new, heat-based, experiments.

  3. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics analysis of buoyancy-driven natural ventilation and entropy generation in a prismatic greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aich Walid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational analysis of the natural ventilation process and entropy generation in 3-D prismatic greenhouse was performed using CFD. The aim of the study is to investigate how buoyancy forces influence air-flow and temperature patterns inside the greenhouse having lower level opening in its right heated façade and also upper level opening near the roof top in the opposite cooled façade. The bot-tom and all other walls are assumed to be perfect thermal insulators. Rayleigh number is the main parameter which changes from 103 to 106 and Prandtl number is fixed at Pr = 0.71. Results are reported in terms of particles trajectories, iso-surfaces of temperature, mean Nusselt number, and entropy generation. It has been found that the flow structure is sensitive to the value of Rayleigh number and that heat transfer increases with increasing this parameter. Also, it have been noticed that, using asymmetric opening positions improve the natural ventilation and facilitate the occurrence of buoyancy induced upward cross air-flow (low-level supply and upper-level extraction inside the greenhouse.

  4. The analysis of repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    To safely and permanently store high-level nuclear waste, the potential Yucca Mountain repository site must mitigate the release and transport of radionuclides for tens of thousands of years. In the failure scenario of greatest concern, water would contact the waste package (WP), accelerate its failure rate, and eventually transport radionuclides to the water table. In a concept called the ''extended-dry repository,'' decay heat arising from radioactive waste extends the time before liquid water can contact a WP. Recent modeling and theoretical advances in nonisothermal, multiphase fracture-matrix flow have demonstrated (1) the critical importance of capillary pressure disequilibrium between fracture and matrix flow, and (2) that radioactive decay heat plays a dominant role in the ability of the engineered and natural barriers to contain and isolate radionuclides. Our analyses indicate that the thermo-hydrological performance of both the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) will be dominated by repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow for tens of thousands of years. For thermal loads resulting in extended-dry repository conditions, UZ performance is primarily sensitive to the thermal properties and thermal loading conditions and much less sensitive to the highly spatially and temporally variable ambient hydrologic properties and conditions. The magnitude of repository-heat-driven buoyancy flow in the SZ is far more dependent on the total mass of emplaced spent nuclear fuel (SNF) than on the details of SNF emplacement, such as the Areal Power Density [(APD) expressed in kill/acre] or SNF age

  5. Pressure-Driven Poiseuille Flow: A Major Component of the Torque-Balance Governing Pacific Plate Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, I. L.; Iaffaldano, G.; Davies, D. R.

    2018-01-01

    The Pacific Plate is thought to be driven mainly by slab pull, associated with subduction along the Aleutians-Japan, Marianas-Izu-Bonin, and Tonga-Kermadec trenches. This implies that viscous flow within the sub-Pacific asthenosphere is mainly generated by overlying plate motion (i.e., Couette flow) and that the associated shear stresses at the lithosphere's base are resisting such motion. Recent studies on glacial isostatic adjustment and lithosphere dynamics provide tighter constraints on the viscosity and thickness of Earth's asthenosphere and, therefore, on the amount of shear stress that asthenosphere and lithosphere mutually exchange, by virtue of Newton's third law of motion. In light of these constraints, the notion that subduction is the main driver of present-day Pacific Plate motion becomes somewhat unviable, as the pulling force that would be required by slabs exceeds the maximum available from their negative buoyancy. Here we use coupled global models of mantle and lithosphere dynamics to show that the sub-Pacific asthenosphere features a significant component of pressure-driven (i.e., Poiseuille) flow and that this has driven at least 50% of the Pacific Plate motion since, at least, 15 Ma. A corollary of our models is that a sublithospheric pressure difference as high as ±50 MPa is required across the Pacific domain.

  6. Natural ventilation of buildings: opposing wind and buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Paul; Hunt, Gary

    1998-11-01

    The use of natural ventilation in buildings is an attractive way to reduce energy usage thereby reducing costs and CO2 emissions. Generally, it is necessary to remove excess heat from a building and the designer can use the buoyancy forces associated with the above ambient temperatures within the building to drive a flow - 'stack' ventilation. The most efficient mode is displacement ventilation where warm air accumulates near the top of the building and flows out through upper level vents and cooler air flows in at lower levels. Ventilation will also be driven between these lower and upper openings by the wind. We report on laboratory modeling and theory which investigates the effects of an opposing wind on stack ventilation driven by a constant source of heat within a space under displacement ventilation. We show that there is a critical wind speed, expressed in dimensionless terms as a critical Froude number, above which displacement ventilation is replaced by (less efficient) mixing ventilation with reversed flow. Below this critical speed, displacement ventilation, in which the interior has a two-layer stratification, is maintained. The criterion for the change in ventilation mode is derived from general considerations of mixing efficiencies in stratified flows. We conclude that even when wind effects might appear to be dominant, the inhibition of mixing by the stable stratification within the space ensures that stack ventilation can operate over a wide range of apparently adverse conditions.

  7. A frictionally and hydraulically constrained model of the convectively driven mean flow in partially enclosed seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxworthy, T.

    1997-08-01

    A simple three-layer model of the dynamics of partially enclosed seas, driven by a surface buoyancy flux, is presented. It contains two major elements, a hydraulic constraint at the exit contraction and friction in the interior of the main body of the sea; both together determine the vertical structure and magnitudes of the interior flow variables, i.e. velocity and density. Application of the model to the large-scale dynamics of the Red Sea gives results that are not in disagreement with observation once the model is applied, also, to predict the dense outflow from the Gulf of Suez. The latter appears to be the agent responsible for the formation of dense bottom water in this system. Also, the model is reasonably successful in predicting the density of the outflow from the Persian Gulf, and can be applied to any number of other examples of convectively driven flow in long, narrow channels, with or without sills and constrictions at their exits.

  8. Numerical exploration of a non-Newtonian Carreau fluid flow driven by catalytic surface reactions on an upper horizontal surface of a paraboloid of revolution, buoyancy and stretching at the free stream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.L. Animasaun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Geometrically, the upper pointed surface of an aircraft and bonnet of a car are examples of upper horizontal surfaces of a paraboloid of revolution (uhspr. The motion of these objects strongly depends on the boundary layer that is formed within the immediate space on it. However, each of these surfaces is neither a horizontal/vertical nor cone/wedge and neither a cone nor a wedge. This article presents the motion of 2-dimensional Blasius flow of Carreau fluid on the surface of such object. The case in which the reaction between the Carreau fluid and catalyst at the surface produces significant temperature differences which consequently set up buoyancy-driven flows within the boundary layer is investigated. Single first-order Arrhenius kinetics is adopted to model the reaction on the surface of the catalyst situated on uhspr which initiates the free convection. Suitable similarity variables are applied to non-dimensionalized, parameterized and reduce the governing partial differential equations to a coupled ordinary differential equations (BVP. The BVP is solved numerically using the shooting technique. Temperature distribution in the flow of viscoelastic Carreau fluid is greater than that of a Newtonian fluid. Local heat transfer rate decreases faster when the Carreau fluid is characterized as shear-thinning. Maximum concentration is guaranteed at a small value of power-law index n and large value of thickness parameter. Keywords: Viscoelastic-Carreau fluid, Catalitic surface, Paraboloid of revolution, Numerical method, Uhspr, Boundary layer analysis

  9. Buoyancy Induced Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow Inside a Prismatic Cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aich, Walid; Omri, Ahmed; Ben Nasrallah, Sassi

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with a numerical simulation of natural convection flows in a prismatic cavity. This configuration represents solar energy collectors, conventional attic spaces of greenhouses and buildings with pitched roofs. The third dimension of the cavity is considered long enough for the flow to be considered 2D. The base is submitted to a uniform heat flux, the two top inclined walls are symmetrically cooled and the two vertical walls are assumed to be perfect thermal insulators. The aim of the study is to examine the thermal exchange by natural convection and effects of buoyancy forces on flow structure. The study provides useful information on the flow structure sensitivity to the governing parameters, the Rayleigh number (Ra) and the aspect ratio of the cavity. The hydrodynamic and thermal fields, the local Nusselt number, the temperature profile at the bottom and at the center of the cavity are investigated for a large range of Ra. The effect of the aspect ratio is examined for different values of Ra. Based on the authors knowledge, no previous results on natural convection in this geometry exist

  10. Experimental Study of a natural ventilation strategy in a Full-Scale Enclosure Under Meteorological Conditions: A Buoyancy-Driven Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Miguel Chen; Bruneau, Denis; Sempey, Alain; Mora, Laurent; Sommier, Alain

    2018-01-01

    The performance of a natural ventilation strategy, in a full-scale enclosure under meteorological conditions is studied through an experimental study, a buoyancy-driven approach, by means of the estimation of the air exchange rate per hour and ventilation power. A theoretical and an empirical model are proposed based on the airflow theory in buildings and blower-door tests. A preliminary validation, by comparing our results with standards in air leakage rate determination, is made. The experi...

  11. Centrifuge in space fluid flow visualization experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, William A.; Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Dunbar, Bonnie J.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype flow visualization system is constructed to examine buoyancy driven flows during centrifugation in space. An axial density gradient is formed by imposing a thermal gradient between the two ends of the test cell. Numerical computations for this geometry showed that the Prandtl number plays a limited part in determining the flow.

  12. Buoyancy-driven mixing of fluids in a confined geometry; Melange gravitationnel de fluides en geometrie confinee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallez, Y

    2007-12-15

    The present work based on Direct Numerical Simulations is devoted to the study of mixing between two miscible fluids of different densities. The movement of these fluids is induced by buoyancy. Three geometries are considered: a cylindrical tube, a square channel and a plane two-dimensional flow. For cylindrical tubes, the results of numerical simulations fully confirm previous experimental findings by Seon et al., especially regarding the existence of three different flow regimes, depending on the tilt angle. The comparison of the various geometries shows that tridimensional flows in tubes or channels are similar, whereas the two-dimensional model fails to give reliable information about real 3D flows, either from a quantitative point of view or for a phenomenological understanding. A peculiar attention is put on a joint analysis of the concentration and vorticity fields and allows us to explain several subtle aspects of the mixing dynamics. (author)

  13. Prominence Bubbles and Plumes: Thermo-magnetic Buoyancy in Coronal Cavity Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Thomas; Hurlburt, N.

    2009-05-01

    The Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope continues to produce high spatial and temporal resolution images of solar prominences in both the Ca II 396.8 nm H-line and the H-alpha 656.3 nm line. Time series of these images show that many quiescent prominences produce large scale (50 Mm) dark "bubbles" that "inflate" into, and sometimes burst through, the prominence material. In addition, small-scale (2--5 Mm) dark plumes are seen rising into many quiescent prominences. We show typical examples of both phenomena and argue that they originate from the same mechanism: concentrated and heated magnetic flux that rises due to thermal and magnetic buoyancy to equilibrium heights in the prominence/coronal-cavity system. More generally, these bubbles and upflows offer a source of both magnetic flux and mass to the overlying coronal cavity, supporting B.C. Low's theory of CME initiation via steadily increasing magnetic buoyancy breaking through the overlying helmut streamer tension forces. Quiescent prominences are thus seen as the lowermost parts of the larger coronal cavity system, revealing through thermal effects both the cooled downflowing "drainage" from the cavity and the heated upflowing magnetic "plasmoids" supplying the cavity. We compare SOT movies to new 3D compressible MHD simulations that reproduce the dark turbulent plume dynamics to establish the magnetic and thermal character of these buoyancy-driven flows into the corona.

  14. Marangoni-buoyancy convection in binary fluids under varying noncondensable concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaofa; Yoda, Minami

    2014-11-01

    Marangoni-buoyancy convection in binary fluids in the presence of phase change is a complex and poorly understood problem. Nevertheless, this flow is of interest in evaporative cooling because solutocapillary stresses could reduce film dryout. Convection was therefore studied in methanol-water (MeOH-H2O) layers of depth h ~ 1 - 3 mm confined in a sealed rectangular cell driven by horizontal temperature differences of ~6° C applied over ~ 5 cm. Particle-image velocimetry (PIV) was used to study how varying the fraction of noncondensables (i.e., air) ca from ~ 7 mol% to ambient conditions in the vapor space affects soluto- and thermocapillary stresses in this flow. Although solutocapillary stresses can be used to drive the flow towards hot regions, solutocapillarity appears to have the greatest effect on the flow at small ca, because noncondensables suppress phase change and hence the gradient in the liquid-phase composition at the interface. Surprisingly, convection at ca ~ 50 % leads to a very weak flow and significant condensation in the central portion of the layer i.e., away from the heated and cooled walls). Supported by ONR.

  15. The effects of buoyancy on shear-induced melt bands in a compacting porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    It has recently been shown [Holtzman, B., Groebner, N., Zimmerman, M., Ginsberg, S., Kohlstedt, D., 2003. Stress-driven melt segregation in partially molten rocks. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 4, Art. No. 8607; Holtzman, B.K., Kohlstedt, D.L., 2007. Stress-driven melt segregation and strain partitioning in partially molten rocks: effects of stress and strain. J. Petrol. 48, 2379-2406] that when partially molten rock is subjected to simple shear, bands of high and low porosity are formed at a particular angle to the direction of instantaneous maximum extension. These have been modeled numerically and it has been speculated that high porosity bands may form an interconnected network with a bulk, effective permeability that is enhanced in a direction parallel to the bands. As a result, the bands may act to focus mantle melt towards the axis of mid-ocean ridges [Katz, R.F., Spiegelman, M., Holtzman, B., 2006. The dynamics of melt and shear localization in partially molten aggregates. Nature 442, 676-679]. In this contribution, we examine the combined effects of buoyancy and matrix shear on a deforming porous layer. The linear theory of Spiegelman [Spiegelman, M., 1993. Flow in deformable porous media. Part 1. Simple analysis. J. Fluid Mech. 247, 17-38; Spiegelman, M., 2003. Linear analysis of melt band formation by simple shear. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 4, doi:10.1029/2002GC000499, Article 8615] and Katz et al. [Katz, R.F., Spiegelman, M., Holtzman, B., 2006. The dynamics of melt and shear localization in partially molten aggregates. Nature 442, 676-679] is generalized to include both the effects of buoyancy and matrix shear on a deformable porous layer with strain-rate dependent rheology. The predictions of linear theory are compared with the early time evolution of our 2D numerical model and they are found to be in excellent agreement. For conditions similar to the upper mantle, buoyancy forces can be similar to or much greater than matrix shear-induced forces. The

  16. Two-phase turbulent mixing and buoyancy drift in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, L.N.; Hammouda, N.; Rowe, D.S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of generalized relationships for single- and two-phase inter subchannel turbulent mixing in vertical and horizontal flows, and lateral buoyancy drift in horizontal flows. The relationships for turbulent mixing, together with a recommended one for void drift, have been implemented in a subchannel thermal hydraulics code, and assessed using a range of data on enthalpy migration in vertical steam-water lows under BWR and PWR diabatic conditions. The intent of this assessment as to optimize these relationships to give the best agreement with the enthalpy migration data for vertical flows. The optimized turbulent mixing relationships were then used as a basis to benchmark a proposed buoyancy rift model to give the best predictions of void and enthalpy migration data n horizontal flows typical of PHWR CANDU reactor operation under normal and off-normal conditions. Overall, the optimized turbulent mixing and buoyancy drift relationships have been found to predict the available data quite well, nd generally better and more consistently than currently used models. This is expected to result in more accurate calculations of subchannel distributions of phasic flows, and hence, in improved predictions of critical heat flux (CHF)

  17. Weakly Nonlinear Model with Exact Coefficients for the Fluttering and Spiraling Motion of Buoyancy-Driven Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchoufag, Joël; Fabre, David; Magnaudet, Jacques

    2015-09-01

    Gravity- or buoyancy-driven bodies moving in a slightly viscous fluid frequently follow fluttering or helical paths. Current models of such systems are largely empirical and fail to predict several of the key features of their evolution, especially close to the onset of path instability. Here, using a weakly nonlinear expansion of the full set of governing equations, we present a new generic reduced-order model based on a pair of amplitude equations with exact coefficients that drive the evolution of the first pair of unstable modes. We show that the predictions of this model for the style (e.g., fluttering or spiraling) and characteristics (e.g., frequency and maximum inclination angle) of path oscillations compare well with various recent data for both solid disks and air bubbles.

  18. THE DOMINANCE OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Multi-dimensional instabilities have become an important ingredient in core-collapse supernova (CCSN) theory. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the driving mechanism of the dominant instability. We compare our parameterized three-dimensional CCSN simulations with other buoyancy-driven simulations and propose scaling relations for neutrino-driven convection. Through these comparisons, we infer that buoyancy-driven convection dominates post-shock turbulence in our simulations. In support of this inference, we present four major results. First, the convective fluxes and kinetic energies in the neutrino-heated region are consistent with expectations of buoyancy-driven convection. Second, the convective flux is positive where buoyancy actively drives convection, and the radial and tangential components of the kinetic energy are in rough equipartition (i.e., K r ∼ K θ + K φ ). Both results are natural consequences of buoyancy-driven convection, and are commonly observed in simulations of convection. Third, buoyant driving is balanced by turbulent dissipation. Fourth, the convective luminosity and turbulent dissipation scale with the driving neutrino power. In all, these four results suggest that in neutrino-driven explosions, the multi-dimensional motions are consistent with neutrino-driven convection.

  19. Impact of co-flow air on buoyant diffusion flames flicker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohari Darabkhani, H., E-mail: h.g.darabkhani@gmail.com [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Wang, Q.; Chen, L.; Zhang, Y. [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Sheffield, Mapping Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} We present the co-flow effects on flickering behaviour of diffusion flames. {yields} Co-flow air is shown to fully suppress the buoyancy driven flame oscillations. {yields} Schlieren and PIV illustrate the shift of outer vortices beyond the flame zone. {yields} Stability controlling parameter as a ratio of air to fuel velocities is presented. {yields} Equation for linear increase in flickering frequency by co-flow air is presented. - Abstract: This paper describes experimental investigation of co-flow air velocity effects on the flickering behaviour of laminar non-lifted methane diffusion flames. Chemiluminescence, high-speed photography, schlieren and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), have been used to study the changes in the flame/vortex interactions as well as the flame flickering frequency and magnitude by the co-flow air. Four cases of methane flow rates at different co-flow air velocities are investigated. It has been observed that the flame dynamics and stability of co-flow diffusion flames are strongly affected by the co-flow air velocity. When the co-flow velocity has reached a certain value the buoyancy driven flame oscillation was completely suppressed. The schlieren and PIV imaging have revealed that the co-flow of air is able to push the initiation point of the outer toroidal vortices beyond the visible flame to create a very steady laminar flow region in the reaction zone. Then the buoyancy driven instability is only effective in the plume of hot gases above the visible flame. It is observed that a higher co-flow rate is needed in order to suppress the flame flickering at a higher fuel flow rate. Therefore the ratio of the air velocity to the fuel velocity, {gamma}, is a stability controlling parameter. The velocity ratio, {gamma}, was found to be 0.72 for the range of tested flow rates. The dominant flickering frequency was observed to increase linearly with the co-flow rate (a) as; f = 0.33a + 11. The frequency amplitudes

  20. The control variable method: a fully implicit numerical method for solving conservation equations for unsteady multidimensional fluid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Coq, G.; Boudsocq, G.; Raymond, P.

    1983-03-01

    The Control Variable Method is extended to multidimensional fluid flow transient computations. In this paper basic principles of the method are given. The method uses a fully implicit space discretization and is based on the decomposition of the momentum flux tensor into scalar, vectorial, and tensorial, terms. Finally some computations about viscous-driven flow and buoyancy-driven flow in cavity are presented

  1. Effects of Buoyancy on Laminar and Turbulent Premixed V-Flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Robert K.; Bedat, Benoit

    1997-01-01

    Turbulent combustion occurs naturally in almost all combustion systems and involves complex dynamic coupling of chemical and fluid mechanical processes. It is considered as one of the most challenging combustion research problems today. Though buoyancy has little effect on power generating systems operating under high pressures (e.g., IC engines and turbines), flames in atmospheric burners and the operation of small to medium furnaces and boilers are profoundly affected by buoyancy. Changes in burner orientation impacts on their blow-off, flash-back and extinction limits, and their range of operation, burning rate, heat transfer, and emissions. Theoretically, buoyancy is often neglected in turbulent combustion models. Yet the modeling results are routinely compared with experiments of open laboratory flames that are obviously affected by buoyancy. This inconsistency is an obstacle to reconciling experiments and theories. Consequently, a fundamental understanding of the coupling between turbulent flames and buoyancy is significant to both turbulent combustion science and applications. The overall effect of buoyancy relates to the dynamic interaction between the flame and its surrounding, i.e., the so-called elliptical problem. The overall flame shape, its flowfield, stability, and mean and local burning rates are dictated by both upstream and downstream boundary conditions. In steady propagating premixed flames, buoyancy affects the products region downstream of the flame zone. These effects are manifested upstream through the mean and fluctuating pressure fields to influence flame stretch and flame wrinkling. Intuitively, the effects buoyancy should diminish with increasing flow momentum. This is the justification for excluding buoyancy in turbulent combustion models that treats high Reynolds number flows. The objectives of our experimental research program is to elucidate flame-buoyancy coupling processes in laminar and turbulent premixed flames, and to

  2. Numerical investigation of the onset of centrifugal buoyancy in a rotating cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitz, Diogo B.; Marxen, Olaf; Chew, John

    2016-11-01

    Buoyancy-induced flows in a differentially heated rotating annulus present a multitude of dynamics when control parameters such as rotation rate, temperature difference and Prandtl number are varied. Whilst most of the work in this area has been motivated by applications involving geophysics, the problem of buoyancy-induced convection in rotating systems is also relevant in industrial applications such as the flow between rotating disks of turbomachinery internal air systems, in which buoyancy plays a major role and poses a challenge to accurately predict temperature distributions and heat transfer rates. In such applications the rotational speeds involved are very large, so that the centrifugal accelerations induced are much higher than gravity. In this work we perform direct numerical simulations and linear stability analysis of flow induced by centrifugal buoyancy in a sealed rotating annulus of finite gap with flat end-walls, using a canonical setup representative of an internal air system rotating cavity. The analysis focuses on the behaviour of small-amplitude disturbances added to the base flow, and how those affect the onset of Rossby waves and, ultimately, the transition to a fully turbulent state where convection columns no longer have a well-defined structure. Diogo B. Pitz acknowledges the financial support from the Capes foundation through the Science without Borders program.

  3. Characteristics of buoyancy force on stagnation point flow with magneto-nanoparticles and zero mass flux condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Uddin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This attempt dedicated to the solution of buoyancy effect over a stretching sheet in existence of MHD stagnation point flow with convective boundary conditions. Thermophoresis and Brownian motion aspects are included. Incompressible fluid is electrically conducted in the presence of varying magnetic field. Boundary layer analysis is used to develop the mathematical formulation. Zero mass flux condition is considered at the boundary. Non-linear ordinary differential system of equations is constructed by means of proper transformations. Interval of convergence via numerical data and plots are developed. Characteristics of involved variables on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Features of correlated parameters on Cf and Nu are examined by means of tables. It is found that buoyancy ratio and magnetic parameters increase and reduce the velocity field. Further opposite feature is noticed for higher values of thermophoresis and Brownian motion parameters on concentration distribution. Keywords: Stagnation point, MHD, Nanoparticles, Zero mass flux condition

  4. Numerical investigation on thermal performance and correlations of double skin facade with buoyancy-driven airflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pappas, Alexandra; Zhai, Zhiqiang [Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado, UCB 428, ECOT 441, Boulder, CO 80309-0428 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews the primary parameters for a double skin facade (DSF) design. The research presents an integrated and iterative modeling process for analyzing the thermal performance of DSF cavities with buoyancy-driven airflow by using a building energy simulation program (BESP) along with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package. A typical DSF cavity model has been established and simulated. The model and the modeling process have been calibrated and validated against the experimental data. The validated model was used to develop correlations that can be implemented in a BESP, allowing users to take advantage of the accuracy gained from CFD simulations without the required computation time. Correlations were developed for airflow rate through cavity, average and peak cavity air temperature, cavity air pressure, and interior convection coefficient. The correlations are valuable for 'back of the envelope' calculation and for examining accuracy of zonal-model-based energy and airflow simulation programs. (author)

  5. Buoyancy effects in vertical rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field and single sided heat load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostichev, P. I.; Poddubnyi, I. I.; Razuvanov, N. G.

    2017-11-01

    In some DEMO blanket designs liquid metal flows in vertical ducts of rectangular cross-section between ceramic breeder units providing their cooling. Heat exchange in these conditions is governed by the influence of magnetic field (coplanar) and by buoyancy effects that depend on the flow orientation to the gravity vector (downward and upward flow). Magnetohydrodynamic and heat transfer of liquid metal in vertical rectangular ducts is not well researched. Experimental study of buoyancy effects in rectangular duct with coplanar magnetic field for one-sided heat load and downward and upward flowsis presented in this paper. The detail research with has been done on mercury MHD close loop with using of the probe technique allow to discover several advantageous and disadvantageous effects. The intensive impact of buoyancy force has been observed in a few regime of downward flow which has been laminarized by magnetic field. Due to the development in the flow of the secondary large-scale vortices heat transfer improved and the temperature fluctuations of the abnormally high intensity have been fixed. On the contrary, in the upward flow the buoyancy force stabilized the flow which lead to decreasing of the turbulence heat transfer ratio and, consequently, deterioration of heat transfer.

  6. The effects of buoyancy on turbulent nonpremixed jet flames in crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxx, Isaac G.

    An experimental research study was conducted to investigate what effect buoyancy had on the mean and instantaneous flow-field characteristics of turbulent jet-flames in crossflow (JFICF). The study used an experimental technique wherein a series of normal-gravity, hydrogen-diluted propane JFICF were compared with otherwise identical ones in low-gravity. Experiments were conducted at the University of Texas Drop Tower Facility, a new microgravity science laboratory built for this study at the University of Texas at Austin. Two different diagnostic techniques were employed, high frame-rate digital cinematographic imaging and planar laser Mie scattering (PLMS). The flame-luminosity imaging revealed significant elongation and distortion of the large-scale luminous structure of the JFICF. This was seen to affect the flametip oscillation and burnout characteristics. Mean and root-mean-square (RMS) images of flame-luminosity were computed from the flame-luminosity image sequences. These were used to compare visible flame-shapes, flame chord-lengths and jet centerline-trajectories of the normal- and low-gravity flames. In all cases the jet-centerline penetration and mean luminous flame-width were seen to increase with decreasing buoyancy. The jet-centerline trajectories for the normal-gravity flames were seen to behave differently to those of the low-gravity flames. This difference led to the conclusion that the jet transitions from a momentum-dominated forced convection limit to a buoyancy-influenced regime when it reaches xiC ≈ 3, where xiC is the Becker and Yamazaki (1978) buoyancy parameter based on local flame chord-length. The mean luminous flame-lengths showed little sensitivity to buoyancy or momentum flux ratio. Consistent with the flame-luminosity imaging experiments, comparison of the instantaneous PLMS flow-visualization images revealed substantial buoyancy-induced elongation and distortion of the large-scale shear-layer vortices in the flow. This effect

  7. A weakly nonlinear model with exact coefficients for the fluttering and spiraling motions of buoyancy-driven bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnaudet, Jacques; Tchoufag, Joel; Fabre, David

    2015-11-01

    Gravity/buoyancy-driven bodies moving in a slightly viscous fluid frequently follow fluttering or helical paths. Current models of such systems are largely empirical and fail to predict several of the key features of their evolution, especially close to the onset of path instability. Using a weakly nonlinear expansion of the full set of governing equations, we derive a new generic reduced-order model of this class of phenomena based on a pair of amplitude equations with exact coefficients that drive the evolution of the first pair of unstable modes. We show that the predictions of this model for the style (eg. fluttering or spiraling) and characteristics (eg. frequency and maximum inclination angle) of path oscillations compare well with various recent data for both solid disks and air bubbles.

  8. Assessment of RANS and LES Turbulence Modeling for Buoyancy-Aided/Opposed Forced and Mixed Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Corey; Kimber, Mark

    2017-11-01

    Over the last 30 years, an industry-wide shift within the nuclear community has led to increased utilization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to supplement nuclear reactor safety analyses. One such area that is of particular interest to the nuclear community, specifically to those performing loss-of-flow accident (LOFA) analyses for next-generation very-high temperature reactors (VHTR), is the capacity of current computational models to predict heat transfer across a wide range of buoyancy conditions. In the present investigation, a critical evaluation of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) turbulence modeling techniques is conducted based on CFD validation data collected from the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel (RoBuT) at Utah State University. Four different experimental flow conditions are investigated: (1) buoyancy-aided forced convection; (2) buoyancy-opposed forced convection; (3) buoyancy-aided mixed convection; (4) buoyancy-opposed mixed convection. Overall, good agreement is found for both forced convection-dominated scenarios, but an overly-diffusive prediction of the normal Reynolds stress is observed for the RANS-based turbulence models. Low-Reynolds number RANS models perform adequately for mixed convection, while higher-order RANS approaches underestimate the influence of buoyancy on the production of turbulence.

  9. Pressure Driven Poiseuille Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stotz, Ingo Leonardo; Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Davies, D. Rhodri

    2018-01-01

    The Pacific plate is thought to be driven mainly by slab pull, associated with subduction along the Aleutians–Japan, Marianas–Izu–Bonin and Tonga–Kermadec trenches. This implies that viscous flow within the sub–Pacific asthenosphere is mainly generated by overlying plate motion (i.e. Couette flow...

  10. Hydrodynamics of piston-driven laminar pulsating flow: Part 2. Fully developed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aygun, Cemalettin; Aydin, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The piston-driven laminar pulsating flow in a pipe is studied. • Fully developed flow is examined analytically, numerically and experimentally. • An increase in F results an increase in the amplitude of the centerline velocity. • The characters of the radial velocity profiles critically depend on both the frequency and the phase angle. • The near/off-wall flow reversals are observed for F = 105, 226 and 402. - Abstract: Piston-driven pulsating flow is a specific type of pressure-driven pulsating flows. In this study, piston-driven laminar pulsating flow in a pipe is studied. This study mainly exists of two parts: developing flow and fully developed flow. In this part, hydrodynamically fully developed flow is examined analytically, numerically and experimentally. A constant value of the time-averaged Reynolds number is considered, Re = 1000. In the theoretical studies, both analytical and numerical, an inlet velocity profile representing the experimental case, i.e., the piston driven flow, is assumed. In the experiments, in the hydrodynamically fully developed region, radial velocity distribution and pressure drop are obtained using hot-wire anemometer and pressure transmitter, respectively. The effect pulsation frequency on the friction coefficient as well as velocity profiles are obtained. A good agreement is observed among analytical, numerical and experimental results

  11. Influence of radiation on predictive accuracy in numerical simulations of the thermal environment in industrial buildings with buoyancy-driven natural ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Xiaojing; Wang, Yi; Liu, Tiening; Xing, Xiao; Cao, Yingxue; Zhao, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of radiation on predictive accuracy in numerical simulations were studied. • A scaled experimental model with a high-temperature heat source was set up. • Simulation results were discussed considering with and without radiation model. • The buoyancy force and the ventilation rate were investigated. - Abstract: This paper investigates the effects of radiation on predictive accuracy in the numerical simulations of industrial buildings. A scaled experimental model with a high-temperature heat source is set up and the buoyancy-driven natural ventilation performance is presented. Besides predicting ventilation performance in an industrial building, the scaled model in this paper is also used to generate data to validate the numerical simulations. The simulation results show good agreement with the experiment data. The effects of radiation on predictive accuracy in the numerical simulations are studied for both pure convection model and combined convection and radiation model. Detailed results are discussed regarding the temperature and velocity distribution, the buoyancy force and the ventilation rate. The temperature and velocity distributions through the middle plane are presented for the pure convection model and the combined convection and radiation model. It is observed that the overall temperature and velocity magnitude predicted by the simulations for pure convection were significantly greater than those for the combined convection and radiation model. In addition, the Grashof number and the ventilation rate are investigated. The results show that the Grashof number and the ventilation rate are greater for the pure convection model than for the combined convection and radiation model.

  12. Effects of buoyancy and thermal radiation on MHD flow over a stretching porous sheet using homotopy analysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya Shagaiya Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the theoretical influence of buoyancy and thermal radiation on MHD flow over a stretching porous sheet. The model which constituted highly nonlinear governing equations is transformed using similarity solution and then solved using homotopy analysis method (HAM. The analysis is carried out up to the 5th order of approximation and the influences of different physical parameters such as Prandtl number, Grashof number, suction/injection parameter, thermal radiation parameter and heat generation/absorption coefficient and also Hartman number on dimensionless velocity, temperature and the rate of heat transfer are investigated and discussed quantitatively with the aid of graphs. Numerical results obtained are compared with the previous results published in the literature and are found to be in good agreement. It was found that when the buoyancy parameter and the fluid velocity increase, the thermal boundary layer decreases. In case of the thermal radiation, increasing the thermal radiation parameter produces significant increases in the thermal conditions of the fluid temperature which cause more fluid in the boundary layer due to buoyancy effect, causing the velocity in the fluid to increase. The hydrodynamic boundary layer and thermal boundary layer thickness increase as a result of increase in radiation.

  13. Regulation of ETG turbulence by TEM driven zonal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Yuuichi; Ishizawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Tomohiko; Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji

    2013-10-01

    Anomalous heat transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence is investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations. It is found that the ETG turbulence can be suppressed by zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes (TEMs). The TEMs appear in a statistically steady state of ETG turbulence and generate zonal flows, while its growth rate is much smaller than those of ETGs. The TEM-driven zonal flows with lower radial wave numbers are more strongly generated than those driven by ETG modes, because of the higher zonal flow response to a density source term. An ExB shearing rate of the TEM-driven zonal flows is strong enough to suppress the long-wavelength ETG modes which make the main contribution to the turbulent transport.

  14. Large-eddy simulation of open channel flow with surface cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, R.; Tejada-Martínez, A.E.; Martinat, G.; Grosch, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Open channel flow comparable to a shallow tidal ocean flow is simulated using LES. • Unstable stratification is imposed by a constant surface cooling flux. • Full-depth, convection-driven, rotating supercells develop when cooling is applied. • Strengthening of cells occurs corresponding to an increasing of the Rayleigh number. - Abstract: Results are presented from large-eddy simulations of an unstably stratified open channel flow, driven by a uniform pressure gradient and with zero surface shear stress and a no-slip lower boundary. The unstable stratification is applied by a constant cooling flux at the surface and an adiabatic bottom wall, with a constant source term present to ensure the temperature reaches a statistically steady state. The structure of the turbulence and the turbulence statistics are analyzed with respect to the Rayleigh number (Ra τ ) representative of the surface buoyancy relative to shear. The impact of the surface cooling-induced buoyancy on mean and root mean square of velocity and temperature, budgets of turbulent kinetic energy (and components), Reynolds shear stress and vertical turbulent heat flux will be investigated. Additionally, colormaps of velocity fluctuations will aid the visualization of turbulent structures on both vertical and horizontal planes in the flow. Under neutrally stratified conditions the flow is characterized by weak, full-depth, streamwise cells similar to but less coherent than Couette cells in plane Couette flow. Increased Ra τ and thus increased buoyancy effects due to surface cooling lead to full-depth convection cells of significantly greater spanwise size and coherence, thus termed convective supercells. Full-depth convective cell structures of this magnitude are seen for the first time in this open channel domain, and may have important implications for turbulence analysis in a comparable tidally-driven ocean boundary layer. As such, these results motivate further study of the

  15. Development and Assessment of CFD Models Including a Supplemental Program Code for Analyzing Buoyancy-Driven Flows Through BWR Fuel Assemblies in SFP Complete LOCA Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artnak, Edward Joseph, III

    This work seeks to illustrate the potential benefits afforded by implementing aspects of fluid dynamics, especially the latest computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling approach, through numerical experimentation and the traditional discipline of physical experimentation to improve the calibration of the severe reactor accident analysis code, MELCOR, in one of several spent fuel pool (SFP) complete loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) scenarios. While the scope of experimental work performed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) extends well beyond that which is reasonably addressed by our allotted resources and computational time in accordance with initial project allocations to complete the report, these simulated case trials produced a significant array of supplementary high-fidelity solutions and hydraulic flow-field data in support of SNL research objectives. Results contained herein show FLUENT CFD model representations of a 9x9 BWR fuel assembly in conditions corresponding to a complete loss-of-coolant accident scenario. In addition to the CFD model developments, a MATLAB based controlvolume model was constructed to independently assess the 9x9 BWR fuel assembly under similar accident scenarios. The data produced from this work show that FLUENT CFD models are capable of resolving complex flow fields within a BWR fuel assembly in the realm of buoyancy-induced mass flow rates and that characteristic hydraulic parameters from such CFD simulations (or physical experiments) are reasonably employed in corresponding constitutive correlations for developing simplified numerical models of comparable solution accuracy.

  16. A sharp interface immersed boundary method for vortex-induced vibration in the presence of thermal buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Hemanshul; Soti, Atul K.; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh

    2018-02-01

    We report the development of an in-house fluid-structure interaction solver and its application to vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of an elastically mounted cylinder in the presence of thermal buoyancy. The flow solver utilizes a sharp interface immersed boundary method, and in the present work, we extend it to account for the thermal buoyancy using Boussinesq approximation and couple it with a spring-mass system of the VIV. The one-way coupling utilizes an explicit time integration scheme and is computationally efficient. We present benchmark code verifications of the solver for natural convection, mixed convection, and VIV. In addition, we verify a coupled VIV-thermal buoyancy problem at a Reynolds number, Re = 150. We numerically demonstrate the onset of the VIV in the presence of the thermal buoyancy for an insulated cylinder at low Re. The buoyancy is induced by two parallel plates, kept in the direction of flow and symmetrically placed around the cylinder. The plates are maintained at the hot and cold temperature to the same degree relative to the ambient. In the absence of the thermal buoyancy (i.e., the plates are at ambient temperature), the VIV does not occur for Re ≤ 20 due to stable shear layers. By contrast, the thermal buoyancy induces flow instability and the vortex shedding helps us to achieve the VIV at Re ≤ 20, lower than the critical value of Re (≈21.7), reported in the literature, for a self-sustained VIV in the absence of the thermal buoyancy. The present simulations show that the lowest Re to achieve VIV in the presence of the thermal buoyancy is around Re ≈ 3, at Richardson number, Ri = 1. We examine the effect of the reduced velocity (UR), mass ratio (m), Prandtl number (Pr), Richardson number (Ri) on the displacement of the cylinder, lift coefficient, oscillation frequency, the phase difference between displacement and lift force, and wake structures. We obtain a significantly larger vibration amplitude of the cylinder over a wide

  17. ROLE OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND NUMERICAL RESOLUTION IN SIMULATIONS OF THE HEAT-FLUX-DRIVEN BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avara, Mark J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Bogdanović, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    The role played by magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is complex. The weakly collisional nature of the ICM leads to thermal conduction that is channeled along field lines. This anisotropic heat conduction profoundly changes the instabilities of the ICM atmosphere, with convective stabilities being driven by temperature gradients of either sign. Here, we employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the local non-linear behavior of the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) relevant in the cores of cooling-core clusters where the temperature increases with radius. We study a grid of two-dimensional simulations that span a large range of initial magnetic field strengths and numerical resolutions. For very weak initial fields, we recover the previously known result that the HBI wraps the field in the horizontal direction, thereby shutting off the heat flux. However, we find that simulations that begin with intermediate initial field strengths have a qualitatively different behavior, forming HBI-stable filaments that resist field-line wrapping and enable sustained vertical conductive heat flux at a level of 10%-25% of the Spitzer value. While astrophysical conclusions regarding the role of conduction in cooling cores require detailed global models, our local study proves that systems dominated by the HBI do not necessarily quench the conductive heat flux

  18. Numerical and Experimental Study on Negative Buoyance Induced Vortices in N-Butane Jet Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan; Cha, Min; Chung, Suk-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Near nozzle flow field in flickering n-butane diffusion jet flames was investigated with a special focus on transient flow patterns of negative buoyance induced vortices. The flow structures were obtained through Mie scattering imaging with seed

  19. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  20. Problems of mixed convection flow regime map in a vertical cylinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Gyeong Uk; Chung, Bum Jin

    2012-01-01

    One of the technical issues by the development of the VHTR is the mixed convection, which is the regime of heat transfer that occurs when the driving forces of both forced and natural convection are of comparable orders of magnitude. In vertical internal flows, the buoyancy force acts upward only, but forced flows can move either upward or downward. Thus, there are two types of mixed convection flows, depending on the direction of the forced flow. When the directions of the forced flow and buoyancy are the same, the flow is a buoyancy aided flow; when they are opposite, the flow is a buoyancy opposed flow. In laminar flows, buoyancy aided flow shows enhanced heat transfer compared to the pure forced convection and buoyancy opposed flow shows impaired heat transfer due to the flow velocity affected by the buoyancy forces. In turbulent flows, however, buoyancy opposed flows shows enhanced heat transfer due to increased turbulence production and buoyancy aided flow shows impaired heat transfer at low buoyancy forces and as the buoyancy increases, the heat transfer restores and at further increases of the buoyancy forces, the heat transfer is enhanced. It is of primary interests to classify which convection regime is mainly dominant. The methods most used to classify between forced, mixed and natural convection have been to refer to the classical flow regime map suggested by Meta is and Eckert. During the course of fundamental literature studies on this topic, it is found that there are some problems on the flow regime map in a vertical cylinder. This paper is to discuss problems identified through reviewing the papers composed in the classical flow regime map. We have tried to reproduce the flow regime map independently using the data obtained from the literatures and compared with the classical flow regime map and finally, the problems on this topic were discussed

  1. Some Exact Solutions of Boundary Layer Flows along a Vertical Plate with Buoyancy Forces Combined with Lorentz Forces under Uniform Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asterios Pantokratoras

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exact analytical solutions of boundary layer flows along a vertical porous plate with uniform suction are derived and presented in this paper. The solutions concern the Blasius, Sakiadis, and Blasius-Sakiadis flows with buoyancy forces combined with either MHD Lorentz or EMHD Lorentz forces. In addition, some exact solutions are presented specifically for water in the temperature range of 0∘C≤≤8∘C, where water density is nearly parabolic. Except for their use as benchmarking means for testing the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, the presented exact solutions with EMHD forces have use in flow separation control in aeronautics and hydronautics, whereas the MHD results have applications in process metallurgy and fusion technology. These analytical solutions are valid for flows with strong suction.

  2. Buoyancy-Driven Ventilation Generated by the Double-Skin Façade of a High-Rise Building in Tropical Climate: Case Study Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziiz Akhlish Diinal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-rise buildings in tropical region is identical to the use of mechanical Air Conditioning in massive scale. Nevertheless, there is an encouragement to high-rise buildings to reduce its energy consumptions, since they consume quite large amount of energy. This challenge can be overcome with various of strategies, one of them, by means of reducing the cooling load of mechanical Air Conditioning in high-rise building. Prospects come from the modern tall building design strategies, for example the use of double-skin façade to give addition of building skin which could provide indoor temperature protection from outside. Double-skin façade system has continued to increase in buildings in a tropical region such as in Indonesia. However, there is another potential of double skin façade, which is the possibility to increase the buoyancy effect in the air gap between the skin and building envelope. The possibility needs to be studied in order to give a proper way in designing double-skin façade of a high-rise building, especially on Bandung-Indonesia tropical climate. This paper explores the potential of double-skin façade in driving the air inside the façade to generate natural ventilation for a high-rise building in Bandung climate condition. Two parameters are used in exploring the buoyancy force, the width of double-skin façade and the temperature of the skin façade. In general, double-skin façade of a high-rise building in tropical climate can generate buoyancy driven ventilation for the building, it relates strongly to the distance between of the double-skin façade and the building envelope.

  3. Wind influence on a coastal buoyant outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Michael M.; Garvine, Richard W.

    2005-03-01

    This paper investigates the interplay between river discharge and winds in forcing coastal buoyant outflows. During light winds a plume influenced by the Earth's rotation will flow down shelf (in the direction of Kelvin wave propagation) as a slender buoyancy-driven coastal current. Downwelling favorable winds augment this down-shelf flow, narrow the plume, and mix the water column. Upwelling favorable winds drive currents that counter the buoyancy-driven flow, spread plume waters offshore, and rapidly mix buoyant waters. Two criteria are developed to assess the wind influence on a buoyant outflow. The wind strength index (Ws) determines whether a plume's along-shelf flow is in a wind-driven or buoyancy-driven state. Ws is the ratio of the wind-driven and buoyancy-driven along-shelf velocities. Wind influence on across-shelf plume structure is rated with a timescale (ttilt) for the isopycnal tilting caused by wind-driven Ekman circulation. These criteria are used to characterize wind influence on the Delaware Coastal Current and can be applied to other coastal buoyant outflows. The Delaware buoyant outflow is simulated for springtime high-river discharge conditions. Simulation results and Ws values reveal that the coastal current is buoyancy-driven most of the time (∣Ws∣ Wind events, however, overwhelm the buoyancy-driven flow (∣Ws∣ > 1) several times during the high-discharge period. Strong upwelling events reverse the buoyant outflow; they constitute an important mechanism for transporting fresh water up shelf. Across-shelf plume structure is more sensitive to wind influence than the along-shelf flow. Values of ttilt indicate that moderate or strong winds persisting throughout a day can modify plume width significantly. Plume widening during upwelling events is accompanied by mixing that can erase the buoyant outflow.

  4. Mixing and entrainment in hydraulically driven stratified sill flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard; Pratt, Larry; Helfrich, Karl

    2004-01-01

    The investigation involves the hydraulic behaviour of a dense layer of fluid flowing over an obstacle and subject to entrainment of mass and momentum from a dynamically inactive (but possibly moving) overlying fluid. An approach based on the use of reduced gravity, shallow-water theory with a cross......-interface entrainment velocity is compared with numerical simulations based on a model with continuously varying stratification and velocity. The locations of critical flow (hydraulic control) in the continuous model are estimated by observing the direction of propagation of small-amplitude long-wave disturbances...... that the reduced gravity model systematically underestimates inertia and overestimates buoyancy. These differences are quantified by shape coefficients that measure the vertical non-uniformities of the density and horizontal velocity that arise, in part, by incomplete mixing of entrained mass and momentum over...

  5. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.

    1988-12-01

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  6. Feedback mechanisms of shallow convective clouds in a warmer climate as demonstrated by changes in buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, G.; Koren, I.; Altaratz, O.; Feingold, G.

    2018-05-01

    Cloud feedbacks could influence significantly the overall response of the climate system to global warming. Here we study the response of warm convective clouds to a uniform temperature change under constant relative humidity (RH) conditions. We show that an increase in temperature drives competing effects at the cloud scale: a reduction in the thermal buoyancy term and an increase in the humidity buoyancy term. Both effects are driven by the increased contrast in the water vapor content between the cloud and its environment, under warming with constant RH. The increase in the moisture content contrast between the cloud and its environment enhances the evaporation at the cloud margins, increases the entrainment, and acts to cool the cloud. Hence, there is a reduction in the thermal buoyancy term, despite the fact that theoretically this term should increase.

  7. Numerical and Experimental Study on Negative Buoyance Induced Vortices in N-Butane Jet Flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-07-26

    Near nozzle flow field in flickering n-butane diffusion jet flames was investigated with a special focus on transient flow patterns of negative buoyance induced vortices. The flow structures were obtained through Mie scattering imaging with seed particles in a fuel stream using continuous-wave (CW) Argon-ion laser. Velocity fields were also quantified with particle mage velocimetry (PIV) system having kHz repetition rate. The results showed that the dynamic motion of negative buoyance induced vortices near the nozzle exit was coupled strongly with a flame flickering instability. Typically during the flame flickering, the negative buoyant vortices oscillated at the flickering frequency. The vortices were distorted by the flickering motion and exhibited complicated transient vortical patterns, such as tilting and stretching. Numerical simulations were also implemented based on an open source C++ package, LaminarSMOKE, for further validations.

  8. Internally driven inertial waves in geodynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.; Davidson, P. A.; Christensen, U. R.; Wicht, J.

    2018-05-01

    Inertial waves are oscillations in a rotating fluid, such as the Earth's outer core, which result from the restoring action of the Coriolis force. In an earlier work, it was argued by Davidson that inertial waves launched near the equatorial regions could be important for the α2 dynamo mechanism, as they can maintain a helicity distribution which is negative (positive) in the north (south). Here, we identify such internally driven inertial waves, triggered by buoyant anomalies in the equatorial regions in a strongly forced geodynamo simulation. Using the time derivative of vertical velocity, ∂uz/∂t, as a diagnostic for traveling wave fronts, we find that the horizontal movement in the buoyancy field near the equator is well correlated with a corresponding movement of the fluid far from the equator. Moreover, the azimuthally averaged spectrum of ∂uz/∂t lies in the inertial wave frequency range. We also test the dispersion properties of the waves by computing the spectral energy as a function of frequency, ϖ, and the dispersion angle, θ. Our results suggest that the columnar flow in the rotation-dominated core, which is an important ingredient for the maintenance of a dipolar magnetic field, is maintained despite the chaotic evolution of the buoyancy field on a fast timescale by internally driven inertial waves.

  9. Review of Mixed Convection Flow Regime Map of a Vertical pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, Myeong-Seon; Chung, Bum-Jin; Kang, Gyeong-Uk

    2015-01-01

    In a vertical pipe, the natural convective force due to buoyancy acts upward only, but forced convective force can be either upward or downward. This determines buoyancy-aided and buoyancy-opposed flows depending on the direction of forced flow with respect to the buoyancy forces. Furthermore, depending on the exchange mechanism, the flow condition is classified into laminar and turbulent. In laminar mixed convection, buoyancy-aided flow presents enhanced heat transfer compared to the pure forced convection and buoyancy-opposed flow shows impaired heat transfer as the flow velocity affected by the buoyancy forces. However, in turbulent mixed convection, buoyancy-aided flow shows an impairment of the heat transfer rate for small buoyancy, and a gradational enhancement for large buoyancy. In this study, the existing flow regime map on mixed convection in a vertical pipe was reviewed through an analysis of literatures. Using the investigated data and heat transfer correlations, the flow regime map was reconstructed independently, and compared with the existing one. This study reviewed the limitations of the classical mixed convection flow regime map. Using the existing data and heat transfer correlations by Martinelli and Boelter and Watzinger and Johnson, the flow regime map was reconstructed independently. The results revealed that the existing map used the data selectively among the experimental and theoretical results, and a detailed description for lines forming mixed convection and transition regime were not given. And the information about uncertainty analysis and the evidentiary data were given insufficiently. The flow regime map and investigator commonly used the diameter as the characteristic length for both Re and Gr in place of the height of the heated wall, though the buoyancy forces are proportional to the third power of the height of heated wall

  10. Hydrodynamic bifurcation in electro-osmotically driven periodic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Alexander; Marenduzzo, Davide; Larson, Ronald G.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we report an inertial instability that occurs in electro-osmotically driven channel flows. We assume that the charge motion under the influence of an externally applied electric field is confined to a small vicinity of the channel walls that, effectively, drives a bulk flow through a prescribed slip velocity at the boundaries. Here, we study spatially periodic wall velocity modulations in a two-dimensional straight channel numerically. At low slip velocities, the bulk flow consists of a set of vortices along each wall that are left-right symmetric, while at sufficiently high slip velocities, this flow loses its stability through a supercritical bifurcation. Surprisingly, the flow state that bifurcates from a left-right symmetric base flow has a rather strong mean component along the channel, which is similar to pressure-driven velocity profiles. The instability sets in at rather small Reynolds numbers of about 20-30, and we discuss its potential applications in microfluidic devices.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation of Driven Cavity Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.; Wissink, J.G.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D driven cavity flows have been performed. The simulations exhibit that the flow converges to a periodically oscillating state at Re=11,000, and reveal that the dynamics is chaotic at Re=22,000. The dimension of the attractor and the Kolmogorov entropy have been

  12. The Effects of Buoyancy on Characteristics of Turbulent Nonpremixed Jet Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idicheria, Cherian; Boxx, Isaac; Clemens, Noel

    2002-11-01

    This work addresses the influence of buoyant forces on the underlying structure of turbulent nonpremixed jet flames. Buoyancy effects are investigated by studying transitional and turbulent propane and ethylene flames (Re_D=2500-10500) at normal, low and microgravity conditions. The reduced gravity experiments are conducted by dropping a combustion rig in the University of Texas 1.25-second drop tower and the NASA Glenn 2.2-second drop tower. The diagnostic employed is high-speed luminosity imaging using a CCD camera. The images obtained are used to compare flame length, mean, RMS and flame tip oscillation characteristics The results showed that, in contrast to previous studies, the high Reynolds number flames at all gravity levels were essentially identical. Furthermore, the parameter ξL (Becker and Yamazaki, 1978) is sufficient for quantifying the effects of buoyancy on the flame characteristics. The large-scale structure and flame tip dynamics are essentially identical to those of purely momentum driven flames provided ξL is less than approximately 3.

  13. Hybrid upwind discretization of nonlinear two-phase flow with gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Efendiev, Y.; Tchelepi, H. A.

    2015-08-01

    time discretization to yield a fully implicit method. In the HU scheme, the phase flux is divided into two parts based on the driving force. The viscous-driven and buoyancy-driven phase fluxes are upwinded differently. Specifically, the viscous flux, which is always co-current, is upwinded based on the direction of the total-velocity. The buoyancy-driven flux across an interface is always counter-current and is upwinded such that the heavier fluid goes downward and the lighter fluid goes upward. We analyze the properties of the Implicit Hybrid Upwinding (IHU) scheme. It is shown that IHU is locally conservative and produces monotone, physically-consistent numerical solutions. The IHU solutions show numerical diffusion levels that are slightly higher than those for standard FIM (i.e., implicit PPU). The primary advantage of the IHU scheme is that the numerical overall-flux of a fluid phase remains continuous and differentiable as the flow regime changes between co-current and counter-current conditions. This is in contrast to the standard phase-potential upwinding scheme, in which the overall fractional-flow (flux) function is non-differentiable across the boundary between co-current and counter-current flows.

