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Sample records for bunyavirus

  1. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

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    Kate McElroy Horne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family.

  2. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions

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    Amelina Albornoz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion.

  3. Emerging and Reemeriging Human Bunyavirus Infections and Climate Change

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    Sutherland, Laura J.; Anyamba, Assaf; LaBeaud, A. Desiree

    2013-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae family includes a growing number of viruses that have contributed to the burden of emerging and reemerging infectious diseases around the globe. Many of these viruses cause severe clinical outcomes in human and animal populations, the results of which can be detrimental to public health and the economies of affected communities. The threat to endemic and non-native regions is particularly high, and national and international public health agencies are often on alert. Many of the bunyaviruses cause severe clinical disease including hemorrhage, organ failure, and death leading to their high-risk classification. Hantaviruses and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) (genus Phlebovirus) are National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Category A priority pathogens in the United States. Viral hemorrhagic fevers, a classification that includes many bunyaviruses, are immediately notifiable in the European Union. The emergence of new and reemerging bunyaviruses has resulted in numerous human and animal fatalities. Outbreaks of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in East Africa (1997/1998, 2006/2007), Sudan (2007), Southern Africa (2008-2010), Kenya (1997/1998, 2006/2007) (Anyamba et al., 2009, 2010; Breiman et al., 2010; Grobbelaar et al., 2011; Woods et al., 2002) and Saudi Arabia & Yemen (2000, 2010) (Food and Agriculture Organization, 2000; Hjelle and Glass, 2000; Madani et al., 2003) and the emergence of Sin Nombre virus (1993) (Hjelle and Glass, 2000) and most recently Schmallenberg virus (2011) (DEFRA, 2012) are prime examples of the devastating and worldwide toll bunyaviruses have on health and economies. Climate variability (precipitation and temperature in particular) greatly influence the ecological conditions that drive arboviral disease outbreaks across the globe. Several human and animal disease outbreaks have been influenced by changes in climate associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon including the bunyaviruses RVFV and Sin

  4. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins.

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    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-07-23

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far.

  5. Viral RNA Silencing Suppression: The Enigma of Bunyavirus NSs Proteins

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    Marcio Hedil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant- and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative transmission. For this reason, they are generally assumed to encounter antiviral RNA silencing in plants and insects. Here we present an overview on how tospovirus nonstructural NSs protein counteracts antiviral RNA silencing in plants and what is known so far in insects. Like tospoviruses, members of the related vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses classified in the genera Orthobunyavirus, Hantavirus and Phlebovirus also code for a NSs protein. However, for none of them RNA silencing suppressor activity has been unambiguously demonstrated in neither vertebrate host nor arthropod vector. The second part of this review will briefly describe the role of these NSs proteins in modulation of innate immune responses in mammals and elaborate on a hypothetical scenario to explain if and how NSs proteins from vertebrate-infecting bunyaviruses affect RNA silencing. If so, why this discovery has been hampered so far.

  6. A mini-review of Bunyaviruses recorded in India

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    Pragya D Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly emerging and re-emerging viral infections are of major public health concern. Bunyaviridae family of viruses comprises a large group of animal viruses. Clinical symptoms exhibited by persons infected by viruses belonging to this family vary from mild-to-severe diseases i.e., febrile illness, encephalitis, haemorrhagic fever and acute respiratory illness. Several arthropods-borne viruses have been discovered and classified at serological level in India in the past. Some of these are highly pathogenic as the recent emergence and spread of Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus and presence of antibodies against Hantavirus in humans in India have provided evidences that it may become one of the emerging diseases in this country. For many of the discovered viruses, we still need to study their relevance to human and animal health. Chittoor virus, a variant of Batai virus; Ganjam virus, an Asian variant of Nairobi sheep disease virus; tick-borne viruses such as Bhanja, Palma and mosquito-borne viruses such as Sathuperi, Thimiri, Umbre and Ingwavuma viruses have been identified as the members of this family. As Bunyaviruses are three segmented RNA viruses, they can reassort the segments into genetically distinct viruses in target cells. This ability is believed to play a major role in evolution, pathogenesis and epidemiology of the viruses. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of discovery, emergence and distribution of Bunyaviruses in India.

  7. Non-Structural Proteins of Arthropod-Borne Bunyaviruses: Roles and Functions

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    Alain Kohl

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses within the Bunyaviridae family are tri-segmented, negative-stranded RNA viruses. The family includes several emerging and re-emerging viruses of humans, animals and plants, such as Rift Valley fever virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, Schmallenberg virus and tomato spotted wilt virus. Many bunyaviruses are arthropod-borne, so-called arboviruses. Depending on the genus, bunyaviruses encode, in addition to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and the different structural proteins, one or several non-structural proteins. These non-structural proteins are not always essential for virus growth and replication but can play an important role in viral pathogenesis through their interaction with the host innate immune system. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge and understanding of insect-borne bunyavirus non-structural protein function(s in vertebrate, plant and arthropod.

  8. Arbovirus infection in humans in NSW: seroprevalence and pathogenicity of certain Australian bunyaviruses.

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    Boughton, C R; Hawkes, R A; Naim, H M

    1990-02-01

    A sero epidemiological study was carried out on human sera from all regions of New South Wales for the presence of antibodies to nine bunyaviruses viz Aino, Akabane, Belmont, Gan Gan, Kowanyama, mapputta, Peaton, Tinaroo, Trubanaman and the orbivirus Corriparta. Neutralising antibodies were found in titres up to 1280 to Gan Gan and to 640 to Trubanaman viruses, prevalences 4.7% and 1.4% respectively. Neutralisation titres up to 40 were found to Belmont, Aino, Peaton and Corriparta viruses but the significance of these is uncertain since they may represent either non-specific inhibitors or cross reacting antibodies to related but currently unknown viruses. No antibodies were found to Akabane, Kowanyama, Mapputta or Tinaroo viruses in New South Wales sera. Gan Gan virus appeared to be pathogenic for man being associated with an acute epidemic polyarthritic like illness. Trubanaman virus is suspected of being pathogenic. This is the first report of the pathogenicity of these Australian bunyaviruses.

  9. Acute Thrombocytopenia, Leucopenia, and Multiorgan Dysfunction: The First Case of SFTS Bunyavirus outside China?

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    Srdjan Denic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 57-year-old man with acute thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, and multiorgan dysfunction. Patient was from North Korea and was temporarily working in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, when he fell ill in March 2009. At the same time and unknown to us, many patients with similar clinical manifestations were admitted to hospitals in China. The Chinese cases—identified between March and July 2009—were recently reported to have been infected with a tick-born strain of bunyavirus, a new disease. The virus infection was documented in patients from central China and the region that shares the border with North Korea. The clinical manifestations, the time of disease onset, and geographical link of the patient with the region in which the disease is endemic suggest that the patient had SFTS bunyavirus infection.

  10. Making Bunyaviruses Talk: Interrogation Tactics to Identify Host Factors Required for Infection

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    Amber M. Riblett

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The identification of host cellular genes that act as either proviral or antiviral factors has been aided by the development of an increasingly large number of high-throughput screening approaches. Here, we review recent advances in which these new technologies have been used to interrogate host genes for the ability to impact bunyavirus infection, both in terms of technical advances as well as a summary of biological insights gained from these studies.

  11. Rapid identification of Australian bunyavirus isolates belonging to the Simbu serogroup using indirect ELISA formats.

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    Blacksell, S D; Lunt, R A; White, J R

    1997-06-01

    The Bunyavirus genus, belonging to the Bunyaviridae family, is comprised of a large group of antigenically and geographically disparate arthropod-borne viruses of medical and veterinary significance. In Australia, viruses belonging to the Simbu serogroup of the Bunyavirus genus, Akabane, Tinaroo, Peaton, Aino, Douglas, Thimiri and Facey's Paddock have been isolated. In this communication we describe two indirect ELISAs, referred to as the Simbu serogroup ELISA (SG-ELISA), and the Simbu typing ELISA (ST-ELISA), for the identification of these Simbu serogroup viruses. Infected cell lysate antigens prepared from Simbu serogroup virus isolates were assessed in the SG-ELISA for reactivity with a mouse monoclonal antibody (4H9/B11/F1). The monoclonal antibody reacted strongly with all Australian members of Simbu serogroup reference viruses and is proposed for use as a serogrouping reagent for Simbu viruses. Furthermore, the ST-ELISA enabled specific identification of viruses from within this group by recognition of characteristic reaction patterns between infected cell lysate antigens and a panel of polyclonal antisera raised to Simbu serogroup viruses.

  12. Biochemical and serological comparisons of Australian bunyaviruses belonging to the Simbu serogroup.

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    McPhee, D A; Della-Porta, A J

    1988-05-01

    Comparative analysis of the structural and possible non-structural proteins of seven Simbu serogroup bunyaviruses isolated in Australia revealed them all to be similar in size to those of Bunyamwera virus, the prototype of the Bunyavirus genus. The molecular weights of the structural proteins for these bunyaviruses (Akabane, Aino, Tinaroo, Douglas, Peaton, Facey's Paddock and Thimiri viruses) were 193K to 205K (L), 103K to 125K (G1), 33K to 37K (G2) and 25K to 26K (N). Analysis of the virion RNA of three viruses (Akabane, Douglas and Facey's Paddock) showed them all to be similar to Bunyamwera virus RNA, apparent Mr values being 2.6 X 10(6) (L), 1.4 X 10(6) to 1.9 X 10(6) (M) and 0.24 X 10(6) to 0.42 X 10(6) (S). Host cell protein synthesis was switched off late during infection, revealing four structural proteins L, G1, G2 and N. Comparative analysis of these protein profiles in infected Vero cells showed each virus, although similar, to be unique and easily identified; this method of comparison was efficient and rapid compared to the difficulty in obtaining adequate amounts of purified virus for analysis. Additionally, for all viruses except Douglas, two to four possible non-structural proteins were identified, with an Mr range from 12K to 30K. The viruses Akabane and Tinaroo, which have previously been shown to cross-react by plaque inhibition virus neutralization tests, were readily distinguished in migration of the G1 glycoprotein and by analysis of plaque reduction virus neutralization data using linear regression analysis of the dose-response curves. Using these same analyses, the differences between Aino and Douglas viruses, also related by plaque inhibition, were even greater. Application of the biochemical analysis of virus-specified proteins and some serological comparisons identified a mixed pool of different viruses in two unknown isolates grouped as Simbu serogroup viruses, and further identified a potential teratogenic strain in one of the two pools.

  13. Multilamellar Structures and Filament Bundles Are Found on the Cell Surface during Bunyavirus Egress

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    Sanz-Sánchez, Laura; Risco, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Inside cells, viruses build specialized compartments for replication and morphogenesis. We observed that virus release associates with specific structures found on the surface of mammalian cells. Cultured adherent cells were infected with a bunyavirus and processed for oriented sectioning and transmission electron microscopy. Imaging of cell basal regions showed sophisticated multilamellar structures (MLS) and extracellular filament bundles with attached viruses. Correlative light and electron microscopy confirmed that both MLS and filaments proliferated during the maximum egress of new viruses. MLS dimensions and structure were reminiscent of those reported for the nanostructures on gecko fingertips, which are responsible for the extraordinary attachment capacity of these lizards. As infected cells with MLS were more resistant to detachment than control cells, we propose an adhesive function for these structures, which would compensate for the loss of adherence during release of new virus progeny. PMID:23799021

  14. Multilamellar structures and filament bundles are found on the cell surface during bunyavirus egress.

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    Laura Sanz-Sánchez

    Full Text Available Inside cells, viruses build specialized compartments for replication and morphogenesis. We observed that virus release associates with specific structures found on the surface of mammalian cells. Cultured adherent cells were infected with a bunyavirus and processed for oriented sectioning and transmission electron microscopy. Imaging of cell basal regions showed sophisticated multilamellar structures (MLS and extracellular filament bundles with attached viruses. Correlative light and electron microscopy confirmed that both MLS and filaments proliferated during the maximum egress of new viruses. MLS dimensions and structure were reminiscent of those reported for the nanostructures on gecko fingertips, which are responsible for the extraordinary attachment capacity of these lizards. As infected cells with MLS were more resistant to detachment than control cells, we propose an adhesive function for these structures, which would compensate for the loss of adherence during release of new virus progeny.

  15. Comparative Structural and Functional Analysis of Bunyavirus and Arenavirus Cap-Snatching Endonucleases.

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    Juan Reguera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Segmented negative strand RNA viruses of the arena-, bunya- and orthomyxovirus families uniquely carry out viral mRNA transcription by the cap-snatching mechanism. This involves cleavage of host mRNAs close to their capped 5' end by an endonuclease (EN domain located in the N-terminal region of the viral polymerase. We present the structure of the cap-snatching EN of Hantaan virus, a bunyavirus belonging to hantavirus genus. Hantaan EN has an active site configuration, including a metal co-ordinating histidine, and nuclease activity similar to the previously reported La Crosse virus and Influenza virus ENs (orthobunyavirus and orthomyxovirus respectively, but is more active in cleaving a double stranded RNA substrate. In contrast, Lassa arenavirus EN has only acidic metal co-ordinating residues. We present three high resolution structures of Lassa virus EN with different bound ion configurations and show in comparative biophysical and biochemical experiments with Hantaan, La Crosse and influenza ENs that the isolated Lassa EN is essentially inactive. The results are discussed in the light of EN activation mechanisms revealed by recent structures of full-length influenza virus polymerase.

