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Sample records for bullhead ameiurus nebulosus

  1. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the tidal Potomac River watershed [poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Associations between contaminant exposure and liver and skin tumor prevalence were evaluated in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the tidal Potomac River watershed. Thirty bullheads (>260 mm) were collected from (1) Quantico embayment, near a Superfund site which released organochlorine contaminants; (2) Neabsco Creek, a tributary with petroleum inputs from runoff and marinas; and (3) Anacostia River (spring and fall), an urban tributary designated as a Chesapeake Bay Region of Concern, contaminated with PCBs, PAHs, and organochlorine pesticides. Fish were collected from the Tuckahoe River, as a reference. Cytochrome P450 activity, bile PAH metabolites, and muscle organochlorine pesticide/PCB concentrations were measured in randomly-selected individuals and sediment contaminants were analyzed. We found statistically significant differences in liver tumor prevalences: Anacostia (spring)-50%, Anacostia (fall)-60%, Neabsco-17%, Quantico-7%, Tuckahoe-10%. Skin tumor prevalences were significantly different: Anacostia (spring)-37%, Anacostia (fall)-10%, Neabsco-3%, Quantico-3%, Tuckahoe-0%. Tumor prevalence in Anacostia bullheads warrants concern and was similar to those at highly contaminated sites in the Great Lakes. There was evidence of higher PAH exposure in Anacostia fish but a cause-effect linkage cannot be established. Fish tumor surveys, with histopathological examination of internal and external organs, are recommended for monitoring the status of Regions of Concern.

  2. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers of genotoxicity in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) in Chesapeake Bay tributaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, Alfred E; Harshbarger, John C; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K; Jenko, Kathryn; Balk, Lennart; Skarphéðinsdóttir, Halldóra; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Rutter, Michael A

    2011-12-01

    We surveyed four Chesapeake Bay tributaries for skin and liver tumors in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). We focused on the South River, where the highest skin tumor prevalence (53%) in the Bay watershed had been reported. The objectives were to 1) compare tumor prevalence with nearby rivers (Severn and Rhode) and a more remote river (Choptank); 2) investigate associations between tumor prevalence and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylating agents; and 3) statistically analyze Chesapeake Bay bullhead tumor data from 1992 through 2008. All four South River collections exhibited high skin tumor prevalence (19% to 58%), whereas skin tumor prevalence was 2%, 10%, and 52% in the three Severn collections; 0% and 2% in the Choptank collections; and 5.6% in the Rhode collection. Liver tumor prevalence was 0% to 6% in all but one South River collection (20%) and 0% to 6% in the three other rivers. In a subset of samples, PAH-like biliary metabolites and (32)P-DNA adducts were used as biomarkers of exposure and response to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Adducts from alkylating agents were detected as O6-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (O6Me-dG) and O6-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (O6Et-dG) modified DNA. Bullheads from the contaminated Anacostia River were used as a positive control for DNA adducts. (32)P-DNA adduct concentrations were significantly higher in Anacostia bullhead livers compared with the other rivers. We identified alkyl DNA adducts in bullhead livers from the South and Anacostia, but not the Choptank. Neither the PAH-like bile metabolite data, sediment PAH data, nor the DNA adduct data suggest an association between liver or skin tumor prevalence and exposure to PACs or alkylating agents in the South, Choptank, Severn, or Rhode rivers. Logistic regression analysis of the Chesapeake Bay database revealed that sex and length were significant covariates for liver tumors and length was a significant covariate for skin tumors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers of genotoxicity in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, Alfred E.; Harshbarger, John C.; Karouna-Renier, Natalie K.; Jenko, Kathryn; Balk, Lennart; Skarphéðinsdóttir, Halldora; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Rutter, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    We surveyed four Chesapeake Bay tributaries for skin and liver tumors in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). We focused on the South River, where the highest skin tumor prevalence (53%) in the Bay watershed had been reported. The objectives were to 1) compare tumor prevalence with nearby rivers (Severn and Rhode) and a more remote river (Choptank); 2) investigate associations between tumor prevalence and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylating agents; and 3) statistically analyze Chesapeake Bay bullhead tumor data from 1992 through 2008. All four South River collections exhibited high skin tumor prevalence (19% to 58%), whereas skin tumor prevalence was 2%, 10%, and 52% in the three Severn collections; 0% and 2% in the Choptank collections; and 5.6% in the Rhode collection. Liver tumor prevalence was 0% to 6% in all but one South River collection (20%) and 0% to 6% in the three other rivers. In a subset of samples, PAH-like biliary metabolites and 32P-DNA adducts were used as biomarkers of exposure and response to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Adducts from alkylating agents were detected as O6-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (O6Me-dG) and O6-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (O6Et-dG) modified DNA. Bullheads from the contaminated Anacostia River were used as a positive control for DNA adducts. 32P-DNA adduct concentrations were significantly higher in Anacostia bullhead livers compared with the other rivers. We identified alkyl DNA adducts in bullhead livers from the South and Anacostia, but not the Choptank. Neither the PAH-like bile metabolite data, sediment PAH data, nor the DNA adduct data suggest an association between liver or skin tumor prevalence and exposure to PACs or alkylating agents in the South, Choptank, Severn, or Rhode rivers. Logistic regression analysis of the Chesapeake Bay database revealed that sex and length were significant covariates for liver tumors and length was a significant covariate for skin tumors.

  4. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers of genotoxicity in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkney, Alfred E., E-mail: Fred_Pinkney@fws.gov [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Chesapeake Bay Field Office, 177 Admiral Cochrane Drive, Annapolis, MD 21401 (United States); Harshbarger, John C., E-mail: jcharshbarger@verizon.net [Department of Pathology, George Washington University Medical Center, 2300 I Street, NW, Washington, DC 20037 (United States); Karouna-Renier, Natalie K., E-mail: nkarouna@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, BARC, Bldg. 308, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Jenko, Kathryn [U.S. Geological Survey, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, BARC, Bldg. 308, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Balk, Lennart, E-mail: lennart.balk@itm.su.se [Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University SE-106 91, Stockholm (Sweden); Skarphe Latin-Small-Letter-Eth insdottir, Halldora; Liewenborg, Birgitta [Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University SE-106 91, Stockholm (Sweden); Rutter, Michael A., E-mail: mar36@psu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College, 5091 Station Road, Erie, PA 16563 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    We surveyed four Chesapeake Bay tributaries for skin and liver tumors in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). We focused on the South River, where the highest skin tumor prevalence (53%) in the Bay watershed had been reported. The objectives were to 1) compare tumor prevalence with nearby rivers (Severn and Rhode) and a more remote river (Choptank); 2) investigate associations between tumor prevalence and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylating agents; and 3) statistically analyze Chesapeake Bay bullhead tumor data from 1992 through 2008. All four South River collections exhibited high skin tumor prevalence (19% to 58%), whereas skin tumor prevalence was 2%, 10%, and 52% in the three Severn collections; 0% and 2% in the Choptank collections; and 5.6% in the Rhode collection. Liver tumor prevalence was 0% to 6% in all but one South River collection (20%) and 0% to 6% in the three other rivers. In a subset of samples, PAH-like biliary metabolites and {sup 32}P-DNA adducts were used as biomarkers of exposure and response to polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Adducts from alkylating agents were detected as O6-methyl-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (O6Me-dG) and O6-ethyl-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (O6Et-dG) modified DNA. Bullheads from the contaminated Anacostia River were used as a positive control for DNA adducts. {sup 32}P-DNA adduct concentrations were significantly higher in Anacostia bullhead livers compared with the other rivers. We identified alkyl DNA adducts in bullhead livers from the South and Anacostia, but not the Choptank. Neither the PAH-like bile metabolite data, sediment PAH data, nor the DNA adduct data suggest an association between liver or skin tumor prevalence and exposure to PACs or alkylating agents in the South, Choptank, Severn, or Rhode rivers. Logistic regression analysis of the Chesapeake Bay database revealed that sex and length were significant covariates for liver tumors and length was a significant covariate for skin tumors

  5. Aroclor 1248 exposure leads to immunomodulation, decreased disease resistance and endocrine disruption in the brown bullhead, Ameiurus nebulosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Blazer, V.S.; McCormick, S.D.; Van Veld, P.A.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    The brown bullhead Ameiurus nebulosus is a species of the family Ictaluridae commonly used as a sentinel of environmental contamination. While these fish have been utilized for this purpose in areas contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), few controlled, laboratory-based studies have been designed to document the effects of PCB mixtures in this species. Here, brown bullhead were exposed to the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1248, via intraperitoneal injection and the effects on immune function, plasma hormones and disease resistance were evaluated. Exposure to this mixture led to a decrease in bactericidal activity and circulating antibodies to Edwardsiella ictaluri present from a previous exposure to this pathogen. A subsequent E. ictaluri disease challenge led to significantly higher mortality in A1248 treated fish compared to vehicle-control fish. The mitogenic response to the T-cell mitogen, phytohemaglutinin-P, was increased compared to vehicle-control fish. The steroid hormone, cortisol, and the thyroid hormone, T3, were also significantly lower in A1248 exposed fish. In summary, we have validated a number of functional immune assays for application in brown bullhead immunotoxicity studies. Additionally, we have demonstrated that the PCB mixture (A1248) modulates both immune function and endocrine physiology in brown bullhead. Such data may compliment the interpretation of data yielded from applied field studies conducted in PCB contaminated aquatic ecosystems.

  6. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers of exposure in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the tidal Potomac River, USA, watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, A.E.; Harshbarger, J.C.; May, E.B.; Melancon, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    Associations between contaminant exposure and liver and skin tumor prevalence were evaluated in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the tidal Potomac River, USA, watershed. Thirty bullheads (>age 3) were collected from Quantico embayment near a Superfund site that released organochlorine contaminants; Neabsco Creek, a tributary with petroleum inputs from runoff and marinas; and Anacostia River (spring and fall), an urban tributary designated as a Chesapeake Bay region of concern, that was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and organochlorine pesticides. Fish were collected from the Tuckahoe River, as a reference. Cytochrome P450 activity, bile PAH metabolites, and muscle organochlorine pesticide and PCB concentrations were measured in randomly selected individuals and sediment contaminants were analyzed. We found statistically significant differences in liver tumor prevalences: Anacostia (spring), 50%, Anacostia (fall), 60%, Neabsco, 17%, Quantico, 7%, and Tuckahoe, 10%. Skin tumor prevalences were significantly different: Anacostia (spring), 37%, Anacostia (fall), 10%, Neabsco, 3%, Quantico, 3%, and Tuckahoe, 0%. Tumor prevalences in Anacostia bullheads warrants concern and was similar to those as highly contaminated sites in the Great Lakes. Evidence was found of higher PAH exposure in Anacostia fish but a cause-effect linkage could not be established. Fish tumor surveys, with histopathologic examination of internal and external organs are recommended for monitoring the status of regions of concern.

  7. Whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic characterization of brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) origin ranavirus strains from independent disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, Enikő; Doszpoly, Andor; Horváth, Balázs; Marton, Szilvia; Forró, Barbara; Farkas, Szilvia L; Bányai, Krisztián; Juhász, Tamás

    2016-11-01

    Ranaviruses are emerging pathogens associated with high mortality diseases in fish, amphibians and reptiles. Here we describe the whole genome sequence of two ranavirus isolates from brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) specimens collected in 2012 at two different locations in Hungary during independent mass mortality events. The two Hungarian isolates were highly similar to each other at the genome sequence level (99.9% nucleotide identity) and to a European sheatfish (Silurus glanis) origin ranavirus (ESV, 99.7%-99.9% nucleotide identity). The coding potential of the genomes of both Hungarian isolates, with 136 putative proteins, were shared with that of the ESV. The core genes commonly used in phylogenetic analysis of ranaviruses were not useful to differentiate the two brown bullhead ESV strains. However genome-wide distribution of point mutations and structural variations observed mainly in the non-coding regions of the genome suggested that the ranavirus disease outbreaks in Hungary were caused by different virus strains. At this moment, due to limited whole genome sequence data of ESV it is unclear whether these genomic changes are useful in molecular epidemiological monitoring of ranavirus disease outbreaks. Therefore, complete genome sequencing of further isolates will be needed to identify adequate genetic markers, if any, and demonstrate their utility in disease control and prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tumor prevalence and biomarkers of exposure in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) from Back River, Furnace Creek, and Tuckahoe River, Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, A.E.; Harshbarger, J.C.; May, E.B.; Melancon, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) were collected from 2 locations near Baltimore, Maryland, Back River and Furnace Creek, and 1 (reference) location, Tuckahoe River, to compare the prevalence of tumors (liver and skin) and visible skin lesions (fin erosion and abnormal barbels). Cytochrome P450 activity measured as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, biliary PAH-like fluorescent metabolites, and fillet contaminant concentrations were determined as indicators of exposure in a randomly selected subset of the fish. There were no significant differences in liver tumor prevalence: Back River = 8% (4/50), Furnace Creek = 0% (0/50), and Tuckahoe River = 2.6% (1/39; p = 0.20, extension of Fishers exact test). Skin tumor prevalence was as follows: Furnace Creek = 12% (6/50), Back River = 8% (4/50), and Tuckahoe River = 0% (0/39; p = 0.063). In the Back River fish, there was a 40% (20/50) prevalence of fin erosion and a 28% (14/50) prevalence of abnormal (shortened, clubbed, or missing) barbels. Fin erosion was not observed in the other collections, and only 10% (5/50) of the Furnace Creek fish had abnormal barbels (p tumors, fin erosion, and abnormal barbels.

  9. Assessment of the "fish tumors or other deformities" beneficial use impairment in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus): II. Liver neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, V.S.; Rafferty, S.D.; Baumman, P.C.; Smith, S.B.; Obert, E.C.

    2009-01-01

    Liver pathology of fishes, including neoplastic and preneoplastic lesions, is widely used as an indicator of exposure to anthropogenic contaminants. By definition, the "fish tumor or other deformities" beneficial use impairment (BUI) at Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOC) includes neoplastic and preneoplastic liver lesions in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) or suckers. Unfortunately, adequate guidelines for defining neoplastic and preneoplastic liver lesions or determining rates at unimpacted control sites were not provided and different criteria have been used. In some cases, only neoplastic changes were used to calculate tumor prevalence, in some both neoplastic and preneoplastic changes and in some it is difficult to determine which changes were included. Using standardized criteria, the prevalence of liver neoplasia was compared at eight AOC during 1998-2000. The Cuyahoga River had the highest prevalence (25.0%), while the Maumee River had the lowest (3.9%). The Buffalo (4.8%), Detroit (5.9%), Ashtabula (6.8%), Niagara (7.5%) and Black (8.9%) rivers were intermediate, as was Presque Isle Bay (7.1%). From 2002 to 2007 the prevalence of liver neoplasia at Presque Isle Bay ranged from a low of 2.1% (2002) to a high of 12.0% (2007). Non-AOC sites, as potential reference sites, also were monitored during this time. By combining years and sites, the prevalence of liver neoplasia in bullhead (aged 2 to 12 years) at inland lakes was 0.7%, at bays/harbors was 1.6% and at tributary sites was 4.1%. This is the same trend (inland lakes < bays/harbors < tributaries < Presque Isle Bay) noted for orocutaneous neoplasms.

  10. Assessment of the "fish tumors or other deformities" beneficial use impairment in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus): I. Orocutaneous tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, V.S.; Rafferty, S.D.; Baumman, P.C.; Smith, S.B.; Obert, E.C.

    2009-01-01

    The "fish tumor or other deformities" beneficial use impairment (BUI) occurs at 9 of the 12 areas of concern (AOC) on Lake Erie. As point sources are mitigated and remediation occurs, AOC are faced with determining delisting criteria. The lack of standardized analyses for this BUI has confounded that process. For orocutaneous tumors, different criteria (presumptive tumors and/or abnormal barbels) and methodology (gross versus microscopic observations) have been used. Hence, this project evaluated tumors at numerous AOC and non-AOC sites and compared methodology. In 1998-2000 the prevalence of presumptive orocutaneous tumors and barbel abnormalities was compared in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) collected at eight AOC. The Black (46.7%), Buffalo (29.3%), Cuyahoga (58.9%), and Detroit (26.5%) rivers and Presque Isle Bay (28.6%) had high prevalences of orocutaneous tumors, while the Niagara (10%), Maumee (3.9%) and Ashtabula (4.4%) rivers were lower. From 2002 to 2007 the prevalence of orocutaneous tumors at Presque Isle Bay was consistently near 30%. A variety of non-AOC sites, as potential reference sites, were also monitored during this time. By combining years and sites the prevalence of orocutaneous tumors in bullhead (age 2-12 years) at inland lakes was 6.3%, at Long Point Inner Bay was 8.7%, at other bays and harbors was 14.6% and at tributary sites was 12.5%. Overall, 93% of the raised lesions identified as presumptive tumors grossly were verified as neoplasms microscopically. The prevalence of orocutaneous tumors increased with age at both Presque Isle Bay and Long Point Inner Bay, the sites with the largest sample sizes.

  11. Effects of dietary vitamin C and soybean lecithin in the nutrition of brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus L. fingerlings

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    Ivica Aničić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different forms of vitamin C and soybean lecithin on growth performance, feed utilization and body composition of brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus, Lesuer 1819 were evaluated during a 9-week growth trial. A special interest was to investigate a possible combine effect of these nutritional components. The diets used contained three forms of vitamin C (crystallized ascorbic acid, encapsulated L-ascorbic acid and Ca-L-threonate (100 mg/kg with and without the combination of soybean lecithin. Besides control diet (K, one more diet was supplemented with soybean lecithin (L only. One-hundred-ninety-two brown bullhead of about 45 g initial body weight was randomly divided in 24 tanks (115 L each. Testing conditions included 8 fish per tank, with triplicate tanks for treatment. All diets with supplemented components had higher final weight. Specific growth rate, feed conversion rate and condition factor were significantly higher with encapsulated vitamin C diets (CC, CCL, followed by the results of enriched ascorbic acid diets. Vitamin C and lecithin supplementation showed positive influence on significantly higher number of erythrocytes, haematocrit, triglycerides and total protein. Vitamin C content of muscle and liver tissue was not uniform and was significantly higher in AAL, CCL, CC and AA feeding groups. The fatty acids profile of muscle and liver tissue showed that phospholipids from soybean lecithin and vitamin C diets enhanced the quality of usable part of the fish body. Combine supplementation of vitamin C and soy lecithin indicated positive production effects, but did not cause a statistically significant difference.