  14. Dynamic pore network simulator for modelling buoyancy-driven migration during depressurisation of heavy-oil systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezeuko, C.C.; McDougall, S.R. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Bondino, I. [Total E and P UK Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hamon, G. [Total S.A., Paris (France)

    2008-10-15

    In an attempt to investigate the impact of gravitational forces on gas evolution during solution gas drive, a number of vertically-oriented heavy oil depletion experiments have been conducted. Some of the results of these studies suggest the occurrence of gas migration during these tests. However, a major limitation of these experiments is the difficulty in visualizing the process in reservoir rock samples. Experimental observations using transparent glass models have been useful in this context and provide a sound physical basis for modelling gravitational gas migration in gas-oil systems. This paper presented a new pore network simulator that was capable of modelling the time-dependent migration of growing gas structures. Multiple pore filling events were dynamically modelled with interface tracking allowing the full range of migratory behaviours to be reproduced, including braided migration and discontinuous dispersed flow. Simulation results were compared with experiments and were found to be in excellent agreement. The paper presented the model and discussed the implication of evolution regime on recovery from heavy oil systems undergoing depressurization. The simulation results demonstrated the complex interaction of a number of network and fluid parameters. It was concluded that the concomitant effect on the competition between capillarity and buoyancy produced different gas evolution patterns during pressure depletion. 28 refs., 2 tabs., 19 figs.

  15. Parametric instability and wave turbulence driven by tidal excitation of internal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Reun, Thomas; Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the stability of stratified fluid layers undergoing homogeneous and periodic tidal deformation. We first introduce a local model which allows to study velocity and buoyancy fluctuations in a Lagrangian domain periodically stretched and sheared by the tidal base flow. While keeping the key physical ingredients only, such a model is efficient to simulate planetary regimes where tidal amplitudes and dissipation are small. With this model, we prove that tidal flows are able to drive parametric subharmonic resonances of internal waves, in a way reminiscent of the elliptical instability in rotating fluids. The growth rates computed via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are in very good agreement with WKB analysis and Floquet theory. We also investigate the turbulence driven by this instability mechanism. With spatio-temporal analysis, we show that it is a weak internal wave turbulence occurring at small Froude and buoyancy Reynolds numbers. When the gap between the excitation and the Brunt-V\\"ais\\"al\\"a frequencies is increased, the frequency spectrum of this wave turbulence displays a -2 power law reminiscent of the high-frequency branch of the Garett and Munk spectrum (Garrett & Munk 1979) which has been measured in the oceans. In addition, we find that the mixing efficiency is altered compared to what is computed in the context of DNS of stratified turbulence excited at small Froude and large buoyancy Reynolds numbers and is consistent with a superposition of waves.

  16. Analysis of Flow Evolution and Thermal Instabilities in the Near-Nozzle Region of a Free Plane Laminar Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Barrios-Piña

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the evolution of a free plane laminar jet in the near-nozzle region. The jet is buoyant because it is driven by a continuous addition of both buoyancy and momentum at the source. Buoyancy is given by a temperature difference between the jet and the environment. To study the jet evolution, numerical simulations were performed for two Richardson numbers: the one corresponding to a temperature difference slightly near the validity of the Boussinesq approximation and the other one corresponding to a higher temperature difference. For this purpose, a time dependent numerical model is used to solve the fully dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Density variations are given by the ideal gas law and flow properties as dynamic viscosity and thermal conductivity are considered nonconstant. Particular attention was paid to the implementation of the boundary conditions to ensure jet stability and flow rates control. The numerical simulations were also reproduced by using the Boussinesq approximation to find out more about its pertinence for this kind of flows. Finally, a stability diagram is also obtained to identify the onset of the unsteady state in the near-nozzle region by varying control parameters of momentum and buoyancy. It is found that, at the onset of the unsteady state, momentum effects decrease almost linearly when buoyancy effects increase.

  17. Perspectives on continuum flow models for force-driven nano-channel liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskok, Ali; Ghorbanian, Jafar; Celebi, Alper

    2017-11-01

    A phenomenological continuum model is developed using systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of force-driven liquid argon flows confined in gold nano-channels at a fixed thermodynamic state. Well known density layering near the walls leads to the definition of an effective channel height and a density deficit parameter. While the former defines the slip-plane, the latter parameter relates channel averaged density with the desired thermodynamic state value. Definitions of these new parameters require a single MD simulation performed for a specific liquid-solid pair at the desired thermodynamic state and used for calibration of model parameters. Combined with our observations of constant slip-length and kinematic viscosity, the model accurately predicts the velocity distribution and volumetric and mass flow rates for force-driven liquid flows in different height nano-channels. Model is verified for liquid argon flow at distinct thermodynamic states and using various argon-gold interaction strengths. Further verification is performed for water flow in silica and gold nano-channels, exhibiting slip lengths of 1.2 nm and 15.5 nm, respectively. Excellent agreements between the model and the MD simulations are reported for channel heights as small as 3 nm for various liquid-solid pairs.

  18. How Informative are the Vertical Buoyancy and the Prone Gliding Tests to Assess Young Swimmers’ Hydrostatic and Hydrodynamic Profiles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Tiago M.; Costa, Mário J.; Morais, Jorge E; Moreira, Marc; Silva, António J.; Marinho, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a path-flow analysis model to highlight the relationships between buoyancy and prone gliding tests and some selected anthropometrical and biomechanical variables. Thirty-eight young male swimmers (12.97 ± 1.05 years old) with several competitive levels were evaluated. It were assessed the body mass, height, fat mass, body surface area, vertical buoyancy, prone gliding after wall push-off, stroke length, stroke frequency and velocity after a maximal 25 [m] swim. The confirmatory model included the body mass, height, fat mass, prone gliding test, stroke length, stroke frequency and velocity. All theoretical paths were verified except for the vertical buoyancy test that did not present any relationship with anthropometrical and biomechanical variables nor with the prone gliding test. The good-of-fit from the confirmatory path-flow model, assessed with the standardized root mean square residuals (SRMR), is considered as being close to the cut-off value, but even so not suitable of the theory (SRMR = 0.11). As a conclusion, vertical buoyancy and prone gliding tests are not the best techniques to assess the swimmer’s hydrostatic and hydrodynamic profile, respectively. PMID:23486528

  19. 14 CFR 29.755 - Hull buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hull buoyancy. 29.755 Section 29.755... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Floats and Hulls § 29.755 Hull buoyancy. Water-based and amphibian rotorcraft. The hull and auxiliary floats, if used, must have enough...

  20. Study on flow rate measurement and visualization of helium-air exchange flow through a small opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with an experimental investigation on buoyancy-driven exchange flows through horizontal and inclined openings. The method of the mass increment was developed to measure the flow rate in helium-air system and a displacement fringe technique was adopted in Mach-Zehnder interferometer to visualize the flow. As the result, the followings were obtained: Flow visualization results indicate that the upward and downward plumes of helium and air break through the opening intermittently, and they swing in the lateral direction through the horizontal opening. It is clearly visualized that the exchange flows through the inclined openings take place smoothly and stably in the separated passages. The inclination angle for the maximum Froude number decreases with increasing length-to-diameter ratio in the helium-air system, on the contrary to Mercer's experimental results in the water-brine system indicating that the angle remains almost constant. (author)

  1. Is academic buoyancy anything more than adaptive coping?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, David W; Connors, Liz; Symes, Wendy; Douglas-Osborn, Erica

    2012-05-01

    Academic buoyancy refers to a positive, constructive, and adaptive response to the types of challenges and setbacks experienced in a typical and everyday academic setting. In this project we examined whether academic buoyancy explained any additional variance in test anxiety over and above that explained by coping. Two hundred and ninety-eight students in their final two years of compulsory schooling completed self-report measures of academic buoyancy, coping, and test anxiety. Results suggested that buoyancy was inversely related to test anxiety and unrelated to coping. With the exception of test-irrelevant thoughts, test anxiety was positively related to avoidance coping and social support. Test-irrelevant thoughts were inversely related to task focus, unrelated to social support, and positively related to avoidance. A hierarchical regression analysis showed that academic buoyancy explained a significant additional proportion of variance in test anxiety when the variance for coping had already been accounted for. These findings suggest that academic buoyancy can be considered as a distinct construct from that of adaptive coping.

  2. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Anando G.; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-01-01

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4

  3. Three dimensional numerical simulation of a full scale CANDU reactor moderator to study temperature fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarchami, Araz; Ashgriz, Nasser; Kwee, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D model of a Candu reactor is modeled to investigate flow distribution. • The results show the temperature distribution is not symmetrical. • Temperature contours show the hot regions at the top left-hand side of the tank. • Interactions of momentum flows and buoyancy flows create circulation zones. • The results indicate that the moderator tank operates in the buoyancy driven mode. -- Abstract: Three dimensional numerical simulations are conducted on a full scale CANDU Moderator and transient variations of the temperature and velocity distributions inside the tank are determined. The results show that the flow and temperature distributions inside the moderator tank are three dimensional and no symmetry plane can be identified. Competition between the upward moving buoyancy driven flows and the downward moving momentum driven flows in the center region of the tank, results in the formation of circulation zones. The moderator tank operates in the buoyancy driven mode and any small disturbances in the flow or temperature makes the system unstable and asymmetric. Different types of temperature fluctuations are noted inside the tank: (i) large amplitude are at the boundaries between the hot and cold; (ii) low amplitude are in the core of the tank; (iii) high frequency fluctuations are in the regions with high velocities and (iv) low frequency fluctuations are in the regions with lower velocities

  4. Coupled thermo-capillary and buoyancy convection in a liquid layer locally heated on its free surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, E.

    1997-01-01

    Coupled buoyancy and thermo-capillary convection lead to a convective motion of the interface liquid/gas, which changes drastically the heat and mass transfer across the liquid layer. Two experiments are considered, depending on the fluid: oil or mercury. The liquid is set in a cooled cylindrical vessel, and heated by a heat flux across the center of the free surface. The basic flow, in the case of oil, is a torus. When the heat parameter increases, a stationary flow looking like petals or rays appears when the aspect ratio length/depth is small, and like concentric rings in the case of large values of the aspect ratio. The lateral confinement selects the azimuthal length wave. In the case of petals-like flow, a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation is underlined. The turbulence is found to be 'weak', even for the largest values of the Marangoni number (Ma ≅ 1.3 * 10 5 ). In the case of mercury, the thermo-capillary effect is reduced to zero, due to impurities at the surface, which have special trajectories we describe and compare to a simpler experiment. The only buoyancy forces induces an un-stationary, weakly turbulent flow as soon as the heating power exceeds 4 W (≅ 4.5 * 10 3 , calculated with h = 1 mm). The last part concerns the analysis of the effect on the flow of the boundary conditions, the geometry, the Prandtl number, the buoyancy force, with the help of the literature. Results concerning heat transfer, especially the exponent of the law Nusselt number vs. heating power, are compared with available data. (author) [fr

  5. Effect of buoyancy on fuel containment in an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putre, H. A.

    1971-01-01

    Analysis aimed at determining the scaling laws for the buoyancy effect on fuel containment in an open-cycle gas-core nuclear rocket engine, so conducted that experimental conditions can be related to engine conditions. The fuel volume fraction in a short coaxial flow cavity is calculated with a programmed numerical solution of the steady Navier-Stokes equations for isothermal, variable density fluid mixing. A dimensionless parameter B, called the Buoyancy number, was found to correlate the fuel volume fraction for large accelerations and various density ratios. This parameter has the value B = 0 for zero acceleration, and B = 350 for typical engine conditions.

  6. Solar Dynamo Driven by Periodic Flow Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed that the periodicity of the solar magnetic cycle is determined by wave mean flow interactions analogous to those driving the Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the Earth's atmosphere. Upward propagating gravity waves would produce oscillating flows near the top of the radiation zone that in turn would drive a kinematic dynamo to generate the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. The dynamo we propose is built on a given time independent magnetic field B, which allows us to estimate the time dependent, oscillating components of the magnetic field, (Delta)B. The toroidal magnetic field (Delta)B(sub phi) is directly driven by zonal flow and is relatively large in the source region, (Delta)(sub phi)/B(sub Theta) much greater than 1. Consistent with observations, this field peaks at low latitudes and has opposite polarities in both hemispheres. The oscillating poloidal magnetic field component, (Delta)B(sub Theta), is driven by the meridional circulation, which is difficult to assess without a numerical model that properly accounts for the solar atmosphere dynamics. Scale-analysis suggests that (Delta)B(sub Theta) is small compared to B(sub Theta) in the dynamo region. Relative to B(sub Theta), however, the oscillating magnetic field perturbations are expected to be transported more rapidly upwards in the convection zone to the solar surface. As a result, (Delta)B(sub Theta) (and (Delta)B(sub phi)) should grow relative to B(sub Theta), so that the magnetic fields reverse at the surface as observed. Since the meridional and zonai flow oscillations are out of phase, the poloidal magnetic field peaks during times when the toroidal field reverses direction, which is observed. With the proposed wave driven flow oscillation, the magnitude of the oscillating poloidal magnetic field increases with the mean rotation rate of the fluid. This is consistent with the Bode-Blackett empirical scaling law, which reveals that in massive astrophysical bodies the magnetic moment tends

  7. Magma buoyancy and volatile ascent driving autocyclic eruptivity at Hekla Volcano (Iceland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautmann, Stefanie; Sacks, I. Selwyn; Linde, Alan T.; Roberts, Matthew J.

    2017-09-01

    Volcanic eruptions are typically accompanied by ground deflation due to the withdrawal of magma from depth and its effusion at the surface. Here, based on continuous high-resolution borehole strain data, we show that ground deformation was absent during the major effusion phases of the 1991 and 2000 eruptions of Hekla Volcano, Iceland. This lack of surface deformation challenges the classic model of magma intrusion/withdrawal as source for volcanic ground uplift/subsidence. We incorporate geodetic and geochemical observables into theoretical models of magma chamber dynamics in order to constrain quantitatively alternative co- and intereruptive physical mechanisms that govern magma propagation and system pressurization. We find the lack of surface deformation during lava effusion to be linked to chamber replenishment from below whilst magma migrates as a buoyancy-driven flow from the magma chamber towards the surface. We further demonstrate that intereruptive pressure build-up is likely to be generated by volatile ascent within the chamber rather than magma injection. Our model explains the persistent periodic eruptivity at Hekla throughout historic times with self-initiating cycles and is conceptually relevant to other volcanic systems.

  8. Measurement of buoyancy driven convection and microaccelerations on board International Space Station with the use of convection sensor Dacon-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putin, Gennady; Belyaev, Mikhail; Babushkin, Igor; Glukhov, Alexander; Zilberman, Evgeny; Maksimova, Marina; Ivanov, Alexander; Sazonov, Viktor; Nikitin, Sergey; Zavalishin, Denis; Polezhaev, Vadim

    The system for studying buoyancy driven convection and low-frequency microaccelerations aboard spacecraft is described. The system consists of: 1. facility for experimentation on a spaceship - the convection sensor and electronic equipment for apparatus control and for acquisition and processing of relevant information; 2. facility for ground-based laboratory modeling of various fluid motion mechanisms in application to orbital flight environment; 3. the system for computer simulations of convection processes in a fluid cell of a sensor using the data on microaccelerations obtained by accelerometers and another devices aboard the orbital station. The arrangement and functioning of the sensor and control hardware are expounded. The results of terrestrial experiments performed in order to determine the sensitivity of the sensor are described. The results of experiments carried out in 2008 - 2011 with the “DACON-M” apparatus in different modules of the Russian Segment of International Space Station and for various regimes of Station activity are reported. Experimental data recorded by “DACON-M” apparatus have been compared with the calculations of acceleration components based on the telemetry information about the orientation of the Station.

  9. Intermittency and transition to chaos in the cubical lid-driven cavity flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiseau, J-Ch [Department of Mechanics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Robinet, J-Ch [Laboratoire DynFluid, Arts et Métiers ParisTech, F-75013 Paris (France); Leriche, E, E-mail: loiseau@mech.kth.se [Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille, Université Lille 1, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-12-15

    Transition from steady state to intermittent chaos in the cubical lid-driven cavity flow is investigated numerically. Fully three-dimensional stability analyses have revealed that the flow experiences an Andronov–Poincaré–Hopf bifurcation at a critical Reynolds number Re {sub c} = 1914. As for the 2D-periodic lid-driven cavity flows, the unstable mode originates from a centrifugal instability of the primary vortex core. A Reynolds–Orr analysis reveals that the unstable perturbation relies on a combination of the lift-up and anti lift-up mechanisms to extract its energy from the base flow. Once linearly unstable, direct numerical simulations show that the flow is driven toward a primary limit cycle before eventually exhibiting intermittent chaotic dynamics. Though only one eigenpair of the linearized Navier–Stokes operator is unstable, the dynamics during the intermittencies are surprisingly well characterized by one of the stable eigenpairs. (paper)

  10. Tail thrust of bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix at different buoyancies, speeds, and swimming angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvy, C S; DuBois, A B

    1982-06-01

    1. The tail thrust of bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix was measured using a body accelerometer at different water speeds, buoyancies, and angles of water flow to determine the contribution of tail thrust in overcoming parasitic drag, induced drag, and weight directed along the track. The lengths and weights of the fish averaged 0.52 m and 1.50 kg respectively. 2. The tail thrust overcoming parasitic drag in Newtons, as measured during neutral buoyancy, was: 0.51 x speed + 0.15, with a standard error of estimate of 0.09 N. 3. When buoyancy was altered by the introduction or removal of air from a balloon implanted in the swim bladder, the tail thrust was altered by an amount of the same order as the value calculated for the induced drag of the pectoral fins. 4. The component of weight directed backward along the track was the weight in water multiplied by the sine of the angle of the swimming tunnel relative to horizontal. When this force was added to the calculated induced drag and tail thrust measured at neutral buoyancy, the rearward force equal to the tail thrust, at 45 ml negative buoyancy, 0.5 m s-1, and 15 degrees head up, was 0.12 N due to weight + 0.05 N due to induced drag + 0.40 N due to parasitic drag = 0.57 N total rearward force. 5. The conditions required for gliding were not achieved in our bluefish because the drag exceeded the component of the weight in water directed forward along the track at speeds above the stalling speed of the pectoral fins.

  11. An Integrated Capillary, Buoyancy, and Viscous-Driven Model for Brine/CO2Relative Permeability in a Compositional and Parallel Reservoir Simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, X.; Delshad, M.; Wheeler, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of CO2 storage in the saline aquifers is governed by the interplay of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. Recent experimental study reveals the impact of pressure, temperature, and salinity on interfacial tension (IFT) between CO2 and brine. The dependence of CO2-brine relative permeability and capillary pressure on pressure (IFT) is also clearly evident in published experimental results. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control the migration and trapping of CO2 in subsurface is crucial to design future storage projects that warrant long-term and safe containment. Simulation studies ignoring the buoyancy and also variation in interfacial tension and the effect on the petrophysical properties such as trapped CO2 saturations, relative permeability, and capillary pressure have a poor chance of making accurate predictions of CO2 injectivity and plume migration. We have developed and implemented a general relative permeability model that combines effects of pressure gradient, buoyancy, and IFT in an equation of state (EOS) compositional and parallel simulator. The significance of IFT variations on CO2 migration and trapping is assessed.

  12. An Integrated Capillary, Buoyancy, and Viscous-Driven Model for Brine/CO2Relative Permeability in a Compositional and Parallel Reservoir Simulator

    KAUST Repository

    Kong, X.

    2012-11-03

    The effectiveness of CO2 storage in the saline aquifers is governed by the interplay of capillary, viscous, and buoyancy forces. Recent experimental study reveals the impact of pressure, temperature, and salinity on interfacial tension (IFT) between CO2 and brine. The dependence of CO2-brine relative permeability and capillary pressure on pressure (IFT) is also clearly evident in published experimental results. Improved understanding of the mechanisms that control the migration and trapping of CO2 in subsurface is crucial to design future storage projects that warrant long-term and safe containment. Simulation studies ignoring the buoyancy and also variation in interfacial tension and the effect on the petrophysical properties such as trapped CO2 saturations, relative permeability, and capillary pressure have a poor chance of making accurate predictions of CO2 injectivity and plume migration. We have developed and implemented a general relative permeability model that combines effects of pressure gradient, buoyancy, and IFT in an equation of state (EOS) compositional and parallel simulator. The significance of IFT variations on CO2 migration and trapping is assessed.

  13. Heat transfer and fluid flow in regular rod arrays with opposing flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The heat transfer and fluid flow problem of opposing flow in the fully developed laminar region has been solved analytically for regular rod arrays. The problem is governed by two parameters: the pitch-to-diameter ratio and the Grashof-to-Reynolds number ratio. The critical Gr/Re ratios for flow separation caused by the upward buoyancy force on the downward flow were evaluated for a large range of P/D ratios of the triangular array. Numerical results reveal that both the heat transfer and pressure loss are reduced by the buoyancy force. Applications to nuclear reactors are discussed

  14. The `Henry Problem' of `density-driven' groundwater flow versus Tothian `groundwater flow systems' with variable density: A review of the influential Biscayne aquifer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, K. U.

    2017-12-01

    Coastal groundwater flow investigations at the Biscayne Bay, south of Miami, Florida, gave rise to the concept of density-driven flow of seawater into coastal aquifers creating a saltwater wedge. Within that wedge, convection-driven return flow of seawater and a dispersion zone were assumed by Cooper et al. (1964) to be the cause of the Biscayne aquifer `sea water wedge'. This conclusion was based on the chloride distribution within the aquifer and on an analytical model concept assuming convection flow within a confined aquifer without taking non-chemical field data into consideration. This concept was later labelled the `Henry Problem', which any numerical variable density flow program must be able to simulate to be considered acceptable. Both, `density-driven flow' and Tothian `groundwater flow systems' (with or without variable density conditions) are driven by gravitation. The difference between the two are the boundary conditions. 'Density-driven flow' occurs under hydrostatic boundary conditions while Tothian `groundwater flow systems' occur under hydrodynamic boundary conditions. Revisiting the Cooper et al. (1964) publication with its record of piezometric field data (heads) showed that the so-called sea water wedge has been caused by discharging deep saline groundwater driven by gravitational flow and not by denser sea water. Density driven flow of seawater into the aquifer was not found reflected in the head measurements for low and high tide conditions which had been taken contemporaneously with the chloride measurements. These head measurements had not been included in the flow interpretation. The very same head measurements indicated a clear dividing line between shallow local fresh groundwater flow and saline deep groundwater flow without the existence of a dispersion zone or a convection cell. The Biscayne situation emphasizes the need for any chemical interpretation of flow pattern to be supported by head data as energy indicators of flow fields

  15. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Buoyant Convection in Geophysical Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorovich, E; Viegas, D; Wyngaard, J

    1998-01-01

    Studies of convection in geophysical flows constitute an advanced and rapidly developing area of research that is relevant to problems of the natural environment. During the last decade, significant progress has been achieved in the field as a result of both experimental studies and numerical modelling. This led to the principal revision of the widely held view on buoyancy-driven turbulent flows comprising an organised mean component with superimposed chaotic turbulence. An intermediate type of motion, represented by coherent structures, has been found to play a key role in geophysical boundary layers and in larger scale atmospheric and hydrospheric circulations driven by buoyant forcing. New aspects of the interaction between convective motions and rotation have recently been discovered and investigated. Extensive experimental data have also been collected on the role of convection in cloud dynamics and microphysics. New theoretical concepts and approaches have been outlined regarding scaling and parameteriz...

  16. Buoyancy effects on thermal behavior of a flat-plate solar collector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of the flow and temperature distribution in a 12.53 m(2) solar collector panel with an absorber consisting of two vertical manifolds interconnected by 16 parallel horizontal fins have been carried out. The investigations are focused on overheating...... and the influence of the buoyancy effects are considered in the investigations. Further experimental investigations of the solar collector panel are carried out. The flow distribution through the absorber is evaluated by means of temperature measurements on the back of the absorber tubes. The measured temperatures....... The CFD calculations elucidate the flow and temperature distribution in the collector panels of different designs. Based on the investigations, recommendations are given in order to avoid overheating or boiling problems in the solar collector panel....

  17. Importance of initial buoyancy field on evolution of mantle thermal structure: Implications of surface boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petar Glišović

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there has been significant progress in the seismic imaging of mantle heterogeneity, the outstanding issue that remains to be resolved is the unknown distribution of mantle temperature anomalies in the distant geological past that give rise to the present-day anomalies inferred by global tomography models. To address this question, we present 3-D convection models in compressible and self-gravitating mantle initialised by different hypothetical temperature patterns. A notable feature of our forward convection modelling is the use of self-consistent coupling of the motion of surface tectonic plates to the underlying mantle flow, without imposing prescribed surface velocities (i.e., plate-like boundary condition. As an approximation for the surface mechanical conditions before plate tectonics began to operate we employ the no-slip (rigid boundary condition. A rigid boundary condition demonstrates that the initial thermally-dominated structure is preserved, and its geographical location is fixed during the evolution of mantle flow. Considering the impact of different assumed surface boundary conditions (rigid and plate-like on the evolution of thermal heterogeneity in the mantle we suggest that the intrinsic buoyancy of seven superplumes is most-likely resolved in the tomographic images of present-day mantle thermal structure. Our convection simulations with a plate-like boundary condition reveal that the evolution of an initial cold anomaly beneath the Java-Indonesian trench system yields a long-term, stable pattern of thermal heterogeneity in the lowermost mantle that resembles the present-day Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVPs, especially below the Pacific. The evolution of subduction zones may be, however, influenced by the mantle-wide flow driven by deeply-rooted and long-lived superplumes since Archean times. These convection models also detect the intrinsic buoyancy of the Perm Anomaly that has been identified as a unique

  18. Numerical simulation of stratified flows with different k-ε turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagestad, S.

    1991-01-01

    The thesis comprises the numerical simulation of stratified flows with different k-ε models. When using the k-ε model, two equations are solved to describe the turbulence. The k-equation represents the turbulent kinetic energy of the turbulence and the ε-equation is the turbulent dissipation. Different k-ε models predict stratified flows differently. The standard k-ε model leads to higher turbulent mixing than the low-Reynolds model does. For lower Froude numbers, F 0 , this effect becomes enhanced. Buoyancy extension of the k-ε model also leads to less vertical mixing in cases with strong stratification. When the stratification increases, buoyancy-extension becomes larger influence. The turbulent Prandtl number effects have large impact on the transport of heat and the development of the flow. Two different formulae which express the turbulent Prandtl effects have been tested. For unstably stratified flows, the rapid mixing and three-dimensionality of the flow can in fact be computed using a k-ε model when buoyancy-extended is employed. The turbulent heat transfer and thus turbulent production in unstable stratified flows depends strongly upon the turbulent Prandtl number effect. The main conclusions are: Stable stratified flows should be computed with a buoyancy-extended low-Reynolds k-ε model; Unstable stratified flows should be computed with a buoyancy-extended standard k-ε model; The turbulent Prandtl number effects should be included in the computations; Buoyancy-extension has lead to more correct description of the physics for all of the investigated flows. 78 refs., 128 figs., 17 tabs

  19. Backward flow in a surface tension driven micropump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Jongil; Park, Joong Yull; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Kyung Chun; Kim, Hyundong; Berthier, Erwin; Beebe, David J

    2008-01-01

    A surface tension driven micropump harnessing the pressure difference generated by drops of different curvature radii proves to be a simple and attractive passive method to drive fluid flow in microdevices. Here we observed the appearance of backward flow when the initial sizes of the droplets at the inlet and outlet ports are similar. To explain this phenomenon several hypotheses have been investigated. Consideration of the inertia of the fluid in the channel revealed that it alone is insufficient to explain the observed backward flow. We discovered that rotational flow inside the outlet droplet could be a source of inertia, explaining the generation of the backward flow. In addition, we have experimentally determined that the ratio of the volumes of the initial outlet drop and inlet drop correlates with the occurrence of the backward flow. (note)

  20. Analysis of Buoyancy Module Auxiliary Installation Technology Based on Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Songsen; Jiao, Chunshuo; Ning, Meng; Dong, Sheng

    2018-04-01

    To reduce the requirement for lifting capacity and decrease the hoist cable force during the descending and laying process of a subsea production system (SPS), a buoyancy module auxiliary installation technology was proposed by loading buoyancy modules on the SPS to reduce the lifting weight. Two models are established, namely, the SPS lowering-down model and the buoyancy module floating-up model. The main study results are the following: 1) When the buoyancy module enters the water under wave condition, the amplitude of tension fluctuation is twice that when SPS enters water; 2) Under current condition, the displacement of SPS becomes three times larger because of the existence of the buoyancy module; 3) After being released, the velocity of the buoyancy module increases to a large speed rapidly and then reaches a balancing speed gradually. The buoyancy module floats up at a balancing speed and rushes out from the water at a pop-up distance; 4) In deep water, the floating-up velocity of the buoyancy module is related to its mass density and shape, and it is not related to water depth; 5) A drag parachute can reduce floating-up velocity and pop-up distance effectively. Good agreement was found between the simulation and experiment results.

  1. Double Diffusive Natural Convection in a Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y. Hao; J. Nitao; T.A. Buscheck; Y. Sun

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we conduct a two-dimensional numerical analysis of double diffusive natural convection in an emplacement drift for a nuclear waste repository. In-drift heat and moisture transport is driven by combined thermal- and compositional-induced buoyancy forces. Numerical results demonstrate buoyancy-driven convective flow patterns and configurations during both repository heat-up and cool-down phases. It is also shown that boundary conditions, particularly on the drip-shield surface, have strong impacts on the in-drift convective flow and transport

  2. Stability analysis of hybrid-driven underwater glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wen-dong; Wang, Shu-xin; Wang, Yan-hui; Song, Yang; Zhu, Ya-qiang

    2017-10-01

    Hybrid-driven underwater glider is a new type of unmanned underwater vehicle, which combines the advantages of autonomous underwater vehicles and traditional underwater gliders. The autonomous underwater vehicles have good maneuverability and can travel with a high speed, while the traditional underwater gliders are highlighted by low power consumption, long voyage, long endurance and good stealth characteristics. The hybrid-driven underwater gliders can realize variable motion profiles by their own buoyancy-driven and propeller propulsion systems. Stability of the mechanical system determines the performance of the system. In this paper, the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider developed by Tianjin University is selected as the research object and the stability of hybrid-driven underwater glider unitedly controlled by buoyancy and propeller has been targeted and evidenced. The dimensionless equations of the hybrid-driven underwater glider are obtained when the propeller is working. Then, the steady speed and steady glide path angle under steady-state motion have also been achieved. The steady-state operating conditions can be calculated when the hybrid-driven underwater glider reaches the desired steady-state motion. And the steadystate operating conditions are relatively conservative at the lower bound of the velocity range compared with the range of the velocity derived from the method of the composite Lyapunov function. By calculating the hydrodynamic coefficients of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider, the simulation analysis has been conducted. In addition, the results of the field trials conducted in the South China Sea and the Danjiangkou Reservoir of China have been presented to illustrate the validity of the analysis and simulation, and to show the feasibility of the method of the composite Lyapunov function which verifies the stability of the Petrel-II hybrid-driven underwater glider.

  3. Micro Coriolis mass flow sensor driven by external piezo ceramic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Yaxiang; Groenesteijn, Jarno; Alveringh, Dennis; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2017-01-01

    We have realized a micro Coriolis mass flow meter driven with an external piezo ceramic. The piezoelec tric ceramic is glued on top of sensor chip with a inertial weight on top of the piezo ceramic. Its ability to measure mass flow is characterized by a laser Doppler vibrometer. Our measurement with

  4. Numerical simulation of double-diffusive mixed convective flow in rectangular enclosure with insulated moving lid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teamah, M.A. [Faculty of Engineering, Alexandria University, Mech. Eng. Dept, Alexandria (Egypt); El-Maghlany, W.M. [Faculty of Engineering, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is concerned with the mixed convection in a rectangular lid-driven cavity under the combined buoyancy effects of thermal and mass diffusion. Double-diffusive convective flow in a rectangular enclosure with moving upper surface is studied numerically. Both upper and lower surfaces are being insulated and impermeable. Constant different temperatures and concentration are imposed along the vertical walls of the enclosure, steady state laminar regime is considered. The transport equations for continuity, momentum, energy and spices transfer are solved. The numerical results are reported for the effect of Richardson number, Lewis number, and buoyancy ratio on the iso-contours of stream line, temperature, and concentration. In addition, the predicted results for both local and average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented and discussed for various parametric conditions. This study was done for 0.1 <= Le <= 50 and Prandtl number Pr = 0.7. Through out the study the Grashof number and aspect ratio are kept constant at 10{sup 4} and 2 respectively and -10 <= N <= 10, while Richardson number has been varied from 0.01 to 10 to simulate forced convection dominated flow, mixed convection and natural convection dominated flow. (authors)

  5. Inherent work suit buoyancy distribution: effects on lifejacket self-righting performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, Martin J; Long, Geoffrey M; Lunt, Heather; Tipton, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Accidental immersion in cold water is an occupational risk. Work suits and life jackets (LJ) should work effectively in combination to keep the airway clear of the water (freeboard) and enable self-righting. We hypothesized that inherent buoyancy, in the suit or LJ, would be beneficial for enabling freeboard, but its distribution may influence LJ self-righting. Six participants consented to complete nine immersions. Suits and LJ tested were: flotation suit (FLOAT; 85 N inherent buoyancy); oilskins 1 (OS-1) and 2 (OS-2), both with no inherent buoyancy; LJs (inherent buoyancy/buoyancy after inflation/total buoyancy), LJ-1 50/150/200 N, LJ-2 0/290/290 N, LJ-3 80/190/270 N. Once dressed, the subject entered an immersion pool where uninflated freeboard, self-righting performance, and inflated freeboard were measured. Data were compared using Friedman's test to the 0.05 alpha level. All suits and LJs enabled uninflated and inflated freeboard, but differences were seen between the suits and LJs. Self-righting was achieved on 43 of 54 occasions, irrespective of suit or LJ. On all occasions that self-righting was not achieved, this occurred in an LJ that included inherent buoyancy (11/54 occasions). Of these 11 failures, 8 occurred (73% of occasions) when the FLOAT suit was being worn. LJs that included inherent buoyancy, that are certified as effective on their own, worked less effectively from the perspective of self-righting in combination with a work suit that also included inherent buoyancy. Equipment that is approved for use in the workplace should be tested in combination to ensure adequate performance in an emergency scenario.

  6. A study of the pressure correction approach in the colocated grid arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miettinen, A. [Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    A pressure correction approach in a collocated grid arrangement is studied. The SIMPLE algorithm has been implemented into a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver for incompressible flows. A multigrid Poisson solver for the pressure correction equation is utilized. It has been tested alone and as a part of the Navier- Stokes solver. In the former case. the improvement in the convergence rate is remarkable. As a part of a carefully performed Navier-Stokes computation, the multigrid Poisson solver is able to decrease the total CPU time to one third. Cell-face velocity formulas for the continuity equation are also studied. The solution method is tested using several flow cases including a lid-driven cavity and a buoyancy-driven flow. The Rhie and Chow interpolation method and its simplified and limited versions are compared with each other. The traditional Rhie and Chow interpolation method had problems if the flow field contained a high pressure gradient, which can be overcome by using the two latter versions. For buoyancy-driven flows, a body force term in the cell-face velocity formula has been proposed, but the buoyancy-driven test case (Ra -> 10{sup 9}) indicated that this is not necessary. (orig.) 72 refs.

  7. Regulation of electron temperature gradient turbulence by zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Y.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Tsutsui, H.; Tsuji-Iio, S.

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent transport caused by electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes was investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulations. It was found that the ETG turbulence can be regulated by meso-scale zonal flows driven by trapped electron modes (TEMs), which are excited with much smaller growth rates than those of ETG modes. The zonal flows of which radial wavelengths are in between the ion and the electron banana widths are not shielded by trapped ions nor electrons, and hence they are effectively driven by the TEMs. It was also shown that an E × B shearing rate of the TEM-driven zonal flows is larger than or comparable to the growth rates of long-wavelength ETG modes and TEMs, which make a main contribution to the turbulent transport before excitation of the zonal flows.

  8. Experimental and theoretical studies of buoyant-thermo capillary flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favre, E.; Blumenfeld, L.; Soubbaramayer

    1996-01-01

    In the AVLIS process, uranium metal is evaporated using a high power electron gun. We have prior discussed the power balance equation in the electron beam evaporation process and pointed out, among the loss terms, the importance of the power loss due to the convective flow in the molten pool driven by buoyancy and thermo capillarity. An empirical formula has been derived from model experiments with cerium, to estimate the latter power loss and that formula can be used practically in engineering calculations. In order to complete the empirical approach, a more fundamental research program of theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out in Cea-France, with the objective of understanding the basic phenomena (heat transport, flow instabilities, turbulence, etc.) occurring in a convective flow in a liquid layer locally heated on its free surface

  9. RANS Modeling of Stably Stratified Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows in OpenFOAM®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jordan M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying mixing processes relating to the transport of heat, momentum, and scalar quantities of stably stratified turbulent geophysical flows remains a substantial task. In a stably stratified flow, such as the stable atmospheric boundary layer (SABL, buoyancy forces have a significant impact on the flow characteristics. This study investigates constant and stability-dependent turbulent Prandtl number (Prt formulations linking the turbulent viscosity (νt and diffusivity (κt for modeling applications of boundary layer flows. Numerical simulations of plane Couette flow and pressure-driven channel flow are performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS framework with the standard k-ε turbulence model. Results are compared with DNS data to evaluate model efficacy for predicting mean velocity and density fields. In channel flow simulations, a Prandtl number formulation for wall-bounded flows is introduced to alleviate overmixing of the mean density field. This research reveals that appropriate specification of Prt can improve predictions of stably stratified turbulent boundary layer flows.

  10. Processes governing transient responses of the deep ocean buoyancy budget to a doubling of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palter, J. B.; Griffies, S. M.; Hunter Samuels, B. L.; Galbraith, E. D.; Gnanadesikan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observational analyses suggest there is a temporal trend and high-frequency variability in deep ocean buoyancy in the last twenty years, a phenomenon reproduced even in low-mixing models. Here we use an earth system model (GFDL's ESM2M) to evaluate physical processes that influence buoyancy (and thus steric sea level) budget of the deep ocean in quasi-steady state and under a doubling of CO2. A new suite of model diagnostics allows us to quantitatively assess every process that influences the buoyancy budget and its temporal evolution, revealing surprising dynamics governing both the equilibrium budget and its transient response to climate change. The results suggest that the temporal evolution of the deep ocean contribution to sea level rise is due to a diversity of processes at high latitudes, whose net effect is then advected in the Eulerian mean flow to mid and low latitudes. In the Southern Ocean, a slowdown in convection and spin up of the residual mean advection are approximately equal players in the deep steric sea level rise. In the North Atlantic, the region of greatest deep steric sea level variability in our simulations, a decrease in mixing of cold, dense waters from the marginal seas and a reduction in open ocean convection causes an accumulation of buoyancy in the deep subpolar gyre, which is then advected equatorward.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Study of Electromagnetically Driven Vortical Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Verdoold, J.; Tummers, M.J.; Hanjalic, K.; Kleijn, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    The paper reports on numerical and experimental investigations of electromagnetically driven vortical flows of an electrically conductive fluid in a generic setup. Two different configurations of permanent magnets are considered: a 3-magnet configuration in which the resulting Lorentz force is

  12. 46 CFR 160.010-5 - Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. 160.010-5... Vessels § 160.010-5 Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. (a) Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy must have a plastic foam body with an external protective covering. The body may be reinforced as...

  13. Pressure-driven occlusive flow of a confined red blood cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Thierry; Bandi, M M; Mahadevan, L

    2016-01-14

    When red blood cells (RBCs) move through narrow capillaries in the microcirculation, they deform as they flow. In pathophysiological processes such as sickle cell disease and malaria, RBC motion and flow are severely restricted. To understand this threshold of occlusion, we use a combination of experiment and theory to study the motion of a single swollen RBC through a narrow glass capillary of varying inner diameter. By tracking the movement of the squeezed cell as it is driven by a controlled pressure drop, we measure the RBC velocity as a function of the pressure gradient as well as the local capillary diameter, and find that the effective blood viscosity in this regime increases with both decreasing RBC velocity and tube radius by following a power-law that depends upon the length of the confined cell. Our observations are consistent with a simple elasto-hydrodynamic model and highlight the role of lateral confinement in the occluded pressure-driven slow flow of soft confined objects.

  14. Self-driven particles in linear flows and trapped in a harmonic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Mario; Hidalgo-Gonzalez, Julio C.; Jimenez-Aquino, Jose I.

    2018-03-01

    We present analytical expressions for the mean-square displacement of self-driven particles in general linear flows and trapped in a harmonic potential. The general expressions are applied to three types of linear flows, namely, shear flow, solid-body rotation flow, and extensional flow. By using Brownian dynamics simulations, the effect of trapping and external linear flows on the particles' distribution is also elucidated. These simulations also enabled us to validate our theoretical results.

  15. Effect of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux on buoyancy MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of Joule heating and thermal radiation impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonchi, A. S.; Ganji, D. D.

    2018-06-01

    In this study, buoyancy MHD nanofluid flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet in the presence of Joule heating and thermal radiation impacts, are studied. Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model instead of conventional Fourier's law of heat conduction is applied to investigate the heat transfer characteristics. A similarity transformation is used to transmute the governing momentum and energy equations into non-linear ordinary differential equations with the appropriate boundary conditions. The obtained non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically. The impacts of diverse active parameters such as the magnetic parameter, the radiation parameter, the buoyancy parameter, the heat source parameter, the volume fraction of nanofluid and the thermal relaxation parameter are examined on the velocity and temperature profiles. In addition, the value of the Nusselt number is calculated and presented through figures. The results demonstrate that the temperature profile is lower in the case of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model as compared to Fourier's law. Moreover, the Nusselt number raises with the raising volume fraction of nanofluid and it abates with the ascending the radiation parameter.

  16. Developing Buoyancy Driven Flow of a Nanofluid in a Vertical Channel Subject to Heat Flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal C. Sacheti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The developing natural convective flow of a nanofluid in an infinite vertical channel with impermeable bounding walls has been investigated. It is assumed that the nanofluid is dominated by two specific slip mechanisms and that the channel walls are subject to constant heat flux and isothermal temperature, respectively. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations coupling different transport processes have been solved numerically. The variations of velocity, temperature, and nanoparticles concentration have been discussed in relation to a number of physical parameters. It is seen that the approach to the steady-state profiles of velocity and temperature in the present work is different from the ones reported in a previous study corresponding to isothermal wall conditions.

  17. Amazon rainforest exchange of carbon and subcanopy air flow: Manaus LBA site--a complex terrain condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóta, Julio; Fitzjarrald, David Roy; da Silva Dias, Maria A F

    2012-01-01

    On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras--ZF2--02°36'17.1'' S, 60°12'24.4'' W), subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO(2) concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008) was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO(2) sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy) and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy) flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12%) was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m) over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO(2)) were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO(2) into those estimates.

  18. Detailed flow analysis for the Three Mile Island unit 2 reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillington, J.N.; Lyons, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Some particular characteristics of the steam flow in the accident at the Three Mile Island unit 2 pressurized water reactor are investigated using the AEA Technology Flow3D code. Natural circulation flows with heat removal from the core and deposition in the upper plenum are predicted during the primary heating phase. The structure of the upper plenum cylinder and core blockage, owing to material relocation, are shown to force the flow into a complex three-dimensional pattern. The flows and temperature distributions from the calculations are shown to be consistent with the observed damage pattern above the core. Despite high core temperatures, damage was limited by the operation of one of the pumps at the end of the initial heating phase. Flow3D calculations are also carried out to demonstrate that the three-dimensional buoyancy driven flows are completely destroyed by the high steam generation rates arising from the pump operation. (author)

  19. Tidally-driven Surface Flow in a Georgia Estuarine Saltmarsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D.; Bruder, B. L.; Haas, K. A.; Webster, D. R.

    2016-02-01

    Estuarine saltmarshes are diverse, valuable, and productive ecosystems. Vegetation dampens wave and current energy, thereby allowing the estuaries to serve as a nursery habitat for shellfish and fish species. Tidally-driven flow transports nutrients into and out of the estuary, nourishing inshore and offshore vegetation and animals. The effects of vegetation on the marsh hydrodynamics and on the estuary creek and channel flow are, unfortunately, poorly understood, and the knowledge that does exist primarily originates from modeling studies. Field studies addressing marsh surface flows are limited due to the difficulty of accurately measuring the water surface elevation and acquiring concurrent velocity measurements in the dense marsh vegetation. This study partially bridges the gap between the model observations of marsh flow driven by water surface elevation gradients and flume studies of flow through vegetation. Three current meters and three pressure transducers were deployed for three days along a transect perpendicular to the main channel (Little Ogeechee River) in a saltmarsh adjacent to Rose Dhu Island (Savannah, Georgia, USA). The pressure transducer locations were surveyed daily with static GPS yielding highly accurate water surface elevation data. During flood and ebb tide, water surface elevation differences between the marsh and Little Ogeechee River were observed up to 15 cm and pressure gradients were observed up to 0.0017 m of water surface elevation drop per m of linear distance. The resulting channel-to-saltmarsh pressure gradients substantially affected tidal currents at all current meters. At one current meter, the velocity was nearly perpendicular to the Little Ogeechee River bank. The velocity at this location was effectively modeled as a balance between the pressure gradient and marsh vegetation-induced drag force using the Darcy-Weisbach/Lindner's equations developed for flow-through-vegetation analysis in open channel flow.

  20. Global characteristics of zonal flows generated by ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyato, Naoaki; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Li, Jiquan

    2004-08-01

    Global structure of zonal flows driven by ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a global electromagnetic Landau fluid code. Characteristics of the coupled system of the zonal flows and the turbulence change with the safety factor q. In a low q region stationary zonal flows are excited and suppress the turbulence effectively. Coupling between zonal flows and poloidally asymmetric pressure perturbations via a geodesic curvature makes the zonal flows oscillatory in a high q region. Also we identify energy transfer from the zonal flows to the turbulence via the poloidally asymmetric pressure perturbations in the high q region. Therefore in the high q region the zonal flows cannot quench the turbulent transport completely. (author)

  1. Nonlinear entropy transfer in ETG-TEM turbulence via TEM driven zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, Yuuichi; Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Tsuji-Iio, Shunji; Ishizawa, Akihiro; Sugama, Hideo; Watanabe, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    Nonlinear interplay of the electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes and the trapped electron modes (TEMs) was investigated by means of gyrokinetic simulation. Focusing on the situation where both TEMs and ETG modes are linearly unstable, the effects of TEM-driven zonal flows on ETG turbulence were examined by means of entropy transfer analysis. In a statistically steady turbulence where the TEM driven zonal flows are dominant, it turned out that the zonal flows meditate the entropy transfer of the ETG modes from the low to high radial wavenumber regions. The successive entropy transfer broadens the potential fluctuation spectrum in the radial wavenumber direction. In contrast, in the situation where ETG modes are unstable but TEMs are stable, the pure ETG turbulence does not produce strong zonal flows, leading to a rather narrow spectrum in the radial wavenumber space and a higher transport level. (author)

  2. Buoyancy disorders in pet axolotls Ambystoma mexicanum: three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, Yoshinori; Une, Yumi

    2018-01-31

    As far as we are aware, there are no previous reports on the pathologic conditions of buoyancy disorders in Ambystoma mexicanum. Herein, we describe various clinical test results, clinical outcomes, and the pathological findings of an experimental pneumonectomy procedure in 3 A. mexicanum exhibiting abnormal buoyancy. The 3 pet A. mexicanum were adults, and their respective ages and body weights were 1, 5, and 6 yr and 48, 55, and 56 g. Two of these cases were confirmed via radiographic examination to have free air within the body cavity, and all 3 cases were found via ultrasonography to have an acoustic shadow within the body cavity and were diagnosed with pneumocoelom. Lung perforations were detected macroscopically in 2 of the cases, and all 3 cases had fibrosis in the caudal ends of the lungs. Removal of the lung lesions eliminated the abnormal buoyancy in all 3 cases. We concluded that air had leaked into the body cavity from the lungs, and we propose that lung lesions are an important cause of buoyancy disorders in A. mexicanum.

  3. Air–Sea Interaction and Horizontal Circulation in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Bower, Amy S.; Farrar, J. Thomas

    2015-01-01

    quasi-stationary eddy pair is driven largely by winds blowing through a gap in the mountains (Tokar Gap), but numerical simulations suggest that much of the eddy field is driven by the interaction of the buoyancy-driven flow with topography. Recent

  4. Buoyancy differences among two deepwater ciscoes from the Great Lakes and their putative ancestor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, A.E.; Eshenroder, R.L.; Begnoche, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed buoyancy in two deepwater ciscoes, Coregonus hoyi and C. kiyi, and in C. artedi, their putative ancestor, and also analyzed how variations in fish weight, water content, and lipid content affected buoyancy. Buoyancy was significantly different among the three species (p < 0.0001). Estimates of percent buoyancy (neutral buoyancy = 0.0%) were: kiyi, 3.8%; hoyi, 4.7%; and artedi, 5.7%. Buoyancy did not change with fish weight alone (p = 0.38). Fish weight was negatively related to water content for all three species (p = 0.037). Lipid content was not significantly different between hoyi and kiyi, but artedi had significantly fewer lipids than hoyi and kiyi (p < 0.10). When artedi was removed from the analysis, fish weight and lipids accounted for 48% of the variation in buoyancy (p = 0.003), fatter hoyi were less dense than leaner hoyi, but fatter and leaner kiyi were no different in density. Our findings provide additional evidence that buoyancy regulation was a speciating mechanism in deepwater ciscoes and that kiyi is more specialized than hoyi for diel-vertical migration in deep water.

  5. Numerical simulation and comparison of two ventilation methods for a restaurant - displacement vs mixed flow ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitaru, George; Berville, Charles; Dogeanu, Angel

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a comparison between a displacement ventilation method and a mixed flow ventilation method using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The paper analyses different aspects of the two systems, like the draft effect in certain areas, the air temperatureand velocity distribution in the occupied zone. The results highlighted that the displacement ventilation system presents an advantage for the current scenario, due to the increased buoyancy driven flows caused by the interior heat sources. For the displacement ventilation case the draft effect was less prone to appear in the occupied zone but the high heat emissions from the interior sources have increased the temperature gradient in the occupied zone. Both systems have been studied in similar conditions, concentrating only on the flow patterns for each case.

  6. Ceramic Spheres—A Novel Solution to Deep Sea Buoyancy Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Blugan, Gurdial; Sturzenegger, Philip N.; Gonzenbach, Urs T.; Misson, Michael; Thornberry, John; Stenerud, Runar; Cartlidge, David; Kuebler, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic-based hollow spheres are considered a great driving force for many applications such as offshore buoyancy modules due to their large diameter to wall thickness ratio and uniform wall thickness geometric features. We have developed such thin-walled hollow spheres made of alumina using slip casting and sintering processes. A diameter as large as 50 mm with a wall thickness of 0.5–1.0 mm has been successfully achieved in these spheres. Their material and structural properties were examined by a series of characterization tools. Particularly, the feasibility of these spheres was investigated with respect to its application for deep sea (>3000 m) buoyancy modules. These spheres, sintered at 1600 °C and with 1.0 mm of wall thickness, have achieved buoyancy of more than 54%. As the sphere’s wall thickness was reduced (e.g., 0.5 mm), their buoyancy reached 72%. The mechanical performance of such spheres has shown a hydrostatic failure pressure above 150 MPa, corresponding to a rating depth below sea level of 5000 m considering a safety factor of 3. The developed alumina-based ceramic spheres are feasible for low cost and scaled-up production and show great potential at depths greater than those achievable by the current deep-sea buoyancy module technologies. PMID:28773651

  7. Shear flow driven counter rotating vortices in an inhomogeneous dusty magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Ijaz, Aisha; Haque, Q.

    2014-02-01

    The coupling of Shukla-Varma (SV) and convective cell modes is discussed in the presence of non-Boltzmannian electron response and parallel equilibrium shear flow. In the linear case, a new dispersion relation is derived and analyzed. It is found that the coupled SV and convective cell modes destabilize in the presence of electron shear flow. On the other hand, in the nonlinear regime, it is shown that Shukla-Varma mode driven counter rotating vortices can be formed for the system under consideration. It is found that these vortices move slowly by comparison with the ion acoustic or electron drift-wave driven counter rotating vortices. The relevance of the present investigation with regard to space plasmas is also pointed out.

  8. ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION AND THE COOLING FLOW PROBLEM IN GALAXY CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, Ian J.; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot

    2009-01-01

    We examine the long-standing cooling flow problem in galaxy clusters with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of isolated clusters including radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The central regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) can have cooling timescales of ∼200 Myr or shorter-in order to prevent a cooling catastrophe the ICM must be heated by some mechanism such as active galactic nucleus feedback or thermal conduction from the thermal reservoir at large radii. The cores of galaxy clusters are linearly unstable to the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI), which significantly changes the thermodynamics of the cluster core. The HBI is a convective, buoyancy-driven instability that rearranges the magnetic field to be preferentially perpendicular to the temperature gradient. For a wide range of parameters, our simulations demonstrate that in the presence of the HBI, the effective radial thermal conductivity is reduced to ∼<10% of the full Spitzer conductivity. With this suppression of conductive heating, the cooling catastrophe occurs on a timescale comparable to the central cooling time of the cluster. Thermal conduction alone is thus unlikely to stabilize clusters with low central entropies and short central cooling timescales. High central entropy clusters have sufficiently long cooling times that conduction can help stave off the cooling catastrophe for cosmologically interesting timescales.

