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Sample records for bullfrog vestibular otolith

  1. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  2. Central integration of canal and otolith signals is abnormal in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan eKing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM, a common cause of vestibular symptoms within the general population, is a disabling and poorly understood form of dizziness. We sought to examine the underlying pathophysiology of VM with three studies which involved central synthesis of canal and otolith cues, and present preliminary results from each of these studies: 1 VM patients appear to have reduced motion perception thresholds when canal and otolith signals are modulated in a coplanar manner during roll tilt; 2 percepts of roll tilt appear to develop more slowly in VM patients than in control groups during a centrifugation paradigm that presents conflicting, orthogonal canal and otolith cues; and 3 eye movement responses appear to be different in VM patients when studied with a post-rotational tilt paradigm, which also presents a canal-otolith conflict, as the shift of the eye’s rotational axis was larger in VM and the relationship between the axis shift and tilt-suppression of the VOR appeared to differ in VM patients relative to control groups. Based on these preliminary perceptual and eye movement results obtained with three different motion paradigms, we present a hypothesis that the integration of canal and otolith signals by the brain differs in VM and that this difference could be cerebellar in origin. We provide several possible mechanisms that could underlie these observations, and speculate that one of more of these mechanisms contributes to the vestibular symptoms and motion intolerance that are characteristic of the VM syndrome.

  3. Do vestibular otolith organs participate in human orthostatic blood pressure control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Cothron, Adriena V.; Wasmund, Stephen L.; Wasmund, Wendy L.; Carter, Robert 3rd; Muenter, Nicolette K.; Smith, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    We hypothesized that vestibular otolith organ stimulation contributes to human orthostatic responses. Twelve subjects underwent three 60 degrees upright tilts: (1) with the neck flexed from 0 degrees to 30 degrees relative to the body during 60 degrees tilt, such that the head moved from horizontal to 90 degrees above horizontal (0 to 1 Gz otolith stimulation); (2) with the head and body aligned, such that they tilted together to 60 degrees (0 to 0.87 Gz otolith stimulation); and (3) with the neck flexed 30 degrees relative to the body during supine conditions, and the neck then extended to -30 degrees during 60 degrees body tilting, such that the head remained at 30 degrees above horizontal throughout body tilting (constant 0.5 Gz otolith stimulation). All three tilt procedures increased thoracic impedance, sympathetic nerve activity (N = 8 of 12), arterial pressure, and heart rate relative to supine conditions (all P < 0.04). Within the first 20 s of tilt, arterial pressure increased most obviously in the 0 to 1 Gz otolith condition. Thoracic impedance tended to increase more in otolith-constant conditions, but no dependent variable differed significantly between tilt conditions, and no significant time x tilt interactions emerged. Otolith inputs may contribute to early transient adjustments to orthostasis. However, lack of significant main effects of tilt condition and time x tilt interactions suggests that potential otolith effects on the variables we studied are relatively subtle and ephemeral, or that other mechanisms compensate for a lack of change in otolith input with orthostasis.

  4. The cortical spatiotemporal correlate of otolith stimulation: vestibular evoked potentials by body translations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, M; Moser, M; Boegle, R; Conrad, J; Zu Eulenburg, P; Dieterich, M

    2017-02-22

    The vestibular organ senses linear and rotational acceleration of the head during active and passive motion. These signals are necessary for bipedal locomotion, navigation, the coordination of eye and head movements in 3D space. The temporal dynamics of vestibular processing in cortical structures have hardly been studied in humans, let alone with natural stimulation. The aim was to investigate the cortical vestibular network related to natural otolith stimulation using a hexapod motion platform. We conducted two experiments, 1. to estimate the sources of the vestibular evoked potentials (VestEPs) by means of distributed source localization (n=49), and 2. to reveal modulations of the VestEPs through the underlying acceleration intensity (n=24). For both experiments subjects were accelerated along the main axis (left/right, up/down, fore/aft) while the EEG was recorded. We were able to identify five VestEPs (P1, N1, P2, N2, P3) with latencies between 38 and 461 ms as well as an evoked beta-band response peaking with a latency of 68 ms in all subjects and for all acceleration directions. Source localization gave the cingulate sulcus visual (CSv) area and the opercular-insular region as the main origin of the evoked potentials. No lateralization effects due to handedness could be observed. In the second experiment, area CSv was shown to be integral in the processing of acceleration intensities as sensed by the otolith organs, hinting at its potential role in ego-motion detection. These robust VestEPs could be used to investigate the mechanisms of inter-regional interaction in the natural context of vestibular processing and multisensory integration.

  5. Mutant Medaka fish having a deficiency in otolith-vestibular system and their behavior in microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, K

    2000-07-01

    Vestibular and visual senses are two major factors fish use for controlling their posture under 1 G conditions. From various studies in the past (parabolic flights and some ground-laboratory experiments), I came to have a hypothesis that "heavily eye-dependent" fish are tolerant to microgravity (micro-G). Theoretically, for "heavily eye-dependent" fish, the following three types may exist. (a) Fish having good eyesight, and having an ordinary sensitivity to gravity, (b) Fish having an ordinary eyesight, and having less sensitivity to gravity, (c) Fish having good eyesight, and having less sensitivity to gravity. In Medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), these three types have successfully been obtained. In this paper, the behavior of such different types of Medaka fish under micro-G will be studied by use of parabolic flights of an airplane. The ground-laboratory experiments are also reported, which focus on the contribution of both vestibular and visual senses to the posture control for each of three types of Medaka fish.

  6. [The influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in the patients presenting with an unilateral lesion in a peripheral vestibular neuron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhac, S A; Pleshko, I V

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study the influence of otolithic afferentation on the vestibulo-ocular interaction in 20 patients with vestibular neuronitis (at the stages of decompensation and subcompensation) and in 30 healthy subjects by the electronystagmographic technique. The sinusoidal (program 1) and eccentric (program 2) rotation was applied with the angular velocity of 10 degrees/s (stimulus 1, rotation rate 0.04 Hz), 30 degrees/s (stimulus II, rotation rate 0.12 Hz), 60 degrees/s (stimulus III) and oscillation periods of 18, 6, and 3 s respectively. No significant changes in the parameters of the vesicular reflex were observed in the patients with vestibular neuronitis and control subjects studied in the phase of decompensation under programs 1 and 2 . The study of the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis in the subcompensation phase (program 2) revealed a significant increase of nystagmus intensity on the affected side compared with the respective parameters estimated in the framework of program 1 (pvestibular labyrinth dysfunction in the patients presenting with vestibular neuronitis at the stage of decompensation.

  7. A multicolor carbocyanine dye analysis of the development of the vestibular projections from canal and otolithic endorgans of the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, B.; Maklad, A.

    The vestibular apparatus of the ear consists of two distinct sensory organs, the angular acceleration perceiving canal organs and the gravity and linear acceleration sensing utricle and saccule. Previous work has shown that microgravity or hypergravity affects the pattern of movement of pregnant rats and thus the way the ear is stimulated. Understanding how this activity affects the pattern of projections requires a more detailed understanding of the central projections, in particular during development. We report data generated with a technique using old and new carbocyanine dyes. The properties of these dyes to diffuse in the lipid bilayer of aldehyde fixed neurons make them ideal for such studies. Our data show that the initial projection develops prior to the onset of functional input from the endorgans and is likely governed exclusively by genetic developmental programs. However, our data also provide two aspects of the neonatal segregation that might be influenced by activity. One of these areas o continued segregation is in thef brainstem, specifically the rostral part of the medial vestibular nucleus. The other part is in the cerebellum, specifically the nodulus and flocculus. These areas show more overlap in the embryos that progressively is reduced during further development suggesting the possible influence of activity in this process. Supported by NASA (NAG 2-1353).

  8. M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission: 3. Effects of prolonged weightlessness on a human otolith-spinal reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, D. G.; Money, K. E.; Tomi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflex responses that depend on human otolith organ sensitivity were measured before, during and after a 10 day space flight. Otolith-spinal reflexes were elicited by means of sudden, unexpected falls. In weightlessness, "falls" were achieved using elastic cords running from a torso harness to the floor. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from gastrocnemius-soleus. The EMG response occurring in the first 100-120 ms of a fall, considered to be predominantly otolith-spinal in origin, decreased in amplitude immediately upon entering weightlessness, and continued to decline throughout the flight, especially during the first two mission days. The response returned to normal before the first post-flight testing session. The results suggest that information coming from the otolith organs is gradually ignored by the nervous system during prolonged space flight, although the possibility that otolith-spinal reflexes are decreased independent of other otolith output pathways cannot be ruled out.

  9. M.I.T./Canadian vestibular experiments on the Spacelab-1 mission. III - Effects of prolonged weightlessness on a human otolith-spinal reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, D. G. D.; Money, K. E.; Tomi, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflex responses that depend on human otolith organ sensitivity were measured before, during and after a 10 day space flight. Otolith-spinal reflexes were elicited by means of sudden, unexpected falls. In weightlessness, 'falls' were achieved using elastic cords running from a torso harness to the floor. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from gastrocnemius-soleus. The EMG response occurring in the first 100-120 ms of a fall, considered to be predominantly otolith-spinal in origin, decreased in amplitude immediately upon entering weightlessness, and continued to decline throughout the flight, especially during the first two mission days. The response returned to normal before the first post-flight testing session. The results suggest that information coming from the otolith organs is gradually ignored by the nervous system during prolonged space flight, although the possibility that otolith-spinal reflexes are decreased independent of other otolith output pathways cannot by ruled out.

  10. The OTOLITH Experiment - Assessment of Otolith Function During Postflight Re-adaption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A. H.; Wood, S. J.; Schoenfeld, U.

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing "Otolith" experiment is designed to comprehensively assess the otolith function during the re-adaptation phase after spaceflight. The novel protocol includes unilateral testing of each of the two otolith organs the utricle and the saccule. To assess utricle function, the otolith-ocular response (OOR) and the subjective visual vertical (SVV) are measured during unilateral centrifugation, which permits independent stimulation of the right and left ear. Measurement of the unilateral otolith-ocular response (uOOR) yields information on the response behaviour of the right and left peripheral utricles, whereas the SVV reflects the behaviour of the entire pathway from the peripheral otolith receptors to the vestibular cortex. Thus, by comparative evaluation of the results from the two tests, the degree of peripheral versus central adaptation during the post-flight period can be determined. To assess unilateral saccule function, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are recorded. Since the saccules are predominantly aligned to gravity, and interplay with the antigravity muscles, it is hypothesised that these potentials shall be altered after spaceflight. To date the study has been conducted with 5 of a planned 8 short-flight Shuttle astronauts. Preliminary results will be discussed together with those from clinical studies of dizziness patients, where the same test protocol is employed. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This work is supported by the German Aerospace Center (Grant DLR W130729) and is conducted under the auspices of ESA, in cooperation with NASA.

  11. Movement Symmetries and the Mammalian Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Gin; Boyle, Richard

    2000-03-01

    Unity of movement requires vertebrates to have an ability to symmetrize along the midline. For example, human erect stance involves symmetry with respect to gravity. The mammalian vestibular system provides a mechanism for maintaining symmetries, which is also open to influence and adaptation by the rest of the organism. The vestibular system includes the inner ear endorgans and central nuclei, along with projections to oculomotor, cerebellar, thalamic, and spinal motor centers. The vestibular endorgans - the semicircular canals and the otoliths - use sensory hairs to register inertia. The vestibular endorgans are right-left symmetric and the semicircular canals form an approximately orthogonal coordinate system for angular motion. Primary afferent axons project from the endorgans to the vestibular nuclei (and a few other places). The vestibular nuclei integrate vestibular, visual, and somatosensory signals, along with a proposed copy of the voluntary motor command and signals from other central structures. The relationship between the canals and the otoliths gives rise to symmetries among neurons, in the organization among the several vestibular nuclei, and in the projections from the vestibular nuclei. These symmetries organize the space of body movements so that functional relationships are maintained in spite of the many free variables of body movement. They also provide a foundation for adaptive reinterpretation of the relationship between canal and otolith signals, for example in freefall.

  12. Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Diagnostic testing of the vestibular system is an essential component of treating patients with balance dysfunction. Until recently, testing methods primarily evaluated the integrity of the horizontal semicircular canal, which is only a portion of the vestibular system. Recent advances in technology have afforded clinicians the ability to assess otolith function through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. VEMP testing from the inferior extraocular muscles of the eye has been the subject of interest of recent research. Objective To summarize recent developments in ocular VEMP testing. Results Recent studies suggest that the ocular VEMP is produced by otolith afferents in the superior division of the vestibular nerve. The ocular VEMP is a short latency potential, composed of extraocular myogenic responses activated by sound stimulation and registered by surface electromyography via ipsilateral otolithic and contralateral extraocular muscle activation. The inferior oblique muscle is the most superficial of the six extraocular muscles responsible for eye movement. Therefore, measurement of ocular VEMPs can be performed easily by using surface electrodes on the skin below the eyes contralateral to the stimulated side. Conclusion This new variation of the VEMP procedure may supplement conventional testing in difficult to test populations. It may also be possible to use this technique to evaluate previously inaccessible information on the vestibular system.

  13. Cloning and expression of vacuolar proton-pumping ATPase subunits in the follicular epithelium of the bullfrog endolymphatic sac

    OpenAIRE

    Yajima, Shinya; Kubota, Makoto; Nakakura, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takahiro; Katagiri, Nobuto; Tomura, Hideaki; Sasayama, Yuichi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tanaka, Shigeyasu

    2007-01-01

    In an investigation aimed at clarifying the mechanism of crystal dissolution of the calcium carbonate lattice in otoconia (the mineral particles embedded in the otolithic membrane) of the endolymphatic sac (ELS) of the bullfrog, cDNAs encoding the A- and E-subunits of bullfrog vacuolar proton-pumping ATPase (V-ATPase) were cloned and sequenced. The cDNA of the A-subunit consisted of an 11-bp 5′-untranslated region (UTR), a 1,854-bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein comprising 617 am...

  14. Otolithic organ function in patients with profound sensorineural hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujuan Zhou; Yongzhen Wu; Jing Wang

    2016-01-01

    Profound sensorineural hearing loss (PSHL) is not uncommonly encountered in otology. In clinics, there is a high incidence of otolithic damage in patients with PSHL, but relevant reports are few. Sharing a continuous membranous structure and similar receptor cell ultrastructures, the cochlea and vestibule may be susceptible to the same harmful factors. Disorders of the inner ear may result in a variety of manifestations, including vertigo, spatial disorientation, blurred vision, impaired articulation, and hearing impairment. Considering the diversity of clinical symptoms associated with PSHL with otolithic dysfunction, it may be frequently misdiagnosed, and objective means of testing the function of otolithic organs should be recommended for hearing-impaired patients. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) via air-conducted sound are of great importance for the diagnosis of otolithic function. Hearing devices such as cochlear implants are commonly accepted treatments for PSHL, and early identification and treatment of vestibular disorders may increase the success rate of cochlear implantation. Therefore, it is necessary to increase awareness of otolithic functional states in patients with PSHL.

  15. Thyroid hormone-responsive genes mediate otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K; Schreiber, A M

    2011-01-01

    Flatfish begin life as up-right swimming, bilaterally symmetrical larvae that metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles that swim with a highly lateralized posture. We have previously shown that TH induces abrupt growth and mineralization of one component of the vestibular system, the otoliths, during early larval development and metamorphosis. Here we report that four of five vestibular-specific genes that we tested (alpha-tectorin, otogelin, otolith matrix protein, and otopetrins 1 and 2 that are known to be associated with otolith development in other vertebrates are up-regulated 1.5- to 7-fold in larval flatfish during spontaneous metamorphosis and/or following 72 h of TH treatment. These findings suggest that otolith growth and development are mediated by diverse TH-responsive genes during flatfish metamorphosis.

  16. Neuronal feedback between brain and inner ear for growth of otoliths in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, R. H.; Edelmann, E.; Rahmann, H.

    Previous investigations revealed that fish inner ear otolith growth (concerning otolith size and calcium-incorporation) depends on the amplitude and the direction of gravity, suggesting the existence of a (negative) feedback mechanism. In search for the regulating unit, the vestibular nerve was unilaterally transected in neonate swordtail fish ( Xiphophorus helleri) which were subsequently incubated in the calcium-tracer alizarin-complexone. Calcium incorporation ceased on the transected head sides, indicating that calcium uptake is neurally regulated.

  17. Bottomfish Otolith Archive

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ryan Nichols (FBSAB LHP) collected this data set and it contains information on fish otoliths collected from previous research cruises and stored in Aiea Research...

  18. VESTIBULAR REHABILITATION

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    Maksim Valer'evich Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular disorders are a frequent abnormality that physicians of various specialties have to encounter. Vestibular and equilibrium disorders are particularly common in elderly patients. In this case they are frequently a cause of falls and various injuries. Vestibular rehabilitation is the most important component of treatment for vestibular and equilibrium disorders. The paper considers the basic mechanisms of vestibular compensation, discusses vestibular rehabilitation procedures by doing routine exercises and by using various biofeedback crunches. In particular, it describes the principle of operation of a posturography platform, a SwayStar system for the diagnosis and therapy of vestibular disorders, and a Brainport device for vestibular rehabilitation. The current methods for drug stimulation of vestibular compensation are discussed. Vestibular rehabilitation used in the complex therapy of equilibrium disorders is stressed to considerably enhance therapeutic effectiveness, to cause a reduction in the risk of falls, and to increase quality of life in patients with vestibular disorders

  19. Otolith and Vertical Canal Contributions to Dynamic Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. Owen

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine: 1) how do normal subjects adjust postural movements in response to changing or altered otolith input, for example, due to aging? and 2) how do patients adapt postural control after altered unilateral or bilateral vestibular sensory inputs such as ablative inner ear surgery or ototoxicity, respectively? The following hypotheses are under investigation: 1) selective alteration of otolith input or abnormalities of otolith receptor function will result in distinctive spatial, frequency, and temporal patterns of head movements and body postural sway dynamics. 2) subjects with reduced, altered, or absent vertical semicircular canal receptor sensitivity but normal otolith receptor function or vice versa, should show predictable alterations of body and head movement strategies essential for the control of postural sway and movement. The effect of altered postural movement control upon compensation and/or adaptation will be determined. These experiments provide data for the development of computational models of postural control in normals, vestibular deficient subjects and normal humans exposed to unusual force environments, including orbital space flight.

  20. A study in motion sickness - Saccular hair cells in the adult bullfrog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, G. M.; Reschke, M.; Homick, J.

    1982-01-01

    The bullfrog's saccule were examined using light and scanning electron microscopy. No evidence of a striola was found. Type A hair cells were not only distributed peripherally, but also throughout the central macula, though far less frequently than the dominant type D. Two primary hair cell types were distinguished, which corresponded to the ciliary patterns: type A cilia are associated with short, conical hair cells, and type D cilia are associated with long, cylindrical hair cells. Each displays at least one subtype, which may represent developmental precursors. The otolithic membrane is crisscrossed with tunnels and topped with statoconia.

  1. Vestibular migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lempert, Thomas; Olesen, Jes; Furman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine, jointly formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society and the Migraine Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society (IHS). The classification includes vestibular...... migraine and probable vestibular migraine. Vestibular migraine will appear in an appendix of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) as a first step for new entities, in accordance with the usual IHS procedures. Probable vestibular migraine may be included...... in a later version of the ICHD, when further evidence has been accumulated. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine is based on recurrent vestibular symptoms, a history of migraine, a temporal association between vestibular symptoms and migraine symptoms and exclusion of other causes of vestibular symptoms...

  2. Plasticity of the human otolith-ocular reflex

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    Wall, C. 3rd; Smith, T. R.; Furman, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    The eye movement response to earth vertical axis rotation in the dark, a semicircular canal stimulus, can be altered by prior exposure to combined visual-vestibular stimuli. Such plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex has not been described for earth horizontal axis rotation, a dynamic otolith stimulus. Twenty normal human subjects underwent one of two types of adaptation paradigms designed either to attenuate or enhance the gain of the semicircular canal-ocular reflex prior to undergoing otolith-ocular reflex testing with horizontal axis rotation. The adaptation paradigm paired a 0.2 Hz sinusoidal rotation about a vertical axis with a 0.2 Hz optokinetic stripe pattern that was deliberately mismatched in peak velocity. Pre- and post-adaptation horizontal axis rotations were at 60 degrees/s in the dark and produced a modulation in the slow component velocity of nystagmus having a frequency of 0.17 Hz due to putative stimulation of the otolith organs. Results showed that the magnitude of this modulation component response was altered in a manner similar to the alteration in semicircular canal-ocular responses. These results suggest that physiologic alteration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex using deliberately mismatched visual and semicircular canal stimuli induces changes in both canal-ocular and otolith-ocular responses. We postulate, therefore, that central nervous system pathways responsible for controlling the gains of canal-ocular and otolith-ocular reflexes are shared.