  12. Tumor Prevalence and Biomarkers of Exposure and Response in Brown Bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the Tidal Potomac River Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, A.E.; Harshbarger, J.C.; May, E.B.; Melancon, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Four groups of thirty brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) were collected from the tidal Potomac River watershed to survey tumor prevalence in relation to contaminant exposure. Fish were obtained from the Quantico embayment, near a Superfund site that released polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and DDT compounds; Neabsco Creek,.a tributary with petroleum inputs from upstream areas and marinas; and the Anacostia River (both in spring and fall),where sediment is contaminated with polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs, and organochlorine pesticides. Fish were also collected from the Tuckahoe River, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, as a reference. Fish were necropsied and examined grossly and histopathologically for skin and liver neoplasms. Cytochrome P450 activity, bile PAH metabolites, and muscle organochlorine pesticide/PCB concentrations were determined in randomly selected individuals. There were significant differences among sites in liver tumor prevalence: Anacostia (spring)-50%, Anacostia (fall)-60%, Neabsco-17%, Quantico-7%, Tuckahoe-10%. Skin tumor prevalences were also significantly different: Anacostia (spring)-37%, Anacostia (fall)-10%, Neabsco-3%, Quantico-3%, Tuckahoe-0%. Tumor prevalences in Anacostia fish were comparable to those at contaminated sites in the Great Lakes. PAH concentrations were higher in Anacostia sediments than at the other sites and there were significantly higher concentrations of PAH metabolites in bile of the Anacostia fish. At present, there are insufficient data, however, to establish a cause-effect linkage with a particular class of contaminants. Tumor surveys in selected species are recommended for monitoring the status and remediation of Regions of Concern and other areas in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  13. Assessment of the fish tumor beneficial use impairment in brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) at selected Great Lakes Areas of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Vicki; Mazik, Patricia M.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Braham, Ryan P.; Hahn, Cassidy M.; Walsh, Heather L.; Sperry, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    A total of 878 adult Brown Bullhead were collected at 11 sites within the Lake Erie and Lake Ontario drainages from 2011 to 2013. The sites included seven Areas of Concern (AOC; 670 individuals), one delisted AOC (50 individuals) and three non-AOC sites (158 individuals) used as reference sites. These fish were used to assess the “fish tumor or other deformities” beneficial use impairment. Fish were anesthetized, weighed, measured and any external abnormalities documented and removed. Abnormal orocutaneous and barbel tissue, as well as five to eight pieces of liver, were preserved for histopathological analyses. Otoliths were removed and used for age analyses. Visible external abnormalities included reddened (raised or eroded), melanistic areas and raised growths on lips, body surface, fins and barbels. Microscopically, these raised growths included papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, osteoma and osteosarcoma. Proliferative lesions of the liver included bile duct hyperplasia, foci of cellular alteration, bile duct (cholangioma, cholangiocarcinoma) and hepatocellular (adenoma, hepatic cell carcinoma) neoplasia. The two reference sites (Long Point Inner Bay, Conneaut Creek), at which 30 or more bullhead were collected had a skin tumor prevalence of 10% or less and liver tumor prevalence of 4% or less. Presque Isle Bay, recently delisted, had a similar liver tumor prevalence (4%) and slightly higher prevalence (12%) of skin tumors. The prevalence of skin neoplasms was 15% or less at sites in the Black River, Cuyahoga River and Maumee AOCs, while more than 20% of the bullheads from the Rochester Embayment, Niagara River, Detroit River and Ashtabula River AOCs had skin tumors. The prevalence of liver tumors was greater than 4% at all AOC sites except the Old Channel site at the Cuyahoga River AOC, Wolf Creek within the Maumee AOC and the upper and lower sites within the Niagara River AOC.

  14. Morfometrická analýza dvou druhů Ameiurus melas a Ameiurus nebulosus, (Teleostei:Ictaluridae) vyskytujících se na území České republiky

    OpenAIRE

    PÍCHA, Roman

    2010-01-01

    North American freshwater catfishes (Ictaluridae) is family of freshwater catfishes and includes 7 genera and 48 species. Original habitat of those family is Northern and Central America, but some species were to be introduced to the other regions inclusive Europe. In Czech Republic was recorded occurrence of two species of genus Ameiurus. Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) imported by J. Šusta in 1890, and black bullhead (Ameiurus melas), which was imported in 2003 as an admixture to load o...

  15. A comparison of β-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in tissues of brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the black river and old woman creek, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevens, Jeffery A.; Baumann, Paul C.; Jones, Susan B.

    1996-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptors (βARs) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors were measured in brain, gill, and heart tissues of brown bullhead catfish exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Black River, Ohio, USA, and were compared to values from Old Woman Creek, Ohio, a reference site. A decreased number of βARs were found in the gill from Black River fish, possibly indicating a compensatory response subsequent to chemical stress.

  16. Ameiurus melas (black bullhead): morphological characteristics of new introduced species and its comparison with Ameiurus nebulosus (brown bullhead)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rutkayová, J.; Biskup, R.; Harant, R.; Šlechta, Vlastimil; Koščo, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 1 (2013), s. 51-68 ISSN 0960-3166 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : morphometry * multivariate analyse * osteology Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.564, year: 2013

  17. Species-specific markers provide molecular genetic evidence for natural introgression of bullhead catfishes in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béres, Beatrix; Kánainé Sipos, Dóra; Müller, Tamás; Staszny, Ádám; Farkas, Milán; Bakos, Katalin; Urbányi, Béla

    2017-01-01

    Since three bullhead catfish species were introduced to Europe in the late 19th century, they have spread to most European countries. In Hungary, the brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) was more widespread in the 1970s–1980s, but the black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) has gradually supplanted since their second introduction in 1980. The introgressive hybridization of the two species has been presumed based on morphological examinations, but it has not previously been supported by genetic evidence. In this study, 11 different Hungarian habitats were screened with a new species-specific nuclear genetic, duplex PCR based, marker system to distinguish the introduced catfish species, Ameiurus nebulosus, Ameiurus melas, and Ameiurus natalis, as well as the hybrids of the first two. More than 460 specimens were analyzed using the above markers and additional mitochondrial sequence analyses were also conducted on >25% of the individuals from each habitat sampled. The results showed that only 7.9% of the specimens from two habitats belonged to Ameiurus nebulosus, and 92.1% were classified as Ameiurus melas of all habitats, whereas the presence of Ameiurus natalis was not detected. Two specimens (>0.4%) showed the presence of both nuclear genomes and they were identified as hybrids of Ameiurus melas and Ameiurus nebulosus. An additional two individuals showed contradicting results from the nuclear and mitochondrial assays as a sign of a possible footprint of introgressive hybridization that might have happened two or more generations before. Surprisingly, the level of hybridization was much smaller than expected based on the analyses of the North American continent’s indigenous stock from the hybrid zones. This phenomenon has been observed in several invasive fish species and it is regarded as an added level of complexity in the management of their rapid adaptation. PMID:28265489

  18. Pigmented macrophage aggregates as a biomarker of oxidative damage in yellow bullhead catfish, Ameiurus natalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreedy, C.D.; HoganEsch, H.; Turek, J.; Jagoe, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Pigmented macrophage aggregates (PMs) occur when peroxidized lipids resulting from oxidative damage in tissues are scavenged by macrophages. Ionizing radiation causes oxidative damage, so the authors evaluated PMs as a biomarker in the pronephros of yellow bullheads (Ameiurus natalis) inhabiting Pond B, Savannah River Site, SC, a reservoir contaminated with low levels of 137 Cs. ANOVA, ANCOVA, and stepwise regression were used to relate the mean number of PMs, per 0.15 mm 2 of tissue section, to fish sex (females: N = 61; males: N = 84), age (1--6 yrs), body-condition, and muscle 137 Cs concentration. Mean pronephric PMs differed by six and with fish muscle 137 Cs concentration. Among males, PMs were positively correlated with fish age and 137 Cs. In females, PMs were also correlated with fish age and 137 Cs. ANCOVA, with age as covariate, affirmed that sex and muscle 137 Cs were significantly associated with the mean number of pronephric PMs. Using stepwise regression, the interaction of age and 137 Cs concentration was most strongly associated with pronephric PMs in males. Among females, the product of age, body-condition, and 137 Cs concentration was most strongly associated with pronephric PMs. The positive relationships between the number of pronephric PMs and 137 Cs concentration suggest that oxidative damage related to long-term exposure to low-level radiation is detectable in these fish. Secondarily, these results demonstrate the importance of considering covariates such as age and sex when evaluating effects of environmental contaminants

  19. Bioaccumulation of cesium-137 in yellow bullhead catfish (Ameiurus natalis) inhabiting an abandoned nuclear reactor reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreedy, C.D.; Glickman, L.T.; Jagoe, C.H.; Brisbin, I.L. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Bioaccumulation of 137 Cs was investigated in yellow bullhead catfish (Ameiurus natalis) inhabiting an abandoned reactor reservoir, Pond B, Savannah River Site, Barnwell Co., South Carolina. The authors collected fish by trap-netting, and determined ages from pectoral spines. Muscle and other tissues were assayed for 137 Cs by NaI-scintillation. Music 137 Cs was unrelated to sex or mass of fish, but was related to age. Examination of least-squares means suggested that 137 Cs in muscle increased up to about age 3, but did not increase with greater age. A modified Richards model showed equilibrium 137 Cs concentration in muscle was acquired in approximately 2.4 years. Growth differed between sexes and the time to asymptotic body mass was longer than the time to attain equilibrium 137 Cs concentration. Males attained an asymptotic mass of 577 g in approximately 6.3 years; females attained an asymptotic mass of 438 g in approximately 5.9 years. The cumulative 137 Cs burden of the population was 4.9 x 10 6 Bq, representing 137 Cs inventory of the reservoir. Concentration of 137 Cs varied among tissues with gill and muscle the lowest and highest. Concentration of 137 Cs in ovaries declined with increasing ovary mass. Until equilibrium is attained in these fish, 137 Cs concentration is directly related to increasing age rather than size

  20. Decreased glutathione S-transferase expression and activity and altered sex steroids in Lake Apopka brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, E.P.; Gross, T.S.; Sheehy, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    A number of freshwater lakes and reclaimed agricultural sites in Central Florida have been the receiving waters for agrochemical and municipal runoff. One of these sites, Lake Apopka, is also a eutrophic system that has been the focus of several case studies reporting altered reproductive activity linked to bioaccumulation of persistent organochlorine chemicals in aquatic species. The present study was initiated to determine if brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) from the north marsh of Lake Apopka (Lake Apopka Marsh) exhibit an altered capacity to detoxify environmental chemicals through hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation as compared with bullheads from a nearby reference site (Lake Woodruff). We also compared plasma sex hormone concentrations (testosterone, 17-?? estradiol, and 11 keto-testosterone) in bullheads from the two sites. Female bullheads from Lake Apopka had 40% lower initial rate GST conjugative activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 50% lower activity towards p-nitrobutyl chloride (NBC), 33% lower activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA), and 43% lower activity toward ??5-androstene-3,17-dione (??5-ADI), as compared with female bullheads from Lake Woodruff. Enzyme kinetic analyses demonstrated that female bullheads from Lake Apopka had lower GST-catalyzed CDNB clearance than did female Lake Woodruff bullheads. Western blotting studies of bullhead liver cytosolic proteins demonstrated that the reduced GST catalytic activities in female Lake Apopka bullheads were accompanied by lower expression of hepatic GST protein. No site differences were observed with respect to GST activities or GST protein expression in male bullheads. Female Lake Apopka bullheads also had elevated concentrations of plasma androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) as compared with females from Lake Woodruff. In contrast, male Lake Apopka bullheads had elevated levels of plasma estrogen but similar levels of androgens as compared with

  1. Tumor frequencies in walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) and brown bullhead (Ictalurus nebulosus) and sediment contaminants in tributaries of the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Paul C.; Mac, Michael J.; Smith, Stephen B.; Harshbarger, John C.

    1991-01-01

    To better characterize neoplasm epizootics in the Great Lakes basin and their association with families of contaminants, we sampled five locations: the Fox and Menominee rivers, Lake Michigan; Munuscong Lake, St. Mary's River; and the Black and Cuyahoga rivers, Lake Erie. Frequencies of external and liver tumors were determined for brown bullhead (Ictalurus nebulosus) from all locations except the Black River and for walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) from the Lake Michigan and St. Mary's River sites. Sediment samples were analyzed for metals, polychlorinated aromatics, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Liver neoplasms occurred in brown bullhead from the Cuyahoga River and Munuscong Lake; brown bullhead captured from Munuscong Lake were older than those collected from the other locations. Brown bullhead from these same two rivers had elevated hepatosomatic indexes. No liver neoplasms were found in brown bullhead from the Fox and Menominee rivers, although polychlorinated aromatics were highest in both Fox River sediment and Fox and Menominee brown bullhead, and arsenic was highest in Menominee River sediment and fish. Liver neoplasms in brown bullhead from the Cuyahoga River fit the prevailing hypothesis that elevated PAH in sediment can induce cancer in wild fish. The cause of the liver neoplasms in Munuscong Lake brown bullhead is undetermined.

  2. Biologická charakteristika a význam sumečkovitých ryb ve vodách ČR

    OpenAIRE

    PÍCHA, Roman

    2008-01-01

    Bullhead catfishes (Ictaluridae) is family of freshwater catfishes and includes 7 genera and 48 species. Original habitat of those family is Northern and Central America, but some species were to be introduce to the other regions inclusive Europe. In Czech republic was recorded occurrence of two species of genus Ameiurus. Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) imported by J. Šusta in 1890, and black bullhead (Ameiurus melas), which was imported in 2003 as an admixture to load of Common carp stoc...

  3. Tumors in brown bullheads in the Chesapeake Bay watershed: analysis of survey data from 1992 through 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikney, Alfred E; Harshbarger, John C; Rutter, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    Liver and skin tumor prevalences in brown bullheads Ameiurus nebulosus have been used in the North American Great Lakes to designate highly contaminated areas of concern and monitor their recovery. Here we interpret the results of six surveys conducted in the Chesapeake Bay watershed between 1992 and 2006, with data for 647 fish. The objective has been to develop an adequate database to critically evaluate the use of tumor prevalence as a habitat quality indicator within the watershed. Surveys featured randomized fish collection; recording of sex, length, weight, and age; and histopathology of all livers and all raised skin lesions. The Bayes information criterion was used to analyze all possible combinations of age, gender, length, and weight as covariates for logistic regression. Length and gender were the covariates that best described liver tumor prevalence. There were no covariates in the model for skin tumor prevalence. In some surveys, biomarkers, such as biliary polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-like metabolites, hepatic cytochrome P450 activity, and hepatic DNA adducts, were used with sediment and tissue chemistry data to evaluate classes of chemicals as likely contributors to tumor prevalence. We highlight two surveys of the Anacostia River, Washington, D.C. (average = 55% liver tumors, 23% skin tumors), where sediment PAHs, biliary PAH-like metabolites, and hepatic DNA adducts were high, suggesting that PAHs play a major role. We show that logistic regression is an appropriate procedure for comparing "contaminated" versus "reference" locations, and we evaluate the utility of tumor surveys as an environmental indicator for the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  4. The Gelastocoris nebulosus complex (Heteroptera – Gelastocoridae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieser, N.

    1972-01-01

    Se trata de las espécies del grupo nebulosus del género Gelastocoris. Según el autór este grupo contiene una espécie con dos subespécies. Gelastocoris nebulosus nebulosus (Guérin) con sinónimas G. flavus (Guérin), G. apureensis Melin, G. monrosi De Cario, G. paraguayensis De Carlo y G. vianai De

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Pholis nebulosus (Perciformes: Pholidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongquan; Qin, Kaili; Liu, Jingxi; Song, Na; Han, Zhiqiang; Gao, Tianxiang

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Pholis nebulosus has been determined by long polymerase chain reaction and primer-walking methods. The mitogenome is a circular molecule of 16 524 bp in length, including the typical structure of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 non-coding regions (L-strand replication origin and control region), the gene contents of which are identical to those observed in most bony fishes. Within the control region, we identified the termination-associated sequence domain (TAS), and the conserved sequence block domain (CSB-F, CSB-E, CSB-D, CSB-C, CSB-B, CSB-A, CSB-1, CSB-2, CSB-3).

  6. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG): A biomarker of oxidative damage in yellow bullheads chronically exposed to low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCreedy, C.D.; Glickman, L.T.

    1995-01-01

    8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG), an oxidation product of the nucleotide deoxyguanosine (dG) was used as a biomarker to assess oxidative damage in brain and gill tissues of yellow bullhead catfish (Ameiurus natalis; n = 18) inhabiting an abandoned reactor reservoir contaminated with low levels of d137 Cs (Pond B, Savannah River Site, SC). DNA was isolated by chloroform-isoamyl extraction, enzymatically digested with Nuclease P1/Calf Intestinal Phosphatase, and analyzed by HPLC with electrochemical detection.Length, weight, age, condition and muscle 137 Cs activity of each fish were also determined. Concentrations of 8-OH-dG were greater in brain than in gill tissues. 8-OH-dG in gill tissues decreased as condition of fish increased, but as age increased, the effect of condition declined. Brain 8-OH-dG concentration was not related to age or condition of fish, but was greater in females and the interaction between gender and 137 Cs was significant. Brain 8-OH-dG was positively associated with muscle 137 Cs concentration among females, but was unrelated to 137 Cs concentration in males. At lower 137 Cs concentrations, females tended to have fewer oxidative DNA adducts in brian than did males. Deposition of somatic lipids into eggs may provide females some anti-oxidant benefit by diminishing the contribution of lipid peroxidation to DNA damage. 8-OH-dG is a sensitive biomarker of low-level radiation exposure, however, its application in fish requires consideration of factors such as gender, age, body-condition, and the tissue type sampled

  7. Kudoa inornata sp. n. (Myxosporea: Multivalvulida) from the skeletal muscles of Cynoscion nebulosus (Teleostei: Sciaenidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyková, Iva; de Buron, I.; Fiala, Ivan; Roumillat, W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2009), s. 91-98 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Myxozoa * Myxosporea * Kudoa inornata * Cynoscion nebulosus Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.266, year: 2009

  8. Phylogeny of European Bullhead (Cottus sp. in Western Balkans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Bravničar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available European bullhead sensus lato is a species complex, in which lineage determination based on morphology has proven to be extremely difficult, probably due to low interspecific and high intraspeciefic morphological variation. Therefore, major evolutionary lineages across Europe have been determined based on molecular data, which also to some extent corresponds to known morphological variation. Cottus populations on the Balkan Peninsula have not yet been thoroughly studied. Thus we used molecular genetic approach (mtDNA-CR and nu-LSU to evaluate evolutionary distinctive units of Cottus in the Western Balkans and compare them to other European lineages. We found presence of five distinct lineages. Populations corresponding to Cottus gobio clade inhabit tributaries of Danube River in southern Serbia, rivers of Adriatic drainage and Drava River. Interestingly, we found three additional Cottus linages in Sava River and its tributaries, differing considerably from “main” C. gobio. First, we confirmed morphologically determined Cottus meate from Upper Sava, with species range from the source of Sava River, including tributaries, to the inflow of Kolpa River. Second, we found a new lineage inhabiting the Kolpa and Una river systems. Third, lineage was found inhabiting Bosna and Vrbas rivers. High density of evolutionary distinctive lineages in such a small area is according to our knowledge exceptional for European bullhead and lines up with the general notion of the Balkans as major refuge and present day biodiversity hotspot. Our results correspond with two wave colonization theory of Europe by Cottus genus probosed by Volckaert, first possibly being in Pliocene and second during the Pleistocene, with Balkan Peninsula as starting point for both of them.