  9. Numerical simulation and global linear stability analysis of low-Re flow past a heated circular cylinder

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We perform two-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes simulation and global linear stability analysis of flow past a heated circular cylinder to investigate the effect of aided buoyancy on the stabilization of the flow. The Reynolds number of the incoming flow is fixed at 100, and the Richardson number characterizing the buoyancy is varied from 0.00 (buoyancy-free case) to 0.10 at which the flow is still unsteady. We investigate the effect of aided buoyancy in stabilizing the wake flow, identify the temporal and spatial characteristics of the growth of the perturbation, and quantify the contributions from various terms comprising the perturbed kinetic energy budget. Numerical results reveal that the increasing Ri decreases the fluctuation magnitude of the characteristic quantities monotonically, and the momentum deficit in the wake flow decays rapidly so that the flow velocity recovers to that of the free-stream; the strain on the wake flow is reduced in the region where the perturbation is the most greatly amplified. Global stability analysis shows that the temporal growth rate of the perturbation decreases monotonically with Ri, reflecting the stabilization of the flow due to aided buoyancy. The perturbation grows most significantly in the free shear layer separated from the cylinder. As Ri increases, the location of maximum perturbation growth moves closer to the cylinder and the perturbation decays more rapidly in the far wake. The introduction of the aided buoyancy alters the base flow, and destabilizes the near wake shear layer mainly through the strain-induced transfer term and the pressure term of the perturbed kinetic energy, whereas the flow is stabilized in the far wake as the strain is alleviated. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical simulation and global linear stability analysis of low-Re flow past a heated circular cylinder

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Wei

    2016-03-31

    We perform two-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes simulation and global linear stability analysis of flow past a heated circular cylinder to investigate the effect of aided buoyancy on the stabilization of the flow. The Reynolds number of the incoming flow is fixed at 100, and the Richardson number characterizing the buoyancy is varied from 0.00 (buoyancy-free case) to 0.10 at which the flow is still unsteady. We investigate the effect of aided buoyancy in stabilizing the wake flow, identify the temporal and spatial characteristics of the growth of the perturbation, and quantify the contributions from various terms comprising the perturbed kinetic energy budget. Numerical results reveal that the increasing Ri decreases the fluctuation magnitude of the characteristic quantities monotonically, and the momentum deficit in the wake flow decays rapidly so that the flow velocity recovers to that of the free-stream; the strain on the wake flow is reduced in the region where the perturbation is the most greatly amplified. Global stability analysis shows that the temporal growth rate of the perturbation decreases monotonically with Ri, reflecting the stabilization of the flow due to aided buoyancy. The perturbation grows most significantly in the free shear layer separated from the cylinder. As Ri increases, the location of maximum perturbation growth moves closer to the cylinder and the perturbation decays more rapidly in the far wake. The introduction of the aided buoyancy alters the base flow, and destabilizes the near wake shear layer mainly through the strain-induced transfer term and the pressure term of the perturbed kinetic energy, whereas the flow is stabilized in the far wake as the strain is alleviated. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of three-dimensional incompressible flows in a four-sided lid driven cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Cheng Gong [National Engineering Laboratory for MTO, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China); Maa, Jerome P-Y, E-mail: chenggongli@dicp.ac.cn [Virginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary, Gloucester Point, VA 23062 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Numerical study on three-dimensional (3D), incompressible, four-sided lid (FSL) driven cavity flows has been conducted to show the effects of the transverse aspect ratio, K , on the flow field by using a multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann equation. The top wall is driven from left to right, the left wall is moved downward, whereas the right wall is driven upward, and the bottom wall is moved from right to left, all the four moving walls have the same speed and the others boundaries are fixed. Numerical computations are performed for several Reynolds numbers for laminar flows, up to 1000, with various transverse aspect ratios. The flow can reach a steady state and the flow pattern is symmetric with respect to the two cavity diagonals (i.e., the center of the cavity). At Reynolds number = 300, the flow structures of the 3D FSL cavity flow at steady state with various transverse aspect ratio, i.e., 3, 2, 1, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 only show the unstable symmetrical flow pattern. The stable asymmetrical flow pattern could be reproduced only by increasing the Reynolds number that is above a critical value which is dependent on the aspect ratio. It is found that an aspect ratio of more than 5 is needed to reproduce flow patterns, both symmetric and asymmetric flows, simulated by using 2D numerical models. (paper)

  12. Buoyancy Effects in Turbulent Jet Flames in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxx, Isaac; Idicheria, Cherian; Clemens, Noel

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of buoyancy on the structure of turbulent, non-premixed hydrocarbon jet-flames in crossflow (JFICF). This was accomplished using a small jet-in-crossflow facility which can be oriented at a variety of angles with respect to the gravity vector. This facility enables us to alter the relative influence of buoyancy on the JFICF without altering the jet-exit Reynolds number, momentum flux ratio or the geometry of the system. Results are compared to similar, but non-buoyant, JFICF studied in microgravity. Departures of jet-centerline trajectory from the well-known power-law scaling of turbulent JFICF were used to explore the transition from a buoyancy-influenced regime to a momentum dominated one. The primary diagnostic was CCD imaging of soot-luminosity. We present results on ethylene jet flames with jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 1770 to 8000 and momentum flux ratios of 5 to 13.

  13. 40 CFR 1065.690 - Buoyancy correction for PM sample media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mass, use a sample media density of 920 kg/m3. (3) For PTFE membrane (film) media with an integral... media. 1065.690 Section 1065.690 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Buoyancy correction for PM sample media. (a) General. Correct PM sample media for their buoyancy in air if...

  14. Study on heat transfer and fluid flow in the stand pipe rupture accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo; Hishida, Makoto

    1991-09-01

    This paper deals with an experimental investigation of the buoyancy driven exchange flow which takes place through a narrow cylindrical channel, during the stand pipe rupture accident in a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The velocity distribution through the cylindrical channel is measured by a laser Doppler velocimeter, in order to evaluate the air ingress flow rate. The experiments are performed under atmospheric pressure with nitrogen as a working fluid. Rayleigh number ranges from 1.3 x 10 7 to 7.0 x 10 7 . The following conclusions were obtained: (1) The laser Doppler velocimeter was found a good method for the measurement of the velocity of the exchange flow. (2) When the temperature of the hemisphere and the bottom heated plate, which simulate the top cover of the reactor, was kept uniform, the volumetric exchange flow rate agreed well with Epstein's result. (3) The exchange flow through a narrow cylindrical channel fluctuated irregularly with time and space. (author)

  15. Convection flows driven by laser heating of a liquid layer

    OpenAIRE

    Rivière , David; Selva , Bertrand; Chraibi , Hamza; Delabre , Ulysse; Delville , Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; When a fluid is heated by the absorption of a continuous laser wave, the fluid density decreases in the heated area. This induces a pressure gradient that generates internal motion of the fluid. Due to mass conservation, convection eddies emerge in the sample. To investigate these laser-driven bulk flows at the microscopic scale, we built a setup to perform temperature measurements with a fluorescent-sensitive dye on the one hand, and measured the flow pattern at diffe...

  16. Magnetization Transfer Effects on the Efficiency of Flow-driven Adiabatic Fast Passage Inversion of Arterial Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez-Garcia, Luis; Lewis, David P.; Moffat, Bradford; Branch, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    Continuous arterial spin labeling experiments typically use flow-driven adiabatic fast passage (AFP) inversion of the arterial blood water protons. In this article, we measure the effect of magnetization transfer in blood and how it affects the inversion label. We use modified Bloch equations to model flow-driven adiabatic inversion in the presence of magnetization transfer in blood flowing at velocities from 1 to 30 cm/s in order to explain our findings. Magnetization transfer results in a r...

  17. T-junction cross-flow mixing with thermally driven density stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickhofel, John, E-mail: jkickhofel@gmail.com [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Prasser, Horst-Michael, E-mail: prasser@lke.mavt.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Selvam, P. Karthick, E-mail: karthick.selvam@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Laurien, Eckart, E-mail: eckart.laurien@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kulenovic, Rudi, E-mail: rudi.kulenovic@ike.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE), University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Mesh sensor for realistic nuclear thermal hydraulic scenarios is demonstrated. • Flow temperature behavior across a wide range of Richardson numbers measured. • Upstream stratified flow in the T-junction results in a thermal shock scenario. • Large, stable near-wall thermal gradients exist in spite of turbulent flows. - Abstract: As a means of further elucidating turbulence- and stratification-driven thermal fatigue in the vicinity of T-junctions in nuclear power plants, a series of experiments have been conducted at the high temperature high pressure fluid–structure interaction T-junction facility of the University of Stuttgart with novel fluid measurement instrumentation. T-junction mixing with large fluid temperature gradients results in complex flow behavior, the result of density driven effects. Deionized water mixing at temperature differences of up to 232 K at 7 MPa pressure have been investigated in a T-junction with main pipe diameter 71.8 mm and branch line diameter 38.9 mm. The experiments have been performed with fixed flow rates of 0.4 kg/s in the main pipe and 0.1 kg/s in the branch line. A novel electrode-mesh sensor compatible with the DN80 PN100 pipeline upstream and downstream of the T-junction has been utilized as a temperature sensor providing a high density information in the pipe cross-section in both space and time. Additionally, in-flow and in-wall thermocouples quantify the damping of thermal fluctuations by the wall material. The results indicate that large inflow temperature differences lead to strong turbulence damping, and ultimately stable stratification extending both downstream and upstream of the T-junction resulting in large local thermal gradients.

  18. Direct Numerical Simulations of turbulent flow in a driven cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.; Wissink, J.G.; Cazemier, W.; Veldman, A.E.P.

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of 2 and 3D turbulent flows in a lid-driven cavity have been performed. DNS are numerical solutions of the unsteady (here: incompressible) Navier-Stokes equations that compute the evolution of all dynamically significant scales of motion. In view of the large

  19. Wave Dragon Buoyancy Regulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jens; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    Wave Dragon is a wave energy converter, which was deployed offshore at Nissum Bredning in Denmark in 2003. The experience gained from operating Wave Dragon during 2003 and 2004 has shown that the buoyancy regulation system can be improved in a number of ways. This study describes the current...

  20. Thermo capillary and buoyancy convection in a fluid locally heated on its free surface; Convection thermocapillaire et thermogravitaire dans un fluide chauffe localement sur sa surface libre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favre, E.

    1997-09-26

    coupled buoyancy and thermo-capillary convection lead to a convective motion of the interface liquid/gas which drastically changes the heat and mass transfer across the liquid layer. Two experiments were considered, depending on the fluid: oil or mercury. The liquid is set in a cooled cylindrical vessel, and heated by a heat flux across the center of the free surface. The basic flow, in the case of oil, is a torus. When the heat parameter increases, a stationary flow appears as petals or rays when the aspect ratio. The lateral confinement selects the azimuthal wavelength. In the case of petals-like flow, a sub-critical Hopf bifurcation is underlined. The turbulence is found to be `weak`, even for the largest values of the Marangoni number (Ma = 1.3 10{sup 5}). In the case of mercury, the thermo-capillary effect is reduced to zero to impurities at the surface which have special trajectories we describe and compare to a simpler experiment. Only the buoyancy forces induce a unstationary, weakly turbulent flow as soon as the heating power exceeds 4W (Ra = 4.5 10{sup 3}, calculated with h = 1 mm). The past part concerns the analysis of the effect on the flow of the boundary conditions, the geometry, the Prandtl number and the buoyancy force with the help of the literature. Results concerning heat transfer, in particular the exponent of the law Nusselt number vs. heating power, were compared with available data. (author) 115 refs.

  1. Influence of various aspects of low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models on predicting in-tube buoyancy affected heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Pei-Xue; Bo, Han-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Understanding of the mechanism of buoyancy effect on supercritical heat transfer. • Turbulence related parameters in upward and downward flows were compared. • Turbulent Prandtl number affected the prediction insignificantly. • Buoyancy production was insignificant compared with shear production. • Damping function had the greatest effect and is a priority for further modification. - Abstract: Heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids was modeled for normal and buoyancy affected conditions using several low Reynolds number k-ε models, including the Launder and Sharma, Myong and Kasagi, and Abe, Kondoh and Nagano, with the predictions compared with experimental data. All three turbulence models accurately predicted the cases without heat transfer deterioration, but failed to accurately predict the cases with heat transfer deterioration although the general trends were captured, indicating that further improvements and modifications are needed for the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to better predict buoyancy deteriorated heat transfer. Further investigations studied the influence of various aspects of the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models, including the turbulent Prandtl number, the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy, and the damping function to provide guidelines for model development to more precisely predict buoyancy affected heat transfer. The results show that the turbulent Prandtl number and the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy have little influence on the predictions for cases in this study, while new damping functions with carefully selected control parameters are needed in the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to correctly predict the buoyancy effect for heat transfer simulations in various applications such as supercritical pressure steam generators (SPSGs) in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) and the supercritical pressure water reactor (SCWR).

  2. Influence of various aspects of low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models on predicting in-tube buoyancy affected heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chen-Ru; Zhang, Zhen [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Pei-Xue, E-mail: jiangpx@tsinghua.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of CO_2 Utilization and Reduction Technology/Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Bo, Han-Liang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology of Tsinghua University, Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology Cooperation Innovation Centre, Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Engineering and Safety, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Understanding of the mechanism of buoyancy effect on supercritical heat transfer. • Turbulence related parameters in upward and downward flows were compared. • Turbulent Prandtl number affected the prediction insignificantly. • Buoyancy production was insignificant compared with shear production. • Damping function had the greatest effect and is a priority for further modification. - Abstract: Heat transfer to supercritical pressure fluids was modeled for normal and buoyancy affected conditions using several low Reynolds number k-ε models, including the Launder and Sharma, Myong and Kasagi, and Abe, Kondoh and Nagano, with the predictions compared with experimental data. All three turbulence models accurately predicted the cases without heat transfer deterioration, but failed to accurately predict the cases with heat transfer deterioration although the general trends were captured, indicating that further improvements and modifications are needed for the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to better predict buoyancy deteriorated heat transfer. Further investigations studied the influence of various aspects of the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models, including the turbulent Prandtl number, the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy, and the damping function to provide guidelines for model development to more precisely predict buoyancy affected heat transfer. The results show that the turbulent Prandtl number and the buoyancy production of turbulent kinetic energy have little influence on the predictions for cases in this study, while new damping functions with carefully selected control parameters are needed in the low Reynolds number k-ε turbulence models to correctly predict the buoyancy effect for heat transfer simulations in various applications such as supercritical pressure steam generators (SPSGs) in the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTR) and the supercritical pressure water reactor (SCWR).

  3. ON THE ANALYSIS OF IMPEDANCE-DRIVEN REVERSE FLOW DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE V. C.-C.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Impedance pump is a simple valve-less pumping mechanism, where an elastic tube is joined to a more rigid tube, at both ends. By inducing a periodic asymmetrical compression on the elastic tube will produce a unidirectional flow within the system. This pumping concept offers a low energy, low noise alternative, which makes it an effective driving mechanism, especially for micro-fluidic systems. In addition, the wave-based mechanism through which pumping occurs infers many benefits in terms of simplicity of design and manufacturing. Adjustment of simple parameters such as the excitation frequencies or compression locations will reverse the direction of flow, providing a very versatile range of flow outputs. This paper describes the experimental analysis of such impedance-driven flow with emphasis on the dynamical study of the reverse flow in open-loop environment. In this study, tapered section with converging steps is introduced at both ends of the elastic tube to amplify the magnitude of reverse flow. Study conducted shows that the reverse peak flow is rather significant with estimate of 23% lower than the forward peak flow. The flow dynamics on the other hand has shown to exhibit different characteristics as per the forward peak flow. The flow characteristics is then studied and showed that the tapered sections altered the impedance within the system and hence induce a higher flow in the reverse direction.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann equation calculation of internal, pressure-driven turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, L A; Halliday, I; Care, C M; Stevens, A

    2002-01-01

    We describe a mixing-length extension of the lattice Boltzmann approach to the simulation of an incompressible liquid in turbulent flow. The method uses a simple, adaptable, closure algorithm to bound the lattice Boltzmann fluid incorporating a law-of-the-wall. The test application, of an internal, pressure-driven and smooth duct flow, recovers correct velocity profiles for Reynolds number to 1.25 x 10 5 . In addition, the Reynolds number dependence of the friction factor in the smooth-wall branch of the Moody chart is correctly recovered. The method promises a straightforward extension to other curves of the Moody chart and to cylindrical pipe flow

  5. Mixed convection of nanofluids in a lid-driven rough cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhimeng; Wang, Jinyu; Mozumder, Aloke K.; Das, Prodip K.

    2017-06-01

    Mixed convection heat transfer and fluid flow of air, water or oil in enclosures have been studied extensively using experimental and numerical means for many years due to their ever-increasing applications in many engineering fields. In comparison, little effort has been given to the problem of mixed convection of nanofluids in spite of several applications in solar collectors, electronic cooling, lubrication technologies, food processing, and nuclear reactors. Mixed convection of nanofluids is a challenging problem due to the complex interactions among inertia, viscous, and buoyancy forces. In this study, mixed convection of nanofluids in a lid-driven square cavity with sinusoidal roughness elements at the bottom is studied numerically using the Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation. The numerical model is developed using commercial finite volume software ANSYS-FLUENT for Al2O3-water and CuO-water nanofluids inside a square cavity with various roughness elements. The effects of number and amplitude of roughness elements on the heat transfer and fluid flow are analysed for various volume concentrations of Al2O3 and CuO nanoparticles. The flow fields, temperature fields, and heat transfer rates are examined for different values of Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers. The outcome of this study provides some important insight into the heat transfer behaviour of Al2O3-water and CuO-water nanofluids inside a lid-driven rough cavity. This knowledge can be further used in developing novel geometries with enhanced and controlled heat transfer for solar collectors, electronic cooling, and food processing industries.

  6. BRIEF COMMUNICATION: On the drift kinetic equation driven by plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, K. C.

    2010-07-01

    A drift kinetic equation that is driven by plasma flows has previously been derived by Shaing and Spong 1990 (Phys. Fluids B 2 1190). The terms that are driven by particle speed that is parallel to the magnetic field B have been neglected. Here, such terms are discussed to examine their importance to the equation and to show that these terms do not contribute to the calculations of plasma viscosity in large aspect ratio toroidal plasmas, e.g. tokamaks and stellarators.

  7. Convective instability in a time-dependent buoyancy driven boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooker, A.M.H.; Patterson, J.C.; Graham, T.; Schoepf, W. [University of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia). Centre for Water Research

    2000-01-01

    The stability of the parallel time-dependent boundary layer adjacent to a suddenly heated vertical wall is described. The flow is investigated through experiments in water, through direct numerical simulation and also through linear stability analysis. The full numerical simulation of the flow shows that small perturbations to the wall boundary conditions, that are also present in the experimental study, are responsible for triggering the instability. As a result, oscillatory behaviour in the boundary layer is observed well before the transition to a steady two-dimensional flow begins. The properties of the observed oscillations are compared with those predicted by a linear stability analysis of the unsteady boundary layer using a quasi-stationary assumption and also using non-stationary assumptions by the formulation of parabolized equations (PSE). (Author)

  8. BUOYANCY INSTABILITIES IN A WEAKLY COLLISIONAL INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Matthew W.; Stone, James M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, 4 Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Bogdanovic, Tamara; Reynolds, Christopher S., E-mail: kunz@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jstone@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: tamarab@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: chris@astro.umd.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is a weakly collisional plasma in which the transport of heat and momentum occurs primarily along magnetic-field lines. Anisotropic heat conduction allows convective instabilities to be driven by temperature gradients of either sign: the magnetothermal instability (MTI) in the outskirts of clusters and the heat-flux buoyancy-driven instability (HBI) in their cooling cores. We employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities, self-consistently including the effects of anisotropic viscosity (i.e., Braginskii pressure anisotropy), anisotropic conduction, and radiative cooling. We find that, in all but the innermost regions of cool-core clusters, anisotropic viscosity significantly impairs the ability of the HBI to reorient magnetic-field lines orthogonal to the temperature gradient. Thus, while radio-mode feedback appears necessary in the central few Multiplication-Sign 10 kpc, heat conduction may be capable of offsetting radiative losses throughout most of a cool core over a significant fraction of the Hubble time. Magnetically aligned cold filaments are then able to form by local thermal instability. Viscous dissipation during cold filament formation produces accompanying hot filaments, which can be searched for in deep Chandra observations of cool-core clusters. In the case of MTI, anisotropic viscosity leads to a nonlinear state with a folded magnetic field structure in which field-line curvature and field strength are anti-correlated. These results demonstrate that, if the HBI and MTI are relevant for shaping the properties of the ICM, one must self-consistently include anisotropic viscosity in order to obtain even qualitatively correct results.

  9. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is a pressurized heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor that began operation at 40 MW. The reactor was subsequently upgraded to 60 MW and operated at that level for several years. The reactor undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Questions which were raised about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal transition led to a reactor shutdown and subsequent resumption of operation at a reduced power of 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these questions is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW. Direct use of the experimental results and an understanding of the governing phenomenology supports this conclusion

  10. Amazon Rainforest Exchange of Carbon and Subcanopy Air Flow: Manaus LBA Site—A Complex Terrain Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Tóta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras—ZF2—02°36′17.1′′ S, 60°12′24.4′′ W, subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO2 concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008 was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO2 sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12% was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO2 were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO2 into those estimates.

  11. EVA Development and Verification Testing at NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairala, Juniper C.; Durkin, Robert; Marak, Ralph J.; Sipila, Stepahnie A.; Ney, Zane A.; Parazynski, Scott E.; Thomason, Arthur H.

    2012-01-01

    As an early step in the preparation for future Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), astronauts perform neutral buoyancy testing to develop and verify EVA hardware and operations. Neutral buoyancy demonstrations at NASA Johnson Space Center's Sonny Carter Training Facility to date have primarily evaluated assembly and maintenance tasks associated with several elements of the International Space Station (ISS). With the retirement of the Shuttle, completion of ISS assembly, and introduction of commercial players for human transportation to space, evaluations at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) will take on a new focus. Test objectives are selected for their criticality, lack of previous testing, or design changes that justify retesting. Assembly tasks investigated are performed using procedures developed by the flight hardware providers and the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD). Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) maintenance tasks are performed using a more systematic set of procedures, EVA Concept of Operations for the International Space Station (JSC-33408), also developed by the MOD. This paper describes the requirements and process for performing a neutral buoyancy test, including typical hardware and support equipment requirements, personnel and administrative resource requirements, examples of ISS systems and operations that are evaluated, and typical operational objectives that are evaluated.

  12. Validation of buoyancy driven spectral tensor model using HATS data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, A.; Mann, Jakob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous spectral tensor model for wind velocity and temperature fluctuations, driven by mean vertical shear and mean temperature gradient. Results from the model, including one-dimensional velocity and temperature spectra and the associated co-spectra, are shown in this paper....... The model also reproduces two-point statistics, such as coherence and phases, via cross-spectra between two points separated in space. Model results are compared with observations from the Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) field program (Horst et al. 2004). The spectral velocity tensor in the model...

  13. From convection rolls to finger convection in double-diffusive turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yantao; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    Double-diffusive convection (DDC), which is the buoyancy-driven flow with fluid density depending on two scalar components, is ubiquitous in many natural and engineering environments. Of great interests are scalars’ transfer rate and flow structures. Here we systematically investigate DDC flow

  14. Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsufumi; Aoki, Kagari; Watanabe, Yuuki Y; Miller, Patrick J O

    2013-01-01

    Flying and terrestrial animals should spend energy to move while supporting their weight against gravity. On the other hand, supported by buoyancy, aquatic animals can minimize the energy cost for supporting their body weight and neutral buoyancy has been considered advantageous for aquatic animals. However, some studies suggested that aquatic animals might use non-neutral buoyancy for gliding and thereby save energy cost for locomotion. We manipulated the body density of seals using detachable weights and floats, and compared stroke efforts of horizontally swimming seals under natural conditions using animal-borne recorders. The results indicated that seals had smaller stroke efforts to swim a given speed when they were closer to neutral buoyancy. We conclude that neutral buoyancy is likely the best body density to minimize the cost of transport in horizontal swimming by seals.

  15. Finite element simulation of an electroosmotic-driven flow division at a T-junction of microscale dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi; Ferrigno; Girault

    2000-05-01

    A finite element formulation is developed for the simulation of an electroosmotic flow in rectangular microscale channel networks. The distribution of the flow at a decoupling T-junction is investigated from a hydrodynamic standpoint in the case of a pressure-driven and an electroosmotically driven flow. The calculations are carried out in two steps: first solving the potential distribution arising from the external electric field and from the inherent zeta potential. These distributions are then injected in the Navier Stokes equation for the calculation of the velocity profile. The influence of the various parameters such as the zeta potential distribution, the Reynolds number, and the relative channel widths on the flow distribution is investigated.

  16. Separation of ions in nanofluidic channels with combined pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Dirk; Pennathur, Sumita

    2013-03-05

    Separation of ionic species with the same electrophoretic mobility but different valence in electrolyte systems can occur within nanometer-scale channels with finite electrical double layers (EDLs). This is because EDL thicknesses are a significant fraction of slit height in such channels and can create transverse analyte concentration profiles that allow for unique separation modalities when combined with axial fluid flow. Previous work has shown such separation to occur using either pressure-driven flow or electro-osmotic flow separately. Here, we develop a Poisson-Boltzmann model to compare the separation of such ions using the combination of both pressure-driven and electro-osmotic flow. Applying a pressure gradient in the opposite direction of electro-osmotic flow can allow for zero or infinite retention of analyte species, which we investigate using three different wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we determine conditions in fused silica nanochannels with which to generate optimal separation between two analytes of different charge but the same mobility. We also give simple rules of thumb to achieve the best separation efficacy in nanochannel systems.

  17. A safety concern related to CANDU moderator subcooling and status of KAERI moderator circulation test (MCT) experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Bo W.; Kim, Hyoung T.; Kim, Tongbeum; Im, Sunghyuk

    2015-01-01

    The flow inside the moderator tank of a CANDU-6 reactor during full power steady state operation has been suspected to be operating in the buoyancy/inertial driven mixed convection regime as illustrated in the middle figure. At some regions of the moderator tank where the buoyancy driven upward flow and the inertial momentum driven downward flows interface counter-currently, there exist some interface regions between these two flows like the middle one, and the local temperatures at these interface regions are known to oscillate with different amplitude at various fluctuation frequencies as shown. According to a numerical simulation of the moderator flow and temperature distribution at full power steady state carried out by previous researches showed that any small disturbances in the flow or temperature may initiate the system unstable and aggravate the asymmetric flow and temperature patterns. The tests at the 3-D Moderator Test Facility (MTF) that is a representative scaled-down of CANDU reactors, reproduced the expected and observed moderator behavior in the reactor as well as the local temperature fluctuations arising from the delicate balance of forced and buoyancy induced flow. This observation raised a safety concern as the local moderator temperature at some regions showed fluctuations with an amplitude that may jeopardize the safety margin, i.e. the difference between the available subcooling and the subcooling requirement. The scope of this paper is to review the basis of the safety concern related to this moderator subcooling and local temperature fluctuation and describe the current status of MCT erection and some of the experiments carried so far

  18. Electrical Aspects of Flames in Microgravity Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Strayer, B.; Weinberg, F.; Carleton, F.

    1999-01-01

    A principal characteristic of combustion in microgravity is the absence of buoyancy driven flows. In some cases, such as for spherically symmetrical droplet burning, the absence of buoyancy is desirable for matching analytical treatments with experiments. In other cases, however, it can be more valuable to arbitrarily control the flame's convective environment independent of the environmental gravitational condition. To accomplish this, we propose the use of ion generated winds driven by electric fields to control local convection of flames. Such control can produce reduced buoyancy (effectively zero buoyancy) conditions in the laboratory in 1-g facilitating a wide range of laser diagnostics that can probe the system without special packaging required for drop tower or flight tests. In addition, the electric field generated ionic winds allow varying gravitational convection equivalents even if the test occurs in reduced gravity environments.

  19. Transient thermal hydraulic analysis of the IAEA 10 MW MTR reactor during Loss of Flow Accident to investigate the flow inversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AL-Yahia, Omar S.; Albati, Mohammad A.; Park, Jonghark; Chae, Heetaek; Jo, Daeseong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Transient analyses of a slow and fast LOFA were investigated. • A reactor kinetic and thermal hydraulic coupled model was developed. • Based on force balance, the flow rate during flow inversion was determined. • Flow inversion in a hot channel occurred earlier than in an average channel. • Two temperature peaks were observed during both slow and fast LOFA. - Abstract: Transient analyses of the IAEA 10 MW MTR reactor are investigated during a fast and slow Loss of Flow Accident (LOFA) with a neutron kinetic and thermal hydraulic coupling model. A spatial-dependent thermal hydraulic technique is adopted for analyzing the local thermal hydraulic parameters and hotspot location during a flow inversion. The flow rate through the channel is determined in terms of a balance between driving and preventing forces. Friction and buoyancy forces act as resistance of the flow before a flow inversion while buoyancy force becomes the driving force after a flow inversion. By taking into account the buoyancy effect to determine the flow rate, the difference in the flow inversion time between hot and average channels is investigated: a flow inversion occurs earlier in the hot channel than in an average channel. Furthermore, the movement of the hotspot location before and after a flow inversion is investigated for a slow and fast LOFA. During a flow inversion, two temperature peaks are observed: (1) the first temperature peak is at the initiation of the LOFA, and (2) the second temperature peak is when a flow inversion occurs. The maximum temperature of the cladding is found at the second temperature peak for both LOFA analyses, and is lower than the saturation temperature

  20. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of vacillation in convection induced by centrifugal buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitz, Diogo B.; Marxen, Olaf; Chew, John W.

    2017-11-01

    Flows induced by centrifugal buoyancy occur in industrial systems, such as in the compressor cavities of gas turbines, as well as in flows of geophysical interest. In this numerical study we use direct numerical simulation (DNS) to investigate the transition between the steady waves regime, which is characterized by great regularity, to the vacillation regime, which is critical to understand transition to the fully turbulent regime. From previous work it is known that the onset of convection occurs in the form of pairs of nearly-circular rolls which span the entire axial length of the cavity, with small deviations near the parallel, no-slip end walls. When non-linearity sets in triadic interactions occur and, depending on the value of the centrifugal Rayleigh number, the flow is dominated by either a single mode and its harmonics or by broadband effects if turbulence develops. In this study we increase the centrifugal Rayleigh number progressively and investigate mode interactions during the vacillation regime which eventually lead to chaotic motion. Diogo B. Pitz acknowledges the financial support from the Capes foundation through the Science without Borders program.

  2. Buoyancy and thermocapillary driven convection flow of electrically conducting fluid in an enclosure with heat generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Md. Anwar; Rees, D.A.S.

    2002-05-01

    The effect of surface tension on unsteady laminar natural convection flow of a viscous incompressible fluid in a rectangle enclosure with internal heat generation and in presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field acting in the direction normal to the gravity has been investigated. The top horizontal surface of the rectangular cavity is assumed to be free and the bottom ones insulated; whereas the left vertical wall is cold and the right one is uniformly hot. The equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically by an upwind finite difference method together with a successive over-relaxation (SOR) technique. The effects of heat generation together with the combined effects of the magnetic field and the surface tension are presented graphically in terms of isotherms, streamlines and velocity vector plots. The effects of varying the physical parameters on the rate of heat transfer from the heated surface of the enclosure are also depicted. The fluid here has Prandtl number Pr=0.054 while the value of the Grashof number is 2x10 4 . (author)

  3. Buoyancy increase and drag-reduction through a simple superhydrophobic coating

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, G. B.; Patir, A.; Page, K.; Lu, Y.; Allan, E.; Parkin, I. P.

    2017-01-01

    A superhydrophobic paint was fabricated using 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOTES), TiO2 nanoparticles and ethanol. The paint has potential for aquatic application of a superhydrophobic coating as it induces increased buoyancy and drag reduction. Buoyance testing showed that the reduction of surface energy by superhydrophobic coating made it feasible that glass, a high density material, was supported by the surface tension of water. In a miniature boat sailing test, it was shown...

  4. Buoyancy increase and drag-reduction through a simple superhydrophobic coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gi Byoung; Patir, Adnan; Page, Kristopher; Lu, Yao; Allan, Elaine; Parkin, Ivan P

    2017-06-08

    A superhydrophobic paint was fabricated using 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane (PFOTES), TiO 2 nanoparticles and ethanol. The paint has potential for aquatic application of a superhydrophobic coating as it induces increased buoyancy and drag reduction. Buoyance testing showed that the reduction of surface energy by superhydrophobic coating made it feasible that glass, a high density material, was supported by the surface tension of water. In a miniature boat sailing test, it was shown that the low energy surface treatment decreased the adhesion of water molecules to the surface of the boat resulting in a reduction of the drag force. Additionally, a robust superhydrophobic surface was fabricated through layer-by-layer coating using adhesive double side tape and the paint, and after a 100 cm abrasion test with sand paper, the surface still retained its water repellency, enhanced buoyancy and drag reduction.

  5. Vertical structure of turbulence in offshore flow during RASEX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahrt, L.; Vickers, D.; Edson, J.

    2001-01-01

    and dissipation. However, weakly stable and weakly unstable cases exhibit completely different vertical structure. With flow of warm air from land over cooler water, modest buoyancy destruction of turbulence and reduced shear generation of turbulence over the less rough sea surface cause the turbulence to rapidly...... with height and downward transport of turbulence energy toward the surface. With flow of cool air over a warmer sea surface, a convective internal boundary layer develops downstream from the coast. An overlying relatively thick layer of downward buoyancy flux (virtual temperature flux) is sometimes maintained...

  6. Momentum-energy transport from turbulence driven by parallel flow shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.Q.; Horton, W.; Bengtson, R.D.; Li, G.X.

    1994-04-01

    The low frequency E x B turbulence driven by the shear in the mass flow velocity parallel to the magnetic field is studied using the fluid theory in a slab configuration with magnetic shear. Ion temperature gradient effects are taken into account. The eigenfunctions of the linear instability are asymmetric about the mode rational surfaces. Quasilinear Reynolds stress induced by such asymmetric fluctuations produces momentum and energy transport across the magnetic field. Analytic formulas for the parallel and perpendicular Reynolds stress, viscosity and energy transport coefficients are given. Experimental observations of the parallel and poloidal plasma flows on TEXT-U are presented and compared with the theoretical models

  7. On fluid flow driven by topography in a librating body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C.; Roberts, P. H.

    2009-12-01

    Currently considerable effort and resources are being devoted to studies of Mercury, the Moon and Europa. Measuring the libration of these bodies can provide significant knowledge about their internal structures and physical properties; see Williams et al., 2001, Peale et al., 2002, Wu et al., 2007. To interpret such observations, it is important to understand better how libration affects the motion of the fluid in their interiors. To this end, Noir et al. (2009) investigated, via laboratory experiments and numerical simulations, the flow in a fluid filling a rotating spherical cavity driven by an axial oscillation of the container about a diameter. More realistically, the cavity is better represented by a triaxial ellipsoid. We may then distinguish between topographic and axisymmetricli libration. The latter refers to libration about a symmetry axis of the container which is therefore only viscously coupled to the fluid. In topographic libration, pressure forces on the boundary also affect the fluid motions in the cavity. We describe results from preliminary studies of topographic libration obtained through numerical simulation of incompressible fluid motion in an oblate spheroidal cavity with a libration axis perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the container. The computer code is a modification of one recently developed to study precessionally-driven flows in a spheroidal body of fluid (Wu and Roberts, 2009). It advances the flow in time using finite differences on overlapping grids; in this way the numerical difficulty known as the pole problem, is completely avoided.

  8. Mixed convection flow past a horizontal plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Lj.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed convection flow past a horizontal plate being aligned through a small angle of attack to a uniform free stream will be considered in the limit of large Reynolds number and small Richardson number. Even a small angle of inclination of the wake is sufficient for the buoyancy force to accelerate the flow in the wake which causes a velocity overshoot in the wake. Moreover a hydrostatic pressure difference across the wake induces a correction to the potential flow which influences the inclination of the wake. Thus the wake and the correction of the potential flow have to be determined simultaneously. However, it turns out that solutions exist only if the angle of attack is sufficiently large. Solutions are computed numerically and the influence of the buoyancy on the lift coefficient is determined.

  9. Transitional inertialess instabilities in driven multilayer channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaefthymiou, Evangelos; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    2016-11-01

    We study the nonlinear stability of viscous, immiscible multilayer flows in channels driven both by a pressure gradient and/or gravity in a slightly inclined channel. Three fluid phases are present with two internal interfaces. Novel weakly nonlinear models of coupled evolution equations are derived and we concentrate on inertialess flows with stably stratified fluids, with and without surface tension. These are 2 × 2 systems of second-order semilinear parabolic PDEs that can exhibit inertialess instabilities due to resonances between the interfaces - mathematically this is manifested by a transition from hyperbolic to elliptic behavior of the nonlinear flux functions. We consider flows that are linearly stable (i.e the nonlinear fluxes are hyperbolic initially) and use the theory of nonlinear systems of conservation laws to obtain a criterion (which can be verified easily) that can predict nonlinear stability or instability (i.e. nonlinear fluxes encounter ellipticity as they evolve spatiotemporally) at large times. In the former case the solution decays asymptotically to its base state, and in the latter nonlinear traveling waves emerge. EPSRC Grant Numbers EP/K041134 and EP/L020564.

  10. Air-Flow-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerators for Self-Powered Real-Time Respiratory Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Jiahao; Tang, Yingjie; Li, Jun; Zhang, Baosen; Liang, Erjun; Mao, Yanchao; Wang, Xudong

    2018-06-04

    Respiration is one of the most important vital signs of humans, and respiratory monitoring plays an important role in physical health management. A low-cost and convenient real-time respiratory monitoring system is extremely desirable. In this work, we demonstrated an air-flow-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) for self-powered real-time respiratory monitoring by converting mechanical energy of human respiration into electric output signals. The operation of the TENG was based on the air-flow-driven vibration of a flexible nanostructured polytetrafluoroethylene (n-PTFE) thin film in an acrylic tube. This TENG can generate distinct real-time electric signals when exposed to the air flow from different breath behaviors. It was also found that the accumulative charge transferred in breath sensing corresponds well to the total volume of air exchanged during the respiration process. Based on this TENG device, an intelligent wireless respiratory monitoring and alert system was further developed, which used the TENG signal to directly trigger a wireless alarm or dial a cell phone to provide timely alerts in response to breath behavior changes. This research offers a promising solution for developing self-powered real-time respiratory monitoring devices.

  11. Effect of flow configuration on moderator temperature distribution for 700 MWe Calandria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharj, Jaspal Singh; Sahaya, R.R.; Dharne, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    The Calandria of a Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) is essentially a horizontal cylindrical vessel housing a matrix of horizontal tubes called Calandria tubes within which is contained the pressure tubes that house the fuel bundles. In addition there are horizontal and vertical flux control and shutdown devices. The Calandria is filled with heavy water moderator at a pressure slightly above the atmosphere. A large amount of heat (about 125 MWth) is generated within the moderator mainly due to neutron slowing down and attenuation of gamma radiations. This heat generation gives rise to a strong buoyancy-driven natural convection flow. In the proposed configuration of 700 MWe PHWR Calandria, moderator inlet diffusers are directed upwards and the outlet nozzles are at the bottom of the Calandria. The basis for the above said inlet/outlet configuration depends upon the various factors like space availability, NPSH requirement for the moderator pumps, and interference of flow with the other components inside the Calandria. This configuration is not conducive for the buoyancy-dominated flows generated due to large volumetric heat generation in the moderator. In order to see the effects of changes in flow configuration by re-orienting the inlet/outlet, a CFD study was undertaken for moderator flows in the conceptual Calandria. In the study, the moderator inlet diffusers direct the cool moderator towards the bottom of the Calandria and hot moderator flows out through the outlets in the upper half of the Calandria. The results of the study with various flow configurations show that modification in moderator flow configuration in Calandria, by way of introduction of moderator in the downward direction through diffusers and provision of the exits from the upper portion of the Calandria, results in significant reduction of the maximum temperature of moderator in Calandria. Further, the temperature distribution in the Calandria in the proposed configurations is much more

  12. Analysis of IBW-driven plasma flows in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, L.A.; Jaeger, E.F.; D'Azevedo, E.F.; Batchelor, D.B.; Carlsson, J.A.; Carter, M.D.; Cesario, R.

    2001-01-01

    Both theory and experiment have suggested that damping of Ion Bernstein Waves (IBWs) at ion cyclotron frequency harmonics could drive poloidal flows and lead to enhanced confinement for tokamaks. However, the early analyses were based on Reynolds stress closures of moment equations. More rigorous, finite Larmor radius (FLR) expansions of the radio frequency (RF) kinetic pressure for low harmonic interactions indicated that the Reynolds stress approximation was not generally valid, and resulted in significant changes in the plasma flow response. These changes were largest for wave interactions driven by finite Larmour radius effects. To provide a better assessment of higher harmonic interactions and IBW flow drive prospects, the electromagnetic (E and M) and RF kinetic force models are extended with no assumptions regarding the smallness of the ion Larmor radius. For both models, a spectral-width approximation was used to make the numerical analysis tractable. In addition, it was necessary to include the effects of plasma equilibrium gradients on the plasma conductivity and the RF-induced momentum in order to conserve energy and momentum. The analysis of high-harmonic IBW interactions for TFTR and FTU parameters indicates significant poloidal flow shears (relative to turbulence correlation times) for power levels available in present experiments. Recent advances in all-orders calculations of E and M fields in 2-D are also discussed. (author)

  13. Laboratory observation of magnetic field growth driven by shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T. P., E-mail: intrator@lanl.gov; Feng, Y.; Sears, J.; Weber, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, M.S. E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Dorf, L. [Applied Materials, Inc., Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Sun, X. [University of Science and Technology, Hefei (China)

    2014-04-15

    Two magnetic flux ropes that collide and bounce have been characterized in the laboratory. We find screw pinch profiles that include ion flow v{sub i}, magnetic field B, current density J, and plasma pressure. The electron flow v{sub e} can be inferred, allowing the evaluation of the Hall J×B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm's Law. Flux ropes that are initially cylindrical are mutually attracted and compress each other, which distorts the cylindrical symmetry. Magnetic field is created via the ∇×v{sub e}×B induction term in Ohm's Law where in-plane (perpendicular) shear of parallel flow (along the flux rope) is the dominant feature, along with some dissipation and magnetic reconnection. We predict and measure the growth of a quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field δB{sub z}. This is a simple and coherent example of a shear flow driven dynamo. There is some similarity with two dimensional reconnection scenarios, which induce a current sheet and thus out-of-plane flow in the third dimension, despite the customary picture that considers flows only in the reconnection plane. These data illustrate a general and deterministic mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence.

  14. Flow Driven by an Archimedean Helical Permanent Magnetic Field. Part I: Flow Patterns and Their Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Xiaodong; Etay, Jacqueline; Na, Xianzhao; Zhang, Xinde; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an Archimedean helical permanent magnetic field was constructed and its driving effects on liquid metal were examined. A magnetic stirrer was constructed using a series of arc-like magnets. The helical distribution of its magnetic field, which was confirmed via Gauss probe measurements and numerical simulations, can be considered a combination of rotating and traveling magnetic fields. The characteristics of the flow patterns, particularly the transitions between the meridian secondary flow (two vortices) and the global axial flow (one vortex), driven by this magnetic field were quantitatively measured using ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry. The transient and modulated flow behaviors will be presented in a companion article. The D/ H dimension ratio was used to characterize the transitions of these two flow patterns. The results demonstrated that the flow patterns depend on not only the intrinsic structure of the magnetic field, e.g., the helix lead angle, but also the performance parameters, e.g., the dimensional ratio of the liquid bulk. The notable opposing roles of these two flow patterns in the improvement of macrosegregations when imposing such magnetic fields near the solidifying front were qualitatively addressed.

  15. On the structure of cellular solutions in Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni flows in small-aspect-ratio containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Henk A.

    1992-01-01

    Multiple steady flow patterns occur in surface-tension/buoyancy-driven convection in a liquid layer heated from below (Rayleigh-Benard-Marangoni flows). Techniques of numerical bifurcation theory are used to study the multiplicity and stability of two-dimensional steady flow patterns (rolls) in rectangular small-aspect-ratio containers as the aspect ratio is varied. For pure Marangoni flows at moderate Biot and Prandtl number, the transitions occurring when paths of codimension 1 singularities intersect determine to a large extent the multiplicity of stable patterns. These transitions also lead, for example, to Hopf bifurcations and stable periodic flows for a small range in aspect ratio. The influence of the type of lateral walls on the multiplicity of steady states is considered. 'No-slip' lateral walls lead to hysteresis effects and typically restrict the number of stable flow patterns (with respect to 'slippery' sidewalls) through the occurrence of saddle node bifurcations. In this way 'no-slip' sidewalls induce a selection of certain patterns, which typically have the largest Nusselt number, through secondary bifurcation.

  16. An analysis of the effect of buoyancy on phase distribution phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maneesh Singhal; Richard T Lahey Jr

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It is well known that pronounced lateral phase distributions may occur in two-phase conduit flows. Moreover, the lateral phase distribution appears to strongly influenced by the buoyancy of the dispersed phase. This study used a state-of-the-art two-fluid model, having no arbitrary coefficients, to predict steady, fully developed phase distribution in pipe flows. In particular, bubbly up-flows and down-flows in pipes, and slurry up-flows in pipes, having positive, negative and neutral buoyant particles, were analyzed and compared against appropriate terrestrial (1 g) data. In addition, microgravity bubbly flow data were also analyzed using the same two-fluid model. It was found that this two-fluid model was able to predict these data sets, including detailed predictions of the measured phasic velocity, dispersed phase volume fraction and turbulence (i.e., turbulent kinetic energy and Reynolds stress) fields. It was also found that the numerical algorithm, which was developed and used to evaluate the two-fluid model, was extremely efficient and could be easily run on a small PC. These results clearly demonstrate that a properly formulated two-fluid model, using mechanistically-based closure laws, can predict a wide range of multidimensional multiphase flow data without the need for 'tuners' and empirical correlations. Moreover, it appears that this approach can be used to develop and/or assess other flow-regime-specific closure laws for use in computational multiphase fluid dynamic (CMFD) solvers of transient two-fluid models, which, in turn, can be used for the design and analysis of various industrially important multiphase systems and processes. (authors)

  17. An accessible micro-capillary electrophoresis device using surface-tension-driven flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Swomitra K.; Warrick, Jay; Gorski, Jack; Beebe, David J.

    2010-01-01

    We present a rapidly fabricated micro-capillary electrophoresis chip that utilizes surface-tension-driven flow for sample injection and extraction of DNA. Surface-tension-driven flow (i.e. passive pumping) injects a fixed volume of sample that can be predicted mathematically. Passive pumping eliminates the need for tubing, valves, syringe pumps, and other equipment typically needed for interfacing with microelectrophoresis chips. This method requires a standard micropipette to load samples before separation, and remove the resulting bands after analysis. The device was made using liquid phase photopolymerization to rapidly fabricate the chip without the need of special equipment typically associated with the construction of microelectrophoresis chips (e.g. cleanroom). Batch fabrication time for the device presented here was 1.5 h including channel coating time to suppress electroosmotic flow. Devices were constructed out of poly-isobornyl acrylate and glass. A standard microscope with a UV source was used for sample detection. Separations were demonstrated using Promega BenchTop 100 bp ladder in hydroxyl ethyl cellulose (HEC) and oligonucleotides of 91 and 118 bp were used to characterize sample injection and extraction of DNA bands. The end result was an inexpensive micro-capillary electrophoresis device that uses tools (e.g. micropipette, electrophoretic power supplies, and microscopes) already present in most labs for sample manipulation and detection, making it more accessible for potential end users. PMID:19425002

  18. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF FLOW BEHAVIOR IN DRIVEN CAVITY AT HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudhail Bin Abdul Munir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, due to rapidly increasing computational power, computational methods have become the essential tools to conduct researches in various engineering fields.  In parallel to the development of ultra high speed digital computers, computational fluid dynamics (CFD has become the new third approach apart from theory and experiment in the philosophical study and development of fluid dynamics.  Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM is an alternative method to conventional CFD.  LBM is relatively new approach that uses simple microscopic models to simulate complicated microscopic behavior of transport phenomena.  In this paper, fluid flow behaviors of steady incompressible flow inside lid driven square cavity are studied.  Numerical calculations are conducted for different Reynolds numbers by using Lattice Boltzmann scheme.  The objective of the paper is to demonstrate the capability of this lattice Boltzmann scheme for engineering applications particularly in fluid transport phenomena. Keywords-component; lattice Boltzmann method, lid driven cavity, computational fluid dynamics.

  19. A finite volume method for density driven flows in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilhorst Danielle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we apply a semi-implicit finite volume method for the numerical simulation of density driven flows in porous media; this amounts to solving a nonlinear convection-diffusion parabolic equation for the concentration coupled with an elliptic equation for the pressure. We compute the solutions for two specific problems: a problem involving a rotating interface between salt and fresh water and the classical but difficult Henry’s problem. All solutions are compared to results obtained by running FEflow, a commercial software package for the simulation of groundwater flow, mass and heat transfer in porous media.

  20. Study on the improvement of the convective differencing scheme for the high-accuracy and stable resolution of the numerical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. K.; Choi, Y. D.

    1992-01-01

    QUICKER scheme has several attractive properties. However, under highly convective conditions, it produces overshoots and possibly some oscillations on each side of steps in the dependent variable when the flow is convected at an angle oblique to the grid line. Fortunately, it is possible to modify the QUICKER scheme using non-linear and linear functional relationship. Details of the development of polynomial upwinding scheme are given in this paper, where it is seen that this non-linear scheme has also third order accuracy. This polynomial upwinding scheme is used as the basis for the SHARPER and SMARTER schemes. Another revised scheme was developed by partial modification of QUICKER scheme using CDS and UPWIND schemes (QUICKUP). These revised schemes are tested at the well known bench mark flows, Two-Dimensional Pure Convection Flows in Oblique-Step, Lid Driven Cavity Flows and Buoyancy Driven Cavity Flows. For remain absolutely monotonic without overshoot and oscillation. QUICKUP scheme is more accurate than any other scheme in their relative accuracy. In high Reynolds number Lid Driven Catity Flow, SMARTER and SHARPER schemes retain lower computational cost than QUICKER and QUICKUP schemes, but computed velocity values in the revised schemes produced less predicted values than QUICKER scheme which is strongly effected by overshoot and undershoot values. Also, in Buoyancy Driven Cavity Flow, SMARTER, SHARPER and QUICKUP schemes give acceptable results. (Author)

  1. Numerical study of two-fluid flowing equilibria of helicity-driven spherical torus plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanki, T.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.

    2004-01-01

    Two-fluid flowing equilibrium configurations of a helicity-driven spherical torus (HD-ST) are numerically determined by using the combination of the finite difference and the boundary element methods. It is found from the numerical results that electron fluids near the central conductor are tied to an external toroidal field and ion fluids are not. The magnetic configurations change from the high-q HD-ST (q>1) with paramagnetic toroidal field and low-β (volume average β value, ∼ 2%) through the helicity-driven spheromak and RFP (reverse field pinch) to the ultra low-q HD-ST (0 ∼ 18%) as the external toroidal field at the inner edge regions decreases and reverses the sign. The two-fluid effects are more significant in this equilibrium transition when the ion diamagnetic drift is dominant in the flowing two-fluid. (authors)

  2. Buoyancy-driven chaotic regimes during solute dispersion in pore networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsakiroglou, C.D.; Theodoropoulou, M.A.; Karoutsos, V.

    2005-01-01

    In an attempt to investigate gravity effects on solute dispersion at the scale of a pore network, single source-solute transport visualization experiments are performed on glass-etched pore networks of varying morphology and degree of pore-scale heterogeneities. The (lighter) low solute concentration aqueous solution flows steadily through the porous medium and the (heavier) high solute concentration solution is injected at a very low and constant flow rate through an inner port. The transient evolution of the solute concentration distribution over various regions of the pore network is determined at different scales by capturing and video-recording snapshots of the dispersion on PC, measuring automatically the spatial variation of the color intensity of the solution, and transforming the color intensities to solute concentrations. Without the action of gravity, the steady-state dispersion regime changes with Peclet (Pe) number, and the longitudinal and transverse dispersivities are estimated by fitting the experimental datasets to approximate analytic solutions of the advection-dispersion equation. Under the action of gravity, multiple of steady-state solute dispersion regimes is developed at each Pe value, and lobe-shaped instabilities of the solute concentration are observed across the pore network, as the downward flow of the denser (higher solute concentration) fluid is counterbalanced by the upward flow of the less dense (lower solute concentration) fluid. The steady-state dispersion regimes may be periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic depending on the system parameters. The nature of the transient fluctuations of the average solute concentration is analyzed by identifying the periodicity of the fluctuations, determining the autocorrelation function and the statistical moments of the time series, and inspecting the FFT (fast Fourier transform) power spectra. It is found that the mixing zone tends to be stabilized at higher values of the Peclet (Pe) number

  3. Research and development at the Marshall Space Flight Center Neutral Buoyancy Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulpa, Vygantas P.