  3. Thyroid hormone mediates otolith growth and development during flatfish metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, A M; Wang, X; Tan, Y; Sievers, Q; Sievers, B; Lee, M; Burrall, K

    2010-11-01

    Flatfish begin life as bilaterally symmetrical larvae that swim up-right, then abruptly metamorphose into asymmetrically shaped juveniles with lateralized swimming postures. Flatfish metamorphosis is mediated entirely by thyroid hormone (TH). Changes in flatfish swim posture are thought to be regulated via vestibular remodeling, although the influence of TH on teleost inner ear development remains unclear. This study addresses the role of TH on the development of the three otolith end-organs (sacculus, utricle, and lagena) during southern flounder (Paralichthys lethostigma) metamorphosis. Compared with pre-metamorphosis, growth rates of the sacculus and utricle otoliths increase dramatically during metamorphosis in a manner that is uncoupled from general somatic growth. Treatment of P. lethostigma larvae with methimazol (a pharmacological inhibitor of endogenous TH production) inhibits growth of the sacculus and utricle, whereas treatment with TH dramatically accelerates their growth. In contrast with the sacculus and utricle otoliths that begin to form and mineralize during embryogenesis, a non-mineralized lagena otolith is first visible 10-12 days after hatching. The lagena grows during pre- and pro-metamorphosis, then abruptly mineralizes during metamorphic climax. Mineralization of the lagena, but not growth, can be induced with TH treatment, whereas treatment with methimazol completely inhibits lagena mineralization without inhibiting its growth. These findings suggest that during southern flounder metamorphosis TH exerts differential effects on growth and development among the three types of otolith.

  4. Perspectives for the comprehensive examination of semicircular canal and otolith function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A H

    2001-12-01

    A review is presented on the three-dimensional aspects of the vestibulo-oculomotor system and the current functional tests for unilateral examination of the individual receptors in the vestibular labyrinth. In the presentation, attention is directed towards the recently developed vestibular tests, which promise a more comprehensive examination of labyrinth function. More explicitly, unilateral tests for the utricle, saccule and the individual semicircular canals are discussed. Caloric irrigation and rotatory testing are widely used as tests for the integrity of the (horizontal) semicircular canals. Little useful diagnosis is made however on the vertical canals, not to mention the otolith organs. A promising approach to the examination of individual semicircular canal function has been described. This involves the perception of self-rotation in each of the planes of the semicircular canals. The patient/subject is rotated by an arbitrary amount on a standard Barany chair and then required to return the chair to its original position, by joystick control of the chair velocity. In order to test the vertical canals, the head of the subject/patient is positioned so that the plane of each canal lies in the plane of rotation. A promising unilateral test of saccular function involves the use of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Here it has been demonstrated that the saccules can be activated using brief, high-intensity acoustic clicks. The myogenic potential is measured using surface electrodes over the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Initial data from patients has indicated that the test is specific for unilateral saccule disorders. The unilateral test of utricle function is based on the eccentric displacement profile. Thus, eccentric displacement of the head to 3.5 cm during constant velocity rotation about the earth-vertical axis generates an adequate unilateral stimulation of the otolith organ, without involving the semicircular canals. This paradigm has also proved

  5. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 and 2. Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease. Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely.In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine. In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve. In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers. In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of the

  6. Structural and Functional Organization of the Vestibular Apparatus in Rats Subjected to Weightlessness for 19.5 Days Aboard the Kosmos-782 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnikov, Y. A.; Gazenko, O. G.; Titova, L. K.; Bronshteyn, A. A.; Govardovskiy, V. I.; Pevzner, R. A.; Gribakin, G. G.; Aronova, M. Z.; Kharkeyevich, T. A.; Tsirulis, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    The vestibular apparatus was investigated in rats subjected to weightlessness for 19.5 days. The vestibular apparatus was removed and its sections were fixed in a glutaraldehyde solution for investigation by light and electron microscopes. Structural and functional charges were noted in the otolith portions of the ear, with the otolith particles clinging to the utricular receptor surface and with the peripheral arrangement of the nucleolus in the nuclei of the receptor cells. It is possible that increased edema of the vestibular tissue resulted in the destruction of some receptor cells and in changes in the form and structure of the otolith. In the horizontal crista, the capula was separated.

  7. The vestibular system of the owl

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    Money, K. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Five owls were given vestibular examinations, and two of them were sacrificed to provide serial histological sections of the temporal bones. The owls exhibited a curious variability in the postrotatory head nystagmus following abrupt deceleration; sometimes a brisk nystagnus with direction opposite to that appropriate to the stimulus would occur promptly after deceleration. It was found also that owls can exhibit a remarkable head stability during angular movement of the body about any axis passing through the skull. The vestibular apparatus in the owl is larger than in man, and a prominent crista neglecta is present. The tectorial membrane, the cupula, and the otolithic membranes of the utricle, saccule, and lagena are all attached to surfaces in addition to the surfaces hearing hair cells. These attachments are very substantial in the utricular otolithic membrane and in the cupula.

  8. Rizatriptan reduces vestibular-induced motion sickness in migraineurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Joseph M; Marcus, Dawn A; Balaban, Carey D

    2011-02-01

    A previous pilot study suggested that rizatriptan reduces motion sickness induced by complex vestibular stimulation. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study we measured motion sickness in response to a complex vestibular stimulus following pretreatment with either rizatriptan or a placebo. Subjects included 25 migraineurs with or without migraine-related dizziness (23 females) aged 21-45 years (31.0 ± 7.8 years). Motion sickness was induced by off-vertical axis rotation in darkness, which stimulates both the semicircular canals and otolith organs of the vestibular apparatus. Results indicated that of the 15 subjects who experienced vestibular-induced motion sickness when pretreated with placebo, 13 showed a decrease in motion sickness following pretreatment with rizatriptan as compared to pretreatment with placebo (P rizatriptan, reduces vestibular-induced motion sickness by influencing serotonergic vestibular-autonomic projections.

  9. VESTIBULAR VERTIGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M V Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors consider the cardinal causes of vestibular vertigo, a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuroni-tis, vestibular migraine, cerebrovascular diseases. It gives brief data on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of these diseases. The diagnosis of the latter is largely based on a patientKhs complaints and medical history data and frequently requires no additional instrumental study. The currently available treatments for various diseases manifesting as vestibular vertigo are analyzed. Vestibular exercises and rehabilitation maneuvers that are effective in benign positional vertigo are noted to play an important role. In addition, methods for drug stimulation of vestibular compensation in central and peripheral vestibulopathies are described.

  10. VESTIBULAR VERTIGO

    OpenAIRE

    M V Zamergrad

    2009-01-01

    The authors consider the cardinal causes of vestibular vertigo, a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuroni-tis, vestibular migraine, cerebrovascular diseases. It gives brief data on the etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and treatment of these diseases. The diagnosis of the latter is largely based on a patientKhs complaints and medical history data and frequently requires no additional instrumental study. The currently available treatments for ...

  11. Conboy Lake - Bullfrog and Bullhead Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal is to support two AmeriCorps interns for 24 weeks to work on removal of American bullfrogs and brown bullhead to benefit Oregon spotted frogs, a...

  12. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  13. North American sturgeon otolith morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Dittman, Dawn E.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate expedient species identification of deceased sturgeon (Acipenseridae) when external physical characteristic analysis is inconclusive has become a high priority due to the endangered or threatened status of sturgeon species around the world. Examination of otoliths has provided useful information to aid in population management, age and size-class analysis, understanding predator–prey interactions, and archeological research in other fish species. The relationship between otolith characteristics and sturgeon species has remained unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the shape of otoliths from the eight species of sturgeon found in North America to test the utility of otolith characteristic morphology in species identification. There were distinct differences in the size and shape of the otoliths between species of sturgeon with little shape variation among individuals of the same species. The relationship between otolith length axes was linear, and most of the variability was explained by a Log (axis + 1) transformation of the x and y axes (r2 = 0.8983) using the equation y = 0.73x + 0.0612. Images of otoliths from all eight North American species are presented to assist in the identification process.

  14. Suppressing bullfrog larvae with carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jackson A.; Ray, Andrew; Sepulveda, Adam J.; Watten, Barnaby J.; Densmore, Christine L.; Layhee, Megan J.; Mark Abbey-Lambert,; ,

    2014-01-01

    Current management strategies for the control and suppression of the American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus = Rana catesbeiana Shaw) and other invasive amphibians have had minimal effect on their abundance and distribution. This study evaluates the effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) on pre- and prometamorphic Bullfrog larvae. Bullfrogs are a model organism for evaluating potential suppression agents because they are a successful invader worldwide. From experimental trials we estimated that the 24-h 50% and 99% lethal concentration (LC50 and LC99) values for Bullfrog larvae were 371 and 549 mg CO2/L, respectively. Overall, larvae that succumbed to experimental conditions had a lower body condition index than those that survived. We also documented sublethal changes in blood chemistry during prolonged exposure to elevated CO2. Specifically, blood pH decreased by more than 0.5 pH units after 9 h of exposure and both blood partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and blood glucose increased. These findings suggest that CO2 treatments can be lethal to Bullfrog larvae under controlled laboratory conditions. We believe this work represents the necessary foundation for further consideration of CO2 as a potential suppression agent for one of the most harmful invaders to freshwater ecosystems.

  15. Stuttering: A novel bullfrog vocalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrea; Suggs, Dianne

    2004-05-01

    The advertisement call of male bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) consists of a series of individual croaks, each of which contains multiple harmonics with a missing or attenuated fundamental frequency of approximately 100 Hz. The envelope of individual croaks has typically been represented in the literature as smooth and unmodulated. From an analysis of 5251 advertisement calls from 17 different choruses over two mating seasons, we show that males add an extra modulation (around 4 Hz) to the envelope of individual croaks, following specific rules. We term these extra modulations stutters. Neither single croak calls nor the first croak in multiple croak calls contains stutters. When stuttering begins, it does so with a croak containing a single stutter, and the number of stutters increases linearly (plus or minus 1 stutter, up to 4 stutters) with the number of croaks. This pattern is stable across individual males (N=10). Playback experiments reveal that vocal responses to stuttered and nonstuttered calls vary with proximity to the stimulus. Close males respond with nonstuttered calls, while far males respond with stuttered calls. The data suggest that nonstuttered calls are used for aggressive or territorial purposes, while stuttered calls are used to attract females.

  16. BULLFROG HEMOGRAM UNDER MANAGEMENT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Coelho Teixeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Stress is one of the major obstacles in frog culture and can be caused by factors such as inappropriate farming systems; inadequate management among other situations. The objective of the present study was to assess the hemogram, erythrogram and leukogram of bullfrogs (L. catesbeianus when exposed to stress caused by different types of management: density and handling (manipulation, developed in the laboratory and repeated in the field for the appropriate comparisons in a experimental period of 30 days. The density experiment was conducted with four treatments: 70 animals m-2 (D70; 100 animals m-2 (D100, Control; 150 animals m-2 (D150 and 200 animals m-2 (D200, with 10, 14, 21 and 28 animals/box in the laboratory, respectively. Each treatment was performed with three simultaneous replicates. The handling experiment was conducted with three treatments: Treatment Without Handling (WH; Treatment with Partial Handling (PH every 15 days and Treatment with Total Handling (TH every 15 days. Each treatment was performed with four simultaneous replications. The methodology of the blood analysis followed international recommendations. In the present study we could observe that the animals of the field experiment did not reflect the same stress response observed in the laboratory in both experiment, which demonstrated the plasticity of these animals.

  17. Vestibular schowanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massoume Rouzbahani

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular Schowanoma is one of the most common Intracranial Tumors which has elicited from the Schwann cells in the upper part of vestibular branch of 8th nerve and can affect the cochlear branch too. This benign capsulated tumor  is mostly unilateral. Schowanoma is relatively slow growing. In the current article we have presented the case of a 51 year-old woman complaining Right ear Tinnitus accompanying with numbness of the right side of the face without any sign of vertigo or imbalance. MRI and Auditory Brain stem Responses (ABR studies demonstrated right side vestibular Schowanoma next to cerebellopontine Angle (CPA. The audiological and imaging findings have been brought here in details.

  18. Quantification of vestibular-induced eye movements in zebrafish larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Weike

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular reflexes coordinate movements or sensory input with changes in body or head position. Vestibular-evoked responses that involve the extraocular muscles include the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR, a compensatory eye movement to stabilize retinal images. Although an angular VOR attributable to semicircular canal stimulation was reported to be absent in free-swimming zebrafish larvae, recent studies reveal that vestibular-induced eye movements can be evoked in zebrafish larvae by both static tilts and dynamic rotations that tilt the head with respect to gravity. Results We have determined herein the basis of sensitivity of the larval eye movements with respect to vestibular stimulus, developmental stage, and sensory receptors of the inner ear. For our experiments, video recordings of larvae rotated sinusoidally at 0.25 Hz were analyzed to quantitate eye movements under infrared illumination. We observed a robust response that appeared as early as 72 hours post fertilization (hpf, which increased in amplitude over time. Unlike rotation about an earth horizontal axis, rotation about an earth vertical axis at 0.25 Hz did not evoke eye movements. Moreover, vestibular-induced responses were absent in mutant cdh23 larvae and larvae lacking anterior otoliths. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for a functional vestibulo-oculomotor circuit in 72 hpf zebrafish larvae that relies upon sensory input from anterior/utricular otolith organs.

  19. DARA vestibular equipment onboard MIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, P; Kellig, A; Hoffmann, H U; Ruyters, G

    1998-01-01

    In space, the weightless environment provides a different stimulus to the otolith organs of the vestibular system, and the resulting signals no longer correspond with the visual and other sensory signals sent to the brain. This signal conflict causes disorientation. To study this and also to understand the vestibular adaptation to weightlessness, DARA has developed scientific equipment for vestibular and visuo-oculomotoric investigations. Especially, two video-oculography systems (monocular--VOG--and binocular--BIVOG, respectively) as well as stimuli such as an optokinetic stimulation device have successfully been employed onboard MIR in the frame of national and European missions since 1992. The monocular VOG was used by Klaus Flade during the MIR '92 mission, by Victor Polyakov during his record 15 months stay onboard MIR in 1993/94 as well as by Ulf Merbold during EUROMIR '94. The binocular version was used by Thomas Reiter and Sergej Avdeyev during the 6 months EUROMIR '95 mission. PIs of the various experiments include H. Scherer and A. Clarke (FU Berlin), M. Dieterichs and S. Krafczyk (LMU Munchen) from Germany as well as C.H. Markham and S.G. Diamond from the United States. Video-Oculography (VOG) is a technique for examining the function of the human balance system located in the inner ear (vestibular system) and the visio-oculomotor interactions of the vestibular organ. The human eye movements are measured, recorded and evaluated by state-of-the-art video techniques. The method was first conceived and designed at the Vestibular Research Laboratory of the ENT Clinic in Steglitz, FU Berlin (A. Clarke, H. Scherer). Kayser-Threde developed, manufactured and tested the facilities for space application under contract to DARA. Evaluation software was first provided by the ENT Clinic, Berlin, later by our subcontractor Sensomotoric Instruments (SMI), Teltow. Optokinetic hardware to support visuo-oculomotoric investigations, has been shipped to MIR for EUROMIR '95

  20. Invasion of American bullfrogs along the Yellowstone River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Adam; Layhee, Megan J.; Stagliano, Dave; Chaffin, Jake; Begley, Allison; Maxell, Bryce A.

    2015-01-01

    The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) is a globally distributed invasive species that was introduced to the Yellowstone River floodplain of Montana. Knowledge about floodplain habitat features that allow for bullfrog persistence and spread will help identify effective control strategies. We used field surveys in 2010, 2012 and 2013 to describe bullfrog spread in the Yellowstone River floodplain and the habitat features that are associated with bullfrog occupancy and colonization. Bullfrogs in our study area expanded from ~ 60 km in 2010 to 106 km in 2013, and are spreading to up- and downstream habitats. The number of breeding sites (i.e., presence of bullfrog eggs or larvae) increased from 12 sites in 2010 to 45 sites in 2013. We found that bullfrogs were associated with deeper waters, emergent vegetation and public-access sites, which are habitat features that characterize permanent waters and describe human-mediated introductions. Control strategies that reduce the hydroperiod of breeding sites may help to limit bullfrog persistence and spread, while an increase in public outreach and education may help prevent further bullfrog introductions at public-access sites.

  1. Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Public / Hearing and Balance Balance (or Vestibular) Rehabilitation Audiologic (hearing), balance, and medical diagnostic tests help ... whether you are a candidate for vestibular (balance) rehabilitation. Vestibular rehabilitation is an individualized balance retraining exercise ...

  2. Vestibular animal models: contributions to understanding physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Hans; Zwergal, Andreas; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge of the vestibular sensory system, its functional significance for gaze and posture stabilization, and its capability to ensure accurate spatial orientation perception and spatial navigation has greatly benefitted from experimental approaches using a variety of vertebrate species. This review summarizes the attempts to establish the roles of semicircular canal and otolith endorgans in these functions followed by an overview of the most relevant fields of vestibular research including major findings that have advanced our understanding of how this system exerts its influence on reflexive and cognitive challenges encountered during daily life. In particular, we highlight the contributions of different animal models and the advantage of using a comparative research approach. Cross-species comparisons have established that the morpho-physiological properties underlying vestibular signal processing are evolutionarily inherent, thereby disclosing general principles. Based on the documented success of this approach, we suggest that future research employing a balanced spectrum of standard animal models such as fish/frog, mouse and primate will optimize our progress in understanding vestibular processing in health and disease. Moreover, we propose that this should be further supplemented by research employing more "exotic" species that offer unique experimental access and/or have specific vestibular adaptations due to unusual locomotor capabilities or lifestyles. Taken together this strategy will expedite our understanding of the basic principles underlying vestibular computations to reveal relevant translational aspects. Accordingly, studies employing animal models are indispensible and even mandatory for the development of new treatments, medication and technical aids (implants) for patients with vestibular pathologies.

  3. Interaural difference values of vestibular evoked myogenic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziyeh Moallemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine is a neurologic disease, which often is associated with a unilateral headache. Vestibular abnormalities are common in migraine. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs assess otolith function in particular functional integrity of the saccule and the inferior vestibular nerve. We used VEMP to evaluate if the migraine headache can affect VEMP asymmetry parameters. A total of 25 patients with migraine (22 females and 3 males who were diagnosed according to the criteria of IHS-1988 were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Control group consisted of 26 healthy participants (18 female and 8 male, without neurotological symptoms and history of migraine. The short tone burst (95 dB nHL, 500 Hz was presented to ears. VEMP was recorded with surface electromyography over the contracted ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid (SCM muscle. Although current results showed that the amplitude ratio is greater in migraine patients than normal group, there was no statistical difference between two groups in mean asymmetry parameters of VEMP. Asymmetry measurements in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials probably are not indicators of unilateral deficient in saccular pathways of migraine patients.

  4. RECORDING OF VESTIBULAR EVOKED MYOGENIC POTENTIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sazgar

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown recently that loud clicks evoke myogenic potentials in the tonically contracting sternocleidomastoid muscles. Studies have suggested that these potentials are of vestibular origin, especially of the saccule and inferior vestibular nerve. A pilot study was undertaken in our hospital to record vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP for the first time in Iran. Eighteen healthy volunteers (32 ears without history of otologic or vestibular disorders were subjected to the VEMP test. Twenty-one patients (26 ears with unilateral (6 patients and bilateral (5 patients high frequency sensorineural hearing loss with unknown etiology, acoustic neuroma (1 patient, Meniere’s disease (4 patients and unilateral low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint (5 patients were also enrolled in this study. VEMP response to clicks was obtained from 84.4% of ears of healthy subjects. These subjects demonstrated short latency waves to click stimuli during tonic neck flexor activation. Mean latencies of first positive (p13 and first negative (n23 potentials in healthy subjects were 12.45 ± 1.9 ms and 20.8 ± 3.5 ms, respectively. Median latencies of these two potentials were 12.1 and 19.3 ms, respectively. We could record VEMP in 5 patients with unilateral and all patients with high and low frequency sensorineural hearing loss without vestibular complaint. In the patient with acoustic neuroma VEMP was absent on the affected side. This technique may offer a new method to evaluate otolith and sacculocollic pathways in human.