  16. Risk assessment of human infection with a novel bunyavirus in China

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    Tamano Matsui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the public health risk of human infection from a novel bunyavirus – severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV – in China.Methods: The likelihood of disease spread and the magnitude of public health impact were assessed to clarify overall risk. Literature about hazard, exposure and contextual factors associated with SFTSV infection was collected and reviewed. Information on SFTSV cases and the population in six provinces under surveillance was compared.Results: SFTSV is a member of the Phlebovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. A widely distributed tick species, Haemaphysalis longicornis, can act as the vector; thus the disease is likely to spread in China. Symptoms of SFTSV infection are nonspecific, but have led to multiorgan dysfunction in severe cases. High-risk populations include farmers and older females. Evidence of human-to-human transmission within family and hospital has been reported. The capacity for treatment and diagnosis of SFTSV are adequate in rural communities in China, and community awareness of the disease should be high. Discussion: There is a low to moderate public health risk related to SFTSV human infection in China. There is potential for an increase in the number of cases reported as awareness increases and when surveillance is expanded.

  17. Risk factors for bunyavirus-associated severe Fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, china.

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    Fan Ding

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS is an emerging disease that is caused by a novel bunyavirus, referred to as SFTS virus. During January 2011 to December 2011 we conducted a case-control study in Henan, Hubei and Shandong Provinces of China to determine the risk factors for SFTS.Case-patients were identified in hospitals and reported to provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention while being notified electronically to the National Surveillance System. Controls were randomly selected from a pool of patients admitted to the same hospital ward within one week of the inclusion of the cases. They were matched by age (+/-5 years and gender.A total of 422 patients participated in the study including 134 cases and 288 matched controls. The median age of the cases was 58.8 years, ranging from 47.6 to 70.1 years; 54.5% were male. No differences in demographics were observed between cases and controls; however, farmers were frequent and more common among cases (88.8% than controls (58.7%. In multivariate analysis, the odds for SFTS was 2.4∼4.5 fold higher with patients who reported tick bites or presence of tick in the living area. Other independent risk factors included cat or cattle ownership and reported presence of weeds and shrubs in the working environment.Our findings support the hypothesis that ticks are important vectors of SFTS virus. Further investigations are warranted to understand the detailed modes of transmission of SFTS virus while vector management, education on tick bites prevention and personal hygiene management should be implemented for high-risk groups in high incidence areas.

  18. Extracellular Vesicles Mediate Receptor-Independent Transmission of Novel Tick-Borne Bunyavirus

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    Silvas, Jesus A.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus is a newly recognized member of the genus Phlebovirus in the family Bunyaviridae. The virus was isolated from patients presenting with hemorrhagic manifestations and an initial case fatality rate of 12 to 30% was reported. Due to the recent emergence of this pathogen, there is limited knowledge on the molecular virology of SFTS virus. Recently, we reported that the SFTS virus NSs protein inhibited the activation of the beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter. Furthermore, we also found that SFTS virus NSs relocalizes key components of the IFN response into NSs-induced cytoplasmic structures. Due to the important role these structures play during SFTS virus replication, we conducted live cell imaging studies to gain further insight into the role and trafficking of these cytoplasmic structures during virus infection. We found that some of the SFTS virus NSs-positive cytoplasmic structures were secreted to the extracellular space and endocytosed by neighboring cells. We also found that these secreted structures isolated from NSs-expressing cells and SFTS virus-infected cells were positive for the viral protein NSs and the host protein CD63, a protein associated with extracellular vesicles. Electron microscopy studies also revealed that the isolated CD63-immunoprecipitated extracellular vesicles produced during SFTS virus infection contained virions. The virions harbored within these structures were efficiently delivered to uninfected cells and were able to sustain SFTS virus replication. Altogether, these results suggest that SFTS virus exploits extracellular vesicles to mediate virus receptor-independent transmission to host cells and open the avenue for novel therapeutic strategies against SFTS virus and related pathogens. IMPORTANCE SFTS virus is novel bunyavirus associated with hemorrhagic fever illness. Currently, limited information is available about SFTS virus. In the present study, we demonstrated

  19. Synthesis of bunyavirus-specific proteins in a continuous cell line (XTC-2) derived from Xenopus laevis.

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    Watret, G E; Pringle, C R; Elliott, R M

    1985-03-01

    The XTC-2 cell line, derived from Xenopus laevis, supported the replication of representative viruses from each of the four genera in the family Bunyaviridae. Generally, viral titres were higher in XTC-2 cells than in other susceptible cell lines, and for some viruses plaques were detected earlier in XTC-2 cells. The XTC-2 cell line permitted comparative analyses of bunyavirus-specific protein synthesis. The patterns of synthesis of viral proteins, characteristic of each of the genera, were observed with representative viruses. These studies provided biochemical characterization of two Scottish isolates, which support the inclusion of Clo Mor virus in the Nairovirus genus and St Abb's Head (M349) virus in the Uukuvirus genus.

  20. Ticks and tick-borne novel bunyavirus collected from the natural environment and domestic animals in Jinan city, East China.

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    Wang, Dong; Wang, Yongming; Yang, Guoliang; Liu, Huiyuan; Xin, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    Since 2011, 73 cases of the severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, a novel tick-borne disease, have been reported in Jinan city through information system for disease control and prevention. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the species, distribution, host animals of ticks and tick-borne pathogens. A total of 722 ticks were collected from two types of natural environment and six kinds of domestic animal in Jinan city. All the sampled ticks belonged to the same species, namely Haemaphysalis longicornis, and 94.7% of them were adult. The density of free-living ticks in grassland was nearly six times that in shrub. The prevalence of the goat (53.3%) was highest among the domestic animals. The host body region most frequently parasitized by H. longicornis was the head (77.8%), especially ears and periocular region. Novel bunyavirus was detected on the free-ranging goats in Jinan city. Acaricide treatment with a higher concentration on the ears, periocular region and the groin of domestic animals should be recommended to control the ticks effectively.

  1. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus Characterization and antigenic relationship of three new Bunyavirus in the Anopheles A serogroup (Bunyaviridae of arboviruses

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    Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da Rosa

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.The isolation and characterization of three new viruses obtained from the Tucuruí hydroelectric dam region is repeated. These three agents belong to the Anopheles A serogroup, genus Bunyavirus, Bunyaviridae. The Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipe (CPE and Arumateua (ART viruses have close relationships with each other and with Trombetas (TBT virus, an Anopheles A virus previously isolated in the Amazon Region of Brazil. These viruses form the "Trombetas complex". TUC, CPE and ART viruses were obtained from pools of

  2. Ultrastructural, Antigenic and Physicochemical Characterization of the Mojuí dos Campos (Bunyavirus Isolated from Bat in the Brazilian Amazon Region

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    Wanzeller Ana LM

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mojuí dos Campos virus (MDCV was isolated from the blood of an unidentified bat (Chiroptera captured in Mojuí dos Campos, Santarém, State of Pará, Brazil, in 1975 and considerated to be antigenically different from other 102 arboviruses belonging to several antigenic groups isolated in the Amazon region or another region by complement fixation tests. The objective of this work was to develop a morphologic, an antigenic and physicochemical characterization of this virus. MDCV produces cytopathic effect in Vero cells, 24 h post-infection (p.i, and the degree of cellular destruction increases after a few hours. Negative staining electron microscopy of the supernatant of Vero cell cultures showed the presence of coated viral particles with a diameter of around 98 nm. Ultrathin sections of Vero cells, and brain and liver of newborn mice infected with MDCV showed an assembly of the viral particles into the Golgi vesicles. The synthesis kinetics of the proteins for MDCV were similar to that observed for other bunyaviruses, and viral proteins could be detected as early as 6 h p.i. Our results reinforce the original studies which had classified MDCV in the family Bunyaviridae, genus Bunyavirus as an ungrouped virus, and it may represent the prototype of a new serogroup.

  3. Arbovirus investigations in Argentina, 1977-1980. III. Identification and characterization of viruses isolated, including new subtypes of western and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses and four new bunyaviruses (Las Maloyas, Resistencia, Barranqueras, and Antequera).

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    Calisher, C H; Monath, T P; Mitchell, C J; Sabattini, M S; Cropp, C B; Kerschner, J; Hunt, A R; Lazuick, J S

    1985-09-01

    Forty viruses isolated from mosquitoes between 1977 and 1980 in Argentina have been identified and characterized. Nineteen strains of VEE virus, identical by neutralization (N) tests, were shown by hemagglutination-inhibition tests with anti-E2 glycoprotein sera to represent a new subtype VI of the VEE complex. RNA oligonucleotide fingerprints of this virus were distinct from subtype I viruses. The virus was not lethal for English short-haired guinea pigs, indicating that it is probably not equine-virulent. Three strains of a member of the WEE virus complex were shown to differ by N tests in 1 direction from prototype WEE virus. The new WEE subtype was also found to be distinct by RNA oligonucleotide mapping. Its vector relationships indicate that it is an enzootic virus, and it has not been associated with equine disease. A new member of the Anopheles A serogroup was identified, shown to be most closely related to Lukuni and Col An 57389 viruses, and given the name Las Maloyas virus. A strain of Para virus (Bunyaviridae, Bunyavirus) was identified. Six isolates, representing 3 new viruses morphologically resembling bunyaviruses are described; the names Antequera, Barranqueras, and Resistencia are proposed for these agents, which were all isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) delpontei in Chaco Province. No serologic relationships between these viruses and other bunyaviruses were found. Since they are antigenically interrelated, they form a new (Antequera) serogroup. Eight Gamboa serogroup viruses and 2 strains of St. Louis encephalitis virus were also identified.

  4. Computational identification of epitopes in the glycoproteins of novel bunyavirus (SFTS virus) recognized by a human monoclonal antibody (MAb 4-5)

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    Zhang, Wenshuai; Zeng, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Peng, Haiyan; Jiao, Yongjun; Zeng, Jun; Treutlein, Herbert R.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we have developed a new approach to predict the epitopes of antigens that are recognized by a specific antibody. Our method is based on the "multiple copy simultaneous search" (MCSS) approach which identifies optimal locations of small chemical functional groups on the surfaces of the antibody, and identifying sequence patterns of peptides that can bind to the surface of the antibody. The identified sequence patterns are then used to search the amino-acid sequence of the antigen protein. The approach was validated by reproducing the binding epitope of HIV gp120 envelop glycoprotein for the human neutralizing antibody as revealed in the available crystal structure. Our method was then applied to predict the epitopes of two glycoproteins of a newly discovered bunyavirus recognized by an antibody named MAb 4-5. These predicted epitopes can be verified by experimental methods. We also discuss the involvement of different amino acids in the antigen-antibody recognition based on the distributions of MCSS minima of different functional groups.

  5. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus

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    Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da Rosa

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.

  6. Caracterização e relacionamento antigênico de três novos Bunyavirus no grupo Anopheles A (Bunyaviridae dos arbovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos da

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available São descritos o isolamento e a caracterização de três novos arbovirus isolados na região da Usina Hidro-Elétrica de Tucuruí (UHE-TUC. Os três novos arbovirus pertencem ao grupo Anopheles A(ANA, gênero Bunyavirus (família Bunyaviridae. Os vírus Tucuruí (TUC, Caraipé (CPE e Arumateua (ART são relacionados entre si e com o vírus Trombetas (TBT, formando dentro do grupo ANA um complexo chamado Trombetas. Os arbovirus TUC, CPE e ART foram obtidos a partir de lotes de mosquitos Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus sp capturados em Tucuruí, nas proximidades da usina hidrelétrica de Tucuruí, Estado do Pará, nos meses de fevereiro, agosto e outubro de 1984, respectivamente. Até o final de 1990 os vírus TUC, CPE e ART foram isolados 12, 32 e 28 vezes respectivamente, sempre na região da UHE-TUC, exceção feita ao vírus TUC, do qual se obteve uma amostra procedente de Balbina, onde também foi construída uma hidroelétrica. Até o presente, esses vírus só foram isolados a partir de mosquitos do grupo An. (Nys. principalmente, a partir das espécies An. (Nys. nuneztovari e An. (Nys. triannulatus também consideradas vetores secundários da malária na Amazônia Brasileira. Testes sorológicos executados com soros humanos e de diversas espécies de animais silvestres foram negativos, com exceção de um soro de um carnívoro de espécie Nasua nasua que neutralizou a amostra TUC em títulos de 2.6 índice logaritmico de neutralização (ILN.