    1987-01-01

    The Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS), a facility designed to imitate zero-gravity conditions, was used to test the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) and the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS). Neutral Buoyancy Simulator applications and operations; early space structure research; development of the EASE/ACCESS experiments; and improvement of NBS simulation are summarized.

  4. Manipulating Microrobots Using Balanced Magnetic and Buoyancy Forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Feng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method for the three-dimensional (3D control of microrobots within a microfluidic chip. The microrobot body contains a hollow space, producing buoyancy that allows it to float in a microfluidic environment. The robot moves in the z direction by balancing magnetic and buoyancy forces. In coordination with the motion of stages in the xy plane, we achieved 3D microrobot control. A microgripper designed to grasp micron-scale objects was attached to the front of the robot, allowing it to hold and deliver micro-objects in three dimensions. The microrobot had four degrees of freedom and generated micronewton-order forces. We demonstrate the microrobot’s utility in an experiment in which it grips a 200 μm particle and delivers it in a 3D space.

  5. Solution for laminar natural convection flows in a square cavity with temperature dependent viscosity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, J.G. [Parsons Brinckerhoff, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an examination of numerical results for the buoyancy-driven convection heat transfer problem, in a two-dimensional enclosure under steady-state, laminar, incompressible, and temperature dependent viscosity fluid flow conditions. The vertical walls are exposed to different temperatures and the top and bottom are insulated. Rayleigh numbers of 10{sup 4}, 10{sup 5}, and 10{sup 6} are considered. Specific heat, thermal conductivity, and the thermal expansion coefficient are assumed constant. Density variation is included using the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. The results are obtained using the SIMPLEC solution technique based on a power-law, finite-volume discretization scheme. The hydrodynamic and thermal fields are presented at various locations in the enclosures.

  6. Convection-driven melting in an n-octane pool fire bounded by an ice wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmahini Farahani, Hamed; Alva, Ulises; Rangwala, Ali; Jomaas, Grunde

    2017-11-01

    Burning of the liquid fuels adjacent to ice bodies creates a lateral cavity due to melting of the ice. The formation of lateral cavities are noticed recently and only a few experimental studies have addressed them. One study has shown lateral cavity formation with length of 12 cm for 5 minutes burning of oil. Based on the hypothesis that melting is facilitated by the convection in the liquid fuel, a series of PIV tests were conducted on burning of n-octane in a square glass tray with a 3 cm thick ice wall placed on one side of the tray. Marangoni generates a flow below the surface of the fuel and near the ice from hot to cold regions. The flow measurements by a 2D PIV system indicated the existence of different flow regimes. Before ignition, combined surface tension and buoyancy effects led to a one roll structure. After ignition the flow field began transitioning toward an unstable regime with an increase in velocity magnitude. Unfortunately, the PIV quality declined in the unstable regime, but indications of a multi-roll structure separating from a primary horizontal flow on the top driven by Marangoni convection were observed. The knowledge gained from these experiments will help determine the influential parameters in ice melting during burning of oil in ice-infested waters.

  7. Modeling the buoyancy-driven Black Sea Water outflow into the North Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Kokkos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional numerical model was applied to simulate the Black Sea Water (BSW outflux and spreading over the North Aegean Sea, and its impact on circulation and stratification–mixing dynamics. Model results were validated against satellite-derived sea surface temperature and in-situ temperature and salinity profiles. Further, the model results were post-processed in terms of the potential energy anomaly, ϕ, analyzing the factors contributing to its change. It occurs that BSW contributes significantly on the Thracian Sea water column stratification, but its signal reduces in the rest of the North Aegean Sea. The BSW buoyancy flux contributed to the change of ϕ in the Thracian Sea by 1.23 × 10−3 W m−3 in the winter and 7.9 × 10−4 W m−3 in the summer, significantly higher than the corresponding solar heat flux contribution (1.41 × 10−5 W m−3 and 7.4 × 10−5 W m−3, respectively. Quantification of the ϕ-advective term crossing the north-western BSW branch (to the north of Lemnos Island, depicted a strong non-linear relation to the relative vorticity of Samothraki Anticyclone. Similar analysis for the south-western branch illustrated a relationship between the ϕ-advective term sign and the relative vorticity in the Sporades system. The ϕ-mixing term increases its significance under strong winds (>15 m s−1, tending to destroy surface meso-scale eddies.

  8. Spatio-temporal organization of dynamics in a two-dimensional periodically driven vortex flow: A Lagrangian flow network perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Michael; Donner, Reik V

    2017-03-01

    We study the Lagrangian dynamics of passive tracers in a simple model of a driven two-dimensional vortex resembling real-world geophysical flow patterns. Using a discrete approximation of the system's transfer operator, we construct a directed network that describes the exchange of mass between distinct regions of the flow domain. By studying different measures characterizing flow network connectivity at different time-scales, we are able to identify the location of dynamically invariant structures and regions of maximum dispersion. Specifically, our approach allows us to delimit co-existing flow regimes with different dynamics. To validate our findings, we compare several network characteristics to the well-established finite-time Lyapunov exponents and apply a receiver operating characteristic analysis to identify network measures that are particularly useful for unveiling the skeleton of Lagrangian chaos.

  9. Simulation of incompressible flows with heat and mass transfer using parallel finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Abedi

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The stabilized finite element formulations based on the SUPG (Stream-line-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin and PSPG (Pressure-Stabilization/Petrov-Galerkin methods are developed and applied to solve buoyancy-driven incompressible flows with heat and mass transfer. The SUPG stabilization term allows us to solve flow problems at high speeds (advection dominant flows and the PSPG term eliminates instabilities associated with the use of equal order interpolation functions for both pressure and velocity. The finite element formulations are implemented in parallel using MPI. In parallel computations, the finite element mesh is partitioned into contiguous subdomains using METIS, which are then assigned to individual processors. To ensure a balanced load, the number of elements assigned to each processor is approximately equal. To solve nonlinear systems in large-scale applications, we developed a matrix-free GMRES iterative solver. Here we totally eliminate a need to form any matrices, even at the element levels. To measure the accuracy of the method, we solve 2D and 3D example of natural convection flows at moderate to high Rayleigh numbers.

  10. Non-uniqueness of the point of application of the buoyancy force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kliava, Janis; Megel, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Even though the buoyancy force (also known as the Archimedes force) has always been an important topic of academic studies in physics, its point of application has not been explicitly identified yet. We present a quantitative approach to this problem based on the concept of the hydrostatic energy, considered here for a general shape of the cross-section of a floating body and for an arbitrary angle of heel. We show that the location of the point of application of the buoyancy force essentially depends (i) on the type of motion experienced by the floating body and (ii) on the definition of this point. In a rolling/pitching motion, considerations involving the rotational moment lead to a particular dynamical point of application of the buoyancy force, and for some simple shapes of the floating body this point coincides with the well-known metacentre. On the other hand, from the work-energy relation it follows that in the rolling/pitching motion the energetical point of application of this force is rigidly connected to the centre of buoyancy; in contrast, in a vertical translation this point is rigidly connected to the centre of gravity of the body. Finally, we consider the location of the characteristic points of the floating bodies for some particular shapes of immersed cross-sections. The paper is intended for higher education level physics teachers and students.

  11. MHD rotating flow and heat transfer through a channel with Hall effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sushil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation is the flow and heat transfer of a viscous fluid through a rotating channel about the vertical axis under the influence of transverse magnetic field. The linear temperature dependent density has been introduced along with the induced magnetic field in horizontal directions. To study the temperature distribution, the energy equation consisting of viscous dissipation and joule heating term is solved analytically. The velocity distribution in axial and vertical directions is found to be interesting such as the magnetic Reynolds number and the parameter appears due to buoyancy forces have a substantial contribution to influence the flow pattern. Also the results obtained in the study for magnetic induction variables as well as temperature distribution put forward some significant insight in the fluid flow and heat transfer. The important observation of the present study is that the temperature distribution takes the higher values in the vicinity of the upper wall and this happens due to the fact of buoyancy force and channel rotation. This is a key parameter to worm up or cool down the fluid in a useful purposes. - Highlights: • The important observation of the present study is that the temperature distribution takes the higher values in the vicinity of the upper wall and this happens due to the fact of buoyancy force and channel rotation. • Buoyancy is a key parameter to worm up or cool down the fluid in useful purposes. • It may be predicted that the effect of buoyancy force and magnetic induction force suppress the flow at the lower wall and the effect of the forces lost its potential at the layers near to the upper walls. • It may suggest that the bouncy effect has more prominent role in the fluid flow phenomena as well as heat transfer than magnetic induction and Lorentz force. • The rotation enhances the advantage of circulation of fluid in up and down and tries to make the heat balance within the layers. Our result is true

  12. Multiphase flow simulation with gravity effect in anisotropic porous media using multipoint flux approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah; Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu

    2015-01-01

    Numerical investigations of two-phase flows in anisotropic porous media have been conducted. In the flow model, the permeability has been considered as a full tensor and is implemented in the numerical scheme using the multipoint flux approximation within the framework of finite difference method. In addition, the experimenting pressure field approach is used to obtain the solution of the pressure field, which makes the matrix of coefficient of the global system easily constructed. A number of numerical experiments on the flow of two-phase system in two-dimensional porous medium domain are presented. In this work, the gravity is included in the model to capture the possible buoyancy-driven effects due to density differences between the two phases. Different anisotropy scenarios have been considered. From the numerical results, interesting patterns of the flow, pressure, and saturation fields emerge, which are significantly influenced by the anisotropy of the absolute permeability field. It is found that the two-phase system moves along the principal direction of anisotropy. Furthermore, the effects of anisotropy orientation on the flow rates and the cross flow index are also discussed in the paper.

  13. Multiphase flow simulation with gravity effect in anisotropic porous media using multipoint flux approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah

    2015-03-04

    Numerical investigations of two-phase flows in anisotropic porous media have been conducted. In the flow model, the permeability has been considered as a full tensor and is implemented in the numerical scheme using the multipoint flux approximation within the framework of finite difference method. In addition, the experimenting pressure field approach is used to obtain the solution of the pressure field, which makes the matrix of coefficient of the global system easily constructed. A number of numerical experiments on the flow of two-phase system in two-dimensional porous medium domain are presented. In this work, the gravity is included in the model to capture the possible buoyancy-driven effects due to density differences between the two phases. Different anisotropy scenarios have been considered. From the numerical results, interesting patterns of the flow, pressure, and saturation fields emerge, which are significantly influenced by the anisotropy of the absolute permeability field. It is found that the two-phase system moves along the principal direction of anisotropy. Furthermore, the effects of anisotropy orientation on the flow rates and the cross flow index are also discussed in the paper.

  14. Short-term stream flow forecasting at Australian river sites using data-driven regression techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, Melise

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a computationally efficient solution to stream flow forecasting for river basins where historical time series data are available. Two data-driven modeling techniques are investigated, namely support vector regression...

  15. Richardson effects in turbulent buoyant flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggi, Renaud; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    Rayleigh Taylor instabilities are found in a wide range of scientific fields from supernova explosions to underwater hot plumes. The turbulent flow is affected by the presence of buoyancy forces and may not follow the Kolmogorov theory anymore. The objective of the present work is to analyze the complex interactions between turbulence and buoyancy. Towards that goal, simulations have been performed with a high order, conservative, low Mach number code [Desjardins et. al. JCP 2010]. The configuration corresponds to a cubic box initially filled with homogeneous isotropic turbulence with heavy fluid on top and light gas at the bottom. The initial turbulent field was forced using linear forcing up to a Reynolds number of Reλ=55 [Meneveau & Rosales, POF 2005]. The Richardson number based on the rms velocity and the integral length scale was varied from 0.1 to 10 to investigate cases with weak and strong buoyancy. Cases with gravity as a stabilizer of turbulence (gravity pointing up) were also considered. The evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and the total kinetic energy was analyzed and a simple phenomenological model was proposed. Finally, the energy spectra and the isotropy of the flow were also investigated.

  16. Working gas temperature and pressure changes for microscale thermal creep-driven flow caused by discontinuous wall temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yen-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Microscale temperature gradient-driven (thermal creep/transpiration) gas flows have attracted significant interest during the past decade. For free molecular and transitional conditions, applying temperature gradients to a flow channel's walls induces the thermal creep effect. This results in a working gas flowing through the channel from cold to hot, which is generally accompanied by a rising pressure from cold to hot in the channel. Working gas temperature and pressure distributions can vary significantly, depending on a flow channel's configuration and wall temperature distribution. Understanding working gas temperature excursions, both increases and decreases, is essential to ensure the effective use of thermal creep flows in microscale applications. In this study, the characterizations of working gas temperature variations, due to both temperature discontinuities and more gradual changes, on a variety of flow channel walls, were systematically investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. A micro/meso-scale pump, the Knudsen compressor, was chosen to illustrate the importance of controlling working gas temperature in thermal creep-driven flows. Gas pressure and temperature variations, through several Knudsen compressor stage configurations, were studied to determine the most advantageous flow phenomena for the efficient operation of Knudsen compressors.

  17. Numerical Study of Flow Motion and Patterns Driven by a Rotating Permanent Helical Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenzhi; Wang, Xiaodong; Wang, Bo; Baltaretu, Florin; Etay, Jacqueline; Fautrelle, Yves

    2016-10-01

    Liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flow driven by a rotating permanent helical magnetic field in a cylindrical container is numerically studied. A three-dimensional numerical simulation provides insight into the visualization of the physical fields, including the magnetic field, the Lorentz force density, and the flow structures, especially the flow patterns in the meridional plane. Because the screen parameter is sufficiently small, the model is decoupled into electromagnetic and hydrodynamic components. Two flow patterns in the meridional plane, i.e., the global flow and the secondary flow, are discovered and the impact of several system parameters on their transition is investigated. Finally, a verifying model is used for comparison with the previous experiment.

  18. Experimental study of heat and mass transfer in a buoyant countercurrent exchange flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Timothy Allan

    Buoyant Countercurrent Exchange Flow occurs in a vertical vent through which two miscible fluids communicate, the higher-density fluid, residing above the lower-density fluid, separated by the vented partition. The buoyancy- driven zero net volumetric flow through the vent transports any passive scalars, such as heat and toxic fumes, between the two compartments as the fluids seek thermodynamic and gravitational equilibrium. The plume rising from the vent into the top compartment resembles a pool fire plume. In some circumstances both countercurrent flows and pool fires can ``puff'' periodically, with distinct frequencies. One experimental test section containing fresh water in the top compartment and brine (NaCl solution) in the bottom compartment provided a convenient, idealized flow for study. This brine flow decayed in time as the concentrations approached equilibrium. A second test section contained fresh water that was cooled by heat exchangers above and heated by electrical elements below and operated steadily, allowing more time for data acquisition. Brine transport was reduced to a buoyancy- scaled flow coefficient, Q*, and heat transfer was reduced to an analogous coefficient, H*. Results for vent diameter D = 5.08 cm were consistent between test sections and with the literature. Some results for D = 2.54 cm were inconsistent, suggesting viscosity and/or molecular diffusion of heat become important at smaller scales. Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used to measure velocity fields in both test sections, and in thermal flow a small thermocouple measured temperature simultaneously with velocity. Measurement fields were restricted to the plume base region, above the vent proper. In baseline periodic flow, instantaneous velocity and temperature were ensemble averaged, producing a movie of the average variation of each measure during a puffing flow cycle. The temperature movie revealed the previously unknown cold core of the puff during its early development. The

  19. Flow-driven triboelectric generator for directly powering a wireless sensor node.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Yang, Ya; Sun, Chengliang; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-01-14

    A triboelectric generator (TEG) for scavenging flow-driven mechanical -energy to directly power a wireless sensor node is demonstrated for the first time. The output performances of TEGs with different dimensions are systematically investigated, indicating that a largest output power of about 3.7 mW for one TEG can be achieved under an external load of 3 MΩ. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Idealized debris flow in flume with bed driven by a conveyor belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chi-Hai; Chen, Cheng-lung

    1989-01-01

    The generalized viscoplastic fluid (GVF) model is used to derive the theoretical expressions of two-dimensional velocities and surface profile for debris flow established in a flume with bed driven by a conveyor belt. The rheological parameters of the GVF model are evaluated through the comparison of theoretical results with measured data. A slip velocity of the established (steady) nonuniform flow on the moving bed (i.e., the conveyor belt) is observed, and a relation between the slip velocity and the velocity gradient at the bed is derived. Two belts, one rough and the other smooth, were tested. The flow profile in the flume is found to be linear and dependent on the roughness of the belt, but not much on its speed.

  1. Extracting a mix parameter from 2D radiography of variable density flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Susan; Doss, Forrest; Livescu, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    A methodology is presented for extracting quantities related to the statistical description of the mixing state from the 2D radiographic image of a flow. X-ray attenuation through a target flow is given by the Beer-Lambert law which exponentially damps the incident beam intensity by a factor proportional to the density, opacity and thickness of the target. By making reasonable assumptions for the mean density, opacity and effective thickness of the target flow, we estimate the contribution of density fluctuations to the attenuation. The fluctuations thus inferred may be used to form the correlation of density and specific-volume, averaged across the thickness of the flow in the direction of the beam. This correlation function, denoted by b in RANS modeling, quantifies turbulent mixing in variable density flows. The scheme is tested using DNS data computed for variable-density buoyancy-driven mixing. We quantify the deficits in the extracted value of b due to target thickness, Atwood number, and modeled noise in the incident beam. This analysis corroborates the proposed scheme to infer the mix parameter from thin targets at moderate to low Atwood numbers. The scheme is then applied to an image of counter-shear flow obtained from experiments at the National Ignition Facility. US Department of Energy.

  2. Investigation of buoyancy effects on turbulent nonpremixed jet flames by using normal and low-gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idicheria, Cherian Alex

    An experimental study was performed with the aim of investigating the structure of transitional and turbulent nonpremixed jet flames under different gravity conditions. In particular, the focus was to determine the effect of buoyancy on the mean and fluctuating characteristics of the jet flames. Experiments were conducted under three gravity levels, viz. 1 g, 20 mg and 100 mug. The milligravity and microgravity conditions were achieved by dropping a jet-flame rig in the UT-Austin 1.25-second and the NASA-Glenn Research Center 2.2-second drop towers, respectively. The principal diagnostics employed were time-resolved, cinematographic imaging of the visible soot luminosity and planar laser Mie scattering (PLMS). For the cinematographic flame luminosity imaging experiments, the flames studied were piloted nonpremixed propane, ethylene and methane jet flames at source Reynolds numbers ranging from 2000 to 10500. From the soot luminosity images, mean and root-mean square (RMS) images were computed, and volume rendering of the image sequences was used to investigate the large-scale structure evolution and flame tip dynamics. The relative importance of buoyancy was quantified with the parameter, xL , as defined by Becker and Yamazaki [1978]. The results show, in contrast to previous microgravity studies, that the high Reynolds number flames have the same flame length irrespective of the gravity level. The RMS fluctuations and volume renderings indicate that the large-scale structure and flame tip dynamics are essentially identical to those of purely momentum driven flames provided xL is approximately less than 2. The volume-renderings show that the luminous structure celerities (normalized by jet exit velocity) are approximately constant for xL 8. The celerity values for xL > 8 are seen to follow a x3/2L scaling, which can be predicted with a simplified momentum equation analysis for the buoyancy-dominated regime. The underlying turbulent structure and mean mixture

  3. Medication and volume delivery by gravity-driven micro-drip intravenous infusion: potential variations during "wide-open" flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Eric T; Kumar, Vikram; Zheng, Hui; Peterfreund, Robert A

    2013-03-01

    Gravity-driven micro-drip infusion sets allow control of medication dose delivery by adjusting drops per minute. When the roller clamp is fully open, flow in the drip chamber can be a continuous fluid column rather than discrete, countable, drops. We hypothesized that during this "wide-open" state, drug delivery becomes dependent on factors extrinsic to the micro-drip set and is therefore difficult to predict. We conducted laboratory experiments to characterize volume delivery under various clinically relevant conditions of wide-open flow in an in vitro laboratory model. A micro-drip infusion set, plugged into a bag of normal saline, was connected to a high-flow stopcock at the distal end. Vertically oriented IV catheters (gauges 14-22) were connected to the stopcock. The fluid meniscus height in the bag was fixed (60-120 cm) above the outflow point. The roller clamp on the infusion set was in fully open position for all experiments resulting in a continuous column of fluid in the drip chamber. Fluid volume delivered in 1 minute was measured 4 times with each condition. To model resistive effects of carrier flow, volumetric infusion pumps were used to deliver various flow rates of normal saline through a carrier IV set into which a micro-drip infusion was "piggybacked." We also compared delivery by micro-drip infusion sets from 3 manufacturers. The volume of fluid delivered by gravity-driven infusion under wide-open conditions (continuous fluid column in drip chamber) varied 2.9-fold (95% confidence interval, 2.84-2.96) depending on catheter size and fluid column height. Total model resistance of the micro-drip with stopcock and catheter varied with flow rate. Volume delivered by the piggybacked micro-drip decreased up to 29.7% ± 0.8% (mean ± SE) as the carrier flow increased from 0 to 1998 mL/min. Delivery characteristics of the micro-drip infusion sets from 3 different manufacturers were similar. Laboratory simulation of clinical situations with gravity-driven

  4. The effect of centrifugal buoyancy on the heat transport in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susanne; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    In a rapidly rotating and differentially heated fluid, the centrifugal acceleration can play a similar role to that of gravity in generating convective motion. However, in the paradigm system of rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection, centrifugal buoyancy is typically not considered in theoretical studies and, thus, usually undesired in laboratory experiments, despite being unavoidable. How centrifugal buoyancy affects the turbulent flow, including the heat transport, is still largely unknown, in particular, when it can be considered negligible. We study this problem by means of direct numerical simulations. Unlike in experiments, we are able to systematically vary the Froude number Fr (ratio of centrifugal to gravitational acceleration) and the Rossby number Ro (dimensionless rotation rate) independently, and even set each to zero exactly. We show that the centrifugal acceleration simultaneously leads to contending phenomena, e.g. reflected by an increase and a decrease of the center temperature, or a suppression and an enhancement of the heat transfer efficiency. Which one prevails as net effect strongly depends on the combination of Fr and Ro. Furthermore, we discuss implications for experiments of rapidly rotating convection. SH acknowledges funding by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under Grant HO 5890/1-1, JA by the NSF Geophysics Program.

  5. Coupling between electroosmotically driven flow and bipolar faradaic depolarization processes in electron-conducting microchannels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qian, S.Z.; Duval, J.F.L.

    2006-01-01

    A quantitative theory is proposed for the analysis of steady electroosmotically driven flows within conducting cylindrical microchannels. Beyond a threshold value of the electric field applied in the electrolyte Solution and parallel to the conducting surface, electrochemical oxidation and reduction

  6. Positive segregation as a function of buoyancy force during steel ingot solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radovic, Zarko; Jaukovic, Nada; Lalovic, Milisav; Tadic, Nebojsa

    2008-01-01

    We analyze theoretically and experimentally solute redistribution in the dendritic solidification process and positive segregation during solidification of steel ingots. Positive segregation is mainly caused by liquid flow in the mushy zone. Changes in the liquid steel velocity are caused by the temperature gradient and by the increase in the solid fraction during solidification. The effects of buoyancy and of the change in the solid fraction on segregation intensity are analyzed. The relationships between the density change, liquid fraction and the steel composition are considered. Such elements as W, Ni, Mo and Cr decrease the effect of the density variations, i.e. they show smaller tendency to segregate. Based on the modeling and experimental results, coefficients are provided controlling the effects of chemical composition, secondary dendrite arm spacing and the solid fraction.

  7. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Itsumi; Meyer, Carl G; Sato, Katsufumi

    2015-01-01

    We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two species of deep-sea sharks (bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a prickly shark, Echinorhinus cookei) in their natural habitat, we used accelerometer-magnetometer data loggers to measure their swimming performance. Both species of deep-sea sharks showed similar diel vertical migrations: they swam at depths of 200-300 m at night and deeper than 500 m during the day. Ambient water temperature was around 15°C at 200-300 m but below 7°C at depths greater than 500 m. During vertical movements, all deep-sea sharks showed higher swimming efforts during descent than ascent to maintain a given swimming speed, and were able to glide uphill for extended periods (several minutes), indicating that these deep-sea sharks are in fact positively buoyant in their natural habitats. This positive buoyancy may adaptive for stealthy hunting (i.e. upward gliding to surprise prey from underneath) or may facilitate evening upward migrations when muscle temperatures are coolest, and swimming most sluggish, after spending the day in deep, cold water. Positive buoyancy could potentially be widespread in fish conducting daily vertical migration in deep-sea habitats.

  8. Study of electroosmosis-driven two-liquid displacement flow in a microcapillary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan, H Y; Yang, C; Wan, S Y M; Lim, G C; Lam, Y C

    2006-01-01

    Multi-liquid flow, such as one liquid displacing another liquid, is frequently encountered in practice. This can be achieved by electroosmotic (EO) pumping, which has its own unique characteristics and advantages. This investigation is on EO-driven, two-liquid displacement flow in a microcapillary. A theoretical model was developed to take into consideration the axial step change of velocity flow fields at the time-dependent liquid/liquid interface, continuity requirement, and induced local pressure gradients. The electrical current monitoring method was employed to measure the flowrate and subsequently determine the capillary zeta potentials which are required for the model prediction. The nonlinear change of the electrical current with time under a constant applied voltage was observed during the displacement process. The theoretical and experimental results validated the hypothesis that the non-uniform zeta potential and electric field induce local pressure gradients in the two different liquids. Our experimental results indicated that the time of displacement, and thus the flow velocity, is found to be dependent on the displacing flow direction, which has hitherto not been reported in the literature. The underlying mechanisms were postulated, but demand further investigation

  9. Libration-driven flows in ellipsoidal shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemasquerier, D.; Grannan, A. M.; Vidal, J.; Cébron, D.; Favier, B.; Le Bars, M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2017-09-01

    Planets and satellites can undergo physical librations, which consist of forced periodic variations in their rotation rate induced by gravitational interactions with nearby bodies. This mechanical forcing may drive turbulence in interior fluid layers such as subsurface oceans and metallic liquid cores through a libration-driven elliptical instability (LDEI) that refers to the resonance of two inertial modes with the libration-induced base flow. LDEI has been studied in the case of a full ellipsoid. Here we address for the first time the question of the persistence of LDEI in the more geophysically relevant ellipsoidal shell geometries. In the experimental setup, an ellipsoidal container with spherical inner cores of different sizes is filled with water. Direct side view flow visualizations are made in the librating frame using Kalliroscope particles. A Fourier analysis of the light intensity fluctuations extracted from recorded movies shows that the presence of an inner core leads to spatial heterogeneities but does not prevent LDEI. Particle image velocimetry and direct numerical simulations are performed on selected cases to confirm our results. Additionally, our survey at a fixed forcing frequency and variable rotation period (i.e., variable Ekman number, E) shows that the libration amplitude at the instability threshold varies as ˜E0.65. This scaling is explained by a competition between surface and bulk dissipation. When extrapolating to planetary interior conditions, this leads to the E1/2 scaling commonly considered. We argue that Enceladus' subsurface ocean and the core of the exoplanet 55 CnC e should both be unstable to LDEI.

  10. Comparison of strongly heat-driven flow codes for unsaturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Updegraff, C.D.

    1989-08-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a performance assessment methodology for the analysis of long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in unsaturated welded tuff. As part of this effort, SNL evaluated existing strongly heat-driven flow computer codes for simulating ground-water flow in unsaturated media. The three codes tested, NORIA, PETROS, and TOUGH, were compared against a suite of problems for which analytical and numerical solutions or experimental results exist. The problems were selected to test the abilities of the codes to simulate situations ranging from simple, uncoupled processes, such as two-phase flow or heat transfer, to fully coupled processes, such as vaporization caused by high temperatures. In general, all three codes were found to be difficult to use because of (1) built-in time stepping criteria, (2) the treatment of boundary conditions, and (3) handling of evaporation/condensation problems. A drawback of the study was that adequate problems related to expected repository conditions were not available in the literature. Nevertheless, the results of this study suggest the need for thorough investigations of the impact of heat on the flow field in the vicinity of an unsaturated HLW repository. Recommendations are to develop a new flow code combining the best features of these three codes and eliminating the worst ones. 19 refs., 49 figs

  11. Anisotropy and buoyancy in nuclear turbulent heat transfer - critical assessment and needs for modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetzbach, G.

    2007-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) programs have a wide application field in reactor technique, like to diverse flow types which have to be considered in Accelerator Driven nuclear reactor Systems (ADS). This requires turbulence models for the momentum and heat transfer with very different capabilities. The physical demands on the models are elaborated for selected transport mechanisms, the status quo of the modelling is discussed, and it is investigated which capabilities are offered by the market dominating commercial CFD codes. One topic of the discussion is on the already earlier achieved knowledge on the distinct anisotropy of the turbulent momentum and heat transport near walls. It is shown that this is relevant in channel flows with inhomogeneous wall conditions. The related consequences for the turbulence modelling are discussed. The second topic is the turbulent heat transport in buoyancy influenced flows. The only turbulence model for heat transfer which is available in the large commercial CFD-codes is based on the Reynolds analogy. This means, it is required to prescribe suitable turbulent Prandtl number distributions. There exist many correlations for channel flows, but they are seldom used in practical applications. Here, a correlation is deduced for the local turbulent Prandtl number which accounts for many parameters, like wall distance, molecular Prandtl number of the fluid, wall roughness and local shear stress, thermal wall condition, etc. so that it can be applied to most ADS typical heat transporting channel flows. The spatial dependence is discussed. It is shown that it is essential for reliable temperature calculations to get accurate turbulent Prandtl numbers especially near walls. If thermal wall functions are applied, then the correlation for the turbulent Prandtl number has to be consistent with the wall functions to avoid unphysical discretisation dependences. In using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data for horizontal fluid layers it

  12. Investigating Students' Ideas About Buoyancy and the Influence of Haptic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, James; Borland, David

    2016-04-01

    While haptics (simulated touch) represents a potential breakthrough technology for science teaching and learning, there is relatively little research into its differential impact in the context of teaching and learning. This paper describes the testing of a haptically enhanced simulation (HES) for learning about buoyancy. Despite a lifetime of everyday experiences, a scientifically sound explanation of buoyancy remains difficult to construct for many. It requires the integration of domain-specific knowledge regarding density, fluid, force, gravity, mass, weight, and buoyancy. Prior studies suggest that novices often focus on only one dimension of the sinking and floating phenomenon. Our HES was designed to promote the integration of the subconcepts of density and buoyant forces and stresses the relationship between the object itself and the surrounding fluid. The study employed a randomized pretest-posttest control group research design and a suite of measures including an open-ended prompt and objective content questions to provide insights into the influence of haptic feedback on undergraduate students' thinking about buoyancy. A convenience sample (n = 40) was drawn from a university's population of undergraduate elementary education majors. Two groups were formed from haptic feedback (n = 22) and no haptic feedback (n = 18). Through content analysis, discernible differences were seen in the posttest explanations sinking and floating across treatment groups. Learners that experienced the haptic feedback made more frequent use of "haptically grounded" terms (e.g., mass, gravity, buoyant force, pushing), leading us to begin to build a local theory of language-mediated haptic cognition.

  13. Time-Dependent Thermally-Driven Interfacial Flows in Multilayered Fluid Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Borhan, A.

    1996-01-01

    A computational study of thermally-driven convection in multilayered fluid structures will be performed to examine the effect of interactions among deformable fluid-fluid interfaces on the structure of time-dependent flow in these systems. Multilayered fluid structures in two models configurations will be considered: the differentially heated rectangular cavity with a free surface, and the encapsulated cylindrical liquid bridge. An extension of a numerical method developed as part of our recent NASA Fluid Physics grant will be used to account for finite deformations of fluid-fluid interfaces.

  14. Forced and free convection flow with viscous dissipation effects: The method of parametric differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.A.; Arbad, O.

    1988-07-01

    Effect of buoyancy force in a laminar uniform forced convection flow past a semi-infinite vertical plate has been analyzed near the leading edge, taking into account the viscous dissipation. The coupled non-linear locally similar equations, which govern the flow, are solved by the method of parametric differentiation. Effects of the buoyancy force and the heat due to viscous dissipation on the flow and the temperature fields as well as on the wall shear-stress and the heat transfer at the surface of the plate are shown graphically for the values of the Prandtl number σ ranging from 10 -1 to 1.0. (author). 20 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Performance assessment of turbulence models for the prediction of moderator thermal flow inside CANDU calandria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gong Hee; Bang, Young Seok; Woo, Sweng Woong

    2012-01-01

    The moderator thermal flow in the CANDU calandria is generally complex and highly turbulent because of the interaction of the buoyancy force with the inlet jet inertia. In this study, the prediction performance of turbulence models for the accurate analysis of the moderator thermal flow are assessed by comparing the results calculated with various types of turbulence models in the commercial flow solver FLUENT with experimental data for the test vessel at Sheridan Park Engineering Laboratory (SPEL). Through this comparative study of turbulence models, it is concluded that turbulence models that include the source term to consider the effects of buoyancy on the turbulent flow should be used for the reliable prediction of the moderator thermal flow inside the CANDU calandria

  16. An Analysis of Tax Buoyancy Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Rasheed

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available By using econometric techniques for estimating tax elasticities, this paper findssignificant but low tax buoyancy rates for GDP, M0 and volume of trade. Surprisingly,the theoretically important factor of tax evasion (SFTR was found to be ineffective. Thisindicates that SFTR is not an adequate measure of tax evasion. There is no significantassociation between tax revenue growth and investment, credit, public debt and inflation.This illustrates the weakness of the tax regime in Pakistan.

  17. Unexpected Positive Buoyancy in Deep Sea Sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a Echinorhinus cookei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsumi Nakamura

    Full Text Available We do not expect non air-breathing aquatic animals to exhibit positive buoyancy. Sharks, for example, rely on oil-filled livers instead of gas-filled swim bladders to increase their buoyancy, but are nonetheless ubiquitously regarded as either negatively or neutrally buoyant. Deep-sea sharks have particularly large, oil-filled livers, and are believed to be neutrally buoyant in their natural habitat, but this has never been confirmed. To empirically determine the buoyancy status of two species of deep-sea sharks (bluntnose sixgill sharks, Hexanchus griseus, and a prickly shark, Echinorhinus cookei in their natural habitat, we used accelerometer-magnetometer data loggers to measure their swimming performance. Both species of deep-sea sharks showed similar diel vertical migrations: they swam at depths of 200-300 m at night and deeper than 500 m during the day. Ambient water temperature was around 15°C at 200-300 m but below 7°C at depths greater than 500 m. During vertical movements, all deep-sea sharks showed higher swimming efforts during descent than ascent to maintain a given swimming speed, and were able to glide uphill for extended periods (several minutes, indicating that these deep-sea sharks are in fact positively buoyant in their natural habitats. This positive buoyancy may adaptive for stealthy hunting (i.e. upward gliding to surprise prey from underneath or may facilitate evening upward migrations when muscle temperatures are coolest, and swimming most sluggish, after spending the day in deep, cold water. Positive buoyancy could potentially be widespread in fish conducting daily vertical migration in deep-sea habitats.

  18. A data-driven approach for modeling post-fire debris-flow volumes and their uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    This study demonstrates the novel application of genetic programming to evolve nonlinear post-fire debris-flow volume equations from variables associated with a data-driven conceptual model of the western United States. The search space is constrained using a multi-component objective function that simultaneously minimizes root-mean squared and unit errors for the evolution of fittest equations. An optimization technique is then used to estimate the limits of nonlinear prediction uncertainty associated with the debris-flow equations. In contrast to a published multiple linear regression three-variable equation, linking basin area with slopes greater or equal to 30 percent, burn severity characterized as area burned moderate plus high, and total storm rainfall, the data-driven approach discovers many nonlinear and several dimensionally consistent equations that are unbiased and have less prediction uncertainty. Of the nonlinear equations, the best performance (lowest prediction uncertainty) is achieved when using three variables: average basin slope, total burned area, and total storm rainfall. Further reduction in uncertainty is possible for the nonlinear equations when dimensional consistency is not a priority and by subsequently applying a gradient solver to the fittest solutions. The data-driven modeling approach can be applied to nonlinear multivariate problems in all fields of study.

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Unstably Stratified Turbulent Flow over Urban-Like Building Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal instability induced by solar radiation is the most common condition of urban atmosphere in daytime. Compared to researches under neutral conditions, only a few numerical works studied the unstable urban boundary layer and the effect of buoyancy force is unclear. In this paper, unstably stratified turbulent boundary layer flow over three-dimensional urban-like building arrays with ground heating is simulated. Large eddy simulation is applied to capture main turbulence structures and the effect of buoyancy force on turbulence can be investigated. Lagrangian dynamic subgrid scale model is used for complex flow together with a wall function, taking into account the large pressure gradient near buildings. The numerical model and method are verified with the results measured in wind tunnel experiment. The simulated results satisfy well with the experiment in mean velocity and temperature, as well as turbulent intensities. Mean flow structure inside canopy layer varies with thermal instability, while no large secondary vortex is observed. Turbulent intensities are enhanced, as buoyancy force contributes to the production of turbulent kinetic energy.

  20. Big Data-Driven Based Real-Time Traffic Flow State Identification and Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-pu Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of urban informatization, the era of big data is coming. To satisfy the demand of traffic congestion early warning, this paper studies the method of real-time traffic flow state identification and prediction based on big data-driven theory. Traffic big data holds several characteristics, such as temporal correlation, spatial correlation, historical correlation, and multistate. Traffic flow state quantification, the basis of traffic flow state identification, is achieved by a SAGA-FCM (simulated annealing genetic algorithm based fuzzy c-means based traffic clustering model. Considering simple calculation and predictive accuracy, a bilevel optimization model for regional traffic flow correlation analysis is established to predict traffic flow parameters based on temporal-spatial-historical correlation. A two-stage model for correction coefficients optimization is put forward to simplify the bilevel optimization model. The first stage model is built to calculate the number of temporal-spatial-historical correlation variables. The second stage model is present to calculate basic model formulation of regional traffic flow correlation. A case study based on a real-world road network in Beijing, China, is implemented to test the efficiency and applicability of the proposed modeling and computing methods.

  1. Pulsatile pressure driven rarefied gas flow in long rectangular ducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimpoukis, Alexandros; Valougeorgis, Dimitris

    2018-04-01

    The pulsatile pressure driven fully developed flow of a rarefied gas through an orthogonal duct is investigated, based on the time-dependent linear Bhatnagar, Gross, and Krook equation, by decomposing the flow into its steady and oscillatory parts. The investigation is focused on the oscillatory part, which is characterized by the gas rarefaction and oscillation parameters, the duct aspect ratio, and the accommodation coefficient. As the oscillation frequency is increased, the amplitude of all macroscopic quantities is decreased, while their phase angle lag is increased reaching the limiting value of π/2. As the gas becomes more rarefied, higher frequencies are needed to trigger this behavior. At small and moderate frequencies, there is a critical degree of gas rarefaction, where a maximum flow rate is obtained. As the duct aspect ratio is decreased and tends to zero, the flow rate and mean wall shear stress amplitudes are increased, while their phase angle lags are slightly affected. The accommodation coefficient has a significant effect on the amplitude and a very weak one on the phase angle of the macroscopic quantities. The computation of the inertia and viscous forces clarifies when the flow consists of only one oscillating viscous region or of two regions, namely, the inviscid piston flow in the core and the oscillating Stokes layer at the wall with the velocity overshooting. Finally, the time average oscillatory pumping power is increased as the oscillation frequency is reduced and its maximum value is one half of the corresponding steady one.

  2. Osmotically driven flows in microchannels separated by a semipermeable membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Lee, J.; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We have fabricated lab-on-a-chip systems with microchannels separated by integrated membranes allowing for osmotically driven microflows. We have investigated these flows experimentally by studying the dynamics and structure of the front of a sugar solution travelling in 200 mu m wide and 50-200 mu...... m deep microchannels. We find that the sugar front travels at a constant speed, and that this speed is proportional to the concentration of the sugar solution and inversely proportional to the depth of the channel. We propose a theoretical model, which, in the limit of low axial flow resistance......, predicts that the sugar front should indeed travel with a constant velocity. The model also predicts an inverse relationship between the depth of the channel and the speed, and a linear relation between the sugar concentration and the speed. We thus find good qualitative agreement between the experimental...

  3. The enigmatic ultra-long run-out of seafloor density driven flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    Dilute, particulate-laden, density-driven flows - turbidity currents - are a predominant mechanism for transporting sediment from source to sink in deep marine environments. These flows sculpt channels on the seafloor and, as evidenced by a wealth of bathymetric data, can travel for >1000km, forming some of the largest sedimentary landforms on the planet. For turbidity currents to travel such large dsitances, sediment must be self-maintained in suspension, i.e., be in a state of autosuspension. It has been shown that such self-maintained sediment suspensions can only occur whilst inertial forces are greater than gravitational forces, entailing supercritical flow. This conclusion is paradoxical, as inertia dominated flows rapidly entrain fluid, thereby thickening and slowing to become subcritical. However, current theory can only truly be applied to the proximal upper slope regions of seafloor channels where incised flows are fully confined. This contrasts with the distal reaches of long run out turbidity current systems, where the flow is only partially confined through self-channelization. Here it is shown that overspill of partially confined flow has a significant effect on the hydro- and morphodynamics of turbidity current systems. A new model is derived that shows that channel overspill acts to negate the effects of ambient fluid entrainment: a dynamic balance that limits increases in flow depth and maintains supercritical flow throughout the channel. In the new model mass, momentum and energy conservation is modulated by flow overspill onto channel banks, necessarily requiring description of the vertical structure of the flow. Analysis of continuously stratified steady state flow dynamics shows that the integration of overspill and stratification is necessary to enable maintained autosuspension and thus predict the ultra-long run-out of turbidity currents.

  4. Anomalous Chained Turbulence in Actively Driven Flows on Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelin, Oscar; Słomka, Jonasz; Burns, Keaton J.; Lecoanet, Daniel; Vasil, Geoffrey M.; Faria, Luiz M.; Dunkel, Jörn

    2018-04-01

    Recent experiments demonstrate the importance of substrate curvature for actively forced fluid dynamics. Yet, the covariant formulation and analysis of continuum models for nonequilibrium flows on curved surfaces still poses theoretical challenges. Here, we introduce and study a generalized covariant Navier-Stokes model for fluid flows driven by active stresses in nonplanar geometries. The analytical tractability of the theory is demonstrated through exact stationary solutions for the case of a spherical bubble geometry. Direct numerical simulations reveal a curvature-induced transition from a burst phase to an anomalous turbulent phase that differs distinctly from externally forced classical 2D Kolmogorov turbulence. This new type of active turbulence is characterized by the self-assembly of finite-size vortices into linked chains of antiferromagnetic order, which percolate through the entire fluid domain, forming an active dynamic network. The coherent motion of the vortex chain network provides an efficient mechanism for upward energy transfer from smaller to larger scales, presenting an alternative to the conventional energy cascade in classical 2D turbulence.

  5. Heat transfer in rotating serpentine passages with trips normal to the flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J. H.; Johnson, B. V.; Graziani, R. A.; Yeh, F. C.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of buoyancy and Coriolis forces on heat transfer in turbine blade internal coolant passages. The experiments were conducted with a large scale, multipass, heat transfer model with both radially inward and outward flow. Trip strips on the leading and trailing surfaces of the radial coolant passages were used to produce the rough walls. An analysis of the governing flow equations showed that four parameters influence the heat transfer in rotating passages: coolant-to-wall temperature ratio, Rossby number, Reynolds number, and radius-to-passage hydraulic diameter ratio. The first three of these four parameters were varied over ranges which are typical of advanced gas turbine engine operating conditions. Results were correlated and compared to previous results from stationary and rotating similar models with trip strips. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat increased with rotation and buoyancy, varied by as much as a factor of four. Maximum values of the heat transfer coefficients with high rotation were only slightly above the highest levels obtained with the smooth wall model. The heat transfer coefficients on surfaces, where the heat transfer decreased with rotation, varied by as much as a factor of three due to rotation and buoyancy. It was concluded that both Coriolis and buoyancy effects must be considered in turbine blade cooling designs with trip strips and that the effects of rotation were markedly different depending upon the flow direction.

  6. Demonstration of the role of turbulence-driven poloidal flow generation in the L-H transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.X.; Xu, Y.H.; Luo, J.R.; Mao, J.S.; Liu, B.H.; Li, J.G.; Wan, B.N.; Wan, Y.X.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the evidence for the role of turbulence-driven poloidal flow generation in the L-H transition induced by a turbulent heating pulse on the HT-6M tokamak. It is found that the poloidal flow υ θ plays a key role in developing the electric field E r and triggering the transition. The acceleration of υ θ across the transition is clearly correlated with the enhancement of the Reynolds stress gradient. (author)

  7. Structure analysis of bubble driven flow by time-resolved PIV and POD techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Dong; Yi, Seung Jae; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the recirculation flow motion and turbulence characteristics of liquid flow driven by air bubble stream in a rectangular water tank are studied. The time-resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique is adopted for the quantitative visualization and analysis. 532nm Diode CW laser is used for illumination and orange fluorescent (λex = 540nm, λem = 584nm) particle images are acquired by a 1280X1024 high-speed camera. To obtain clean particle images, 545nm long pass optical filter and an image intensifier are employed and the flow rate of compressed air is 3/min at 0.5MPa. The recirculation and mixing flow field is further investigated by timeresolved Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis technique. It is observed that the large scale recirculation resulting from the interaction between rising bubble stream and side wall is the most dominant flow structure and there are small scale vortical structures moving along with the large scale recirculation flow. It is also verified that the sum of 20 modes of velocity field has about 67.4% of total turbulent energy

  8. Zonal Flows Driven by Small-Scale Drift-Alfven Modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dehui; Zhou Deng

    2011-01-01

    Generation of zonal flows by small-scale drift-Alfven modes is investigated by adopting the approach of parametric instability with the electron polarization drift included. The zonal mode can be excited by primary modes propagating at both electron and ion diamagnetic drift directions in contrast to the assertion in previous studies that only primary modes propagating in the ion diamagnetic drift directions can drive zonal instabilities. Generally, the growth rate of the driven zonal mode is in the same order as that in previous study. However, different from the previous work, the growth rate is no longer proportional to the difference between the diamagnetic drift frequencies of electrons and ions. (magnetically confined plasma)

  9. SIMULATION OF TRANSIENT CAVITY FLOWS DRIVEN BY BUOYANCY AND SHEAR. (R824801)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. Buoyancy under control: underwater locomotor performance in a deep diving seabird suggests respiratory strategies for reducing foraging effort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothée R Cook

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Because they have air stored in many body compartments, diving seabirds are expected to exhibit efficient behavioural strategies for reducing costs related to buoyancy control. We study the underwater locomotor activity of a deep-diving species from the Cormorant family (Kerguelen shag and report locomotor adjustments to the change of buoyancy with depth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using accelerometers, we show that during both the descent and ascent phases of dives, shags modelled their acceleration and stroking activity on the natural variation of buoyancy with depth. For example, during the descent phase, birds increased swim speed with depth. But in parallel, and with a decay constant similar to the one in the equation explaining the decrease of buoyancy with depth, they decreased foot-stroke frequency exponentially, a behaviour that enables birds to reduce oxygen consumption. During ascent, birds also reduced locomotor cost by ascending passively. We considered the depth at which they started gliding as a proxy to their depth of neutral buoyancy. This depth increased with maximum dive depth. As an explanation for this, we propose that shags adjust their buoyancy to depth by varying the amount of respiratory air they dive with. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Calculations based on known values of stored body oxygen volumes and on deep-diving metabolic rates in avian divers suggest that the variations of volume of respiratory oxygen associated with a respiration mediated buoyancy control only influence aerobic dive duration moderately. Therefore, we propose that an advantage in cormorants--as in other families of diving seabirds--of respiratory air volume adjustment upon diving could be related less to increasing time of submergence, through an increased volume of body oxygen stores, than to reducing the locomotor costs of buoyancy control.

  11. Numerical investigation of double diffusive buoyancy forces induced natural convection in a cavity partially heated and cooled from sidewalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Nikbakhti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a numerical investigation of double-diffusive natural convective heat and mass transfer in a cavity filled with Newtonian fluid. The active parts of two vertical walls of the cavity are maintained at fixed but different temperatures and concentrations, while the other two walls, as well as inactive areas of the sidewalls, are considered to be adiabatic and impermeable to mass transfer. The length of the thermally active part equals half of the height. The non-dimensional forms of governing transport equations that describe double-diffusive natural convection for two-dimensional incompressible flow are functions of temperature or energy, concentration, vorticity, and stream-function. The coupled differential equations are discretized via FDM (Finite Difference Method. The Successive-Over-Relaxation (SOR method is used in the solution of the stream function equation. The analysis has been done for an enclosure with different aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 11 for three different combinations of partially active sections. The results are presented graphically in terms of streamlines, isotherms and isoconcentrations. In addition, the heat and mass transfer rate in the cavity is measured in terms of the average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers for various parameters including thermal Grashof number, Lewis number, buoyancy ratio and aspect ratio. It is revealed that the placement order of partially thermally active walls and the buoyancy ratio influence significantly the flow pattern and the corresponding heat and mass transfer performance in the cavity.

  12. A Model of Secondary Hydrocarbon Migration As a Buoyancy-Driven Separate Phase Flow Un modèle de migration secondaire des hydrocarbures considéré comme un écoulement en phases séparées régi par la poussée d'Archimède

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehner F. K.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of secondary migration is described which permits the prediction of hydrocarbon migration and accumulation patterns in a sedimentary basin, if source rock expulsion rates and geometrical and hydraulic properties of major carrier systems are known through geological time. In this model, secondary migration is treated as buoyancy-driven, segregated flow of hydrocarbons in hydrostatic aquifers. Lateral, updip migration is conceived as a Boussinesq-type, free-surface flow, with source and sink terms representing supply from source rocks and leakage through cap rocks and faults. This permits a two-dimensional, map-view mathematical description of a three-dimensional, time-dependent secondary migration system. A nine-point finite difference approximation has been developed to minimize numerical dispersion, and upstream-weighting is used to obtain stable solutions. Example computations for simple, single carrier bed structures are presented. L'article décrit un modèle mathématique de migration secondaire prédisant la migration des hydrocarbures et leur accumulation dans un bassin sédimentaire, lorsque les taux d'expulsion des roches mères et les propriétés géométriques et hydrauliques des principaux systèmes de drainage sont connus à l'échelle du temps géologique. Dans ce modèle, la migration secondaire est traitée comme un écoulement des hydrocarbures en phase séparée, contrôlé par la poussée d'Archimède, dans des aquifères hydrostatiques. La migration latérale est considérée comme un écoulement de type Boussinesq, à surface libre, avec des termes sources et puits représentant les apports venant des roches mères et les fuites à travers les couvertures et les failles. Ceci permet une description mathématique bidimensionnelle cartographiable d'un système de migration secondaire tridimensionnel et dépendant du temps. On utilise une approximation type différences finies à neuf points pour minimiser

  13. Experimental investigation on single-sided transient natural ventilation driven by buoyancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadugapalayam Rangasamy Lenin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption in building sector plays a major role in hot climate for space cooling. In this view of equipment energy consumption reduction on building space cooling, top vent and window operation-based natural ventilation model is developed in reduced scale. In this study, the performance of rectangular top vent arrangement along with window opening configuration with respect to temperature distribution and air flow pattern is investigated experimentally. The results depicted that the heat generated from the indoor element with vent and window opening configuration showed a greater influence in vertical temperature difference. For both the case of window opened and closed with vent, the time taken to attain the steady-state is shorter for larger vent compared to smaller vent. Increasing the top vent area reduces the indoor air temperature at various levels. When windows in open condition, there is significant reduction in indoor air temperature upto window level for all vent areas. Air flow pattern of the in-door air is validated through smoke visualization test.

  14. Gravity-driven granular flow in a silo: Characterizing local forces and rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thackray Emma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While the gravity-driven flow of a granular material in a silo geometry can be modeled by the Beverloo equation, the mesoscale-level particle rearrangements and interactions that drive this flow are not wellunderstood. We have constructed a quasi-two-dimensional system of bidisperse, millimeter-scale disks with photoelastic properties that make force networks within the material visible. The system is contained in an acrylic box with an adjustable bottom opening. We can approach the clogging transition by adjusting this opening. By placing the system between cross-polarizers, we can obtain high-speed video of this system during flow, and extract intensity signals that can be used to identify and quantify localized, otherwise indeterminate forces. We can simultaneously track individual particle motions, which can be used to identify shear transformation zones in the system. In this paper, we present our results thus far.

  15. Objective function choice for control of a thermocapillary flow using an adjoint-based control strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muldoon, Frank H.; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Suppression of oscillations in a thermocapillary flow is addressed by optimization. • The gradient of the objective function is obtained by solving the adjoint equations. • The issue of choosing an objective function is investigated. - Abstract: The problem of suppressing flow oscillations in a thermocapillary flow is addressed using a gradient-based control strategy. The physical problem addressed is the “open boat” process of crystal growth, the flow in which is driven by thermocapillary and buoyancy effects. The problem is modeled by the two-dimensional unsteady incompressible Navier–Stokes and energy equations under the Boussinesq approximation. The goal of the control is to suppress flow oscillations which arise when the driving forces are such that the flow becomes unsteady. The control is a spatially and temporally varying temperature gradient boundary condition at the free surface. The control which minimizes the flow oscillations is found using a conjugate gradient method, where the gradient of the objective function with respect to the control variables is obtained from solving a set of adjoint equations. The issue of choosing an objective function that can be both optimized in a computationally efficient manner and optimization of which provides control that damps the flow oscillations is investigated. Almost complete suppression of the flow oscillations is obtained for certain choices of the objective function.