  5. Frog community responses to recent American bullfrog invasions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiming LI; Zhunwei KE; Yihua WANG; Tim M. BLACKBURN

    2011-01-01

    Native species may decline quickly when confronted with an exotic species to which they are not adapted. The extent of decline may depend on the abundance of an invader and the length of time since it first arrived in the community (residence time), and the interaction between these two variables. We tested these effects using data on the effects of American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus invasion on native frog communities in 65 permanent lentic waters on islands in the Zhoushan Archipelago, China. We examined variation in native frog abundance and species richness in relation to features of the American bullfrog invasion, habitat disturbance, characteristics of the water body and fish communities and the presence of red swamp crayfish.Bullfrog invaded sites had lower native frog density and species richness, higher submerged vegetation cover and greater frequency of repairs to the water body than did non-invaded sites. The minimum adequate general linear mixed models showed that both native frog density and species richness were negatively related to post-metamorphosis bullfrog density, and that native frog species richness was also positively related to the vegetation cover. There was no effect on either native frog density or species richness of residence time or its interaction with bullfrog density, or of the abundance of bullfrog tadpoles. The results suggested that post-metamorphosis bullfrogs had impacts on native frog communities in the islands, and that the extents of these impacts are proportional to post-metamorphosis bullfrog density.

  6. A New Kind of Biomaterials-Bullfrog Skin Collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He LI; Bai Ling LIU; Hua Lin CHEN; Li Zhen GAO

    2003-01-01

    Pepsin-soluble collagen was prepared from bullfrog skin and partially characterized. This study revealed interesting differences, such as molecular weight, amino acid composition, denaturation temperature (Td), in the frog skin collagen when compared to the known vertebrate collagens. This study gives hints that bullfrog skin can be a potential, safe alternative source of collagen from cattle for use in various fields.

  7. Hearing capacities and otolith size in two ophidiiform species (Ophidion rochei and Carapus acus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kéver, Loïc; Colleye, Orphal; Herrel, Anthony; Romans, Pascal; Parmentier, Eric

    2014-07-15

    Numerous studies have highlighted the diversity of fish inner ear morphology. However, the function of the shape, size and orientation of the different structures remains poorly understood. The saccule (otolithic endorgan) is considered to be the principal hearing organ in fishes and it has been hypothesized that sagitta (saccular otolith) shape and size affect hearing capacities: large sagittae are thought to increase sensitivity. The sagittae of many ophidiids and carapids occupy a large volume inside the neurocranium. Hence they are a good structure with which to test the size hypothesis. The main aim of this study was to investigate hearing capacities and inner ear morphology in two ophidiiform species: Ophidion rochei and Carapus acus. We used a multidisciplinary approach that combines dissections, μCT-scan examinations and auditory evoked potential techniques. Carapus acus and O. rochei sagittae have similar maximal diameters; both species have larger otoliths than many non-ophidiiform species, especially compared with the intra-neurocranium volume. Both species are sensitive to sounds up to 2100 Hz. Relative to the skull, O. rochei has smaller sagittae than the carapid, but better hearing capacities from 300 to 900 Hz and similar sensitivities at 150 Hz and from 1200 to 2100 Hz. Results show that hearing capacities of a fish species cannot be predicted only based on sagitta size. Larger otoliths (in size relative to the skull) may have evolved mainly for performing vestibular functions in fishes, especially those species that need to execute precise and complex movements.

  8. Restricted fish feeding reduces cod otolith opacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høie, H.; Folkvord, A.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to examine the effect of reduced feeding and constant temperature on cod otolith opacity. Three groups of juvenile cod were given restricted food rations at different times for 4 months, resulting in depressed somatic growth. Otolith opacity was measured on pictures...... in otolith opacity were found between individual fish both within groups and between groups. In two of the three groups significantly more translucent otolith material was deposited in response to reduced feeding. Our results show that variations in feeding and hence fish growth resulted in variation...

  9. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  10. Implantes vestibulares

    OpenAIRE

    Aedo Sánchez,Cristian; Délano Reyes,Paul H

    2013-01-01

    La lesión o hipofunción vestibular bilateral (HVB) es un cuadro clínico que provoca oscilopsias y desequilibrio incapacitante que se agrava en oscuridad. Algunas de las causas de HVB son el uso de drogas ototóxicas, enfermedad de Ménière bilateral, enfermedades autoinmunes y degeneración espinocerebelar. El manejo de esta discapacidad es complejo y muchas veces la rehabilitación no logra los objetivos deseados. Una de las alternativas terapéuticas futuras para la HVB y aún en plena fase exper...

  11. [Vestibular migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lars Juul; Kirchmann, Malene; Friis, Morten

    2015-12-14

    Dizziness caused by migraine, vestibular migraine (VM), has been highly debated over the last three decades. The co-morbidity of migraine and dizziness is higher than a random concurrence. One third of the patients with migraine and dizziness have VM. Recently, The International Headache Society approved VM as a diagnostic entity and the diagnostic criteria for VM appear in the appendix for The International Classification of Headache Disorders. VM is common but often underdiagnosed. Treatment follows migraine management guidelines although evidence is sparse.

  12. The effects of aging on clinical vestibular evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime eMaheu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Balance disorders are common issues for aging populations due to the effects of normal aging on peripheral vestibular structures. These changes affect the results of vestibular function evaluations and make the interpretation of these results more difficult. The objective of this article is to review the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant vestibular measures. We will first focus on otolith function assessment methods cVEMP and oVEMP, then the caloric and vHIT methods for semi-circular canals assessment. cVEMP and oVEMP are useful methods, though research on the effects of age for some parameters are still inconclusive. vHIT results are largely independent of age as compared to caloric stimulation and should therefore be preferred for the evaluation of the semi-circular canals function.

  13. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...... are associated with distinctive disease of the peripheral vestibular tissue structures, suggesting anterograde degeneration and that dizziness in these patients may be caused by deficient peripheral vestibular nerve fibers, neurons, and end organs. In smaller tumors, a highly localized disease occurs, which...

  14. Unilateral otolith centrifugation by head tilt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, S.M.; Bos, J.E.; Klis, S.F.L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To test for otolith asymmetries, several studies described horizontal translation of the body and head en bloc during fast vertical axis rotation. This stimulus causes one otolithic organ to rotate on-axis, and the other to experience centripetal acceleration. OBJECTIVE: To test a new, m

  15. Rehabilitation in vestibular system diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valeryevich Zamergrad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular rehabilitation is an important component of combination treatment in a patient with vertigo. Vestibular rehabilitation is indicated for different diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The goal of vestibular rehabilitation is to ensure gaze stabilization, to train postural stability, and to reduce subjective vertigo. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on the stimulation of vestibular adaptation, sensory substitution, and habituation. Vestibular suppressants, inadequate mobility, anxiety, and depression decelerate vestibular compensation whereas early activation, mobility, and betaserc use accelerate it.

  16. [Structural and functional organization of the vestibular apparatus in rats maintained under weightless conditions for 19.5 days aboard the satellite "Cosmos-782"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnikov, Ia A; Gazenko, O G; Titova, L K; Bronshteĭn, A A; Govardovskiĭ, V I

    1978-01-01

    Vestibular apparatus was investigated in rats subjected to weightlessness for 19.5 days in the satelite "Cosmos-782" and experienced acceleration on launching and landing. Some structural and functional changes were noted. They were seen in otolith clinging to the utricular receptor surface and in the peripheral arrangement of the nucleolus in the nuclei of the receptor cells. It is also possible that increased edema of the vestibular tissue resulted in destruction of some receptor cells, and within the otolith--changes in the form and structure of otoconia. In the horizontal crista the cupula was separated.

  17. [Otolith microchemistry of tuna species: research progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guo-ping

    2011-08-01

    Microchemistry analysis of trace elements and isotopes in fishes' calcified substances is an emerging approach to analyze the population structure, life history, and migration environmental history of fishes. With the increasing improvement of the researches and applications of otolith microchemistry, this approach has been a good tool for studying the ecology of tuna species. Currently, the research contents of tuna species' otolith microchemistry mainly include trace elements and isotopes, and the former is the emphasis and hotspot in applied research, playing a vital role in the researches of population partitioning, natal origin, migration environmental history, and life history of tuna species, especially bluefin tuna. However, most of the researches are focusing on the variation of otolith's Sr/Ca ratio, and there is no final conclusion on the relationships between the fractionation of isotopes C and O in otolith and the temperature. For the sake of exploiting the huge value of otolith microchemistry, it would be necessary to strengthen the researches on the deposition mechanisms of trace elements in otolith, and to analyze the spatio-temporal variations of various trace elements in otolith by comprehensive research methods.

  18. Electrical vestibular stimulation after vestibular deafferentation and in vestibular schwannoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Tin Aw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vestibular reflexes, evoked by human electrical (galvanic vestibular stimulation (EVS, are utilized to assess vestibular function and investigate its pathways. Our study aimed to investigate the electrically-evoked vestibulo-ocular reflex (eVOR output after bilateral and unilateral vestibular deafferentations to determine the characteristics for interpreting unilateral lesions such as vestibular schwannomas. METHODS: EVOR was recorded with dual-search coils as binocular three-dimensional eye movements evoked by bipolar 100 ms-step at EVS intensities of [0.9, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0] mA and unipolar 100 ms-step at 5 mA EVS intensity. Five bilateral vestibular deafferented (BVD, 12 unilateral vestibular deafferented (UVD, four unilateral vestibular schwannoma (UVS patients and 17 healthy subjects were tested with bipolar EVS, and five UVDs with unipolar EVS. RESULTS: After BVD, bipolar EVS elicited no eVOR. After UVD, bipolar EVS of one functioning ear elicited bidirectional, excitatory eVOR to cathodal EVS with 9 ms latency and inhibitory eVOR to anodal EVS, opposite in direction, at half the amplitude with 12 ms latency, exhibiting an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry. The eVOR patterns from UVS were consistent with responses from UVD confirming the vestibular loss on the lesion side. Unexpectedly, unipolar EVS of the UVD ear, instead of absent response, evoked one-third the bipolar eVOR while unipolar EVS of the functioning ear evoked half the bipolar response. CONCLUSIONS: The bidirectional eVOR evoked by bipolar EVS from UVD with an excitatory-inhibitory asymmetry and the 3 ms latency difference between normal and lesion side may be useful for detecting vestibular lesions such as UVS. We suggest that current spread could account for the small eVOR to 5 mA unipolar EVS of the UVD ear.

  19. Frog community responses to recent American bullfrog invasions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming LI, Zhunwei KE, Yihua WANG, Tim M. BLACKBURN

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Native species may decline quickly when confronted with an exotic species to which they are not adapted. The extent of decline may depend on the abundance of an invader and the length of time since it first arrived in the community (residence time, and the interaction between these two variables. We tested these effects using data on the effects of American bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus invasion on native frog communities in 65 permanent lentic waters on islands in the Zhoushan Archipelago, China. We examined variation in native frog abundance and species richness in relation to features of the American bullfrog invasion, habitat disturbance, characteristics of the water body and fish communities and the presence of red swamp crayfish. Bullfrog invaded sites had lower native frog density and species richness, higher submerged vegetation cover and greater frequency of repairs to the water body than did non-invaded sites. The minimum adequate general linear mixed models showed that both native frog density and species richness were negatively related to post-metamorphosis bullfrog density, and that native frog species richness was also positively related to the vegetation cover. There was no effect on either native frog density or species richness of residence time or its interaction with bullfrog density, or of the abundance of bullfrog tadpoles. The results suggested that post-metamorphosis bullfrogs had impacts on native frog communities in the islands, and that the extents of these impacts are proportional to post-metamorphosis bullfrog density [Current Zoology 57 (1: 83–92, 2011].

  20. Radiocarbon Values From Otoliths of Regional Bottomfishes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains bomb radiocarbon dating of opakapaka (Pristipomoides filamentosus) otoliths from recent and archival collections (1978-2008). Specimens were...

  1. Alternative method of removing otoliths from sturgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Dittman, Dawn E.

    2016-01-01

    Extracting the otoliths (ear bones) from fish that have very thick skulls can be difficult and very time consuming. The common practice of making a transverse vertical incision on the top of the skull with a hand or electrical saw may damage the otolith if not performed correctly. Sturgeons (Acipenseridae) are one family in particular that have a very large and thick skull. A new laboratory method entering the brain cavity from the ventral side of the fish to expose the otoliths was easier than other otolith extraction methods found in the literature. Methods reviewed in the literature are designed for the field and are more efficient at processing large quantities of fish quickly. However, this new technique was designed to be more suited for a laboratory setting when time is not pressing and successful extraction from each specimen is critical. The success of finding and removing otoliths using this technique is very high and does not compromise the structure in any manner. This alternative technique is applicable to other similar fish species for extracting the otoliths.

  2. Spatial Cognition, Body Representation and Affective Processes: The Role of Vestibular Information beyond Ocular Reflexes and Control of Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred W Mast

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: 1 Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths, body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals, in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. 2 Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. 3 Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are – at least in part – associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood.

  3. Spatial cognition, body representation and affective processes: the role of vestibular information beyond ocular reflexes and control of posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Fred W.; Preuss, Nora; Hartmann, Matthias; Grabherr, Luzia

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies in humans demonstrate the involvement of vestibular information in tasks that are seemingly remote from well-known functions such as space constancy or postural control. In this review article we point out three emerging streams of research highlighting the importance of vestibular input: (1) Spatial Cognition: Modulation of vestibular signals can induce specific changes in spatial cognitive tasks like mental imagery and the processing of numbers. This has been shown in studies manipulating body orientation (changing the input from the otoliths), body rotation (changing the input from the semicircular canals), in clinical findings with vestibular patients, and in studies carried out in microgravity. There is also an effect in the reverse direction; top-down processes can affect perception of vestibular stimuli. (2) Body Representation: Numerous studies demonstrate that vestibular stimulation changes the representation of body parts, and sensitivity to tactile input or pain. Thus, the vestibular system plays an integral role in multisensory coordination of body representation. (3) Affective Processes and Disorders: Studies in psychiatric patients and patients with a vestibular disorder report a high comorbidity of vestibular dysfunctions and psychiatric symptoms. Recent studies investigated the beneficial effect of vestibular stimulation on psychiatric disorders, and how vestibular input can change mood and affect. These three emerging streams of research in vestibular science are—at least in part—associated with different neuronal core mechanisms. Spatial transformations draw on parietal areas, body representation is associated with somatosensory areas, and affective processes involve insular and cingulate cortices, all of which receive vestibular input. Even though a wide range of different vestibular cortical projection areas has been ascertained, their functionality still is scarcely understood. PMID:24904327

  4. Adaptive plasticity in the otolith-ocular reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizuka, Izumi

    2003-02-01

    This review focuses on the plasticity in the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), especially in the otolith-ocular reflex (OOR). The VOR is a mechanism for the production of rapid compensatory eye movements during head movements. The VOR is under adaptive control which corrects VOR performance when visual-vestibular mismatch arises during head movements. It has been demonstrated that chronic exposure to certain visual environments, those generated by magnifying lenses and reversing prisms, alter the gain and phase of VOR in the dark in numerous species. Most experiments concerning such modification of the VOR have used semicircular canal stimulation. The VOR consists of the semicircular-ocular reflex (ScOR) and the OOR. There are few results regarding the relationship between the gain of the ScOR and the OOR. This review summarizes the studies on plasticity in the OOR. In addition, the difficulty in evaluating the OOR using current conventional methods including earth horizontal axis (EHA) rotation, off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) and linear sled, is discussed. We believe that the ScOR and the OOR share common neural pathways in such a way that a change in the synaptic efficacy of one pathway is accompanied by a change in the other.

  5. Could high salinity be used to control bullfrogs in small ponds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David L.; Finch, Colton; Blasius, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    We examined survival of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) eggs and tadpoles at 3 ppt and 6 ppt salinity in the laboratory to determine if low-level salinity could be used to eradicate bullfrogs from small ponds that contain native fishes. Bullfrog eggs and tadpoles salinity for 10 days. Bullfrog tadpoles 10–15 days old experienced significantly reduced survival when exposed to salinity of 6 ppt for 10 days. Older bullfrog tadpoles (>9 months old) appeared unaffected by 14 days of 6 ppt salinity. Salinity of 3 ppt did not impact survival of bullfrog tadpole eggs or tadpoles at any of the life stages we tested. Adding salt to ponds in the early spring to increase salinity to 6 ppt may be a cost effective way to eradicate bullfrogs from small ponds without harming native fishes.

  6. Effect of Vestibular Impairment on Cerebral Blood Flow Response to Dynamic Roll Tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrador, J. M.; Black, F. O.; Schlgel, Todd T.; Lipsitz, L. A.; Wood, S. J.

    2008-01-01

    Change to upright posture results in reductions in cerebral perfusion pressure due to hydrostatic pressure changes related to gravity. Since vestibular organs, specifically the otoliths, provide information on position relative to gravity, vestibular inputs may assist in adaptation to the upright posture. The goal of this study was to examine the effect of direct vestibular stimulation on cerebral blood flow (CBF). To examine the role of otolith inputs we screened 165 subjects for vestibular function and classified subjects as either normal or impaired based on ocular torsion. Ocular torsion, an indication of otolith function, was assessed during sinusoidal roll tilt of 20 degrees at 0.01 Hz (100 sec per cycle). Subjects with torsion one SD below the mean were classified as impaired while subjects one SD above the mean were considered normal. During one session subjects were placed in a chair that was sinusoidally rotated 25 degrees in the roll plane at five frequencies: 0.25 & 0.125 Hz for 80 sec, 0.0625 Hz for 160 sec and 0.03125 Hz and 0.015625 Hz for 320 sec. During testing, CBF (transcranial Doppler), blood pressure (Finapres), and end tidal CO2 (Puritan Bennet) were measured continuously. Ocular torsion was assessed from infrared images of the eyes. All rotations were done in the dark with subjects fixated on a red LED directly at the center of rotation. In the normal group, dynamic tilt resulted in significant changes in both blood pressure and cerebral blood flow velocity that was related to the frequency of stimulus. In contrast the impaired group did not show similar patterns. As expected normal subjects demonstrated significant ocular torsion that was related to stimulus frequency while impaired subjects had minimal changes. These data suggest that vestibular inputs have direct effects on cerebral blood flow regulation during dynamic tilt. Supported by NASA.

  7. Estimating population age structure using otolith morphometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doering-Arjes, P.; Cardinale, M.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    known-age fish individuals. Here we used known-age Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) from the Faroe Bank and Faroe Plateau stocks. Cod populations usually show quite large variation in growth rates and otolith shape. We showed that including otolith morphometrics into ageing processes has the potential...... to make ageing objective, accurate, and fast. Calibration analysis indicated that a known-age sample from the same population and environment is needed to obtain robust calibration; using a sample from a different stock more than doubles the error rate, even in the case of genetically highly related...... populations. The intercalibration method was successful but generalization from one stock to another remains problematic. The development of an otolith growth model is needed for generalization if an operational method for different populations is required in the future....

  8. Human otolith function, experiment M009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II

    1971-01-01

    The experiments that were performed during the Gemini 5 and 7 missions resulted in quantitative information concerning otolithic function and orientation of four subjects exposed to an orbiting spacecraft environment for prolonged periods of time. Preflight counterrolling measurements revealed significant differences between crewmembers with regard to the basic magnitude of otolith response. However, after the flight, each crewmember maintained his respective preflight level of response. This was indicative that no significant change in otolithic sensitivity occurred as a result of the flight, or at least no change persisted long enough to be recorded several hours after recovery. The EVLH data recorded for each subject confirmed the observation that a coordinate space sense exists even in a weightless environment if contact cues are adequate. However, it was noted that the apparent location of the horizontal within the spacecraft may not agree necessarily with its physical correlate in the spacecraft.

  9. OTOLITHS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS IN FISHERY SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rodriguez Mendoza

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Otoliths are structures located in the inner ear cavity of all teleost fish and serve as a balance organ and also aid in hearing. They have been used traditionally to obtain information about the taxon, age and size of fishes. This is very important because age, growth rate, and mortality rate are three of the most influential life history characteristics controlling the productivity of fish populations. Besides age and growth determination, otoliths have been the object of study in many different fields, such as fish biology (hearing and balance in fishes, larval fish ecology, species identification, fish stock identification and environmental reconstruction of the fish habitat. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the traditional and current applications of the otoliths. Also, a short description of the traditional methods for age determination is included.