  7. The Genus Tospovirus: Emerging Bunyaviruses that Threaten Food Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J E; Whitfield, A E

    2016-09-29

    The genus Tospovirus is unique within the family Bunyaviridae in that it is made up of viruses that infect plants. Initially documented over 100 years ago, tospoviruses have become increasingly important worldwide since the 1980s due to the spread of the important insect vector Frankliniella occidentalis and the discovery of new viruses. As a result, tospoviruses are now recognized globally as emerging agricultural diseases. Tospoviruses and their vectors, thrips species in the order Thysanoptera, represent a major problem for agricultural and ornamental crops that must be managed to avoid devastating losses. In recent years, the number of recognized species in the genus has increased rapidly, and our knowledge of the molecular interactions of tospoviruses with their host plants and vectors has expanded. In this review, we present an overview of the genus Tospovirus with particular emphasis on new understandings of the molecular plant-virus and vector-virus interactions as well as relationships among genus members.

  8. Antigen and Genome Detection of Arenavirus, Bunyavirus, and Filovirus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    nucleic acid probes supplied by the MRDC as well as virus infected tissues or cell cultures. Pichinde virus , an arenavirus non-pathogenic to humans , is a...were tested using plasmid PL-2, containing the entire BPV-I (bovine papilloma virus ) genome as probe. The target was a frozen section of bovine...Pichinde virus have been portrayed, by Jahrling et al., as an animal model for Lassa fever virus infection in humans . To follow the progression of the

  9. Enhanced arbovirus surveillance with deep sequencing: Identification of novel rhabdoviruses and bunyaviruses in Australian mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L; Page, Brady L; Greninger, Alexander L; Herring, Belinda L; Russell, Richard C; Doggett, Stephen L; Haniotis, John; Wang, Chunlin; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric L

    2014-01-05

    Viral metagenomics characterizes known and identifies unknown viruses based on sequence similarities to any previously sequenced viral genomes. A metagenomics approach was used to identify virus sequences in Australian mosquitoes causing cytopathic effects in inoculated mammalian cell cultures. Sequence comparisons revealed strains of Liao Ning virus (Reovirus, Seadornavirus), previously detected only in China, livestock-infecting Stretch Lagoon virus (Reovirus, Orbivirus), two novel dimarhabdoviruses, named Beaumont and North Creek viruses, and two novel orthobunyaviruses, named Murrumbidgee and Salt Ash viruses. The novel virus proteomes diverged by ≥ 50% relative to their closest previously genetically characterized viral relatives. Deep sequencing also generated genomes of Warrego and Wallal viruses, orbiviruses linked to kangaroo blindness, whose genomes had not been fully characterized. This study highlights viral metagenomics in concert with traditional arbovirus surveillance to characterize known and new arboviruses in field-collected mosquitoes. Follow-up epidemiological studies are required to determine whether the novel viruses infect humans. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection and differentiation of Aino and Akabane Simbu serogroup bunyaviruses by nested polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, H; Onuma, S; Nagano, H; Ohta, M; Fukutomi, T

    1999-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR were developed to detect and differentiate Aino (AINO) and Akabane (AKA) virus S RNA. Two pairs of AINO- and AKA-specific primers for nested PCR were synthesized and examined for their capacity to amplify PCR products using 7 Simbu serogroup viruses isolated in Japan and Australia. RT- and nested PCR using AKA-specific primers amplified cDNA from Tinaroo virus RNA as well as homologous RNA. Nested PCR products were differentiated by Hph I and Bst EII digestion. Peaton (PEA) virus S cDNA was also amplified using AINO- specific primers. The nested PCR products of PEA virus were not digested by 3 restriction enzymes (Ava II, Eco RI and Hae II), whereras those of AINO virus were digested as expected. Using this technique, AINO and AKA viruses were detected at concentrations as low as 10(-3) plaque-forming units (PFU) and 10(-5) PFU, respectively, in a supernatant of virus-infected cells. It was possible to detect AINO and AKA genome from various tissues of experimentally infected mice, and also the AKA nested PCR products from serum samples from sentinel cattle naturally infected with AKA virus. The present nested PCR appears a simple, rapid and valuable method for diagnosing AINO and AKA infection.

  11. Ribavirin Treatment of Toga-, Arena- and Bunyavirus Infections in Subhuman Primates and Other Laboratory Animal Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious / ,4...days after the cessation of treatment. E. Studies in Subhuman Primates (Intramuscular Administracion of Ribavirin) Rhesus monkeys inoculated with FVF

  12. Role of Anopheles quadrimaculatus and Coquillettidia perturbans (Diptera: Culicidae) in the transmission cycle of Cache Valley virus (Bunyaviridae: Bunyavirus) in the midwest, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, C G; Blackmore, M S; Grimstad, P R

    1998-09-01

    Midwestern populations of Coquillettidia perturbans (Walker) and Anopheles quadrimaculatus (Say) were tested for their ability to transmit Cache Valley virus (CV), a recognized human and animal pathogen. Field-collected mosquitoes were fed artificial blood meals containing 5.2-6.2 log10 pfu/ml of CV. After 9-23 d at 28 degrees C, 75-93% of blood-fed Cq. perturbans had disseminated infections and 6-62% transmitted the virus to suckling mice. However, when infected with a lower virus titer (3.3 log10 pfu/ml), only 10-36% of the mosquitoes had disseminated infections and 0-10% transmitted the virus to suckling mice. A similar infection rate (21%) was observed in Cq. perturbans fed on viremic (3.2 log10 pfu/ml) hamsters. An. quadrimaculatus were infected (81-100%) by both doses used, with transmission rates ranging from 13-67% after 16-23 d of incubation. Transmission rates for the laboratory strain An. quadrimaculatus SAVANNAH ranged from 20 to 33% after 7-14 d of incubation. Our data show that although An. quadrimaculatus is more susceptible to CV infections than Cq. perturbans, both mosquito species could be involved in the midwestern transmission cycle of the virus.

  13. AcEST: BP921688 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MK0977 ... 31 2.6 sp|P04875|VGLM_BUNSH Envelope glycoprotein OS=Bunyavirus snowsho... 30 5.6 sp|A1U7G1|AMIE_...BUNSH Envelope glycoprotein OS=Bunyavirus snowshoe hare GN=M PE=1 SV=1 Length = 1441 Score = 29.6 bits (65),

  14. Viruses of the family Bunyaviridae: are all available isolates reassortants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briese, Thomas; Calisher, Charles H; Higgs, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    Viruses of the family Bunyaviridae (the bunyaviruses) possess three distinct linear, single-stranded, negative sense or ambisense RNA segments (large, medium, and small). Dual infections of arthropod and perhaps vertebrate and plant hosts provide substantial opportunity for segment reassortment and an increasingly recognized number of the nearly 300 viruses in this family have been shown to be reassortants. Reassortment of RNA segments (genetic shift) complements genetic drift (accumulation of point mutations) as a powerful mechanism underlying bunyavirus evolution. Here we consider the possibility, if not likelihood, that most if not all bunyaviruses currently recognized may represent reassortants, some of which may be reassortants of existing viruses, and some of which may be reassortants of extinct viruses. If this hypothesis is correct, then the roots of the family and genus trees of bunyaviruses as currently described (or ignored) are incomplete or incorrect. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolations of Bwamba virus from south central Uganda and north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bwamba virus (Genus Bunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae) is widely distributed in Africa. It causes many unidentified fevers because of its benign nature. Objectives: Samples of blood from patients were received at Uganda Virus Research Institute for diagnosis and confirmation of infections. Mosquito collections ...

  16. Tomato spotted wilt virus particle assembly : studying the role of the structural proteins in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, M.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bunyaviridae have spherical, enveloped virus particles that acquire their lipid membrane at the Golgi complex. For the animal-infecting bunyaviruses, virus assembly involves budding of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) into vacuolised lumen of the Golgi complex, after which the

  17. Single-Molecule FISH Reveals Non-selective Packaging of Rift Valley Fever Virus Genome Segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichgers Schreur, Paul J.; Kortekaas, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The bunyavirus genome comprises a small (S), medium (M), and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. Although genome segmentation confers evolutionary advantages by enabling genome reassortment events with related viruses, genome segmentation also complicates genome replication and packaging.

  18. Viral RNA silencing suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hedil, Marcio; Kormelink, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is a family of arboviruses including both plant-and vertebrate-infecting representatives. The Tospovirus genus accommodates plant-infecting bunyaviruses, which not only replicate in their plant host, but also in their insect thrips vector during persistent propagative

  19. Genetics of War and Truce between Mosquitos and Emerging Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jesse; Jurado, Kellie Ann; Fikrig, Erol

    2016-05-11

    Arboviruses have made unexpected reappearances in recent years. Unlike viruses that undergo direct transmission, arboviruses utilize an arthropod vector (e.g., mosquitos, sandflies, and ticks) to spread throughout human populations. Here, we provide a snapshot of mosquito susceptibility to viral infection using flaviviruses, alphaviruses, and bunyaviruses as examples of emerging pathogens of global health relevance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Serological examination of songbirds (Passeriformes) for mosquito-borne viruses Sindbis, Ťahyňa, and Batai in a South Moravian Wetland (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juřicová, Zina; Hubálek, Zdeněk; Halouzka, Jiří; Šikutová, Silvie

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 3 (2009), s. 295-299 ISSN 1530-3667 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600930611 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Alphavirus * Bunyavirus * Orthobunyavirus * mosquitoes * Moravia * Wetland birds Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.607, year: 2009

  1. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  2. Intracellular localization of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF virus glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lisa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus (CCHFV, a member of the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae, is a tick-borne pathogen causing severe disease in humans. To better understand the CCHFV life cycle and explore potential intervention strategies, we studied the biosynthesis and intracellular targeting of the glycoproteins, which are encoded by the M genome segment. Results Following determination of the complete genome sequence of the CCHFV reference strain IbAr10200, we generated expression plasmids for the individual expression of the glycoproteins GN and GC, using CMV- and chicken β-actin-driven promoters. The cellular localization of recombinantly expressed CCHFV glycoproteins was compared to authentic glycoproteins expressed during virus infection using indirect immunofluorescence assays, subcellular fractionation/western blot assays and confocal microscopy. To further elucidate potential intracellular targeting/retention signals of the two glycoproteins, GFP-fusion proteins containing different parts of the CCHFV glycoprotein were analyzed for their intracellular targeting. The N-terminal glycoprotein GN localized to the Golgi complex, a process mediated by retention/targeting signal(s in the cytoplasmic domain and ectodomain of this protein. In contrast, the C-terminal glycoprotein GC remained in the endoplasmic reticulum but could be rescued into the Golgi complex by co-expression of GN. Conclusion The data are consistent with the intracellular targeting of most bunyavirus glycoproteins and support the general model for assembly and budding of bunyavirus particles in the Golgi compartment.

  3. An Assembly Model of Rift Valley Fever Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Mirabela; Bonneau, Richard; Holbrook, Michael R.; Watowich, Stanley J.; Birmanns, Stefan; Wriggers, Willy; Freiberg, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a bunyavirus endemic to Africa and the Arabian Peninsula that infects humans and livestock. The virus encodes two glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, which represent the major structural antigens and are responsible for host cell receptor binding and fusion. Both glycoproteins are organized on the virus surface as cylindrical hollow spikes that cluster into distinct capsomers with the overall assembly exhibiting an icosahedral symmetry. Currently, no experimental three-dimensional structure for any entire bunyavirus glycoprotein is available. Using fold recognition, we generated molecular models for both RVFV glycoproteins and found significant structural matches between the RVFV Gn protein and the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein and a separate match between RVFV Gc protein and Sindbis virus envelope protein E1. Using these models, the potential interaction and arrangement of both glycoproteins in the RVFV particle was analyzed, by modeling their placement within the cryo-electron microscopy density map of RVFV. We identified four possible arrangements of the glycoproteins in the virion envelope. Each assembly model proposes that the ectodomain of Gn forms the majority of the protruding capsomer and that Gc is involved in formation of the capsomer base. Furthermore, Gc is suggested to facilitate intercapsomer connections. The proposed arrangement of the two glycoproteins on the RVFV surface is similar to that described for the alphavirus E1-E2 proteins. Our models will provide guidance to better understand the assembly process of phleboviruses and such structural studies can also contribute to the design of targeted antivirals. PMID:22837754

  4. An assembly model of Rift Valley fever virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirabela eRusu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a bunyavirus endemic to Africa and the Arabian Peninsula that infects humans and livestock. The virus encodes two glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, which represent the major structural antigens and are responsible for host cell receptor binding and fusion. Both glycoproteins are organized on the virus surface as cylindrical hollow spikes that cluster into distinct capsomers with the overall assembly exhibiting an icosahedral symmetry. Currently, no experimental three-dimensional structure for any entire bunyavirus glycoprotein is available. Using fold recognition, we generated molecular models for both RVFV glycoproteins and found significant structural matches between the RVFV Gn protein and the influenza virus hemagglutinin protein and a separate match between RVFV Gc protein and Sindbis virus envelope protein E1. Using these models, the potential interaction and arrangement of both glycoproteins in the RVFV particle was analyzed, by modeling their placement within the cryo-electron microscopy density map of RVFV. We identified four possible arrangements of the glycoproteins in the virion envelope. Each assembly model proposes that the ectodomain of Gn forms the majority of the protruding capsomer and that Gc is involved in formation of the capsomer base. Furthermore, Gc is suggested to facilitate intercapsomer connections. The proposed arrangement of the two glycoproteins on the RVFV surface is similar to that described for the alphavirus E1-E2 proteins. Our models will provide guidance to better understand the assembly process of phleboviruses and such structural studies can also contribute to the design of targeted antivirals.