  16. Practicing for space underwater: inventing neutral buoyancy training, 1963-1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Michael J; Charles, John B

    2015-01-01

    Neutral buoyancy's value was far from obvious when human spaceflight began in 1961. Starting in 1964, Environmental Research Associates, a tiny company in the suburbs of Baltimore, developed the key innovations in an obscure research project funded by NASA's Langley Research Center. The new Houston center dismissed it until a mid-1966 EVA crisis, after which it rapidly took over. In parallel, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center developed many of the same techniques, as did many large aerospace corporations, yet the long-run technological impact of corporate activity was near zero. Because ERA and Marshall's pioneering activities led to the two long-running NASA training centers at Houston and Huntsville, those two organizations deserve primary credit for the construction of the neutral buoyancy technological system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Electric field measurements in a kHz-driven He jet - The influence of the gas flow speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobota, A.; Guaitella, O.; Sretenović, G.B.; Krstić, I.B.; Kovačević, V.V.; Obrusník, A.; Nguyen, Y.N.; Zajíčková, L.; Obradović, B.M.; Kuraica, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    This report focuses on the dependence of electric field strength in the effluent of a vertically downwards-operated plasma jet freely expanding into room air as a function of the gas flow speed. A 30 kHz AC-driven He jet was used in a coaxial geometry, with an amplitude of 2 kV and gas flow between

  18. Time-dependent particle migration and margination in the pressure-driven channel flow of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qin M.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2018-03-01

    We present a theory to describe the time evolution of the red blood cell (RBC) and platelet concentration distributions in pressure-driven flow through a straight channel. This model is based on our previous theory for the steady-state distributions [Qi and Shaqfeh, Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 093102 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.093102] and captures the flow-induced nonuniformity of the concentrations of RBCs and platelets in the cross-flow direction. Starting with a uniform concentration, RBCs migrate away from the channel walls due to a shear-induced lift force and eventually reach steady state due to shear-induced diffusion, i.e., hydrodynamic "collisions" with other RBCs. On the other hand, platelets exit the cell-laden region due to RBC-platelet interactions and enter the cell-free layer, resulting in margination. To validate the theory, we also perform boundary integral simulations of blood flow in microchannels and directly compare various measureables between theory and simulation. The timescales associated with RBC migration and platelet margination are discussed in the context of the simulation and theory, and their importance in the function of microfluidic devices as well as the vascular network are elucidated. Due to the varying shear rate in pressure-driven flow and the wall-induced RBC lift, we report a separation of timescales for the transport in the near-wall region and in the bulk region. We also relate the transient problem to the axial variation of migration and margination, and we demonstrate how the relevant timescales can be used to predict corresponding entrance lengths. Our theory can serve as a fast and convenient alternative to large-scale simulations of these phenomena.

  19. Visualization study of helium-air counter flow through a small opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumizawa, Motoo

    2007-01-01

    Buoyancy-driven counter flows of helium-air were investigated through horizontal and inclined small openings. Counter flows may occur following a window opening as ventilation, fire in the room as well as a pipe rupture accident in a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor. The experiment has carried out by a test chamber filled with helium and flow was visualized by the smoke wire method. The flow behavior has recorded by a high-speed camera with a computer system. The image of the flow was transferred to the digital data, thus the flow velocity was measured by PTV software. The mass fraction in the test chamber was measured by electronic balance. The detected data was arranged by the densimetric Floude number of the counter flow rate that derived from the dimensional analysis. The method of mass increment was developed and applied to measure the counter flow rate. By removing the cover plate placed on the top of the opening, the counter flow initiated. Air enters the test chamber and the mass of the gas mixture in the test chamber increased. The volumetric counter flow rate was evaluated from the mass increment data. In the case of inclination openings, the results of both methods were compared. The inclination angle for maximum densimetric Floude number decreased with increasing length-to-diameter ratio of the opening. For a horizontal opening, the results from the method of mass increment agreed with those obtained by other authors for a water-brine system. (author)

  20. Influence of thermal buoyancy on vertical tube bundle thermal density head predictions under transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, H.C.; Kasza, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic behavior of an LMFBR system under various types of plant transients is usually studied using one-dimensional (1-D) flow and energy transport models of the system components. Many of the transient events involve the change from a high to a low flow with an accompanying change in temperature of the fluid passing through the components which can be conductive to significant thermal bouyancy forces. Thermal bouyancy can exert its influence on system dynamic energy transport predictions through alterations of flow and thermal distributions which in turn can influence decay heat removal, system-response time constants, heat transport between primary and secondary systems, and thermal energy rejection at the reactor heat sink, i.e., the steam generator. In this paper the results from a comparison of a 1-D model prediction and experimental data for vertical tube bundle overall thermal density head and outlet temperature under transient conditions causing varying degrees of thermal bouyancy are presented. These comparisons are being used to generate insight into how, when, and to what degree thermal buoyancy can cause departures from 1-D model predictions

  1. Magnetorotational and Parker instabilities in magnetized plasma Dean flow as applied to centrifugally confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yimin; Hassam, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    The ideal magnetohydrodynamics stability of a Dean flow plasma supported against centrifugal forces by an axial magnetic field is studied. Only axisymmetric perturbations are allowed for simplicity. Two distinct but coupled destabilization mechanisms are present: flow shear (magnetorotational instability) and magnetic buoyancy (Parker instability). It is shown that the flow shear alone is likely insufficient to destabilize the plasma, but the magnetic buoyancy instability could occur. For a high Mach number (M S ), high Alfven Mach number (M A ) system with M S M A > or approx. πR/a (R/a is the aspect ratio), the Parker instability is unstable for long axial wavelength modes. Implications for the centrifugal confinement approach to magnetic fusion are also discussed

  2. Mixed convection in inclined lid driven cavity by Lattice Boltzmann Method and heat flux boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Orazio, A; Karimipour, A; Nezhad, A H; Shirani, E

    2014-01-01

    Laminar mixed convective heat transfer in two-dimensional rectangular inclined driven cavity is studied numerically by means of a double population thermal Lattice Boltzmann method. Through the top moving lid the heat flux enters the cavity whereas it leaves the system through the bottom wall; side walls are adiabatic. The counter-slip internal energy density boundary condition, able to simulate an imposed non zero heat flux at the wall, is applied, in order to demonstrate that it can be effectively used to simulate heat transfer phenomena also in case of moving walls. Results are analyzed over a range of the Richardson numbers and tilting angles of the enclosure, encompassing the dominating forced convection, mixed convection, and dominating natural convection flow regimes. As expected, heat transfer rate increases as increases the inclination angle, but this effect is significant for higher Richardson numbers, when buoyancy forces dominate the problem; for horizontal cavity, average Nusselt number decreases with the increase of Richardson number because of the stratified field configuration

  3. Buoyancy package for self-contained acoustic doppler current profiler mooring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Krishnakumar, V.

    A buoyancy package for self-contained Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler(SC-ADCP 1200 RD instruments USA) was designed and fabricated indigenously, for subsurface mooring in coastal waters. The system design is discussed. The design to keep SC...

  4. Tackling complex turbulent flows with transient RANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenjeres, S.; Hanjalic, K.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews some recent applications of the transient-Reynoldsaveraged Navier–Stokes (T-RANS) approach in simulating complex turbulent flows dominated by externally imposed body forces, primarily by thermal buoyancy and the Lorentz force. The T-RANS aims at numerical resolving unsteady

  5. Development of Bubble Driven Flow CFD Model Applied for Aluminium Smelting Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Q. Feng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD model for the study of bubble driven bath flow in aluminium reduction cells. For validation purposes, the model development was conducted using a full scale air -water model of part of an aluminium reduction cell as a test-bed. The bubble induced turbulence has been modelled by either modifying bubble induced turbulence viscosity directly or by modifying bubble induced turbulence kinetic energy in a standard k- ε turbulence model. The relative performance of the two modelling approaches has been examined through comparison with experimental data taken under similar conditions using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV. Detailed comparison has been conducted by point-wise comparison of liquid velocities to quantify the level of agreement between CFD simulation and PIV measurement. Both models can capture the key flow patterns determined by PIV measurement, while the modified turbulence kinetic energy model gives better agreement with flow patterns in the gap between anode and cathode.

  6. Biased and flow driven Brownian motion in periodic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, S.; Straube, A.; Schmid, G.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Hänggi, P.

    2012-02-01

    In this talk we will present an expansion of the common Fick-Jacobs approximation to hydrodynamically as well as by external forces driven Brownian transport in two-dimensional channels exhibiting smoothly varying periodic cross-section. We employ an asymptotic analysis to the components of the flow field and to stationary probability density for finding the particles within the channel in a geometric parameter. We demonstrate that the problem of biased Brownian dynamics in a confined 2D geometry can be replaced by Brownian motion in an effective periodic one-dimensional potential ψ(x) which takes the external bias, the change of the local channel width, and the flow velocity component in longitudinal direction into account. In addition, we study the influence of the external force magnitude, respectively, the pressure drop of the fluid on the particle transport quantities like the averaged velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient. The critical ratio between the external force and pressure drop where the average velocity equals zero is identified and the dependence of the latter on the channel geometry is derived. Analytic findings are confirmed by numerical simulations of the particle dynamics in a reflection symmetric sinusoidal channel.

  7. Use of an Arduino to Study Buoyancy Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, P. R.; Cena, C. R.; Alves, D. C. B.; Bozano, D. F.; Goncalves, A. M. B.

    2018-01-01

    The study of buoyancy becomes very interesting when we measure the apparent weight of the body and the liquid vessel weight. In this paper, we propose an experimental apparatus that measures both the forces mentioned before as a function of the depth that a cylinder is sunk into the water. It is done using two load cells connected to an Arduino.…

  8. Computational fluid dynamics for turbomachinery internal air systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, John W; Hills, Nicholas J

    2007-10-15

    Considerable progress in development and application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aeroengine internal flow systems has been made in recent years. CFD is regularly used in industry for assessment of air systems, and the performance of CFD for basic axisymmetric rotor/rotor and stator/rotor disc cavities with radial throughflow is largely understood and documented. Incorporation of three-dimensional geometrical features and calculation of unsteady flows are becoming commonplace. Automation of CFD, coupling with thermal models of the solid components, and extension of CFD models to include both air system and main gas path flows are current areas of development. CFD is also being used as a research tool to investigate a number of flow phenomena that are not yet fully understood. These include buoyancy-affected flows in rotating cavities, rim seal flows and mixed air/oil flows. Large eddy simulation has shown considerable promise for the buoyancy-driven flows and its use for air system flows is expected to expand in the future.

  9. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow in partially saturated fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous media, with particular emphasis on strongly heat-driven flow. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator used for their flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions to handle the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. They model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, they develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account the fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 27 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  10. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow in partially saturated fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1984-10-01

    We have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous media, with particular emphasis on strongly heat-driven flow. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator used for our flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions to handle the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. We model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, we develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account for fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 27 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  11. Buoyancy of gas-filled bladders at great depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priede, Imants G.

    2018-02-01

    At high hydrostatic pressures exceeding 20 MPa or 200 bar, equivalent to depths exceeding ca.2000 m, the behaviour of gases deviates significantly from the predictions of standard equations such as Boyle's Law, the Ideal Gas Law and Van der Waals equation. The predictions of these equations are compared with experimental data for nitrogen, oxygen and air at 0 °C and 15 °C, at pressures up to 1100 bar (110 MPa) equivalent to full ocean depth of ca. 11000 m. Owing to reduced compressibility of gases at high pressures, gas-filled bladders at full ocean depth have a density of 847 kg m-3 for Oxygen, 622 kg m-3 for Nitrogen and 660 kg m-3 for air providing potentially useful buoyancy comparable with that available from man-made materials. This helps explain why some of the deepest-living fishes at ca. 7000 m depth (700 bar or 70 MPa) have gas-filled swim bladders. A table is provided of the density and buoyancy of oxygen, nitrogen and air at 0 °C and 15 °C from 100 to 1100 bar.

  12. Electrohydrodynamics and other hydrodynamic phenomena in continuous-flow electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saville, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    The process known as continuous flow electrophoresis employs an electric field to separate the constituents of particulate samples suspended in a liquid. Complications arise because the electric field generates temperature gradients due to Joule heating and derives an electrohydrodynamic crossflow. Several aspects of the flow are discussed including entrance effects, hydrodynamic stability and a flow restructuring due to the combined effects of buoyancy and the crossflow. 10 references

  13. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Quarterly, 2000-present, Buoyancy Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has quarterly Buoyancy Flux data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  14. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, 2000-present, Buoyancy Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Buoyancy Flux data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, https://www.pmel.noaa.gov/gtmba/ ), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations of high temperature gas heat transfer and flow in a VHTR reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin Rodriguez, Francisco Ivan

    dissipating capabilities of helium flow, due to natural circulation in the system at both high and low pressure, were also examined. These experimental results are useful for the development and validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. Numerical simulations were performed using a Multiphysics computer code, COMSOL, displaying less than 5% error between the measured graphite temperatures in both the heated and cooled channels. Finally, new correlations have been proposed describing the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in buoyancy driven flows in both heated and cooled channels.

  16. A numerical study on the influence of slope and curvature on smoke flow in special section tunnel with natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhou; Zhou, Xianping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Ya; Liu, Wanfu; Hong, Li

    2017-09-01

    In this study, a special section tunnel model was established by using FDS (Fire Dynamics Simulator). The influences of lope and curvature on smoke flow under natural ventilation have been studied. The results showed that under the condition of natural ventilation, the slope has some influences on the smoke flow in special section tunnel. The smoke spreading speed is accelerated along the upstream direction and decrease along the downstream direction due to buoyancy effect of slope. The steeper the tunnel, the more obvious the buoyancy effect. The curvature has little effect on the flow of flue gas.

  17. Buoyancy limits on magnetic viscosity stress-law scalings in quasi stellar object accretion disk models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakimoto, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSOs) are apparently the excessively bright nuclei of distant galaxies. They are thought to be powered by accretion disks surrounding supermassive black holes: however, proof of this presumption is hampered by major uncertainties in the viscous stress necessary for accretion to occur. Models generally assume an and hoc stress law which scales the stress with the total pressure. Near the black hole, radiation pressure dominates gas pressure; scaling the stress with the radiation pressure results in disk models that are thermally unstable and optically thin. This dissertation shows that a radiation pressure scaling for the stress is not possible if the viscosity is due to turbulent magnetic Maxwell stresses. The argument is one of internal self-consistency. First, four model accretion disks that bound the reasonably expected ranges of viscous stress scalings and vertical structures are constructed. Magnetic flux tubes of various initial field strengths are then placed within these models, nd their buoyancy is modeled numerically. In disks using the radiation pressure stress law scaling, low opacities allow rapid heat flow into the flux tubes: the tubes are extremely buoyant, and magnetic fields strong enough to provide the required stress cannot be retained. If an alternative gas pressure scaling for the stress is assumed, then the disks are optically thick; flux tubes have corresponding lower buoyancy, and magnetic fields strong enough to provide the stress can be retained for dynamically significant time periods

  18. An Experimental Study of Continuous Plasma Flows Driven by a Confined Arc in a Transverse Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, R. L.; Brooks, J. D.; Beasley, W. D.

    1961-01-01

    A crossed-field, continuous-flow plasma accelerator has been built and operated. The highest measured velocity of the flow, which was driven by the interaction of the electric and magnetic fields, was about 500 meters per second. Some of the problems discussed are ion slip, stability and uniformity of the discharge, effect of the magnetic field on electron emission, use of preionization, and electrode contamination.

  19. Flow near the meniscus of a pressure-driven water slug in microchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Wook; Jin, Song Wan; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2006-01-01

    Micro-PIV system with a high speed CCD camera is used to measure the flow field near the advancing meniscus of a water slug in microchannels. Image shifting technique combined with meniscus detecting technique is proposed to measure the relative velocity of the liquid near the meniscus in a moving reference frame. The proposed method is applied to an advancing front of a slug in microchannels with rectangular cross section. In the case of hydrophilic channel, strong flow from the center to the side wall along the meniscus occurs, while in the case of the hydrophobic channel, the fluid flows in the opposite direction. Further, the velocity near the side wall is higher than the center region velocity, exhibiting the characteristics of a strong shear-driven flow. This phenomenon is explained to be due to the existence of small gaps between the slug and the channel wall at each capillary corner so that the gas flows through the gaps inducing high shear on the slug surface. Simulation of the shape of a static droplet inside a cubic cell obtained by using the Surface Evolver program is supportive of the existence of the gap at the rectangular capillary corners. The flow fields in the circular capillary, in which no such gap exists, are also measured. The results show that a similar flow pattern to that of the hydrophilic rectangular capillary (i.e., center-to-wall flow) is always exhibited regardless of the wettability of the channel wall, which is also indicative of the validity of the above-mentioned assertion

  20. Influence of Buoyancy Control Performance on Power Production by the Wave Dragon Nissum Bredning Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Tedd, James; Friis-Madsen, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the real sea performance of the buoyancy control system of Wave Dragon, a floating wave energy converter using the overtopping principle. The device operates with the full independent control system which has been tested during three years of operation. The impact of the buo...... of the buoyancy control system performance on the power production is noted. This provides motivation and a target for improved control algorithms....

  1. Air pollutant dispersion from a large semi-enclosed stadium in an urban area: high-resolution CFD modeling versus full-scale measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooff, van T.A.J.; Blocken, B.J.E.; Seppelt, R.; Voinov, A.A.; Lange, S.; Bankamp, D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: High-resolution CFD simulations and full-scale measurements have been performed to assess the dispersion of air pollutants (CO2) from the large semi-enclosed Amsterdam ArenA football stadium. The dispersion process is driven by natural ventilation by the urban wind flow and by buoyancy,

  2. A numerical study of secondary flow and large eddies in a driven cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yau, Y. H.; Badarudin, A. [University of Malaya, Lumpur (Malaysia); Rubini, P. A. [University of Hull, East Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    This paper reports on the application of a newly developed LES flow solver to compute a true three-dimensional flow. The research also investigates the behavior of turbulence statistics by comparing transient simulation results to available data based on experiments and simulations. An extensive discussion on the results such as energy spectrum, velocity profiles and time trace of velocities is carried out in the research as well. Based on the results obtained, the application of the flow solver for a turbulent three-dimensional driven cavity flow by using three grids with varying densities is proven. In addition, the research successfully verifies that in many instances computational results agreed reasonably well with the reference data, and the changes in the statistical properties of turbulence with respect to time are closely related to the changes in the flow structure and strength of vortices. The focus of this study is on the prediction of a subgrid scale Reynolds shear stress profiles, and the results show that the standard model is able to reproduce general trends measured from experiments. Furthermore, in certain areas inside the cavity the computed shear stress values are in close agreement with experimental data.

  3. A numerical study of secondary flow and large eddies in a driven cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yau, Y. H.; Badarudin, A.; Rubini, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the application of a newly developed LES flow solver to compute a true three-dimensional flow. The research also investigates the behavior of turbulence statistics by comparing transient simulation results to available data based on experiments and simulations. An extensive discussion on the results such as energy spectrum, velocity profiles and time trace of velocities is carried out in the research as well. Based on the results obtained, the application of the flow solver for a turbulent three-dimensional driven cavity flow by using three grids with varying densities is proven. In addition, the research successfully verifies that in many instances computational results agreed reasonably well with the reference data, and the changes in the statistical properties of turbulence with respect to time are closely related to the changes in the flow structure and strength of vortices. The focus of this study is on the prediction of a subgrid scale Reynolds shear stress profiles, and the results show that the standard model is able to reproduce general trends measured from experiments. Furthermore, in certain areas inside the cavity the computed shear stress values are in close agreement with experimental data

  4. Experimental and Analytical Study of Lead-Bismuth-Water Direct Contact Boiling Two-Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitrian; Dostal, Vaclav; Takahashi, Minoru

    The characteristics of lead-bismuth(Pb-Bi)-water boiling two-phase flow were investigated experimentally and analytically using a Pb-Bi-water direct contact boiling two-phase flow loop. Pb-Bi flow rates and void fraction were measured in a vertical circular tube at conditions of system pressure 7MPa, liquid metal temperature 460°C and injected water temperature 220°C. The drift-flux model with the assumption that bubble sizes were dependent on the fluid surface tension and the density ratio of Pb-Bi to steam-water mixture was chosen and modified by the best fit to the measured void fraction. Pb-Bi flow rates were analytically estimated using balance condition between buoyancy force and pressure losses, where the buoyancy force was calculated from void fraction estimated using the modified drift-flux model. The deviation of the analytical results of the flow rates from the experimental ones was less than 10%.

  5. Analysis of Understanding the Concept of Buoyancy in the Context of its Transfer from Pre-school Teachers to Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Furlan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kindergarten curricula (Bahovec et al. 1999, 37 cover different areas of education that are sensibly interconnected and integrated. Science is one of the areas that represent child’s first learning about the surrounding world and the first introduction to nature. Science education is a very suitable approach of introducing children into basic research work, since in nature objects and phenomena are more concrete, and hence the children are instinctively attracted. Therefore, science education could act as a starting point for all other areas of education. Teaching science comprises several difficulties, which are mainly connected with the way how contents are introduced to children. This is often a great challenge and great responsibility for pre-school teachers, because the scientific content needs to be explained in an appropriate way taking into consideration the child's age, the use of correct terminology, and at the same time avoiding inadequate generalization and over-simplification. Buoyancy is a natural phenomenon that is experienced by every child, but which, on the other hand, is quite difficult to explain. With the present study we wished to assess the knowledge considering buoyancy of the part-time students within the Pre-school Teaching educational programme at the Faculty of Education of the University of Primorska, which is performed on different locations throughout Slovenia. These students already teach in the kindergartens and should be well acquainted with buoyancy from previously passed physics courses at the Faculty of Education. We examined how they explained the buoyancy to children in kindergartens, and whether the knowledge about buoyancy is affected by their working experience or the location of their study. The results show that the students’ knowledge about buoyancy is insufficient and incomplete. In addition, many misconceptions about buoyancy are transmitted to the children in the process of teaching

  6. Prediction of flow recirculation in a blanket assembly under worst-case natural-convection conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, E.U.; Rector, D.R.

    1982-01-01

    Reactor fuel and blanket assemblies within a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) can be subjected to severe radial heat flux gradients. At low-flow conditions, with power-to-flow ratios of nearly the same magnitude as design conditions, buoyancy forces cause flow redistribution to the side of a bundle with the higher heat generation rate. Recirculation of fluid within a rod bundle can occur during a natural convection transient because of the combined effect of flow coastdown and buoyancy-induced redistribution. An important concern is whether recirculation leads to high coolant temperatures. For this reason, the COBRA-WC code was developed with the capability of modeling recirculating flows. Experiments have been conducted in a 2 x 6 rod bundle for flow and power transients to study recirculation in the mixed-convection (forced cooled) and natural-convection regimes. The data base developed was used to validate the recirculation module in the COBRA-WC code. COBRA-WC code calculations were made to predict flow and temperature distributions in a typical LMFBR blanket assembly for the worst-case, natural-circulation transient

  7. Academic Buoyancy and Academic Outcomes: Towards a Further Understanding of Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Students without ADHD, and Academic Buoyancy Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Academic buoyancy is students' capacity to successfully overcome setback and challenge that is typical of the ordinary course of everyday academic life. It may represent an important factor on the psycho-educational landscape assisting students who experience difficulties in school and schoolwork. Aims: This study investigated the…

  8. A thermal engine for underwater glider driven by ocean thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yanan; Wang, Yanhui; Ma, Zhesong; Wang, Shuxin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal engine with a double-tube structure is developed for underwater glider. • Isostatic pressing technology is effective to increase volumetric change rate. • Actual volumetric change rate reaches 89.2% of the theoretical value. • Long term sailing of 677 km and 27 days is achieved by thermal underwater glider. - Graphical Abstract: - Abstract: Underwater glider is one of the most popular platforms for long term ocean observation. Underwater glider driven by ocean thermal energy extends the duration and range of underwater glider powered by battery. Thermal engine is the core device of underwater glider to harvest ocean thermal energy. In this paper, (1) model of thermal engine was raised by thermodynamics method and the performance of thermal engine was investigated, (2) thermal engine with a double-tube structure was developed and isostatic pressing technology was applied to improve the performance for buoyancy driven, referencing powder pressing theory, (3) wall thickness of thermal engine was optimized to reduce the overall weight of thermal engine, (4) material selection and dimension determination were discussed for a faster heat transfer design, by thermal resistance analysis, (5) laboratory test and long term sea trail were carried out to test the performance of thermal engine. The study shows that volumetric change rate is the most important indicator to evaluating buoyancy-driven performance of a thermal engine, isostatic pressing technology is effective to improve volumetric change rate, actual volumetric change rate can reach 89.2% of the theoretical value and the average power is about 124 W in a typical diving profile. Thermal engine developed by Tianjin University is a superior thermal energy conversion device for underwater glider. Additionally, application of thermal engine provides a new solution for miniaturization of ocean thermal energy conversion.

  9. Gravity-driven groundwater flow and slope failure potential: 1. Elastic effective-stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Richard M.; Reid, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    Hilly or mountainous topography influences gravity-driven groundwater flow and the consequent distribution of effective stress in shallow subsurface environments. Effective stress, in turn, influences the potential for slope failure. To evaluate these influences, we formulate a two-dimensional, steady state, poroelastic model. The governing equations incorporate groundwater effects as body forces, and they demonstrate that spatially uniform pore pressure changes do not influence effective stresses. We implement the model using two finite element codes. As an illustrative case, we calculate the groundwater flow field, total body force field, and effective stress field in a straight, homogeneous hillslope. The total body force and effective stress fields show that groundwater flow can influence shear stresses as well as effective normal stresses. In most parts of the hillslope, groundwater flow significantly increases the Coulomb failure potential Φ, which we define as the ratio of maximum shear stress to mean effective normal stress. Groundwater flow also shifts the locus of greatest failure potential toward the slope toe. However, the effects of groundwater flow on failure potential are less pronounced than might be anticipated on the basis of a simpler, one-dimensional, limit equilibrium analysis. This is a consequence of continuity, compatibility, and boundary constraints on the two-dimensional flow and stress fields, and it points to important differences between our elastic continuum model and limit equilibrium models commonly used to assess slope stability.

  10. Natural circulation in single-phase and two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    Natural circulation usually arises in a closed loop between a heat source and a heat sink were the fluid motion is driven by density difference. It may also occur in enclosures or cavities where the flow is induced primarily by temperature or concentration gradients within the fluid. The subject has recently received special attention by the heat transfer and nuclear reactor safety communities because of it importance to the areas of energy extraction, decay, heat removal in nuclear reactors, solar and geothermal heating, and cooling of electronic equipment. Although many new results and physical insights have been gained of the various natural circulation phenomena, a number of critical issues remain unresolved. These include, for example, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, buoyancy-induced turbulent flow modeling, change of flow regimes, flow field visualization, variable property effects, and flow instability. This symposium volume contains papers presented in the Natural Circulation in Single-Phase and Two-Phase Flow session at the 1989 Winter Annual Meeting of ASME, by authors from different countries including the United States, Japan, Canada, and Brazil. The papers deal with experimental and theoretical studies as well as state-of-the-art reviews, covering a broad spectrum of topics in natural circulation including: variable-conductance thermosyphons, microelectronic chip cooling, natural circulation in anisotropic porous media and in cavities, heat transfer in flat plat solar collectors, shutdown heat removal in fast reactors, cooling of light-water and heavy-water reactors. The breadth of papers contained in this volume clearly reflect the importance of the current interest in natural circulation as a means for passive cooling and heating

  11. Predictions of the effect of stratification on superimposed forced and free convection between vertical parallel plates for various boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, G.H.; Irvine, T.J. Jr.; Quarini, G.L.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity and temperature equations for laminar buoyancy and forced convection flows between vertical flat parallel plates are presented. The thermal boundary conditions on the plate define the buoyancy driven field, while the channel Reynolds number defines the forced flow field. Specific examples relating to tall narrow channels with laminar convention and to closed high ratio cavities (as may be found in the proposed active and passive insulation systems for sodium cooled fast reactors) are presented. The analysis is limited to the laminar flow regimes, whilst some reactor situations are likely to be turbulent, hence a proposal for a simple extension of this analysis to the turbulent regime is made. It is shown how the analysis can be made to apply to fluids of various Prandtl numbers. (author)

  12. Electro-osmotic and pressure-driven flow of viscoelastic fluids in microchannels: Analytical and semi-analytical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrás, L. L.; Afonso, A. M.; Alves, M. A.; Nóbrega, J. M.; Pinho, F. T.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present a series of solutions for combined electro-osmotic and pressure-driven flows of viscoelastic fluids in microchannels. The solutions are semi-analytical, a feature made possible by the use of the Debye-Hückel approximation for the electrokinetic fields, thus restricted to cases with small electric double-layers, in which the distance between the microfluidic device walls is at least one order of magnitude larger than the electric double-layer thickness. To describe the complex fluid rheology, several viscoelastic differential constitutive models were used, namely, the simplified Phan-Thien-Tanner model with linear, quadratic or exponential kernel for the stress coefficient function, the Johnson-Segalman model, and the Giesekus model. The results obtained illustrate the effects of the Weissenberg number, the Johnson-Segalman slip parameter, the Giesekus mobility parameter, and the relative strengths of the electro-osmotic and pressure gradient-driven forcings on the dynamics of these viscoelastic flows.

  13. Relationship between thermal stratification and flow patterns in steam-quenching suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Daehun; Erkan, Nejdet; Jo, Byeongnam; Okamoto, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal stratification mechanism by direct contact condensation is investigated. • Thermal stratification condition changes according to the flow pattern. • Thermal stratification depends on the force balance between buoyancy and momentum. • Flow pattern change was observed even in the same regime. • Flow pattern is affected by the sensitive force balance. - Abstract: This study aims to examine the relationship between thermal stratification and flow patterns in a steam-quenching suppression pool using particle image velocimetry. Thermal stratification was experimentally evaluated in a depressurized water pool under different steam mass flux conditions. The time evolution of the temperature profile of the suppression pool was presented with the variation of condensation regimes, and steam condensation processes were visualized using a high-speed camera. The thermal stratification condition was classified into full mixing, gradual thermal stratification, and developed thermal stratification. It was found that the condition was determined by the flow patterns depending on the force balance between buoyancy and momentum. The force balance affected both the condensation regime and the flow pattern, and hence, the flow pattern was changed with the condensation regime. However, the force balance had a sensitive influence on the flow in the pool; therefore, distinct flow patterns were observed even in the same condensation regime.

  14. Suppression of atmospheric recycling of planets embedded in a protoplanetary disc by buoyancy barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Tanigawa, Takayuki

    2018-06-01

    The ubiquity of super-Earths poses a problem for planet formation theory to explain how they avoided becoming gas giants. Rapid recycling of the envelope gas of planets embedded in a protoplanetary disc has been proposed to delay the cooling and following accretion of disc gas. We compare isothermal and non-isothermal 3D hydrodynamical simulations of the gas flow past a planet to investigate the influence on the feasibility of the recycling mechanism. Radiative cooling is implemented by using the β cooling model. We find that, in either case, gas enters the Bondi sphere at high latitudes and leaves through the midplane regions, or vice versa when disc gas rotates sub-Keplerian. However, in contrast to the isothermal case where the recycling flow reaches the deeper part of the envelope, the inflow is inhibited from reaching the deep envelope in the non-isothermal case. Once the atmosphere starts cooling, buoyant force prevents the high-entropy disc gas from intruding the low-entropy atmosphere. We suggest that the buoyancy barrier isolates the lower envelope from the recycling and allows further cooling, which may lead runaway gas accretion onto the core.

  15. Influence of the weighing bar size to determine optimal time of biodiesel-glycerol separation by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambun, R.; Sibagariang, Y.; Manurung, J.

    2018-02-01

    The buoyancy weighing-bar method is a novel method in the particle size distribution measurement. This method can measure particle size distributions of the settling particles and floating particles. In this study, the buoyancy weighing-bar method is applied to determine optimal time of biodiesel-glycerol separation. The buoyancy weighing-bar method can be applied to determine the separation time because biodiesel and glycerol have the different densities. The influences of diameter of weighing-bar by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method would be experimentally investigated. The diameters of weighing-bar in this experiment are 8 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm and 20 mm, while the graduated cylinder (diameter : 65 mm) is used as vessel. The samples used in this experiment are the mixture of 95 % of biodiesel and 5 % of glycerol. The data obtained by the buoyancy weighing-bar method are analized by using the gas chromatography to determine the purity of biodiesel. Based on the data obtained, the buoyancy weighing-bar method can be used to detect the separation time of biodiesel-glycerol by using the weighing-bar diameter of 8 mm, 10 mm, 15 mm and 20 mm, but the most accuracy in determination the biodiesel-glycerol separation time is obtained by using the weighing-bar diameter of 20 mm. The biodiesel purity of 97.97 % could be detected at 64 minutes by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method when the weighing-bar diameter of 20 mm is used.

  16. Observation of the L-H confinement bifurcation triggered by a turbulence-driven shear flow in a tokamak plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z; McKee, G R; Fonck, R; Gohil, P; Groebner, R J; Osborne, T H

    2014-03-28

    Comprehensive 2D turbulence and eddy flow velocity measurements on DIII-D demonstrate a rapidly increasing turbulence-driven shear flow that develops ∼100  μs prior to the low-confinement (L mode) to high-confinement (H mode) transition and appears to trigger it. These changes are localized to a narrow layer 1-2 cm inside the magnetic boundary. Increasing heating power increases the Reynolds stress, the energy transfer from turbulence to the poloidal flow, and the edge flow shearing rate that then exceeds the decorrelation rate, suppressing turbulence and triggering the transition.

  17. Application of the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to Turbulent Czochralski Convective Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahal, S; Cerisier, P; Azuma, H

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the general aspects of the convective flow instabilities in a simulated Czochralski system. We considered the influence of the buoyancy and crystal rotation. Velocity fields, obtained by an ultrasonic technique, the corresponding 2D Fourier spectra and a correlation function, have been used. Steady, quasi-periodic and turbulent flows, are successively recognized, as the Reynolds number was increased, for a fixed Rayleigh number. The orthogonal decomposition method was applied and the numbers of modes, involved in the dynamics of turbulent flows, calculated. As far as we know, this method has been used for the first time to study the Czochralski convective flows. This method provides also information on the most important modes and allows simple theoretical models to be established. The large rotation rates of the crystal were found to stabilize the flow, and conversely the temperature gradients destabilize the flow. Indeed, the increase of the rotation effects reduces the number of involved modes and oscillations, and conversely, as expected, the increase of the buoyancy effects induces more modes to be involved in the dynamics. Thus, the flow oscillations can be reduced either by increasing the crystal rotation rate to the adequate value, as shown in this study or by imposing a magnetic field

  18. Effects of Buoyancy Forces on Immiscible Water/Oil Displacements in a Vertically Oriented Porous Medium Effets des facteurs de flottabilité sur les déplacements non-miscibles eau/huile dans un milieu poreux vertical

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thirunavu S. R.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The effects of buoyancy forces on liquid-liquid displacement processes occurring in porous media are important in a variety of practical situations, in particular during the displacement of oil from partially-depleted underground reservoirs by means of aqueous solutions. Most previous studies involving the visualization of water/oil displacements in porous media have been undertaken in horizontal two-dimensional porous medium cells. The objective of the present work was to determine the effects of buoyancy forces; on the fingering pattern and oil recovery by conducting immiscible displacement experiments in two-dimensional consolidated porous medium cells aligned in the vertical plane. In order to obtain a clear understanding of the favourable and unfavourable effects of buoyancy forces, experiments were carried out in three different flow modes, namely horizontal, vertical upward, and vertical downward. As the effects of buoyancy forces are negligible for two-dimensional porous media in the horizontal flow mode, the recoveries obtained in this mode were used as a reference for comparison with those obtained in the two vertical modes. Displacements using five different density ratios were studied. The breakthrough time and percentage oil recovery were measured in each case. The effects of buoyancy forces, viscous forces, and capillary forces, as well as the injection flow rate, were also recorded. The results obtained indicate that the effects of buoyancy forces are very pronounced at low flow rates and low oil/water density ratios, and that even a slight increase in the flow rate causes the buoyancy forces to rapidly become less significant. Les facteurs de flottabilité exercent un effet important sur les déplacements liquide/liquide en milieu poreux dans toute une gamme de situations pratiques, en particulier lorsqu'on veut déplacer l'huile de roches réservoirs partiellement épuisées à l'aide de solutions aqueuses. La plupart des

  19. The fluid mechanics of continuous flow electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective is to establish theoretically and confirm experimentally the ultimate capabilities of continuous flow electrophoresis chambers operating in an environment essentially free of particle sedimentation and buoyancy. The efforts are devoted to: (1) studying the effects of particle concentration on sample conductivity and dielectric constant. The dielectric constant and conductivity were identified as playing crucial roles in the behavior of the sample and on the resolving power and throughput of continuous flow devices; and (2) improving the extant mathematical models to predict flow fields and particle trajectories in continuous flow electrophoresis. A dielectric spectrometer was designed and built to measure the complex dielectric constant of a colloidal dispersion as a function of frequency between 500 Hz and 200 kHz. The real part of the signal can be related to the sample's conductivity and the imaginary part to its dielectric constant. Measurements of the dielectric constants of several different dispersions disclosed that the dielectric constants of dilute systems of the sort encountered in particle electrophoresis are much larger than would be expected based on the extant theory. Experiments were carried out to show that, in many cases, this behavior is due to the presence of a filamentary structure of small hairs on the particle surface. A technique for producing electrokinetically ideal synthetic latex particles by heat treating was developed. Given the ubiquitous nature of hairy surfaces with both cells and synthetic particles, it was deemed necessary to develop a theory to explain their behavior. A theory for electrophoretic mobility of hairy particles was developed. Finally, the extant computer programs for predicting the structure of electro-osmotically driven flows were extended to encompass flow channels with variable wall mobilities.

  20. Modeling and simulations of radiative blast wave driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimony, Assaf; Huntington, Channing M.; Trantham, Matthew; Malamud, Guy; Elbaz, Yonatan; Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Shvarts, Dov

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility measured the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor RT instabilities driven by radiative blast waves, relevant to astrophysics and other HEDP systems. We constructed a new Buoyancy-Drag (BD) model, which accounts for the ablation effect on both bubble and spike. This ablation effect is accounted for by using the potential flow model ]Oron et al PoP 1998], adding another term to the classical BD formalism: βDuA / u , where β the Takabe constant, D the drag term, uA the ablation velocity and uthe instability growth velocity. The model results are compared with the results of experiments and 2D simulations using the CRASH code, with nominal radiation or reduced foam opacity (by a factor of 1000). The ablation constant of the model, βb / s, for the bubble and for the spike fronts, are calibrated using the results of the radiative shock experiments. This work is funded by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Multidisciplinary design approach and safety analysis of ADSR cooled by buoyancy driven flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceballos Castillo, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Transmutation is useful to reduce the storing time and the amount of nuclear waste to be stored in the geological repository. Transmutation can be achieved in all types of reactors: thermal systems, fast systems, critical and subcritical systems. Fast spectrum systems have significant advantages

  2. Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow in Naturally Ventilated Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Elashmawy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, heat transfer and fluid flow in naturally ventilated greenhouses are studied numerically for tow configuration according to the number and positions of the opening. The equations governing the phenomenon are developed using the stream function-vorticity formalism and solved using the finite volume method. The aim of the study is to investigate how buoyancy forces influence airflow and temperature patterns inside the greenhouse. Rayleigh number is the main parameter which changes from 103 to 106 and Prandtl number is fixed at Pr=0.71. Results are reported in terms of stream function, isotherms and average Nusselt number. It is found that the flow structure is sensitive to the value of Rayleigh number and the number of openings. Also, that using asymmetric opening positions improve the natural ventilation and facilitate the occurrence of buoyancy induced upward cross-airflow inside the greenhouse.

  3. Effect of nature convection on heat transfer in the liquid LiPb blanket for FDS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hongyan; Chen Hongli [Huaibei Coal Industry Teachers Coll. (China). Dept. of Physics; Zhou Tao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    2007-07-01

    The He-cooled liquid LiPb tritium breeder (SLL) blanket concept is one of options of the blanket design of the fusion power reactor (FDS-II). The SLL blanket could be developed relatively easily with lower LiPb outlet temperature and slower LiPb flow velocity that allows the utilization of relatively mature material technology. The velocity of the liquid LiPb in the blanket is very slowly only in order to extract tritium. The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow and heat transfer become very complex resulting from the differential heating of walls of the channels, especially adjacent to the First Wall (FW), and internal heat sources inside of the liquid LiPb. It is necessary to analyse the effect of the buoyancy-driven LiPb MHD flow on heat transfer in the channels with electrically and thermally conducting walls adjacent to the FW. The nature convection of the liquid LiPb, due to thermal diffusion, in the poloidal channel adjacent to the FW in the presence of the strong magnetic field of the SLL blanket has been considered and studied. The specially numerical MHD code based on the computational fluid dynamic software has been developed for analysis of the buoyancy-driven MHD flow. The properties of buoyantly convective flows have been investigated for various thermal boundary conditions. The numerical analysis was performed for the effect of nature convection on heat transfer of the liquid LiPb MHD flow in the poloidal channel in the SLL blanket. For the strong temperature gradient in the blanket and internal heat flux of Liquid LiPb, the three-dimensional temperature distributions of the LiPb, the FW and other walls have been given. Finally, The effect of the ratio of MHD buoyancy on the heat transfer characteristics of the LiPb flow have been calculated and presented. (orig.)

  4. Mixed convection stagnation-point flow of nanofluids over a stretching/shrinking sheet in a porous medium with internal heat generation/absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulal Pal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyzed the buoyancy-driven radiative non-isothermal heat transfer in a nanofluid stagnation-point flow over a stretching/shrinking sheet embedded in a porous medium.The effects of thermal radiation and internal heat generation/absorption along with suction/injection at the boundary are also considered. Three different types of nanofluids, namely the Copper-water, the Alumina-water and the Titanium dioxide water are considered. The resulting coupled nonlinear differential equations are solved numerically by a fifth-order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integration scheme with a shooting technique. A good agreement is found between the present numerical results and the available results in the literature for some special cases. The effects of the physical parameters on the flow and temperature characteristics are presented through tables and graphs, and the salient features are discussed. The results obtained reveal many interesting behaviors that warrant further study on the heat transfer enhancement due to the nanofluids.

  5. Kinematics and dynamics of the East Pacific Rise linked to a stable, deep-mantle upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, David B.; Forte, Alessandro M.; Rowan, Christopher J.; Glišović, Petar; Moucha, Robert; Grand, Stephen P.; Simmons, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Earth’s tectonic plates are generally considered to be driven largely by negative buoyancy associated with subduction of oceanic lithosphere. In this context, mid-ocean ridges (MORs) are passive plate boundaries whose divergence accommodates flow driven by subduction of oceanic slabs at trenches. We show that over the past 80 million years (My), the East Pacific Rise (EPR), Earth’s dominant MOR, has been characterized by limited ridge-perpendicular migration and persistent, asymmetric ridge accretion that are anomalous relative to other MORs. We reconstruct the subduction-related buoyancy fluxes of plates on either side of the EPR. The general expectation is that greater slab pull should correlate with faster plate motion and faster spreading at the EPR. Moreover, asymmetry in slab pull on either side of the EPR should correlate with either ridge migration or enhanced plate velocity in the direction of greater slab pull. Based on our analysis, none of the expected correlations are evident. This implies that other forces significantly contribute to EPR behavior. We explain these observations using mantle flow calculations based on globally integrated buoyancy distributions that require core-mantle boundary heat flux of up to 20 TW. The time-dependent mantle flow predictions yield a long-lived deep-seated upwelling that has its highest radial velocity under the EPR and is inferred to control its observed kinematics. The mantle-wide upwelling beneath the EPR drives horizontal components of asthenospheric flows beneath the plates that are similarly asymmetric but faster than the overlying surface plates, thereby contributing to plate motions through viscous tractions in the Pacific region. PMID:28028535

  6. Solution of the square lid-driven cavity flow of a Bingham plastic using the finite volume method

    OpenAIRE

    Syrakos, Alexandros; Georgiou, Georgios C.; Alexandrou, Andreas N.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the performance of the finite volume method in solving viscoplastic flows. The creeping square lid-driven cavity flow of a Bingham plastic is chosen as the test case and the constitutive equation is regularised as proposed by Papanastasiou [J. Rheol. 31 (1987) 385-404]. It is shown that the convergence rate of the standard SIMPLE pressure-correction algorithm, which is used to solve the algebraic equation system that is produced by the finite volume discretisation, severely det...

  7. Fluid queues driven by a birth and death process with alternating flow rates

    OpenAIRE

    P. R. Parthasarathy; K. V. Vijayashree; R. B. Lenin

    2004-01-01

    Fluid queue driven by a birth and death process (BDP) with only one negative effective input rate has been considered in the literature. As an alternative, here we consider a fluid queue in which the input is characterized by a BDP with alternating positive and negative flow rates on a finite state space. Also, the BDP has two alternating arrival rates and two alternating service rates. Explicit expression for the distribution function of the buffer occupancy is obtained. The case where the s...

  8. Ethiop. J. Sci. & Technol. 7(1) 49-66, 2014 49 Mixed convection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The governing momentum and energy equations are coupled and non linear due to the viscous .... gravitational body force, which is typical in this type of buoyancy driven flows in which the density will ... dissipation, along with heat generation or absorption, the energy balance equation relevant to the present situation is.

  9. Linear and nonlinear stability of a thermally stratified magnetically driven rotating flow in a cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grants, Ilmars; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2010-07-01

    The stability of a thermally stratified liquid metal flow is considered numerically. The flow is driven by a rotating magnetic field in a cylinder heated from above and cooled from below. The stable thermal stratification turns out to destabilize the flow. This is explained by the fact that a stable stratification suppresses the secondary meridional flow, thus indirectly enhancing the primary rotation. The instability in the form of Taylor-Görtler rolls is consequently promoted. These rolls can only be excited by finite disturbances in the isothermal flow. A sufficiently strong thermal stratification transforms this nonlinear bypass instability into a linear one reducing, thus, the critical value of the magnetic driving force. A weaker temperature gradient delays the linear instability but makes the bypass transition more likely. We quantify the non-normal and nonlinear components of this transition by direct numerical simulation of the flow response to noise. It is observed that the flow sensitivity to finite disturbances increases considerably under the action of a stable thermal stratification. The capabilities of the random forcing approach to identify disconnected coherent states in a general case are discussed.

  10. Annual and seasonal mean buoyancy fluxes for the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.

    . The fluxes of heat and freshwater across the air-sea interface, and hence the surface buoyancy flux, show strong spatial and temporal variability. The Bay of Bengal and eastern equatorial Indian Ocean are characterized by a net freshwater gain due to heavy...

  11. Interaction of pressure and momentum driven flows with thin porous media: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naaktgeboren, Christian

    Flow interaction with thin porous media arise in a variety of natural and man-made settings. Examples include flow through thin grids in electronics cooling, and NOx emissions reduction by means of ammonia injection grids, pulsatile aquatic propulsion with complex trailing anatomy (e.g., jellyfish with tentacles) and microbursts from thunderstorm activity over dense vegetation, unsteady combustion in or near porous materials, pulsatile jet-drying of textiles, and pulsed jet agitation of clothing for trace contaminant sampling. Two types of interactions with thin porous media are considered: (i) forced convection or pressure-driven flows, where fluid advection is maintained by external forces, and (ii) inertial or momentum-driven flows, in which fluid motion is generated but not maintained by external forces. Forced convection analysis through thin permeable media using a porous continuum approach requires the knowledge of porous medium permeability and form coefficients, K and C, respectively, which are defined by the Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation. Their determination, however, requires the measurement of the pressure-drop per unit of porous medium length. The pressure-drop caused by fluid entering and exiting the porous medium, however, is not related to the porous medium length. Hence, for situations in which the inlet and outlet pressure-drops are not negligible, e.g., for short porous media, the definition of Kand C via the HDD equation becomes ambiguous. This aspect is investigated analytically and numerically using the flow through a restriction in circular pipe and parallel plates channels as preliminary models. Results show that inlet and outlet pressure-drop effects become increasingly important when the inlet and outlet fluid surface fraction φ decreases and the Reynolds number Re increases for both laminar and turbulent flow regimes. A conservative estimate of the minimum porous medium length beyond which the core pressure-drop predominates over the

  12. SuperLig Ion Exchange Resin Swelling and Buoyancy Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to achieve a fundamental understanding of SuperLig resin swelling and shrinking characteristics, which lead to channeling and early breakthrough during loading cycles. The density of salt solution that causes resin floating was also determined to establish a limit for operation. Specific tests performed include (a) pH dependence, (b) ionic strength dependence and (c) buoyancy effect vs. simulant composition

  13. An experimental study of gravity-driven countercurrent two-phase flow in horizontal and inclined channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillibridge, K.H.; Ghiaasiaan, S.M.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    Countercurrent two-phase flow in horizontal and inclined channels, connecting a sealed liquid-filled reservoir to the atmosphere, is experimentally studied. This type of gravity-driven countercurrent two-phase flow can occur during the operation of passive safety coolant injection systems of advanced reactors. It can also occur in the pressurizer surge line of pressurized water reactors during severe accidents when the hot leg becomes voided. Four distinct flow regimes are identified: (a) stratified countercurrent, which mainly occurs when the channel is horizontal; (b) intermittent stratified-slug; (c) oscillating, which occurs when the angle of inclination is ≥30 deg; and (d) annular countercurrent. The characteristics of each regime and their sensitivity to important geometric parameters are examined. The superficial velocities in the stratified countercurrent and oscillating regimes are empirically correlated

  14. The Principles of Buoyancy in Marine Fish Eggs and Their Vertical Distributions across the World Oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby, Svein; Kristiansen, Trond

    2015-01-01

    Buoyancy acting on plankton, i.e. the difference in specific gravity between plankton and the ambient water, is a function of salinity and temperature. From specific gravity measurements of marine fish eggs salinity appears to be the only determinant of the buoyancy indicating that the thermal expansions of the fish egg and the ambient seawater are equal. We analyze the mechanisms behind thermal expansion in fish eggs in order to determine to what extent it can be justified to neglect the effects of temperature on buoyancy. Our results confirm the earlier assumptions that salinity is the basic determinant on buoyancy in marine fish eggs that, in turn, influence the vertical distributions and, consequently, the dispersal of fish eggs from the spawning areas. Fish populations have adapted accordingly by producing egg specific gravities that tune the egg buoyancy to create specific vertical distributions for each local population. A wide variety of buoyancy adaptations are found among fish populations. The ambient physical conditions at the spawning sites form a basic constraint for adaptation. In coastal regions where salinity increases with depth, and where the major fraction of the fish stocks spawns, pelagic and mesopelagic egg distributions dominate. However, in the larger part of worlds' oceans salinity decreases with depth resulting in different egg distributions. Here, the principles of vertical distributions of fish eggs in the world oceans are presented in an overarching framework presenting the basic differences between regions, mainly coastal, where salinity increases with depth and the major part of the world oceans where salinity decreases with depth. We show that under these latter conditions, steady-state vertical distribution of mesopelagic fish eggs cannot exist as it does in most coastal regions. In fact, a critical spawning depth must exist where spawning below this depth threshold results in eggs sinking out of the water column and become lost for

  15. The Principles of Buoyancy in Marine Fish Eggs and Their Vertical Distributions across the World Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby, Svein; Kristiansen, Trond

    2015-01-01

    Buoyancy acting on plankton, i.e. the difference in specific gravity between plankton and the ambient water, is a function of salinity and temperature. From specific gravity measurements of marine fish eggs salinity appears to be the only determinant of the buoyancy indicating that the thermal expansions of the fish egg and the ambient seawater are equal. We analyze the mechanisms behind thermal expansion in fish eggs in order to determine to what extent it can be justified to neglect the effects of temperature on buoyancy. Our results confirm the earlier assumptions that salinity is the basic determinant on buoyancy in marine fish eggs that, in turn, influence the vertical distributions and, consequently, the dispersal of fish eggs from the spawning areas. Fish populations have adapted accordingly by producing egg specific gravities that tune the egg buoyancy to create specific vertical distributions for each local population. A wide variety of buoyancy adaptations are found among fish populations. The ambient physical conditions at the spawning sites form a basic constraint for adaptation. In coastal regions where salinity increases with depth, and where the major fraction of the fish stocks spawns, pelagic and mesopelagic egg distributions dominate. However, in the larger part of worlds’ oceans salinity decreases with depth resulting in different egg distributions. Here, the principles of vertical distributions of fish eggs in the world oceans are presented in an overarching framework presenting the basic differences between regions, mainly coastal, where salinity increases with depth and the major part of the world oceans where salinity decreases with depth. We show that under these latter conditions, steady-state vertical distribution of mesopelagic fish eggs cannot exist as it does in most coastal regions. In fact, a critical spawning depth must exist where spawning below this depth threshold results in eggs sinking out of the water column and become lost

  16. A continuous and prognostic convection scheme based on buoyancy, PCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérémy, Jean-François; Piriou, Jean-Marcel

    2016-04-01

    A new and consistent convection scheme (PCMT: Prognostic Condensates Microphysics and Transport), providing a continuous and prognostic treatment of this atmospheric process, is described. The main concept ensuring the consistency of the whole system is the buoyancy, key element of any vertical motion. The buoyancy constitutes the forcing term of the convective vertical velocity, which is then used to define the triggering condition, the mass flux, and the rates of entrainment-detrainment. The buoyancy is also used in its vertically integrated form (CAPE) to determine the closure condition. The continuous treatment of convection, from dry thermals to deep precipitating convection, is achieved with the help of a continuous formulation of the entrainment-detrainment rates (depending on the convective vertical velocity) and of the CAPE relaxation time (depending on the convective over-turning time). The convective tendencies are directly expressed in terms of condensation and transport. Finally, the convective vertical velocity and condensates are fully prognostic, the latter being treated using the same microphysics scheme as for the resolved condensates but considering the convective environment. A Single Column Model (SCM) validation of this scheme is shown, allowing detailed comparisons with observed and explicitly simulated data. Four cases covering the convective spectrum are considered: over ocean, sensitivity to environmental moisture (S. Derbyshire) non precipitating shallow convection to deep precipitating convection, trade wind shallow convection (BOMEX) and strato-cumulus (FIRE), together with an entire continental diurnal cycle of convection (ARM). The emphasis is put on the characteristics of the scheme which enable a continuous treatment of convection. Then, a 3D LAM validation is presented considering an AMMA case with both observations and a CRM simulation using the same initial and lateral conditions as for the parameterized one. Finally, global

  17. Experimental Investigation of Rainfall Impact on Overland Flow Driven Erosion Processes and Flow Hydrodynamics on a Steep Hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, P.; Xu, X.; Pan, C.; Hsu, K. L.; Yang, T.