  9. Effects of Photoperiod and Temperature on Growth and Development in Clouded Salamander (Hynobius nebulosus) Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukita, Sayuri; Gouda, Mika; Ikeda, Sakiko; Ishibashi, Sakiko; Furuya, Tatsunori; Nakamura, Keiji

    2015-06-01

    Day length is one of the most important factors that organisms use to predict seasonal changes in their environment. Several amphibians regulate their growth and development in response to photoperiod. However, many studies have not focused on the ecological effects of the photoperiodic response on growth and development because they use tropical animals, animals from a commercial source or from unknown localities, or extreme light regimens for experiments. In the present study, we examined the effects of photoperiod on growth and development in the clouded salamander (Hynobius nebulosus) by raising larvae under different photoperiods and at different temperatures in the laboratory. The average larval period under a long-day photoperiod of L16:D8 was longer than that under L12:D12 at 15°C or 20°C, although the difference between the photoperiods was only significant for 15°C. Juveniles weighed more at metamorphosis under L16:D8 than those under L12:D12, irrespective of temperature, suggesting that a longer developmental period results in a heavier body weight. The head width of juveniles did not differ for different photoperiods at either temperature. However, the growth rate of the head width under L12:D12 was faster than that under L16:D8 at 15°C. Long day length appears to produce larger H. nebulosus juveniles in a relatively stable aquatic environment with a low population density. Thus, development may be accelerated when the day length becomes shorter as winter approaches, and larvae may have increased the growth rate of their head widths to compensate for the shorter growing period under shorter day lengths.

  10. Henneguya cynoscioni sp. n. (Myxosporea: Bivalvulida), an agent of severe cardiac lesions in the spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus (Teleostei: Sciaenidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyková, Iva; de Buron, I.; Roumillat, W. A.; Fiala, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2011), 169–177 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Henneguya cynoscioni * Myxosporea * pathogenicity * cardiac henneguyosis * Cynoscion nebulosus * Cardicola laruei * Atlantic Ocean Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.812, year: 2011 http://www.paru.cas.cz/folia/pdfs/showpdf.php?pdf=21985

  11. 78 FR 13811 - Special Local Regulation; Annual Marine Events on the Colorado River, Between Davis Dam (Bullhead...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG-2012-1094] Special Local Regulation; Annual Marine Events on the Colorado River, Between Davis Dam (Bullhead City, AZ) and Headgate Dam (Parker, AZ) Within the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...

  12. 77 FR 70121 - Special Local Regulation; Annual Marine Events on the Colorado River Between Davis Dam (Bullhead...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0954] Special Local Regulation; Annual Marine Events on the Colorado River Between Davis Dam (Bullhead City, AZ) and Headgate Dam (Parker, AZ) Within the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...

  13. 77 FR 67563 - Special Local Regulation; Annual Marine Events on the Colorado River, Between Davis Dam (Bullhead...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0925] Special Local Regulation; Annual Marine Events on the Colorado River, Between Davis Dam (Bullhead City, AZ) and Headgate Dam (Parker, AZ) Within the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION...

  14. Genetic variability in spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), determined with microsatellite DNA markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R.; Bowers, K.; Hensley, R.; Mobley, B.; Belouski, E.

    2007-01-01

    Variation in the allele frequencies of five microsatellite loci was surveyed in 1256 individual spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) obtained from 12 bays and estuaries from Laguna Madre, Texas, to Charlotte Harbor, Florida, to St. John's River on the Florida Atlantic Coast. Texas and Louisiana collection sites were resampled each year for two to four years (1998-2001). Genetic differentiation was observed. Spotted seatrout from Florida waters were strongly differentiated from spotted seatrout collected in Louisiana and Texas. The greatest genetic discontinuity was observed between Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor, and Charlotte Harbor seatrout were most similar to Atlantic Coast spotted seatrout. Texas and Louisiana samples were not strongly structured within the northwestern Gulf of Mexico and there was little evidence of temporal differentiation within bays. These findings are contrary to those of earlier analyses with allozymes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) where evidence of spatial differentiation was found for spotted seatrout resident on the Texas coast. The differences in genetic structure observed among these markers may reflect differences in response to selective pressure, or may be due to differences in underlying genetic processes.

  15. Immunocytochemical survey of the neuroepithelial endocrine system in the respiratory tract of the Tokyo salamander, Hynobius nebulosus tokyoensis TAgo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomi, T; Kikuchi, Y; Adriaensen, D; Timmermans, J P; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H; Kimura, A; Naruse, H; Ishikawa, Y; Kishi, K; Scheuermann, D W

    1994-12-01

    The epithelial lining of the respiratory tract of urodeles has been shown to harbor an innervated system of neuroepithelial endocrine (NEE) cells. Even between phylogenetically closely related species, large differences have been reported in the appearance and chemical coding of the NEE system. Although urodeles are well suited for the purpose, none of the prior studies have provided an immunocytochemical survey of the NEE system in all parts of the respiratory tract. In the present study, many bioactive substances and a general marker were immunocytochemically demonstrated in serial sections of the entire respiratory tract of the Tokyo salamander, Hynobius nebulosus tokyoensis, a species in which neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) were previously characterized at the electron microscopic level. In the current study, serotonin-immunoreactive solitary NEE cells were observed in variable numbers in the larynx, in all parts of the trachea, and in areas of the lungs covered with ciliomucous epithelium. Serotonin-containing NEBs, however, were detected in small cranial areas of the lung only. Solitary NEE cells were seen in the trachea and lungs of H. nebulosus tokyoensis by immunocytochemical staining for somatostatin, calcitonin, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and bombesin, but the number, localization, and appearance of the labeled NEE cells differed considerably. Only calcitonin-like immunoreactivity was also noted in some NEB-like cell clusters in the cranial parts of the lungs. Unlike many other vertebrates, neuron specific enolase was found to be a poor marker for the NEE system in the salamander species used in this investigation. It may be concluded that the NEE system of H. nebulosus tokyoensis contains at least five different bioactive substances.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Egg Development of the Ussurian Bullhead Fish, Leiocassis ussuriensis (Pisces: Bagridae) and Morphological Development of Its Larvae and Juveniles

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jae-Min; Yim, Hu-Sun; Lee, Yong-Sik; Kim, Heung-Yun; Han, Kyeong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study was examined the ovogenesis of Ussurian bullhead, Leiocassis ussuriensis and the morphological development of its larvae and juveniles and to use the results as basic information for the preservation of species and resource enhancement. For artificial egg collection, human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) was injected at a rate of 10 IU per gram of fish weight. During breeding period, water temperature maintained at 24.5~26.5?C (mean 25.0?0.05?C). The process of ovogenesis reached the ...

  17. Acoustic monitoring indicates a correlation between calling and spawning in captive spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montie, Eric W; Hoover, Matt; Kehrer, Christopher; Yost, Justin; Brenkert, Karl; O'Donnell, Tim; Denson, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Fish sound production is widespread throughout many families. Territorial displays and courtship are the most common reasons for fish sound production. Yet, there is still some questions on how acoustic signaling and reproduction are correlated in many sound-producing species. In the present study, our aim was to determine if a quantitative relationship exists between calling and egg deposition in captive spotted seatrout ( Cynoscion nebulosus ). This type of data is essential if passive acoustics is to be used to identify spawning aggregations over large spatial scales and monitor reproductive activity over annual and decadal timeframes. Acoustic recorders (i.e., DSG-Oceans) were placed in three laboratory tanks to record underwater sound over an entire, simulated reproductive season. We enumerated the number of calls, calculated the received sound pressure level, and counted the number of eggs every morning in each tank. Spotted seatrout produced three distinct call types characterized as "drums," "grunts," and "staccatos." Spotted seatrout calling increased as the light cycle shifted from 13.5 to 14.5 h of light, and the temperature increased to 27.7 °C. Calling decreased once the temperature fell below 27.7 °C, and the light cycle shifted to 12 h of light. These temperature and light patterns followed the natural reproductive season observed in wild spotted seatrout in the Southeast United States. Spotted seatrout exhibited daily rhythms in calling. Acoustic signaling began once the lights turned off, and calling reached maximum activity approximately 3 h later. Eggs were released only on evenings in which spotted seatrout were calling. In all tanks, spotted seatrout were more likely to spawn when male fish called more frequently. A positive relationship between SPL and the number of eggs collected was found in Tanks 1 and 3. Our findings indicate that acoustic metrics can predict spawning potential. These findings are important because plankton tows may

  18. Acoustic monitoring indicates a correlation between calling and spawning in captive spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. Montie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Fish sound production is widespread throughout many families. Territorial displays and courtship are the most common reasons for fish sound production. Yet, there is still some questions on how acoustic signaling and reproduction are correlated in many sound-producing species. In the present study, our aim was to determine if a quantitative relationship exists between calling and egg deposition in captive spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus. This type of data is essential if passive acoustics is to be used to identify spawning aggregations over large spatial scales and monitor reproductive activity over annual and decadal timeframes. Methods Acoustic recorders (i.e., DSG-Oceans were placed in three laboratory tanks to record underwater sound over an entire, simulated reproductive season. We enumerated the number of calls, calculated the received sound pressure level, and counted the number of eggs every morning in each tank. Results Spotted seatrout produced three distinct call types characterized as “drums,” “grunts,” and “staccatos.” Spotted seatrout calling increased as the light cycle shifted from 13.5 to 14.5 h of light, and the temperature increased to 27.7 °C. Calling decreased once the temperature fell below 27.7 °C, and the light cycle shifted to 12 h of light. These temperature and light patterns followed the natural reproductive season observed in wild spotted seatrout in the Southeast United States. Spotted seatrout exhibited daily rhythms in calling. Acoustic signaling began once the lights turned off, and calling reached maximum activity approximately 3 h later. Eggs were released only on evenings in which spotted seatrout were calling. In all tanks, spotted seatrout were more likely to spawn when male fish called more frequently. A positive relationship between SPL and the number of eggs collected was found in Tanks 1 and 3. Discussion Our findings indicate that acoustic metrics can predict spawning

  19. Remedial Investigation Addendum Report Data Item A009. Volume 1: Report Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Bullhead * ictalurus nebulosus (Lesueur) Brown Bullhead PERCIFORMES Percichthyidae Morone americana (Gmelin) White Perch Centrarchidae Lepomnis...Bullhead PERCIFORMES Centrarchidae Lepomis gibbosus (Linnaeus) P umpkinseed Pomoxis nigromaculatus (Lesueur) Black Crappie W006931 OT.080/5 z 0’ N ý - efi

  20. Contaminant-associated health effects in fishes from the Ottawa and Ashtabula Rivers, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Luke; Blazer, Vicki; Walsh, Heather L.; Shaw, Cassidy H.; DeVault, David S.; Banda, Jo A.

    2018-01-01

    The health of resident fishes serves as a biologically relevant barometer of aquatic ecosystem integrity. Here, the health of the Ottawa River and Ashtabula River (both within the Lake Erie Basin) were assessed using morphological and immunological biomarkers in brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Biomarker metrics were compared to fish collected from a reference site (Conneaut Creek). Data utilized for analyses were collected between 2003 and 2011. Fish collected from all three river systems had markedly different contaminant profiles. Total PCBs were the dominant contaminant class by mass. In bullhead, PCBs were highest in fish from the Ashtabula River and there were no differences in fish collected pre- or post-remediation of Ashtabula Harbor (median = 4.6 and 5.5 mg/kg respectively). Excluding PCBs, the Ottawa River was dominated by organochlorine pesticides. Liver tumor prevalence exceeded the 5% trigger level at both the Ashtabula (7.7%) and Ottawa Rivers (10.2%), but was not statistically different than that at the reference site. There was no statistically significant association between microscopic lesions, gross pathology and contaminant body burdens. Collectively, contaminant body burdens were generally negatively correlated with functional immune responses including bactericidal, cytotoxic-cell and respiratory burst activity in both species. Exceptions were positive correlations of HCB and heptachlor epoxide with respiratory burst activity in largemouth bass, and HCB with respiratory burst activity in bullhead and ΣBHC for all three functional assays in bullhead. Data here provide additional support that organochlorine contamination is associated with immunomodulation, and that species differences exist within sites.

  1. Estimates of population genetic diversity in brown bullhead catfish by DNA fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, A.C.; Wessendarp, T.K.; Gordon, D.A.; Smith, M.K. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lattier, D.L. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hertzberg, V.; Leonard, A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health

    1994-12-31

    Estimates of population genetic diversity may be a sensitive indicator of environmental impact, since limiting the effective breeding population by any means will result in loss of some variant genotypes, as has been demonstrated by allozyme analysis. DNA fingerprinting techniques are also coming into use for population analyses, and the authors chose to apply fingerprinting analysis three populations of brown bullhead catfish collected in Northern Ohio. DNA was isolated from the red blood cells of individual fish. Purified DNAs were digested with EcoR1 restriction enzyme; the digests were then sized on a 1% agarose gel, transferred to nylon membranes and probed with a radiolabeled M13 probe using the Westneat hybridization protocol (Southern blotting). This method effects fragments containing VNTR (variable number of tandem repeat) sequences complementary to the M13, which are highly variable among individual catfish. Hybridized bands were visualized by a Molecular Dynamics phosphorimager and recorded and analyzed with its proprietary Imagequant image analysis program, Excel and SAS. A total of 10 variable bands were identified and their presence or absence scored in each individual. These data were analyzed to determine between and within-population similarity indices as well as population heterozygosity and genetic diversity measures.

  2. Multi year observations reveal variability in residence of a tropical Demersal Fish, Lethrinus nebulosus: implications for spatial management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Pillans

    Full Text Available Off the Ningaloo coast of North West Western Australia, Spangled Emperor Lethrinus nebulosus are among the most highly targeted recreational fish species. The Ningaloo Reef Marine Park comprises an area of 4,566 km2 of which 34% is protected from fishing by 18 no-take sanctuary zones ranging in size from 0.08-44.8 km2. To better understand Spangled Emperor movements and the adequacy of sanctuary zones within the Ningaloo Reef Marine Park for this species, 84 Spangled Emperor of a broad spectrum of maturity and sex were tagged using internal acoustic tags in a range of lagoon and reef slope habitats both inside and adjacent to the Mangrove Bay Sanctuary zone. Kernel Utilisation Distribution (KUD was calculated for 39 resident individuals that were detected for more than 30 days. There was no relationship with fish size and movement or site fidelity. Average home range (95% KUD for residents was 8.5±0.5 km2 compared to average sanctuary zone size of 30 km2. Calculated home range was stable over time resulting in resident animals tagged inside the sanctuary zone spending ∼80% of time within the sanctuary boundaries. The number of fish remaining within the array of receivers declined steadily over time and after one year more than 60% of tagged fish had moved outside the sanctuary zone and also beyond the 28 km2 array of receivers. Long term monitoring identified the importance of shifting home range and was essential for understanding overall residency within protected areas and also for identifying spawning related movements. This study indicates that despite exhibiting stable and small home ranges over periods of one to two years, more than half the population of spangled emperor move at scales greater than average sanctuary size within the Ningaloo Reef Marine Park.

  3. Pathogenic endoparasites of the spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus: patterns of infection in estuaries of South Carolina, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Stephen A; Dyková, Iva; Roumillat, William A; de Buron, Isaure

    2017-06-01

    Six types of pathogenic endoparasites in an economically important fish, spotted seatrout Cynoscion nebulosus, were studied in order to test whether prevalence of infection and assemblage richness varied with season, host sex, host size, or host age. Fish were collected from South Carolina estuaries, USA, over 12 months (n = 216; total lengths 15-663 mm). They were screened histologically for presence of Henneguya cynoscioni (Myxozoa) and Cardicola spp. (Digenea) in the heart, Kudoa inornata (Myxozoa) in the skeletal muscle, Sinuolinea dimorpha (Myxozoa) in the urinary system, Ichthyophonus sp. (Mesomycetozoea) in the kidney, and an unidentified microsporidian in the liver. Prevalence of infection was 29.8, 38.6, 47.2, 41.2, 13.6, and 2.8%, respectively. All factors had significant, but varying effects on the parasites. Parasite infections were more prevalent in winter than other seasons for Cardicola spp. and H. cynoscioni, more prevalent in winter and spring for Ichthyophonus sp., and more prevalent in male fish than female fish for K. inornata, S. dimorpha, and Ichthyophonus. Prevalence of infection by the three myxosporeans and Cardicola spp. increased with fish length, whereas prevalence of Ichthyophonus increased with length among young fish, but decreased with length among older fish. None of the factors affected the liver microsporidian, although statistical power was low due to its rareness. Assemblage richness varied between 0 and 5, was greater during winter and in male fish, and increased with fish length and fish age. Our results demonstrate that spotted seatrout are commonly co-infected by multiple pathogenic endoparasites, suggesting these parasites likely play an import role in controlling fish population numbers.