  5. Arbovirus infections and viral haemorrhagic fevers in Uganda: a serological survey in Karamoja district, 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F; Gonzalez, J P; Mercier, E; Helynck, B; Larouze, B; Hannoun, C

    1989-01-01

    Sera collected in May 1984 from 132 adult residents of Karamoja district, Uganda, were examined by haemagglutination inhibition tests for antibodies against selected arboviruses, namely Chikungunya and Semliki Forest alphaviruses (Togaviridae); dengue type 2, Wesselsbron, West Nile, yellow fever and Zika flaviviruses (Flaviviridae); Bunyamwera, Ilesha and Tahyna bunyaviruses (Bunyaviridae); and Sicilian sandfly fever phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae); and by immunofluorescence tests against certain haemorrhagic fever viruses, Lassa fever arenavirus (Arenaviridae), Ebola-Sudan, Ebola-Zaïre and Marburg filoviruses (Filoviridae), Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever nairovirus and Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae). Antibodies against Chikungunya virus were the most prevalent (47%), followed by flavivirus antibodies (16%), which were probably due mainly to West Nile virus. No evidence of yellow fever or dengue virus circulation was observed. A few individuals had antibodies against Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Lassa, Ebola and Marburg viruses, suggesting that these viruses all circulate in the area.

  6. Viral hemorrhagic fever in the tropics: Report from the task force on tropical diseases by the World Federation of Societies of Intensive and Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Jorge; Richards, Guy A; Jiménez, Juan Ignacio Silesky; Baker, Tim; Amin, Pravin

    2017-12-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) are a group of illnesses caused by four families of viruses namely Arenaviruses, Filoviruses, Bunyaviruses, and Flaviviruses. Humans are not the natural reservoir for any of these organisms and acquire the disease through vectors from animal reservoirs. In some conditions human to human transmission is possible increasing the risk to healthy individuals in the vicinity, more so to Health Care Workers (HCW). The pathogenesis of VHF, though poorly understood, varies according to the viruses involved. The resultant microvascular damage leads to increased vascular permeability, organ dysfunction and even death. The management is generally supportive but antiviral agents are of benefit in certain circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Isolation of Kaeng Khoi virus from dead Chaerephon plicata bats in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, J C; Rupprecht, C E; Olson, J G; Ksiazek, T G; Rollin, P E; Niezgoda, M; Goldsmith, C S; An, U S; Nichol, S T

    2003-10-01

    A virus isolated from dead Chaerephon plicata bats collected near Kampot, Cambodia, was identified as a member of the family Bunyaviridae by electron microscopy. The only bunyavirus previously isolated from Chaerephon species bats in South-East Asia is Kaeng Khoi (KK) virus (genus Orthobunyavirus), detected in Thailand over 30 years earlier and implicated as a public health problem. Using RT-PCR, nucleotide sequences from the M RNA segment of several virus isolates from the Cambodian C. plicata bats were found to be almost identical and to differ from those of the prototype KK virus by only 2.6-3.2 %, despite the temporal and geographic separation of the viruses. These results identify the Cambodian bat viruses as KK virus, extend the known virus geographic range and document the first KK virus isolation in 30 years. These genetic data, together with earlier serologic data, show that KK viruses represent a distinct group within the genus Orthobunyavirus.

  8. Itaya virus, a Novel Orthobunyavirus Associated with Human Febrile Illness, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontz, Robert D; Guevara, Carolina; Halsey, Eric S; Silvas, Jesus; Santiago, Felix W; Widen, Steven G; Wood, Thomas G; Casanova, Wilma; Vasilakis, Nikos; Watts, Douglas M; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Ebihara, Hideki; Aguilar, Patricia V

    2015-05-01

    Our genetic analyses of uncharacterized bunyaviruses isolated in Peru identified a possible reassortant virus containing small and large gene segment sequences closely related to the Caraparu virus and a medium gene segment sequence potentially derived from an unidentified group C orthobunyavirus. Neutralization tests confirmed serologic distinction among the newly identified virus and the prototype and Caraparu strains. This virus, named Itaya, was isolated in 1999 and 2006 from febrile patients in the cities of Iquitos and Yurimaguas in Peru. The geographic distance between the 2 cases suggests that the Itaya virus could be widely distributed throughout the Amazon basin in northeastern Peru. Identification of a new Orthobunyavirus species that causes febrile disease in humans reinforces the need to expand viral disease surveillance in tropical regions of South America.

  9. Immunization with DNA plasmids coding for crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever virus capsid and envelope proteins and/or virus-like particles induces protection and survival in challenged mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinkula, Jorma; Devignot, Stéphanie; Åkerström, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a bunyavirus causing severe hemorrhagic fever disease in humans, with high mortality rates. The requirement of a high-containment laboratory and the lack of an animal model hampered the study of the immune response and protection of vaccine...... transcriptionally competent virus-like particles (tc-VLPs). In contrast to most studies that focus on neutralizing antibodies, we measured both humoral and cellular immune responses. We demonstrated a clear and 100% efficient preventive immunity against lethal CCHFV challenge with the DNA vaccine. Interestingly......, there was no correlation with the neutralizing antibody titers alone, which were higher in the tc-VLP-vaccinated mice. However, the animals with a lower neutralizing titer, but a dominant cell-mediated Th1 response and a balanced Th2 response, resisted the CCHFV challenge. Moreover, we found that in challenged mice...

  10. Assessment of a cricket, Acheta domesticus, bioassay for Chequa Iflavirus and bunya-like virus from redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuna, Kitikarn; Elliman, Jennifer; Owens, Leigh

    2017-11-01

    Chequa iflavirus and a bunya-like virus infect redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) and they may cause mortality reaching 20-40% after about three weeks after a stress event. To complete River's postulates for viruses, virus-free animals are needed. Due to a lack of chequa iflavirus and bunya-like virus-free crayfish (testing shows>85% infection rate) coupled with the facts that iflavirus and bunyaviruses are found in insects and that crickets had been successful alternate hosts for crustacean viruses before, Acheta domesticus was trialled asa bioassay animal. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in mortality rates between uninfected control crickets and infected crickets. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for both viruses failed to find any trace of the RNA viruses in fed or inoculated crickets after 30days. The search for an alternative bioassay host will have to be widened. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Roles of viroplasm-like structures formed by nonstructural protein NSs in infection with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaodong; Qi, Xian; Liang, Mifang; Li, Chuan; Cardona, Carol J; Li, Dexin; Xing, Zheng

    2014-06-01

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus is an emerging bunyavirus that causes a hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. The virus is likely tick-borne and replicates primarily in hemopoietic cells, which may lead to disregulation of proinflammatory cytokine induction and loss of leukocytes and platelets. The viral genome contains L, M, and S segments encoding a viral RNA polymerase, glycoproteins G(n) and G(c), nucleoprotein (NP), and a nonstructural S segment (NSs) protein. NSs protein is involved in the regulation of host innate immune responses and suppression of IFNβ-promoter activities. In this article, we demonstrate that NSs protein can form viroplasm-like structures (VLSs) in infected and transfected cells. NSs protein molecules interact with one another, interact with NP, and were associated with viral RNA in infected cells, suggesting that NSs protein may be involved in viral replication. Furthermore, we observed that NSs-formed VLS colocalized with lipid droplets and that inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis decreased VLS formation or viral replication in transfected and infected cells. Finally, we have demonstrated that viral dsRNAs were also localized in VLS in infected cells, suggesting that NSs-formed VLS may be implicated in the replication of SFTS bunyavirus. These findings identify a novel function of nonstructural NSs in SFTSV-infected cells where it is a scaffolding component in a VLS functioning as a virus replication factory. This function is in addition to the role of NSs protein in modulating host responses that will broaden our understanding of viral pathogenesis of phleboviruses. © FASEB.

  12. Risk analysis of inter-species reassortment through a Rift Valley fever phlebovirus MP-12 vaccine strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoai J Ly

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The causative agent, Rift Valley fever phlebovirus (RVFV, belongs to the genus Phlebovirus in the family Phenuiviridae and causes high rates of abortions in ruminants, and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, or blindness in humans. Viral maintenance by mosquito vectors has led to sporadic RVF outbreaks in ruminants and humans in endemic countries, and effective vaccination of animals and humans may minimize the impact of this disease. A live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine strain is one of the best characterized RVFV strains, and was conditionally approved as a veterinary vaccine in the U.S. Live-attenuated RVF vaccines including MP-12 strain may form reassortant strains with other bunyavirus species. This study thus aimed to characterize the occurrence of genetic reassortment between the MP-12 strain and bunyavirus species closely related to RVFV. The Arumowot virus (AMTV and Gouleako goukovirus (GOLV, are transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa. The results of this study showed that GOLV does not form detectable reassortant strains with the MP-12 strain in co-infected C6/36 cells. The AMTV also did not form any reassortant strains with MP-12 strain in co-infected C6/36 cells, due to the incompatibility among N, L, and Gn/Gc proteins. A lack of reassortant formation could be due to a functional incompatibility of N and L proteins derived from heterologous species, and due to a lack of packaging via heterologous Gn/Gc proteins. The MP-12 strain did, however, randomly exchange L-, M-, and S-segments with a genetic variant strain, rMP12-GM50, in culture cells. The MP-12 strain is thus unlikely to form any reassortant strains with AMTV or GOLV in nature.

  13. Application of modified shell vial culture procedure for arbovirus detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna R Caceda

    Full Text Available The isolation of arboviruses from patient's low titer sera can be difficult. Here we compared the detection efficiency of Dengue (DEN, Yellow Fever (YF, Saint Louis Encephalitis (SLE, West Nile (WN, Ilheus (ILH, Group C (GC, Oropouche (ORO, Mayaro (MAY and Venezuela Encephalitis Equine (VEE viruses using a Modified Shell Vial Culture (MSVC protocol to a Standard Cell Culture (SCC protocol. First the MSVC and SCC protocols were compared using five dilutions for each of the following stock viruses: DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, DEN-4, YF, SLE, WN, ILH, GC, ORO, MAY and VEE. Next, patients' original sera from which viruses (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, YF, GC, ORO, MAY and VEE had been previously isolated were compare by the two methods using five sera dilutions. In addition, seven sera that were positive for DEN-3 by RT-PCR and negative by SCC were processed by MSVC. The MSVC protocol was consistently 1-2 logs higher virus dilution more sensitive for virus detection than the SCC protocol for all stock Flaviviruses tested (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, DEN-4, YF, SLE, WN and ILH. MSVC was equal to or one log more sensitive for virus detection than SCC for the stock Bunyaviruses (GC and ORO. For the stock Alphavirus MAY, MSVC was equally or one log more sensitive for virus detection than SCC, while for VEE SCC was equally or one log more sensitive for virus detection than MSVC. MSVC was consistently one to two sera dilutions more sensitive than SCC for the detection of Flaviviruses from patients' sera. Both methods were approximately equally sensitive for the detection of Bunyaviruses from patients' sera and equal or one dilution less sensitive for the detection of Alphaviruses from patients' sera. Additionally, MSVC detected DEN virus in five of seven DEN-3 RT-PCR positive, SCC negative patients' sera.