  10. Ontogenetic development of otoliths in Alligator Gar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James M.; Snow, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    The Alligator Gar Atractosteus spatula is a species of conservation concern throughout its range, and better definition of otoliths during early development would aid understanding its life history and ecology. We conducted X-ray computed tomography scans, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy to examine the three pairs of otoliths and how they developed over time in relation to fish size and age. The sagittae are the largest, possessing distinct dorsal and ventral lobes covered with small otoconia concentrated in the sulcul region. The sagittae exhibited allometric growth, increasing more rapidly in the ventral lobe than in the dorsal. The asterisci were smaller and also exhibited small otoconia on their surface, but much less than the sagittae. The lapilli were oriented laterally, in contrast to the sagittae and asterisci, which were oriented vertically, with a hump on the dorsum and very large otoconia on the lateral surface that appeared to fuse into the main otolith as the fish grew. Based on size measurements and ring counts in all three pairs of otoliths from 101 known-age Alligator Gar sampled weekly through 91 d after hatch, we developed regression models to examine otolith growth and predict age. All relationships were significant and highly explanatory, but the strongest relationships were between otolith and fish size (for measurements from sagittae) and for age predictions from the lapillus. Age prediction models all resulted in a slope near unity, indicating that ring deposition occurred approximately daily. The first ring in sagittae and lapilli corresponded to swim-up, whereas the first ring formed in asterisci approximately 8 d after swim-up. These results fill a gap in knowledge and can aid understanding of evolutionary processes as well as provide useful information for management and conservation.

  11. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  12. Vestibular perception following acute unilateral vestibular lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Little is known about the vestibulo-perceptual (VP system, particularly after a unilateral vestibular lesion. We investigated vestibulo-ocular (VO and VP function in 25 patients with vestibular neuritis (VN acutely (2 days after onset and after compensation (recovery phase, 10 weeks. Since the effect of VN on reflex and perceptual function may differ at threshold and supra-threshold acceleration levels, we used two stimulus intensities, acceleration steps of 0.5°/s(2 and velocity steps of 90°/s (acceleration 180°/s(2. We hypothesised that the vestibular lesion or the compensatory processes could dissociate VO and VP function, particularly if the acute vertiginous sensation interferes with the perceptual tasks. Both in acute and recovery phases, VO and VP thresholds increased, particularly during ipsilesional rotations. In signal detection theory this indicates that signals from the healthy and affected side are still fused, but result in asymmetric thresholds due to a lesion-induced bias. The normal pattern whereby VP thresholds are higher than VO thresholds was preserved, indicating that any 'perceptual noise' added by the vertigo does not disrupt the cognitive decision-making processes inherent to the perceptual task. Overall, the parallel findings in VO and VP thresholds imply little or no additional cortical processing and suggest that vestibular thresholds essentially reflect the sensitivity of the fused peripheral receptors. In contrast, a significant VO-VP dissociation for supra-threshold stimuli was found. Acutely, time constants and duration of the VO and VP responses were reduced - asymmetrically for VO, as expected, but surprisingly symmetrical for perception. At recovery, VP responses normalised but VO responses remained shortened and asymmetric. Thus, unlike threshold data, supra-threshold responses show considerable VO-VP dissociation indicative of additional, higher-order processing of vestibular signals. We provide evidence of

  13. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  14. Galvanic vestibular stimulation combines with Earth-horizontal rotation in roll to induce the illusion of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Erich; Bartl, Klaus; Glasauer, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Human head rotation in roll around an earth-horizontal axis constitutes a vestibular stimulus that, by its rotational component, acts on the semicircular canals (SCC) and that, by its tilt of the gravity vector, also acts on the otoliths. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is thought to resemble mainly a rotation in roll. A superposition of sinusoidal GVS with a natural earth-horizontal roll movement was therefore applied in order to cancel the rotation effects and to isolate the otolith activation. By self-adjusting the amplitude and phase of GVS, subjects were able to minimize their sensation of rotation and to generate the perception of a linear translation. The final adjustments are in the range of a model that predicts SCC activation during natural rotations and GVS. This indicates that the tilt-translation ambiguity of the otoliths is resolved by SCC-otolith interaction. It is concluded that GVS might be able to cancel rotations in roll and that the residual tilt of the gravitoinertial force is possibly interpreted as a linear translation.

  15. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  16. Otoliths in continental shelf and slope surficial sediments off Saurashtra, Arabian Sea, India and their significance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; John, S.; Rana, R.S.

    Otoliths are a viable and underutlized paleoceanographic tool. In India a considerable amount of work has been done on otoliths of the fresh water fishes, however no significant report is available for marine otoliths. In the present study, about 89...

  17. Fish otolith biomineralization process: first investigations about organic matrix and growth of Triglidae (Scorpaeniformes otoliths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Montanini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Otolith formation involves rhythmic variations in the deposition and size of organic matrix framework and carbonate crystals, resulting in the formation of macroscopic translucent and opaque rings and microscopic zonations (growth increments (Morales Nin, 2000. As in most biominerals, the otolith matrix forms only 2-3 % of its weight, but it is admitted that it has a considerable importance in the otolith crystallization processes of nucleation, growth, orientation and growth control. The goal of this study is to characterize the matrix protein composition in the otoliths of Triglidae (Scorpaeniformes as a first step to understand molecular mechanisms of otolith formation according to biology and ecology of the species. In particular 500 sagittal otoliths from six gurnard species were analysed: Chelidonichthys cuculus, C. lucerna, Eutrigla gurnardus, Lepidotrigla cavillone, L. dieuzeidei and Trigloporus lastoviza. Protein contents were estimated by Bradford method and the urea 8 M extracts were loaded into a polyacrylamide gel, separated by SDS page and detected by Silver staining (Sigma followed the protocol of Borelli et al. (2001 with some modifications regarding protein precipitation that was enhanced by using TCA, trichloroacetic acid, 100% w/v. The urea soluble fractions revealed a unique large band around 50-55 kDa. Another common clear band was visible at the top of the separating gel (proteins >300/350 kDa unable to enter into the pores of polyacrylamide gels (12%. The complexity of the protein mixtures was investigated by 2-D electrophoresis (Gel TGX 4-20%; proteins were separated on the basis of both isoelectric point (pI and molecular size. A common protein pattern of 50-75 kDa were found in all gurnards showing a similar composition of organic matter even if the 2-D maps of otolith samples showed specie-specific variation in acid protein fractions in all the pairwise comparison. This result confirmed that the amino acid composition

  18. UREA/ammonium ion removal system for the orbiting frog otolith experiment. [ion exchange resins for water treatment during space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, J. R.; Anselmi, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of using free urease enzyme and ANGC-101 ion exchange resin to remove urea and ammonium ion for space system waste water applications was studied. Specifically examined is the prevention of urea and ammonia toxicity in a 30-day Orbiting Frog Otolith (OFO) flight experiment. It is shown that free urease enzyme used in conjunction with ANGC-101 ion-exchange resin and pH control can control urea and amonium ion concentration in unbuffered recirculating water. In addition, the resin does not adversely effect the bullfrogs by lowering the concentration of cations below critical minimum levels. Further investigations on bioburden control, frog waste excretion on an OFO diet, a trade-off analysis of methods of automating the urea/ammonium ion removal system and fabrication and test of a semiautomated breadboard were recommended as continuing efforts. Photographs of test equipment and test animals are shown.

  19. Vestibular function testing.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lang, E E

    2010-06-01

    Vestibular symptoms of vertigo, dizziness and dysequilibrium are common complaints which can be disabling both physically and psychologically. Routine examination of the ear nose and throat and neurological system are often normal in these patients. An accurate history and thorough clinical examination can provide a diagnosis in the majority of patients. However, in a subgroup of patients, vestibular function testing may be invaluable in arriving at a correct diagnosis and ultimately in the optimal treatment of these patients.

  20. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology.......In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  1. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Kinnaird, Catherine; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Seidler, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit saccular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (VEMP) (Colebatch & Halmagyi 1992; Colebatch et al. 1994). Some researchers have reported that airconducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects (Curthoys et al. 2009, Wackym et al., 2012). However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying the vestibular disorders related to otolith deficits. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, pre and post central gyri, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation (Bottini et al., 1994; Dieterich et al., 2003; Emri et al., 2003; Schlindwein et al., 2008; Janzen et al., 2008). Here we hypothesized that the skull tap elicits the similar pattern of cortical activity as the auditory tone burst. Subjects put on a set of MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in supine position, with eyes closed. All subjects received both forms of the stimulation, however, the order of stimulation with auditory tone burst and air-conducted skull tap was counterbalanced across subjects. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular cortex, resulting in vestibular response (Halmagyi et al., 1995). Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate

  2. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    OpenAIRE

    Greco, A.; Macri, G. F.; Gallo, A.; M. Fusconi; DE VIRGILIO, A.; G. Pagliuca; Marinelli, C.; M. De Vincentiis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a su...

  3. [BEHAVIORAL AND FUNCTIONAL VESTIBULAR DISTURBANCES AFTER SPACE FLIGHT. 2. FISHES, AMPHIBIANS AND BIRDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychakov, D V

    2016-01-01

    The review contains data on functional shifts in fishes, amphibians and birds caused by changes in the otolith system operation after stay under weightlessness conditions. These data are of theoretical and practical significance and are important to resolve some fundamental problems of vestibulogy. The analysis of the results of space experiments has shown that weightlessness conditions do not exert a substantial impact on formation and functional state of the otolith system in embryonic fishes, amphibians and birds developed during space flight. Weightlessness conditions do pot inhibit embryonic development of lower vertebrates but even have rather beneficial effect on it. This is consistent with conclusions concerning development of mammalian fetuses. The experimental results show that weightlessness can cause similar functional and behavioral vestibular shifts both in lower vertebrates and in mammals. For example, immediately after an orbital flight the vestibuloocular reflex in fish larvae and tadpoles (without lordosis) was stronger than in control individuals. A similar shift of the otolith reflex was observed in the majority of cosmonauts after short-term orbital flights. Immediately after landing adult terrestrial vertebrates, as well as human beings, exhibit lower activity levels, worse equilibrium and coordination of movements. Another interesting finding observed after landing of the cosmic apparatus was an unusual looping character of tadpole swimming. It is supposed that the unusual motor activity of animals as well as appearance of illusions in cosmonauts and astronauts after switching from 1 to 0 g have the same nature and are related to the change in character of otolith organs stimulation. Considering this similarity of vestibular reactions, using animals seems rather perspective. Besides it allows applying in experiments various invasive techniques.

  4. A compact equipment package for vestibular experiments during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A. H.; Teiwes, W.; Scherer, H.

    A compact measurement and stimulus equipment package for vestibular testing is described. The package is designed on a modular concept so that a customized version can be assembled for each experimental situation. Although primarily conceived for space-related research, the equipment has also been introduced successfully into the clinical diagnostic procedure. An essential function of the equipment is the recording and evaluation of eye movements. This is performed by a video-based measurement system which permits evaluation of horizontal, vertical and torsional components of eye movement. Objective testing of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in all three orthogonal planes is therefore possible. Furthermore evaluation of the otolithic function in weightlessness is made feasible by the possibility of measuring dynamic ocular counterrolling. Some applications of the equipment are described.

  5. Results of the study of the vestibular apparatus and the functions of the perception of space in cosmonauts (pre- and post-flight observations)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, I. Y.; Kornilova, L. N.; Tarasov, I. K.; Alekseyev, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the set of space flight factors caused a change in the activity of the vestibular apparatus and the spatial perception function. More significant and longer shifts were observed during expeditions of great duration. The detected disorders (increase in reactivity of the otolithic apparatus, decrease in sensitivity of the cupula receptor, deterioration in the perception accuracy, etc.) had a definite tendency to be restored. The primary damage to the otolithic reflex (changes were found in practically all the subjects) is probably caused by the specific effect of zero gravitation, and apparently, may be one of the trigger mechanisms for discrepancy in the activity of the sensory systems, disorders in the correcting function of the cerebellum, and central vestibular formations.

  6. Adaptations of the vestibular system to short and long-term exposures to altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, L.

    Long-term space flight creates unique environmental conditions to which the vestibular system must adapt for optimal survival. We are studying two aspects of this vestibular adaptation: (1) How does long-term exposure to microgravity and hypergravity affect the development of vestibular afferents? (2) How does short- term exposure to extremely rapid changes in gravity, such as those that occur during launch and landing, affect the vestibular system. During space flight the gravistatic receptors in the otolith organs are effectively unloaded. In hypergravity conditions they are overloaded. However, the angular acceleration receptors of the semicircular canals receive relatively normal stimulation in both micro- and hypergravity.Rat embryos exposed to microgravity from gestation day 10 (prior to vestibular function) until gestation day 20 (vestibular system is somewhat functional) showed that afferents from the posterior vertical canal projecting to the medial vestibular nucleus developed similarly in microgravity, hypergravity, and in controls . However, afferents from the saccule showed delayed development in microgravity as compared to development in hypergravity and in controls. Cerebellar plasticity is crucial for modification of sensory-motor control and learning. Thus we explored the possibility that strong vestibular stimuli would modify cerebellar motor control (i.e., eye movement, postural control, gut motility) by altering the morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To study the effects of short-term exposures to strong vestibular stimuli we focused on structural changes in the vestibulo-cerebellum that are caused by strong vestibular stimuli. Adult mice were exposed to various combinations of constant and/or rapidly changing angular and linear accelerations for 8.5 min (the time length of shuttle launch). Our data shows that these stimuli cause intense excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, inducing up-regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

  7. Bioconversion of leukotriene C4 by the bullfrog heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R P; Heller, R S; Canavan, C M; Herman, C A

    1988-01-01

    Isolated perfused bullfrog hearts were administered randomized doses of LTC4, LTD4 or LTE4. The cardiac parameters of heart rate, developed tension and its first derivative (dT/dt) were recorded. LTC4 was the most potent of the leukotrienes tested in eliciting positive inotropic effects. LTD4 and LTE4 were equally effective but about one order of magnitude less potent than LTC4. None of the LTs showed any chronotropic effects in this preparation. LTC4 was significantly more potent in the presence of L-serine borate, an inhibitor of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, than in its absence, raising the possibility of significant bioconversion of LTC4 by the bullfrog heart. 3H-LTC4 metabolism experiments were carried out using whole perfused hearts or minced bullfrog heart tissue. During the six minute course of collection, the isolated perfused heart converted significant amounts of LTC4 to LTD4 and to a lesser degree LTE4. This conversion was attenuated in the presence of L-serine borate. Both minced atrial and ventricular tissue converted 3H-LTC4 to radioactive metabolites which co-migrated with authentic LTD4 and LTE4 standards. In both tissues, the major product was LTD4, with smaller amounts of LTE4 produced. The atrium converted significantly more LTC4 to its metabolites than did the ventricle. The metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4 by both tissues was virtually abolished in the presence of serine borate. It is interesting that LTC4 metabolism pattern and rate is comparable in mammals and frogs in spite of the fact that the inotropic effects of leukotrienes are opposite in the two taxa and, in frogs, metabolism results in a less potent agent.

  8. Vestibular Deficits Following Concussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Division of Emergency Medicine, Sports Medicine, and Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA, and Sports Medicine, Somerset, NJ, performed a retrospective cohort study of 247 patients ages 5-18 years with concussion referred from July 2010 to Dec 2011; 81% of patients showed a vestibular abnormality on initial clinical examination.

  9. A Low-Power ASIC Signal Processor for a Vestibular Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töreyin, Hakan; Bhatti, Pamela T

    2016-06-01

    A low-power ASIC signal processor for a vestibular prosthesis (VP) is reported. Fabricated with TI 0.35 μm CMOS technology and designed to interface with implanted inertial sensors, the digitally assisted analog signal processor operates extensively in the CMOS subthreshold region. During its operation the ASIC encodes head motion signals captured by the inertial sensors as electrical pulses ultimately targeted for in-vivo stimulation of vestibular nerve fibers. To achieve this, the ASIC implements a coordinate system transformation to correct for misalignment between natural sensors and implanted inertial sensors. It also mimics the frequency response characteristics and frequency encoding mappings of angular and linear head motions observed at the peripheral sense organs, semicircular canals and otolith. Overall the design occupies an area of 6.22 mm (2) and consumes 1.24 mW when supplied with ± 1.6 V.

  10. Is Vestibular Neuritis an Immune Related Vestibular Neuropathy Inducing Vertigo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Greco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To review the current knowledge of the aetiology of vestibular neuritis including viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms and to discuss the pathogenesis with relevance to pharmacotherapy. Systematic Review Methodology. Relevant publications on the aetiology and treatment of vestibular neuritis from 1909 to 2013 were analysed. Results and Conclusions. Vestibular neuritis is the second most common cause of peripheral vestibular vertigo and is due to a sudden unilateral loss of vestibular function. Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder thought to represent the vestibular-nerve equivalent of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Histopathological studies of patients who died from unrelated clinical problems have demonstrated degeneration of the superior vestibular nerve. The characteristic signs and symptoms include sudden and prolonged vertigo, the absence of auditory symptoms, and the absence of other neurological symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the condition remain unknown. Proposed theories of causation include viral infections, vascular occlusion, and immunomediated mechanisms. The management of vestibular neuritis involves symptomatic treatment with antivertiginous drugs, causal treatment with corticosteroids, and physical therapy. Antiviral agents did not improve the outcomes.

  11. Stretch-activated cation channel from larval bullfrog skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Willumsen, Niels J; Marrero, Mario B

    2010-01-01

    Cell-attached patches from isolated epithelial cells from larval bullfrog skin revealed a cation channel that was activated by applying suction (-1 kPa to -4.5 kPa) to the pipette. Activation was characterized by an initial large current spike that rapidly attenuated to a stable value and showed...... was markedly reduced with N-methyl-D-glucamide (NMDG)-Cl Ringer's solution in the pipette. Neither amiloride nor ATP, which are known to stimulate an apical cation channel in Ussing chamber preparations of larval frog skin, produced channel activation nor did these compounds affect the response to suction....... Stretch activation was not affected by varying the pipette concentrations of Ca(2+) between 0 mmol l(-1) and 4 mmol l(-1) or by varying pH between 6.8 and 8.0. However, conductance was reduced with 4 mmol l(-1) Ca(2+). Western blot analysis of membrane homogenates from larval bullfrog and larval toad skin...

  12. Audiologic diagnostics of vestibular schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komazec Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma is a rare, but important cause of sensorineural hearing loss. Patients with asymmetric hearing loss, or unilateral tinnitus should be evaluated expeditiously, to prevent further neurological damage. Audiologic diagnostics Audiologic diagnostics represents the basic diagnosis for early detection of vestibular schwannoma. Patients with vestibular schwannomas may present with a variety of clinical features, including retrocochlear pattern of sensorineural hearing loss. Supraliminary audiometry, tympano- metry, stapedius reflex and otoacoustic emissions as well as vestibular response to caloric testing are methods for selection of patients with suspicion of this tumor. Conclusion The golden standard for audiologic diagnostics of vestibular schwannoma is BAEP (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials. Patients with pathological findings of BAEP should undergo MRI of the posterior fossa. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging is the best and final tool for making a diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma.

  13. Stochastic resonance in the synaptic transmission between hair cells and vestibular primary afferents in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A; Manilla, S; Huidobro, N; De la Torre-Valdovinos, B; Kristeva, R; Mendez-Balbuena, I; Galindo, F; Treviño, M; Manjarrez, E

    2016-05-13

    The stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon of nonlinear systems in which the addition of an intermediate level of noise improves the response of such system. Although SR has been studied in isolated hair cells and in the bullfrog sacculus, the occurrence of this phenomenon in the vestibular system in development is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to explore for the existence of SR via natural mechanical-stimulation in the hair cell-vestibular primary afferent transmission. In vitro experiments were performed on the posterior semicircular canal of the chicken inner ear during development. Our experiments showed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent multiunit activity from E15 to P5 stages of development exhibited the SR phenomenon, which was characterized by an inverted U-like response as a function of the input noise level. The inverted U-like graphs of SR acquired their higher amplitude after the post-hatching stage of development. Blockage of the synaptic transmission with selective antagonists of the NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors abolished the SR of the afferent multiunit activity. Furthermore, computer simulations on a model of the hair cell - primary afferent synapse qualitatively reproduced this SR behavior and provided a possible explanation of how and where the SR could occur. These results demonstrate that a particular level of mechanical noise on the semicircular canals can improve the performance of the vestibular system in their peripheral sensory processing even during embryonic stages of development.

  14. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Fablet

    Full Text Available Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  15. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves.