  4. Applications in environmental risk assessment of leucocyte apoptosis, necrosis and respiratory burst analysis on the European bullhead, Cottus sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bado-Nilles, Anne; Jolly, Sabrina; Porcher, Jean-Marc; Palluel, Olivier; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The use of a biochemical multi-biomarker approach proved insufficient to obtain clear information about ecosystem health. The fish immune system is considered as an attractive non-specific marker for environmental biomonitoring which has direct implications in individual fitness and population growth. Thus, the present work proposes the use of fish immunomarkers together with more common biochemical biomarkers in sampling conditions optimized to reduce biomarker variability and increase parameter robustness. European bullheads (Cottus sp.) from 11 stations in the Artois-Picardie watershed (France) were sampled. In the multiple discriminant analysis, the sites were highly correlated with apoptosis, respiratory burst, GST and EROD activities. Moreover, the use together of biochemical and immune markers increased the percentage of fish correctly classed at each site and enhanced site separation. This study argues in favor of the utilization of apoptosis, necrosis and respiratory burst for the determination of environmental risk assessment in addition to the set of biochemical biomarkers commonly used in fish. -- Highlights: • Optimization of biomarker variability and parameters robustness for biomonitoring. • Adding of fish immunomarkers together with more current biochemical biomarkers. • Use of immune system allows a better evaluation of fish health. • We argue for the deployment of immunomarkers in freshwater monitoring programs. -- Attractive use of freshwater fish leucocyte non-specific immune function in environmental risk assessment according to international recommendations

  5. Monitoring exposure of brown bullheads and benthic macroinvertebrates to sediment contaminants in the Ashtabula River before, during, and after remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, John R; Lazorchak, James M; Mills, Marc; Wernsing, Paul; Baumann, Paul C

    2015-06-01

    In 2007, approximately 420,500 cubic meters of contaminated sediment were removed from the Ashtabula River by dredging. The primary objective of the present study was to monitor contaminant exposure in fish and macroinvertebrates before, during, and after dredging. This was done by measuring tissue concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) in brown bullhead catfish (Ameriurus nebulosa) and in benthic macroinvertebrates, assessing changes in DNA damage in fish liver and blood, and scoring external and histopathological lesions and anomalies in the fish. In surficial sediment PCBs and PAHs were also quantified in conjunction with the biological sampling. The results show a significant reduction in contaminant levels in both fish and macroinvertebrates following dredging, indicating the effectiveness of the remediation in reducing exposure of biota to the primary contaminants of concern. Similarly, DNA damage levels in fish collected from the Ashtabula River significantly declined following dredging; however, a similar reduction in DNA damage over time was seen in fish collected from a reference site (Conneaut Creek), making interpretation difficult. Macroinvertebrate PCB concentrations were reflective of the sediment concentrations in the areas where Hester-Dendy samplers were deployed for macroinvertebrate collection. The present study demonstrates that these methods can be used to evaluate and assess the effectiveness of remediation techniques at contaminated sediment sites. Published 2015 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  6. Histologic, immunologic and endocrine biomarkers indicate contaminant effects in fishes of the Ashtabula River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, L.R.; Blazer, V.S.; Hitt, N.P.; McCormick, S.D.; Devault, D.S.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fish as sentinels of aquatic ecosystem health is a biologically relevant approach to environmental monitoring and assessment. We examined the health of the Ashtabula River using histologic, immunologic, and endocrine biomarkers in brown bullhead (BB; Ameiurus nebulosus) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and compared fish collected from a reference site (Conneaut Creek). Seasonal analysis was necessary to distinguish differences in fish between the two rivers. Overall BB from the Ashtabula River had a lower condition factor and significantly more macrophage aggregates than those from the reference site. Reduced bactericidal and cytotoxic-cell activity was observed in anterior kidney leukocytes from both BB and largemouth bass from the Ashtabula River. Lower plasma thyroxine and triiodo-L-thyronine in both species in the Ashtabula River indicated disruption of the thyroid axis. Differences in physiological biomarker responses were supported by body burden chemical concentrations when data were analyzed on a seasonal basis. The use of two fish species added a level of rigor that demonstrated biological effects were not exclusive to a single species. The results provide strong evidence that contaminants have affected fish in the Ashtabula River, a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and provide a baseline by which to evaluate remediation activities.

  7. Monitoring of wild fish health at selected sites in the Great Lakes Basin: methods and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazer, Vicki; Mazik, Patricia M.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Braham, Ryan; Hahn, Cassidy; Walsh, Heather L.; Sperry, Adam

    2014-01-01

    During fall 2010 and spring 2011, a total of 119 brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus), 136 white sucker (Catostomus commersoni), 73 smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), and 59 largemouth bass (M. salmoides) were collected from seven Great Lakes Basin Areas of Concern and one Reference Site. Comprehensive fish health assessments were conducted in order to document potential adverse affects from exposure to complex chemical mixtures. Fish were necropsied on site, blood samples obtained, pieces of liver, spleen, kidney, gill and any abnormalities placed in fixative for histopathology. Liver samples were saved for gene expression analysis and otoliths were removed for aging. A suite of fish health indicators was developed and implemented for site comparisons and to document seasonal effects and species differences in response to environmental conditions. Organism level (grossly visible lesions, condition factor), tissue level (microscopic pathology, organosomatic indices, micronuclei, and other nuclear abnormalities), plasma factors (reproductive steroid hormones, vitellogenin), and molecular (gene expression) indicators were included. This report describes the methods and preliminary results.

  8. Micronuclei and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities in fishes from the Great Lakes Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braham, Ryan P.; Blazer, Vicki; Shaw, Cassidy H.; Mazik, Patricia M.

    2017-01-01

    Biological markers (biomarkers) sensitive to genotoxic and mutagenic contamination in fishes are widely used to identify exposure effects in aquatic environments. The micronucleus assay was incorporated into a suite of indicators to assess exposure to genotoxic and mutagenic contamination at five Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs), as well as one non-AOC (reference) site. The assay allowed enumeration of micronuclei as well as other nuclear abnormalities for both site and species comparisons. Erythrocyte abnormality data was also compared to skin and liver tumor prevalence and hepatic transcript abundance. Erythrocyte abnormalities were observed at all sites with variable occurrence and severity among sites and species. Benthic-oriented brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) expressed lower rates of erythrocyte abnormalities, but higher rates of skin and liver neoplasms, when compared to pelagic-oriented largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) at the same site. The reduced erythrocyte abnormalities, increased transcript abundance associated with Phase I and II toxicant responsive pathways, and increased neoplastic lesions among benthic-oriented taxa may indicate the development of contaminant resistance of these species to more acute effects.

  9. Transcriptome discovery in non-model wild fish species for the development of quantitative transcript abundance assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Cassidy M.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Cornman, Robert S.; Mazik, Patricia M.; Blazer, Vicki S.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental studies increasingly identify the presence of both contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) and legacy contaminants in aquatic environments; however, the biological effects of these compounds on resident fishes remain largely unknown. High throughput methodologies were employed to establish partial transcriptomes for three wild-caught, non-model fish species; smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu), white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) and brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). Sequences from these transcriptome databases were utilized in the development of a custom nCounter CodeSet that allowed for direct multiplexed measurement of 50 transcript abundance endpoints in liver tissue. Sequence information was also utilized in the development of quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) primers. Cross-species hybridization allowed the smallmouth bass nCounter CodeSet to be used for quantitative transcript abundance analysis of an additional non-model species, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). We validated the nCounter analysis data system with qPCR for a subset of genes and confirmed concordant results. Changes in transcript abundance biomarkers between sexes and seasons were evaluated to provide baseline data on transcript modulation for each species of interest.

  10. A C-type lectin isolated from the skin of Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus) binds a remarkably broad range of sugars and induces blood coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Shigeyuki; Dotsuta, Yuma; Ono, Ayaka; Suzuki, Masanari; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Nakamura, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physiological role of skin lectins of the Japanese bullhead shark (Heterodontus japonicus). A skin extract was subjected to affinity chromatography using seven different sugars as ligands. Molecular mass and N-terminal amino acid sequence analyses indicated elution of the same protein by each of the seven respective cognate ligands from sugar affinity columns. The predicted amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA of this protein [designated as H. japonicus C-type-lectin (HjCL)] identified it as a novel fish subgroup VII C-type lectin evolutionarily related to snake venom lectins. HjCL was predicted to bind to mannose because of the presence of a Glu-Pro-Asn (EPN) motif; however, haemagglutination inhibition assays and glycoconjugate microarray analysis demonstrated its binding to numerous structurally diverse sugars. Competitive sugar-binding assays using affinity chromatography indicated that HjCL bound multiple sugars via a common carbohydrate-recognition domain. The mRNA encoding HjCL was specifically detected in the skin, and immunohistochemical analysis detected its expression in uncharacterized large cells in the epidermis. HjCL agglutinated the bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella tarda and promoted immediate clotting of shark blood, indicating that HjCL is involved in host defence on the skin surface especially when the shark is injured and bleeds. © The Authors 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Micronuclei and other erythrocyte nuclear abnormalities in fishes from the Great Lakes Basin, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braham, Ryan P; Blazer, Vicki S; Shaw, Cassidy H; Mazik, Patricia M

    2017-10-01

    Biological markers (biomarkers) sensitive to genotoxic and mutagenic contamination in fishes are widely used to identify exposure effects in aquatic environments. The micronucleus assay was incorporated into a suite of indicators to assess exposure to genotoxic and mutagenic contamination at five Great Lakes Areas of Concern (AOCs), as well as one non-AOC (reference) site. The assay allowed enumeration of micronuclei as well as other nuclear abnormalities for both site and species comparisons. Erythrocyte abnormality data was also compared to skin and liver tumor prevalence and hepatic transcript abundance. Erythrocyte abnormalities were observed at all sites with variable occurrence and severity among sites and species. Benthic-oriented brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) and white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) expressed lower rates of erythrocyte abnormalities, but higher rates of skin and liver neoplasms, when compared to pelagic-oriented largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) at the same site. The reduced erythrocyte abnormalities, increased transcript abundance associated with Phase I and II toxicant responsive pathways, and increased neoplastic lesions among benthic-oriented taxa may indicate the development of contaminant resistance of these species to more acute effects. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:570-581, 2017. © 2017 This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society. © 2017 This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Environmental Mutagen Society.

  12. Factors affecting food chain transfer of mercury in the vicinity of the Nyanza site, Sudbury River, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, T.A.; May, T.W.; Finlayson, R.T.; Mierzykowski, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund Site on the Sudbury River, Massachusetts, was assessed by analysis of sediment, fish prey organisms, and predator fish from four locations in the river system. Whitehall Reservoir is an impoundment upstream of the site, and Reservoir #2 is an impoundment downstream of the site. Cedar Street is a flowing reach upstream of the site, and Sherman Bridge is a flowing reach downstream of the site. Collections of material for analysis were made three times, in May, July, and October. Sediment was analyzed for acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), simultaneously-extracted (SEM) metals (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, Sb, Zn), and total recoverable Hg. The dominant predatory fish species collected at all sites, largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), was analyzed for the same suite of metals as sediment. Analysis of stomach contents of bass identified small fish (yellow perch Perca flavescens, bluegill Lepomis macrochirus, and pumpkinseed Lepomis gibbosus), crayfish, and dragonfly larvae as the dominant prey organisms. Samples of the prey were collected from the same locations and at the same times as predator fish, and were analyzed for total and methyl mercury. Results of AVS and SEM analyses indicated that sediments were not toxic to aquatic invertebrates at any site. The SEM concentrations of As, Cd, and Cr were significantly higher at Reservoir #2 than at the reference sites, and SEM As and Cd were significantly higher at Sherman Bridge than at Cedar St. Sediment total Hg was elevated only at Reservoir #2. Hg was higher at site-influenced locations in all fish species except brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus). Cd was higher in bluegill, black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus), and brown bullhead, and Cr was higher in largemouth bass fillet samples but not in whole-body samples. There were no seasonal differences in sediment or prey organism metals, but some metals in some fish species did vary over time in an inconsistent manner

  13. Mercury Dynamics in Aquatic Food Webs of the Finger Lakes, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleckner, L.; Razavi, N. R.; Halfman, J. D.; Cushman, S. F.; Foust, J.; Gilman, B.

    2016-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination of fish is a global concern due to the deleterious health effects in humans and wildlife associated with ingesting fish with elevated concentrations. A key to understanding elevated fish Hg concentrations is to examine methyl Hg dynamics at the base of food webs, including algae and zooplankton. Predicting determinants of methyl Hg concentrations in lower trophic level biota remains an active area of research. This study was conducted to assess Hg concentrations in biota of the Finger Lakes (New York, USA), a region where fisheries are an important economic driver, but where no comprehensive assessment of food web Hg dynamics has been completed to date. Sources of Hg in the region include atmospheric pollution from an active coal-fired power plant. The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine if fish Hg concentrations were of concern, 2) assess differences in Hg accumulation among lakes and determine predictors of fish Hg concentrations, and 3) evaluate the predictive power of monthly zooplankton methyl Hg concentrations on fish Hg concentrations. From May - October 2015, suspended particulate matter, zooplankton, and benthos were sampled monthly in five of the Finger Lakes (Honeoye, Canandaigua, Seneca, Cayuga, and Owasco Lakes). Fish were sampled once over the same study period and species were targeted from all trophic levels. Results for top predatory fish including Lake Trout (Salvelinus namaycush), Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides), and Walleye (Sander vitreus) showed significant differences among lakes, and elevated concentrations are above US Environmental Protection Agency's screening value (300 ng/g wet weight). No clear pattern in Hg levels among lakes was evident in lower trophic level fishes such as Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) and Golden Shiner (Notemigonus crysoleucas), but concentrations were low. Benthivorous Brown Bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) exhibited significant differences in Hg among lakes with

  14. Biological Monitoring of Pesticides, Heavy Metals and Other Contaminants at Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    0. -Thlp𔃻’ ,𔃾tU.fl "CR0,fl.I geiIcr ’ ,% Dd0’ 0 .’Ifl.fl0tOfl JO..4V5t $.r..ei, r.c 0rIe0r ,’?cfl’St0n uoc’I.o, dna orrr...Micropterus salmoides Black Bullhead Ameiurus melas Grasshoppers Order Orthopetera or Ground Beetles Order Coleoptera Family Carabidae Leeches Class Hirudinea...RMA. Grasshoppers and ground beetles, both abundant and widely distributed, are representative of the terrestrial arthropods. The grasshopper is

  15. 78 FR 44011 - Safety Zone; Bullhead City Regatta; Bullhead City, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... excessive trash resulting from the event. The safety zone is being established this year as in past years to... safety measures have been taken and fees associated with the event are used for trash clean up... comments from the Small Business Administration on this rule and the impact of a temporary one day closure...

  16. 78 FR 34300 - Safety Zone; Bullhead City Regatta, Bullhead City, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ...Rulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . (2) Fax: 202-493-2251. (3) Mail or Delivery: Docket..., Waterways Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector San Diego; telephone (619) 278-7261, email [email protected] by the Captain of the Port of San Diego or his designated representative. (2) Mariners can request...

  17. 77 FR 36439 - Safety Zone; Bullhead City Regatta; Bullhead City, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ...) Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov . (2) Fax: 202-493-2251. (3) Mail or Delivery... Petty Officer Deborah Metzger, Waterways Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector San Diego; telephone (619... Captain of the Port of San Diego or his designated representative. ] (2) Mariners can request permission...

  18. Ontogenetic development of weberian ossicles and hearing abilities in the African bullhead catfish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lechner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The weberian apparatus of otophysine fishes facilitates sound transmission from the swimbladder to the inner ear to increase hearing sensitivity. It has been of great interest to biologists since the 19(th century. No studies, however, are available on the development of the weberian ossicles and its effect on the development of hearing in catfishes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the development of the weberian apparatus and auditory sensitivity in the catfish Lophiobagrus cyclurus. Specimens from 11.3 mm to 85.5 mm in standard length were studied. Morphology was assessed using sectioning, histology, and X-ray computed tomography, along with 3D reconstruction. Hearing thresholds were measured utilizing the auditory evoked potentials recording technique. Weberian ossicles and interossicular ligaments were fully developed in all stages investigated except in the smallest size group. In the smallest catfish, the intercalarium and the interossicular ligaments were still missing and the tripus was not yet fully developed. Smallest juveniles revealed lowest auditory sensitivity and were unable to detect frequencies higher than 2 or 3 kHz; sensitivity increased in larger specimens by up to 40 dB, and frequency detection up to 6 kHz. In the size groups capable of perceiving frequencies up to 6 kHz, larger individuals had better hearing abilities at low frequencies (0.05-2 kHz, whereas smaller individuals showed better hearing at the highest frequencies (4-6 kHz. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that the ability of otophysine fish to detect sounds at low levels and high frequencies largely depends on the development of the weberian apparatus. A significant increase in auditory sensitivity was observed as soon as all weberian ossicles and interossicular ligaments are present and the chain for transmitting sounds from the swimbladder to the inner ear is complete. This contrasts with findings in another otophysine, the zebrafish, where no threshold changes have been observed.

  19. 33 CFR 100.1102 - Marine Events on the Colorado River, between Davis Dam (Bullhead City, Arizona) and Headgate Dam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.1102 Marine Events on the Colorado River, between... interested parties and to provide the sponsor the best support to ensure the safety of life and property. A..., Nevada, from the Pioneer Hotel to the Edgewater Hotel. Laughlin Aquamoto Sports Challenge and Expo...

  20. Long-term monitoring of native bullhead and invasive gobiids in the Danubian rip-rap zone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janáč, Michal; Roche, Kevin Francis; Šlapanský, Luděk; Polačik, Matej; Jurajda, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 807, č. 1 (2018), s. 263-275 ISSN 0018-8158 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Competition * Fish population structure * Invasive species impact * Ponto–Caspian gobies * River bank stabilisation Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.056, year: 2016

  1. Bioaccumulation of PCB Contaminants in Five Fish Species in Utah Lake as Affected by Carp Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjinez-Guzmán, V. A.; Cadet, E. L.; Crandall, T.; Chamberlain, T.; Rakotoarisaona, H.; Morris, P.