    2016-12-01

    Few attempts have been made to investigate the quantitative effects of rainfall on overland flow driven erosion processes and flow hydrodynamics on steep hillslopes under field conditions. Field experiments were performed in flows for six inflow rates (q: 6-36 Lmin-1m-1) with and without rainfall (60 mm h-1) on a steep slope (26°) to investigate: (1) the quantitative effects of rainfall on runoff and sediment yield processes, and flow hydrodynamics; (2) the effect of interaction between rainfall and overland flow on soil loss. Results showed that the rainfall increased runoff coefficients and the fluctuation of temporal variations in runoff. The rainfall significantly increased soil loss (10.6-68.0%), but this increment declined as q increased. When the interrill erosion dominated (q=6 Lmin-1m-1), the increment in the rill erosion was 1.5 times that in the interrill erosion, and the effect of the interaction on soil loss was negative. When the rill erosion dominated (q=6-36 Lmin-1m-1), the increment in the interrill erosion was 1.7-8.8 times that in the rill erosion, and the effect of the interaction on soil loss became positive. The rainfall was conducive to the development of rills especially for low inflow rates. The rainfall always decreased interrill flow velocity, decreased rill flow velocity (q=6-24 Lmin-1m-1), and enhanced the spatial uniformity of the velocity distribution. Under rainfall disturbance, flow depth, Reynolds number (Re) and resistance were increased but Froude number was reduced, and lower Re was needed to transform a laminar flow to turbulent flow. The rainfall significantly increased flow shear stress (τ) and stream power (φ), with the most sensitive parameters to sediment yield being τ (R2=0.994) and φ (R2=0.993), respectively, for non-rainfall and rainfall conditions. Compared to non-rainfall conditions, there was a reduction in the critical hydrodynamic parameters of mean flow velocity, τ, and φ by the rainfall. These findings

  18. Mass-corrections for the conservative coupling of flow and transport on collocated meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waluga, Christian, E-mail: waluga@ma.tum.de [Institute for Numerical Mathematics (M2), Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstraße 3, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Wohlmuth, Barbara [Institute for Numerical Mathematics (M2), Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstraße 3, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Rüde, Ulrich [Department of Computer Science 10, University Erlangen–Nuremberg, Cauerstr. 11, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    Buoyancy-driven flow models demand a careful treatment of the mass-balance equation to avoid spurious source and sink terms in the non-linear coupling between flow and transport. In the context of finite-elements, it is therefore commonly proposed to employ sufficiently rich pressure spaces, containing piecewise constant shape functions to obtain local or even strong mass-conservation. In three-dimensional computations, this usually requires nonconforming approaches, special meshes or higher order velocities, which make these schemes prohibitively expensive for some applications and complicate the implementation into legacy code. In this paper, we therefore propose a lean and conservatively coupled scheme based on standard stabilized linear equal-order finite elements for the Stokes part and vertex-centered finite volumes for the energy equation. We show that in a weak mass-balance it is possible to recover exact conservation properties by a local flux-correction which can be computed efficiently on the control volume boundaries of the transport mesh. We discuss implementation aspects and demonstrate the effectiveness of the flux-correction by different two- and three-dimensional examples which are motivated by geophysical applications.

  19. Gas mixing under the influence of thermal-dynamic parameters such as buoyancy, jet momentum and fan-induced convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.K.; Jones, S.C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Various scaling parameters for simulating mixing under the influence of buoyancy, jet momentum, and fan-induced convection were examined. Their significance was assessed by comparing the mixing of helium (a simulant for hydrogen) with air in a large-scale enclosure (1.8 m x 1.8 m x 1.8 m) to the mixing of salt-water with fresh-water in a small-scale enclosure (1/6 the size). The advantage of using the salt-water/freshwater technique is that it allows the characteristic flow regime (either turbulent or laminar flow) in the full-scale containment to be maintained in the reduced scale containment. A smoke technique for flow visualization was used to examine the mixing of the helium with air. For the small-scale salt-water/fresh-water experiment, fluorescent dye was used to provide a means to visualize the mixing process. The mixing behaviour in both sets of experiments were analyzed based on video records and concentration measurements in ten locations. Measurements showed that depending on the recirculation and jet flow rates, the injected salt-water (in small-scale experiments) and helium (in large-scale experiments) can disperse sufficiently quickly to produce an essentially 'well mixed' condition rendering the concentration measurements insensitive to the variation in the Froude or the Grashof Numbers. (author)

  20. Opposing flow in square porous annulus: Influence of Dufour effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athani, Abdulgaphur; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Khaleed, H. M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium is very important area of research which is also termed as double diffusive convection or thermo-solutal convection. The buoyancy ratio which is the ratio of thermal to concentration buoyancy can have negative values thus leading to opposing flow. This article is aimed to study the influence of Dufour effect on the opposing flow in a square porous annulus. The partial differential equations that govern the heat and mass transfer behavior inside porous medium are solved using finite element method. A three node triangular element is used to divide the porous domain into smaller elements. Results are presented with respect to geometric and physical parameters such as duct diameter ratio, Rayleigh number, radiation parameter etc. It is found that the heat transfer increase with increase in Rayleigh number and radiation parameter. It is observed that Dufour coefficient has more influence on velocity profile.

  1. Opposing flow in square porous annulus: Influence of Dufour effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athani, Abdulgaphur, E-mail: abbu.bec@gmail.com [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Anjuman Institute of Technology & Management, Bhatkal (India); Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A., E-mail: aa.alrashed@paaet.edu.kw [Dept. of Automotive and Marine Engineering Technology, College of Technological Studies, The Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (Kuwait); Khaleed, H. M. T., E-mail: khalid-tan@yahoo.com [Dept of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Islamic University, Madinah Munawwarra (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-21

    Heat and mass transfer in porous medium is very important area of research which is also termed as double diffusive convection or thermo-solutal convection. The buoyancy ratio which is the ratio of thermal to concentration buoyancy can have negative values thus leading to opposing flow. This article is aimed to study the influence of Dufour effect on the opposing flow in a square porous annulus. The partial differential equations that govern the heat and mass transfer behavior inside porous medium are solved using finite element method. A three node triangular element is used to divide the porous domain into smaller elements. Results are presented with respect to geometric and physical parameters such as duct diameter ratio, Rayleigh number, radiation parameter etc. It is found that the heat transfer increase with increase in Rayleigh number and radiation parameter. It is observed that Dufour coefficient has more influence on velocity profile.

  2. Modeling particle emission and power flow in pulsed-power driven, nonuniform transmission lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichelle Bruner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed-power driven x-ray radiographic systems are being developed to operate at higher power in an effort to increase source brightness and penetration power. Essential to the design of these systems is a thorough understanding of electron power flow in the transmission line that couples the pulsed-power driver to the load. In this paper, analytic theory and fully relativistic particle-in-cell simulations are used to model power flow in several experimental transmission-line geometries fielded on Sandia National Laboratories’ upgraded Radiographic Integrated Test Stand [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 28, 1653 (2000ITPSBD0093-381310.1109/27.901250]. Good agreement with measured electrical currents is demonstrated on a shot-by-shot basis for simulations which include detailed models accounting for space-charge-limited electron emission, surface heating, and stimulated particle emission. Resonant cavity modes related to the transmission-line impedance transitions are also shown to be excited by electron power flow. These modes can drive oscillations in the output power of the system, degrading radiographic resolution.

  3. Ring waves as a mass transport mechanism in air-driven core-annular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassa, Roberto; Forest, M Gregory; Lee, Long; Ogrosky, H Reed; Olander, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Air-driven core-annular fluid flows occur in many situations, from lung airways to engineering applications. Here we study, experimentally and theoretically, flows where a viscous liquid film lining the inside of a tube is forced upwards against gravity by turbulent airflow up the center of the tube. We present results on the thickness and mean speed of the film and properties of the interfacial waves that develop from an instability of the air-liquid interface. We derive a long-wave asymptotic model and compare properties of its solutions with those of the experiments. Traveling wave solutions of this long-wave model exhibit evidence of different mass transport regimes: Past a certain threshold, sufficiently large-amplitude waves begin to trap cores of fluid which propagate upward at wave speeds. This theoretical result is then confirmed by a second set of experiments that show evidence of ring waves of annular fluid propagating over the underlying creeping flow. By tuning the parameters of the experiments, the strength of this phenomenon can be adjusted in a way that is predicted qualitatively by the model.

  4. Experimental aspects of buoyancy correction in measuring reliable highpressure excess adsorption isotherms using the gravimetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong Giang T; Horn, Jarod C; Thommes, Matthias; van Zee, Roger D; Espinal, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Addressing reproducibility issues in adsorption measurements is critical to accelerating the path to discovery of new industrial adsorbents and to understanding adsorption processes. A National Institute of Standards and Technology Reference Material, RM 8852 (ammonium ZSM-5 zeolite), and two gravimetric instruments with asymmetric two-beam balances were used to measure high-pressure adsorption isotherms. This work demonstrates how common approaches to buoyancy correction, a key factor in obtaining the mass change due to surface excess gas uptake from the apparent mass change, can impact the adsorption isotherm data. Three different approaches to buoyancy correction were investigated and applied to the subcritical CO 2 and supercritical N 2 adsorption isotherms at 293 K. It was observed that measuring a collective volume for all balance components for the buoyancy correction (helium method) introduces an inherent bias in temperature partition when there is a temperature gradient (i.e. analysis temperature is not equal to instrument air bath temperature). We demonstrate that a blank subtraction is effective in mitigating the biases associated with temperature partitioning, instrument calibration, and the determined volumes of the balance components. In general, the manual and subtraction methods allow for better treatment of the temperature gradient during buoyancy correction. From the study, best practices specific to asymmetric two-beam balances and more general recommendations for measuring isotherms far from critical temperatures using gravimetric instruments are offered.

  5. Polar cap flow channel events: spontaneous and driven responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We present two case studies of specific flow channel events appearing at the dusk and/or dawn polar cap boundary during passage at Earth of interplanetary (IP coronal mass ejections (ICMEs on 10 January and 25 July 2004. The channels of enhanced (>1 km/s antisunward convection are documented by SuperDARN radars and dawn-dusk crossings of the polar cap by the DMSP F13 satellite. The relationship with Birkeland currents (C1–C2 located poleward of the traditional R1–R2 currents is demonstrated. The convection events are manifest in ground magnetic deflections obtained from the IMAGE (International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects Svalbard chain of ground magnetometer stations located within 71–76° MLAT. By combining the ionospheric convection data and the ground magnetograms we are able to study the temporal behaviour of the convection events. In the two ICME case studies the convection events belong to two different categories, i.e., directly driven and spontaneous events. In the 10 January case two sharp southward turnings of the ICME magnetic field excited corresponding convection events as detected by IMAGE and SuperDARN. We use this case to determine the ground magnetic signature of enhanced flow channel events (the NH-dusk/By<0 variant. In the 25 July case a several-hour-long interval of steady southwest ICME field (Bz<0; By<0 gave rise to a long series of spontaneous convection events as detected by IMAGE when the ground stations swept through the 12:00–18:00 MLT sector. From the ground-satellite conjunction on 25 July we infer the pulsed nature of the polar cap ionospheric flow channel events in this case. The typical duration of these convection enhancements in the polar cap is 10 min.

  6. A mathematical model for the motion analysis of embedded straight microcantilevers under a pressure-driven flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezkerra, A; Mayora, K; Ruano-López, J M; Wilson, P A

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model that estimates the deflection of straight microcantilevers embedded in a microchannel under a pressure-driven flow at low Reynolds numbers is presented. The model makes use of the Schwarz–Christoffel mapping in order to couple the geometry of the structure and the flow passing around it. Therefore, it allows the determination of the most influential parameters and suitable modifications in order to achieve the desired performance. The model does not require specific knowledge of the flow conditions in the vicinity of the structure, which improves its practical use during the early stages of design. Estimations have been made for two straight cantilevers under a range of pressures. The results obtained show good agreement with measurements from experiments

  7. Finite volume simulation of 2-D steady square lid driven cavity flow at high reynolds numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yapici

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, computer simulation results of steady incompressible flow in a 2-D square lid-driven cavity up to Reynolds number (Re 65000 are presented and compared with those of earlier studies. The governing flow equations are solved by using the finite volume approach. Quadratic upstream interpolation for convective kinematics (QUICK is used for the approximation of the convective terms in the flow equations. In the implementation of QUICK, the deferred correction technique is adopted. A non-uniform staggered grid arrangement of 768x768 is employed to discretize the flow geometry. Algebraic forms of the coupled flow equations are then solved through the iterative SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equation algorithm. The outlined computational methodology allows one to meet the main objective of this work, which is to address the computational convergence and wiggled flow problems encountered at high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe numbers. Furthermore, after Re > 25000 additional vortexes appear at the bottom left and right corners that have not been observed in earlier studies.

  8. A weighted multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann method for multiphase flows and its application to partial coalescence cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhari, Abbas; Bolster, Diogo; Luo, Li-Shi

    2017-07-01

    We present a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) with a weighted multiple-relaxation-time (WMRT) collision model and an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm for direct numerical simulation of two-phase flows in three dimensions. The proposed WMRT model enhances the numerical stability of the LBM for immiscible fluids at high density ratios, particularly on the D3Q27 lattice. The effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed WMRT-LBM-AMR is validated through simulations of (a) buoyancy-driven motion and deformation of a gas bubble rising in a viscous liquid; (b) the bag-breakup mechanism of a falling drop; (c) crown splashing of a droplet on a wet surface; and (d) the partial coalescence mechanism of a liquid drop at a liquid-liquid interface. The numerical simulations agree well with available experimental data and theoretical approximations where applicable.

  9. In search of chiral magnetic effect: separating flow-driven background effects and quantifying anomaly-induced charge separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xu-Guang [Physics Department and Center for Particle Physics and Field Theory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yin, Yi [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Liao, Jinfeng [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, 2401 N Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); RIKEN BNL Research Center, Bldg. 510A, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We report our recent progress on the search of Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) by developing new measurements as well as by hydrodynamic simulations of CME and background effects, with both approaches addressing the pressing issue of separating flow-driven background contributions and possible CME signal in current heavy ion collision measurements.

  10. Numerical analysis of transport phenomena in Y-Ba-Cu-O melt during growth of superconducting crystal Y123 by Czochralski method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szmyd, J. S.; Suzuki, K.

    2003-10-01

    In 1993, at the Superconductivity Research Laboratory (SRL), International Superconductivity Technology Centre (ISTEC), in Tokyo, continuous growth of large single crystals of YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x (Y123) was achieved by the application of a modified Czochralski method. This paper presents the numerical computations of the flow, thermal and Y concentration fields in the Ba-Cu-O melt for Y123 single crystal growth by this modified method. The finite volume method was used to calculate the fluid flow, heat transfer and yttrium distribution in the melt with staggered numerical grid. The flow in the melt was modelled as an incompressible Newtonian and Boussinesque fluid. Calculations are presented for a combined flow regime of buoyancy-driven natural convection and crystal-rotation-driven forced convection.

  11. Buoyancy effects in overcooling transients calculated for the NRC pressurized thermal shock study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Iyer, K.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Gherson, P.

    1986-05-01

    The thermal-hydraulic responses of three PWRs (Oconee, Calvert Cliffs, and H.B. Robinson), to postulated Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) scenarios, which were originally determined by RELAP5 and TRAC calculations, are being further developed here with regard to buoyancy/stratification effects. These three PWRs were the subject of the NRC PTS study, and the present results helped define the thermal-hydraulic conditions utilized in the fracture mechanics calculations carried out at ORNL. The computer program REMIX, which is based on the Regional Mixing Model (RMM), was the analytical tool employed, while Purdue's 1/2-Scale HPI Thermal Mixing facility provided the basis for experimental support. Important mixing and wall heat transfer regimes are delineated on the basis of these results. We conclude that stratification is important only in cases of complete loop stagnation and that mixed-convection effects are important for downcomer flow velocities below approx.0.25 m/s. The stratification is small in magnitude, however it is important in creating a recirculating flow pattern which activates the lower plenum, pump and loop seal volumes, to participate in the mixing process. This mixing process together with the heat input from the wall metal significantly impact the cooldown rates. Heat transfer in the plume region is dominated by forced convection. On the other hand, the presence of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) wall cladding and wall conduction significantly dampen the free convection effects in the low velocity, mixed-convection, regime. For the stagnant loop cases, all locations outside the plume region are included in this regime. In the presence of natural loop circulation and a uniformly distributed downcomer flow, the mixed convection regime is also expected, however, the forced convection regime can also be observed in highly asymmetric flow behavior

  12. Local-scale modelling of density-driven flow for the phases of repository operation and post-closure at Beberg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaquet, O.; Siegel, P.

    2004-09-01

    A hydrogeological model was developed for Beberg with the aim of evaluating the impact of a repository (for the operational and post-closure phases) while accounting for the effects of density-driven flow. Two embedded scales were taken into account for this modelling study: a local scale at which the granitic medium was considered as a continuum and a repository scale, where the medium is fractured and therefore was regarded to be discrete. The following step-wise approach was established to model density-driven flow at both repository and local scale: (a) modelling fracture networks at the repository scale, (b) upscaling the hydraulic properties to a continuum at local scale and (c) modelling density-driven flow to evaluate repository impact at local scale. The results demonstrate the strong impact of the repository on the flow field during the phase of operation. The distribution of the salt concentration is affected by a large upcoming effect with increased relative concentration and by the presence of fracture zones carrying freshwater from the surface. The concentrations obtained for the reference case, expressed in terms of percentage with respect to the maximum (prescribed) value in the model, are as follows: ca 30% for the phase of desaturation, and ca 20% for the resaturation phase. For the reference case, the impact of repository operations appears no longer visible after a resaturation period of about 20 years after repository closure; under resaturation conditions, evidence of the operational phase has already disappeared in terms of the observed hydraulic and concentration fields. Sensitivity calculations have proven the importance of explicitly discretising repository tunnels when assessing resaturation time and maximum concentration values. Furthermore, the definition of a fixed potential as boundary condition along the model's top surface is likely to provide underestimated values for the maximum concentration and overestimated flow rates in the

  13. MAGNUM-2D, Heat Transport and Groundwater Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, D.W.; Baca, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: MAGNUM2D was developed to analyze thermally driven fluid motion in the deep basalts below the Paco Basin at the Westinghouse Hanford Site. Has been used in the Basalt Waste Isolation Project to simulate nonisothermal groundwater flow in a heterogeneous anisotropic medium and heat transport in a water-rock system near a high level nuclear waste repository. Allows three representations of the hydrogeologic system: an equivalent porous continuum, a system of discrete, unfilled, and inter- connecting fractures separated by impervious rock mass, and a low permeability porous continuum with several discrete, unfilled fractures traversing the medium. The calculations assume local thermodynamic equilibrium between the rock and groundwater, non- isothermal Darcy flow in the continuum portions of the rock, and nonisothermal Poiseuille flow in discrete unfilled fractures. In addition, the code accounts for thermal loading within the elements, zero normal gradient and fixed boundary conditions for both temperature and hydraulic head, and simulation of the temperature and flow independently. The Q2DGEOM preprocessor was developed to generate, modify, plot and verify quadratic two dimensional finite element geometries. The BCGEN preprocessor generates the boundary conditions for head and temperature and ICGEN generates the initial conditions. The GRIDDER post-processor interpolates non-regularly spaced nodal flow and temperature data onto a regular rectangular grid. CONTOUR plots and labels contour lines for a function of two variables and PARAM plots cross sections and time histories for a function of time and one or two spatial variables. NPRINT generates data tables that display the data along horizontal or vertical cross sections. VELPLT differentiates the hydraulic head and buoyancy data and plots the velocity vectors. The PATH post-processor plots flow paths and computes the corresponding travel times. 2 - Method of solution: MAGNUM2

  14. Channel Incision Driven by Suburbanization: Impacts to Riparian Groundwater Flow and Overbank Flow Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, C. J.; Lawrence, R. L.; Noll, C.; Hancock, G. S.

    2005-12-01

    surface. Groundwater flow is redirected toward the stream. Moving downstream banks continue to widen, and the channel is up to 8 m wide and ~1.3 m deep ~100 m below the current knickpoint position. In the most downstream transects, the water table slopes gently toward the stream and remains ~1 m below the floodplain surface, equivalent to the depth of incision generated by knickpoint passage. Upstream of the knickpoint, overbank flooding occurs frequently, while below the knickpoint the majority of storm flow is contained within the incised channel and occupation of the floodplain is rare. The impact of incision to the riparian water table is dramatic, with a lowered water table and redirection of groundwater flow toward the stream. The incision is driven by suburbanization upstream of this riparian corridor, and has likely reduced the ability of this protected riparian system to improve the water quality of the suburban runoff that passes through it.

  15. Experimental study on cavity flow natural convection in porous medium, saturated with an Al(sub2)0(sub3) 60% EG-40% water nanofluid

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, Carla

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural convection is convection where the fluid motion is driven by buoyancy forces. Porous media and nanofluids have an impact on the heat transfer capabilities of thermal systems. The present experimental study is part of ongoing research...

  16. Buoyed by geophysics : geophysics, just-in-time procurement help save millions on Ekwan pipeline buoyancy control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, P.

    2005-09-01

    Large-diameter natural gas pipelines buried in wet muskeg have the potential to rise to the surface due to buoyancy. Until recently, the most reliable method to prevent this was to attach specially manufactured bolt-on concrete weights at closely spaced intervals. However, these weights significantly increase capital budgets by millions of dollars because each weight weighs 2,540 kg and costs $1,000. A less costly alternative for buoyancy control in shallow muskeg is for the contractor to simply dig a deeper ditch. Another option is to hold down the pipeline by polyester straps attached to screw anchors. The challenge of applying these less costly options is that heavy equipment cannot be brought to the site to determine ground conditions until after all procurement, assessment and design is completed. Engineers must therefore select a buoyancy control measure based only on air photos and possibly a few drill holes. However, air photos do not indicate the depth of muskeg. Although some muskeg areas may turn out to be thick enough to avoid buoyancy control altogether, once construction is underway, it is too late to opt for cheaper alternatives. EnCana Corporation's 24-inch Ekwan pipeline was recently constructed through a remote area of British Columbia to connect the Greater Sierra natural gas discovery to a tie-in point on Nova Gas Transmission's northwest mainline. Air photos indicated that half of the route was through muskeg. AMEC E and C Services Inc. was responsible for the engineering and management of the project. The company used a combination of geophysical techniques to learn about the ground conditions. Toboggan mounted portable equipment was hauled by snowmobiles along trails made earlier by the survey crews. Ground penetrating radar assessed the muskeg thickness. Fixed frequency electromagnetic surveys also enhanced the results of the ground penetrating radar. The number of bolt-on weights was reduced from 9,000 to 3,700, a savings of $3

  17. Effect of stable-density stratification on counter gradient flux of a homogeneous shear flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lida, Oaki; Nagano, Yasutaka [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya (Japan). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-01-15

    We performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow under stable-density stratification to study the buoyancy effects on the heat and momentum transfer. These numerical data were compared with those of a turbulent channel flow to investigate the similarity between the near-wall turbulence and the homogeneous shear flow. We also investigated the generation mechanism of the persistent CGFs (counter gradient fluxes) appearing at the higher wavenumbers of the cospectrum, and lasting over a long time without oscillation. Spatially, the persistent CGFs are associated with the longitudinal vortical structure, which is elongated in the streamwise direction and typically observed in both homogeneous shear flow and near-wall turbulence. The CGFs appear at both the top and bottom of this longitudinal vortical structure, and expand horizontally with an increase in the Richardson number. It was found that the production and turbulent-diffusion terms are responsible for the distribution of the Reynolds shear stress including the persistent CGFs. The buoyancy term, combined with the swirling motion of the vortex, contributes to expand the persistent CGF regions and decrease the down gradient fluxes. (author)

  18. Simulation of buoyancy-induced turbulent flow from a hot horizontal jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu; Salama, Amgad

    2014-01-01

    force effects due to temperature difference and density variation. After certain times, depending on the case condition, the flow tends to reach a steady state. © 2014 Publishing House for Journal of Hydrodynamics.

  19. Dual solutions of Casson fluid flow over a stretching or shrinking sheet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a stretching sheet is significant due to its ... in porous media in the presence of Soret, Dufour and chemical reaction effects. .... equations (9) – (14) are the buoyancy or free convection parameter λ, ...

  20. Characteristics of Vertical Mantle Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Louise Jivan; Morrison, G.L.; Behnia, M.

    1999-01-01

    - The flow structure in vertical mantle heat exchangers was investigated using a full-scale tank designed to facilitate flow visualisation. The flow structure and velocities in the mantle were measured using a particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. A CFD simulation model of vertical mantle heat...... exchangers was also developed for detailed evaluation of the heat flux distribution over the mantle surface. Both the experimental and simulation results indicate that distribution of the flow around the mantle gap is governed by buoyancy driven recirculation in the mantle. The operation of the mantle...

  1. Input variable selection for data-driven models of Coriolis flowmeters for two-phase flow measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lijuan; Yan, Yong; Wang, Xue; Wang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Input variable selection is an essential step in the development of data-driven models for environmental, biological and industrial applications. Through input variable selection to eliminate the irrelevant or redundant variables, a suitable subset of variables is identified as the input of a model. Meanwhile, through input variable selection the complexity of the model structure is simplified and the computational efficiency is improved. This paper describes the procedures of the input variable selection for the data-driven models for the measurement of liquid mass flowrate and gas volume fraction under two-phase flow conditions using Coriolis flowmeters. Three advanced input variable selection methods, including partial mutual information (PMI), genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and tree-based iterative input selection (IIS) are applied in this study. Typical data-driven models incorporating support vector machine (SVM) are established individually based on the input candidates resulting from the selection methods. The validity of the selection outcomes is assessed through an output performance comparison of the SVM based data-driven models and sensitivity analysis. The validation and analysis results suggest that the input variables selected from the PMI algorithm provide more effective information for the models to measure liquid mass flowrate while the IIS algorithm provides a fewer but more effective variables for the models to predict gas volume fraction. (paper)

  2. Experimental aspects of buoyancy correction in measuring reliable high-pressure excess adsorption isotherms using the gravimetric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong Giang T.; Horn, Jarod C.; Thommes, Matthias; van Zee, Roger D.; Espinal, Laura

    2017-12-01

    Addressing reproducibility issues in adsorption measurements is critical to accelerating the path to discovery of new industrial adsorbents and to understanding adsorption processes. A National Institute of Standards and Technology Reference Material, RM 8852 (ammonium ZSM-5 zeolite), and two gravimetric instruments with asymmetric two-beam balances were used to measure high-pressure adsorption isotherms. This work demonstrates how common approaches to buoyancy correction, a key factor in obtaining the mass change due to surface excess gas uptake from the apparent mass change, can impact the adsorption isotherm data. Three different approaches to buoyancy correction were investigated and applied to the subcritical CO2 and supercritical N2 adsorption isotherms at 293 K. It was observed that measuring a collective volume for all balance components for the buoyancy correction (helium method) introduces an inherent bias in temperature partition when there is a temperature gradient (i.e. analysis temperature is not equal to instrument air bath temperature). We demonstrate that a blank subtraction is effective in mitigating the biases associated with temperature partitioning, instrument calibration, and the determined volumes of the balance components. In general, the manual and subtraction methods allow for better treatment of the temperature gradient during buoyancy correction. From the study, best practices specific to asymmetric two-beam balances and more general recommendations for measuring isotherms far from critical temperatures using gravimetric instruments are offered.

  3. Magnetic and velocity fields MHD flow of a stretched vertical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analytical solutions for heat and mass transfer by laminar flow of Newtonian, viscous, electrically conducting and heat generation/absorbing fluid on a continuously moving vertical permeable surface with buoyancy in the presence of a magnetic field and a first order chemical reaction are reported. The solutions for magnetic ...

  4. Separation and Characterization of DNA Molecules and Intermolecular Interactions in Pressure-Driven Micro Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Sarah; Wang, Tza-Huei

    Pressure-driven flow in micron-sized diameter capillaries can be used to separate DNA molecules by size in a technique called Free Solution Hydrodynamic Separation. By coupling this technique with Cylindrical Illumination Confocal Spectroscopy, we have developed a highly sensitive and quantitative platform capable of separating DNA molecules by length over a large dynamic range (25 bp to 48 kbp) in a single run using only picoliters or femtograms of a DNA sample. The optical detection volume completely spans the capillary cross section, enabling highly efficient single molecule detection for enhanced sensitivity and quantification accuracy via single molecule counting. Because each DNA molecule generates its own fluorescent burst, these burst profiles can be further analyzed to individually characterize each DNA molecule's shape as it passes through the detection region. We exploit these burst profiles to visualize fluctuations in conformation under shear flow in microcapillaries, and utilizing combined mobility shift analysis, explore the complex relationship between molecular properties including length and conformation, hydrodynamic mobility, solution conditions including ion species and concentrations, and separation conditions including flow rate and capillary diameter.

  5. Instabilities and spin-up behaviour of a rotating magnetic field driven flow in a rectangular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, V.; Nauber, R.; Räbiger, D.; Franke, S.; Beyer, H.; Büttner, L.; Czarske, J.; Eckert, S.

    2017-11-01

    This study presents numerical simulations and experiments considering the flow of an electrically conducting fluid inside a cube driven by a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The investigations are focused on the spin-up, where a liquid metal (GaInSn) is suddenly exposed to an azimuthal body force generated by the RMF and the subsequent flow development. The numerical simulations rely on a semi-analytical expression for the induced electromagnetic force density in an electrically conducting medium inside a cuboid container with insulating walls. Velocity distributions in two perpendicular planes are measured using a novel dual-plane, two-component ultrasound array Doppler velocimeter with continuous data streaming, enabling long term measurements for investigating transient flows. This approach allows identifying the main emerging flow modes during the transition from stable to unstable flow regimes with exponentially growing velocity oscillations using the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition method. Characteristic frequencies in the oscillating flow regimes are determined in the super critical range above the critical magnetic Taylor number T ac≈1.26 ×1 05, where the transition from the steady double vortex structure of the secondary flow to an unstable regime with exponentially growing oscillations is detected. The mean flow structures and the temporal evolution of the flow predicted by the numerical simulations and observed in experiments are in very good agreement.

  6. Buoyancy frequency profiles and internal semidiurnal tide turning depths in the oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, B.; Stone, M.; Zhang, H.P.; Gerkema, T.; Marder, M.; Scott, R.B.; Swinney, H.L.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the possible existence of internal gravity wave "turning depths," depths below which the local buoyancy frequency N(z) becomes smaller than the wave frequency. At a turning depth, incident gravity waves reflect rather than reaching the ocean bottom as is generally assumed. Here we

  7. Laser driven supersonic flow over a compressible foam surface on the Nike lasera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Plewa, T.; Velikovich, A. L.; Gillespie, R. S.; Weaver, J. L.; Visco, A.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.

    2010-05-01

    A laser driven millimeter-scale target was used to generate a supersonic shear layer in an attempt to create a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable interface in a high-energy-density (HED) plasma. The KH instability is a fundamental fluid instability that remains unexplored in HED plasmas, which are relevant to the inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical environments. In the experiment presented here the Nike laser [S. P. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] was used to create and drive Al plasma over a rippled foam surface. In response to the supersonic Al flow (Mach=2.6±1.1) shocks should form in the Al flow near the perturbations. The experimental data were used to infer the existence and location of these shocks. In addition, the interface perturbations show growth that has possible contributions from both KH and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. Since compressible shear layers exhibit smaller growth, it is important to use the KH growth rate derived from the compressible dispersion relation.

  8. Laser driven supersonic flow over a compressible foam surface on the Nike laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Visco, A.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Ditmar, J. R.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Velikovich, A. L.; Weaver, J. L.; Plewa, T.

    2010-01-01

    A laser driven millimeter-scale target was used to generate a supersonic shear layer in an attempt to create a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable interface in a high-energy-density (HED) plasma. The KH instability is a fundamental fluid instability that remains unexplored in HED plasmas, which are relevant to the inertial confinement fusion and astrophysical environments. In the experiment presented here the Nike laser [S. P. Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2098 (1996)] was used to create and drive Al plasma over a rippled foam surface. In response to the supersonic Al flow (Mach=2.6±1.1) shocks should form in the Al flow near the perturbations. The experimental data were used to infer the existence and location of these shocks. In addition, the interface perturbations show growth that has possible contributions from both KH and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. Since compressible shear layers exhibit smaller growth, it is important to use the KH growth rate derived from the compressible dispersion relation.

  9. Application of Micropore Filter Technology: Exploring the Blood Flow Path in Arterial-Line Filters and Its Effect on Bubble Trapping Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Daniel P

    2017-03-01

    Conventional arterial-line filters commonly use a large volume circular shaped housing, a wetted micropore screen, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove gas bubbles from extracorporeal blood flow. Focusing on the bubble trapping function, this work attempts to explore how the filter housing shape and its resulting blood flow path affect the clinical application of arterial-line filters in terms of gross air handling. A video camera was used in a wet-lab setting to record observations made during gross air-bolus injections in three different radially designed filters using a 30-70% glycerol-saline mixture flowing at 4.5 L/min. Two of the filters both had inlet ports attached near the filter-housing top with bottom oriented outlet ports at the bottom, whereas the third filter had its inlet and outlet ports both located at the bottom of the filter housing. The two filters with top-in bottom-out fluid paths were shown to direct the incoming flow downward as it passed through the filter, placing the forces of buoyancy and viscous drag in opposition to each other. This contrasted with the third filter's bottom-in bottom-out fluid path, which was shown to direct the incoming flow upward so that the forces of buoyancy and viscous drag work together. The direction of the blood flow path through a filter may be important to the application of arterial-line filter technology as it helps determine how the forces of buoyancy and flow are aligned with one another.

  10. Non-Uniqueness of the Point of Application of the Buoyancy Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliava, Janis; Megel, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Even though the buoyancy force (also known as the Archimedes force) has always been an important topic of academic studies in physics, its point of application has not been explicitly identified yet. We present a quantitative approach to this problem based on the concept of the hydrostatic energy, considered here for a general shape of the…

  11. Turbulent structure of stably stratified inhomogeneous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Oaki

    2018-04-01

    Effects of buoyancy force stabilizing disturbances are investigated on the inhomogeneous flow where disturbances are dispersed from the turbulent to non-turbulent field in the direction perpendicular to the gravity force. Attaching the fringe region, where disturbances are excited by the artificial body force, a Fourier spectral method is used for the inhomogeneous flow stirred at one side of the cuboid computational box. As a result, it is found that the turbulent kinetic energy is dispersed as layered structures elongated in the streamwise direction through the vibrating motion. A close look at the layered structures shows that they are flanked by colder fluids at the top and hotter fluids at the bottom, and hence vertically compressed and horizontally expanded by the buoyancy related to the countergradient heat flux, though they are punctuated by the vertical expansion of fluids at the forefront of the layered structures, which is related to the downgradient heat flux, indicating that the layered structures are gravity currents. However, the phase between temperature fluctuations and vertical velocity is shifted by π/2 rad, indicating that temperature fluctuations are generated by the propagation of internal gravity waves.

  12. Tropical cloud buoyancy is the same in a world with or without ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Jacob T.; Romps, David M.

    2016-04-01

    When convective clouds grow above the melting line, where temperatures fall below 0°C, condensed water begins to freeze and water vapor is deposited. These processes release the latent heat of fusion, which warms cloud air, and many previous studies have suggested that this heating from fusion increases cloud buoyancy in the upper troposphere. Here we use numerical simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium with and without ice processes to argue that tropical cloud buoyancy is not systematically higher in a world with fusion than in a world without it. This insensitivity results from the fact that the environmental temperature profile encountered by developing tropical clouds is itself determined by convection. We also offer a simple explanation for the large reservoir of convective available potential energy in the tropical upper troposphere that does not invoke ice.

  13. On the influence of buoyancy and suction/injection In Heat and Mass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we examined the influence of buoyancy and suction/injection in the problem of unsteady convection with chemical reaction and radiative heat transfer past a flat porous plate moving through a binary mixture in an optically thin environment is presented. The dimensionless governing equations for this ...

  14. CFD-Driven Valve Shape Optimization for Performance Improvement of a Micro Cross-Flow Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endashaw Tesfaye Woldemariam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbines are critical parts in hydropower facilities, and the cross-flow turbine is one of the widely applied turbine designs in small- and micro-hydro facilities. Cross-flow turbines are relatively simple, flexible and less expensive, compared to other conventional hydro-turbines. However, the power generation efficiency of cross-flow turbines is not yet well optimized compared to conventional hydro-turbines. In this article, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD-driven design optimization approach is applied to one of the critical parts of the turbine, the valve. The valve controls the fluid flow, as well as determines the velocity and pressure magnitudes of the fluid jet leaving the nozzle region in the turbine. The Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS function is employed to generate construction points for the valve profile curve. Control points from the function that are highly sensitive to the output power are selected as optimization parameters, leading to the generation of construction points. Metamodel-assisted and metaheuristic optimization tools are used in the optimization. Optimized turbine designs from both optimization methods outperformed the original design with regard to performance of the turbine. Moreover, the metamodel-assisted optimization approach reduced the computational cost, compared to its counterpart.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of pressure-driven flows in microchannels using Navier–Maxwell slip boundary conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, Tim

    2012-01-01

    We present lattice Boltzmann simulations of rarefied flows driven by pressure drops along two-dimensional microchannels. Rarefied effects lead to non-zero cross-channel velocities, nonlinear variations in the pressure along the channel. Both effects are absent in flows driven by uniform body forces. We obtain second-order accuracy for the two components of velocity the pressure relative to asymptotic solutions of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations with slip boundary conditions. Since the common lattice Boltzmann formulations cannot capture Knudsen boundary layers, we replace the usual discrete analogs of the specular diffuse reflection conditions from continuous kinetic theory with a moment-based implementation of the first-order Navier-Maxwell slip boundary conditions that relate the tangential velocity to the strain rate at the boundary. We use these conditions to solve for the unknown distribution functions that propagate into the domain across the boundary. We achieve second-order accuracy by reformulating these conditions for the second set of distribution functions that arise in the derivation of the lattice Boltzmann method by an integration along characteristics. Our moment formalism is also valuable for analysing the existing boundary conditions. It reveals the origin of numerical slip in the bounce-back other common boundary conditions that impose conditions on the higher moments, not on the local tangential velocity itself. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of electromagnetically driven multiscale shallow layer flows: Numerical modeling and physical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeau, Sylvain; Ferrari, Simone; Rossi, Lionel

    2008-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulations of a flow driven by multiscale electromagnetic forcing are performed in order to reproduce with maximum accuracy the quasi-two-dimensional (2D) flow generated by the same multiscale forcing in the laboratory. The method presented is based on a 3D description of the flow and the electromagnetic forcing. Very good agreements between our simulations and the experiments are found both on velocity and acceleration field, this last comparison being, to our knowledge, done for the first time. Such agreement requires that both experiments and simulations are carefully performed and, more importantly, that the underlying simplification to model the experiments and the multiscale electromagnetic forcing do not introduce significant errors. The results presented in this paper differ significantly from previous 2D direct numerical simulation in which a classical linear Rayleigh friction modeling term was used to mimic the effect of the wall-normal friction. Indeed, purely 2D simulations are found to underestimate the Reynolds number and, due to the dominance of nonhomogeneous bottom friction, lead to the wrong physical mechanism. For the range of conditions presented in this paper, the Reynolds number, defined by the ratio between acceleration and viscous terms, remains the order of unity, and the Hartmann number, defined by the ratio between electromagnetic force terms and viscous terms, is about 2. The main conclusion is that 3D simulations are required to model the (3D) electromagnetic forces and the wall-normal shear. Indeed, even if the flow is quasi-2D in terms of energy, a full 3D approach is required to simulate these shallow layer flows driven by multiscale electromagnetic forcing. In the range of forcing intensity investigated in this paper, these multiscale flows remain quasi-2D, with negligible energy in the wall-normal velocity component. It is also shown that the driving terms are the electromagnetic forcing and

  17. Response of mantle transition zone thickness to plume buoyancy flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Sharma, S.; Ramesh, D. S.; Li, X.; Yuan, X.; Sreenivas, B.; Kind, R.

    2010-01-01

    The debate concerning thermal plumes in the Earth's mantle, their geophysical detection and depth characterization remains contentious. Available geophysical, petrological and geochemical evidence is at variance regarding the very existence of mantle plumes. Utilizing P-to-S converted seismic waves (P receiver functions) from the 410 and 660 km discontinuities, we investigate disposition of these boundaries beneath a number of prominent hotspot regions. The thickness of the mantle transition zone (MTZ), measured as P660s-P410s differential times (tMTZ), is determined. Our analyses suggest that the MTZ thickness beneath some hotspots correlates with the plume strength. The relationship between tMTZ, in response to the thermal perturbation, and the strength of plumes, as buoyancy flux B, follows a power law. This B-tMTZ behavior provides unprecedented insights into the relation of buoyancy flux and excess temperature at 410-660 km depth below hotspots. We find that the strongest hotspots, which are located in the Pacific, are indeed plumes originating at the MTZ or deeper. According to the detected power law, even the strongest plumes may not shrink the transition zone by significantly more than ~40 km (corresponding to a maximum of 300-400° excess temperature).

  18. Velocity and concentration fields in turbulent buoyant mixing in tilted tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znaien, J.; Moisy, F.; Hulin, J. P.; Salin, D.; Hinch, E. J.

    2008-11-01

    2D PIV and LIF measurements have been performed on buoyancy driven flows of two miscible fluids of the same viscosity in a tube tilted at different angles θ from vertical and at different density contrasts (characterized by the Atwood number At). As θ increases and At decreases, the flow regime evolves, behind the front, from a turbulent shear flow towards a laminar counter flow with 3 layers of different concentrations. Time variations of the structure function show that both intermittent and developed turbulence occur in intermediate conditions. In the turbulent regime (Reλ˜60) the magnitudes of the longitudinal u'^2 and transverse v'^2 velocity fluctuations and of the component u'v' of the Reynolds stress tensor are shown to be largest on the tube axis while viscous stresses is only important close to the walls. The analyzis of the momentum transfer in the flow with buoyancy forces estimated from the concentration gradients demonstrates that 3D effects are required to achieve the momentum balance. These results are discussed in the framework of classical turbulence models.

  19. Scaling Law for Cross-stream Diffusion in Microchannels under Combined Electroosmotic and Pressure Driven Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongjun; Wang, Yi; Pant, Kapil

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical study of the cross-stream diffusion of an analyte in a rectangular microchannel under combined electroosmotic flow (EOF) and pressure driven flow to investigate the heterogeneous transport behavior and spatially-dependent diffusion scaling law. An analytical model capable of accurately describing 3D steady-state convection-diffusion in microchannels with arbitrary aspect ratios is developed based on the assumption of the thin Electric Double Layer (EDL). The model is verified against high-fidelity numerical simulation in terms of flow velocity and analyte concentration profiles with excellent agreement (parametric analysis is then undertaken to interrogate the effect of the combined flow velocity field on the transport behavior in both the positive pressure gradient (PPG) and negative pressure gradient (NPG) cases. For the first time, the evolution from the spindle-shaped concentration profile in the PPG case, via the stripe-shaped profile (pure EOF), and finally to the butterfly-shaped profile in the PPG case is obtained using the analytical model along with a quantitative depiction of the spatially-dependent diffusion layer thickness and scaling law across a wide range of the parameter space.

  20. Numerical study of the effect of Navier slip on the driven cavity flow

    KAUST Repository

    He, Qiaolin

    2009-10-01

    We study the driven cavity flow using the Navier slip boundary condition. Our results have shown that the Navier slip boundary condition removes the corner singularity induced by the no-slip boundary condition. In the low Reynolds number case, the behavior of the tangential stress is examined and the results are compared with the analytic results obtained in [14]. For the high Reynolds number, we study the effect of the slip on the critical Reynolds number for Hopf bifurcation. Our results show that the first Hopf bifurcation critical Reynolds number is increasing with slip length. © 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Investigation and Modelling of Thermal Conditions in Low Flow SDHW Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Louise Jivan

    1999-01-01

    and compared with the CFD-predicted flow structures in the mantle. The results showed that the mantle flow was highly dominated by buoyancy and the CFD-models were able to model this flow. With a steel mantle tank, different dynamic thermal experiments were carried out in a heat storage test facility....... This simulation program predicts the yearly thermal performance of low flow SDHW systems based on mantle tanks. MANTLSIM was verified and afterwards used as a tool for parameter analysis. This analysis showed that MANTLSIM predicted expected tendencies. Only for the mantle gap variations, results in poor...

  2. Inertia-driven particle migration and mixing in a wall-bounded laminar suspension flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loisel, V.; Abbas, M., E-mail: micheline.abbas@ensiacet.fr; Masbernat, O. [Université de Toulouse INPT-UPS: Laboratoire de Génie Chimique and CNRS, Fédération de Recherche FERMaT, Toulouse (France); Climent, E. [Université de Toulouse INPT-UPS: Institut de Mécanique des Fluides de Toulouse and CNRS, Fédération de Recherche FERMaT, Toulouse (France)

    2015-12-15

    Laminar pressure-driven suspension flows are studied in the situation of neutrally buoyant particles at finite Reynolds number. The numerical method is validated for homogeneous particle distribution (no lateral migration across the channel): the increase of particle slip velocities and particle stress with inertia and concentration is in agreement with former works in the literature. In the case of a two-phase channel flow with freely moving particles, migration towards the channel walls due to the Segré-Silberberg effect is observed, leading to the development of a non-uniform concentration profile in the wall-normal direction (the concentration peaks in the wall region and tends towards zero in the channel core). The particle accumulation in the region of highest shear favors the shear-induced particle interactions and agitation, the profile of which appears to be correlated to the concentration profile. A 1D model predicting particle agitation, based on the kinetic theory of granular flows in the quenched state regime when Stokes number St = O(1) and from numerical simulations when St < 1, fails to reproduce the agitation profile in the wall normal direction. Instead, the existence of secondary flows is clearly evidenced by long time simulations. These are composed of a succession of contra-rotating structures, correlated with the development of concentration waves in the transverse direction. The mechanism proposed to explain the onset of this transverse instability is based on the development of a lift force induced by spanwise gradient of the axial velocity fluctuations. The establishment of the concentration profile in the wall-normal direction therefore results from the combination of the mean flow Segré-Silberberg induced migration, which tends to stratify the suspension and secondary flows which tend to mix the particles over the channel cross section.

  3. Inertia-driven particle migration and mixing in a wall-bounded laminar suspension flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loisel, V.; Abbas, M.; Masbernat, O.; Climent, E.

    2015-01-01

    Laminar pressure-driven suspension flows are studied in the situation of neutrally buoyant particles at finite Reynolds number. The numerical method is validated for homogeneous particle distribution (no lateral migration across the channel): the increase of particle slip velocities and particle stress with inertia and concentration is in agreement with former works in the literature. In the case of a two-phase channel flow with freely moving particles, migration towards the channel walls due to the Segré-Silberberg effect is observed, leading to the development of a non-uniform concentration profile in the wall-normal direction (the concentration peaks in the wall region and tends towards zero in the channel core). The particle accumulation in the region of highest shear favors the shear-induced particle interactions and agitation, the profile of which appears to be correlated to the concentration profile. A 1D model predicting particle agitation, based on the kinetic theory of granular flows in the quenched state regime when Stokes number St = O(1) and from numerical simulations when St < 1, fails to reproduce the agitation profile in the wall normal direction. Instead, the existence of secondary flows is clearly evidenced by long time simulations. These are composed of a succession of contra-rotating structures, correlated with the development of concentration waves in the transverse direction. The mechanism proposed to explain the onset of this transverse instability is based on the development of a lift force induced by spanwise gradient of the axial velocity fluctuations. The establishment of the concentration profile in the wall-normal direction therefore results from the combination of the mean flow Segré-Silberberg induced migration, which tends to stratify the suspension and secondary flows which tend to mix the particles over the channel cross section

  4. UV DRIVEN EVAPORATION OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS: ENERGY-LIMITED, RECOMBINATION-LIMITED, AND PHOTON-LIMITED FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, James E.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the evaporation of close-in exoplanets irradiated by ionizing photons. We find that the properties of the flow are controlled by the ratio of the recombination time to the flow timescale. When the recombination timescale is short compared to the flow timescale, the flow is in approximate local ionization equilibrium with a thin ionization front where the photon mean free path is short compared to the flow scale. In this “recombination-limited” flow the mass-loss scales roughly with the square root of the incident flux. When the recombination time is long compared to the flow timescale the ionization front becomes thick and encompasses the entire flow with the mass-loss rate scaling linearly with flux. If the planet's potential is deep, then the flow is approximately “energy-limited”; however, if the planet's potential is shallow, then we identify a new limiting mass-loss regime, which we term “photon-limited.” In this scenario, the mass-loss rate is purely limited by the incoming flux of ionizing photons. We have developed a new numerical approach that takes into account the frequency dependence of the incoming ionizing spectrum and performed a large suite of 1D simulations to characterize UV driven mass-loss around low-mass planets. We find that the flow is “recombination-limited” at high fluxes but becomes “energy-limited” at low fluxes; however, the transition is broad occurring over several orders of magnitude in flux. Finally, we point out that the transitions between the different flow types do not occur at a single flux value but depend on the planet's properties, with higher-mass planets becoming “energy-limited” at lower fluxes

  5. Natural convection heat transfer in shallow horizontal rectangular enclosures uniformly heated from the side and filled with non-Newtonian power law fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamsaadi, M.; Naimi, M.; Hasnaoui, M.

    2006-01-01

    A combined analytical and numerical study is conducted for two dimensional, steady state, buoyancy driven flows of non-Newtonian power law fluids confined in a shallow rectangular cavity submitted to uniform fluxes of heat along both its short vertical sides, while its long horizontal walls are considered adiabatic. The effect of the non-Newtonian behavior on the fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics is examined. An approximate theoretical solution is developed on the basis of the parallel flow assumption and validated numerically by solving the full governing equations

  6. Astronaut Training in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This photograph shows an STS-61 astronaut training for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing mission (STS-61) in the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). Two months after its deployment in space, scientists detected a 2-micron spherical aberration in the primary mirror of the HST that affected the telescope's ability to focus faint light sources into a precise point. This imperfection was very slight, one-fiftieth of the width of a human hair. A scheduled Space Service servicing mission (STS-61) in 1993 permitted scientists to correct the problem. The MSFC NBS provided an excellent environment for testing hardware to examine how it would operate in space and for evaluating techniques for space construction and spacecraft servicing.

  7. Reynolds number and end-wall effects on a lid-driven cavity flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, A.K.; Koseff, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A series of experiments has been conducted in a lid-driven cavity of square cross section (depth = width = 150 mm) for Reynolds numbers (Re, based on lid speed and cavity width) between 3200 and 10 000, and spanwise aspect ratios (SAR) between 0.25:1 and 1:1. Flow visualization using polystyrene beads and two-dimensional laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements have shed new light on the momentum transfer processes within the cavity. This paper focuses on the variation, with Re and SAR, of the mean and the rms velocities profiles, as well as the /similar to/(U'V') profile, along the horizontal and vertical centerlines in the symmetry plane. In addition, the contribution of the large-scale ''organized structures,'' and the high-frequency ''turbulent'' velocity fluctuations to the total rms is examined. At low Re, the organized structures account for most of the energy contained in the flow irrespective of SAR. As the Re increases, however, so does the energy content of the higher frequency fluctuations. This trend is not independent of SAR; a reduction in the SAR causes the ''organized structures'' to again become more evident

  8. Combined free and forced convection flow of a second order liquid through porous parallel walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.P.