  14. Spatial-Temporal Analysis of Cache Valley Virus (Bunyaviridae: Orthobunyavirus) Infection in Anopheline and Culicine Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the Northeastern United States, 1997–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Philip M.; Anderson, John F.; Main, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cache Valley virus (CVV) is a mosquito-borne bunyavirus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) that is enzootic throughout much of North and Central America. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been incriminated as important reservoir and amplification hosts. CVV has been found in a diverse array of mosquito species, but the principal vectors are unknown. A 16-year study was undertaken to identify the primary mosquito vectors in Connecticut, quantify seasonal prevalence rates of infection, and define the spatial geographic distribution of CVV in the state as a function of land use and white-tailed deer populations, which have increased substantially over this period. CVV was isolated from 16 mosquito species in seven genera, almost all of which were multivoltine and mammalophilic. Anopheles (An.) punctipennis was incriminated as the most consistent and likely vector in this region on the basis of yearly isolation frequencies and the spatial geographic distribution of infected mosquitoes. Other species exhibiting frequent temporal and moderate spatial geographic patterns of virus isolation within the state included Ochlerotatus (Oc.) trivittatus, Oc. canadensis, Aedes (Ae.) vexans, and Ae. cinereus. New isolation records for CVV were established for An. walkeri, Culiseta melanura, and Oc. cantator. Other species from which CVV was isolated included An. quadrimaculatus, Coquillettidia perturbans, Culex salinarius, Oc. japonicus, Oc. sollicitans, Oc. taeniorhynchus, Oc. triseriatus, and Psorophora ferox. Mosquitoes infected with CVV were equally distributed throughout urban, suburban, and rural locales, and infection rates were not directly associated with the localized abundance of white-tailed deer, possibly due to their saturation throughout the region. Virus activity in mosquitoes was episodic with no consistent pattern from year-to-year, and fluctuations in yearly seasonal infection rates did not appear to be directly impacted by

  15. Spatial-temporal analysis of Cache Valley virus (Bunyaviridae: Orthobunyavirus) infection in anopheline and culicine mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the northeastern United States, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadis, Theodore G; Armstrong, Philip M; Anderson, John F; Main, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Cache Valley virus (CVV) is a mosquito-borne bunyavirus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) that is enzootic throughout much of North and Central America. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been incriminated as important reservoir and amplification hosts. CVV has been found in a diverse array of mosquito species, but the principal vectors are unknown. A 16-year study was undertaken to identify the primary mosquito vectors in Connecticut, quantify seasonal prevalence rates of infection, and define the spatial geographic distribution of CVV in the state as a function of land use and white-tailed deer populations, which have increased substantially over this period. CVV was isolated from 16 mosquito species in seven genera, almost all of which were multivoltine and mammalophilic. Anopheles (An.) punctipennis was incriminated as the most consistent and likely vector in this region on the basis of yearly isolation frequencies and the spatial geographic distribution of infected mosquitoes. Other species exhibiting frequent temporal and moderate spatial geographic patterns of virus isolation within the state included Ochlerotatus (Oc.) trivittatus, Oc. canadensis, Aedes (Ae.) vexans, and Ae. cinereus. New isolation records for CVV were established for An. walkeri, Culiseta melanura, and Oc. cantator. Other species from which CVV was isolated included An. quadrimaculatus, Coquillettidia perturbans, Culex salinarius, Oc. japonicus, Oc. sollicitans, Oc. taeniorhynchus, Oc. triseriatus, and Psorophora ferox. Mosquitoes infected with CVV were equally distributed throughout urban, suburban, and rural locales, and infection rates were not directly associated with the localized abundance of white-tailed deer, possibly due to their saturation throughout the region. Virus activity in mosquitoes was episodic with no consistent pattern from year-to-year, and fluctuations in yearly seasonal infection rates did not appear to be directly impacted by overall

  16. Antigenic and genetic comparisons of Japanese and Australian Simbu serogroup viruses: evidence for the recovery of natural virus reassortants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, H; Kaku, Y; Kong, X; Pang, H

    1997-08-01

    The antigenicity and RNA genome structures of five Simbu serogroup bunyaviruses isolated in Japan and Australia were analyzed using monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) raised to Akabane (AKA) virus and oligonucleotide fingerprinting. The virion surface glycoprotein (G1) and the nucleocapsid (N) protein of heterologous viruses showed no reactivity to the Mabs, while the AKA-derived anti-G1 Mab (2F1) reacted with Peaton virus and all three AKA anti-N Mabs reacted with Tinaroo (TIN) virus at almost the same antibody titers as the homologous virus. Oligonucleotide fingerprinting analyses indicated that the three RNA species of all the viruses were unique and distinguishable. However, AKA and TIN viruses exhibited very similar S RNA oligonucleotide fingerprints, while the L and M RNA fingerprints were quite different. The S RNA sequence of TIN virus has been determined and compared with that of AKA and Aino viruses. The results revealed 95.1% S sequence homology between the AKA and TIN viruses. The antigenic and genetic comparisons of AKA and TIN viruses suggest that the two viruses may represent naturally occurring reassortant viruses.

  17. A large-scale serological survey of Akabane virus infection in cattle, yak, sheep and goats in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jidong; Blasdell, Kim R; Yin, Hong; Walker, Peter J

    2017-08-01

    Akabane virus (AKAV) is a member of the Simbu serogroup, classified in the genus Orthobunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae. AKAV infection can cause abortion, stillbirth, and congenital arthrogryposis and hydranencephaly in cattle and sheep. The distribution and prevalence of AKAV infection in China is still unknown. A total of 2731 sera collected from 2006 to 2015 in 24 provinces of China from cattle, sheep, goats and yak were examined by serum neutralisation test. The overall seroprevalence rates for AKAV antibodies were 21.3% in cattle (471/2215) and 12.0% (17/142) in sheep or goats, and 0% in yak (0/374). The results indicated widespread AKAV infection in China among cattle and sheep but yak appear to have a low risk of infection. Using a selection of 50 AKAV-positive and 25 AKAV-negative cattle sera, neutralisation tests were also conducted to detect antibodies to several other Simbu serogroup bunyaviruses and closely related Leanyer virus. Although inconclusive, the data suggest that both Aino virus and Peaton virus, which have been reported previously in Japan and Korea, may also be present in cattle in China. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanozyme-strip for rapid local diagnosis of Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Demin; Fan, Kelong; Zhang, Dexi; Tan, Shuguang; Liang, Mifang; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jianlin; Zhang, Panhe; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P; Gao, George Fu; Yan, Xiyun

    2015-12-15

    Ebola continues to rage in West Africa. In the absence of an approved vaccine or treatment, the priority in controlling this epidemic is to promptly identify and isolate infected individuals. To this end, a rapid, highly sensitive, and easy-to-use test for Ebola diagnosis is urgently needed. Here, by using Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) as a nanozyme probe, we developed a MNP-based immunochromatographic strip (Nanozyme-strip), which detects the glycoprotein of Ebola virus (EBOV) as low as 1 ng/mL, which is 100-fold more sensitive than the standard strip method. The sensitivity of the Nanozyme-strip for EBOV detection and diagnostic accuracy for New Bunyavirus clinical samples is comparable with ELISA, but is much faster (within 30 min) and simpler (without need of specialist facilities). The results demonstrate that the Nanozyme-strip test can rapidly and sensitively detect EBOV, providing a valuable simple screening tool for diagnosis of infection in Ebola-stricken areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Analyses of Entry Mechanisms of Novel Emerging Viruses Using Pseudotype VSV System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Emerging infectious diseases include newly identified diseases caused by previously unknown organisms or diseases found in new and expanding geographic areas. Viruses capable of causing clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding are referred to as viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs). Arenaviruses and Bunyaviruses, both belonging to families classified as VHFs are considered major etiologies of hemorrhagic fevers caused by emerging viruses; having significant clinical and public health impact. Because these viruses are categorized as Biosafety Level (BSL) 3 and 4 pathogens, restricting their use, biological studies including therapeutic drug and vaccine development have been impeded. Due to these restrictions and the difficulties in handling such live viruses, pseudotype viruses bearing envelope proteins of VHF viruses have been developed using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a surrogate system. Here, we report the successful developments of two pseudotype VSV systems; bearing the envelope proteins of Lujo virus and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus, both recently identified viruses of the family Arenaviridae and Bunyaviridae, respectively. My presentation will summarize the characterization of the envelope proteins of Lujo virus including its cellular receptor use and cell entry mechanisms. In addition, I will also present a brief introduction of SFTS reported in Japan and the diagnostic studies in progress using these newly pseudotype VSV system.

  20. A scoring model for predicting prognosis of patients with severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome.

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    Bei Jia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS is an emerging epidemic infectious disease caused by the SFTS bunyavirus (SFTSV with an estimated high case-fatality rate of 12.7% to 32.6%. Currently, the disease has been reported in mainland China, Japan, Korea, and the United States. At present, there is no specific antiviral therapy for SFTSV infection. Considering the higher mortality rate and rapid clinical progress of SFTS, supporting the appropriate treatment in time to SFTS patients is critical. Therefore, it is very important for clinicians to predict these SFTS cases who are more likely to have a poor prognosis or even more likely to decease. In the present study, we established a simple and feasible model for assessing the severity and predicting the prognosis of SFTS patients with high sensitivity and specificity. This model may aid the physicians to immediately initiate prompt treatment to block the rapid development of the illness and reduce the fatality of SFTS patients.

  1. Critical epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of SFTS virus recognized by a panel of SFTS patients derived human monoclonal antibodies.

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    Li Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SFTS virus (SFTSV is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognized the nucleocapsid (N protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection.

  2. A preliminary study of viral metagenomics of French bat species in contact with humans: identification of new mammalian viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacheux, Laurent; Cervantes-Gonzalez, Minerva; Guigon, Ghislaine; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Maufrais, Corinne; Caro, Valérie; Bourhy, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of viral zoonosis epidemics has become a major public health issue. A profound understanding of the viral population in key animal species acting as reservoirs represents an important step towards this goal. Bats harbor diverse viruses, some of which are of particular interest because they cause severe human diseases. However, little is known about the diversity of the global population of viruses found in bats (virome). We determined the viral diversity of five different French insectivorous bat species (nine specimens in total) in close contact with humans. Sequence-independent amplification, high-throughput sequencing with Illumina technology and a dedicated bioinformatics analysis pipeline were used on pooled tissues (brain, liver and lungs). Comparisons of the sequences of contigs and unassembled reads provided a global taxonomic distribution of virus-related sequences for each sample, highlighting differences both within and between bat species. Many viral families were present in these viromes, including viruses known to infect bacteria, plants/fungi, insects or vertebrates, the most relevant being those infecting mammals (Retroviridae, Herpesviridae, Bunyaviridae, Poxviridae, Flaviviridae, Reoviridae, Bornaviridae, Picobirnaviridae). In particular, we detected several new mammalian viruses, including rotaviruses, gammaretroviruses, bornaviruses and bunyaviruses with the identification of the first bat nairovirus. These observations demonstrate that bats naturally harbor viruses from many different families, most of which infect mammals. They may therefore constitute a major reservoir of viral diversity that should be analyzed carefully, to determine the role played by bats in the spread of zoonotic viral infections.

  3. A preliminary study of viral metagenomics of French bat species in contact with humans: identification of new mammalian viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dacheux

    Full Text Available The prediction of viral zoonosis epidemics has become a major public health issue. A profound understanding of the viral population in key animal species acting as reservoirs represents an important step towards this goal. Bats harbor diverse viruses, some of which are of particular interest because they cause severe human diseases. However, little is known about the diversity of the global population of viruses found in bats (virome. We determined the viral diversity of five different French insectivorous bat species (nine specimens in total in close contact with humans. Sequence-independent amplification, high-throughput sequencing with Illumina technology and a dedicated bioinformatics analysis pipeline were used on pooled tissues (brain, liver and lungs. Comparisons of the sequences of contigs and unassembled reads provided a global taxonomic distribution of virus-related sequences for each sample, highlighting differences both within and between bat species. Many viral families were present in these viromes, including viruses known to infect bacteria, plants/fungi, insects or vertebrates, the most relevant being those infecting mammals (Retroviridae, Herpesviridae, Bunyaviridae, Poxviridae, Flaviviridae, Reoviridae, Bornaviridae, Picobirnaviridae. In particular, we detected several new mammalian viruses, including rotaviruses, gammaretroviruses, bornaviruses and bunyaviruses with the identification of the first bat nairovirus. These observations demonstrate that bats naturally harbor viruses from many different families, most of which infect mammals. They may therefore constitute a major reservoir of viral diversity that should be analyzed carefully, to determine the role played by bats in the spread of zoonotic viral infections.

  4. Congenital abnormalities in newborn lambs after infection of pregnant sheep with Akabane virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsonson, I M; Della-Porta, A J; Snowdon, W A

    1977-01-01

    Akabane virus (a Bunyavirus) has been associated with epizootics of congenital deformities in cattle, sheep, and goats. Experimental studies using mouse-adapted virus inoculated intravenously into pregnant sheep gave an inapparent infection. Neutralizing antibodies were detected on day 5, and peaks in the titer were seen at days 10 and 48. Ewes infected at day 30 to 36 of pregnancy produced five (31% incidence) deformed lambs. Sera from four of these possessed neutralizing antibodies to Akabane virus before ingesting colostrum. Two lambs had arthrogryposis, hydranencephaly, kyphosis, scoliosis, and brachygnathia; one had micrencephaly; and the other two had porencephaly. The two lambs with arthrogryposis and hydranencephaly also had extensive lesions in other tissues. In the spinal cord there was a marked decrease in the number of ventral horn neurones and a depletion of myelin. Skeletal muscles showed marked atrophy. The medulla of the thymus possessed large Hassall's corpuscles and a reduced number of thymocytes in the cortex. It would appear that the pathogenic effects of Akabane virus are related to the gestational age (30 to 36 days) at which the fetus is infected. Akabane virus can now be included in the growing list of teratogenic viruses and provides an interesting system for studying such congenital diseases. Images PMID:832900

  5. Phylogenetic and Geographic Relationships of Severe Fever With Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus in China, South Korea, and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Shimojima, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tani, Hideki; Fukuma, Aiko; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Singh, Harpal; Suda, Yuto; Shirabe, Komei; Toda, Shoichi; Shimazu, Yukie; Nomachi, Taro; Gokuden, Mutsuyo; Morimitsu, Toshiharu; Ando, Katsuyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kan, Miki; Uramoto, Marina; Osako, Hideo; Kida, Kouji; Takimoto, Hirokazu; Kitamoto, Hiroaki; Terasoma, Fumio; Honda, Akiko; Maeda, Ken; Takahashi, Toru; Yamagishi, Takuya; Oishi, Kazunori; Morikawa, Shigeru; Saijo, Masayuki