  16. Shedding Light on Fish Otolith Biomineralization Using a Bioenergetic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; de Pontual, Hélène; Høie, Hans; Millner, Richard; Mosegaard, Henrik; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They however often lack validation and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. Here we develop and validate a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves. PMID:22110601

  17. Lead-Radium Activity Ratios From Otoliths of Regional Bottomfishes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains lead-radium dating of opakapaka (Pristipomoides filamentosus) otoliths from recent and archival collections (1987-2009).

  18. Angiogenesis in vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Werther, Kim; Nalla, Amarnadh;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are potent mediators of tumor angiogenesis. It has been demonstrated that vestibular schwannoma VEGF expression correlates with tumor growth pattern, whereas knowledge on the expression of MMPs is lacking. This study t...... targets the angiogenic process by investigation of tumor expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1. A possible correlation with gender, patient age, symptom duration, tumor size, and the absolute and relative growth rate is explored....

  19. Shedding light on fish otolith biomineralization using a bioenergetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, R.; Pecquerie, L.; de Pontual, H.;

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm-following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosys...... simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  20. Differential projections from the vestibular nuclei to the flocculus and uvula-nodulus in pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakan, Janelle M P; Graham, David J; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Wylie, Douglas R W

    2008-05-20

    The pigeon vestibulocerebellum is divided into two regions based on the responses of Purkinje cells to optic flow stimuli: the uvula-nodulus responds best to self-translation, and the flocculus responds best to self-rotation. We used retrograde tracing to determine whether the flocculus and uvula-nodulus receive differential mossy fiber input from the vestibular and cerebellar nuclei. From retrograde injections into the both the flocculus and uvula-nodulus, numerous cells were found in the superior vestibular nucleus (VeS), the cerebellovestibular process (pcv), the descending vestibular nucleus (VeD), and the medial vestibular nucleus (VeM). Less labeling was found in the prepositus hypoglossi, the cerebellar nuclei, the dorsolateral vestibular nucleus, and the lateral vestibular nucleus, pars ventralis. In the VeS, the differential input to the flocculus and uvula-nodulus was distinct: cells were localized to the medial and lateral regions, respectively. The same pattern was observed in the VeD, although there was considerable overlap. In the VeM, the majority of cells labeled from the flocculus were in rostral margins on the ipsilateral side, whereas labeling from uvula-nodulus injections was distributed bilaterally throughout the VeM. Finally, from injections in the flocculus but not the uvula-nodulus, moderate labeling was observed in a paramedian area, adjacent to the medial longitudinal fasciculus. In summary, there were clear differences with respect to the projections from the vestibular nuclei to functionally distinct parts of the vestibulocerebellum. Generally speaking, the mossy fibers to the flocculus and uvula-nodulus arise from regions of the vestibular nuclei that receive input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs, respectively.

  1. Status of bullfrogs and northern leopard frogs at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge, Juab County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document describes aspects of the ecology and natural history of bullfrogs introduced to Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. The purpose of this study was to...

  2. The role of otolith size in hearing – Insights from cichlid fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Schulz-Mirbach

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Otolithic end organs in fishes function as accelerometers and are involved in the senses of balance and hearing (e.g. Popper et al. 2005. Otolith mass and shape are likely decisive factors influencing otolith motion, but while it is largely unknown how different shapes affect otolith movement relative to the sensory epithelium (Popper et al. 2005, greater otolith mass is predicted to result in enhanced stimulation of sensory hair cells and improved hearing (Lychakov and Rebane 2005. What few studies exist on this topic, however, yielded contradicting results in that they did or did not find a correlation between increased otolith mass and enhanced hearing (see Kéver et al. 2014. We investigated the relationship between otolith morphology (including 3D-models of otoliths based on high-resolution microCT imaging and otolith weight and hearing abilities in cichlids while comparing three species (Etroplus maculatus, Hemichromis guttatus, Steatocranus tinanti with different swimbladder morphology and hearing abilities (Schulz-Mirbach et al. 2014. We predicted Etroplus maculatus—the species that displays the best hearing sensitivities—to possess larger/heavier otoliths. As swimbladder extensions in this species are connected to the lagena, we further predicted to find heavier lagenar otoliths. Compared to H. guttatus and S. tinanti, E. maculatus showed the heaviest saccular otoliths, while lagenar otoliths were significantly thinner and lighter than in the former two species, apparently contradicting the hypothesis that the lagena and its otolith are primarily involved in improved hearing abilities. Our results support the idea that there is no ‘simple’ relationship between otolith weight, ancilliary auditory structures and hearing abilities. 3D-models of inner ears and otoliths may be ideally suited for future studies modeling complex otolith motion and thus, may provide a better understanding of how otolith morphology contributes to inner

  3. Vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation. Current concepts and new trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveze, A; Bernard-Demanze, L; Xavier, F; Lavieille, J-P; Elziere, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the vestibular compensation and demonstrating how the vestibular rehabilitation is conducted to help the recovery of balance function. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on improving the natural phenomenon called vestibular compensation that occurs after acute vestibular disturbance or chronic and gradual misbalance. Central compensation implies three main mechanisms namely adaptation, substitution and habituation. The compensation, aided by the rehabilitation aimed to compensate and/or to correct the underused or misused of the visual, proprioceptive and vestibular inputs involved in the postural control. As the strategy of equilibration is not corrected, the patient is incompletely cured and remains with inappropriate balance control with its significance on the risk of fall and impact on quality of life. The vestibular rehabilitation helps to correct inappropriate strategy of equilibrium or to accelerate a good but slow compensation phenomenon. Nowadays, new tools are more and more employed for the diagnosis of vestibular deficit (that may include various sources of impairment), the assessment of postural deficit, the control of the appropriate strategy as well to facilitate the efficiency of the rehabilitation especially in elderly people.

  4. Sensory vestibular contributions to constructing internal models of self-motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrea M.; Shaikh, Aasef G.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2005-09-01

    The ability to navigate in the world and execute appropriate behavioral and motor responses depends critically on our capacity to construct an accurate internal representation of our current motion and orientation in space. Vestibular sensory signals are among those that may make an essential contribution to the construction of such 'internal models'. Movement in a gravitational environment represents a situation where the construction of internal models becomes particularly important because the otolith organs, like any linear accelerometer, sense inertial and gravitational accelerations equivalently. Otolith afferents thus provide inherently ambiguous motion information, as they respond identically to translation and head reorientation relative to gravity. Resolution of this ambiguity requires the nonlinear integration of linear acceleration and angular velocity cues, as predicted by the physical equations of motion. Here, we summarize evidence that during translations and tilts from upright the firing rates of brainstem and cerebellar neurons encode a combination of dynamically processed semicircular canal and otolith signals appropriate to construct an internal model representation of the computations required for inertial motion detection.

  5. Vestibular tributaries to the vein of the vestibular aqueduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Marsner; Qvortrup, Klaus; Friis, Morten

    2010-01-01

    CONCLUSION: The vein of the vestibular aqueduct drains blood from areas extensively lined by vestibular dark cells (VDCs). A possible involvement in the pathogenesis of an impaired endolymphatic homeostasis can be envisioned at the level of the dark cells area. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study...... was to investigate the vascular relationship between the vein of the vestibular aqueduct and the vestibular apparatus, with focus on the VDCs. METHODS: Sixteen male Wistar rats were divided into groups of 6 and 10. In the first group, 2 µm thick sections including the vein of the vestibular aqueduct, utricle......, and crista ampullaris of the lateral ampulla were examined by light microscopy and computer-generated three-dimensional imaging. In the second group, ultrathin sections including venules and VDCs were examined by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: A microvascular network was observed in close...

  6. The vestibular implant: Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond eVan De Berg

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: to assess the progress of the development of the vestibular implant and its feasibility short-term. Data sources: a search was performed in Pubmed, Medline and Embase. Key words used were vestibular prosth* and vestibular implant. The only search limit was language: English or Dutch. Additional sources were medical books, conference lectures and our personal experience with per-operative vestibular stimulation in patients selected for cochlear implantation.Study selection: all studies about the vestibular implant and related topics were included and evaluated by two reviewers. No study was excluded since every study investigated different aspects of the vestibular implant. Data extraction and synthesis: data was extracted by the first author from selected reports, supplemented by additional information, medical books conference lectures. Since each study had its own point of interest with its own outcomes, it was not possible to compare data of different studies. Conclusion: to use a basic vestibular implant in humans seems feasible in the very near future. Investigations show that electric stimulation of the canal nerves induces a nystagmus which corresponds to the plane of the canal which is innervated by the stimulated nerve branch. The brain is able to adapt to a higher baseline stimulation, while still reacting on a dynamic component. The best response will be achieved by a combination of the optimal stimulus (stimulus profile, stimulus location, precompensation, complemented by central vestibular adaptation. The degree of response will probably vary between individuals, depending on pathology and their ability to adapt.

  7. Diet composition of post-metamorphic bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) in the Zhoushan archipelago,Zhejiang Province, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Bullfrogs (Runa catesbeiana) are listed as one of the 100 worst invasive alien species in the world.They are generalist predators and thus may affect native species through predation.In previous studies,the food contents of bullfrogs were mostly examined at a single site.In the present study,the diet composition of post-metamorphic bullfrogs on eight islands (Daishan,Liuheng,Xiushan,Fodu,Taohua,Xiashi,Cezi,and Putuoshan) in the Zhoushan Archipelago,Zhejiang Province of China,were examined by using the stomach flushing method from June 30 to August 11 in 2005.A total 0f391 individual frogs were measured,including 113 adults and 278 juveniles.The analysis of the stomach contents shows that,for adult bullfrogs,the most important prey (by diet volume) overall were Decapoda,Coleoptera,Odonata,Mesogastropoda,Raniformes,and Cypriniformes.For juvenile bullfrogs,these were Decapoda,Coleoptera,Cypriniformes,Odonata,Orthoptera,Hymenoptera,Lepidoptera larvae,Mesogastropoda,and Raniformes.Moreover,the prey size and diet volume increased with the body size of both adult and juvenile bullfrogs.The diet composition of primary preys of bullfrogs was significantly different among the islands.The results indicate that bullfrogs exert different predatory influences on native fauna at different sites and that bullfrogs are generalist predators with extensive ecological impacts on native fauna.

  8. Role of cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials testing in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enass Sayed Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: cVEMP is a useful complementary tool for testing vestibular function in vestibular migraine. Reduced cVEMP amplitude or absent response were the most frequent features in vestibular migraine. The saccule and or the sacculo-collic pathway are affected in vestibular migraine, with more tendencies for peripheral vestibular dysfunction in our patient group.

  9. [Some characteristics of vertigo in vestibular neuronitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skliut, I A; Likhachev, S A; Rybina, O V

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a detailed clinical analysis of objective neurological symptoms and vertigo in patients with vestibular neuronitis. Diagnostic criteria are specified allowing differentiation between vertigo and dizziness, pathognomonic signs of vestibular neuronitis are outlined. Peripheral location of the pathological process in vestibular neuronitis is suggested. How rotating vertigo is forming in patients with vestibular neuronitis is hypothesized.

  10. Optical manipulation for optogenetics: otoliths manipulation in zebrafish (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre-Bulle, Itia A.; Scott, Ethan; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Otoliths play an important role in Zebrafish in terms of hearing and sense of balance. Many studies have been conducted to understand its structure and function, however the encoding of its movement in the brain remains unknown. Here we developed a noninvasive system capable of manipulating the otolith using optical trapping while we image its behavioral response and brain activity. We'll also present our tools for behavioral response detection and brain activity mapping. Acceleration is sensed through movements of the otoliths in the inner ear. Because experimental manipulations involve movements, electrophysiology and fluorescence microscopy are difficult. As a result, the neural codes underlying acceleration sensation are poorly understood. We have developed a technique for optically trapping otoliths, allowing us to simulate acceleration in stationary larval zebrafish. By applying forces to the otoliths, we can elicit behavioral responses consistent with compensation for perceived acceleration. Since the animal is stationary, we can use calcium imaging in these animals' brains to identify the functional circuits responsible for mediating responses to acceleration in natural settings.

  11. Bisphenol A induces otolith malformations during vertebrate embryogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeneix Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plastic monomer and plasticizer bisphenol A (BPA, used for manufacturing polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, is produced at over 2.5 million metric tons per year. Concerns have been raised that BPA acts as an endocrine disruptor on both developmental and reproductive processes and a large body of evidence suggests that BPA interferes with estrogen and thyroid hormone signaling. Here, we investigated BPA effects during embryonic development using the zebrafish and Xenopus models. Results We report that BPA exposure leads to severe malformations of the otic vesicle. In zebrafish and in Xenopus embryos, exposure to BPA during the first developmental day resulted in dose-dependent defects in otolith formation. Defects included aggregation, multiplication and occasionally failure to form otoliths. As no effects on otolith development were seen with exposure to micromolar concentrations of thyroid hormone, 17-ß-estradiol or of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 we conclude that the effects of BPA are independent of estrogen receptors or thyroid-hormone receptors. Na+/K+ ATPases are crucial for otolith formation in zebrafish. Pharmacological inhibition of the major Na+/K+ ATPase with ouabain can rescue the BPA-induced otolith phenotype. Conclusions The data suggest that the spectrum of BPA action is wider than previously expected and argue for a systematic survey of the developmental effects of this endocrine disruptor.

  12. Presbivértigo: ejercicios vestibulares Presbivertigo: vestibular exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Bernal Valls

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available El uso de ejercicios en el tratamiento de pacientes con déficit vestibular crónico está incrementándose de forma notable, lo que evidencia que se trata de un procedimiento que resulta beneficioso para este tipo de pacientes. Los buenos resultados que se obtienen sugieren que los ejercicios vestibulares dan lugar a una estabilidad postural y a una disminución de la sensación de desequilibrio.The use of exercises in the treatment of patients with vestibular deficits is increasing in a representative way, what evidences this is a profitable process for this kind of patients. The good results suggest that vestibular exercises permit a postural stability and a decrease in the perception of disequilibrium.

  13. Vestibular rehabilitation with visual stimuli in peripheral vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Manso

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Visual stimuli can induce vestibular adaptation and recovery of body balance. OBJECTIVE: To verify the effect of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation of peripheral vestibular disorders. METHODS: Clinical, randomized, prospective study. Forty patients aged between 23 and 63 years with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders underwent 12 sessions of rehabilitation with visual stimuli using digital video disk (DVD (experimental group or Cawthorne-Cooksey exercises (control group. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, dizziness analog scale, and the sensitized Romberg static balance and one-leg stance tests were applied before and after the intervention. RESULTS: Before and after the intervention, there was no difference between the experimental and control groups (p > 0.005 regarding the findings of DHI, dizziness analog scale, and static balance tests. After the intervention, the experimental and control groups showed lower values (p < 0.05 in the DHI and the dizziness analog scale, and higher values (p < 0.05 in the static balance tests in some of the assessed conditions. CONCLUSION: The inclusion of visual stimuli by digital images on vestibular and body balance rehabilitation is effective in reducing dizziness and improving quality of life and postural control in individuals with peripheral vestibular disorders.

  14. Climate change and American Bullfrog invasion: what could we expect in South America?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Nori

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biological invasion and climate change pose challenges to biodiversity conservation in the 21(st century. Invasive species modify ecosystem structure and functioning and climatic changes are likely to produce invasive species' range shifts pushing some populations into protected areas. The American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus is one of the hundred worst invasive species in the world. Native from the southeast of USA, it has colonized more than 75% of South America where it has been reported as a highly effective predator, competitor and vector of amphibian diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We modeled the potential distribution of the bullfrog in its native range based on different climate models and green-house gases emission scenarios, and projected the results onto South America for the years of 2050 and 2080. We also overlaid projected models onto the South American network of protected areas. Our results indicate a slight decrease in potential suitable area for bullfrog invasion, although protected areas will become more climatically suitable. Therefore, invasion of these sites is forecasted. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide new evidence supporting the vulnerability of the Atlantic Forest Biodiversity Hotspot to bullfrog invasion and call attention to optimal future climatic conditions of the Andean-Patagonian forest, eastern Paraguay, and northwestern Bolivia, where invasive populations have not been found yet. We recommend several management and policy strategies to control bullfrog invasion and argue that these would be possible if based on appropriate articulation among government agencies, NGOs, research institutions and civil society.

  15. Introduced bullfrogs and their parasites: Haematoloechus longiplexus (Trematoda) exploits diverse damselfly intermediate hosts on Vancouver Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Colin W; Goater, Timothy M

    2013-02-01

    The lung fluke, Haematoloechus longiplexus, is the most prevalent and abundant parasite of introduced bullfrogs on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. The ecological success of this trematode in invasive bullfrogs is related to the fluke's ability to utilize native intermediate hosts for transmission. The purpose of this study was to identify the odonate (dragonfly/damselfly) species involved in the transmission of H. longiplexus to the introduced bullfrog. The prevalences and mean intensities of 21 species of odonates (nymphs and adults) were examined for metacercariae infections. Haematoloechus longiplexus is a second intermediate host specialist, being found only in damselflies. Six damselfly species exhibiting the "climber" ecological habit were identified as second intermediate hosts of H. longiplexus. Enallagma carunculatum (prevalence = 75.0%, mean intensity = 17.2 ± 10.8), Ischnura cervula (65.2%, 8.9 ± 4.3), Ischnura perparva (45.5%, 15.4 ± 10.3), and Enallagma boreale (40.7%, 4.8 ± 7.8) were the most commonly infected damselfly species. Metacercariae were absent in damselflies collected from sites lacking bullfrogs. Haematoloechus longiplexus was likely introduced along with the bullfrog, and subsequently adapted to the physid snail and diverse damselfly intermediate hosts present in ponds on Vancouver Island.

  16. Diet and Prey Selection of the Invasive American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) in Southwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan LIU; Yu LUO; Jiaxin CHEN; Yisong GUO; Changming BAI; Yiming LI

    2015-01-01

    Invasive predators have been widely regarded as one of the principle drivers of the global decline of amphibians, which are among the most threatened vertebrate taxon on Earth. The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) is identiifed as one of the most successful vertebrate invaders and has caused the decline or extinction of some native amphibians in many regions and countries including China. Based on ifeld surveys and stomach content analyses, we examined the diet composition of the invasive bullfrog for the ifrst time in two invaded populations in Yunnan Province, southwestern China, a region of global conservation priority, during the breeding season from 2008 to 2014. Additionally, we conducted the first quantitative study on the prey selection of this global invader among their invaded ranges after controlling for the local anuran assemblage and other aquatic preys in the environment. Our results showed that the range of food items in the stomachs of bullfrogs spanned more than 30 species belonging to ten taxonomic classes. Both of post-metamorphosis individuals and juveniles preyed upon native frogs, independent of the bullfrog’s body size and mouth width. Importantly, Jacobs’ selection index showed a bullfrog preference for the Yunnan pond frog (Babina pleuraden), one native endemic anuran with population decline, in terms of both food volume and occurrence. We therefore provided direct evidence on the predation impact of the invasive bullfrog on an endemic anuran and urged further efforts to prevent the dispersal of this invader into more fragile habitats to reduce their negative impacts on native amphibians.

  17. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vert...

  18. Vestibular Barre Syndrome and Lieou

    OpenAIRE

    Aniya, Julio; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Barré syndrome and Lieou of vestibular origin, is characterized by a vertiginous symptomatology box , accompanied by disorders of neuro- vegetative type ; which is often confused with Meniere's Syndrome and other neurolóciccs entities. The cause of this condition lies in a cervical disc disease at C5- C6 level of understanding that phenomena on the sympathetic peri -arterial -cervical vertebral artery disorders will produce reflections at the maze , preferably ; or of the vestibular nuclei . ...