    1977-01-01

    An analysis of the flow of a second order fluid through porous parallel walls with heat transfer under the influence of buoyancy forces is carried out. Solutions for the velocity and temperature fields have been obtained by an iterative procedure. The flow phenomena have been characterized by parameters like: R (cross flow Reynolds number), Λ (elastic parameter), G (Grashof number), σ (Prandtl number) and the effects of these numbers on the flow characteristics have been presented in several graphs and tables. (author)

  9. Flow instability in laminar jet flames driven by alternating current electric fields

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Gyeong Taek

    2016-10-13

    The effect of electric fields on the instability of laminar nonpremixed jet flames was investigated experimentally by applying the alternating current (AC) to a jet nozzle. We aimed to elucidate the origin of the occurrence of twin-lifted jet flames in laminar jet flow configurations, which occurred when AC electric fields were applied. The results indicated that a twin-lifted jet flame originated from cold jet instability, caused by interactions between negative ions in the jet flow via electron attachment as O +e→O when AC electric fields were applied. This was confirmed by conducting systematic, parametric experiment, which included changing gaseous component in jets and applying different polarity of direct current (DC) to the nozzle. Using two deflection plates installed in parallel with the jet stream, we found that only negative DC on the nozzle could charge oxygen molecules negatively. Meanwhile, the cold jet instability occurred only for oxygen-containing jets. A shedding frequency of jet stream due to AC driven instability showed a good correlation with applied AC frequency exhibiting a frequency doubling. However, for the applied AC frequencies over 80Hz, the jet did not respond to the AC, indicating an existence of a minimum flow induction time in a dynamic response of negative ions to external AC fields. Detailed regime of the instability in terms of jet velocity, AC voltage and frequency was presented and discussed. Hypothesized mechanism to explain the instability was also proposed.

  10. Turbulent Boyant Jets and Plumes in Flowing Ambient Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo

    and the stage of plume. The stability criteria for the upstream wedge created by the submerged turbulent buoyant jet were established by applying the Bernoulli equations for a two-dimensional problem and by considering the front velocity driven by the buoyancy force for a three-dimensional problem....... The integral model was developed on the basis of the volume control method ( for jets with two-dimensional trajectories ) and the differential method ( for jets with three-dimensional trajectories ). The turbulence model adopted here was the k - ε model based on Launder and Spalding. The mathematical models...

  11. Spanwise homogeneous buoyancy-drag model for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing and experimental evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimonte, Guy

    2000-01-01

    A buoyancy-drag model for Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing is developed on the premise that the bubble and spike regions behave as distinct and spanwise homogeneous fluids. Then, mass conservation is applied accross the mixing zone to obtain their average mixture densities dynamically. These are used to explicitly calculate the inertia and buoyancy terms in the evolutionary equation. The only unknown parameter in the model is the Newtonian drag constant C∼2.5±0.6, which is determined from turbulent RT experiments over various Atwood numbers A and acceleration histories g(t). The bubble (i=2) and spike (i=1) amplitudes are found to obey the familiar h i =α i Agt 2 for a constant g and h i ∼t θ i for an impulsive g. For bubbles, both α 2 and θ 2 are insensitive to A. For the spikes, both α 1 and θ 1 increase as a power law with the density ratio. However, θ 1 is not universal because it depends on the initial value of h 1 /h 2 . (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  12. Heat transfer to MHD oscillatory dusty fluid flow in a channel filled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we examine the combined effects of thermal radiation, buoyancy force and magnetic field on oscillatory flow of a conducting optically thin dusty fluid through a vertical channel filled with a saturated porous medium. The governing partial differential equations are obtained and solved analytically by variable ...

  13. Cilia driven flow networks in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Faubel, Regina; Westendorf, Chrsitian; Eichele, Gregor; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Neurons exchange soluble substances via the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that fills the ventricular system. The walls of the ventricular cavities are covered with motile cilia that constantly beat and thereby induce a directional flow. We recently discovered that cilia in the third ventricle generate a complex flow pattern leading to partitioning of the ventricular volume and site-directed transport paths along the walls. Transient and daily recurrent alterations in the cilia beating direction lead to changes in the flow pattern. This has consequences for delivery of CSF components along the near wall flow. The contribution of this cilia-induced flow to overall CSF flow remains to be investigated. The state-of-art lattice Boltzmann method is adapted for studying the CFS flow. The 3D geometry of the third ventricle at high resolution was reconstructed. Simulation of CSF flow without cilia in this geometry confirmed that the previous idea about unidirectional flow does not explain how different components of CSF can be delivered to their various target sites. We study the contribution of the cilia-induced flow pattern to overall CSF flow and identify target areas for site-specific delivery of CSF-constituents with respect to the temporal changes.

  14. Measurement of beam driven hydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Black, E.; Bandura, L.; Errede, D.; Cummings, M. A. C.

    2003-01-01

    Cooling intense muon beams in liquid hydrogen absorbers introduces kW of heating to the cold fluid, which will drive turbulent flow. The amount of turbulence may be sufficient to help cool the liquid, but calculations are difficult. We have used a 20 MeV electron beam in a water tank to look at the scale of the beam driven convection and turbulence. The density and flow measurements are made with schlieren and Ronchi systems. We describe the optical systems and the turbulence measured. These data are being used to calibrate hydrodynamic calculations of convection driven and forced flow cooling in muon cooling absorbers

  15. Coexisting contraction-extension consistent with buoyancy of the crust and upper mantle in North-Central Italy

    CERN Document Server

    Aoudia, A; Ismail-Zadeh, A T; Panza, G F; Pontevivo, A

    2002-01-01

    The juxtaposed contraction and extension observed in the crust of the Italian Apennines and elsewhere has, for a long time, attracted the attention of geoscientists and is a long-standing enigmatic feature. Several models, invoking mainly external forces, have been put forward to explain the close association of these two end-member deformation mechanisms clearly observed by geophysical and geological investigations. These models appeal to interactions along plate margins or at the base of the lithosphere such as back-arc extension or shear tractions from mantle flow or to subduction processes such as slab roll back, retreat or pull and detachment. We present here a revisited crust and upper mantle model that supports delamination processes beneath North-Central Italy and provides a new background for the genesis and age of the recent magmatism in Tuscany. Although external forces must have been important in the building up of the Apennines, we show that internal buoyancy forces solely can explain the coexist...

  16. Large-eddy-simulation approach in understanding flow structures of 2D turbulent density currents over sloping surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayamatullah, M.; Rao Pillalamarri, Narasimha; Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2018-04-01

    A numerical investigation was performed to understand the flow dynamics of 2D density currents over sloping surfaces. Large eddy simulation was conducted for lock-exchange (L-E) release currents and overflows. 2D Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the Boussinesq approximation. The effects of the lock aspect-ratio (height/length of lock), slope, and Reynolds number on the flow structures and turbulence mixing have been analyzed. Results have confirmed buoyancy within the head of the two-dimensional currents is not conserved which contradicts the classical thermal theory. The lock aspect-ratio dictates the fraction of initial buoyancy which is carried by the head of the current at the beginning of the slumping (horizontal) and accelerating phase (over a slope), which has important implications on turbulence kinetic energy production, and hence mixing in the current. For L-E flows over a slope, increasing slope angle enhances the turbulence production. Increasing slope results in shear reversal within the density current resulting in shear-instabilities. Differences in turbulence production mechanisms and flow structures exist between the L-E and constant-flux release currents resulting in significant differences in the flow characteristics between different releases.

  17. Fuel density effect on near nozzle flow field in small laminar coflow diffusion flames

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Flow characteristics in small coflow diffusion flames were investigated with a particular focus on the near-nozzle region and on the buoyancy force exerted on fuels with densities lighter and heavier than air (methane, ethylene, propane, and n-butane). The flow-fields were visualized through the trajectories of seed particles. The particle image velocimetry technique was also adopted for quantitative velocity field measurements. The results showed that the buoyancy force exerted on the fuel as well as on burnt gas significantly distorted the near-nozzle flow-fields. In the fuels with densities heavier than air, recirculation zones were formed very close to the nozzle, emphasizing the importance of the relative density of the fuel to that of the air on the flow-field. Nozzle heating influenced the near-nozzle flow-field particularly among lighter fuels (methane and ethylene). Numerical simulations were also conducted, focusing specifically on the effect of specifying inlet boundary conditions for fuel. The results showed that a fuel inlet boundary with a fully developed velocity profile for cases with long tubes should be specified inside the fuel tube to permit satisfactory prediction of the flow-field. The calculated temperature fields also indicated the importance of the selection of the location of the inlet boundary, especially in testing various combustion models that include soot in small coflow diffusion flames. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  18. A virtual power plant model for time-driven power flow calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Guerra

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the implementation of a custom-made virtual power plant model in OpenDSS. The goal is to develop a model adequate for time-driven power flow calculations in distribution systems. The virtual power plant is modeled as the aggregation of renewable generation and energy storage connected to the distribution system through an inverter. The implemented operation mode allows the virtual power plant to act as a single dispatchable generation unit. The case studies presented in the paper demonstrate that the model behaves according to the specified control algorithm and show how it can be incorporated into the solution scheme of a general parallel genetic algorithm in order to obtain the optimal day-ahead dispatch. Simulation results exhibit a clear benefit from the deployment of a virtual power plant when compared to distributed generation based only on renewable intermittent generation.

  19. Strongly coupled dispersed two-phase flows; Ecoulements diphasiques disperses fortement couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zun, I.; Lance, M.; Ekiel-Jezewska, M.L.; Petrosyan, A.; Lecoq, N.; Anthore, R.; Bostel, F.; Feuillebois, F.; Nott, P.; Zenit, R.; Hunt, M.L.; Brennen, C.E.; Campbell, C.S.; Tong, P.; Lei, X.; Ackerson, B.J.; Asmolov, E.S.; Abade, G.; da Cunha, F.R.; Lhuillier, D.; Cartellier, A.; Ruzicka, M.C.; Drahos, J.; Thomas, N.H.; Talini, L.; Leblond, J.; Leshansky, A.M.; Lavrenteva, O.M.; Nir, A.; Teshukov, V.; Risso, F.; Ellinsen, K.; Crispel, S.; Dahlkild, A.; Vynnycky, M.; Davila, J.; Matas, J.P.; Guazelli, L.; Morris, J.; Ooms, G.; Poelma, C.; van Wijngaarden, L.; de Vries, A.; Elghobashi, S.; Huilier, D.; Peirano, E.; Minier, J.P.; Gavrilyuk, S.; Saurel, R.; Kashinsky, O.; Randin, V.; Colin, C.; Larue de Tournemine, A.; Roig, V.; Suzanne, C.; Bounhoure, C.; Brunet, Y.; Tanaka, A.T.; Noma, K.; Tsuji, Y.; Pascal-Ribot, S.; Le Gall, F.; Aliseda, A.; Hainaux, F.; Lasheras, J.; Didwania, A.; Costa, A.; Vallerin, W.; Mudde, R.F.; Van Den Akker, H.E.A.; Jaumouillie, P.; Larrarte, F.; Burgisser, A.; Bergantz, G.; Necker, F.; Hartel, C.; Kleiser, L.; Meiburg, E.; Michallet, H.; Mory, M.; Hutter, M.; Markov, A.A.; Dumoulin, F.X.; Suard, S.; Borghi, R.; Hong, M.; Hopfinger, E.; Laforgia, A.; Lawrence, C.J.; Hewitt, G.F.; Osiptsov, A.N.; Tsirkunov, Yu. M.; Volkov, A.N.

    2003-07-01

    -phase flow, current distribution and mass transfer along a vertical gas evolving electrode; a two-way coupled model for dilute multiphase flows. Topic 3: turbulence modulation by particles, droplets or bubbles in dense systems: influence of particles on the transition to turbulence in pipe flow; comparison between a point particle model and a finite-diameter-model for the particle turbulence interaction in a suspension; the effect on turbulence by bubbles rising through it under buoyancy; the physical mechanisms of modifying the structure of turbulent homogeneous shear flows by dispersed particles; influence of hydrodynamic interactions between particles on the turbulent flow in a suspension; review of relationships between Lagrangian and Eulerian scales; a two-point PDF for modelling turbulent dispersed two-phase flows and derivation of a two field model; mathematical and numerical modeling of two-phase compressible flows with micro-inertia. Topic 4: collective effects in dispersed two-phase flows clustering and phase distribution: hydrodynamic structure of downward bubbly flow; influence of gravity on the dynamics of a turbulent bubbly pipe flow; experimental study of two-phase flows; particle clusters formed in dispersed gas-solid flows: simulations and experiments; experimental study of the turbulence in bubbly flows at high void fraction; first step in the study of the correlation between air/water flow fluctuations and random buffering forces; clustering and settling velocity of micro-droplets in a grid turbulence. Topic 5: large scale instabilities and gravity driven dispersed flows: new 'non-isothermal' linear instability modes in fluidized beds and bubbly flows; large scale instability in a confined buoyant shear layer; convective instability in uniform dispersed layers; structures in gravity driven bubbly flows; effects of concentration profiles on velocity profiles in sewer; pyroclastic density currents viewed as mammoth scale two-phase flows; mixing and

  20. Prediction of stably stratified homogeneous shear flows with second-order turbulence models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, J C F; Rocha, J M P

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of pressure-correlation second-order turbulence modelling schemes on the predicted behaviour of stably stratified homogeneous vertical-sheared turbulence. The pressure-correlation terms were modelled with a nonlinear formulation (Craft 1991), which was compared with a linear pressure-strain model and the 'isotropization of production' model for the pressure-scalar correlation. Two additional modelling issues were investigated: the influence of the buoyancy term in the kinetic energy dissipation rate equation and the time scale in the thermal production term in the scalar variance dissipation equation. The predicted effects of increasing the Richardson number on turbulence characteristics were compared against a comprehensive set of direct numerical simulation databases. The linear models provide a broadly satisfactory description of the major effects of the Richardson number on stratified shear flow. The buoyancy term in the dissipation equation of the turbulent kinetic energy generates excessively low levels of dissipation. For moderate and large Richardson numbers, the term yields unrealistic linear oscillations in the shear and buoyancy production terms, and therefore should be dropped in this flow (or at least their coefficient c ε3 should be substantially reduced from its standard value). The mechanical dissipation time scale provides marginal improvements in comparison to the scalar time scale in the production. The observed inaccuracy of the linear model in predicting the magnitude of the effects on the velocity anisotropy was demonstrated to be attributed mainly to the defective behaviour of the pressure-correlation model, especially for stronger stratification. The turbulence closure embodying a nonlinear formulation for the pressure-correlations and specific versions of the dissipation equations failed to predict the tendency of the flow to anisotropy with increasing stratification. By isolating the effects of the

  1. Surface pressure drag for hydrostatic two-layer flow over axisymmetric mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutbecher, M.

    2000-07-01

    The effect of partial reflections on surface pressure drag is investigated for hydrostatic gravity waves in two-layer flow with piecewise constant buoyancy frequency. The variation of normalized surface pressure drag with interface height is analyzed for axisymmetric mountains. The results are compared with the familiar solution for infinitely long ridges. The drag for the two-layer flow is normalized with the drag of one-layer flow, which has the buoyancy frequency of the lower layer. An analytical expression for the normalized drag of axisymmetric mountains is derived from linear theory of steady flow. Additionally, two-layer flow over finite-height axisymmetric mountains is simulated numerically for flow with higher stability in the upper layer. The temporal evolution of the surface pressure drag is examined in a series of experiments with different interface and mountain heights. The focus is on the linear regime and the nonlinear regime of nonbreaking gravity waves. The dispersion of gravity waves in flow over isolated mountains prevents that the entire wave spectrum is in resonance at the same interface height, which is the case in hydrostatic flow over infinitely long ridges. In consequence, the oscillation of the normalized drag with interface height is smaller for axisymmetric mountains than for infinitely long ridges. However, even for a reflection coefficient as low as 1/3 the drag of an axisymmetric mountain can be amplified by 50% and reduced by 40%. The nonlinear drag becomes steady in the numerical experiments in which no wave breaking occurs. The steady state nonlinear drag agrees quite well with the prediction of linear theory if the linear drag is computed for a slightly lowered interface. (orig.)

  2. Flagella-Driven Flows Circumvent Diffusive Bottlenecks that Inhibit Metabolite Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Martin; Solari, Cristian; Ganguly, Sujoy; Kessler, John; Goldstein, Raymond; Powers, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The evolution of single cells to large and multicellular organisms requires matching the organisms' needs to the rate of exchange of metabolites with the environment. This logistic problem can be a severe constraint on development. For organisms with a body plan that approximates a spherical shell, such as colonies of the volvocine green algae, the required current of metabolites grows quadratically with colony radius whereas the rate at which diffusion can exchange metabolites grows only linearly with radius. Hence, there is a bottleneck radius beyond which the diffusive current cannot keep up with metabolic demands. Using Volvox carteri as a model organism, we examine experimentally and theoretically the role that advection of fluid by surface-mounted flagella plays in enhancing nutrient uptake. We show that fluid flow driven by the coordinated beating of flagella produces a convective boundary layer in the concentration of a diffusing solute which in turn renders the metabolite exchange rate quadratic in the colony radius. This enhanced transport circumvents the diffusive bottleneck, allowing increase in size and thus evolutionary transitions to multicellularity in the Volvocales.

  3. Unsteady laminar flow with convective heat transfer through a rotating curved square duct with small curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Rabindra Nath, E-mail: rnmondal71@yahoo.com; Shaha, Poly Rani [Department of Mathematics, Jagannath University, Dhaka-1100 (Bangladesh); Roy, Titob [Department of Mathematics, Vikarunnesa Nun School and College, Boshundhara, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Yanase, Shinichiro, E-mail: yanase@okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical and Systems Engineering, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2016-07-12

    Unsteady laminar flow with convective heat transfer through a curved square duct rotating at a constant angular velocity about the center of curvature is investigated numerically by using a spectral method, and covering a wide range of the Taylor number −300≤Tr≤1000 for the Dean number Dn = 1000. A temperature difference is applied across the vertical sidewalls for the Grashof number Gr = 100, where the outer wall is heated and the inner wall cooled, the top and bottom walls being adiabatic. Flow characteristics are investigated with the effects of rotational parameter, Tr, and the pressure-driven parameter, Dn, for the constant curvature 0.001. Time evolution calculations as well as their phase spaces show that the unsteady flow undergoes through various flow instabilities in the scenario ‘multi-periodic → chaotic → steady-state → periodic → multi-periodic → chaotic’, if Tr is increased in the positive direction. For negative rotation, however, time evolution calculations show that the flow undergoes in the scenario ‘multi-periodic → periodic → steady-state’, if Tr is increased in the negative direction. Typical contours of secondary flow patterns and temperature profiles are obtained at several values of Tr, and it is found that the unsteady flow consists of two- to six-vortex solutions if the duct rotation is involved. External heating is shown to generate a significant temperature gradient at the outer wall of the duct. This study also shows that there is a strong interaction between the heating-induced buoyancy force and the centrifugal-Coriolis instability in the curved channel that stimulates fluid mixing and consequently enhances heat transfer in the fluid.

  4. Flux-driven simulations of turbulence collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, G. Y.; Kim, S. S.; Jhang, Hogun; Rhee, T. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); CASS and Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States); Xu, X. Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Using three-dimensional nonlinear simulations of tokamak turbulence, we show that an edge transport barrier (ETB) forms naturally once input power exceeds a threshold value. Profiles, turbulence-driven flows, and neoclassical coefficients are evolved self-consistently. A slow power ramp-up simulation shows that ETB transition is triggered by the turbulence-driven flows via an intermediate phase which involves coherent oscillation of turbulence intensity and E×B flow shear. A novel observation of the evolution is that the turbulence collapses and the ETB transition begins when R{sub T} > 1 at t = t{sub R} (R{sub T}: normalized Reynolds power), while the conventional transition criterion (ω{sub E×B}>γ{sub lin} where ω{sub E×B} denotes mean flow shear) is satisfied only after t = t{sub C} ( >t{sub R}), when the mean flow shear grows due to positive feedback.

  5. Variation in polydispersity in pump- and pressure-driven micro-droplet generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wen; Jacobi, Ian; Li, Songjing; Stone, Howard A.

    2015-11-01

    The polydispersity of droplets produced in a typical T-junction microfluidic channel under both syringe-pump-driven and pressure-driven flow configurations is measured quantitatively. Both flow systems exhibit high-frequency flow fluctuations that result in an intrinsic polydispersity due to the mechanism of droplet generation. In addition to this intrinsic polydispersity, the syringe-pump-driven device also exhibits low-frequency fluctuations due to mechanical oscillations of the pump, which overwhelm the high-frequency flow fluctuations and produce a signficantly heightened level of polydispersity. The quantitative difference in polydispersity between the two configurations and time-resolved measurements of individual droplet sizes are presented in order to enable the design of better flow control systems for droplet production.

  6. Density-Driven Flow Simulation in Anisotropic Porous Media: Application to CO2 Geological Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Negara, Ardiansyah

    2014-04-21

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in saline aquifers is considered as one of the most viable and promising ways to reduce CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. CO2 is injected into deep saline formations at supercritical state where its density is smaller than the hosting brine. This motivates an upward motion and eventually CO2 is trapped beneath the cap rock. The trapped CO2 slowly dissolves into the brine causing the density of the mixture to become larger than the host brine. This causes gravitational instabilities that is propagated and magnified with time. In this kind of density-driven flows, the CO2-rich brines migrate downward while the brines with low CO2 concentration move upward. With respect to the properties of the subsurface aquifers, there are instances where saline formations can possess anisotropy with respect to their hydraulic properties. Such anisotropy can have significant effect on the onset and propagation of flow instabilities. Anisotropy is predicted to be more influential in dictating the direction of the convective flow. To account for permeability anisotropy, the method of multipoint flux approximation (MPFA) in the framework of finite differences schemes is used. The MPFA method requires more point stencil than the traditional two-point flux approximation (TPFA). For example, calculation of one flux component requires 6-point stencil and 18-point stencil in 2-D and 3-D cases, respectively. As consequence, the matrix of coefficient for obtaining the pressure fields will be quite complex. Therefore, we combine the MPFA method with the experimenting pressure field technique in which the problem is reduced to solving multitude of local problems and the global matrix of coefficients is constructed automatically, which significantly reduces the complexity. We present several numerical scenarios of density-driven flow simulation in homogeneous, layered, and heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. The numerical results emphasize the

  7. CFD Study of Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer in Upward Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nietiadi, Yohanes Setiawan; Lee, Jeong Ik; Addad, Yacine

    2014-01-01

    DTHT regime can be induced by two effects: buoyancy and acceleration. Apart from these two deteriorating effects, another unique behavior of fluid in the DTHT regime is that the convective heat transfer rate will continue to deteriorate until it reaches certain point. The downstream of this point, is known as the recovery region, where the convective heat transfer rate returns back to the high values by recovering turbulence. We called this phenomena as re-turbulization.. The map of the DTHT regime can be seen from fig. 2, where the x-axis is the buoyancy parameter and y-axis is the acceleration parameter which is the agreed governing non-dimensional numbers among the researchers to illustrate the phenomena. The Buoyancy parameter is defind in Eq. (1) and the acceleration parameter is defined in Eq. (2), respectively. The threshold value for both effects to move from the forced turbulent heat transfer to the DTHT regime are found to be Bo* ≥ 2x10 -6 and Kv ≥ 2.5x10 -6 in the previous works. Bo * =Gr q /Re 3 '. 425 Pr 0 '. 8 (1). K v =4q + /Re (2). Many experiments and simulation have been done to investigate this phenomenon and the boundary of the regime. However, very limited number of experiment was conducted in the regime where buoyancy effect and acceleration effect are in the same order of magnitude and high enough to cause DTHT (mixed DTHT). Some important experimental researches that have been done in the gas DTHT regime is Lee et al. who investigated the heat transfer of gas flow in the range of buoyancy parameter from 3x10 -9 to 10 -5 and acceleration parameter span from 6x10 -8 to 5x10 -6 and presented the behavior of Nusselt number ratio from the experiment as fig. 3 and fig. 4. This paper will discuss a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis on DTHT by assuming hypothetical boundary conditions especially on the mixed DTHT regime. It has been found that a gas cooled fast reactor has a tendency to operate in the Deteriorated Turbulent Heat

  8. Buoyancy Regulation and the Energetics of Diving in Dolphins Seals, Sea Lions and Sea Otters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    We examined swim speed and ascent descent rates in sea lions and elephant seals in order to make comparisons in their diving strategies and how these may be effected by different strategies of buoyancy regulation...

  9. Use of an Arduino to study buoyancy force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, P. R.; Cena, C. R.; Alves, D. C. B.; Bozano, D. F.; Goncalves, A. M. B.

    2018-05-01

    The study of buoyancy becomes very interesting when we measure the apparent weight of the body and the liquid vessel weight. In this paper, we propose an experimental apparatus that measures both the forces mentioned before as a function of the depth that a cylinder is sunk into the water. It is done using two load cells connected to an Arduino. With this experiment, the student can verify Archimedes’ principle, Newton’s third law, and calculate the density of a liquid. This apparatus can be used in fluid physics laboratories as a substitute for very expensive sensor kits or even to improve too simple approaches, usually employed, but still at low cost.

  10. Flow-driven voltage generation in carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The flow of various liquids and gases over single-walled carbon nanotube bundles induces an electrical signal (voltage/current) in the sample along the direction of the flow. The electrical response generated by the flow of liquids is found to be logarithmic in the flow speed over a wide range. In contrast, voltage generated ...

  11. Simulation of density-driven flow in heterogeneous and fractured porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, A. [Politecnico di Torino (Italy). DISMA; Logashenko, D. [Steinbeis Research Center, Oelbronn (Germany); Stichel, S.; Wittum, G. [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). G-CSC

    2015-07-01

    The study of fractured porous media is an important and challenging problem in hydrogeology. One of the difficulties is that mathematical models have to account for heterogeneity introduced by fractures in hydrogeological media. Heterogeneity may strongly influence the physical processes taking place in these media. Moreover, the thickness of the fractures, which is usually negligible in comparison with the size of the whole domain, and the complicated geometry of fracture networks reduce essentially the efficiency of numerical methods. In order to overcome these difficulties, fractures are sometimes considered as objects of reduced dimensionality (surfaces in three dimensions), and the field equations are averaged along the fracture width. Fractures are assumed to be thin regions of space filled with a porous material whose properties differ from those of the porous medium enclosing them. The interfaces separating the fractures from the embedding medium are assumed to be ideal. We consider two approaches: (i) the fractures have the same dimension, d, as the embedding medium and are said to be d-dimensional; (ii) the fractures are considered as (d-1)-dimensional manifolds, and the equations of density-driven flow are found by averaging the d-dimensional laws over the fracture width. We show that the second approach is a valid alternative to the first one. For this purpose, we perform numerical experiments using a finite-volume discretization for both approaches. The results obtained by the two methods are in good agreement with each other. We derive a criterion for the validity of the simplified representation. The criterion characterizes the transition of a mainly parallel flow to a rotational flow, which cannot be reasonably approximated using a d-1 dimensional representation. We further present a numerical algorithm using adaptive dimensional representation.

  12. Ground-based PIV and numerical flow visualization results from the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Werner, Mark P.; Hsieh, Kwang-Chung

    1991-01-01

    The Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment (STDCE) is a Space Transportation System flight experiment to study both transient and steady thermocapillary fluid flows aboard the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) Spacelab mission planned for June, 1992. One of the components of data collected during the experiment is a video record of the flow field. This qualitative data is then quantified using an all electric, two dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique called Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT), which uses a simple space domain particle tracking algorithm. Results using the ground based STDCE hardware, with a radiant flux heating mode, and the PDT system are compared to numerical solutions obtained by solving the axisymmetric Navier Stokes equations with a deformable free surface. The PDT technique is successful in producing a velocity vector field and corresponding stream function from the raw video data which satisfactorily represents the physical flow. A numerical program is used to compute the velocity field and corresponding stream function under identical conditions. Both the PDT system and numerical results were compared to a streak photograph, used as a benchmark, with good correlation.

  13. Hybrid lattice Boltzmann finite difference simulation of mixed convection flows in a lid-driven square cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettaibi, Soufiene, E-mail: Bettaibisoufiene@gmail.com [UR: Rayonnement Thermique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Kuznik, Frédéric [INSA-Lyon, CETHIL, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Université de Lyon, CNRS, UMR5008, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Sediki, Ezeddine [UR: Rayonnement Thermique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Université de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2014-06-27

    Highlights: • Mixed convection heat transfer in 2D lid-driven cavity is studied numerically. • Hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method is used to obtain the velocity field. • Finite difference method is used to compute the temperature. • Effect of both Richardson and Reynolds numbers for mixed convection is studied. - Abstract: Mixed convection heat transfer in two-dimensional lid-driven rectangular cavity filled with air (Pr=0.71) is studied numerically. A hybrid scheme with multiple relaxation time lattice Boltzmann method (MRT-LBM) is used to obtain the velocity field while the temperature field is deduced from energy balance equation by using the finite difference method (FDM). The main objective of this work is to investigate the model effectiveness for mixed convection flow simulation. Results are presented in terms of streamlines, isotherms and Nusselt numbers. Excellent agreement is obtained between our results and previous works. The different comparisons demonstrate the robustness and the accuracy of our proposed approach.

  14. Homogeneous internal wave turbulence driven by tidal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Reun, Thomas; Favier, Benjamin; Le Bars, Michael; Erc Fludyco Team

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel investigation of the stability of strongly stratified planetary fluid layers undergoing periodic tidal distortion in the limit where rotational effects are negligible compared to buoyancy. With the help of a local model focusing on a small fluid area compared to the global layer, we find that periodic tidal distortion drives a parametric subharmonic resonance of internal. This instability saturates into an homogeneous internal wave turbulence pervading the whole fluid interior: the energy is injected in the unstable waves which then feed a succession of triadic resonances also generating small spatial scales. As the timescale separation between the forcing and Brunt-Väisälä is increased, the temporal spectrum of this turbulence displays a -2 power law reminiscent of the Garrett and Munk spectrum measured in the oceans (Garett & Munk 1979). Moreover, in this state consisting of a superposition of waves in weak non-linear interaction, the mixing efficiency is increased compared to classical, Kolmogorov-like stratified turbulence. This study is of wide interest in geophysical fluid dynamics ranging from oceanic turbulence and tidal heating in icy satellites to dynamo action in partially stratified planetary cores as it could be the case in the Earth. We acknowledge support from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (Grant Agreement No. 681835-FLUDYCO-ERC-2015-CoG).

  15. "'Sink or Swim': Buoyancy and Coping in the Cognitive Test Anxiety--Academic Performance Relationship"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, David W.; Daly, Anthony L.; Chamberlain, Suzanne; Sadreddini, Shireen

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between students' self-report levels of cognitive test anxiety (worry), academic buoyancy (withstanding and successfully responding to routine school challenges and setbacks), coping processes and their achieved grades in high-stakes national examinations at the end of compulsory schooling. The sample comprised…

  16. Cold Front Driven Flows Through Multiple Inlets of Lake Pontchartrain Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Chunyan

    2017-11-01

    With in situ observations using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) and numerical experiments using the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM), this study investigates atmospheric cold front induced exchange of water between Lake Pontchartrain Estuary and coastal ocean through multiple inlets. Results show that the subtidal hydrodynamic response is highly correlated with meteorological parameters. Northerly and westerly winds tend to push water out of Lake Pontchartrain, while south and east winds tend to produce currents flowing into it. For most cases, the subtidal water level is inversely correlated with the east wind, with the correlation coefficient being ˜0.8. The most important finding of this work is that, contrary to intuition, the cold front induced remote wind effect has the greatest contribution to the overall water level variation, while the local wind stress determines the surface slope inside the estuary. It is found that wind driven flow is roughly quasi steady state: the surface slope in the north-south direction is determined by the north-south wind stress, explaining ˜83% of the variability but less so in the east-west direction (˜43%). In other words, the north-south local wind stress determines the water level gradient in that direction in the estuary while the overall water level change is pretty much controlled by the open boundary which is the "remote wind effect," a regional response that can be illustrated only by a numerical model for a much larger area encompassing the estuary.

  17. Buoyancy Limitation of Filamentous Cyanobacteria under Prolonged Pressure due to the Gas Vesicles Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeynayaka, Helayaye Damitha Lakmali; Asaeda, Takashi; Kaneko, Yasuko

    2017-08-01

    Freshwater cyanobacterium Pseudanabaena galeata were cultured in chambers under artificially generated pressures, which correspond to the hydrostatic pressures at deep water. Variations occurred in gas vesicles volume, and buoyancy state of cells under those conditions were analyzed at different time intervals (5 min, 1 day, and 5 days). Variations in gas vesicles morphology of cells were observed by transmission electron microscopy images. Settling velocity (Vs) of cells which governs the buoyancy was observed with the aid of a modified optical microscope. Moreover, effects of the prolonged pressure on cell ballast composition (protein and polysaccharides) were examined. Elevated pressure conditions reduced the cell ballast and caused a complete disappearance of gas vesicles in Pseudanabaena galeata cells. Hence cyanobacteria cells were not able to float within the study period. Observations and findings of the study indicate the potential application of hydrostatic pressure, which naturally occurred in hypolimnion of lakes, to inhibit the re-suspension of cyanobacteria cells.

  18. Probing student reasoning approaches through the lens of dual-process theories: A case study in buoyancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gette, Cody R.; Kryjevskaia, Mila; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; Heron, Paula R. L.

    2018-06-01

    A growing body of scholarly work indicates that student performance on physics problems stems from many factors, including relevant conceptual understanding. However, in contexts in which significant conceptual difficulties have been documented via research, it can be difficult to pinpoint and isolate such factors because students' written and interview responses rarely reveal the full richness of their conscious and, perhaps more importantly, subconscious reasoning paths. In this investigation, informed by dual-process theories of reasoning and decision making as well as the theoretical construct of accessibility, we conducted a series of experiments in order to gain greater insight into the factors impacting student performance on the "five-block problem," which has been used in the literature to probe student thinking about buoyancy. In particular, we examined both the impact of problem design (including salient features and cueing) and the impact of targeted instruction focused on density-based arguments for sinking and floating and on neutral buoyancy. The investigation found that instructional modifications designed to remove the strong intuitive appeal of the first-available response led to significantly improved performance, without improving student conceptual understanding of the requisite buoyancy concepts. As such, our findings represent an important first step in identifying systematic strategies for using theories from cognitive science to guide the development and refinement of research-based instructional materials.

  19. Probing student reasoning approaches through the lens of dual-process theories: A case study in buoyancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody R. Gette

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of scholarly work indicates that student performance on physics problems stems from many factors, including relevant conceptual understanding. However, in contexts in which significant conceptual difficulties have been documented via research, it can be difficult to pinpoint and isolate such factors because students’ written and interview responses rarely reveal the full richness of their conscious and, perhaps more importantly, subconscious reasoning paths. In this investigation, informed by dual-process theories of reasoning and decision making as well as the theoretical construct of accessibility, we conducted a series of experiments in order to gain greater insight into the factors impacting student performance on the “five-block problem,” which has been used in the literature to probe student thinking about buoyancy. In particular, we examined both the impact of problem design (including salient features and cueing and the impact of targeted instruction focused on density-based arguments for sinking and floating and on neutral buoyancy. The investigation found that instructional modifications designed to remove the strong intuitive appeal of the first-available response led to significantly improved performance, without improving student conceptual understanding of the requisite buoyancy concepts. As such, our findings represent an important first step in identifying systematic strategies for using theories from cognitive science to guide the development and refinement of research-based instructional materials.

  20. A comparative study of the lattice Boltzmann and volume of fluid method for the rising bubble flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seung Yeob; Park, Cheon Tae; Choi, Suhn [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Recently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has gained much attention for its ability to simulate fluid flows, and for its potential advantages over a conventional CFD method. The key advantages of LBM are, (1) suitability for parallel computations, (2) absence of the need to solve the time-consuming Poisson equation for a pressure, and (3) an ease with the way multiphase flows, complex geometries and interfacial dynamics may be treated. Nevertheless, the LBM is considered as a mere alternative CFD tools, not a promising approach. The motion of the bubbles in a liquid has been the focus of both academic and practical interest. The central problem is the relationship between the rise velocity, bubble shape due to the interface deformation and flow field. The buoyancy effect due to density difference in the two phase flows is characterized with Eotvos and Morton numbers. In this study, a single bubble rising under a buoyancy is simulated with LBM and VOF based on conventional CFD method. The two simulation results are compared with the previous experiments. The main objective of the present work is to establish the lattice Boltzmann method as a viable tool for the simulation of multiphase or multi-component flows

  1. A comparative study of the lattice Boltzmann and volume of fluid method for the rising bubble flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Seung Yeob; Park, Cheon Tae; Choi, Suhn

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has gained much attention for its ability to simulate fluid flows, and for its potential advantages over a conventional CFD method. The key advantages of LBM are, (1) suitability for parallel computations, (2) absence of the need to solve the time-consuming Poisson equation for a pressure, and (3) an ease with the way multiphase flows, complex geometries and interfacial dynamics may be treated. Nevertheless, the LBM is considered as a mere alternative CFD tools, not a promising approach. The motion of the bubbles in a liquid has been the focus of both academic and practical interest. The central problem is the relationship between the rise velocity, bubble shape due to the interface deformation and flow field. The buoyancy effect due to density difference in the two phase flows is characterized with Eotvos and Morton numbers. In this study, a single bubble rising under a buoyancy is simulated with LBM and VOF based on conventional CFD method. The two simulation results are compared with the previous experiments. The main objective of the present work is to establish the lattice Boltzmann method as a viable tool for the simulation of multiphase or multi-component flows

  2. Flow characteristics in occupied zone – An experimental study with symmetrically located thermal plumes and low-momentum diffuse ceiling air distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lestinen, Sami; Kilpeläinen, Simo; Kosonen, Risto

    2018-01-01

    and turbulent mixing that can further yield a draught discomfort in an occupied zone. The main objective was to investigate large-scale airflow patterns and fluctuations as a result of interaction of buoyancy flows and diffuse ceiling flow. Experiments were performed in a test room of 5.5 m (length) x 3.8 m...

  3. The Effect of Surface Tension on the Gravity-driven Thin Film Flow of Newtonian and Power-law Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bin; Kieweg, Sarah L.

    2012-01-01

    Gravity-driven thin film flow is of importance in many fields, as well as for the design of polymeric drug delivery vehicles, such as anti-HIV topical microbicides. There have been many prior works on gravity-driven thin films. However, the incorporation of surface tension effect has not been well studied for non-Newtonian fluids. After surface tension effect was incorporated into our 2D (i.e. 1D spreading) power-law model, we found that surface tension effect not only impacted the spreading speed of the microbicide gel, but also had an influence on the shape of the 2D spreading profile. We observed a capillary ridge at the front of the fluid bolus. Previous literature shows that the emergence of a capillary ridge is strongly related to the contact line fingering instability. Fingering instabilities during epithelial coating may change the microbicide gel distribution and therefore impact how well it can protect the epithelium. In this study, we focused on the capillary ridge in 2D flow and performed a series of simulations and showed how the capillary ridge height varies with other parameters, such as surface tension coefficient, inclination angle, initial thickness, and power-law parameters. As shown in our results, we found that capillary ridge height increased with higher surface tension, steeper inclination angle, bigger initial thickness, and more Newtonian fluids. This study provides the initial insights of how to optimize the flow and prevent the appearance of a capillary ridge and fingering instability. PMID:23687391

  4. Three Dimensional Dynamics of Freshwater Lenses in the Oceans Near Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-14

    surfactants and implications for gas exchange : Part II. Numerical simulations. Pp. 299–312 in Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces. Kyoto University... water mass exchange by horizontal advection and enhanced vertical mixing. As buoyancy- driven flows, they are a type of organized structure that...we investigated the case of a fresh- water plume interacting with wind stress in a nonstratified environment. In order to produce a realistic aque

  5. Thermal convection in a toroidal duct of a liquid metal blanket. Part II. Effect of axial mean flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan, E-mail: xuanz@umich.edu; Zikanov, Oleg

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • 2D convection flow develops with internal heating and strong axial magnetic field. • The flow is strongly modified by the buoyancy force associated with growing T{sub m}. • Thermal convection is suppressed at high Gr. • High temperature difference between top and bottom walls is expected at high Gr. - Abstract: The work continues the exploration of the effect of thermal convection on flows in toroidal ducts of a liquid metal blanket. This time we consider the effect of the mean flow along the duct and of the associated heat transfer diverting the heat deposited by captured neutrons. Numerical simulations are conducted for a model system with two-dimensional (streamwise-uniform) fully developed flow, purely toroidal magnetic field, and perfectly electrically and thermally insulating walls. Realistically high Grashof (up to 10{sup 11}) and Reynolds (up to 10{sup 6}) numbers are used. It is found that the flow develops thermal convection in the transverse plane at moderate Grashof numbers. At large Grashof numbers, the flow is dominated by the top-bottom asymmetry of the streamwise velocity and stable stratification of temperature, which are caused by the buoyancy force due to the mean temperature growing along the duct. This leads to suppression of thermal convection, weak mixing, and substantial gradients of wall temperature. Further analysis based on more realistic models is suggested.

  6. Regional regression models of percentile flows for the contiguous United States: Expert versus data-driven independent variable selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Fouad

    2018-06-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: A set of three variables selected based on an expert assessment of factors that influence percentile flows performed similarly to larger sets of variables selected using a data-driven method. Expert assessment variables included mean annual precipitation, potential evapotranspiration, and baseflow index. Larger sets of up to 37 variables contributed little, if any, additional predictive information. Variables used to describe the distribution of basin data (e.g. standard deviation were not useful, and average values were sufficient to characterize physical and climatic basin conditions. Effectiveness of the expert assessment variables may be due to the high degree of multicollinearity (i.e. cross-correlation among additional variables. A tool is provided in the Supplementary material to predict percentile flows based on the three expert assessment variables. Future work should develop new variables with a strong understanding of the processes related to percentile flows.

  7. Laminar mixed convection heat transfer in a vertical circular tube under buoyancy-assisted and opposed flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Hussein A.

    2008-01-01

    Laminar mixed convection heat transfer for assisted and opposed air flows in the entrance region of a vertical circular tube with the using of a uniform wall heat flux boundary condition has been experimentally investigated. The experimental setup was designed for determining the effect of flow direction and the effect of tube inclination on the surface temperature, local and average Nusselt numbers with Reynolds number ranged from 400 to 1600 and Grashof number from 2.0 x 10 5 to 6.2 x 10 6 . It was found that the circumferential surface temperature along the dimensionless tube length for opposed flow would be higher than that both of assisted flow and horizontal tube [Mohammed HA, Salman YK. Experimental investigation of combined convection heat transfer for thermally developing flow in a horizontal circular cylinder. Appl Therm Eng 2007;27(8-9):1522-33] due to the stronger free convective currents within the cross-section. The Nusselt number values would be lower for opposed flow than that for assisted flow. It was inferred that the behaviour of Nu x for opposed flow to be strongly dependent on the combination of Re and Gr numbers. Empirical equations expressing the average Nusselt numbers in terms of Grashof and Reynolds numbers were proposed for both assisted and opposed flow cases. The average heat transfer results were compared with previous literature and showed similar trend and satisfactory agreement

  8. Two problems in multiphase biological flows: Blood flow and particulate transport in microvascular network, and pseudopod-driven motility of amoeboid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-11-01

    In this talk, two problems in multiphase biological flows will be discussed. The first is the direct numerical simulation of whole blood and drug particulates in microvascular networks. Blood in microcirculation behaves as a dense suspension of heterogeneous cells. The erythrocytes are extremely deformable, while inactivated platelets and leukocytes are nearly rigid. A significant progress has been made in recent years in modeling blood as a dense cellular suspension. However, many of these studies considered the blood flow in simple geometry, e.g., straight tubes of uniform cross-section. In contrast, the architecture of a microvascular network is very complex with bifurcating, merging and winding vessels, posing a further challenge to numerical modeling. We have developed an immersed-boundary-based method that can consider blood cell flow in physiologically realistic and complex microvascular network. In addition to addressing many physiological issues related to network hemodynamics, this tool can be used to optimize the transport properties of drug particulates for effective organ-specific delivery. Our second problem is pseudopod-driven motility as often observed in metastatic cancer cells and other amoeboid cells. We have developed a multiscale hydrodynamic model to simulate such motility. We study the effect of cell stiffness on motility as the former has been considered as a biomarker for metastatic potential. Funded by the National Science Foundation.

  9. Effects of salinity and sea salt type on egg activation, fertilization, buoyancy and early embryology of European eel, Anguilla anguilla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sune Riis; Butts, Ian; Munk, Peter

    2016-01-01

    sizes, while the remaining four salt types resulted in smaller eggs. All salt types except NaCl treatments led to high fertilization rates and had no effect on fertilization success as well as egg neutral buoyancies at 7 h post-fertilization. The study points to the importance of considering ionic...... and egg buoyancy. Egg diameter after activation, using natural seawater adjusted to different salinities, varied among female eels, but no consistent pattern emerged. Activation salinities between 30–40 practical salinity unit (psu) produced higher quality eggs and generally larger egg diameters. Chorion...

  10. The fluid mechanics of natural ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Natural ventilation of buildings is the flow generated by temperature differences and by the wind. Modern buildings have extreme designs with large, tall open plan spaces and large cooling requirements. Natural ventilation offers a means of cooling these buildings and providing good indoor air quality. The essential feature of ventilation is an exchange between an interior space and the external ambient. Recent work shows that in many circumstances temperature variations play a controlling feature on the ventilation since the directional buoyancy force has a large influence on the flow patterns within the space and on the nature of the exchange with the outside. Two forms of buoyancy-driven ventilation are discussed: mixing ventilation in which the interior is at approximately uniform temperature and displacement ventilation where there is strong internal stratification. The dynamics of these flows are considered and the effects of wind on them are examined both experimentally and theoretically. The aim behind this work is to give designers rules and intuition on how air moves within a building and the research shows a fascinating branch of fluid mechanics.

  11. Current delivery and radiation yield in plasma flow switch-driven implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.L.; Degnan, J.H.; Beason, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum inductive-store, plasma flow switch-driven implosion experiments have been performed using the Shiva Star capacitor bank (1300 μf, 3 nH, 120 kV, 9.4 MJ). A coaxial plasma gun arrangement is employed to store magnetic energy in the vacuum volume upstream of a dynamic discharge during the 3- to 4-μs rise of current from the capacitor bank. Motion of the discharge off the end of the inner conductor of the gun releases this energy to implode a coaxial cylindrical foil. The implosion loads are 5-cm-radius, 2-cm-long, 200 to 400 μg/cm 2 cylinders of aluminum or aluminized Formvar. With 5 MJ stored initially in the capacitor bank, more than 9 MA are delivered to the implosion load with a rise time of nearly 200 ns. The subsequent implosion results in a radiation output of 0.95 MJ at a power exceeding 5 TW (assuming isotropic emission). Experimental results and related two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations are discussed. 10 refs., 12 figs

  12. Modeling the Buoyancy System of a Wave Energy Power Plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom S.; Nielsen, Kirsten M.

    2009-01-01

    A nonlinear dynamic model of the buoyancy system in a wave energy power plant is presented. The plant ("Wave Dragon") is a floating device using the potential energy in overtopping waves to produce power. A water reservoir is placed on top of the WD, and hydro turbines lead the water to the sea...... producing electrical power. Through air chambers it is possible to control the level of the WD. It is important to control the level in order to maximize the power production in proportion to the wave height, here the amount of overtopping water and the amount of potential energy is conflicting...

  13. Mixed convection-radiation interaction in boundary-layer flow over horizontal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, F. S.; Hady, F. M.

    1990-06-01

    The effect of buoyancy forces and thermal radiation on the steady laminar plane flow over an isothermal horizontal flat plate is investigated within the framework of first-order boundary-layer theory, taking into account the hydrostatic pressure variation normal to the plate. The fluid considered is a gray, absorbing-emitting but nonscattering medium, and the Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. Both a hot surface facing upward and a cold surface facing downward are considered in the analysis. Numerical results for the local Nusselt number, the local wall shear stress, the local surface heat flux, as well as the velocity and temperature distributions are presented for gases with a Prandtl number of 0.7 for various values of the radiation-conduction parameter, the buoyancy parameter, and the temperature ratio parameter.

  14. On the modelling of turbulent heat and mass transfer for the computation of buoyancy affected flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viollet, P.-L.

    1981-02-01

    The k - epsilon eddy viscosity turbulence model is applied to simple test cases of buoyant flows. Vertical as horizontal stable flows are nearly well represented by the computation, and in unstable flows the mixing is underpredicted. The general agreement is good enough for allowing application to thermal-fluid engineering problems

  15. Partitioning dynamics of unsaturated flows in fractured porous media: Laboratory studies and three-dimensional multi-scale smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of gravity-driven flow in fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, J.; Bresinsky, L. T.; Shigorina, E.; Noffz, T.; Dentz, M.; Sauter, M.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Preferential flow dynamics in unsaturated fractures remain a challenging topic on various scales. On pore- and fracture-scales the highly erratic gravity-driven flow dynamics often provoke a strong deviation from classical volume-effective approaches. Against the common notion that flow in fractures (or macropores) can only occur under equilibrium conditions, i.e., if the surrounding porous matrix is fully saturated and capillary pressures are high enough to allow filling of the fracture void space, arrival times suggest the existence of rapid preferential flow along fractures, fracture networks, and fault zones, even if the matrix is not fully saturated. Modeling such flows requires efficient numerical techniques to cover various flow-relevant physics, such as surface tension, static and dynamic contact angles, free-surface (multi-phase) interface dynamics, and formation of singularities. Here we demonstrate the importance of such flow modes on the partitioning dynamics at simple fracture intersections, with a combination of laboratory experiments, analytical solutions and numerical simulations using our newly developed massively parallel smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. Flow modes heavily influence the "bypass" behavior of water flowing along a fracture junction. Flows favoring the formation of droplets exhibit a much stronger bypass capacity compared to rivulet flows, where nearly the whole fluid mass is initially stored within the horizontal fracture. This behavior is demonstrated for a multi-inlet laboratory setup where the inlet-specific flow rate is chosen so that either a droplet or rivulet flow persists. The effect of fluid buffering within the horizontal fracture is presented in terms of dimensionless fracture inflow so that characteristic scaling regimes can be recovered. For both cases (rivulets and droplets), flow within the horizontal fracture transitions into a Washburn regime until a critical threshold is reached and the bypass efficiency

  16. Wave-driven countercurrent plasma centrifuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterman, Abraham J; Fisch, Nathaniel J [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the {alpha} channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  17. Wave-driven countercurrent plasma centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, Abraham J; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2009-01-01

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  18. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterman, A.J.; Fisch, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided

  19. Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

  20. Visualization periodic flows in a continuously stratified fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakov, R.; Vasiliev, A.

    2012-04-01

    To visualize the flow pattern of viscous continuously stratified fluid both experimental and computational methods were developed. Computational procedures were based on exact solutions of set of the fundamental equations. Solutions of the problems of flows producing by periodically oscillating disk (linear and torsion oscillations) were visualized with a high resolutions to distinguish small-scale the singular components on the background of strong internal waves. Numerical algorithm of visualization allows to represent both the scalar and vector fields, such as velocity, density, pressure, vorticity, stream function. The size of the source, buoyancy and oscillation frequency, kinematic viscosity of the medium effects were traced in 2D an 3D posing problems. Precision schlieren instrument was used to visualize the flow pattern produced by linear and torsion oscillations of strip and disk in a continuously stratified fluid. Uniform stratification was created by the continuous displacement method. The buoyancy period ranged from 7.5 to 14 s. In the experiments disks with diameters from 9 to 30 cm and a thickness of 1 mm to 10 mm were used. Different schlieren methods that are conventional vertical slit - Foucault knife, vertical slit - filament (Maksoutov's method) and horizontal slit - horizontal grating (natural "rainbow" schlieren method) help to produce supplementing flow patterns. Both internal wave beams and fine flow components were visualized in vicinity and far from the source. Intensity of high gradient envelopes increased proportionally the amplitude of the source. In domains of envelopes convergence isolated small scale vortices and extended mushroom like jets were formed. Experiments have shown that in the case of torsion oscillations pattern of currents is more complicated than in case of forced linear oscillations. Comparison with known theoretical model shows that nonlinear interactions between the regular and singular flow components must be taken

  1. Simulation of wind-driven dispersion of fire pollutants in a street canyon using FDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesic, Dusica J; Blagojevic, Milan Dj; Zivkovic, Nenad V

    2014-01-01

    Air quality in urban areas attracts great attention due to increasing pollutant emissions and their negative effects on human health and environment. Numerous studies, such as those by Mouilleau and Champassith (J Loss Prevent Proc 22(3): 316-323, 2009), Xie et al. (J Hydrodyn 21(1): 108-117, 2009), and Yassin (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20(6): 3975-3988, 2013) focus on the air pollutant dispersion with no buoyancy effect or weak buoyancy effect. A few studies, such as those by Hu et al. (J Hazard Mater 166(1): 394-406, 2009; J Hazard Mater 192(3): 940-948, 2011; J Civ Eng Manag (2013)) focus on the fire-induced dispersion of pollutants with heat buoyancy release rate in the range from 0.5 to 20 MW. However, the air pollution source might very often be concentrated and intensive, as a consequence of the hazardous materials fire. Namely, transportation of fuel through urban areas occurs regularly, because it is often impossible to find alternative supply routes. It is accompanied with the risk of fire accident occurrences. Accident prevention strategies require analysis of the worst scenarios in which fire products jeopardize the exposed population and environment. The aim of this article is to analyze the impact of wind flow on air pollution and human vulnerability to fire products in a street canyon. For simulation of the gasoline tanker truck fire as a result of a multivehicle accident, computational fluid dynamics large eddy simulation method has been used. Numerical results show that the fire products flow vertically upward, without touching the walls of the buildings in the absence of wind. However, when the wind velocity reaches the critical value, the products touch the walls of the buildings on both sides of the street canyon. The concentrations of carbon monoxide and soot decrease, whereas carbon dioxide concentration increases with the rise of height above the street canyon ground level. The longitudinal concentration of the pollutants inside the street

  2. The role of meridional density differences for a wind-driven overturning circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schewe, J.; Levermann, A. [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Earth System Analysis, Potsdam (Germany); Potsdam University, Physics Institute, Potsdam (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Experiments with the coupled climate model CLIMBER-3{alpha}, which contains an oceanic general circulation model, show deep upwelling in the Southern Ocean to be proportional to the surface wind stress in the latitudinal band of Drake Passage. At the same time, the distribution of the Southern Ocean upwelling onto the oceanic basins is controlled by buoyancy distribution; the inflow into each basin being proportional to the respective meridional density difference. We observe approximately the same constant of proportionality for all basins, and demonstrate that it can be directly related to the flow geometry. For increased wind stress in the Southern Ocean, the overturning increases both in the Atlantic and the Indo-Pacific basin. For strongly reduced wind stress, the circulation enters a regime where Atlantic overturning is maintained through Pacific upwelling, in order to satisfy the transports set by the density differences. Previous results on surface buoyancy and wind stress forcing, obtained with different models, are reproduced within one model in order to distill a consistent picture. We propose that both Southern Ocean upwelling and meridional density differences set up a system of conditions that determine the global meridional overturning circulation. (orig.)