    2017-12-01

    State reports published by the Utah Department of Health (2005) and the Utah Department of Water Quality (2008) determined that there were elevated levels of PCBs (Polychlorinated biphenyls) that exceeded the EPA's cancer (0.02 𝑚𝑔 𝑘𝑔-1) and non-cancer screening levels (0.08 𝑚𝑔 𝑘𝑔-1) in two fish species from Utah Lake, the Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) and the Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Fish consumption advisories were issued for both of these fish species due to their health effects of PCBs. The Common Carp is a non-native predatory species that comprise 90% of the biomass in Utah Lake. As of September 2009, an extensive carp removal program was instituted by the Department of Natural Resources and began the removal of 75% of the carp population. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of carp removal on PCB levels in five sport fish species consumed by Utah citizens. The fish being analyzed are the Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio), Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus), Black Bullhead (Ameiurus melas), Walleye (Sander vitreus), and White Bass (Morone chrysops). One-hundred twenty (120) fish were collected from Utah Lake and subcategorized by their gender, tissue type (fillet and offal), weight, and size: small (under 33 cm), medium (33 cm - 43 cm), and large (greater than 43 cm). This was done in order to determine the variation of contaminant levels in each subcategory. PCB analysis was performed by Utility Testing Laboratory in Salt Lake City, Utah. Results show there has been a significant increase in PCB levels in all fish species in comparison with the state reports (2008). All fish species have exceeded the EPA cancer screening level, except for the fillet tissue of the White Bass species. In Common Carp fillet, and offal decreased concentrations of 11.80% and 23.72%, respectively. In Channel catfish: the PCB levels in the fillet increase by 87.93%, however, the offal levels

  2. Co-exposure to sunlight enhances the toxicity of naturally weathered Deepwater Horizon oil to early lifestage red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and speckled seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloy, Matthew; Garner, Thomas Ross; Bridges, Kristin; Mansfield, Charles; Carney, Michael; Forth, Heather; Krasnec, Michelle; Lay, Claire; Takeshita, Ryan; Morris, Jeffrey; Bonnot, Shane; Oris, James; Roberts, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in the accidental release of millions of barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Photo-induced toxicity following co-exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is 1 mechanism by which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from oil spills may exert toxicity. Red drum and speckled seatrout are both important fishery resources in the Gulf of Mexico. They spawn near-shore and produce positively buoyant embryos that hatch into larvae in approximately 24 h. The goal of the present study was to determine whether exposure to UV as natural sunlight enhances the toxicity of crude oil to early lifestage red drum and speckled seatrout. Larval fish were exposed to several dilutions of high-energy water-accommodated fractions (HEWAFs) from 2 different oils collected in the field under chain of custody during the 2010 spill and 3 gradations of natural sunlight in a factorial design. Co-exposure to natural sunlight and oil significantly reduced larval survival compared with exposure to oil alone. Although both species were sensitive at PAH concentrations reported during the Deepwater Horizon spill, speckled seatrout demonstrated a greater sensitivity to photo-induced toxicity than red drum. These data demonstrate that even advanced weathering of slicks does not ameliorate the potential for photo-induced toxicity of oil to these species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:780-785. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. Assessment of metal and trace element contamination in water, sediment, plants, macroinvertebrates, and fish in Tavasci Marsh, Tuzigoot National Monument, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Kimberly R.; Paretti, Nicholas V.; Brasher, Anne M.D.; Fuller, Christopher C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    at depth for Bi, Cd, Cu, Hg, In, Pb, Sb, Sn, Te, and Zn. Radioisotope dating indicates that the elevated metal and trace element concentrations are associated with sediments deposited before 1963. Arsenic concentration was greater in cattail roots compared with surrounding sediment at Tavasci Marsh. Concentrations of As, Ni, and Se from yellow bullhead catfish (Ameiurus natalis) in Tavasci Marsh exceeded the 75th percentile of several other regional studies. Mercury concentration in dragonfly larvae and fish from Tavasci Marsh were similar to or greater than in Tavasci Marsh sediment. Future work includes a biologic risk assessment utilizing the data collected in this study to provide the monument management with additional information for their restoration plan.

  4. Identification of natural hybrids between Cottus poecilopus, Heckel, 1837, and Cottus gobio, Linnaeus, 1758, at a hybrid zone on the Svratka River (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítek, T.; Halačka, Karel; Bartoňová-Marešová, Eva; Vetešník, Lukáš; Spurný, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2014), s. 102-108 ISSN 0175-8659 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Fish communities * sculpins Cottus * bullhead * Pisces * Pleistocene Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.867, year: 2014

  5. Evaluation of impact of PAH on a tropical fish, Oreochromis mossambicus using multiple biomarkers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shailaja, M.S.; DeSilva, C.

    -mediated liver cancer in channel catfish (less sensitive) and brown bullhead (more sensitive) is due to differences in their hepatic phase II activities. WeareintheprocessoftestingotherPAHsincluding small molecular size compounds such as anthracene and chrysene...

  6. Literature Review. Aquatic Resources Investigation, Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-26

    Report stated that the "reservoirs are on 3 the verge of being overrun with black bullheads". It was felt that this overcrowding would soon reduce the...Black bullhead were the most abundant species, but they apparently were not stunted by overpopulation . Spawning success of largemouth bass was found...they might eventually overpopulate the waters. The number of bluegill captured in 1975 was almost identical to 1972 (134 vs. 131), but their growth

  7. A historical perspective on the "fish tumors or other deformities" beneficial use impairment at Great Lakes Areas of Concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, S.D.; Blazer, V.S.; Pinkney, A.E.; Grazio, J.L.; Obert, E.C.; Boughton, L.

    2009-01-01

    The Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement defines Areas of Concern as geographic areas that fail to meet the general or specific objectives of the agreement where such failure has caused or is likely to cause impairment of beneficial use of the area's ability to support aquatic life. One of the beneficial use impairments, fish tumors or other deformities, is defined by the International Joint Commission to occur when the incidence rate of fish tumors and other deformities exceeds rates at unimpacted or control sites, or when survey data confirm the presence of neoplastic or preneoplastic liver tumors in bullhead or suckers. Brown bullhead, a benthic species with a limited home range, have frequently been used as indicator species in U.S. Areas of Concern. While there is strong field evidence for an association between PAH exposure and hepatic neoplasia in brown bullhead, laboratory investigations would strengthen the association. There is less evidence linking specific classes of chemicals in the environment to orocutaneous neoplasia in brown bullhead. Studies on orocutaneous neoplasia of brown bullhead should focus on assessing the presence or absence of viruses and on epidermal exposure to specific chemicals and chemical mixtures. Lastly, the effects of covariates such as length, age, and gender on the prevalence of liver and skin neoplasms should be investigated. This paper reviews the state of science on the fish tumors or other deformities beneficial use impairment. Subsequent papers address specific issues related to this impairment and provide recommendations for standardized criteria.

  8. Analysis of fish bile with HPLC — fluorescence to determine environmental exposure to benzo(a)pyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Eric P.; Baumann, Paul C.

    1989-01-01

    Brown bullhead from the Black River, Ohio, have a high incidence of liver neoplasia which is associated with elevated concentrations of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the sediment. We evaluated the use of biliary concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] equivalents as a means for determining PAH exposure. Bile was collected from 16 brown bullheads and 8 common carp taken from each of two Lake Erie tributaries in Ohio, the industrialized Black River and the non-industrialized Old Woman Creek. Hatchery bullhead (n = 8) were used to determine base levels of PAHs. A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) — fluorescence technique was used to determine the concentration of B(a)P equivalents in the bile samples. The area of all peaks fluorescing at 380/430 nm was summed to give a single value for B(a)P equivalents in each sample. Concentrations of B(a)P equivalents generally reflected concentrations of PAH in sediment where fish were collected. Bile taken from Black River carp contained the highest concentration of B(a)P equivalents and was significantly different from all other groups. The value obtained for Black River bullhead was also high and was found to be significantly different from hatchery bullhead. B(a)P equivalents varied between carp and bullhead from the same habitat possibly because of differing food habits or metabolic pathways. However, our results indicate that relative levels of B(a)P equivalents in the bile of fish correspond well to B(a)P levels in sediment and may offer a means of determining environmental exposure of fish to the parent compound.

  9. Sinuolinea infections in the urinary system of Cynoscion species (Sciaenidae) and the search for the phylogenetic position of the type species of Sinuolinea Davis, 1917 (Myxozoa: Myxosporea)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyková, I.; Kodádková, Alena; de Buron, I.; Fiala, Ivan; Roumillat, W. A.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2, - (2013), s. 10-17 ISSN 2213-2244 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Sinuolinea dimorpha * Cynoscion nebulosus * Cynoscion regalis * Cryptic species * Myxosporean phylogeny Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. Abundance of Cottus poecilopus is influenced by O2 saturation, food density and Salmo trutta in three tributaries of the Rožnovská Bečva River, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baran, Roman; Kubečka, Jan; Kubín, M.; Lojkásek, B.; Mrkvička, T.; Ricard, Daniel; Rulík, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2015), s. 805-811 ISSN 0022-1112. [Česká ichtyologická konference /13./. Červená nad Vltavou, 24.10.2012-26.10.2012] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : alpine bullhead * brown trout * macroinvertebrates * organic carbon * shading * water temperature Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.246, year: 2015

  11. Hybridization between Cottus gobio and Cottus poecilopus in the Odra River drainage basin (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marešová, Eva; Lusková, Věra; Lojkásek, B.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 4 (2012), s. 788-795 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SPII2D1/9/07 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : bullheads * hybrid zones * microsatellites * S7 nuclear gene Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.506, year: 2012

  12. 78 FR 59230 - Special Local Regulations; Annual Marine Events on the Colorado River, Between Davis Dam...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 [Docket No. USCG-2013-0644] Special Local Regulations; Annual Marine Events on the Colorado River, Between Davis Dam (Bullhead City, Arizona) and Headgate Dam (Parker, Arizona) Within the San Diego Captain of the Port Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard...

  13. Glochidial infestation by the endangered mollusc Unio crassus in rivers of north-eastern France: Phoxinus phoxinus and Cottus gobio as primary fish hosts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lamand, F.; Roche, Kevin Francis; Beisel, J.-N.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 3 (2016), s. 445-455 ISSN 1052-7613 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : unionid conservation * glochidia * threatened species * Eurasian minnow * bullhead * parasitic host Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.130, year: 2016

  14. 76 FR 50669 - Safety Zones; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    .... Peninsula Fireworks Spectacular, Redwood City Sponsor Peninsula Celebration Association. Event Description Fireworks Display. Date July 4th. Location Redwood City, CA. Regulated Area 100-foot radius around the... Davis Dam (Bullhead City, Arizona) and Headgate Dam (Parker, Arizona). Table 1 for each of the listed...

  15. 76 FR 7131 - Safety Zones; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    .... Peninsula Fireworks Spectacular, Redwood City Sponsor Peninsula Celebration Association. Event Description Fireworks Display. Date July 4th. Location Redwood City, CA. Regulated Area 100-foot radius around the... on the Colorado River between Davis Dam (Bullhead City, Arizona) and Headgate Dam (Parker, Arizona...

  16. 76 FR 30584 - Safety Zones; Eleventh Coast Guard District Annual Fireworks Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    .... Peninsula Fireworks Spectacular, Redwood City Sponsor Peninsula Celebration Association. Event Description Fireworks Display. Date July 4th. Location Redwood City, CA. Regulated Area 100-foot radius around the... Colorado River between Davis Dam (Bullhead City, Arizona) and Headgate Dam (Parker, Arizona), and also...

  17. Bionomy of spruce bud scale, Physokermes piceae (schrank (Hemiptera: Coccidae in the Belgrade area, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graora Draga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spruce bud scale, Physokermes piceae, develops on the genus Picea. Large colonies of this species are constantly present on Picea abies in green areas in the Belgrade territory, causing the drying of needles, branches and whole plants. Therefore, Ph. piceae is a significant spruce pest. Spruce scales attract many entomophagous insects able to reduce pest population. Parasitoid wasps Coccophagus lycimnia (Walk (Aphelinidae and Microterys lunatus (Dalm. (Encyrtidae were reared. Predators Exochomus quadripustulatus L., Scymnus abietis Paykull (Coccinellidae and Anthribus nebulosus Forster (Anthribidae were determined. Both species of ladybird were confirmed as predators of Ph. piceae for the first time in Serbia, while S. abietis is a new species for the fauna of Serbia. The most effective natural enemy of Ph. piceae was A. nebulosus, reducing populations by 68-80%.

  18. Feeding ecology of some fish species occurring in artisanal fishery of Socotra Island (Yemen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Ali', Mohammed Kaed; Belluscio, Andrea; Ventura, Daniele; Ardizzone, Giandomenico

    2016-04-30

    The demersal species Lethrinus borbonicus, Lethrinus mahsena, Lethrinus microdon, Lethrinus nebulosus, Lutjanus bohar, Lutjanus gibbus, Lutjanus kasmira, Epinephelus fasciatus, Epinephelus stoliczkae, Carangoides gymnostethus and Euthynnus affinis are important coastal fishes species of the northern coast of Socotra (Yemen), exploited by local fishery. The biology and feeding ecology of these species are poorly known in the area. A total of 1239 specimens were sampled from the main fishing landing site of the island (Hadibo). Total length and weight were measured, stomach contents were analyzed, diet overlap, Fulton's Condition index, and trophic levels were estimated. C. gymnostethus, L. microdon and L. kasmira occupied the highest position (T=4.50), L. nebulosus occupied the lower one (TL=3.41). The role of the increasing abundance of small pelagic fish in the diet of many species after the upwelling event is evident, but also different feeding strategies are reported, according to fish ecology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Seasonal feeding habits of fishes in the river Bolshaya Uya (bas. Onega Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shustov Yury

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the seasonal feeding habits of five fish species (young trout, mustached loach , bullhead - sculpin , stickleback and minnow in one of the numerous tributaries of the Onega lake, also inhabited by trout. The results of investigation showed that not all the environmental situation are favorable for fish feeding. During the summer droughty period mustached loach limps in search of food due to the low water level. As a result, the intensity of fish feeding is extremely low, and more than half of them (60% even have empty stomach. In summer feeding period the potential food competitors of juvenile trout may be virtually all river fishes: minnow - for " air " fraction, that is imaginal and subimaginal stages of amphibiotic, airial and terrestrial insects, and mustached loach, bullhead-sculpin, stickleback - for "water "fraction, that is larvae and nymphs of amphibiotic invertebrates.

  20. Environmental Inventory Report. East St. Louis and Vicinity, Cahokia Canal Drainage Area, Madison and St. Clair Counties, Illinois. Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    1890’s. In terms of total poundage they are probably the most important fish in the area. Although not highly regarded as a sport fish they are an...normal black bullheads. This is the only report of albinism in this species. Channel catfish is a wide ranging species often cultivated as food fish...They are a desirable sport fish for many anglers though they lack the promotional glamour associated with largemouth bass. They were present, as

  1. THE INVENTORY OF FISH FROM THE NATIONAL PARK CĂLIMANI - DIVERSITY AND DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Florea

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the Călimani National Park, the inventory of the fish species of community importance, carried out in 2013 through a project from the Sectoral Operational Program for Environment, revealed that there is only one species of community interest in the park, namely Cottus gobio (bullhead. This is a normal fact given that the site is located at altitudes ranging from a maximum of 2083 m to a minimum of 470, and most of the waters are represented by alpine creek. In the all four fishing campaigns, 30 tributaries were investigated and a total of 220 individuals were fished out of which: 156 individuals of river trout (Salmo trutta fario, 9 individuals of common bullhead (Cottus gobio, 52 individuals of rare bullhead (Cottus poecilopus, 2 individuals of grayling (Thymallus thymallus and 1 individuals of minnow (Phoxinus phoxinus. Ihtiofauna has a very low diversity, being constantly represented by one species of fish, Salmo trutta fario, which is well suited to the conditions of the creek situated on slopes of 1-3 m/km. Thus, out of the 30 investigated water courses, Salmo trutta fario is present in 17 water courses. Instead of this, Cottus gobio, a species of fish of community importance, has a very low presence on the territory of Calimani National Park, this situation is, to some extent, inadequate.

  2. Tetrodotoxin poisoning caused by Goby fish consumption in southeast China: a retrospective case series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie You

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate an unusual outbreak of tetrodotoxin poisoning in Leizhou, southeast China, a case series analysis was conducted to identify the source of illness. METHODS: A total of 22 individuals experienced symptoms of poisoning, including tongue numbness, dizziness, nausea and limb numbness and weakness. Two toxic species, Amoya caninus and Yongeichthys nebulosus, were morphologically identified from the batches of gobies consumed by the patients. Tetrodotoxin levels in the blood and Goby fish samples were detected using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS: The tetrodotoxin levels in the remaining cooked Goby fish were determined to be 2090.12 µg/kg. For Amoya caninus, the toxicity levels were 1858.29 µg/kg in the muscle and 1997.19 µg/kg in the viscera and for Yongeichthys nebulosus, they were 2783.00 µg/kg in the muscle and 2966.21 µg/kg in the viscera. CONCLUSION: This outbreak demonstrates an underestimation of the risk of Goby fish poisoning. Furthermore, the relationships among the toxic species, climates and marine algae present should be clarified in the future.

  3. Phylogeography of four frog species in forest fragments of northeastern Brazil--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaval, Ana Carolina O Q

    2002-11-01

    I contrast mitochondrial DNA genealogies based on 612 bp of the cytochrome b gene across four co-distributed species of frogs in Northeastern Brazil. They are Hyla albomarginata, Hyla branneri, Proceratophrys boiei, and Scinax nebulosus. Samples were collected from the core or edge of six rainforest remnants in the states of Pernambuco and Alagoas. Three fragments are located within the humid Atlantic Forest morphoclimatic domain (municipalities of Cabo de Santo Agostinho, Ibateguara, and Jaqueira), two are located in the transition zone between the Atlantic Forest domain and the semi-arid Caatinga (Caruaru and Timbaúba), and one is found within the Caatinga (Brejo da Madre de Deus). Results show that local patterns and levels of genetic diversity are influenced by taxon-specific habitat requirements. Populations of the montane, closed-canopy species P. boiei show strong geographical structure, reflecting barriers to gene flow that predate human-driven habitat destruction. Species occurring along forest edges, such as H. albomarginata and S. nebulosus, show genetic patterns similar to those of P. boiei, but lower levels of genetic divergence. The more generalist Hyla branneri shows no geographic pattern. The data are in agreement with distribution and fossil data gathered for other groups of organisms, suggesting that mesic forests occupied the currently arid Caatinga in the recent past.

  4. DETERGENTS: EFFECTS ON THE CHEMICAL SENSES OF THE FISH ICTALURUS NATALIS (LE SUEUR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARDACH, J E; FUJIYA, M; HOLL, A

    1965-06-18

    Two types of detergents, one easily oxidized and the other not, damage the chemoreceptors of yellow bullheads, Ictalurus natalis (le Sueur) exposed to concentrations of 0.5 parts per million in the surrounding water. This concentration is considerably lower than that at which sublethal damage has been detected previously. Histological examination reveals erosion of the taste buds; electrophysiological methods and observations of swimming and feeding behavior reveal impairment of receptor function. Affected fish do not fully recover after 6 weeks in detergent-free water.