  19. The role of vestibular and support-tactile-proprioceptive inputs in visual-manual tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilova, Ludmila; Naumov, Ivan; Glukhikh, Dmitriy; Khabarova, Ekaterina; Pavlova, Aleksandra; Ekimovskiy, Georgiy; Sagalovitch, Viktor; Smirnov, Yuriy; Kozlovskaya, Inesa

    Sensorimotor disorders in weightlessness are caused by changes of functioning of gravity-dependent systems, first of all - vestibular and support. The question arises, what’s the role and the specific contribution of the support afferentation in the development of observed disorders. To determine the role and effects of vestibular, support, tactile and proprioceptive afferentation on characteristics of visual-manual tracking (VMT) we conducted a comparative analysis of the data obtained after prolonged spaceflight and in a model of weightlessness - horizontal “dry” immersion. Altogether we examined 16 Russian cosmonauts before and after prolonged spaceflights (129-215 days) and 30 subjects who stayed in immersion bath for 5-7 days to evaluate the state of the vestibular function (VF) using videooculography and characteristics of the visual-manual tracking (VMT) using electrooculography & joystick with biological visual feedback. Evaluation of the VF has shown that both after immersion and after prolonged spaceflight there were significant decrease of the static torsional otolith-cervical-ocular reflex (OCOR) and simultaneous significant increase of the dynamic vestibular-cervical-ocular reactions (VCOR) with a revealed negative correlation between parameters of the otoliths and canals reactions, as well as significant changes in accuracy of perception of the subjective visual vertical which correlated with changes in OCOR. Analyze of the VMT has shown that significant disorders of the visual tracking (VT) occurred from the beginning of the immersion up to 3-4 day after while in cosmonauts similar but much more pronounced oculomotor disorders and significant changes from the baseline were observed up to R+9 day postflight. Significant changes of the manual tracking (MT) were revealed only for gain and occurred on 1 and 3 days in immersion while after spaceflight such changes were observed up to R+5 day postflight. We found correlation between characteristics

  20. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  1. Vestibular interactions in the thalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eCamp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the vast majority of all information en route to the cerebral cortex must first pass through the thalamus. The long held view that the thalamus serves as a simple hi fidelity relay station for sensory information to the cortex, however, has over recent years been dispelled. Indeed, multiple projections from the vestibular nuclei to thalamic nuclei (including the ventrobasal nuclei, and the geniculate bodies- regions typically associated with other modalities- have been described. Further, some thalamic neurons have been shown to respond to stimuli presented from across sensory modalities. For example, neurons in the rat anterodorsal and laterodorsal nuclei of the thalamus respond to visual, vestibular, proprioceptive and somatosensory stimuli and integrate this information to compute heading within the environment. Together, these findings imply that the thalamus serves crucial integrative functions, at least in regard to vestibular processing, beyond that imparted by a simple relay. In this mini review we outline the vestibular inputs to the thalamus and provide some clinical context for vestibular interactions in the thalamus. We then focus on how vestibular inputs interact with other sensory systems and discuss the multisensory integration properties of the thalamus.

  2. Verification of otolith identity used by fisheries scientists for aging channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James M.; Stewart, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Previously published studies of the age estimation of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus based on otoliths have reported using the sagittae, whereas it is likely they were actually using the lapilli. This confusion may have resulted because in catfishes (ostariophyseans) the lapilli are the largest of the three otoliths, whereas in nonostariophysean fish the sagittae are the largest. Based on (1) scanning electron microscope microphotographs of channel catfish otoliths, (2) X-ray computed tomography scans of a channel catfish head, (3) descriptions of techniques used to removed otoliths from channel catfish reported in the literature, and (4) a sample of channel catfish otoliths received from fisheries biologists from around the country, it is clear that lapilli are most often used for channel catfish aging studies, not sagittae, as has been previously reported. Fisheries scientists who obtain otoliths from channel catfish can use the information in this paper to correctly identify otolith age.

  3. Cadmium block of isometric contractions of isolated bullfrog atrial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, N; Kavaler, F; Spielman, W

    1991-02-01

    We studied the effect of cadmium, verapamil, and quinacrine on the force of contraction (Fp) of isolated, single, field-stimulated bullfrog atrial cells. All agents were applied or removed rapidly (t1/2 approximately 15 ms) to minimize intracellular concentration changes other than intracellular calcium concentration. Two components of twitch force were observed, one blocked by micromolar Cd2+ and the other by millimolar Cd2+. The two contributed about equally to the activation of the twitch. The "cadmium-sensitive" portion of force (that affected by [Cd] less than or equal to 100 microM) had a K1/2 approximately 1 microM, was identical in magnitude to, and not additive with, a "verapamil-sensitive" (10 microM) component of force, was most strongly affected by 50-ms pulses of Cd2+ when they were applied in the mechanical latent period, and was potentiated by catecholamines. The cadmium-insensitive portion of force was abolished by the removal of extracellular calcium and was greatly potentiated by quinacrine (3 or 10 microM), a blocker of Na-Ca exchange. The results are consistent with the idea that activating calcium enters the cell via both an inactivating cadmium-sensitive L-type channel and a noninactivating cadmium-insensitive mechanism that is not Na-Ca exchange and leaves the cell via Na-Ca exchange.

  4. Otolith geochemistry does not reflect dispersal history of clownfish larvae

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2010-07-01

    Natural geochemical signatures in calcified structures are commonly employed to retrospectively estimate dispersal pathways of larval fish and invertebrates. However, the accuracy of the approach is generally untested due to the absence of individuals with known dispersal histories. We used genetic parentage analysis (genotyping) to divide 110 new recruits of the orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, from Kimbe Island, Papua New Guinea, into two groups: "self-recruiters" spawned by parents on Kimbe Island and "immigrants" that had dispersed from distant reefs (>10 km away). Analysis of daily increments in sagittal otoliths found no significant difference in PLDs or otolith growth rates between self-recruiting and immigrant larvae. We also quantified otolith Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios during the larval phase using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Again, we found no significant differences in larval profiles of either element between self-recruits and immigrants. Our results highlight the need for caution when interpreting otolith dispersal histories based on natural geochemical tags in the absence of water chemistry data or known-origin larvae with which to test the discriminatory ability of natural tags. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Otolith microchemistry of tropical diadromous fishes: spatial and migratory dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William E.; Kwak, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Otolith microchemistry was applied to quantify migratory variation and the proportion of native Caribbean stream fishes that undergo full or partial marine migration. Strontium and barium water chemistry in four Puerto Rico, U.S.A., rivers was clearly related to a salinity gradient; however, variation in water barium, and thus fish otoliths, was also dependent on river basin. Strontium was the most accurate index of longitudinal migration in tropical diadromous fish otoliths. Among the four species examined, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor, mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, sirajo goby Sicydium spp. and river goby Awaous banana, most individuals were fully amphidromous, but 9-12% were semi-amphidromous as recruits, having never experienced marine or estuarine conditions in early life stages and showing no evidence of marine elemental signatures in their otolith core. Populations of one species, G. dormitor, may have contained a small contingent of semi-amphidromous adults, migratory individuals that periodically occupied marine or estuarine habitats (4%); however, adult migratory elemental signatures may have been confounded with those related to diet and physiology. These findings indicate the plasticity of migratory strategies of tropical diadromous fishes, which may be more variable than simple categorization might suggest.

  6. Otolith geochemistry does not reflect dispersal history of clownfish larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, M. L.; Walsh, H. J.; Raventos, N.; Planes, S.; Jones, G. P.; Starczak, V.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    Natural geochemical signatures in calcified structures are commonly employed to retrospectively estimate dispersal pathways of larval fish and invertebrates. However, the accuracy of the approach is generally untested due to the absence of individuals with known dispersal histories. We used genetic parentage analysis (genotyping) to divide 110 new recruits of the orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, from Kimbe Island, Papua New Guinea, into two groups: “self-recruiters” spawned by parents on Kimbe Island and “immigrants” that had dispersed from distant reefs (>10 km away). Analysis of daily increments in sagittal otoliths found no significant difference in PLDs or otolith growth rates between self-recruiting and immigrant larvae. We also quantified otolith Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios during the larval phase using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Again, we found no significant differences in larval profiles of either element between self-recruits and immigrants. Our results highlight the need for caution when interpreting otolith dispersal histories based on natural geochemical tags in the absence of water chemistry data or known-origin larvae with which to test the discriminatory ability of natural tags.

  7. Otoliths as an integral part in fossil fish taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Gierl

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Otoliths are small structures in the skull of fishes. They are responsible for hearing and orientation in the 3-dimensional space. They also hold valuable information regarding the taxonomy. Their outline, the shape of the sulcus and other features allow the determination of a fish even to the species level. A lot of fossil species are solely based on otoliths because of their good chance of preservation. Gobies are in this case no different. An additional challenge in gobies is their high similarity between species concerning the preservable parts. Fossil skeletons that are 20 Million years old can show only few differences compared to recent gobies. These features are often hardly recognizable due to their preservation. As a consequence many fossil gobies have been assigned to the genus Gobius sensu lato. Examples are two gobies from the Miocene of Southern Germany. They have a unique combination of characters (six branchiostegals, palatine resembling a “T”, no entopterygoid that allows the rectification of a new fossil genus but the two species are hardly distinguishable based only on the skeleton. The key hints in having two species are the otoliths. They show slight but consistent differences in their outline. This shows that otoliths can be a key feature in species identification. They should also be taken into consideration by recent fish species. Not to mention their possible phylogenetic potential that remains to be explored.

  8. Otolith microchemistry of tropical diadromous fishes: spatial and migratory dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W E; Kwak, T J

    2014-04-01

    Otolith microchemistry was applied to quantify migratory variation and the proportion of native Caribbean stream fishes that undergo full or partial marine migration. Strontium and barium water chemistry in four Puerto Rico, U.S.A., rivers was clearly related to a salinity gradient; however, variation in water barium, and thus fish otoliths, was also dependent on river basin. Strontium was the most accurate index of longitudinal migration in tropical diadromous fish otoliths. Among the four species examined, bigmouth sleeper Gobiomorus dormitor, mountain mullet Agonostomus monticola, sirajo goby Sicydium spp. and river goby Awaous banana, most individuals were fully amphidromous, but 9-12% were semi-amphidromous as recruits, having never experienced marine or estuarine conditions in early life stages and showing no evidence of marine elemental signatures in their otolith core. Populations of one species, G. dormitor, may have contained a small contingent of semi-amphidromous adults, migratory individuals that periodically occupied marine or estuarine habitats (4%); however, adult migratory elemental signatures may have been confounded with those related to diet and physiology. These findings indicate the plasticity of migratory strategies of tropical diadromous fishes, which may be more variable than simple categorization might suggest.

  9. Differential diagnosis and treatment of vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common complaint that leads patients to visit physicians of various specialties. Diseases resulting in vestibular vertigo are very diverse and may be caused by lesion of both the central parts of the vestibular system and the peripheral vestibular apparatus. In many cases, its diagnosis can be made from complaints and a history of disease and special bedside tests requiring no sophisticated equipment. Management of vestibular vertigo should aim at treating the underlying disease; vestibular dilators as symptomatic therapy can be effective for several days. Vestibular exercises the efficiency of which can be enhanced by betahistine and other drugs accelerating vestibular compensation should be further needed. Data on the efficacy of betaver (betahistine in patients with vestibular vertigo are given.

  10. Processing of vestibular inputs by the medullary lateral tegmental field of conscious cats: implications for generation of motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Andrew A; Moy, Jennifer D; DeMayo, William M; Puterbaugh, Sonya R; Miller, Daniel J; Catanzaro, Michael F; Yates, Bill J

    2013-03-01

    The dorsolateral reticular formation of the caudal medulla, the lateral tegmental field (LTF), participates in generating vomiting. LTF neurons exhibited complex responses to vestibular stimulation in decerebrate cats, indicating that they received converging inputs from a variety of labyrinthine receptors. Such a convergence pattern of vestibular inputs is appropriate for a brain region that participates in generating motion sickness. Since responses of brainstem neurons to vestibular stimulation can differ between decerebrate and conscious animals, the current study examined the effects of whole-body rotations in vertical planes on the activity of LTF neurons in conscious felines. Wobble stimuli, fixed-amplitude tilts, the direction of which moves around the animal at a constant speed, were used to determine the response vector orientation, and also to ascertain whether neurons had spatial-temporal convergence (STC) behavior (which is due to the convergence of vestibular inputs with different spatial and temporal properties). The proportion of LTF neurons with STC behavior in conscious animals (25 %) was similar to that in decerebrate cats. Far fewer neurons in other regions of the feline brainstem had STC behavior, confirming findings that many LTF neurons receive converging inputs from a variety of labyrinthine receptors. However, responses to vertical plane vestibular stimulation were considerably different in decerebrate and conscious felines for LTF neurons lacking STC behavior. In decerebrate cats, most LTF neurons had graviceptive responses to rotations, similar to those of otolith organ afferents. However, in conscious animals, the response properties were similar to those of semicircular canal afferents. These differences show that higher centers of the brain that are removed during decerebration regulate the labyrinthine inputs relayed to the LTF, either by gating connections in the brainstem or by conveying vestibular inputs directly to the region.

  11. Development and Application of Otoliths as Paleoclimate Proxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, C. T.; Crowe, D. E.; Sandweiss, D. H.

    2001-12-01

    Otoliths are small (maritime archaeological sites and are also found as fossils as old as the Jurassic. Gross otolith morphology is taxon-specific, often permitting identification to the species level. Depending on the behavior and natural history of each species, conditions within different environments and habitats may be recorded in the isotope chemistry. These environments range from abyssal oceanic depths to mid-continental rivers and lakes, but the most abundant archaeological otoliths are from fish that inhabit shallow coastal waters. Unlike most proxies that are sessile, fish are pelagic and thus record a paleoclimate record indicative of the range of habitats in which the individual grew. In fish with well-understood life histories, such as most economically significant species, this permits evaluation of multiple habitat climates through ontogeny as recorded in the incremental growth. In species with a defined home range (i.e. non-migratory), an integrated temperature history of region can be reconstructed from the δ 18O values, thus avoiding micro-environmental biases sometimes associated with sessile proxies. An example of such use of otoliths is our recent analyses of δ 18O profiles from mid-Holocene archaeological sites in coastal Peru that reflect sea surface temperature (SST) histories. This is an area of coast that lacks more traditional proxies, such as coral, yet is central to the understanding of a global phenomenon such as El Niño/southern oscillation. The high-resolution temperature records preserved in these sea catfish (Galeichthys peruvianus) otoliths reveal warmer than present summer SST in central Peru and near tropical conditions in the north.

  12. Compensation following bilateral vestibular damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill J Yates

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that nonlabyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained.

  13. Auditory function in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM is a vestibular syndrome seen in patients with migraine and is characterized by short spells of spontaneous or positional vertigo which lasts between a few seconds to weeks. Migraine and VM are considered to be a result of chemical abnormalities in the serotonin pathway. Neuhauser′s diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine is widely accepted. Research on VM is still limited and there are few studies which have been published on this topic. Materials and Methods: This study has two parts. In the first part, we did a retrospective chart review of eighty consecutive patients who were diagnosed with vestibular migraine and determined the frequency of auditory dysfunction in these patients. The second part was a prospective case control study in which we compared the audiological parameters of thirty patients diagnosed with VM with thirty normal controls to look for any significant differences. Results: The frequency of vestibular migraine in our population is 22%. The frequency of hearing loss in VM is 33%. Conclusion: There is a significant difference between cases and controls with regards to the presence of distortion product otoacoustic emissions in both ears. This finding suggests that the hearing loss in VM is cochlear in origin.

  14. Variations in otolith patterns, sizes and body morphometrics of jack mackerel Trachurus japonicus juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaji, Y; Kishida, M; Watanabe, Y; Kawamura, T; Xie, S; Yamashita, Y; Sassa, C; Tsukamoto, Y

    2010-10-01

    Variations in otolith patterns, sizes and body morphometrics of jack mackerel Trachurus japonicus juveniles were investigated. Under transmitted light, translucent (W(t)) and opaque otoliths (W(o)) were detected in juveniles collected from Wakasa Bay between July 2005 and April 2006, whereas only opaque otoliths (G(o)) were detected in Goto-nada Sea individuals between May and June 2006. Three groups of juveniles were distinguished based on differences in hatch season, otolith size and growth history, and body morphometrics. As T. japonicus has different spawning seasons according to spawning grounds, each group was estimated to hatch in different waters. Juveniles with W(t) otoliths were considered to have stayed in coastal habitat longer, as the hatch area was estimated to be near Wakasa Bay. Juveniles with W(o) and G(o) otoliths appear to recruit to coastal waters at larger size, since their hatch areas were estimated to be far from each collection area. Larger otoliths of W(t) were attributed to otolith accretion after the second growth flexion, which was observed only for W(t) . Standard length of W(t) fish at the second otolith growth flexion was estimated to correspond to recruitment size to coastal rocky reefs in Wakasa Bay. Body morphometrics were correlated with otolith size after removing body size effect, suggesting that morphological variations of T. japonicus juveniles were also associated with the timing of recruitment to coastal habitat.

  15. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh LC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Li-Chun Hsieh,1,2 Hung-Ching Lin,2,3 Guo-She Lee4,5 1Institute of Brain Science, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 2Department of Otolaryngology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; 3Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology, Mackay Memorial Medical College, Taipei, Taiwan; 4Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan; 5Department of Otolaryngology, Taipei City Hospital, Ren-Ai Branch, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT. In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods: We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results: Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05. The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old.Conclusion: Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with

  16. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  17. Otoliths as recorders of palaeoenvironments: comparison of radiocarbon age and isoleucine epimerization in Pleistocene golden perch `Macquaria ambigua` otoliths from Willandra Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, J.M.; Pritchard, C. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia); Miller, G.H.; Rosewater, A. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Tuniz, C.; Lawson, E. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Fish otoliths form by the accretion of layers of calcium carbonate and organic-rich material that often form distinctive layers over time scales ranging from days to years. These layers are not resorbed during the life of the fish and have potential to provide data relevant to both the biology of the fish and the environment to which the fish has been exposed. Environmental variability based on otoliths can be estimated through measures of stable oxygen isotopes, trace elements, and the widths of both daily and annual increments. Although otoliths can be dated based on measurement of radiocarbon by accelerator mass spectrometry this method is relatively expensive. An alternative method for dating golden perch otoliths is based on measurements of isoleucine D/L ratios. Miller and Rosewater (1995) demonstrated that golden perch otoliths are near a perfect closed system for racemization and that otoliths have potential of dating surrounding sediments older than 100 ka. Despite the suitability of these structures for racemization measurements, many of collections of Pleistocene otoliths from Willandra Lakes are not appropriate for determination of sample age. Most otoliths sampled in the region have been derived from surface collections, while it is recommended that samples should have been buried at least 1 m during most of their history. Therefore, the majority of existing otolith collections are not appropriate for geochronology or palaeothermometry. Nevertheless, when used in conjunction with radiocarbon dates, racemization data may be of value in assessing the relationship among otoliths in an assemblage. Radiocarbon ages and isoleucine D/L ratios were determined for 30 otoliths collected from Willandra Lakes. The rostrum of each otolith was analysed for D/L ratios and a portion of the posterior of the same otolith was analysed for radiocarbon by accelerator mass spectrometry. Sample weights for both analyses ranged from 14.0 to 25.6 mg. The central portion of the

  18. Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to intraperitoneal injection of bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila was studied to 60 individuals in two groups. Each bullfrog in bacterium-injected group was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 0.2 ml bacterial suspension at a density of 5.2 × 106 CFU/ml, while each one in control group injected i.p. with 0.2 ml sterile saline solution (0.85%, w/v). Three bullfrogs in both groups were sampled at 0, 1, 3, 7, 11, 15 and 20 days post-injection (dpi) for the evaluation of non-specific immune parameters. It was observed that intraperitoneal injection of A. hydrophila significantly increased the number of leucocytes and that of NBT-positive cells in peripheral blood. Significant increases in serum bactericidal activity and serum acid phosphatase activity were also observed in the bacterium-injected frogs when compared with those in the control group. However, a significant reduction was detected in vitro in phagocytosis activity of peripheral blood phagocytes. No significant difference in changes in the number of peripheral erythrocytes, serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lysozyme activity was detected between the two groups. It is suggested that bullfrogs may produce a series of non-specific immune reactions in response to the A. hydrophila infection.

  19. α-ENaC in bullfrog embryo: expression in cement gland, gills and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki-Aoba, Kayo; Tanaka, Kayoko; Inomata, Reiko; Jensik, Philip J; Takada, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is involved in Na(+) responses such as Na(+) absorption and salt taste. The alpha ENaC subunit (α-ENaC) is expressed in the skin of both the adult and larval (tadpole) bullfrog. α-ENaC expression in the developing bullfrog embryo has not been previously investigated. In this study, the expression of α-ENaC at various stages (Sts.) of bullfrog embryonic development is assessed by western blot and immunofluorescence analysis. Bullfrog α-ENaC (α-fENaC) protein was detected by western blot in embryos at Sts. (Gosner/Shumway) 19, 21 and 25. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that α-fENaC was localized to the embryonic cement glands at St. 18 (muscular response), St. 19 (heart beat) and St. 21 (mouth open and/or cornea transparent), to the external gills at St. 21 and to the outermost cell-layer of the skin at St. 25 (operculum complete). The function(s) of ENaC in these embryonic structures remain to be elucidated.