    2015-09-15

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a tick-borne acute infectious disease caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). SFTS has been reported in China, South Korea, and Japan as a novel Bunyavirus. Although several molecular epidemiology and phylogenetic studies have been performed, the information obtained was limited, because the analyses included no or only a small number of SFTSV strains from Japan. The nucleotide sequences of 75 SFTSV samples in Japan were newly determined directly from the patients' serum samples. In addition, the sequences of 7 strains isolated in vitro were determined and compared with those in the patients' serum samples. More than 90 strains that were identified in China, 1 strain in South Korea, and 50 strains in Japan were phylogenetically analyzed. The viruses were clustered into 2 clades, which were consistent with the geographic distribution. Three strains identified in Japan were clustered in the Chinese clade, and 4 strains identified in China and 26 in South Korea were clustered in the Japanese clade. Two clades of SFTSV may have evolved separately over time. On rare occasions, the viruses were transmitted overseas to the region in which viruses of the other clade were prevalent. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Microarrays – new possibilities for detecting biological factors hazardous for humans and animals, and for use in environmental protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Mirski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Both the known biological agents that cause infectious diseases, as well as modified (ABF-Advanced Biological Factors or new, emerging agents pose a significant diagnostic problem using previously applied methods, both classical, as well as based on molecular biology methods. The latter, such as PCR and real-time PCR, have significant limitations, both quantitative (low capacity, and qualitative (limited number of targets. The article discusses the results of studies on using the microarray method for the identification of viruses (e.g. Orthopoxvirus group, noroviruses, influenza A and B viruses, rhino- and enteroviruses responsible for the FRI (Febrile Respiratory Illness, European bunyaviruses, and SARS-causing viruses, and bacteria ([i]Mycobacterium spp., Yersinia spp., Campylobacter spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria meningitidis, Clostridium difficile , Helicobacter pylori[/i], including multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. The method allows for the serotyping and genotyping of bacteria, and is useful in the diagnosis of genetically modified agents. It allows the testing of thousands of genes in one experiment. In addition to diagnosis, it is applicable for gene expression studies, analysis of the function of genes, microorganisms virulence, and allows the detection of even single mutations. The possibility of its operational application in epidemiological surveillance, and in the detection of disease outbreak agents is demonstrated.

  7. Thrips transmission of tospoviruses.

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    Rotenberg, Dorith; Jacobson, Alana L; Schneweis, Derek J; Whitfield, Anna E

    2015-12-01

    One hundred years ago, the disease tomato spotted wilt was first described in Australia. Since that time, knowledge of this disease caused by Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and transmitted by thrips (insects in the order Thysanoptera) has revealed a complex relationship between the virus, vector, plant host, and environment. Numerous tospoviruses and thrips vectors have been described, revealing diversity in plant host range and geographical distributions. Advances in characterization of the tripartite interaction between the virus, vector, and plant host have provided insight into molecular and ecological relationships. Comparison to animal-infecting viruses in the family Bunyaviridae has enabled the identification of commonalities between tospoviruses and other bunyaviruses in transmission by arthropod vectors and molecular interactions with hosts. This review provides a special emphasis on TSWV and Frankliniella occidentalis, the model tospovirus-thrips pathosystem. However, other virus-vector combinations are also of importance and where possible, comparisons are made between different viruses and thrips vectors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cryptic etiopathological conditions of equine nervous system with special emphasis on viral diseases

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    Rakesh Kumar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of horse (Equus caballus to equine practitioners and researchers cannot be ignored. An unevenly distributed population of equids harbors numerous diseases, which can affect horses of any age and breed. Among these, the affections of nervous system are potent reason for death and euthanasia in equids. Many episodes associated with the emergence of equine encephalitic conditions have also pose a threat to human population as well, which signifies their pathogenic zoonotic potential. Intensification of most of the arboviruses is associated with sophisticated interaction between vectors and hosts, which supports their transmission. The alphaviruses, bunyaviruses, and flaviviruses are the major implicated groups of viruses involved with equines/humans epizootic/epidemic. In recent years, many outbreaks of deadly zoonotic diseases such as Nipah virus, Hendra virus, and Japanese encephalitis in many parts of the globe addresses their alarming significance. The equine encephalitic viruses differ in their global distribution, transmission and main vector species involved, as discussed in this article. The current review summarizes the status, pathogenesis, pathology, and impact of equine neuro-invasive conditions of viral origin. A greater understanding of these aspects might be able to provide development of advances in neuro-protective strategies in equine population.

  9. Histone deacetylase 8 is required for centrosome cohesion and influenza A virus entry.

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    Yohei Yamauchi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV enters host cells by endocytosis followed by acid-activated penetration from late endosomes (LEs. Using siRNA silencing, we found that histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8, a cytoplasmic enzyme, efficiently promoted productive entry of IAV into tissue culture cells, whereas HDAC1 suppressed it. HDAC8 enhanced endocytosis, acidification, and penetration of the incoming virus. In contrast, HDAC1 inhibited acidification and penetration. The effects were connected with dramatic alterations in the organization of the microtubule system, and, as a consequence, a change in the behavior of LEs and lysosomes (LYs. Depletion of HDAC8 caused loss of centrosome-associated microtubules and loss of directed centripetal movement of LEs, dispersing LE/LYs to the cell periphery. For HDAC1, the picture was the opposite. To explain these changes, centrosome cohesion emerged as the critical factor. Depletion of HDAC8 caused centrosome splitting, which could also be induced by depleting a centriole-linker protein, rootletin. In both cases, IAV infection was inhibited. HDAC1 depletion reduced the splitting of centrosomes, and enhanced infection. The longer the distance between centrosomes, the lower the level of infection. HDAC8 depletion was also found to inhibit infection of Uukuniemi virus (a bunyavirus suggesting common requirements among late penetrating enveloped viruses. The results established class I HDACs as powerful regulators of microtubule organization, centrosome function, endosome maturation, and infection by IAV and other late penetrating viruses.

  10. Unexpected differences in the population genetics of phasmavirids (Bunyavirales) from subarctic ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Matthew J; Medeiros, Andrew S; Qin, Jie; Taylor, Derek J

    2017-01-01

    Little is known of the evolution of RNA viruses in aquatic systems. Here, we assess the genetic connectivity of two bunyaviruses (Kigluaik phantom orthophasmavirus or KIGV and Nome phantom orthophasmavirus or NOMV) with zooplanktonic hosts from subarctic ponds. We expected weak genetic structure among populations as the hosts (phantom midges) have a terrestrial winged dispersal stage. To test whether their respective viruses mirror this structure, we collected and analyzed population datasets from 21 subarctic freshwater ponds and obtained sequences from all four genes in the viral genomes. Prevalence averaged 66 per cent for 514 host specimens and was not significantly different between recently formed thaw ponds and glacial ponds. Unexpectedly, KIGV from older ponds showed pronounced haplotype divergence with little evidence of genetic connectivity. However, KIGV populations from recent thaw ponds appeared to be represented by a closely related haplotype group, perhaps indicating a genotypic dispersal bias. Unlike KIGV, NOMV had modest structure and diversity in recently formed thaw ponds. For each virus, we found elevated genetic diversity relative to the host, but similar population structures to the host. Our results suggest that non-random processes such as virus-host interactions, genotypic bias, and habitat effects differ among polar aquatic RNA viruses.

  11. Distribution of tick-borne diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian-Bo; Na, Ren-Hua; Wei, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Jin-Song; Peng, Hong-Juan

    2013-04-23

    As an important contributor to vector-borne diseases in China, in recent years, tick-borne diseases have attracted much attention because of their increasing incidence and consequent significant harm to livestock and human health. The most commonly observed human tick-borne diseases in China include Lyme borreliosis (known as Lyme disease in China), tick-borne encephalitis (known as Forest encephalitis in China), Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (known as Xinjiang hemorrhagic fever in China), Q-fever, tularemia and North-Asia tick-borne spotted fever. In recent years, some emerging tick-borne diseases, such as human monocytic ehrlichiosis, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and a novel bunyavirus infection, have been reported frequently in China. Other tick-borne diseases that are not as frequently reported in China include Colorado fever, oriental spotted fever and piroplasmosis. Detailed information regarding the history, characteristics, and current epidemic status of these human tick-borne diseases in China will be reviewed in this paper. It is clear that greater efforts in government management and research are required for the prevention, control, diagnosis, and treatment of tick-borne diseases, as well as for the control of ticks, in order to decrease the tick-borne disease burden in China.

  12. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J.; Walter, Cheryl T.; Dent, Kyle C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Ranson, Neil A.; Barr, John N.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N–RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:23595147

  13. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J; Walter, Cheryl T; Dent, Kyle C; Shepherd, Dale A; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V; Hiscox, Julian A; Green, Todd J; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M; Fooks, Anthony R; Ashcroft, Alison E; Stonehouse, Nicola J; Ranson, Neil A; Barr, John N; Edwards, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N-RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses.

  14. How viruses infiltrate the central nervous system.

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    Michalicová, A; Bhide, K; Bhide, M; Kováč, A

    Central nervous system is protected by the blood-brain barrier, which represents a physical, metabolic and transport barrier and is considered to be a part of a highly dynamic system termed neurovascular unit. Several pathogens, among them viruses, are able to invade the brain. Traversal of viruses across the blood-brain barrier is an essential step for the invasion of the central nervous system and can occur by different mechanisms - by paracellular, transcellular and/or by "Trojan horse" pathway. Penetration of viruses to brain can lead to the blood-brain barrier dysfunction, including increased permeability, pleocytosis and encephalopathy. Viruses causing the central nervous system infections include human immunodeficiency virus type 1, rhabdovirus, different flaviviruses, mouse adenovirus type 1, herpes simplex virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, reovirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, arbovirus, cytomegalovirus, mumps virus, parvovirus B19, measles virus, human T-cell leukemia virus, enterovirus, morbillivirus, bunyaviruses, togaviruses and others. In this review we summarized what is known about the routes of how some viruses enter the brain and how neurons and glial cells react to infection.

  15. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrantoni, Agostina; Fortuna, Claudia; Remoli, Maria Elena; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Superti, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin. PMID:25643293

  16. Bovine Lactoferrin Inhibits Toscana Virus Infection by Binding to Heparan Sulphate

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    Agostina Pietrantoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toscana virus is an emerging sandfly-borne bunyavirus in Mediterranean Europe responsible for neurological diseases in humans. It accounts for about 80% of paediatric meningitis cases during the summer. Despite the important impact of Toscana virus infection-associated disease on human health, currently approved vaccines or effective antiviral treatments are not available. In this research, we have analyzed the effect of bovine lactoferrin, a bi-globular iron-binding glycoprotein with potent antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities, on Toscana virus infection in vitro. Our results showed that lactoferrin was capable of inhibiting Toscana virus replication in a dose-dependent manner. Results obtained when lactoferrin was added to the cells during different phases of viral infection showed that lactoferrin was able to prevent viral replication when added during the viral adsorption step or during the entire cycle of virus infection, demonstrating that its action takes place in an early phase of viral infection. In particular, our results demonstrated that the anti-Toscana virus action of lactoferrin took place on virus attachment to the cell membrane, mainly through a competition for common glycosaminoglycan receptors. These findings provide further insights on the antiviral activity of bovine lactoferrin.

  17. Imported viral haemorrhagic fever with a potential for person-to-person transmission: review and recommendations for initial management of a suspected case in Belgium.

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    Colebunders, R; Van Esbroeck, M; Moreau, M; Borchert, M

    2002-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic fevers are caused by a wide range of viruses. There are 4 types of viruses well known to spread from person to person and able to cause nosocomial outbreaks with a high case fatality rate: an arenavirus (Lassa fever and more exceptionally the Junin and Machupo virus), a bunyavirus (Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever) and the Filoviridae (Ebola and Marburg viruses). So far there have been only a limited number of imported cases of viral haemorrhagic fever in industrialized countries. In recent years an increasing number of outbreaks of filovirus infections have occurred in Africa and in 2000 5 cases of Lassa fever were brought from Sierra Leone to Europe. Therefore European physicians should consider the possibility of a viral haemorrhagic fever in an acutely ill patient just returning from Africa or South-America with fever for which there is no obvious cause. Such patients should be questioned for risk factors for viral haemorrhagic fever. Using universal precautions for handling blood and body fluids and barrier nursing techniques there is little risk that if a patient with viral haemorrhagic fever arrives in Belgium there will be secondary cases.

  18. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses.

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    Gushchin, Vladimir A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Erokhina, Tatyana N; Morozov, Sergey Y; Agranovsky, Alexey A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV) and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains (1a central region (CR), 1a CR) is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2) of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-μm mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of "virus factories" in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses) and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses).