  5. Evaluation of the possible inclusion of certain fish species in chronic kidney disease diets based on their adverse and beneficial nutrient ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-González, I; Maafs-Rodríguez, A G; Silencio-Barrita, J L; Galindo-Gómez, C; Pérez-Gil, F

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the adverse (phosphorus, protein, sodium, potassium and cholesterol) and beneficial [n-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA); vitamins D(3) and E] nutrients in 14 fish species in order to evaluate their inclusion in chronic kidney disease (CKD) diets. Using AOAC methods, we obtained the following results per 100 g of fish: 50.86-227.52 mg phosphorus, 14.7-30.6 g protein and 3.83-1667.35 mg EPA+DHA. CKD patients with protein or phosphorus restrictions should avoid broadbill swordfish, black bullhead and spotted scorpionfish. However, patients may include parrot sand bass, black bullhead, broadbill swordfish, longjaw leatherjacket, oilfish, Atlantic tripletail, spotted scorpionfish and round herring in their diets based on the (P)/(EPA+DHA) ratios of these fish. Some fish species may be included in CKD diets because of their high biological value protein content - associated with cardiovascular and renal protective nutrients (EPA+DHA) - and low P, Na, K and cholesterol content, their consumption by CKD patients should be encouraged.

  6. Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 October 2010-30 November 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Cecilia; Agudelo, P A; Bâ, K; Barber, P A; Bisol, Paolo Maria; Brouat, C; Burgess, Treena I; Calves, I; Carrillo Avila, Mauricio; Chow, S; Cordes, Lisa; Da Silva, D; Dalecky, A; De Meester, L; Doadrio, Ignacio; Dobigny, G; Duplantier, J M; Evison, Sophie E F; Ford, Rebecca; Fresneau, Dominique; Galetti, Pedro M; Gauthier, P; Geldof, S; Granjon, L; Guérin, F; St J Hardy, Giles E; Hernandez Escobar, Carlos; Hima, K; Hu, Juan; Huang, Luqi; Humeau, L; Jansen, B; Jaquemet, S; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Jung, Sung-Ju; Kim, Bong-Seok; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Kim, Jong-Oh; Lai, Choay-Hoong; Laroche, J; Lavergne, E; Lawton-Rauh, A; Le Corre, M; Leach, M M; Lee, Jehee; Leo, Audrey E; Lichtenzveig, Judith; Lin, Lin; Linde, Celeste C; Liu, Shu-Fang; Marino, Ilaria A M; McKeown, Niall J; Nohara, K; Oh, Myung-Joo; Okamoto, H; Oliver, Richard; Olivera Angel, Martha; Ornelas-García, Claudia Patricia; Orsini, L; Ostos Alfonso, Henry; Othman, A S; Papetti, Chiara; Patarnello, Tomaso; Pedraza-Lara, Carlos; Piller, Kyle R; Poteaux, Chantal; Requier, J-B; Roziana, M K; Semba, Y; Sembene, M; Shah, Ramisah M; Shahril, A R; Shao, Aijuan; Shaw, Paul W; Song, Liangke; Souza Ferreira, Ronara; Su, Yong-Quan; Suzuki, N; Tatard, C; Taylor, Katherine M; Taylor, Paul W J; Thiam, M; Valbuena, Ruben; Wang, He; Yang, Byung-Gyoo; Yuan, Qingjun; Zajonz, U; Zane, Lorenzo; Zhu, Ling; Zhuang, Zhi-Meng; Zulaiha, A R

    2011-03-01

    This article documents the addition of 277 microsatellite marker loci to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Ascochyta rabiei, Cambarellus chapalanus, Chionodraco hamatus, Coptis omeiensis, Cynoscion nebulosus, Daphnia magna, Gerbillus nigeriae, Isurus oxyrinchus, Lates calcarifer, Metacarcinus magister, Oplegnathus fasciatus, Pachycondyla verenae, Phaethon lepturus, Pimelodus grosskopfii, Rotylenchulus reniformis, Scomberomorus niphonius, Sepia esculenta, Terapon jarbua, Teratosphaeria cryptica and Thunnus obesus. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Austropotamobius italicus, Cambarellus montezumae, Cambarellus puer, Cambarellus shufeldtii, Cambarellus texanus, Chionodraco myersi, Chionodraco rastrospinosus, Coptis chinensis, Coptis chinensis var. brevisepala, Coptis deltoidea, Coptis teeta, Orconectes virilis, Pacifastacus leniusculus, Pimelodus bochii, Procambarus clarkii, Pseudopimelodus bufonius, Rhamdia quelen, Sepia andreana, Sepiella maindroni, Thunnus alalunga, Thunnus albacares, Thunnus maccoyii, Thunnus orientalis, Thunnus thynnus and Thunnus tonggol. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Permanent genetic resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 December 2011-31 January 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M C; Arnoux, E; Bell, James J; Bernadou, Abel; Bino, Giorgia; Blatrix, R; Bourguet, Denis; Carrea, Cecilia; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Cunha, Haydée A; d'Alençon, E; Ding, Yi; Djieto-Lordon, C; Dubois, M P; Dumas, P; Eraud, C; Faivre, B; Francisco, F O; Françoso, E; Garcia, M; Gardner, Jonathan P A; Garnier, S; Gimenez, S; Gold, John R; Harris, D J; He, Guangcun; Hellemans, B; Hollenbeck, Christopher M; Jing, Shengli; Kergoat, G J; Liu, Bingfang; McDowell, Jan R; McKey, D; Miller, Terrence L; Newton, Erica; Pagenkopp Lohan, Katrina M; Papetti, Chiara; Paterson, Ian; Peccoud, J; Peng, Xinxin; Piatscheck, F; Ponsard, Sergine; Reece, Kimberly S; Reisser, Céline M O; Renshaw, Mark A; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Sauve, M; Shields, Jeffrey D; Solé-Cava, Antonio; Souche, E L; Van Houdt, J K J; Vasconcellos, Anderson; Volckaert, F A M; Wang, Shuzhen; Xiao, Jie; Yu, Hangjin; Zane, Lorenzo; Zannato, Barbara; Zemlak, Tyler S; Zhang, Chunxiao; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Xi; Zhu, Lili

    2012-05-01

    This article documents the addition of 473 microsatellite marker loci and 71 pairs of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sequencing primers to the Molecular Ecology Resources Database. Loci were developed for the following species: Barteria fistulosa, Bombus morio, Galaxias platei, Hematodinium perezi, Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke (a.k.a. M. abdominalis Fab., M. grandii Goidanich or M. gifuensis Ashmead), Micropogonias furnieri, Nerita melanotragus, Nilaparvata lugens Stål, Sciaenops ocellatus, Scomber scombrus, Spodoptera frugiperda and Turdus lherminieri. These loci were cross-tested on the following species: Barteria dewevrei, Barteria nigritana, Barteria solida, Cynoscion acoupa, Cynoscion jamaicensis, Cynoscion leiarchus, Cynoscion nebulosus, Cynoscion striatus, Cynoscion virescens, Macrodon ancylodon, Menticirrhus americanus, Nilaparvata muiri and Umbrina canosai. This article also documents the addition of 116 sequencing primer pairs for Dicentrarchus labrax. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Comparison of nucleoside concentrations in blood of fish with and without tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehl, D.W.; Johnson, R.D. (Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States)); Eisenschenk, L.; Naumann, S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Superior (United States)); Regal, R.; Barnidge, P. (Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth (United States)); McKim, J. Jr. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and use HPLC based analytical methodology to characterize nucleosides in blood plasma and serum from fish with and without tumors, with a goal of determining if fish blood nucleoside concentrations could similarly be used as a bioindicator of tumor development in fish. The approach was to develop analytical methodology and quality assurance criteria for the analysis of nucleosides in fish blood, and to characterize nucleoside concentrations in blood of fish for which both healthy and tumor-bearing samples were available. Data would then be used to establish parameters with which tumor-bearing fish could be distinguished from healthy fish. Blood samples used to establish the diagnostic parameters were from control rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and those with tumors developed after exposure to aflatoxins. A second set of blood samples was from field collected black bullheads (Ictalurus melas).

  9. Geology of the Fox Hills Formation (late Cretaceous) in the Williston Basin of North Dakota, with reference to uranium potential. Report of investigation No. 55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvancara, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The Fox Hills Formation is a marine and brackish sequence of primarily medium and fine clastics within the Late Cretaceous Montana Group. In the Williston basin of North Dakota, four members (in ascending order) are recognized: Trail City, Timber Lake, Iron Lightning (with Bullhead and Colgate lithofacies), and Linton. The Fox Hills conformably overlies the Pierre Shale and conformably and disconformably underlies and interfingers with the Hell Creek Formation; it occurs in about the western two-thirds of the state. The geology of the Fox Hills Formation in North Dakota, and the stratigraphy of which is based on previous surface information and recent subsurface data, are summarized, and its potential for uranium is evaluated

  10. Acidification in horizontal wells equipped with containment of sand: a new approach; Acidificacao em pocos horizontais injetores equipados com contencao de areia: uma nova abordagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Marcos S.; Martins, Marcio de Oliveira; Chagas, Carlos Magno [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Due to the difficulty of filter cake mechanical clean-up after the gravel packing, injector wells need to be acidized to removing the residual damage and superficial treatment. In order to ensure the treatment of the whole horizontal section, a new technique has been used in the Campos Basin: after the establishment of a loss zone in the well's heel is performed a massive bullheading at high flow rates. Thus a hydrodynamic reconfiguration is established in the open hole, with the competition of the loss zone with the higher permeability intervals for the acid consumption, increasing the distribution of treatment along the whole section. Using this methodology have been obtained damage ratios similar to those obtained in conventional operations. (author)

  11. LONG-TERM CHANGES IN MERCURY CONCENTRATIONS IN FISH FROM THE MIDDLE SAVANNAH RIVER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M; Bill Littrell, B

    2007-01-02

    Total mercury levels were measured in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), ''sunfishes'' (Lepomis spp)., and ''catfish'' (primarily Ameiurus spp.) from 1971 to 2004 in the middle reaches of the Savannah River, which drains the coastal plain of the southeastern U.S. Mercury levels were highest in 1971 but declined over the next ten years due to the mitigation of point sources of industrial pollution. Mercury levels began to increase in the 1980s as a possible consequence of mercury inputs from tributaries and associated wetlands where mercury concentrations were significantly elevated in water and fish. Mercury levels in Savannah River fish decreased sharply in 2001-2003 coincident with a severe drought in the Savannah River basin, but returned to previous levels in 2004 with the resumption of normal precipitation. Regression models showed that mercury levels in Savannah River fish changed significantly over time and were affected by river discharge. Despite temporal changes, there was little overall difference in Savannah River fish tissue mercury levels between 1971 and 2004.

  12. Estructura de la comunidad de peces en el sistema Candelaria-Panlau, Campeche, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Amado Ayala-Pérez

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el comportamiento de los parámetros de temperatura, salinidad, transparencia del agua y temperatura ambiente, y de la abundancia y diversidad de la comunidad del peces del sistema Candelaria-Panlau en escalas temporal y espacial. Los trabajos de campo se realizaron de manera mensual en cinco estaciones entre abril de 1993 y abril de 1994. La comunidad de peces quedó representada por 50 especies con 7 926 organismos y 144.7 kg de peso. Los valores de abundancia y diversidad de la comunidad fueron: 0.09 ind/m², 1.61 g/m² 18.25 g/ind, H’n = 1.879, J = 0.475 y D = 5.681. Las especies con dominio ecológico fueron: Cathorops melanopus, Diapterus rhombeus, Anchoa mitchilli, Sphoeroides testudineus, Bairdiella chrysura, B. ronchus, Cynoscion arenarius, y C. nebulosus, que en conjunto representan el 90.9 % en número y el 78.9 % en peso de la captura total. Las matrices de valores de los parámetros ambientales y de abundancia numérica de la comunidad de peces, fueron sometidas a un análisis de factores con el método de extracción de componentes principales, su representación gráfica confirma la definición de especies dominantes y demuestra que la salinidad, estación cinco y mes de febrero son los componentes que caracterizan al sistema y a la comunidad de peces.The environmental and ecological patterns of the fish community in Candelaria-Panlau system (Mexico are described. Parameters of the water temperature, salinity and transparency, and density, biomass and diversity of the fish community were analyzed. Between April 1993 and April 1994 five stations were sampled monthly. The fish community had 50 species (7 926 individuals, 144.7 kg of weight. The abundance and diversity values for the fish community were: 0.09 ind/m² ; 1.61 g/m²; 18.25 g/ind ; H'n = 1.879; J = 0.475 and D = 5.681. The species with ecological dominance were: Cathorops melanopus, Diapterus rhombeus, Anchoa mitchilli, Sphoeroides testudineus, Bairdiella

  13. The sublethal effects of petroleum refinery effluents: Mixed function oxygenase (MFO) induction in rainbow trout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Parrott, J.; Hodson, P.; Rao, S.

    1995-01-01

    Canada uses a single biological parameter which is based on the ability of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to survive a 24 hour exposure to assess and regulate the toxicity of refinery effluents. The acute toxicity of Canadian refinery effluents is generally well controlled. Long term exposures to sublethal toxicants, which are not covered by the current regulations, could have adverse ecological effects. Since PAHs, such as benzo(a)pyrene, can occur in refinery effluents, the authors tested the hypothesis that refinery effluents can induce mixed-function oxygenase measured as ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD) activity in fish. Two end of pipe effluent samples were collected from each of four Ontario refineries. All effluents induced EROD activity in young trout in a dose dependent manner. The EROD parameter has potential as a bioindicator of exposure to refinery effluents. The samples were also tested for toxicity to fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae and to a fish cell line (Ictalurus nebulosus). Fathead minnow growth was significantly reduced by six out of eight samples, and larval survival was affected by one sample. The in vitro data were less consistent: weak toxicity was detected in some samples but the dose response relationship was poor. Direct acting mutagens were detected in two effluents using the Ames Fluctuation assay

  14. Mycobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, C B; Kane, A S; Baya, A M

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in fish can result in ulcers, emaciation, and in some cases death. Mycobacteria have been previously isolated from a variety of Chesapeake Bay fish species, and the current study was designed to identify potential host specificity and location fidelity of mycobacterial isolates. Mycobacteria were isolated from wild fish of the Chesapeake Bay collected from the Upper Bay, the Choptank River, Herring Bay, the Chicamacomico River, the Pocomoke River and the Potomac River in 2003-2006. Mycobacterial isolates were recovered from striped bass, Morone saxatilis, Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, white perch, Morone americana, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, common carp, Cyprinus carpio carpio, spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus, killifish, Fundulus sp., blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis, American gizzard shad, Dorosoma cepedianum and American silver perch, Bairdiella chrysoura. Twenty-nine well-defined mycobacterial groups resulted from gas chromatography dendrogram clustering of isolates. The majority of groups included more than one host species and more than one site of collection. However, four groups contained only striped bass isolates, three of which were similar to M. shottsii. Therefore, multiple Chesapeake Bay fish species are colonized with multiple mycobacterial isolates, of which few appear to be host or location specific.

  15. Comparative ontogeny of the feeding apparatus of sympatric drums (Perciformes: Sciaenidae) in the Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deary, Alison L; Hilton, Eric J

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the feeding apparatus in fishes, including both oral and pharyngeal jaw elements, is closely related to the ecology of a species. During ontogeny, the oral and pharyngeal jaws undergo dramatic changes. To better understand how such ontogenetic changes occur and relate to the feeding ecology of a species, ontogenetic series of four closely related members of the family Sciaenidae (Cynoscion nebulosus, Cynoscion regalis, Micropogonias undulatus, and Leiostomus xanthurus) were examined. Sciaenids were selected because as adults they exhibit considerable specialization of the feeding apparatus correlated with differences in foraging habitats. However, it is not clear when during ontogeny the structural specializations of the feeding apparatus develop, and thereby enable early life history stage (ELHS) sciaenids to partition their foraging habitats. A regression tree was recovered from the analysis and three divergences were identified during ontogeny. There are no measurable differences in elements of the feeding apparatus until the first divergence at 8.4 mm head length (HL), which was attributed to differences in average gill filament length on the second ceratobranchial. The second divergence occurred at 14.1 mm HL and was associated with premaxilla length. The final divergence occurred at 19.8 mm HL and was associated with differences in the toothed area of the fifth certatobranchial. These morphological divergences suggest that ELHS sciaenids may be structurally able to partition their foraging habitats as early as 8.4 mm HL. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Diversity of the skin microbiota of fishes: evidence for host species specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Andrea; Tao, Zhen; Bullard, Stephen A; Arias, Covadonga R

    2013-09-01

    Skin microbiota of Gulf of Mexico fishes were investigated by ribosomal internal spacer analysis (RISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A total of 102 fish specimens representing six species (Mugil cephalus, Lutjanus campechanus, Cynoscion nebulosus, Cynoscion arenarius, Micropogonias undulatus, and Lagodon rhomboides) were sampled at regular intervals throughout a year. The skin microbiota from each individual fish was analyzed by RISA and produced complex profiles with 23 bands on average. Similarities between RISA profiles ranged from 97.5% to 4.0%. At 70% similarity, 11 clusters were defined, each grouping individuals from the same fish species. Multidimensional scaling and analysis of similarity correlated the RISA-defined clusters with geographic locality, date, and fish species. Global R values indicated that fish species was the most indicative variable for group separation. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences (from pooled samples of 10 individual fish for each fish species) showed that the Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum in skin microbiota, followed by the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria. The distribution and abundance of bacterial sequences were different among all species analyzed. Aeribacillus was found in all fish species representing 19% of all clones sequenced, while some genera were fish species-specific (Neorickettsia in M. cephalus and Microbacterium in L. campechanus). Our data provide evidence for the existence of specific skin microbiota associated with particular fish species. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A revision of the Mexican Anolis (Reptilia, Squamata, Dactyloidae) from the Pacific versant west of the Isthmus de Tehuantepec in the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Puebla, with the description of six new species .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Gunther; Pérez, Raúl Gómez Trejo; Petersen, Claus Bo P; De La Cruz, Fausto R Méndez

    2014-09-19

    We revise the species of anoles occurring along the Pacific versant of Mexico west of the Isthmus de Tehuantepec in the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Puebla. Based on our analyses of morphological and molecular genetic data, we recognize 21 species, six of which we describe as new (i.e., Anolis carlliebi sp. nov., A. immaculogularis sp. nov., A. nietoi sp. nov., A. sacamecatensis sp. nov., A. stevepoei sp. nov., and A. zapotecorum sp. nov.). Furthermore, we synonymize Anolis forbesi Smith & Van Gelder 1955 with Anolis microlepidotus Davis 1954. Of the recognized species, six have smooth ventral scales (i.e., Anolis dunni, A. gadovii, A. liogaster, A. omiltemanus, A. peucephilus, and A. taylori) and 14 have keeled ventral scales (i.e., A. boulengerianus, A. carlliebi, A. immaculogularis, A. megapholidotus, A. microlepidotus, A. nebuloides, A. nebulosus, A. nietoi, A. quercorum, A. sacamecatensis, A. stevepoei, A. subocularis, A. unilobatus, and A. zapotecorum). In one species, A. macrinii, the ventral scales vary from smooth to weakly keeled. For each species we provide color descriptions in life, color photographs in life, descriptions and illustration of hemipenis morphology (if available), description of external morphology, distribution maps based on the specimensexamined, comments on the conservation status, and natural history notes. Finally, we provide a dichotomous key for the identification of the 21 species of anoles occurring along the Pacific versant of Mexico west of the Isthmus de Tehuantepec in the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, and Puebla. 