  20. Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to intraperitoneal injection of bacterium Aeromonas hydrophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjie; Zou, Wenzheng; Yan, Qingpi

    2008-08-01

    Non-specific immune response of bullfrog Rana catesbeiana to pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila was studied to 60 individuals in two groups. Each bullfrog in bacterium-injected group was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 0.2 ml bacterial suspension at a density of 5.2 × 106 CFU/ml, while each one in control group injected i.p. with 0.2 ml sterile saline solution (0.85%, w/v). Three bullfrogs in both groups were sampled at 0, 1, 3, 7, 11, 15 and 20 days post-injection (dpi) for the evaluation of non-specific immune parameters. It was observed that intraperitoneal injection of A. hydrophila significantly increased the number of leucocytes and that of NBT-positive cells in peripheral blood. Significant increases in serum bactericidal activity and serum acid phosphatase activity were also observed in the bacterium-injected frogs when compared with those in the control group. However, a significant reduction was detected in vitro in phagocytosis activity of peripheral blood phagocytes. No significant difference in changes in the number of peripheral erythrocytes, serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lysozyme activity was detected between the two groups. It is suggested that bullfrogs may produce a series of non-specific immune reactions in response to the A. hydrophila infection.

  1. WIENER KERNEL ANALYSIS OF INNER-EAR FUNCTION IN THE AMERICAN BULLFROG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDIJK, P; WIT, HP; SEGENHOUT, JM; TUBIS, A

    1994-01-01

    The response of 17 primary auditory nerve fibers in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) to acoustic noise stimulation of the tympanic membrane was recorded. For each fiber, the first- and second-order Wiener kernels, k(1)(tau(1)) and k(2)(tau(1),tau(2)), were computed by cross correlation of th

  2. Basolateral Cl- channels in the larval bullfrog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillyard, Stanley D.; Rios, K.; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    2002-01-01

    The addition of 150 U/ml nystatin to the mucosal surface of isolated skin from larval bullfrogs increases apical membrane permeability and allows a voltage clamp to be applied to the basolateral membrane. With identical Ringer's solutions bathing either side of the tissue the short-circuit curren...

  3. Impaired tilt perception in Parkinson's disease: a central vestibular integration failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bertolini

    Full Text Available Impaired balance control is a hallmark symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD. Altered sensory-motor integration contributes to the deficiency. We aimed to determine whether impaired vestibular signal processing added to the disorder. We exposed patients (N = 11; 68±6y and age-matched healthy subjects (hS: N = 19; 65±11y on a motion platform in complete darkness to two consecutive forward tilt movements (12 series; N = 24; overall 288 trials and asked them to indicate which tilt was perceived larger. By combing tilt movements with translations we manipulated vestibular sensory input in order to investigate whether putative impairment resulted from a deficiency of the sensory organs (semicircular canals in 'single-SCC-cue-condition', otoliths in 'single-OT-cue-condition' themselves or to a sensory integration failure ('multi-cue-condition'.Tilt discrimination in the multi-cue-condition was inferior in patients compared to hS (p = 0.02. No significant differences between the two groups were found for both single-cue-conditions. Comparison of multi-cue-condition with a prediction resulting from the combination of both single-cue-conditions by optimal observer theory revealed that patients (p = 0.04, in contrast to hS, failed to efficiently combine SCC and OT information to improve tilt perception.We found that PD patients distinguished forward tilts less precise than hS, suggesting impaired vestibular perception. Tilt discrimination in patients, moreover, did not improve as much as in hS in conditions where both SCC and OT information was available compared to conditions where only SCC or OT cues were activated. The latter provides evidence that tilt misperception in PD most likely results from an integration failure of vestibular signals.

  4. Ageing effect on air-conducted ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushlendra Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the recent diagnostic tests to assess the function of otolithic organs is through vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP testing. There are equivocal findings on effect of aging on ocular VEMP (oVEMP parameters with reference to latencies. Hence this study was taken up to investigate the age related changes in oVEMP parameters. This present study considered 30 participants in each age group i.e., young adults, middle-aged adults and older adults. oVEMP were recorded using insert earphone at 100dBnHL at 500hZ short duration tone burst. The results showed in older adult significant difference in response rate, latencies and amplitude as compared to young and middle adult. Hence age should be taken into consideration when interpreting oVEMP results.

  5. Residual dizziness after the first BPPV episode: role of otolithic function and of a delayed diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faralli, Mario; Lapenna, Ruggero; Giommetti, Giorgia; Pellegrino, Cristina; Ricci, Giampietro

    2016-10-01

    Residual dizziness (RD) following the resolution of a benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BBPV) episode is frequently reported by patients. Possible causes are still under debate in the literature. This study discusses the possible role of otolithic function and of elapsed time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis in the genesis of RD. In total, 116 patients younger than 65 years with their first episode of BPPV and without any other comorbidities were enrolled in the study. Before a bedside examination, subjective visual vertical (SVV) was determined in the case of a history suggestive of BPPV. SVV was tested 1 week later in those patients with BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal, and in whom positioning maneuvers showed resolution of BPPV. At 1 week control, reported RD and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) were recorded. Diagnosis and treatment of BPPV occurred within 4 days in 43 patients (group A), between 5 and 8 days in 38 patients (group B) and in more than 9 days in 35 patients (group C). Higher values of reported RD and DHI were recorded in group C, while higher values of SVV deviation were recorded in group A with an inverse relationship between SVV and DHI. Initial peripheral vestibular function asymmetry due to BPPV can induce a new central adaptation. This adaptation becomes better established the longer otoconia remain floating in the endolymph. Because of these changes, the brain is unable to quickly readapt to the old pattern after resolution resulting in more persistent RD.

  6. Does DNA extraction affect the physical and chemical composition of historical cod (Gadus morhua) otoliths?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Hüssy, Karin

    2010-01-01

    conflicting interests regarding how the limited and irreplaceable otolith collections should be used. To resolve this, it is important to find out whether DNA extraction damages otoliths such that they can no longer be used for other research purposes or whether individual otoliths can be used in multiple...... applications. We examined the effects of three different DNA extraction methods on the elemental composition, the morphology, and the clarity of annual growth increments for successful age estimation of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) otoliths that had been archived for 0–31 years. The three extraction methods...... yielded DNA of comparable quality, and none of the methods caused major damage to the otoliths. Of the element concentrations measured, only Mg and Rb showed considerable changes resulting from DNA extraction. The physical properties of the otolith (morphology and clarity of annual growth increments) were...

  7. Cardiovascular responses to catecholamines at 12 degrees C in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C A; Robleto, D O; Mata, P L; Heller, R S

    1986-10-01

    The effects of epinephrine, norepinephrine, phenylephrine, and isoproterenol on blood pressure and heart rate were studied in cannulated American bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana. The bullfrogs were chronically cannulated with a T cannula in the right sciatic artery. In warm-acclimated (22 degrees C) bullfrogs, preinjection mean systemic arterial pressure (SAP) prior to experimental treatment was 13.1 +/- 0.7 mm Hg. Preinjection heart rate was 34.8 +/- 1.8 beats per minute. These parameters were lower in cold-acclimated (12 degrees C) bullfrogs. Cold-acclimated animals had mean SAP values of 8.2 +/- 0.3 mm Hg, and heart rate was 11.1 +/- 1.1 beats per minute. Epinephrine, norepinephrine, and phenylephrine increased blood pressure to an equivalent degree in warm- and cold-acclimated animals. Dose-related decreases in heart rate in response to these catecholamines were observed in warm- but not in cold-acclimated bullfrogs. Warm-acclimated animals were more responsive to isoproterenol from 0.03 micrograms/kg body weight (bw) to 10 micrograms/kg bw than were cold-acclimated animals. The response to isoproterenol was effectively blocked by propranolol (5 mg/kg bw) in both warm- and cold-acclimated animals. Propranolol alone decreased mean SAP in both warm- and cold-acclimated animals, suggesting blockade of endogenous sympathetic activity. Beta receptor response thus appears diminished, but not absent at 12 degrees C. However, the alpha receptors responsible for elevation of blood pressure equally responsive at 12 degrees and 22 degrees C.

  8. Temporal stability of otolith elemental fingerprints discriminates among lagoon nursery habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Tournois, J.; Ferraton, Franck; Velez, Laure; D.J. McKenzie; Aliaume, C.; L. Mercier; Darnaude, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of fish otoliths reflects that of the water masses that they inhabit. Otolith elemental compositions can, therefore, be used as natural tags to discriminate among habitats. However, for retrospective habitat identification to be valid and reliable for any adult, irrespective of its age, significant differences in environmental conditions, and therefore otolith signatures, must be temporally stable within each habitat, otherwise connectivity studies have to be carried ...

  9. Sturgeon and paddlefish (Acipenseridae) sagittal otoliths are composed of the calcium carbonate polymorphs vaterite and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracheil, B M; Chakoumakos, B C; Feygenson, M; Whitledge, G W; Koenigs, R P; Bruch, R M

    2017-02-01

    This study sought to resolve whether sturgeon (Acipenseridae) sagittae (otoliths) contain a non-vaterite fraction and to quantify how large a non-vaterite fraction is using neutron diffraction analysis. This study found that all otoliths examined had a calcite fraction that ranged from 18 ± 6 to 36 ± 3% by mass. This calcite fraction is most probably due to biological variation during otolith formation rather than an artefact of polymorph transformation during preparation.

  10. Cross-axis adaptation improves 3D vestibulo-ocular reflex alignment during chronic stimulation via a head-mounted multichannel vestibular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chenkai; Fridman, Gene Y; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan S; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Cullen, Kathleen E; Della Santina, Charles C

    2011-05-01

    By sensing three-dimensional (3D) head rotation and electrically stimulating the three ampullary branches of a vestibular nerve to encode head angular velocity, a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) can restore vestibular sensation to individuals disabled by loss of vestibular hair cell function. However, current spread to afferent fibers innervating non-targeted canals and otolith end organs can distort the vestibular nerve activation pattern, causing misalignment between the perceived and actual axis of head rotation. We hypothesized that over time, central neural mechanisms can adapt to correct this misalignment. To test this, we rendered five chinchillas vestibular deficient via bilateral gentamicin treatment and unilaterally implanted them with a head-mounted MVP. Comparison of 3D angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (aVOR) responses during 2 Hz, 50°/s peak horizontal sinusoidal head rotations in darkness on the first, third, and seventh days of continual MVP use revealed that eye responses about the intended axis remained stable (at about 70% of the normal gain) while misalignment improved significantly by the end of 1 week of prosthetic stimulation. A comparable time course of improvement was also observed for head rotations about the other two semicircular canal axes and at every stimulus frequency examined (0.2-5 Hz). In addition, the extent of disconjugacy between the two eyes progressively improved during the same time window. These results indicate that the central nervous system rapidly adapts to multichannel prosthetic vestibular stimulation to markedly improve 3D aVOR alignment within the first week after activation. Similar adaptive improvements are likely to occur in other species, including humans.

  11. Source analysis of short and long latency vestibular-evoked potentials (VsEPs) produced by left vs. right ear air-conducted 500 Hz tone pips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, N P M; Paillard, A C; Kluk, K; Whittle, E; Colebatch, J G

    2014-06-01

    Todd et al. (2014) have recently demonstrated the presence of vestibular dependent changes both in the morphology and in the intensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) when passing through the vestibular threshold as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In this paper we extend this work by comparing left vs. right ear stimulation and by conducting a source analysis of the resulting evoked potentials of short and long latency. Ten healthy, right-handed subjects were recruited and evoked potentials were recorded to both left- and right-ear sound stimulation, above and below vestibular threshold. Below VEMP threshold, typical AEPs were recorded, consisting of mid-latency (MLR) waves Na and Pa followed by long latency AEPs (LAEPs) N1 and P2. In the supra-threshold condition, the expected changes in morphology were observed, consisting of: (1) short-latency vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) which have no auditory correlate, i.e. the ocular VEMP (OVEMP) and inion response related potentials; (2) a later deflection, labelled N42/P52, followed by the LAEPs N1 and P2. Statistical analysis of the vestibular dependent responses indicated a contralateral effect for inion related short-latency responses and a left-ear/right-hemisphere advantage for the long-latency responses. Source analysis indicated that the short-latency effects may be mediated by a contralateral projection to left cerebellum, while the long-latency effects were mediated by a contralateral projection to right cingulate cortex. In addition we found evidence of a possible vestibular contribution to the auditory T-complex in radial temporal lobe sources. These last results raise the possibility that acoustic activation of the otolith organs could potentially contribute to auditory processing.

  12. Efficacy of cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials in evaluation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of posterior semicircular canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Apeksha, Kumari

    2016-09-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) constitutes a major proportion of the population with peripheral vestibulopathies. Although the freely floating otoconia within the semicircular canals is responsible for the symptoms of BPPV, the source of the otoconia debris is mainly believed to be the otolith organs. Therefore, the pathology in either or both the otolith organs appears a logical proposition. Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP), being the tests for functional integrity of the otolith organs, appear promising for investigating otolith involvement in BPPV. While recent evidences are suggestive of equivocal findings for cVEMP, there are only a few studies on oVEMP. Additionally, both these potentials have never been explored in the same set of individuals with BPPV. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the functional integrity of the otolith organs through cVEMP and oVEMP in individuals with posterior canal BPPV. Thirty-one individuals with unilateral posterior canal BPPV and 31 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent 500 Hz tone-burst-evoked cVEMP and oVEMP. The results demonstrated no significant group difference on any of the cVEMP parameters (p > 0.05). A similar trend was noticed for the latency-related parameters of oVEMP. However, the peak-to-peak amplitude was significantly smaller in the affected ears of individuals with BPPV than their unaffected ears and the ears of healthy controls (p BPPV group showed significantly higher inter-aural amplitude difference ratio than the healthy controls (p BPPV, and therefore, oVEMP appears to be better suited to clinical investigation than cVEMP in individuals with posterior canal BPPV.

  13. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2015-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  14. Perspectival Structure and Vestibular Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh

    2016-01-01

    I begin by contrasting a taxonomic approach to the vestibular system with the structural approach I take in the bulk of this commentary. I provide an analysis of perspectival structure. Employing that analysis and following the structural approach, I propose three lines of empirical investigation...

  15. Chemistry to conservation: using otoliths to advance recreational and commercial fisheries management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A K; Phelps, Q E; Graeb, B D S

    2017-02-01

    Otolith chemistry is an effective technique for evaluating fish environmental history, but its utility in fisheries management has not been comprehensively examined. Thus, a review of otolith chemistry with emphasis on management applicability is presented. More than 1500 otolith chemistry manuscripts published from 1967 to 2015 are reviewed and descriptive case studies are used to illustrate the utility of otolith chemistry as a fisheries management tool. Otolith chemistry publications span a wide variety of topics (e.g. natal origins, habitat use, movement, stock discrimination and statistical theory) and species in freshwater and marine systems. Despite the broad distribution of manuscripts in a variety of fisheries, environmental and ecological journals, the majority of publications (83%, n = 1264) do not describe implications or applications of otolith chemistry for fisheries management. This information gap is addressed through case studies that illustrate management applications of otolith chemistry. Case studies cover numerous topics (e.g. natal origins, population connectivity, stock enhancement, transgenerational marking, pollution exposure history and invasive species management) in freshwater and marine systems using sport fishes, invasive fishes, endangered fishes and species of commercial and aquaculture importance. Otolith chemistry has diverse implications and applications for fisheries management worldwide. Collaboration among fisheries professionals from academia, government agencies and non-governmental organizations will help bridge the research-management divide and establish otolith chemistry as a fisheries management tool.

  16. Comparison of vertebrae and otoliths measured directly and from radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens

    1997-01-01

    It is general practice among fish ecologists to use indigestible remains such as vertebrae and otoliths in fish stomachs to determine the nature and size of their prey. However, estimation of the relationship between fish length and vertebrae size is a time consuming process when using vertebrae ...... was established at least 10 times faster using radiographs than when direct measurements were used. (C) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V....

  17. Hierarchical structure of the otolith of adult wild carp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhuo; Gao Yonghua [State key laboratory of new ceramics and fine processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State key laboratory of new ceramics and fine processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-04-30

    The otolith of adult wild carp contains a pair of asterisci, a pair of lappilli and a pair of sagittae. Current research works are mainly restricted to the field of the daily ring structure. The purpose of this work is to explore the structural characteristics of carp's otolith in terms of hierarchy from nanometer to millimeter scale by transmission election microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on the observation, carp's lapillus is composed of ordered aragonite crystals. Seven hierarchical levels of the microstructure were proposed and described with the scheme representing a complete organization in detail. SEM studies show not only the clear daily growth increment, but also the morphology within the single daily increment. The domain structure of crystal orientation in otolith was observed for the first time. Furthermore, TEM investigation displays that the lapillus is composed of aragonite crystals with nanometer scale. Four hierarchical levels of the microstructure of the sagitta are also proposed. The asteriscus which is composed of nanometer scale vaterite crystals is considered to have a uniform structure.

  18. Stomach contents from invasive American bullfrogs Rana catesbeiana (= Lithobates catesbeianus on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Jancowski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Invasive alien American bullfrog populations are commonly identified as a pernicious influence on the survival of native species due to their adaptability, proliferation and consequent ecological impacts through competition and predation. However, it has been difficult to determine conclusively their destructive influence due to the fragmentary and geographically dispersed nature of the historical database. An expanding meta-population of invasive American bullfrogs, Rana catesbeiana (= Lithobates catesbeianus, became established on southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada in the mid- to late 1980s. An on-going bullfrog control program begun in 2006 offered a unique opportunity to examine the stomach contents removed from 5,075 adult and juvenile bullfrogs collected from 60 sites throughout the active season (April to October. Of 15 classes of organisms identified in the diet, insects were numerically dominant, particularly social wasps and odonates (damselflies and dragonflies. Seasonality and site-specific habitat characteristics influenced prey occurrence and abundance. Native vertebrates in the diet included fish, frogs, salamanders, snakes, lizards, turtles, birds, and mammals, including some of conservation concern. Certain predators of bullfrog tadpoles and juveniles are commonly preyed upon by adult bullfrogs, thereby suppressing their effectiveness as biological checks to bullfrog population growth. Prey species with anti-predator defences, such as wasps and sticklebacks, were sometimes eaten in abundance. Many prey species have some type of anti-predator defence, such as wasp stingers or stickleback spines, but there was no indication of conditioned avoidance to any of these. Results from this study reinforce the conclusion that, as an invasive alien, the American bullfrog is an opportunistic and seemingly unspecialized predator that has a uniquely large and complex ecological footprint both above and below the water surface.

  19. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years. They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%, hearing difficulties (47.3%, dizziness (36.8%, headache (26.3%, intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%, and earache (15.7%. Seven musicians (37.0% showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%. There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations.

  20. First evidence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in China: discovery of chytridiomycosis in introduced American bullfrogs and native amphibians in the Yunnan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Changming; Garner, Trenton W J; Li, Yiming

    2010-08-01

    Although the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), the etiological agent of amphibian chytridiomycosis, has been implicated in mass mortality and population declines on several continents around the world, there have been no reports on the presence of Bd infections in amphibians in China. We employed quantitative PCR and histological techniques to investigate the presence of Bd in introduced North American bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) (referred to hereafter as bullfrog) and native amphibians in bullfrog-invaded areas of the Yunnan Province, China. A total of 259 samples at five wild sites were collected between June and September in 2007 and 2008, including bullfrogs and four native amphibian species (Rana pleuraden, Rana chaochiaoensis, Odorrana andersonii, and Bombina maxima). In addition, 37 samples of adult bullfrogs were obtained from a food market. Bd infections were discovered in bullfrogs and three native amphibian species from all of the surveyed sites. Of the 39 Bd-positive samples, 35 were from wild-caught bullfrog tadpoles, postmetamorphic bullfrogs, R. pleuraden, R. chaochiaoensis, and O. andersonii, and four were from adult bullfrogs from the market. Our results provide the first evidence of the presence of Bd in Chinese amphibians, suggesting that native amphibian diversity in China is at risk from Bd. There is an urgent need to monitor the distribution of Bd in amphibians in China and understand the susceptibility of native amphibian species to chytridiomycosis. Strict regulations on the transportation of bullfrogs and the breeding of bullfrogs in markets and farms should be drafted in order to stop the spread of Bd by bullfrogs.

  1. Evaluation of cochleo-vestibular functions in patients with auditory neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namea M. Ismail

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Patients with auditory neuropathy could also have vestibular neuropathy. Vestibular neuropathy could be classified into three groups: superior vestibular neuropathy, inferior vestibular neuropathy and superior/inferior vestibular neuropathy.