  19. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Infection Associated with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis as Poor Prognostic Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Kim, Juwon; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Severe fever with thrombocytopenia (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel bunyavirus designated SFTS virus (SFTSV) with a high fatality rate. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is an immune-mediated life-threatening disease triggered by infections, neoplasms and noninfectious inflammatory diseases. A few HLH associated with SFTSV were reported. According to the diagnostic criteria of HLH, 11 patients with SFTS were reviewed. Methods During last 2 years (2015–2016), 11 SFTS patients were diagnosed at the Wonju Severance Christian Hospital, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju, South Korea. Clinical features were analyzed using diagnostic criteria of 2004-HLH trial. We described if the prognosis of SFTSV-infected patients was associated with clinical features of HLH. Results Of 11 patients, four patients were fulfillled the diagnostic criteria of 2004-HLH trial (five of eight criteria). Two patients were fulfilled the four criteria. Five patients were fulfilled three or less criteria. Three of six patients who fulfilled four or more criteria were died. There was no mortality in five patients who fulfilled three or less criteria. Hemophagocytosis in bone marrow (BM) was observed in all six patients who were taken BM study. Conclusion In SFTS, HLH was severe clinical feature and it might be associated with poor prognosis. Disclosures All authors: No reported disclosures.

  20. Epidemia de febre do Oropouche em Serra Pelada, município de Curionópolis, Pará, 1994

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    Amélia P.A.T. Rosa

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available No final de novembro de 1994, o Instituto Evandro Chagas (IEC, Belém, Pará, foi notificado de um surto de doença febril na população do garimpo de Serra Pelada, município de Curionôpolis (5°35'S; 49°30'W, no Estado do Pará. Vinte amostras de soro de pessoas, com hemoscopia negativa para tnalária, foram recebidas para esclarecimento diagnóstico. Estudos laboratoriais comprovaram que os casos eram devido ao vírus Oropouche (grupo Simbu. gênero Bunyavirus, família Bunyaviridae. Esses achados, induziram d ida de um grupo de técnicos para realização de investigações ecoepidemíológicas entre 8 e 22 de dezembro. Foram coletadas 296 amostras de sangue, de 73 grupos familiares, sendo 54 para pequisa de vírus (casos febris e 242para sorologia, bem como, procedeu-se a coleta de artrópodes hematófagos. As amostras para pesquisa de vírus foram inoculadas em camundongos recém-nascidos e os soros testados por inibição da hemaglutinação (1H e MAC ELISA. Foram isoladas dez amostras do vírus Oropouche e obtidas seis soroconversões. Ademais, 245 (82,8% amostras foram positivas por sorologia e 71 (97,3% grupos familiares apresentaram pelo menos um membro positivo. Considerando a elevada positividade de anticoipos IH e IgM específica para Oropouche na população de Serra Pelada, concluímos que a epidemia foi extensa e apresentou taxa de ataque em torno de 83%, que correspondeu a infecção de cerca de 5.000 pessoas.In the final of November 1994, an outbreak of a febrile disease was observed in the Serra Pelada gold mine (5°35'S; 49°30'W in the Southeast region of Parã State. Twenty samples were collected and sent to the laboratory of Arbovirus of Instituto Evandro Chagas. The tests showed that the disease was caused by Oropouche virus (Bunyaviridae, Bunyavirus, Simbu serological group. Between 8-22 December 296 serum samples mere taken (54 from febrile patients, 16 paired samples and 242 from contacts and convalescent patients

  1. Evolution of hantaviruses: co-speciation with reservoir hosts for more than 100 MYR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyusnin, Alexander; Sironen, Tarja

    2014-07-17

    The most recent (9th) Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) lists 23 established and 30 provisional species in the genus Hantavirus (family Bunyaviridae) (Plyusnin et al., 2012). These virus species are harbored by altogether 51 species of rodents, shrews and moles and thus in most cases it is a relationship of "one hantavirus-one host". Such a tight bond between the two, in combination with the observed association between whole groups of hantaviruses and (sub)families of rodents, helped to develop the widely accepted view of a long-term co-evolution (co-speciation) of these viruses with their hosts. Accumulating evidence of host-switching events, both recent and ancient, however challenged some of the earlier views on hantavirus evolution. In this paper we discuss the concept of hantavirus-host co-speciation and propose a scenario of hantavirus evolution based on the currently available genetic information. This scenario is based on the hypothesis that hantaviruses are very ancient viruses which already existed at the estimated diversification point of major placental clades, of which one includes the ancestors of the order Rodentia and another the ancestors of both orders Eulipotyphla and Chiroptera; the diversification occurred approximately at 90-100 MYA. We also speculate that the evolutionary history of hantaviruses extents even deeper in the past, beyond this time-point, and included the transmission of a (pre)bunyavirus from an insect host to a mammal host. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus entry into host cells occurs through the multivesicular body and requires ESCRT regulators.

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    Olena Shtanko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV is a tick-borne bunyavirus causing outbreaks of severe disease in humans, with a fatality rate approaching 30%. There are no widely accepted therapeutics available to prevent or treat the disease. CCHFV enters host cells through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is subsequently transported to an acidified compartment where the fusion of virus envelope with cellular membranes takes place. To better understand the uptake pathway, we sought to identify host factors controlling CCHFV transport through the cell. We demonstrate that after passing through early endosomes in a Rab5-dependent manner, CCHFV is delivered to multivesicular bodies (MVBs. Virus particles localized to MVBs approximately 1 hour after infection and affected the distribution of the organelle within cells. Interestingly, blocking Rab7 activity had no effect on association of the virus with MVBs. Productive virus infection depended on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K activity, which meditates the formation of functional MVBs. Silencing Tsg101, Vps24, Vps4B, or Alix/Aip1, components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT pathway controlling MVB biogenesis, inhibited infection of wild-type virus as well as a novel pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV bearing CCHFV glycoprotein, supporting a role for the MVB pathway in CCHFV entry. We further demonstrate that blocking transport out of MVBs still allowed virus entry while preventing vesicular acidification, required for membrane fusion, trapped virions in the MVBs. These findings suggest that MVBs are necessary for infection and are the sites of virus-endosome membrane fusion.

  3. Zoonotic infections among employees from Great Smoky Mountains and Rocky Mountain National Parks, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjemian, Jennifer; Weber, Ingrid B; McQuiston, Jennifer; Griffith, Kevin S; Mead, Paul S; Nicholson, William; Roche, Aubree; Schriefer, Martin; Fischer, Marc; Kosoy, Olga; Laven, Janeen J; Stoddard, Robyn A; Hoffmaster, Alex R; Smith, Theresa; Bui, Duy; Wilkins, Patricia P; Jones, Jeffery L; Gupton, Paige N; Quinn, Conrad P; Messonnier, Nancy; Higgins, Charles; Wong, David

    2012-11-01

    U.S. National Park Service employees may have prolonged exposure to wildlife and arthropods, placing them at increased risk of infection with endemic zoonoses. To evaluate possible zoonotic risks present at both Great Smoky Mountains (GRSM) and Rocky Mountain (ROMO) National Parks, we assessed park employees for baseline seroprevalence to specific zoonotic pathogens, followed by evaluation of incident infections over a 1-year study period. Park personnel showed evidence of prior infection with a variety of zoonotic agents, including California serogroup bunyaviruses (31.9%), Bartonella henselae (26.7%), spotted fever group rickettsiae (22.2%), Toxoplasma gondii (11.1%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (8.1%), Brucella spp. (8.9%), flaviviruses (2.2%), and Bacillus anthracis (1.5%). Over a 1-year study period, we detected incident infections with leptospirosis (5.7%), B. henselae (5.7%), spotted fever group rickettsiae (1.5%), T. gondii (1.5%), B. anthracis (1.5%), and La Crosse virus (1.5%) in staff members at GRSM, and with spotted fever group rickettsiae (8.5%) and B. henselae (4.3%) in staff at ROMO. The risk of any incident infection was greater for employees who worked as resource managers (OR 7.4; 95% CI 1.4,37.5; p=0.02), and as law enforcement rangers/rescue crew (OR 6.5; 95% CI 1.1,36.5; p=0.03), relative to those who worked primarily in administration or management. The results of this study increase our understanding of the pathogens circulating within both parks, and can be used to inform the development of effective guidelines and interventions to increase visitor and staff awareness and help prevent exposure to zoonotic agents.

  4. High-resolution structure of the N-terminal endonuclease domain of the Lassa virus L polymerase in complex with magnesium ions.

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    Gregor D Wallat

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV causes deadly hemorrhagic fever disease for which there are no vaccines and limited treatments. LASV-encoded L polymerase is required for viral RNA replication and transcription. The functional domains of L-a large protein of 2218 amino acid residues-are largely undefined, except for the centrally located RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP motif. Recent structural and functional analyses of the N-terminal region of the L protein from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV, which is in the same Arenaviridae family as LASV, have identified an endonuclease domain that presumably cleaves the cap structures of host mRNAs in order to initiate viral transcription. Here we present a high-resolution crystal structure of the N-terminal 173-aa region of the LASV L protein (LASV L173 in complex with magnesium ions at 1.72 Å. The structure is highly homologous to other known viral endonucleases of arena- (LCMV NL1, orthomyxo- (influenza virus PA, and bunyaviruses (La Crosse virus NL1. Although the catalytic residues (D89, E102 and K122 are highly conserved among the known viral endonucleases, LASV L endonuclease structure shows some notable differences. Our data collected from in vitro endonuclease assays and a reporter-based LASV minigenome transcriptional assay in mammalian cells confirm structural prediction of LASV L173 as an active endonuclease. The high-resolution structure of the LASV L endonuclease domain in complex with magnesium ions should aid the development of antivirals against lethal Lassa hemorrhagic fever.

  5. Differential Antagonism of Human Innate Immune Responses by Tick-Borne Phlebovirus Nonstructural Proteins.

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    Rezelj, Veronica V; Li, Ping; Chaudhary, Vidyanath; Elliott, Richard M; Jin, Dong-Yan; Brennan, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, several newly discovered tick-borne viruses causing a wide spectrum of diseases in humans have been ascribed to the Phlebovirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. The nonstructural protein (NSs) of bunyaviruses is the main virulence factor and interferon (IFN) antagonist. We studied the molecular mechanisms of IFN antagonism employed by the NSs proteins of human apathogenic Uukuniemi virus (UUKV) and those of Heartland virus (HRTV) and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV), both of which cause severe disease. Using reporter assays, we found that UUKV NSs weakly inhibited the activation of the beta interferon (IFN-β) promoter and response elements. UUKV NSs weakly antagonized human IFN-β promoter activation through a novel interaction with mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. HRTV NSs efficiently antagonized both IFN-β promoter activation and type I IFN signaling pathways through interactions with TBK1, preventing its phosphorylation. HRTV NSs exhibited diffused cytoplasmic localization. This is in comparison to the inclusion bodies formed by SFTSV NSs. HRTV NSs also efficiently interacted with STAT2 and impaired IFN-β-induced phosphorylation but did not affect STAT1 or its translocation to the nucleus. Our results suggest that a weak interaction between STAT1 and HRTV or SFTSV NSs may explain their inability to block type II IFN signaling efficiently, thus enabling the activation of proinflammatory responses that lead to severe disease. Our findings offer insights into how pathogenicity may be linked to the capacity of NSs proteins to block the innate immune system and illustrate the plethora of viral immune evasion strategies utilized by emerging phleboviruses. IMPORTANCE Since 2011, there has been a large expansion in the number of emerging tick-borne viruses that have been assigned to the Phlebovirus genus. Heartland virus (HRTV) and SFTS

  6. Immunization with DNA Plasmids Coding for Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Capsid and Envelope Proteins and/or Virus-Like Particles Induces Protection and Survival in Challenged Mice.