  18. An annotated distributional checklist of exotic freshwater fishes from the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico Lista comentada sobre la distribución de peces dulceacuícolas exóticos de la península de Baja California, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgonio Ruiz-Campos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We documented the distributional status of 27 exotic fish species in the inland waters of the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico, based on voucher specimens collected from 122 sites between 1977 and 2010, and on published records. The species reported here are representatives of genera from the Atlantic drainages of North America (Ictalurus, Ameiurus, Pylodictis, Morone, Lepomis, Pomoxis, Dorosoma, Cyprinella, and Micropterus, Middle America (Poecilia, Gambusia, and Xiphophorus, Eurasia (Cyprinus and Carassius, and Africa (Tilapia and Oreochromis. The family containing the highest number of species is Centrarchidae (7 species followed by Ictaluridae and Poeciliidae (6 species each. Four species were determined to be invasive due to their wide distribution and fast dispersal through the Peninsula (Gambusia affinis, Poecilia reticulata, Lepomis cyanellus, and Tilapia sp. cf. zillii. We analyze the impacts of exotic species on the native populations of 3 species with problems of conservation: Cyprinodon macularius (endangered, Fundulus lima (endangered, and Gasterosteus aculeatus (vulnerable. Alien fishes have been introduced for a variety of reasons in Mexico: ornament, sport, aquaculture, biological control, and by accident. In some cases fish introductions were carried out for more than one reason.El estatus de la distribución de peces exóticos es documentado para 27 especies en las aguas continentales de la península de Baja California, México, basado en registros de ejemplares recolectados en 122 localidades durante el período de 1977 a 2010, así como registros referidos en la literatura. Las especies aquí reportadas son representativas de géneros que proceden de la vertiente Atlántica de Norteamérica (Ictalurus, Ameiurus, Pylodictis, Morone, Lepomis, Pomoxis, Dorosoma, Cyprinella y Micropterus, Mesoamérica (Poecilia, Gambusia y Xiphophorus, Eurasia (Cyprinus y Carassius y África (Tilapia y Oreochromis. La familia con mayor n

  19. Relationships among catch, angler catisfaction, and fish assemblage characteristics of an urban small impoundment fishery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivasauskas, Tomas J.; Xiong, Wilson N.; Engman, Augustin C.; Fischer, Jesse R.; Kwak, Thomas J.; Rundle, Kirk R.

    2017-01-01

    Urban fisheries provide unique angling opportunities for people from traditionally underrepresented demographics. Lake Raleigh is a 38-ha impoundment located on the North Carolina State University campus in Raleigh. Like many urban fisheries, little is known about angler use and satisfaction or how angling catch rate is related to fish availability in Lake Raleigh. We characterized the recreational fishery and fish assemblage with concurrent creel and boat electrofishing surveys over the course of one year. In total, 245 anglers were interviewed on 68 survey days. On average, anglers spent 1.7 h fishing per trip and caught 0.385 fish h –1. A large proportion of anglers (43.9%) targeted multiple species, whereas 36.5% targeted largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), 10.0% targeted panfish (i.e., sunfishes [Lepomis spp.] and crappies [Pomoxis spp.]), and 9.6% targeted catfish (Ameiurus spp. and Ictalurus spp.). Most anglers (69.4%) were satisfied with their experience, and overall satisfaction was unrelated to catch rate. Pulsed-DC boat electrofishing was conducted on 25 dates, and 617 fish were sampled. Angler catch rate was unrelated to electrofishing catch rate, implying that anglers' catch rate was independent of fish density or availability. Our results demonstrate that even minimally managed urban fisheries can provide high angler satisfaction, with limited dedication of management resources. Relationships Among Catch, Angler Satisfaction, and Fish Assemblage Characteristics of an Urban Small Impoundment Fishery (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/316636550_Relationships_Among_Catch_Angler_Satisfaction_and_Fish_Assemblage_Characteristics_of_an_Urban_Small_Impoundment_Fishery [accessed Aug 11, 2017].

  20. Habitat segregation mediates predation by the benthic fish Cottus gobio on the exotic amphipod species Gammarus roeseli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldonski, Nicolas; Lagrue, Clément; Motreuil, Sébastien; Rigaud, Thierry; Bollache, Loïc

    2008-09-01

    Predation is often considered as one of the most important biotic factor determining the success of exotic species. The freshwater amphipod Gammarus roeseli has widely colonized Western Europe, where it is frequently found in sympatry with the native species ( Gammarus pulex). Previous laboratory experiments revealed that G. roeseli may have an advantage over G. pulex through differential predation by native fish (brown trout). Morphological anti-predator defences (spines) were found responsible for lower rates of predation on the invasive G. roeseli. Here, using both field surveys and laboratory experiments, we tested if a differential of predation exists with other fish predators naturally encountered by gammarids. The main predators present in our field site were nocturnal benthic feeders (mainly bullheads, Cottus gobio). Fish diet analysis showed that, compared to its global availability in the river, G. roeseli was less consumed than G. pulex. In the field, however, G. roeseli was found mainly in the aquatic vegetation whereas G. pulex was found in all habitat types. Laboratory experiments in microcosms revealed that G. roeseli was less prone to predation by C. gobio only when vegetation was present. Depending on the type of predator, the differential of predation could therefore be mediated by antipredator behaviour, and a better usage of refuges, rather than by morphological defences.

  1. Reproductive characteristics of a population of the washboard mussel Megalonaias nervosa (Rafinesque 1820) in the upper Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, C.A.; Holland-Bartels, L.

    1993-01-01

    The authors examined monthly and age-specific gametogenic development of the washboard mussel, Megalonaias nervosa, from April 1986 to March 1987 in navigation Pool 10 of the upper Mississippi River. The authors found M. nervosa to be a late tachytictic breeder. Female marsupia contained eggs or glochidia primarily from August (17 degree C) through October (9 degree C). Males were mature from July through October. Most females released their glochidia in October. Only one female was gravid in Nov (3 degree C). Most mussels were sexually mature at 8 years of age and then had an estimated average size of 68 mm (shell height). Only 8% of individuals less than or equal to 4 years of age showed any degree of reproductive development, while > 90% of age 5 and older individuals had recognizable reproductive material present. In host specificity studies, three fish species were verified as hosts for the glochidial stage. Green sunfish (Lepomis cyanellus), black bullhead (Ictalurus melas), and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) produced juveniles after 26-28 days at 17 degree C. White suckers (Catastomus commersoni) and yellow perch (Perca flavescens) retained glochidia from 23 up to 26 days, but no juveniles were produced. Glochidia remained attached to common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) less than or equal to 3 days. Channel catfish were retested at 12 degree C and produced juveniles after 56 days.

  2. Molecular phylogeny of elasmobranchs inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan-Kumar, A; Gireesh-Babu, P; Babu, P P Suresh; Jaiswar, A K; Hari Krishna, V; Prasasd, K Pani; Chaudhari, Aparna; Raje, S G; Chakraborty, S K; Krishna, Gopal; Lakra, W S

    2014-01-01

    The elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates) being the extant survivors of one of the earliest offshoots of the vertebrate evolutionary tree are good model organisms to study the primitive vertebrate conditions. They play a significant role in maintaining the ecological balance and have high economic value. Due to over-exploitation and illegal fishing worldwide, the elasmobranch stocks are being decimated at an alarming rate. Appropriate management measures are necessary for restoring depleted elasmobranch stocks. One approach for restoring stocks is implementation of conservation measures and these measures can be formulated effectively by knowing the evolutionary relationship among the elasmobranchs. In this study, a total of 30 species were chosen for molecular phylogeny studies using mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, 12S ribosomal RNA gene and nuclear Internal Transcribed Spacer 2. Among different genes, the combined dataset of COI and 12S rRNA resulted in a well resolved tree topology with significant bootstrap/posterior probabilities values. The results supported the reciprocal monophyly of sharks and batoids. Within Galeomorphii, Heterodontiformes (bullhead sharks) formed as a sister group to Lamniformes (mackerel sharks): Orectolobiformes (carpet sharks) and to Carcharhiniformes (ground sharks). Within batoids, the Myliobatiformes formed a monophyly group while Pristiformes (sawfishes) and Rhinobatiformes (guitar fishes) formed a sister group to all other batoids.

  3. Comparative evaluation of the cytotoxicity sensitivity of six fish cell lines to four heavy metals in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fengxia; Wang, Min; Wang, Weimin; Lu, Yuanan

    2008-02-01

    To establish the potential use of cell cultures as a simple and sensitive biological tool to detect environmental pollutants, six cell lines established from several fish species including GCF (grass carp fins), CIK (Ctenopharyngodon idellus kidney), EPC (epithelioma papulosum cyprini), CCO (channel catfish ovary), BB (brown bullhead caudal trunk) and FHM (fathead minnow muscle) were tested and compared for their cytotoxic sensitivity to four heavy metals: cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu). Following a 24-h exposure to these metal salts at selected concentrations, test cells were characterized by morphology, viability and proliferation. Our results indicate that all these metal salts are cytotoxic to these fish cell lines, but at varied levels. Calculated inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values revealed that the cytotoxicity of Cr and Cd was significantly more pronounced than that of the other two metal salts. Comparative analysis of these fish cell lines showed that C. idellus kidney (CIK) cells are the most sensitive cell line to copper, epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells are more sensitive than other cells to Cr and Zn, while channel catfish ovary (CCO) cell line is the most sensitive one to Cd. In conclusion, CIK, EPC and CCO could potentially be sensitive bio-indicators for the initial monitoring and assessment of acute cytotoxicity of heavy metals in the aquatic environment.

  4. Phase-II conjugation ability for PAH metabolism in amphibians: characteristics and inter-species differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Haruki; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Nakayama, Shouta M M; Tanaka-Ueno, Tomoko; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2011-10-01

    The present study examines amphibian metabolic activity - particularly conjugation - by analysis of pyrene (a four ring, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector (FD), a mass spectrometry detector (MS) system and kinetic analysis of conjugation enzymes. Six amphibian species were exposed to pyrene (dissolved in water): African claw frog (Xenopus laevis); Tago's brown frog (Rana tagoi); Montane brown frog (Rana ornativentris); Wrinkled frog (Rana rugosa); Japanese newt (Cynops pyrrhogaster); and Clouded salamander (Hynobius nebulosus); plus one fish species, medaka (Oryzias latipes); and a fresh water snail (Clithon retropictus), and the resultant metabolites were collected. Identification of pyrene metabolites by HPLC and ion-trap MS system indicated that medaka mainly excreted pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG), while pyrene-1-sulfate (PYOS) was the main metabolite in all amphibian species. Pyrene metabolites in amphibians were different from those in invertebrate fresh water snails. Inter-species differences were also observed in pyrene metabolism among amphibians. Metabolite analysis showed that frogs relied more strongly on sulfate conjugation than did Japanese newts and clouded salamanders. Furthermore, urodelan amphibians, newts and salamanders, excreted glucose conjugates of pyrene that were not detected in the anuran amphibians. Kinetic analysis of conjugation by hepatic microsomes and cytosols indicated that differences in excreted metabolites reflected differences in enzymatic activities. Furthermore, pyrenediol (PYDOH) glucoside sulfate was detected in the Japanese newt sample. This novel metabolite has not been reported previously to this report, in which we have identified unique characteristics of amphibians in phase II pyrene metabolism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Entomological assessment of yellow fever-epidemic risk indices in Benue State, Nigeria, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agwu, Ekenma Julia; Igbinosa, Igho Benjamin; Isaac, Clement

    2016-09-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and non-human primates in tropical areas. In the past, there have been pockets of YF outbreaks in Nigeria that resulted in preventable deaths. Surveillance efforts towards avoiding another outbreak have been put in place with the aim of early detection and control. However, risk indices relating to the density of immature YF-mosquito vectors are given little consideration even though it is the first step in curbing a possible outbreak. Immature collections from 1538 houses in Ega, Oju, Otukpoicho and Otukpo in Benue State were carried out in 2010 and 2011. Risk indices such as house index (HI), container index (CI) and Breteau index (BI) were estimated. Molecular detection of YF was carried out on randomly selected Aedes larvae and pupae. Overall, 431,381 mosquitoes were collected in and around house premises. Thirteen species were identified: Ae. aegypti (Linneaus), Ae. africanus (Theobald), Ae. albopictus (Skuse), Ae. cumminsii (Theobald), Ae. luteocephalus (Newstead), Ae. simpsoni s.l. (Theobald), Ae. vittatus (Bigot), Anopheles gambiae Giles, An. nili (Theobald), Cx. nebulosus Theobald, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, Lutzia tigripes (Grandpre and Charmoy) and Toxorhynchites brevipalpis Theobald. The HI, CI and BI for Ae. aegypti were high in all the study locations, but low for Ae. lueteocephalus except in Ega. With 50 immature Aedes mosquitoes screened across locations, only Ae. aegypti from Ega were positive for YF. This study places Ega on a high alert of an impending YF outbreak. Thus, urgent steps to clear this area of potential mosquito sites are highly recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Oyster reefs as natural breakwaters mitigate shoreline loss and facilitate fisheries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scyphers, Steven B; Powers, Sean P; Heck, Kenneth L; Byron, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Shorelines at the interface of marine, estuarine and terrestrial biomes are among the most degraded and threatened habitats in the coastal zone because of their sensitivity to sea level rise, storms and increased human utilization. Previous efforts to protect shorelines have largely involved constructing bulkheads and seawalls which can detrimentally affect nearshore habitats. Recently, efforts have shifted towards "living shoreline" approaches that include biogenic breakwater reefs. Our study experimentally tested the efficacy of breakwater reefs constructed of oyster shell for protecting eroding coastal shorelines and their effect on nearshore fish and shellfish communities. Along two different stretches of eroding shoreline, we created replicated pairs of subtidal breakwater reefs and established unaltered reference areas as controls. At both sites we measured shoreline and bathymetric change and quantified oyster recruitment, fish and mobile macro-invertebrate abundances. Breakwater reef treatments mitigated shoreline retreat by more than 40% at one site, but overall vegetation retreat and erosion rates were high across all treatments and at both sites. Oyster settlement and subsequent survival were observed at both sites, with mean adult densities reaching more than eighty oysters m(-2) at one site. We found the corridor between intertidal marsh and oyster reef breakwaters supported higher abundances and different communities of fishes than control plots without oyster reef habitat. Among the fishes and mobile invertebrates that appeared to be strongly enhanced were several economically-important species. Blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) were the most clearly enhanced (+297%) by the presence of breakwater reefs, while red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) (+108%), spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) (+88%) and flounder (Paralichthys sp.) (+79%) also benefited. Although the vertical relief of the breakwater reefs was reduced over the course of our study and this

  7. Brood ball-mediated transmission of microbiome members in the dung beetle, Onthophagus taurus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Estes

    Full Text Available Insects feeding on plant sap, blood, and other nutritionally incomplete diets are typically associated with mutualistic bacteria that supplement missing nutrients. Herbivorous mammal dung contains more than 86% cellulose and lacks amino acids essential for insect development and reproduction. Yet one of the most ecologically necessary and evolutionarily successful groups of beetles, the dung beetles (Scarabaeinae feeds primarily, or exclusively, on dung. These associations suggest that dung beetles may benefit from mutualistic bacteria that provide nutrients missing from dung. The nesting behaviors of the female parent and the feeding behaviors of the larvae suggest that a microbiome could be vertically transmitted from the parental female to her offspring through the brood ball. Using sterile rearing and a combination of molecular and culture-based techniques, we examine transmission of the microbiome in the bull-headed dung beetle, Onthophagus taurus. Beetles were reared on autoclaved dung and the microbiome was characterized across development. A ~1425 bp region of the 16S rRNA identified Pseudomonadaceae, Enterobacteriaceae, and Comamonadaceae as the most common bacterial families across all life stages and populations, including cultured isolates from the 3(rd instar digestive system. Finer level phylotyping analyses based on lepA and gyrB amplicons of cultured isolates placed the isolates closest to Enterobacter cloacae, Providencia stuartii, Pusillimonas sp., Pedobacter heparinus, and Lysinibacillus sphaericus. Scanning electron micrographs of brood balls constructed from sterile dung reveals secretions and microbes only in the chamber the female prepares for the egg. The use of autoclaved dung for rearing, the presence of microbes in the brood ball and offspring, and identical 16S rRNA sequences in both parent and offspring suggests that the O. taurus female parent transmits specific microbiome members to her offspring through the brood

  8. Invasion strategy and abiotic activity triggers for non-native gobiids of the River Rhine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Baer

    Full Text Available The 24 hour activity patterns of three non-native gobiids (round goby Neogobius melanostomus, Western tubenose goby Proterorhinus semilunaris and bighead goby Ponticola kessleri were assessed over 46 consecutive months between 2011 and 2014 from their occurrence in the cooling water intake of a nuclear power plant on the River Rhine, Germany. In total, 117717 gobiids were identified and classified. The occurrence of all three species varied strongly between sampling years, and species-specific activity triggers were identified. The activity of juveniles of all three gobiids species was positively temperature dependent while adult tubenose goby activity appeared to be negatively temperature dependent. Increasing fluvial discharge in the adjoining main river stimulated the activity of juvenile round goby but inhibited activity of adult tubenose goby. Except for adult bighead goby, activity was also structured by time of day, but with no uniform mean. Meteorological factors such as precipitation, air pressure and duration of sunshine hours had little or no influence on gobiid activity. On selected rare occasions, mainly at night, all three species exhibited pulsed swarming behaviour, with thousands of individuals recorded in the intake water. Round goby swarms exhibited both the highest intensity and the largest swarming individuals, suggesting a potential competitive advantage over tubenose and bighead goby. Electric fishing surveys in natural river stretches corroborated this observation. Negative effects on the native fish fauna were apparent only for the bullhead, Cottus gobio. The activity triggers identified offer a unique insight into the invasion mechanisms of these ecosystem-changing non-native gobiids.