  3. An investigation of the constitutive relations for intersubchannel transfer mechanisms in horizontal flows as applied in the ASSERT-4 subchannel code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tye, P.; Teyssedou, A.; Tapucu, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, the influence that the constitutive relations used to represent some of the intersubchannel transfer mechanisms has on the predictions of the ASSERT-4 subchannel code for horizontal flows is examined. In particular the choices made in the representation of the gravity driven phase separation phenomena are analyzed. This is done by comparing the predictions of the ASSERT subchannel code with experimental data on void fraction and mass flow rate, obtained for two horizontal interconnected subchannels. ASSERT uses a drift flux model which allows the two phases to have different velocities. In particular ASSERT contains models for the buoyancy effects which cause phase separation between adjacent subchannels in horizontal flows. This feature, which is of great importance in the subchannel analysis of CANDU reactors, is implemented in the constitutive relationship for the relative velocity. In order to isolate different intersubchannel transfer mechanisms, three different subchannel orientations are analyzed. These are the two subchannels at the same elevation, the high void subchannel below the low void subchannel, and the high void subchannel above the low void subchannel. It is observed that for all three subchannel orientations ASSERT does a reasonably good job of predicting the experimental trends. However, certain modifications to the representation of the gravitational phase separation effects which seem to improve the overall predictions are suggested. ((orig.))

  4. Buoyancy Effect of Ionic Vacancy on the Change of the Partial Molar Volume in Ferricyanide-Ferrocyanide Redox Reaction under a Vertical Gravity Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Oshikiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With a gravity electrode (GE in a vertical gravity field, the buoyancy effect of ionic vacancy on the change of the partial molar volume in the redox reaction between ferricyanide (FERRI and ferrocyanide (FERRO ions was examined. The buoyancy force of ionic vacancy takes a positive or negative value, depending on whether the rate-determining step is the production or extinction of the vacancy. Though the upward convection over an upward electrode in the FERRO ion oxidation suggests the contribution of the positive buoyancy force arising from the vacancy production, the partial molar volume of the vacancy was not measured. On the other hand, for the downward convection under a downward electrode in the FERRI ion reduction, it was not completely but partly measured by the contribution of the negative buoyancy force from the vacancy extinction. Since the lifetime of the vacancy is decreased by the collision between ionic vacancies during the convection, the former result was ascribed to the shortened lifetime due to the increasing collision efficiency in the enhanced upward convection over an upward electrode, whereas the latter was thought to arise from the elongated lifetime due to the decreasing collision efficiency by the stagnation under the downward electrode.

  5. An evaluation of a hubless inducer and a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, B. K.; Martinson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of several configurations of hubless inducers with a hydrodynamically similar conventional inducer and to demonstrate the performance of a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump using these inducers. A boost pump of this type consists of an inducer connected to a hydraulic turbine with a high speed rotor located in between. All the flow passes through the inducer, rotor, and hydraulic turbine, then into the main pump. The rotor, which is attached to the main pump shaft, provides the input power to drive the hydraulic turbine which, in turn, drives the inducer. The inducer, rotating at a lower speed, develops the necessary head to prevent rotor cavitation. The rotor speed is consistent with present main engine liquid hydrogen pump designs and the overall boost pump head rise is sufficient to provide adequate main pump suction head. This system would have the potential for operating at lower liquid hydrogen tank pressures.

  6. Neutral buoyancy testing of architectural and environmental concepts of space vehicle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenda, J. A.; Rosener, A. A.; Stephenson, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Design guidelines are presented that are applicable to providing habitability areas and furniture elements for extended periods in a zero gravity environment. This was accomplished by: (1) analyzing the existing habitability crew area requirements, mobility and restraint aids, cross-cultural design, and establishing a man model for zero gravity; (2) designing specific furniture elements, chair and table, and volumes for a stateroom, office, bathroom, galley, and wardroom; and (3) neutral buoyancy testing and evaluation of these areas.

  7. Radiation yield from SHIVA Star plasma flow switch driven fast liner implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degnan, J.H.; Baker, W.L.; Beason, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    A 2.5 Terawatt 0.5 MJ isotropic equivalent radiation yield was obtained in a SHIVA Star plasma flow switch driven fast liner implosion. The 1313 μF 80 kV discharge delivered 13 MA to a coaxial vacuum inductive store with a plasma armature. Over 9.4 MA current was plasma flow switched to the implosion load (>90% of the gun muzzle current at that time). The load wa a 5 cm radius, 2 cm tall, 200 μg/cm/sup 2/ aluminum plated Formvar cylindrical foil. The radiation pulse was measured with an array of seven X-ray diodes (XRDs). The XRDs all had aluminum photocathodes, a variety of filters and nickel mesh to reduce the incident X-ray photon flux to avoid Child-Langmuir saturation. The filters were chosen so that the authors had seven different diode response functions covering the energy range from 15 eV to about 3 keV. The filters were mounted remote (about 30 cm) from the XRDs. The anode mesh served as part of the mesh array. The distance between meshes was greater than 10 cm. Each XRD had a 5 cm diameter cathode with an aperture limited to a 2 cm diameter. The XRD anode-cathode gap was 1 cm and the bias was 5 kV. The theoretical Child-Langmuir saturation signal was 125 V with 50 Ω termination. The maximum observed signal was 75 V

  8. A Microwave Driven Ion Source for Continuous-Flow AMS (Abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wills, J.; Schneider, R.J.; Reden, K.F. von; Hayes, J.M.; Roberts, M.L.; Benthien, A.

    2005-01-01

    A microwave-driven, gas-fed ion source originally developed as a high-current positive ion injector for a Tandem accelerator at Chalk River has been the subject of a three-year development program at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution NOSAMS facility. Off-line tests have demonstrated positive carbon currents of 1 mA and negative carbon currents of 80 μA from CO2 gas feed. This source and a magnesium charge-exchange canal were coupled to the recombinator of the NOSAMS Tandetron for on-line tests, with the source fed with reference gasses and a combustion device.The promising results obtained have prompted the redesign of the microwave source for use as an on-line, continuous-flow injector for a new AMS facility under construction at NOSAMS. The new design is optimized for best transmission of the extracted positive-ion beam through the charge-exchange canal and for reliable operation at 40 kV extraction voltage. Other goals of the re-design include improved lifetime of the microwave window and the elimination of dead volumes in the plasma generator that increase sample hold-up time.This talk will include a summary of results obtained to date at NOSAMS with the Chalk River source and a detailed description of the new design

  9. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers encompassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundary conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  10. Behavior of neutral solutes in pressurized flow driven electrochromatography using a mixed stationary phase of ODS and anion-exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Shinya; Tsuda, Takao

    2003-05-02

    The behavior of neutral sample solutes in pressurized flow driven electrochromatography using a mixed stationary phase, which consisted of ODS and anion-exchange (ODS-SAX), was studied. Applications of both positive and negative voltage on a column induced increases in retention factors of sample solutes. The direction of an electroosmotic flow under applications of positive and negative voltage were the same, therefore, the sign of the surface charge density under positive and negative voltage was opposite. We proposed a new equation for the relationship between applied voltage and surface charge density, and the practical electroosmotic flow conformed to this equation. Studying the electroosmotic flow using our proposed equation revealed that the applied negative voltage accelerates the protonation of the quaternary ammonium group and dissociation of the silanol group on packing materials. The retention behavior of a neutral solute was affected by the existence of the charged functional groups. We propose that this phenomenon is applicable to the control of the retention behavior of a sample solute using an electric field.

  11. Design of pressure-driven microfluidic networks using electric circuit analogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Kwang W; Lee, Kangsun; Ahn, Byungwook; Furlani, Edward P

    2012-02-07

    This article reviews the application of electric circuit methods for the analysis of pressure-driven microfluidic networks with an emphasis on concentration- and flow-dependent systems. The application of circuit methods to microfluidics is based on the analogous behaviour of hydraulic and electric circuits with correlations of pressure to voltage, volumetric flow rate to current, and hydraulic to electric resistance. Circuit analysis enables rapid predictions of pressure-driven laminar flow in microchannels and is very useful for designing complex microfluidic networks in advance of fabrication. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the physics of pressure-driven laminar flow, the formal analogy between electric and hydraulic circuits, applications of circuit theory to microfluidic network-based devices, recent development and applications of concentration- and flow-dependent microfluidic networks, and promising future applications. The lab-on-a-chip (LOC) and microfluidics community will gain insightful ideas and practical design strategies for developing unique microfluidic network-based devices to address a broad range of biological, chemical, pharmaceutical, and other scientific and technical challenges.

  12. Statistical Change Detection for Diagnosis of Buoyancy Element Defects on Moored Floating Vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanke, Mogens; Fang, Shaoji; Galeazzi, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    . After residual generation, statistical change detection scheme is derived from mathematical models supported by experimental data. To experimentally verify loss of an underwater buoyancy element, an underwater line breaker is designed to create realistic replication of abrupt faults. The paper analyses...... the properties of residuals and suggests a dedicated GLRT change detector based on a vector residual. Special attention is paid to threshold selection for non ideal (non-IID) test statistics....

  13. On the use of the stabilised Q1P0 element for geodynamical simulations and why this is a bad choice for buyoancy-driven flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieulot, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Many Finite Element geodynamical codes (Fullsack,1995; Zhong et al., 2000; Thieulot, 2011) are based on bi/tri­-linear velocity constant pressure element (commonly called Q1P0), because of its ease of programming and rather low memory footprint, despite the presence of (pressure) checker­board modes. However, it is long known that the Q1P0 is not inf­-sup stable and does not lend itself to the use of iterative solvers, which makes it a less­ than­ ideal candidate for high resolution 3D models. Other attempts were made more recently (Burstedde et al., 2013; Le Pourhiet et al., 2012) with the use of the stabilised Q1Q1 element (bi/tri­-linear velocity and pressure). This element, while also attractive from an implementation and memory standpoint, suffers a major drawback due to the artificial compressibility introduced by the polynomial projection stabilization. These observations have shifted part of the community towards the Finite Difference Method while the remaining part is now embracing inf­sup stable second­ order elements [May et al., 2015; Kronbichler,2012). Rather surprinsingly, a third option exists when it comes to first ­order elements in the form of the stabilised Q1P0 element, but virtually no literature exists concerning its use for geodynamical applications. I will then recall the specificity of the stabilisation and will carry out a series of benchmark experiments and geodynamical tests to assess its performance. While being shown to work as expected in benchmark experiments, the stabilised Q1P0 element turns out to introduce first-order numerical artefacts in the velocity and pressure solutions in the case of buoyancy-driven flows. Burstedde, C., Stadler, G., Alisic, L., Wilcox, L. C., Tan, E., Gurnis, M., & Ghattas, O. (2013). Large­scale adaptive mantle convection simulation. Geophysical Journal International, 192(3), 889­906. Fullsack, P. (1995). An arbitrary Lagrangian­Eulerian formulation for creeping flows and its application in

  14. Transmutation of fission products in reactors and accelerator-driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Energy flows and mass flows in several scenarios are considered. Economical and safety aspects of the transmutation scenarios are compared. It is difficult to find a sound motivation for the transmutation of fission products with accelerator-driven systems. If there would be any hesitation in transmuting fission products in nuclear reactors, there would be an even stronger hesitation to use accelerator-driven systems, mainly because of their lower energy efficiency and their poor cost effectiveness. The use of accelerator-driven systems could become a 'meaningful' option only if nuclear energy would be banished completely. (orig./HP)

  15. Preliminary experimentally-validated forced and mixed convection computational simulations of the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, Corey E.; Kimber, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Although computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been directly utilized to perform safety analyses of nuclear reactors in the United States, several vendors are considering adopting commercial numerical packages for current and future projects. To ensure the accuracy of these computational models, it is imperative to validate the assumptions and approximations built into commercial CFD codes against physical data from flows analogous to those in modern nuclear reactors. To this end, researchers at Utah State University (USU) have constructed the Rotatable Buoyancy Tunnel (RoBuT) test facility, which is designed to provide flow and thermal validation data for CFD simulations of forced and mixed convection scenarios. In order to evaluate the ability of current CFD codes to capture the complex physics associated with these types of flows, a computational model of the RoBuT test facility is created using the ANSYS Fluent commercial CFD code. The numerical RoBuT model is analyzed at identical conditions to several experimental trials undertaken at USU. Each experiment is reconstructed numerically and evaluated with the second-order Reynolds stress model (RSM). Two different thermal boundary conditions at the heated surface of the RoBuT test section are investigated: constant temperature (isothermal) and constant surface heat flux (isoflux). Additionally, the fluid velocity at the inlet of the test section is varied in an effort to modify the relative importance of natural convection heat transfer from the heated wall of the RoBuT. Mean velocity, both in the streamwise and transverse directions, as well as components of the Reynolds stress tensor at three points downstream of the RoBuT test section inlet are compared to results obtained from experimental trials. Early computational results obtained from this research initiative are in good agreement with experimental data obtained from the RoBuT facility and both the experimental data and numerical method can be used

  16. Buoyancy frequency profiles and internal semidiurnal tide turning depths in the oceans

    OpenAIRE

    King, B.; Stone, M.; Zhang, H.P.; Gerkema, T.; Marder, M.; Scott, R.B.; Swinney, H.L.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the possible existence of internal gravity wave "turning depths," depths below which the local buoyancy frequency N(z) becomes smaller than the wave frequency. At a turning depth, incident gravity waves reflect rather than reaching the ocean bottom as is generally assumed. Here we consider internal gravity waves at the lunar semidiurnal (M-2) tidal frequency, omega(M2). Profiles of N-2(z) (the quantity in the equations of motion) are computed using conductivity, temperature, and de...

  17. Thermal radiation effects on hydromagnetic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelkhalek, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical results are presented for the effects of thermal radiation, buoyancy and heat generation or absorption on hydromagnetic flow over an accelerating permeable surface. These results are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing the conservation of mass, momentum and energy by a perturbation technique. This qualitatively agrees with the expectations, since the magnetic field exerts a retarding force on the free convection flow. A parametric study is performed to illustrate the influence of the radiation parameter, magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, Grashof number and Schmidt number on the profiles of the velocity components and temperature. The effects of the different parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction and wall heat transfer are presented graphically. Favorable comparisons with previously published work confirm the correctness of numerical results

  18. A Mechanism for Cytoplasmic Streaming: Kinesin-Driven Alignment of Microtubules and Fast Fluid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Corey E; Brunner, Matthew E; Djagaeva, Inna; Bielecki, Anthony M; Deutsch, Joshua M; Saxton, William M

    2016-05-10

    The transport of cytoplasmic components can be profoundly affected by hydrodynamics. Cytoplasmic streaming in Drosophila oocytes offers a striking example. Forces on fluid from kinesin-1 are initially directed by a disordered meshwork of microtubules, generating minor slow cytoplasmic flows. Subsequently, to mix incoming nurse cell cytoplasm with ooplasm, a subcortical layer of microtubules forms parallel arrays that support long-range, fast flows. To analyze the streaming mechanism, we combined observations of microtubule and organelle motions with detailed mathematical modeling. In the fast state, microtubules tethered to the cortex form a thin subcortical layer and undergo correlated sinusoidal bending. Organelles moving in flows along the arrays show velocities that are slow near the cortex and fast on the inward side of the subcortical microtubule layer. Starting with fundamental physical principles suggested by qualitative hypotheses, and with published values for microtubule stiffness, kinesin velocity, and cytoplasmic viscosity, we developed a quantitative coupled hydrodynamic model for streaming. The fully detailed mathematical model and its simulations identify key variables that can shift the system between disordered (slow) and ordered (fast) states. Measurements of array curvature, wave period, and the effects of diminished kinesin velocity on flow rates, as well as prior observations on f-actin perturbation, support the model. This establishes a concrete mechanistic framework for the ooplasmic streaming process. The self-organizing fast phase is a result of viscous drag on kinesin-driven cargoes that mediates equal and opposite forces on cytoplasmic fluid and on microtubules whose minus ends are tethered to the cortex. Fluid moves toward plus ends and microtubules are forced backward toward their minus ends, resulting in buckling. Under certain conditions, the buckling microtubules self-organize into parallel bending arrays, guiding varying directions

  19. Two-dimensional PIC simulations of ion beam instabilities in Supernova-driven plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckmann, M E; Shukla, P K [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Meli, A; Mastichiadis, A [Department of Physics, National University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos 15783 (Greece); Drury, L O C [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: markd@tp4.rub.de

    2008-06-15

    Supernova remnant blast shells can reach the flow speed v{sub s} = 0.1c and shocks form at its front. Instabilities driven by shock-reflected ion beams heat the plasma in the foreshock, which may inject particles into diffusive acceleration. The ion beams can have the speed v{sub b} {approx} v{sub s}. For v{sub b} << v{sub s} the Buneman or upper-hybrid instabilities dominate, while for v{sub b} >> v{sub s} the filamentation and mixed modes grow faster. Here the relevant waves for v{sub b} {approx} v{sub s} are examined and how they interact nonlinearly with the particles. The collision of two plasma clouds at the speed v{sub s} is modelled with particle-in-cell simulations, which convect with them magnetic fields oriented perpendicular to their flow velocity vector. One simulation models equally dense clouds and the other one uses a density ratio of 2. Both simulations show upper-hybrid waves that are planar over large spatial intervals and that accelerate electrons to {approx}10 keV. The symmetric collision yields only short oscillatory wave pulses, while the asymmetric collision also produces large-scale electric fields, probably through a magnetic pressure gradient. The large-scale fields destroy the electron phase space holes and they accelerate the ions, which facilitates the formation of a precursor shock.

  20. Modelling of impaired cerebral blood flow due to gaseous emboli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hague, J P; Banahan, C; Chung, E M L

    2013-01-01

    Bubbles introduced to the arterial circulation during invasive medical procedures can have devastating consequences for brain function but their effects are currently difficult to quantify. Here we present a Monte Carlo simulation investigating the impact of gas bubbles on cerebral blood flow. For the first time, this model includes realistic adhesion forces, bubble deformation, fluid dynamical considerations, and bubble dissolution. This allows investigation of the effects of buoyancy, solubility, and blood pressure on embolus clearance. Our results illustrate that blockages depend on several factors, including the number and size distribution of incident emboli, dissolution time and blood pressure. We found it essential to model the deformation of bubbles to avoid overestimation of arterial obstruction. Incorporation of buoyancy effects within our model slightly reduced the overall level of obstruction but did not decrease embolus clearance times. We found that higher blood pressures generate lower levels of obstruction and improve embolus clearance. Finally, we demonstrate the effects of gas solubility and discuss potential clinical applications of the model. (paper)

  1. RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. RELAP5/MOD2.5 analysis of the HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] for a loss of power and coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

    1990-05-01

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Mathematical modelling of pressure-driven micropolar biological flow due to metachronal wave propulsion of beating cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, N S; Tripathi, D; Khan, Z H; Bég, O Anwar

    2018-04-06

    In this paper, we present an analytical study of pressure-driven flow of micropolar non-Newtonian physiological fluids through a channel comprising two parallel oscillating walls. The cilia are arranged at equal intervals and protrude normally from both walls of the infinitely long channel. A metachronal wave is generated due to natural beating of cilia and the direction of wave propagation is parallel to the direction of fluid flow. Appropriate expressions are presented for deformation via longitudinal and transverse velocity components induced by the ciliary beating phenomenon with cilia assumed to follow elliptic trajectories. The conservation equations for mass, longitudinal and transverse (linear) momentum and angular momentum are reduced in accordance with the long wavelength and creeping Stokesian flow approximations and then normalized with appropriate transformations. The resulting non-linear moving boundary value problem is solved analytically for constant micro-inertia density, subject to physically realistic boundary conditions. Closed-form expressions are derived for axial velocity, angular velocity, volumetric flow rate and pressure rise. The transport phenomena are shown to be dictated by several non-Newtonian parameters, including micropolar material parameter and Eringen coupling parameter, and also several geometric parameters, viz eccentricity parameter, wave number and cilia length. The influence of these parameters on streamline profiles (with a view to addressing trapping features via bolus formation and evolution), pressure gradient and other characteristics are evaluated graphically. Both axial and angular velocities are observed to be substantially modified with both micropolar rheological parameters and furthermore are significantly altered with increasing volumetric flow rate. Free pumping is also examined. An inverse relationship between pressure rise and flow rate is computed which is similar to that observed in Newtonian fluids. The

  4. Influence of the weighing bar position in vessel on measurement of cement’s particle size distribution by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambun, R.; Sihombing, R. O.; Simanjuntak, A.; Hanum, F.

    2018-02-01

    The buoyancy weighing-bar method is a new simple and cost-effective method to determine the particle size distribution both settling and floating particle. In this method, the density change in a suspension due to particle migration is measured by weighing buoyancy against a weighing-bar hung in the suspension, and then the particle size distribution is calculated using the length of the bar and the time-course change in the mass of the bar. The apparatus of this method consists of a weighing-bar and an analytical balance with a hook for under-floor weighing. The weighing bar is used to detect the density change in suspension. In this study we investigate the influences of position of weighing bar in vessel on settling particle size distribution measurements of cement by using the buoyancy weighing-bar method. The vessel used in this experiment is graduated cylinder with the diameter of 65 mm and the position of weighing bar is in center and off center of vessel. The diameter of weighing bar in this experiment is 10 mm, and the kerosene is used as a dispersion liquids. The results obtained show that the positions of weighing bar in vessel have no significant effect on determination the cement’s particle size distribution by using buoyancy weighing-bar method, and the results obtained are comparable to those measured by using settling balance method.

  5. Effect of steady and time-harmonic magnetic fields on macrosegragation in alloy solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incropera, F.P.; Prescott, P.J. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Buoyancy-induced convection during the solidification of alloys can contribute significantly to the redistribution of alloy constituents, thereby creating large composition gradients in the final ingot. Termed macrosegregation, the condition diminishes the quality of the casting and, in the extreme, may require that the casting be remelted. The deleterious effects of buoyancy-driven flows may be suppressed through application of an external magnetic field, and in this study the effects of both steady and time-harmonic fields have been considered. For a steady magnetic field, extremely large field strengths would be required to effectively dampen convection patterns that contribute to macrosegregation. However, by reducing spatial variations in temperature and composition, turbulent mixing induced by a time-harmonic field reduces the number and severity of segregates in the final casting.

  6. Modelling of thermally driven groundwater flow in a facility for disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsic, Nico; Grundfelt, Bertil [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    In this report calculations are presented of buoyancy driven groundwater flow caused by the emission of residual heat from spent nuclear fuel deposited in deep boreholes from the ground surface in combination with the natural geothermal gradient. This work has been conducted within SKB's programme for evaluation of alternative methods for final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The basic safety feature of disposal of spent nuclear fuel in deep boreholes is that the groundwater at great depth has a higher salinity, and hence a higher density, than more superficial groundwater. The result of this is that the deep groundwater becomes virtually stagnant. The study comprises analyses of the effects of different inter-borehole distances as well as the effect of different permeabilities in the backfill and sealing materials in the borehole and of different shapes of the interface between fresh and saline groundwater. The study is an update of a previous study published in 2006. In the present study, the facility design proposed by Sandia National Laboratories has been studied. In this design, steel canisters containing two BWR elements or one PWR element are stacked on top of each other between 3 and 5 kilometres depth. In order to host all spent fuel from the current Swedish nuclear programme, about 80 such holes are needed. The model used in this study comprises nine boreholes spaced 100 metres alternatively 50 metres apart in a 3{Chi}3 matrix. In one set of calculations the salinity in the groundwater was assumed to increase from zero above 700 metres depth to 10% by weight at 1500 metres depth and below. In another set, a sharper salinity gradient was applied in which the salinity increased from 0 to 10% between 1400 and 1500 metres depth. A geothermal gradient of 16 deg C/km was applied. The heat output from the spent fuel was assumed to decrease by time in manner consistent with the radioactive decay in the fuel. When the inter-borehole distance decreased from

  7. A new method of producing local enhancement of buoyancy in liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, G. S.; Narasimha, R.; Arakeri, V. H.

    1989-11-01

    We describe here a novel method of generating large volumetric heating in a liquid. The method uses the principle of ohmic heating of the liquid, rendered electrically conducting by suitable additives if necessary. Electrolysis is prevented by the use of high frequency alternating voltage and chemically treated electrodes. The technique is demonstrated by producing substantial heating in an initially neutral jet of water. Simple flow visualisation studies, made by adding dye to the jet, show marked changes in the growth and development of the jet with heat addition.

  8. Numerical Heat Transfer Prediction for Laminar Flow in a Circular Pipe with a 90° Bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro, Pandaba; Rout, Ani; Barik, Ashok

    2018-06-01

    Laminar air flow in a 90° bend has been studied numerically to investigate convective heat transfer, which is of practical relevance to electronic systems and refrigeration piping layout. CFD simulations are performed for Reynolds number in the range 200 to 1000 at different bend radius ratios (5, 10 and 20). The heat transfer characteristics are found to be enhanced in the curved pipe compared to a straight pipe, which are subjected to the same flow rate. The curvature and buoyancy effectively increase heat transfer in viscous laminar flows. The correlation between the flow structure and the heat transfer is found to be strong.

  9. Intra-assembly flow redistribution in LMFBRs: a simple computational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatib-Rahbar, M.; Cazzoli, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    The liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) core consists of fuel, blanket, control, and shielding assemblies packed in a hexagonal configuration. Radial blanket assemblies occupy peripheral locations in the reactor core and are characterized by steep power gradients, while inner blanket assemblies are located within the fuel assembly region and have higher power levels but flatter distributions. It is due to the presence of this radial power gradient that large sodium temperature distributions exist at full power operation. However, at low power, low flow natural convection conditions, a significant flow redistribution takes place leading to considerable radial temperature flattening. The purpose of the present study is to formulate a simple flow-regime dependent model supported by experimental data for prediction of sodium temperature flattening due to buoyancy-induced flow redistribution in LMFBR subassemblies with significant radial power gradient

  10. Thermocapillary flow about an evaporating meniscus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G. R.; Chung, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    The steady motion and thermal behavior of an evaporating superheated liquid in a small cavity bounded by isothermal sidewalls is examined. Scaling analyses and a two-dimensional finite element model are used to investigate the influence of thermocapillarity, buoyancy, and temperature-dependent mass flux on flowfield, interfacial heat transfer, and meniscus morphology. Numerical investigations indicate the existence of two counter-rotating cells symmetric about the cavity center. Results also show that evaporation tends to counteract this circulation by directing flow toward the hotter sidewalls. Although thermocapillarity and evaporation yield different flowfield distributions, both effects tend to increase interfacial temperature and heat transfer.

  11. Role of compressibility on driven magnetic reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Hayashi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Horiuchi, R.; Tanaka, M.; Sawairi, N.; Kusano, K.

    1991-08-01

    Whether it is induced by an ideal (current driven) instability or by an external force, plasma flow causes a change in the magnetic field configuration and often gives rise to a current intensification locally, thereby a fast driven reconnection being driven there. Many dramatic phenomena in magnetically confined plasmas such as magnetospheric substorms, solar flares, MHD self-organization and tokamak sawtooth crash, may be attributed to this fast driven reconnection. Using a fourth order MHD simulation code it is confirmed that compressibility of the plasma plays a crucial role in leading to a fast (MHD time scale) driven reconnection. This indicates that the incompressible representation is not always applicable to the study of a global dynamical behavior of a magnetically confined plasma. (author)

  12. Retention behavior of neutral solutes in pressurized flow-driven capillary electrochromatography using an ODS column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Shinya; Araki, Shuki; Ohtani, Hajime

    2006-02-01

    Several alkyl benzenes are separated by pressurized flow-driven capillary electrochromatography using a temperature-controlled capillary column packed with octadecyl siloxane-modified silica gel, and the effect of applied voltage on the retention is investigated. The van't Hoff plot shows good linearity at the column temperature between 305 and 330 K under applications from -6 to +6 kV. The applied voltage causes a relatively large variation in the enthalpy and the entropy of transfer of the solute from the mobile phase to the stationary phase (> 20%). However, the direction of variation in the enthalpy is almost opposite to that in the entropy, both of which might compensate each other. Therefore, the retention factor is not significantly varied (< 4%) by the application of voltage.

  13. Air-driven viscous film flow coating the interior of a vertical tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrosky, H. Reed; Camassa, Roberto; Olander, Jeffrey

    2017-11-01

    We discuss a model for the flow of a viscous liquid film coating the interior of a vertical tube when the film is driven upwards against gravity by airflow through the center of the tube. The model consists of two components: (i) a nonlinear model, exploiting the slowly-varying liquid-air interface, for the interfacial stresses created by the airflow, and (ii) a long-wave asymptotic model for the air-liquid interface. The stability of small interfacial disturbances is studied analytically, and it is shown that the modeled free surface stresses contribute to both an increased upwards disturbance velocity and a more rapid instability growth than those of a previously developed model. Numerical solutions to the long-wave model exhibit saturated waves whose profiles and velocities show improvement, with respect to the previous model, in matching experiments. The model results are then compared with additional experiments for a slightly modified version of the problem. We gratefully acknowledge funding from NSF DMS-0509423, DMS-0908423, DMS-1009750, DMS-1517879, RTG DMS-0943851, CMG ARC-1025523 and NIEHS 534197-3411.

  14. Coupled heat and groundwater flow in porous rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rae, J.; Robinson, P.C.; Wickens, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    There are a number of technical areas where coupled heat and flow problems occur for water in porous rock. The area of most interest to the authors has been the possible disposal underground of high-level radioactive waste. High-level waste can emit enough heat to drive significant flows by buoyancy effects and groundwater flow is expected to be the chief transport process for solute leached from such a repository. The possible disposal of radioactive waste under the seabed raises many similar questions and needs similar techniques to find answers. Other areas where related questions arise are the storage and retrieval of hot water in underground reservoirs, the attempts to extract useful geothermal energy by pumping water into fracture systems in hot rock and in certain thermal techniques for persuading oil to flow in tight reservoirs. The authors address questions in a rather general way and give examples which lie more in the area of waste disposal

  15. 2D modeling of moderator flow and temperature distribution around a single channel after pressure tube/calandria tube contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behdadi, A.; Luxat, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    A 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to calculate the moderator velocity field and temperature distribution around a single channel inside the moderator of a CANDU reactor after a postulated ballooning deformation of the pressure tube (PT) into contact with the calandria tube (CT). Following contact between the hot PT and the relatively cold CT, there is a spike in heat flux to the moderator surrounding the CT which may lead to sustained CT dryout. This can detrimentally affect channel integrity if the CT post-dryout temperature becomes sufficiently high to result in thermal creep strain deformation. The present research is focused on establishing the limits for dryout occurrence on the CTs for the situation in which pressure tube-calandria tube contact occurs. In order to consider different location of the channels inside the calandria, both upward and downward flow directions have been analyzed. The standard κ - ε turbulence model associated with logarithmic wall function is applied to predict the effects of turbulence. The governing equations are solved by the finite element software package COMSOL. The buoyancy driven natural convection on the outer surface of a CT has been analyzed to predict the flow and temperature distribution around the single CT considering the local moderator subcooling, wall temperature and heat flux. The model also shows the effect of high CT temperature on the flow and subcooling around the CTs at higher/lower elevation depending on the flow direction in the domain. According to the flow pattern and temperature distribution, it is predicted that stable film boiling generates in the stagnation region on the cylinder. (author)

  16. Meshless Lagrangian SPH method applied to isothermal lid-driven cavity flow at low-Re numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga Filho, C. A. D.; Chacaltana, J. T. A.; Pinto, W. J. N.

    2018-01-01

    SPH is a recent particle method applied in the cavities study, without many results available in the literature. The lid-driven cavity flow is a classic problem of the fluid mechanics, extensively explored in the literature and presenting a considerable complexity. The aim of this paper is to present a solution from the Lagrangian viewpoint for this problem. The discretization of the continuum domain is performed using the Lagrangian particles. The physical laws of mass, momentum and energy conservation are presented by the Navier-Stokes equations. A serial numerical code, written in Fortran programming language, has been used to perform the numerical simulations. The application of the SPH and comparison with the literature (mesh methods and a meshless collocation method) have been done. The positions of the primary vortex centre and the non-dimensional velocity profiles passing through the geometric centre of the cavity have been analysed. The numerical Lagrangian results showed a good agreement when compared to the results found in the literature, specifically for { Re} < 100.00 . Suggestions for improvements in the SPH model presented are listed, in the search for better results for flows with higher Reynolds numbers.

  17. Numerical investigations of free-surface flows in spallation targets for acceleration-driven systems using TransAT - 15019

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.; Lakehal, D.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerator driven systems (ADS) are increasingly employed for the transmutation of high-level nuclear waste. The first advanced design is the multi-purpose hybrid research reactor for high-tech applications (MYRRHA) developed at SCK-CEN Mol in Belgium. The present study investigates the free-surface flow design of MYRRHA's target. The spallation target material for MYRRHA is a liquid metal, lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) to obtain a high neutron gain and allow forced convective heat removal. The understanding of the free surface behavior is essential in determining a safe design. This study is a qualitative comparison of 2 design geometries for a range of flow rates. Transient from Large-Eddy simulation (LES) is preferred here to steady-state RANS, employing two approaches to predict free surface evolution: Interface Tracking Methods (ITMs) and Phase-Averaged Methods. The CFD results produce a qualitative agreement with the experiments conducted by Batta et al. (authors)

  18. The buoyancy convection during directional solidification of AlZn eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prazak, M.; Procio, M.; Holecek, S.

    1993-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of buoyancy convection during the directional solidification of AlZn eutectic alloy. Experiments have been conducted using a Bridgman-Stockbarger arrangement with the furnace moving along the specimen. The apparatus rotated around the horizontal axis, which made it possible to carry out measurements at different angles β contained by the gravity and temperature gradient vectors in the specimen. The anisotropy of both the linear thermal expansion coefficient a and the hardness HK measured by the Knoop method has been studied. The dilatation measurements confirmed the expected anisotropy of the linear thermal expansion of directionally solidified specimens. The values of HK correspond with the lamellar spacing measured in the metallographic study. (orig.)

  19. DNS of fully developed turbulent heat transfer of a viscoelastic drag-reducing flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Bo [Department of Oil and Gas Storage and Transportation Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Kawaguchi, Yasuo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow with a Giesekus model was carried out to investigate turbulent heat transfer mechanism of a viscoelastic drag-reducing flow by additives. The configuration was a fully-developed turbulent channel flow with uniform heat flux imposed on both the walls. The temperature was considered as a passive scalar with the effect of buoyancy force neglected. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and half the channel height was 150. Statistical quantities such as root-mean-square temperature fluctuations, turbulent heat fluxes and turbulent Prandtl number were obtained and compared with those of a Newtonian fluid flow. Budget terms of the temperature variance and turbulent heat fluxes were also presented. (author)

  20. COMMIX analysis of four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in a thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarlagadda, B.S.

    1989-04-01

    The three-dimensional thermal hydraulics computer code COMMIX-1AR was used to analyze four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in the thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR. An objective of these analyses was the validation of COMMIX-1AR for buoyancy affected flows. The COMMIX calculated temperature histories of some thermocouples in the model were compared with the corresponding measured data. The conclusions of this work are presented. 3 refs., 5 figs

  1. A Six-DOF Buoyancy Tank Microgravity Test Bed with Active Drag Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chong; Chen, Shiyu; Yuan, Jianping; Zhu, Zhanxia

    2017-10-01

    Ground experiment under microgravity is very essential because it can verify the space enabling technologies before applied in space missions. In this paper, a novel ground experiment system that can provide long duration, large scale and high microgravity level for the six degree of freedom (DOF) spacecraft trajectory tracking is presented. In which, the most gravity of the test body is balanced by the buoyancy, and the small residual gravity is offset by the electromagnetic force. Because the electromagnetic force on the test body can be adjusted in the electromagnetic system, it can significantly simplify the balancing process using the proposed microgravity test bed compared to the neutral buoyance system. Besides, a novel compensation control system based on the active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) method is developed to estimate and compensate the water resistance online, in order to improve the fidelity of the ground experiment. A six-DOF trajectory tracking in the microgravity system is applied to testify the efficiency of the proposed compensation controller, and the experimental simulation results are compared to that obtained using the classic proportional-integral-derivative (PID) method. The simulation results demonstrated that, for the six-DOF motion ground experiment, the microgravity level can reach to 5 × 10-4 g. And, because the water resistance has been estimated and compensated, the performance of the presented controller is much better than the PID controller. The presented ground microgravity system can be applied in on-orbit service and other related technologies in future.

  2. Laser/fluorescent dye flow visualization technique developed for system component thermal hydraulic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    A novel laser flow visualization technique is presented together with examples of its use in visualizing complex flow patterns and plans for its further development. This technique has been successfully used to study (1) the flow in a horizontal pipe subject to temperature transients, to view the formation and breakup of thermally stratified flow and to determine instantaneous velocity distributions in the same flow at various axial locations; (2) the discharge of a stratified pipe flow into a plenum exhibiting a periodic vortex pattern; and (3) the thermal-buoyancy-induced flow channeling on the shell side of a heat exchanger with glass tubes and shell. This application of the technique to heat exchangers is unique. The flow patterns deep within a large tube bundle can be studied under steady or transient conditions. This laser flow visualization technique constitutes a very powerful tool for studying single or multiphase flows in complex thermal system components

  3. Ultrasonic Concentration in a Line-Driven Cylindrical Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, Gregory Russ [Portland State Univ., Portland, OR (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The fractionation of particles from their suspending fluid or noninvasive micromanipulation of particles in suspension has many applications ranging from the recovery of valuable reagents from process flows to the fabrication of microelectromechanical devices. Techniques based on size, density, solubility, or electromagnetic properties exist for fulfilling these needs, but many particles have traits that preclude their use such as small size, neutral buoyancy, or uniform electromagnetic characteristics. While separation by those techniques may not be possible, often compressibility differences exist between the particle and fluid that would allow fractionation by acoustic forces. The potential of acoustic separation is known, but due to inherent difficulties in achieving and maintaining accurate alignment of the transduction system, it is rarely utilized. The objective of this project is to investigate the use of structural excitation as a potentially efficient concentration/fractionation method for particles in suspension. It is demonstrated that structural excitation of a cylindrically symmetric cavity, such as a tube, allows non-invasive, fast, and low power concentration of particles suspended in a fluid. The inherent symmetry of the system eliminates the need for careful alignment inherent in current acoustic concentration devices. Structural excitation distributes the acoustic field throughout the volume of the cavity, which also significantly reduces temperature gradients and acoustic streaming in the fluid; cavitation is no longer an issue. The lowest-order coupled modes of a long cylindrical glass tube and fluid-filled cavity, driven by a line contact, are tuned, via material properties and aspect ratio, to achieve a coupled dipolar vibration of the system, shown to generate efficient concentration of particles to the central axis of the tube. A two dimensional elastodynamic model of the system was developed and subsequently utilized to optimize particle

  4. Numerical investigations of opposing mixed convection heat transfer in vertical flat channel 2. Vortex flow in case of symmetrical heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirvydas, A.; Poskas, R.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results on numerical investigation of the local opposing mixed convection heat transfer in a vertical flat channel with symmetrical heating at low Reynolds numbers. Numerical two-dimensional simulation was performed for the same channel and for the same conditions as in the experiment using the FLUENT 6.1 code. The unsteady flow investigations were performed in airflow for the experimental conditions at the Reynolds number 2130 and Grashof number 6.2* 10 8 . Quasi-steady flow investigations were performed for two Reynolds numbers (2130 and 4310) and the Grashof number up to 3.1*10 9 in order to simulate the buoyancy effect on the flow structure. In both steady and quasi-steady modelling cases the results demonstrated that under the high buoyancy effect the chequerwise local circular flow took place near the heated walls. This made velocity profiles asymmetrical and caused pulsations of the wall temperature. Wall temperature had a pulsatory character, however, the resulting averaged values correlated rather well with experimental data for steady and quasi-steady cases for Re in = 2130. For Re in = 4310, the resulting averaged values for x/d e ≤25 correlated rather well with experimental data. When x/d e > 25, the difference between the experimental and the calculated wall temperature was increasing, increasing, possibly due to a steady flow and heat transfer modelling. (author)

  5. Theory of radiatively driven stellar winds. I. A physical interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    This series of papers extends the line-driven wind theory of Castor, Abbott, and Klein (CAK). The present paper develops a physical interpretation of line-driven flows using analytic methods. Numerical results will follow in two subsequent papers

  6. Pressure-driven flow of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid with pressure-dependent rheological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaseti, Pandelitsa; Damianou, Yiolanda; Georgiou, Georgios C.; Housiadas, Kostas D.

    2018-03-01

    The lubrication flow of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid in a symmetric long channel of varying width, 2h(x), is modeled extending the approach proposed by Fusi et al. ["Pressure-driven lubrication flow of a Bingham fluid in a channel: A novel approach," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 221, 66-75 (2015)] for a Bingham plastic. Moreover, both the consistency index and the yield stress are assumed to be pressure-dependent. Under the lubrication approximation, the pressure at zero order depends only on x and the semi-width of the unyielded core is found to be given by σ(x) = -(1 + 1/n)h(x) + C, where n is the power-law exponent and the constant C depends on the Bingham number and the consistency-index and yield-stress growth numbers. Hence, in a channel of constant width, the width of the unyielded core is also constant, despite the pressure dependence of the yield stress, and the pressure distribution is not affected by the yield-stress function. With the present model, the pressure is calculated numerically solving an integro-differential equation and then the position of the yield surface and the two velocity components are computed using analytical expressions. Some analytical solutions are also derived for channels of constant and linearly varying widths. The lubrication solutions for other geometries are calculated numerically. The implications of the pressure-dependence of the material parameters and the limitations of the method are discussed.

  7. Simulation based engineering in fluid flow design

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, J S

    2017-01-01

    This volume offers a tool for High Performance Computing (HPC). A brief historical background on the subject is first given. Fluid Statics dealing with Pressure in fluids at rest, Buoyancy and Basics of Thermodynamics are next presented. The Finite Volume Method, the most convenient process for HPC, is explained in one-dimensional approach to diffusion with convection and pressure velocity coupling. Adiabatic, isentropic and supersonic flows in quasi-one dimensional flows in axisymmetric nozzles is considered before applying CFD solutions. Though the theory is restricted to one-dimensional cases, three-dimensional CFD examples are also given. Lastly, nozzle flows with normal shocks are presented using turbulence models. Worked examples and exercises are given in each chapter. Fluids transport thermal energy for its conversion to kinetic energy, thus playing a major role that is central to all heat engines. With the advent of rotating machinery in the 20th century, Fluid Engineering was developed in the form o...

  8. Derivation of a well-posed and multidimensional drift-flux model for boiling flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, O.; Martin, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this note, we derive a multidimensional drift-flux model for boiling flows. Within this framework, the distribution parameter is no longer a scalar but a tensor that might account for the medium anisotropy and the flow regime. A new model for the drift-velocity vector is also derived. It intrinsically takes into account the effect of the friction pressure loss on the buoyancy force. On the other hand, we show that most drift-flux models might exhibit a singularity for large void fraction. In order to avoid this singularity, a remedy based on a simplified three field approach is proposed. (authors)

  9. Acoustics advances study of sea floor hydrothermal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, Peter A.; Jackson, Darrell R.; Bemis, Karen G.; Jones, Christopher D.; Mitsuzawa, Kyohiko; Palmer, David R.; Silver, Deborah

    Sub-sea floor hydrothermal convection systems discharge as plumes from point sources and as seepage from the ocean bottom. The plumes originate as clear, 150-400°C solutions that vent from mineralized chimneys; precipitate dissolved metals as particles to form black or white smokers as they turbulently mix with ambient seawater; and buoyantly rise hundreds of meters to a level of neutral density where they spread laterally. The seepage discharges from networks of fractures at the rock-water interface as clear, diffuse flow, with lower temperatures, metal contents, and buoyancy than the smokers. The diffuse flow may be entrained upward into plumes, or laterally by prevailing currents in discrete layers within tens of meters of the sea floor. The role of these flow regimes in dispersing heat, chemicals, and biological material into the ocean from sub-sea floor hydrothermal convection systems is being studied on a global scale.

  10. Dynamically adaptive data-driven simulation of extreme hydrological flows

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar Jain, Pushkar; Mandli, Kyle; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Knio, Omar; Dawson, Clint

    2017-01-01

    evacuation in real-time and through the development of resilient infrastructure based on knowledge of how systems respond to extreme events. Data-driven computational modeling is a critical technology underpinning these efforts. This investigation focuses

  11. Study of ATES thermal behavior using a steady flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, C.; Hellstroem, G.; Tsang, C. F.; Claesson, J.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal behavior of a single well aquifer thermal energy storage system in which buoyancy flow is neglected is studied. A dimensionless formulation of the energy transport equations for the aquifer system is presented, and the key dimensionless parameters are discussed. A simple numerical model is used to generate graphs showing the thermal behavior of the system as a function of these parameters. Some comparisons with field experiments are given to illustrate the use of the dimensionless groups and graphs.

  12. Noninvasive embryo assessment technique based on buoyancy and its association with embryo survival after cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Cara; Penrose, Lindsay; Ahmad, Khaliq; Prien, Samuel

    2017-11-01

    Embryo cryopreservation offers many benefits by allowing genetic preservation, genetic screening, cost reduction, global embryo transport and single embryo transfer. However, freezing of embryos decreases embryo viability, as intracellular ice crystal formation often damages embryos. Success rates of frozen embryo transfer are expected to be 15-20% less than fresh embryo transfer. We have developed a noninvasive embryo assessment technique (NEAT) which enables us to predict embryo viability based on buoyancy. The purpose of this research was twofold. First was to determine if a NEAT, through a specific gravity device can detect embryo survival of cryopreservation. Second, it was to relate embryo buoyancy to embryo viability for establishing pregnancies in sheep. Blastocysts descent times were measured on one-hundred sixty-nine mice blastocysts before cryopreservation, according to standard protocol and post-thawing blastocysts descent times were measured again. There was a significant difference in blastocyst post-thaw descent times with NEAT in those blastocysts which demonstrated viability from those that did not (P embryos. Further studies on a larger scale commercial setting will evaluate the efficacy of NEAT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulation of the interaction of a solar domestic hot water tank system with a compact plate heat exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizami, D.J.; Lightstone, M.F. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Harrison, S.; Cruickshank, C. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    2008-08-15

    An external natural convection heat exchanger (NCHE) was used as an alternative to forced convection for transferring energy from solar collector loops to a hot water storage tank. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program was used to predict interactions between the natural convection-driven side-arm heat exchanger and a hot water storage tank. A solar domestic hot water tank with a vertical compact plate natural convection heat exchanger was modelled. In addition, the heat exchanger was modelled as a section of pipe with high flow resistance and a volumetric energy source. Transient analyses were conducted and the CFD model was then compared with data obtained from laboratory experiments. Simulations were conducted on the fluid domain in order to investigate the influence of the flow on the thermal stratification in the tank, the heat transfer inside the tank, and the natural convection in the tank loop. Buoyancy for an incompressible fluid with constant fluid properties was modelled using a Boussinesq approximation. Temperature distributions were measured as a function of time. Results of the study indicated that assuming a constant thermal expansion coefficient in evaluation buoyancy forces for a wide range of operating temperatures did not result in accurate predictions. Future studies will model natural convection with a full buoyancy model. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  14. An experimental study of high heat flux removal by shear-driven liquid films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitsev Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensively evaporating liquid films, moving under the friction of a co-current gas flow in a mini-channel (shear-driven liquid films, are promising for the use in cooling systems of modern semiconductor devices with high local heat release. In this work, the effect of various parameters, such as the liquid and gas flow rates and channel height, on the critical heat flux in the locally heated shear-driven water film has been studied. A record value of the critical heat flux of 1200 W/cm2 has been achieved in experiments. Heat leaks to the substrate and heat losses to the atmosphere in total do not exceed 25% for the heat flux above 400 W/cm2. Comparison of the critical heat fluxes for the shear-driven liquid film and for flow boiling in a minichannel shows that the critical heat flux is an order of magnitude higher for the shear-driven liquid film. This confirms the prospect of using shear-driven liquid films in the modern high-efficient cooling systems.

  15. Thermally driven gas flow beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amter, S.; Lu, Ning; Ross, B.

    1991-01-01

    A coupled thermopneumatic model is developed for simulating heat transfer, rock-gas flow and carbon-14 travel time beneath Yucca Mountain, NV. The aim of this work is to understand the coupling of heat transfer and gas flow. Heat transfer in and near the potential repository region depends on several factors, including the geothermal gradient, climate, and local sources of heat such as radioactive wastes. Our numerical study shows that small temperature changes at the surface can change both the temperature field and the gas flow pattern beneath Yucca Mountain. A lateral temperature difference of 1 K is sufficient to create convection cells hundreds of meters in size. Differences in relative humidities between gas inside the mountain and air outside the mountain also significantly affect the gas flow field. 6 refs., 7 figs

  16. Experimental study of particle-driven secondary flow in turbulent pipe flows

    OpenAIRE

    Belt, R.J.; Daalmans, A.C.L.M.; Portela, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    In fully developed single-phase turbulent flow in straight pipes, it is known that mean motions can occur in the plane of the pipe cross-section, when the cross-section is non-circular, or when the wall roughness is non-uniform around the circumference of a circular pipe. This phenomenon is known as secondary flow of the second kind and is associated with the anisotropy in the Reynolds stress tensor in the pipe cross-section. In this work, we show, using careful laser Doppler anemometry exper...

  17. Flow reversal in combined laminar mixed convection heat and mass transfer with phase change in a vertical channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oulaid, Othmane; Benhamou, Brahim; Galanis, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    This paper, deals with a numerical study of the effects of buoyancy forces on an upward, steady state, laminar flow of humid air in a vertical parallel-plate channel. The plates are wetted by a thin liquid water film and maintained at a constant temperature which is lower than that of the air entering the channel. A 2D fully elliptical model, associated with the Boussinesq assumption, is used to take into account axial diffusion. The solution of this mathematical model is based on the finite volume method and the velocity-pressure coupling is handled by the SIMPLER algorithm. Numerical results show that buoyancy forces have a significant effect on the hydrodynamic, thermal and mass fraction fields. Additionally, these forces induce flow reversal for high air temperatures and mass fractions at the channel entrance. It is established that heat transfer associated with phase change is, sometimes, more significant than sensible heat transfer. Furthermore, this importance depends on the mass fraction gradient. The conditions for the existence of flow reversal are presented in charts and analytical expressions specifying the critical thermal Grashof number as a function of the Reynolds number for different values of the solutal Grashof number and different aspect ratios of the channel.

  18. Pressure-driven peristaltic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mingalev, S V; Lyubimov, D V; Lyubimova, T P

    2013-01-01

    The peristaltic motion of an incompressible fluid in two-dimensional channel is investigated. Instead of fixing the law of wall's coordinate variation, the law of pressure variation on the wall is fixed and the border's coordinate changes to provide the law of pressure variation on the wall. In case of small amplitude of pressure-variation on the wall A, expansion wave propagates along the length of channel and the wave results in the peristaltic transport of fluid. In the case of large A, the channel divides into two parts. The small pulsating part in the end of the tube creates the flow as a human heart, while the other big part loses this function. The solution of problem for the first peristaltic mode is stable, while the solution for the second 'heart' mode is unstable and depends heavily on boundary conditions.

  19. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these

  20. Fluid dynamics of bubbly flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegenhein, Thomas

    2016-07-08

    Bubbly flows can be found in many applications in chemical, biological and power engineering. Reliable simulation tools of such flows that allow the design of new processes and optimization of existing one are therefore highly desirable. CFD-simulations applying the multi-fluid approach are very promising to provide such a design tool for complete facilities. In the multi-fluid approach, however, closure models have to be formulated to model the interaction between the continuous and dispersed phase. Due to the complex nature of bubbly flows, different phenomena have to be taken into account and for every phenomenon different closure models exist. Therefore, reliable predictions of unknown bubbly flows are not yet possible with the multi-fluid approach. A strategy to overcome this problem is to define a baseline model in which the closure models including the model constants are fixed so that the limitations of the modeling can be evaluated by validating it on different experiments. Afterwards, the shortcomings are identified so that the baseline model can be stepwise improved without losing the validity for the already validated cases. This development of a baseline model is done in the present work by validating the baseline model developed at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf mainly basing on experimental data for bubbly pipe flows to bubble columns, bubble plumes and air-lift reactors that are relevant in chemical and biological engineering applications. In the present work, a large variety of such setups is used for validation. The buoyancy driven bubbly flows showed thereby a transient behavior on the scale of the facility. Since such large scales are characterized by the geometry of the facility, turbulence models cannot describe them. Therefore, the transient simulation of bubbly flows with two equation models based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations is investigated. In combination with the before mentioned baseline model these