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    Hinkula, Jorma; Devignot, Stéphanie; Åkerström, Sara; Karlberg, Helen; Wattrang, Eva; Bereczky, Sándor; Mousavi-Jazi, Mehrdad; Risinger, Christian; Lindegren, Gunnel; Vernersson, Caroline; Paweska, Janusz; van Vuren, Petrus Jansen; Blixt, Ola; Brun, Alejandro; Weber, Friedemann; Mirazimi, Ali

    2017-05-15

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a bunyavirus causing severe hemorrhagic fever disease in humans, with high mortality rates. The requirement of a high-containment laboratory and the lack of an animal model hampered the study of the immune response and protection of vaccine candidates. Using the recently developed interferon alpha receptor knockout (IFNAR(-/-)) mouse model, which replicates human disease, we investigated the immunogenicity and protection of two novel CCHFV vaccine candidates: a DNA vaccine encoding a ubiquitin-linked version of CCHFV Gc, Gn, and N and one using transcriptionally competent virus-like particles (tc-VLPs). In contrast to most studies that focus on neutralizing antibodies, we measured both humoral and cellular immune responses. We demonstrated a clear and 100% efficient preventive immunity against lethal CCHFV challenge with the DNA vaccine. Interestingly, there was no correlation with the neutralizing antibody titers alone, which were higher in the tc-VLP-vaccinated mice. However, the animals with a lower neutralizing titer, but a dominant cell-mediated Th1 response and a balanced Th2 response, resisted the CCHFV challenge. Moreover, we found that in challenged mice with a Th1 response (immunized by DNA/DNA and boosted by tc-VLPs), the immune response changed to Th2 at day 9 postchallenge. In addition, we were able to identify new linear B-cell epitope regions that are highly conserved between CCHFV strains. Altogether, our results suggest that a predominantly Th1-type immune response provides the most efficient protective immunity against CCHFV challenge. However, we cannot exclude the importance of the neutralizing antibodies as the surviving immunized mice exhibited substantial amounts of them.IMPORTANCE Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is responsible for hemorrhagic diseases in humans, with a high mortality rate. There is no FDA-approved vaccine, and there are still gaps in our knowledge of the immune

  7. Correlation Between HLA-A, B and DRB1 Alleles and Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome.

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    Shu-Jun Ding

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS is an emerging hemorrhagic fever caused by a tick-borne bunyavirus (SFTSV in East Asian countries. The role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA in resistance and susceptibility to SFTSV is not known. We investigated the correlation of HLA locus A, B and DRB1 alleles with the occurrence of SFTS.A total of 84 confirmed SFTS patients (patient group and 501 unrelated non-SFTS patients (healthy individuals as control group from Shandong Province were genotyped by PCR-sequence specific oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP for HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci.Allele frequency was calculated and compared using χ2 test or the Fisher's exact test. A corrected P value was calculated with a bonferronis correction. Odds Ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated by Woolf's method.A total of 11 HLA-A, 23 HLA-B and 12 HLA-DRB1 alleles were identified in the patient group, whereas 15 HLA-A, 30 HLA-B and 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles were detected in the control group. The frequencies of A*30 and B*13 in the SFTS patient group were lower than that in the control group (P = 0.0341 and 0.0085, Pc = 0.5115 and 0.252. The ORs of A*30 and B*13 in the SFTS patient group were 0.54 and 0.49, respectively. The frequency of two-locus haplotype A*30-B*13 was lower in the patient group than in the control group(5.59% versus 12.27%, P = 0.037,OR = 0.41, 95%CI = 0.18-0.96 without significance(Pc>0.05. A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 and A*02-B*15-DRB1*04 had strong associations with SFTS resistance and susceptibility respectively (Pc = 0.0412 and 0.0001,OR = 0.43 and 5.07.The host HLA class I polymorphism might play an important role with the occurrence of SFTS. Negative associations were observed with HLA-A*30, HLA-B*13 and Haplotype A*30-B*13, although the associations were not statistically significant. A*30-B*13-DRB1*07 had negative correlation with the occurrence of SFTS; in contrast, haplotype A*02-B*15-DRB1*04 was positively correlated with SFTS.

  8. RNA Interference Restricts Rift Valley Fever Virus in Multiple Insect Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Isabelle; Jansen, Stephanie; Fall, Gamou; Lorenzen, Stephan; Rudolf, Martin; Huber, Katrin; Heitmann, Anna; Schicht, Sabine; Ndiaye, El Hadji; Watson, Mick; Castelli, Ilaria; Brennan, Benjamin; Elliott, Richard M; Diallo, Mawlouth; Sall, Amadou A; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Schnettler, Esther; Kohl, Alain; Becker, Stefanie C

    2017-01-01

    The emerging bunyavirus Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is transmitted to humans and livestock by a large number of mosquito species. RNA interference (RNAi) has been characterized as an important innate immune defense mechanism used by mosquitoes to limit replication of positive-sense RNA flaviviruses and togaviruses; however, little is known about its role against negative-strand RNA viruses such as RVFV. We show that virus-specific small RNAs are produced in infected mosquito cells, in Drosophila melanogaster cells, and, most importantly, also in RVFV vector mosquitoes. By addressing the production of small RNAs in adult Aedes sp. and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes, we showed the presence of virus-derived Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) not only in Aedes sp. but also in C. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes, indicating that antiviral RNA interference in C. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes is similar to the described activities of RNAi in Aedes sp. mosquitoes. We also show that these have antiviral activity, since silencing of RNAi pathway effectors enhances viral replication. Moreover, our data suggest that RVFV does not encode a suppressor of RNAi. These findings point toward a significant role of RNAi in the control of RVFV in mosquitoes. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; Phlebovirus, Bunyaviridae) is an emerging zoonotic mosquito-borne pathogen of high relevance for human and animal health. Successful strategies of intervention in RVFV transmission by its mosquito vectors and the prevention of human and veterinary disease rely on a better understanding of the mechanisms that govern RVFV-vector interactions. Despite its medical importance, little is known about the factors that govern RVFV replication, dissemination, and transmission in the invertebrate host. Here we studied the role of the antiviral RNA interference immune pathways in the defense against RVFV in natural vector mosquitoes and mosquito cells and draw comparisons to the model insect Drosophila

  9. A Haploid Genetic Screen Identifies Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans Supporting Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riblett, Amber M; Blomen, Vincent A; Jae, Lucas T; Altamura, Louis A; Doms, Robert W; Brummelkamp, Thijn R; Wojcechowskyj, Jason A

    2015-11-18

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes recurrent insect-borne epizootics throughout the African continent, and infection of humans can lead to a lethal hemorrhagic fever syndrome. Deep mutagenesis of haploid human cells was used to identify host factors required for RVFV infection. This screen identified a suite of enzymes involved in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biogenesis and transport, including several components of the cis-oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex, one of the central components of Golgi complex trafficking. In addition, disruption of PTAR1 led to RVFV resistance as well as reduced heparan sulfate surface levels, consistent with recent observations that PTAR1-deficient cells exhibit altered Golgi complex morphology and glycosylation defects. A variety of biochemical and genetic approaches were utilized to show that both pathogenic and attenuated RVFV strains require GAGs for efficient infection on some, but not all, cell types, with the block to infection being at the level of virion attachment. Examination of other members of the Bunyaviridae family for GAG-dependent infection suggested that the interaction with GAGs is not universal among bunyaviruses, indicating that these viruses, as well as RVFV on certain cell types, employ additional unidentified virion attachment factors and/or receptors. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging pathogen that can cause severe disease in humans and animals. Epizootics among livestock populations lead to high mortality rates and can be economically devastating. Human epidemics of Rift Valley fever, often initiated by contact with infected animals, are characterized by a febrile disease that sometimes leads to encephalitis or hemorrhagic fever. The global burden of the pathogen is increasing because it has recently disseminated beyond Africa, which is of particular concern because the virus can be transmitted by widely distributed mosquito species. There are no FDA-licensed vaccines or antiviral agents with activity

  10. Oligomerization of Uukuniemi virus nucleocapsid protein

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    Katz Anna

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uukuniemi virus (UUKV belongs to the Phlebovirus genus in the family Bunyaviridae. As a non-pathogenic virus for humans UUKV has served as a safe model bunyavirus in a number of studies addressing fundamental questions such as organization and regulation of viral genes, genome replication, structure and assembly. The present study is focused on the oligomerization of the UUKV nucleocapsid (N protein, which plays an important role in several steps of virus replication. The aim was to locate the domains involved in the N protein oligomerization and study the process in detail. Results A set of experiments concentrating on the N- and C-termini of the protein was performed, first by completely or partially deleting putative N-N-interaction domains and then by introducing point mutations of amino acid residues. Mutagenesis strategy was based on the computer modeling of secondary and tertiary structure of the N protein. The N protein mutants were studied in chemical cross-linking, immunofluorescence, mammalian two-hybrid, minigenome, and virus-like particle-forming assays. The data showed that the oligomerization ability of UUKV-N protein depends on the presence of intact α-helices on both termini of the N protein molecule and that a specific structure in the N-terminal region plays a crucial role in the N-N interaction(s. This structure is formed by two α-helices, rich in amino acid residues with aromatic (W7, F10, W19, F27, F31 or long aliphatic (I14, I24 side chains. Furthermore, some of the N-terminal mutations (e.g. I14A, I24A, F31A affected the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays. Conclusions UUKV-N protein has ability to form oligomers in chemical cross-linking and mammalian two-hybrid assays. In mutational analysis, some of the introduced single-point mutations abolished the N protein functionality both in mammalian two-hybrid and minigenome assays, suggesting that especially the N

  11. Transmission of Rift Valley fever virus from European-breed lambs to Culex pipiens mosquitoes.

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    Rianka P M Vloet

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a mosquito-borne bunyavirus of the genus Phlebovirus that is highly pathogenic to ruminants and humans. The disease is currently confined to Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, but globalization and climate change may facilitate introductions of the virus into currently unaffected areas via infected animals or mosquitoes. The consequences of such an introduction will depend on environmental factors, the availability of susceptible ruminants and the capacity of local mosquitoes to transmit the virus. We have previously demonstrated that lambs native to the Netherlands are highly susceptible to RVFV and we here report the vector competence of Culex (Cx. pipiens, the most abundant and widespread mosquito species in the country. Vector competence was first determined after artificial blood feeding of laboratory-reared mosquitoes using the attenuated Clone 13 strain. Subsequently, experiments with wild-type RVFV and mosquitoes hatched from field-collected eggs were performed. Finally, the transmission of RVFV from viremic lambs to mosquitoes was studied.Artificial feeding experiments using Clone 13 demonstrated that indigenous, laboratory-reared Cx. pipiens mosquitoes are susceptible to RVFV and that the virus can be transmitted via their saliva. Experiments with wild-type RVFV and mosquitoes hatched from field-collected eggs confirmed the vector competence of Cx. pipiens mosquitoes from the Netherlands. To subsequently investigate transmission of the virus under more natural conditions, mosquitoes were allowed to feed on RVFV-infected lambs during the viremic period. We found that RVFV is efficiently transmitted from lambs to mosquitoes, although transmission was restricted to peak viremia. Interestingly, in the mosquito-exposed skin samples, replication of RVFV was detected in previously unrecognized target cells.We here report the vector competence of Cx. pipiens mosquitoes from the Netherlands for RVFV. Both

  12. Seroprevalence of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus in China: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Peng Li

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS is an emerging infectious disease caused by a novel bunyavirus-SFTSV. The seroprevalence of anti-SFTSV antibodies including immunoglobulin G (IgG and immunoglobulin M (IgM, specific to SFTSV in the general population has been investigated in various epidemiological studies with inconsistent results. Here, we clarify this discrepancy and reach a more comprehensive result by mean of a meta-analysis.All relevant articles were searched in the electronic databases (PubMed, Web of science, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure database, Chinese Wanfang database up to November 2016. The pooled seroprevalence and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs were calculated by random- or fixed- model on the basis of heterogeneity.In total, 21 studies containing 23,848 blood samples from 7 provinces were included in this meta-analysis. The minimum and maximum reported seroprevalences of SFTSV among humans in China were 0.23% and 9.17%, respectively. The overall pooled seroprevalence of SFTSV antibodies was 4.3% (95%CI: 3.2%-5.5%. The pooled prevalence was 5.9% (95%CI: 4.7%-7.0% in Zhejiang province, 4.9% (95%CI: 4.1-5.8% in Anhui province, 3.9% (95%CI: 1.3%-6.4% in Shandong province, and 0.7% (95%CI: 0.2%-1.1% in Jiangsu province. Stratified by occupation, the pooled prevalence of farmer was 6.1% (95%CI: 3.4%-8.9% and others (mainly are students was 3.3% (95%CI: 2.4%-4.2%. Additionally, seroprevalence of SFTSV in people who lived in the same village with the patient were higher than that of people who lived in a different village. Seropositive rates in sampling years after 2012 were higher than that before 2012. The prevalence of SFTSV did not differ by age or gender. Sensitive analysis by omitting one study at a time indicated the results of the pooled seroprevalence were robust.Seroprevalence of SFTSV among healthy population in central and eastern China is high. Surveillance efforts on mild or

  13. Emerging animal viruses: real threats or simple bystanders?

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    Eduardo Furtado Flores

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The list of animal viruses has been frequently added of new members raising permanent concerns to virologists and veterinarians. The pathogenic potential and association with disease have been clearly demonstrated for some, but not for all of these emerging viruses. This review describes recent discoveries of animal viruses and their potential relevance for veterinary practice. Dogs were considered refractory to influenza viruses until 2004, when an influenza A virus subtype H3N8 was transmitted from horses and produced severe respiratory disease in racing greyhounds in Florida/USA. The novel virus, named canine influenza virus (CIV, is considered now a separate virus lineage and has spread among urban canine population in the USA. A new pestivirus (Flaviviridae, tentatively called HoBi-like pestivirus, was identified in 2004 in commercial fetal bovine serum from Brazil. Hobi-like viruses are genetically and antigenically related to bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV and induce similar clinical manifestations. These novel viruses seem to be widespread in Brazilian herds and have also been detected in Southeast Asia and Europe. In 2011, a novel mosquito-borne orthobunyavirus, named Schmallenberg virus (SBV, was associated with fever, drop in milk production, abortion and newborn malformation in cattle and sheep in Germany. Subsequently, the virus disseminated over several European countries and currently represents a real treat for animal health. The origin of SBV is still a matter of debate but it may be a reassortant from previous known bunyaviruses Shamonda and Satuperi. Hepatitis E virus (HEV, family Hepeviridae is a long known agent of human acute hepatitis and in 1997 was first identified in pigs. Current data indicates that swine HEV is spread worldwide, mainly associated with subclinical infection. Two of the four HEV genotypes are zoonotic and may be transmitted between swine and human by contaminated water and undercooked pork meat. The