  9. A novel viscoelastic surfactant suitable for use in high temperature carbonate reservoirs for diverted acidizing stimulation treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, Stuart; Zhou, Jian; Gadberry, Fred [AkzoNobel Surface Chemistry, Forth Worth, TX (United States); Nasr-El-Din, Hisham; Wang, Guanqun [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2012-07-01

    Due to the low permeability of many carbonate hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs, it is difficult to achieve economic hydrocarbon recovery from a well without secondary stimulation. Bullheading of strong acids, such as HCl is practiced in low temperature reservoirs, but as the bottom hole temperature (BHT) rises, the acid becomes increasingly corrosive, causing facial dissolution and sub-optimal wormhole network development. In the last decade, viscoelastic surfactants (VES) have been added to HCl acid systems to improve the stimulation of HT carbonate reservoirs. The VES form 'living polymers' or worm-like micelles as electrolyte concentration rises in the acid due to reaction with the reservoir. This leads to viscosification of the stimulation fluid. The viscosification slows further acid reaction in the region already contacted by the acid, and forces the acid to take an alternate path into the rock, leading to diversion of the acids further down the well to the harder to access toe or lower permeability zones. Until recently, the maximum BHT that such VES-based diverting systems could be used was up to about 250 deg F/120 deg C. Above that temperature, all viscous properties of the fluid are lost, destroying the mechanism of acid diversion. A recently developed novel viscoelastic surfactant provides nearly 100 deg F/55 deg C extension in the BHT range in which diverted acid treatments can be used. These fluids are able to maintain both viscosity up to about 375 deg F/190 deg C, with the elastic modulus predominating up to 350 deg F/175 deg C. It is the elasticity which is particularly important in acid diversion. These fluids can have their viscosity readily broken by in-situ hydrocarbons, dilution with water or by using a mutual solvent. The broken fluids are readily removed from the near-well bore, leaving the newly created wormhole network to produce the target hydrocarbons. The new VES is significantly more environmentally benign compared with current

  10. Chimeric creatures in Greek mythology and reflections in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazopoulou-Kyrkanidou, E

    2001-04-15

    "The Chimaera" in Homer's Iliad, "was of divine stock, not of men, in the forepart a lion, in the hinder a serpent, and in the midst a goat, ellipsis Bellerophon slew her, trusting in the signs of the gods." In Hesiod's Theogony it is emphasized that "Chimaera ellipsis had three heads, one of a grim-eyed lion, another of a goat, and another of a snakeellipsis". In addition to this interspecies animal chimera, human/animal chimeras are referred to in Greek mythology, preeminent among them the Centaurs and the Minotaur. The Centaurs, as horse/men, first appear in Geometric and early Archaic art, but in the literature not until early in the fifth century B.C. The bullheaded-man Minotaur, who is not certainly attested in the literary evidence until circa 500 B.C., first appears in art about 650 B.C. Attempts, in the fourth century B.C. and thereafter, to rationalize their mythical appearance were in vain; their chimeric nature retained its fascinating and archetypal form over the centuries. Early in the 1980s, experimental sheep/goat chimeras were produced removing the reproductive barrier between these two animal species. Late in the 1990s, legal, political, ethical, and moral fights loomed over a patent bid on human/animal chimeras. Chimeric technology is recently developed; however, the concept of chimerism has existed in literary and artistic form in ancient mythology. This is yet another example where art and literature precede scientific research and development. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss. Inc.

  11. Ecological status assessment of regulated lakes; Saeaennoesteltyjen jaervien ekologisen tilan arviointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keto, A.; Sutela, T.; Aroviita, J.; Tarvainen, A.; Haemaelaeinen, H.; Hellsten, S.; Vehanen, T.; Marttunen, M.

    2008-10-15

    Although regulated lakes have been studied extensively during the last 20 years in Finland, biological data are still scattered. Especially in mildly regulated lakes, data have been insufficient to determine reference conditions and to estimate ecological status as required by the Water Framework Directive. The objective of this study was to increase information about the biological quality elements in order to develop ecological classification system and to define environment objectives for regulated lakes. Both existing and new data were collected from littoral fishes, littoral macroinvertebrates and macrophytes from regulated lakes and unregulated reference lakes. New biological classification metrics were then developed and tested. Moreover, alternative combinations of the biological classification parameters were tested for assessment of ecological status of lakes. Impacts of water-level regulation were found in all three biological quality elements: the littoral fishes, macroinvertebrates and macrophytes. The ecological status of the study lakes was at its worst when winter draw-down of water-level exceeded 2-3 meters. Very sensitive species for water-level regulation were recognized in all three biological quality elements. In macrophytes these species were large isoetids, in macroinvertebrates species with at least two-year life cycle and in fishes' minnow and European bullhead. In a same lake, the status of littoral fishes, macroinvertebrates and macrophytes often differed from each other As a result, when results from different biological quality elements are combined to an overall ecological status, quite large differences can exist depending on the method used to derive the overall status; i.e., whether the most sensitive quality element (i.e. the 'one-out all-out' principle) or a median value over all quality elements is used. (orig.)

  12. Cementing of low pressure formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownlie, D. [Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Coupland, M. [Baytex Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposed a solution to the notorious problem of squeeze cementing low pressure formations. It is a well known fact within the petroleum industry that it is difficult to squeeze cement low pressure formations in certain areas. Short of fracturing, most geological formations will not allow cement to penetrate the actual rock. In standard cement squeezing, cement slurries are placed across perforations and then pressure is applied to force the cement into perforation tunnels against the formation causing partial dehydration of the slurry. The cement left in the perforation tunnels makes a seal between the formation and the wellbore that has high compressive strength and low permeability. However, experience has shown that some wells are not capable of holding the hydrostatic pressure of a water column. This paper presented case studies that examined formations with modified geology, a highly unconsolidated sandstone where large volumes of sand were extracted during the production process. In particular, the paper refers to a low pressure field in Western Canada, the remedial cementing in Lloydminster. Within a 3 year period 18 zones were cement squeezed and drilled out. Nine of the zones were cement squeezed using a retainer with thixotropic cement followed by a 0:1:0 Class G cement. Only 11 per cent of the 9 zones was successful on the first attempt. The other 9 zones were cement squeezed using the bullhead technique in which a fluid is shot into the well casing before the downhole equipment. This latter technique proved to be more successful on the first attempt. 2 refs.

  13. Karyotypes of some medium-sized Dytiscidae (Agabinae and Colymbetinae (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Angus

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An account is given of the karyotypes of 29 species of medium sized Dytiscidae (Coleoptera. Of the 20 species of Agabus Leach, 1817, 18 have karyotypes comprising 21 pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are either X0(♂ or XX (♀. These species are A. serricornis (Paykull, 1799, A. labiatus (Brahm, 1791, A. congener (Thunberg, 1794, A. lapponicus (Thomson, 1867, A. thomsoni (J. Sahlberg, 1871, A. confinis (Gyllenhal, 1808, A. sturmii (Gyllenhal, 1808, A. bipustulatus (Linnaeus, 1767, A. nevadensis Håkan Lindberg, 1939, A. wollastoni Sharp, 1882, A. melanarius Aubé, 1837, A. biguttatus (Olivier, 1795, A. binotatus Aubé, 1837, A. affinis (Paykull, 1798, A. unguicularis (Thomson, 1867, A. ramblae Millan & Ribera, 2001, A. conspersus (Marsham, 1802 and A. nebulosus (Forster, 1771. However two species, A. infuscatus Aubé, 1838 and A. adpressus Aubé, 1837, have developed a neo-XY system, with karyotypes comprising 21 pairs of autosomes and XY sex chromosomes (♂. No chromosomal differences have been detected between typical A. bipustulatus and A. bipustulatus var. solieri Aubé, 1837, nor have any been found between the three species of the A. bipustulatus complex (A. bipustulatus, A. nevadensis and A. wollastoni. The four species of Colymbetes Clairville, 1806, C. fuscus (Linnaeus, 1758, C. paykulli Erichson, 1837, C. piceus Klug, 1834 and C. striatus (Linnaeus, 1758 have karyotypes comprising 20 pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are X0 (♂, XX (♀. Two of the species of Rhantus Dejean, 1833, R. exsoletus (Forster, 1771 and R. suturellus (Harris, 1828 have karyotypes comprising 20 pairs of autosomes and X0/XX sex chromosomes, but the other three species, R. grapii (Gyllenhal, 1808, R. frontalis (Marsham, 1802 and R. suturalis (Macleay, 1825 have 22 pairs of autosomes and X0/XX sex chromosomes. Agabus congener and Rhantus suturellus may have one B-chromosome. Nine of the species have previously published karyotype data but

  14. Fishes of Missouri River, chute, and flood plain habitats: Chapter 4 in Initial biotic survey of Lisbon Bottom, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Joanne; Milligan, Jim; Chapman, Duane C.; Ehrhardt, Ellen A.; Dieterman, Douglas J.; Galat, David L.; Hooker, John; Kubisiak, John; DeLonay, Aaron; Little, Edward E.; Robinson, Jack; Tibbs, John

    1999-01-01

    chub, ghost shiner, western silvery minnow, plains minnow, and blue sucker. Equally important to note are fish species that were not collected. The flathead chub, currently listed as State endangered and proposed for Federal listing, were not collected in any of the studies.Common fish species, collected in all seven sampling studies, included gizzard shad, common carp, river carpsucker, and freshwater drum. Paddlefish, skipjack herring, silver carp, white sucker, redfin shiner, western silvery minnow, bullhead minnow, and black bullhead were each collected in only one of the seven studies.Pflieger (1971) developed a guild system for the fishes of Missouri based on distribution patterns and centers of abundance. Fish were assigned to one of four primary faunal groups: Ozark, Big River, Lowland, and Prairie. Two secondary groups (Ozark-prairie and Ozark-lowland) were defined for species equally abundant and distributed in two of the primary areas. Two Ozark-prairie species, shorthead redhorse and white sucker, were collected on or near the Lisbon Bottom Unit.Big River species are found primarily in the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The environmental factors controlling fish distribution in these rivers appear to be substrate, current velocity, and turbidity. On or near the Lisbon Bottom Unit 18 Big River species were collected (Table 2).Lowland species are intolerant of siltation and high turbidity. They inhabit standing or slow-moving water with sand, fine gravel, and organic debris substrates. Two Lowland species, bullhead minnow and mosquitofish, were collected in connected scours on the Lisbon Bottom Unit.Prairie species have broader ecological tolerances than the Ozark and Lowland species. They are largely absent in high gradient streams and cool, clear waters. Prairie species make up a significant proportion of Missouri and Mississippi River fishes. Seven Prairie species were collected on or near the Lisbon Bottom Unit (Table 2).The last group, Wide

  15. Geologic map of the Topock 7.5’ quadrangle, Arizona and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Keith A.; John, Barbara E.; Nielson, Jane E.; Miller, Julia M.G.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    correlated with the alluvium of Bullhead City, (3) the younger fluvial boulder conglomerate of Bat Cave Wash, (4) the fluvial Chemehuevi Formation and related valley-margin deposits, and (5) fluvial Holocene deposits under the river and the valley floor. These fluvial records of Colorado River deposition are interspersed with piedmont alluvial fan deposits of several ages.

  16. Effects of cadmium exposure on the gill proteome of Cottus gobio: Modulatory effects of prior thermal acclimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorts, Jennifer; Kestemont, Patrick; Thézenas, Marie-Laetitia; Raes, Martine; Silvestre, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fish acclimated to elevated temperature were subsequently exposed to cadmium. • Interaction of both stressors on LDH activity and protein expression was complex. • Both stressors have opposite effects at branchial protein expression level. • Proteins belonging to the same functional class exhibited differing responses. • Prior acclimation to elevated temperature modulated the effects of cadmium exposure. - Abstract: Temperature and trace metals are common environmental stressors, and their importance is increasing due to global climate change and anthropogenic pollution. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acclimation to elevated temperature affects the response of the European bullhead (Cottus gobio) to subsequent cadmium (Cd) exposure by using enzymatic and proteomic approaches. Fish acclimated to 15 (standard temperature), 18 or 21 °C for 28 days were exposed to 1 mg Cd/L for 4 days at the respective acclimation temperature. First, exposure to Cd significantly decreased the activity of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in gills of fish acclimated to 15 or 18 °C. However, an acclimation to 21 °C suppressed the inhibitory effect of Cd. Second, using a proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE, we observed that thermal acclimation was the first parameter affecting the protein expression profile in gills of C. gobio, while subsequent Cd exposure seemed to attenuate this temperature effect. Moreover, our results showed opposite effects of these two environmental stressors at protein expression level. From the 52 protein spots displaying significant interaction effects of temperature and Cd exposure, a total of 28 different proteins were identified using nano LC–MS/MS and the Peptide and Protein Prophet algorithms of Scaffold software. The identified differentially expressed proteins can be categorized into diverse functional classes, related to protein turnover, folding and chaperoning, metabolic process, ion transport, cell

  17. Past, present and future of the fish community of Lake Orta (Italy, one of the world’s largest acidified lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Volta

    2016-04-01

    lota, Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus and bullhead (Cottus gobio are still lacking, as are the pelagic zooplanktivores European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus and shad, which dominate offshore communities in the reference lakes, as they did a century ago in Lake Orta.  To propose priorities for fish community rehabilitation in Lake Orta, we categorized the conservation, ecological and fishing values of each missing fish species in the lake, and evaluated the cost and probability of success of the needed intervention for each species. This analysis indicated that rehabilitation of shad and European whitefish should receive highest priority.

  18. Effects of cadmium exposure on the gill proteome of Cottus gobio: Modulatory effects of prior thermal acclimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorts, Jennifer, E-mail: jennifer.dorts@unamur.be [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Kestemont, Patrick [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Thézenas, Marie-Laetitia; Raes, Martine [Research Unit in Cell Biology (URBC) (NARILIS), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Silvestre, Frédéric [Research Unit in Environmental and Evolutionary Biology (URBE), University of Namur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Fish acclimated to elevated temperature were subsequently exposed to cadmium. • Interaction of both stressors on LDH activity and protein expression was complex. • Both stressors have opposite effects at branchial protein expression level. • Proteins belonging to the same functional class exhibited differing responses. • Prior acclimation to elevated temperature modulated the effects of cadmium exposure. - Abstract: Temperature and trace metals are common environmental stressors, and their importance is increasing due to global climate change and anthropogenic pollution. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether acclimation to elevated temperature affects the response of the European bullhead (Cottus gobio) to subsequent cadmium (Cd) exposure by using enzymatic and proteomic approaches. Fish acclimated to 15 (standard temperature), 18 or 21 °C for 28 days were exposed to 1 mg Cd/L for 4 days at the respective acclimation temperature. First, exposure to Cd significantly decreased the activity of the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in gills of fish acclimated to 15 or 18 °C. However, an acclimation to 21 °C suppressed the inhibitory effect of Cd. Second, using a proteomic analysis by 2D-DIGE, we observed that thermal acclimation was the first parameter affecting the protein expression profile in gills of C. gobio, while subsequent Cd exposure seemed to attenuate this temperature effect. Moreover, our results showed opposite effects of these two environmental stressors at protein expression level. From the 52 protein spots displaying significant interaction effects of temperature and Cd exposure, a total of 28 different proteins were identified using nano LC–MS/MS and the Peptide and Protein Prophet algorithms of Scaffold software. The identified differentially expressed proteins can be categorized into diverse functional classes, related to protein turnover, folding and chaperoning, metabolic process, ion transport, cell

  19. Diapause in Calanoid Copepods: within-clutch hatching patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart T. DE STASIO

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Diapause is a major life history feature of many invertebrate organisms. Determining the phenology of diapause is critical for understanding survival and reproductive success of individuals as well as the long-term viability of many populations. The time spent in dormancy by individuals and variability among offspring in the duration of dormancy are two important aspects of invertebrate life histories. Some data are available, especially on duration of diapause, for plants and insects, but little information is available concerning variability among offspring in diapause traits. This is especially true for crustacean zooplankton, where essentially no information has been published on duration of diapause or variability among offspring in diapause timing or dynamics. Here I present data on the duration of diapause, and variability among offspring for diapause characteristics. The freshwater calanoid copepod Onychodiaptomus sanguineus, an obligately sexual species, was collected from Bullhead Pond, Rhode Island, U.S.A., and raised under conditions in the laboratory to induce production of diapausing eggs. One hundred clutches of these diapausing eggs (920 total eggs were incubated for over two years in a full-factorial experiment testing the effects of temperature and photoperiod cycles on the hatching dynamics and duration of diapause. Overall hatching success was highest (approximately 86% for eggs exposed to simultaneous temperature and photoperiod cycles mimicking natural changes, and was lowest (approximately 20% when eggs were incubated at constant temperature (4 °C and in constant dark conditions. The highest fraction of eggs hatched at approximately 550 days of age, but the age of eggs at hatching was highly variable among clutches. There was also large variability within clutches for hatching patterns, with some clutches containing eggs that all hatched synchronously and others in which eggs hatched more continuously throughout the

  20. The impact of acid sulphate soils on water bodies and fish deaths in Finland; Happamien sulfaattimaiden aiheuttamat vesistoevaikutukset ja kalakuolemat Suomessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutela, T.; Vuori, K.-M.; Louhi, P. [and others

    2012-05-15

    , bullhead, burbot, and brown trout, while in estuaries the bivalves are one vulnerable group in macroinvertebrates. Fish kills in rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal waters due to ASS soils were catalogued as comprehensively as possible. This listing is further proof that the problems are concentrated in the region of Ostrobothnia. Fish have been practically extinct in the minor rivers most afflicted with acidity and toxic metals in recent decades (orig.)