  2. High‐resolution stock discrimination of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) based on otolith shape, microstructure, and genetic markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosegaard, Henrik; Worsøe Clausen, Lotte; Bekkevold, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    between populations, which suggest genetic control as well. Thus otolith shape serves as a population marker, suitable for individual assignment. Here we use otolith morphological characteristics (otolith shape and larval otolith microstructure) combined with genetic markers to discriminate between...... different populations of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in the western Baltic and adjacent waters. We analyse a baseline (spawning individuals from several populations validated by genetic markers) for separation of adult herring (2+) based on otolith shape and juveniles using genetically validated...... otolith shape characteristics as separation parameters. Otolith shape was found to clearly discriminate between individuals at all ages from different spawning populations. The identified distances between populations based on otolith shape matched previously obtained genetic distances and were, when...

  3. Provenancing fish in freshwaters of the Alpine Foreland using Sr/Ca and 87Sr/86Sr ratios in otoliths and otolith shape parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Oehm

    2015-12-01

    Although the studied freshwaters were located only in a 50 km range around lake Chiemsee on a similar geological background, differences in water chemistry, fish otolith chemistry and shape were identified. Species specific differences in reflection of the Sr/Ca ratio of a specific water body were detected. Microchemical and morphological otoliths analyses complemented each other and allowed assigning fish to specific groups of waters of origin. This information provides an important basis for the further application of otolith chemistry and shape analysis in the Alpine foreland for a diverse range of ecological questions.

  4. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  5. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy for the dizzy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L H; Chee, N W C

    2005-05-01

    A customised vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) programme is an important treatment modality in patients with vestibular dysfunction resulting in motion-provoked vertigo, oscillopsia (gaze instability), disequilibrium and gait disturbances. We discuss in this paper the patient selection criteria for VRT, rehabilitation strategies for unilateral and bilateral vestibular deficits, and some of the compelling evidence to support the use of VRT in treating such patients.

  6. [The vestibular apparatus of quail embryos in an experiment on the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychakov, D V; Il'inskaia, E V; Dadasheva, O A; Gur'eva, T S

    1993-01-01

    The light microscope was used to study serial sections of labyrinths of quail embryos incubated and reared during 12 d orbiting of Cosmos 1129. On recovery the embryos were aged 9, 11.5 and 12 days. No significant deviations in the development of the vestibular apparatus in flight species were noted as compared to the controls. Given this and our experimental data about in-space development of fish and amphibians we may deduce that hypo-g does not exert a noticeable altering effect on the vestibular embryogenesis. Nevertheless, it should be pointed out that in all otolith organs and semicircular channel ampules of the flight embryos cup-form neural endings innervating type I sensory cells were markedly swollen in contrast to the control. Earlier swollen cup-form nerve endings have been found in one adult rat after 7 days of space flight aboard Cosmos 1667. However, exposure in space does not bring about a substantial swelling of bud-like nerve endings which contact type II sensory cells. Thus, a conclusion may be drawn that spaceflight factors are liable to produce shifts in the type I sensory cell--cup-form nerve ending unit but they do not affect type II sensory cell--bud-like nerve ending unit to the extent when effects can be identified by light microscopy.

  7. Using data storage tags to link otolith macrostructure in Baltic cod Gadus morhua with environmental conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Nielsen, Birgitte; Mosegaard, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    We examined otolith opacity of Baltic cod in relation to environmental conditions in order to evaluate the formation mechanisms of seasonal patterns used in age determination. Adult fish were tagged with data storage tags (DSTs) and a permanent mark was induced in the otoliths by injection...

  8. Epidemiology and natural history of vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2012-01-01

    This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma. A treatm......This article describes various epidemiologic trends for vestibular schwannomas over the last 35 years, including a brief note on terminology. Additionally, it provides information on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing level following the diagnosis of a vestibular schwannoma....... A treatment strategy based on the natural history of tumor growth and hearing also is discussed....

  9. Vehicle effects on in vitro transdermal absorption of sevoflurane in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardente, Amanda J; Barlow, Beth M; Burns, Patrick; Goldman, Rebecca; Baynes, Ronald E

    2008-05-01

    The experimental objectives were to identify a vehicle which produces a homogenous formulation when combined with the anesthetic solution sevoflurane and understand the dermal absorption of sevoflurane in silastic membranes and amphibian skin in vitro utilizing a flow-through diffusion system. Seven vehicles were evaluated in varying ratios with 5 formulations resulting in the desired homogenous consistency for practical application. Sevoflurane diffusion across silastic membranes was influenced by pluronic/lecithin organogel (PLO), pluronic F 127 20% gel, and sterile lube. Flux and permeability across silastic membranes were significantly greater in sterile lube than in the other formulations. While no significant vehicle effects were observed in bullfrog skin, the flux-time profiles suggest that sevoflurane diffusion in bullfrog skin may be positively influenced by PLO. Future in vivo studies are required to assess sevoflurane retention after removal of these formulations to more accurately control the plane of anesthesia in amphibians.

  10. Leukotriene C4 action and metabolism in the isolated perfused bullfrog heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R P; Heller, R S; Canavan, C M; Herman, C A

    1988-08-01

    The effects of leukotrienes (LTs) have been widely studied in the isolated perfused mammalian heart; however, little is known about the effect or metabolism of LTs in the isolated bullfrog heart. Isolated perfused bullfrog hearts were administered randomized doses of LTC4, LTD4, or LTE4. The cardiac parameters of heart rate, developed tension, and its first derivative (dT/dt) were recorded. LTC4 was the most potent of the leukotrienes tested in eliciting positive inotropic effects. LTD4 and LTE4 were equally effective but about one order of magnitude less potent than LTC4. None of the LTs showed any chronotropic effects in this preparation. A series of [3H]LTC4 metabolism experiments were carried out using whole perfused hearts and minced bullfrog heart tissue. Isolated perfused bullfrog hearts administered [3H]LTC4 converted significant amounts to [3H]LTD4, and to a lesser degree, [3H]LTE4, during the 6-min course of collection. Both minced atrial and ventricular tissue converted [3H]LTC4 to radioactive metabolites that co-migrated with authentic LTD4 and LTE4 standards. In both tissues, the major product was [3H]LTD4, with smaller amounts of [3H]LTE4 produced. The atrium converted significantly more [3H]LTC4 to its metabolites than did the ventricle. The metabolism of [3H]LTC4 to [3H]LTD4 by both tissues was virtually abolished in the presence of serine borate. Cysteine had no effect on [3H]LTE4 production. The data in this study demonstrate that leukotrienes have the opposite inotropic effect on the heart when compared with mammals. Also in contrast to mammals, frogs metabolize LTC4 to a less potent compound and may use the LTC4 to LTD4 conversion as a mechanism of LTC4 inactivation.

  11. Genetic reconstruction of a bullfrog invasion to elucidate vectors of introduction and secondary spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Sepulveda, Adam; Layhee, Megan J.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing historical colonization pathways of an invasive species is critical for uncovering factors that determine invasion success and for designing management strategies. The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) is endemic to eastern North America, but now has a global distribution and is considered to be one of the worst invaders in the world. In Montana, several introduced populations have been reported, but little is known of their sources and vectors of introduction and secondary spread. We evaluated the genetic composition of introduced populations at local (Yellowstone River floodplain) and regional (Montana and Wyoming) scales in contrast to native range populations. Our objectives were to (1) estimate the number of introductions, (2) identify probable native sources, (3) evaluate genetic variation relative to sources, and (4) characterize properties of local- and regional-scale spread. We sequenced 937 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b locus in 395 tadpoles collected along 100 km of the Yellowstone River, from three additional sites in MT and a proximate site in WY. Pairwise ΦST revealed high divergence among nonnative populations, suggesting at least four independent introductions into MT from diverse sources. Three cyt b haplotypes were identical to native haplotypes distributed across the Midwest and Great Lakes regions, and AMOVA confirmed the western native region as a likely source. While haplotype (Hd = 0.69) and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.005) were low in introduced bullfrogs, the levels of diversity did not differ significantly from source populations. In the Yellowstone, two identified haplotypes implied few introduction vectors and a significant relationship between genetic and river distance was found. Evidence for multiple invasions and lack of subsequent regional spread emphasizes the importance of enforcing legislation prohibiting bullfrog importation and the need for continuing public education to prevent

  12. THE EVOKED VOCAL RESPONSE OF THE BULLFROG; A STUDY OF COMMUNICATION BY SOUND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research attempts to bridge the existing gap between the naturalistic observations of sound communication in anurans and the anatomical and...principles by which information is processed within the intact animal. To this end, vocal behavior has been evoked from the males of laboratory colonies of...bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) in response to a restricted class of natural and synthetic sounds. The evoked vocal responses, having the signal

  13. Improving Early Adaptation Following Long Duration Spaceflight by Enhancing Vestibular Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Kofman, Igor; DeDios, Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Cohen, Helen; Jeevarajan, Jerome; Reschke, Millard; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    performance while standing on an unstable surface indicating that SVS may be sufficient to provide a comprehensive countermeasure approach for improving postural stability. In a second study, we showed that SVS improved locomotor performance on a treadmill mounted on an oscillating platform indicating that SVS may also be used to maximize locomotor performance during walking in unstable environments. In a third study, SVS was evaluated during an otolith-canal conflict scenario in a variable radius centrifuge at low frequency of oscillation (0.1 Hz) on both eye movements and perceptual responses (using a joystick) to track imposed oscillations. The variable radius centrifuge provides a selective tilting sensation that is detectable only by the otolith organs providing conflicting information from the canal organs of the vestibular system (intra-vestibular conflict). Results show that SVS significantly reduced the timing difference between both the eye movement responses as well as the perceptual tracking responses with respect to the imposed tilt sensations. These results indicate that SVS can improve performance in sensory conflict scenarios like that experienced during space flight. Such a SR countermeasure will act synergistically along with the pre-and in-flight adaptability training protocols providing an integrated, multi-disciplinary countermeasure capable of fulfilling multiple requirements making it a comprehensive and cost effective countermeasure approach to enhance sensorimotor capabilities following long-duration space flight.

  14. Morphometric growth characteristics and body composition of bullfrog tadpoles in captivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Menegasso Mansano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Feed management needs to be improved in frog farming to reduce the indirect effects of inadequate feeding and, consequently, to increase growth rates and nutrient deposition, obtaining better quality animals. The objective of this study was to establish morphometric growth curves for bullfrog tadpoles (Lithobates catesbeianus and to determine nutrient deposition in the carcass. A total of 6,480 bullfrogs (Gosner stage 25 received an experimental diet (26.23% digestible protein and 32.68% crude protein and a commercial diet (37.92% crude protein ad libitum. A Gompertz model was used to describe the growth curve. Tadpoles fed the experimental diet presented higher final protein deposition. In addition, the sigmoidal curve was much more homogenous, indicating a more constant daily protein deposition rate. The Gompertz model provided an excellent fit of the data to describe the morphometric growth curve and carcass nutrient deposition of bullfrog tadpoles, showing that animals fed the experimental diet presented a better growth rate and nutrient deposition.

  15. Multiple stressors in amphibian communities: Effects of chemical contamination, bullfrogs, and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, M.D.; Semlitsch, R.D.; Little, E.E.; Doyle, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    A leading hypothesis of amphibian population declines is that combinations of multiple stressors contribute to declines. We examined the role that chemical contamination, competition, and predation play singly and in combination in aquatic amphibian communities. We exposed larvae of American toads (Bufo americanus), southern leopard frogs (Rana sphenocephala), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) to overwintered bullfrog tadpoles (R. catesbeiana), bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), the insecticide carbaryl, and ammonium nitrate fertilizer in 1000-L mesocosms. Most significantly, our study demonstrated that the presence of multiple factors reduced survival of B. americanus and A. maculatum and lengthened larval periods of R. sphenocephala. The presence of bluegill had the largest impact on the community; it eliminated B. americanus and A. maculatum and reduced the abundance of R. sphenocephala. Chemical contaminants had the second strongest effect on the community with the insecticide, reducing A. maculatum abundance by 50% and increasing the mass of anurans (frogs and toads) at metamorphosis; the fertilizer positively influenced time and mass at metamorphosis for both anurans and A. maculatum. Presence of overwintered bullfrogs reduced mass and increased time to metamorphosis of anurans. While both bluegill and overwintered bullfrog tadpoles had negative effects on the amphibian community, they performed better in the presence of one another and in contaminated habitats. Our results indicate that predicting deleterious combinations from single-factor effects may not be straightforward. Our research supports the hypothesis that combinations of factors can negatively impact some amphibian species and could contribute to population declines. ?? 2007 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Malnutrition in farm-cultured bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana fed on bovine milled lung in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Coppo, N B Mussart

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The true nutritional requirements of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana, Anura: Ranidae are still controversial. In Argentine hatcheries, bullfrogs are fed on commercial balanced diets elaborated for fish; high price of balanced food decreases the relationship cost / benefit. This study had the objective to verify the nutritious effectiveness of bovine lung, by means of liveweight gains and metabolic and nutritional biochemical indicators controls. Eighty frogs were randomly divided into experimental (E and control (C groups of 40 animals each. Controls consumed a fish commercial balanced diet (23% protein in dry matter, DM, while those in group E were fed on bovine milled lung (16% protein, DM. Food was administered at a rate of 5% of liveweight/day (DM for both groups. The weighings and collection of samples were made on days 0 and 120. One frog of group C and 8 frogs of group E died during the study. Control animals did not register physical abnormalities. On the other hand, emaciation, adynamia, weakness, anorexy, and skin abnormal coloration were verified in some amphibians of group E. At the end of the study, liveweight and albumin, creatinine, urea, cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, phosphorous and magnesium serum values, were significantly lower in group E than in group C (p < 0.05. This changes are attributed to metabolic imbalances related to malnutrition and reveal that bovine lung is not an appropriate food for captive bullfrog.

  17. Spatial and ontogenetic variability in the chemical composition of juvenile common sole ( Solea solea) otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, S. E.; Vasconcelos, R. P.; Reis-Santos, P.; Cabral, H. N.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    A description of variations in the chemical composition of fish otoliths at different spatial scales and life history stages is a prerequisite for their use as natural tags in fish population connectivity and migration studies. Otolith geochemistry of juvenile common sole ( Solea solea), a marine migrant species collected in six Portuguese estuaries was examined. Elemental ratios (Mg:Ca, Mn:Ca, Cu:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca, Pb:Ca) were analysed in two zones of the right otolith (corresponding to late larval and juvenile stages) using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Stable carbon and oxygen isotopes (δ 13C and δ 18O) were determined in left otoliths using isotopic ratio monitoring mass spectrometry (irm-MS). Significant differences in otolith geochemical signatures were found among estuaries, among sites within estuaries and between otolith zones. Several elemental ratios (Mg:Ca, Mn:Ca, Cu:Ca and Sr:Ca) showed consistent patterns between otolith zones and were likely influenced by environmental factors and ontogenetic effects associated with physiological changes during metamorphosis. Assignment of individuals to their collection estuary based on the otolith geochemical signatures was more accurate at the site level (81%) than among estuaries (69%). Site temperature was not correlated with any of the elemental or isotope ratios, but salinity was significantly correlated with Ba:Ca, δ 13C and δ 18O. Observed spatial variations among estuaries and sites within estuaries indicate that geochemical signatures in otoliths are accurate natural tags of estuarine habitat in common sole. Nevertheless, the significant variations observed between otolith zones should be taken into account in the design of population connectivity studies.

  18. Boom in boarfish abundance: insight from otolith analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coad, Julie Olivia; Hüssy, Karin

    2012-01-01

    for this increase in stock size. Based on annual otolith growth increments, we developed a growth chronology as a proxy for stock fecundity. Growth patterns were similar between geographically separate areas west and south of Ireland, with distinct years of good and bad growth. Good growth was observed in 2004...... of fish are only aged 4–6 years. These age classes correspond to the year with exceptionally high recruitment. This study has demonstrated that both adult growth as a proxy for reproductive potential and environmental conditions favouring early life stage survival may be the cause for the boom in boarfish...

  19. Suitability of otolith microchemistry for stock separation of Baltic cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, F; Marohn, L; Hinrichsen, HH

    2012-01-01

    differences between individuals from the eastern and the western Baltic Sea and between North Sea and Baltic Sea samples. Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Y/Ca, Mg/Ca, Zr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios had the strongest discriminatory power. A further separation of individuals caught in 3 different spawning grounds of the eastern Baltic......, however, was not possible. Elemental compositions from the core regions of otoliths from young of the year cod caught in eastern and western Baltic Sea spawning grounds showed significant differences in Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca and Mg/Ca concentrations. Analyses of similarities again showed significant differences...

  20. Convergent properties of vestibular-related brain stem neurons in the gerbil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Three classes of vestibular-related neurons were found in and near the prepositus and medial vestibular nuclei of alert or decerebrate gerbils, those responding to: horizontal translational motion, horizontal head rotation, or both. Their distribution ratios were 1:2:2, respectively. Many cells responsive to translational motion exhibited spatiotemporal characteristics with both response gain and phase varying as a function of the stimulus vector angle. Rotationally sensitive neurons were distributed as Type I, II, or III responses (sensitive to ipsilateral, contralateral, or both directions, respectively) in the ratios of 4:6:1. Four tested factors shaped the response dynamics of the sampled neurons: canal-otolith convergence, oculomotor-related activity, rotational Type (I or II), and the phase of the maximum response. Type I nonconvergent cells displayed increasing gains with increasing rotational stimulus frequency (0.1-2.0 Hz, 60 degrees /s), whereas Type II neurons with convergent inputs had response gains that markedly decreased with increasing translational stimulus frequency (0.25-2.0 Hz, +/-0.1 g). Type I convergent and Type II nonconvergent neurons exhibited essentially flat gains across the stimulus frequency range. Oculomotor-related activity was noted in 30% of the cells across all functional types, appearing as burst/pause discharge patterns related to the fast phase of nystagmus during head rotation. Oculomotor-related activity was correlated with enhanced dynamic range compared with the same category that had no oculomotor-related response. Finally, responses that were in-phase with head velocity during rotation exhibited greater gains with stimulus frequency increments than neurons with out-of-phase responses. In contrast, for translational motion, neurons out of phase with head acceleration exhibited low-pass characteristics, whereas in-phase neurons did not. Data from decerebrate preparations revealed that although similar response types could

  1. Motor development after vestibular deprivation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geisler, HC; Gramsbergen, A

    1998-01-01

    This review summarizes the postural development in the rat and the influences of vestibular deprivation from the 5th postnatal day on this development. Vestibular deprivation leads to a delay in motor development. Most probably this delay is caused by a delay in the development of postural control,

  2. Body size affects the predatory interactions between introduced American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) and native anurans in China: An experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Guo, Z.; Pearl, C.A.; Li, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Introduced American Bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana) have established breeding populations in several provinces in China since their introduction in 1959. Although Bullfrogs are viewed as a potentially important predator of Chinese native anurans, their impacts in the field are difficult to quantify. We used two experiments to examine factors likely to mediate Bullfrog predation on native anurans. First, we examined effects of Bullfrog size and sex on daily consumption of a common Chinese native (Rana limnocharis). Second, we examined whether Bullfrogs consumed similar proportions of four Chinese natives: Black-Spotted Pond Frog (Rana nigromaculata), Green Pond Frog (Rana plancyi plancyi), Rice Frog (R. limnocharis), and Zhoushan Toad (Bufo bufo gargarizans). We found that larger Rana catesbeiana consumed more R. limnocharis per day than did smaller R. catesbeiana, and that daily consumption of R. limnocharis was positively related to R. catesbeiana body size. When provided with adults of four anurans that differed significantly in body size, R. catesbeiana consumed more individuals of the smallest species (R. limnocharis). However, when provided with similarly sized juveniles of the same four species, R. catesbeiana did not consume any species more than expected by chance. Our results suggest that body size plays an important role in the predatory interactions between R. catesbeiana and Chinese native anurans and that, other things being equal, smaller species and individuals are at greater risk of predation by R. catesbeiana. Copyright 2007 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  3. Habitat connectivity and resident shared predators determine the impact of invasive bullfrogs on native frogs in farm ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atobe, Takashi; Osada, Yutaka; Takeda, Hayato; Kuroe, Misako; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2014-07-07

    Habitat connectivity is considered to have an important role on the persistence of populations in the face of habitat fragmentation, in particular, for species with conservation concern. However, it can also impose indirect negative effects on native species through the spread of invasive species. Here, we investigated direct and indirect effects of habitat connectivity on populations of invasive bullfrogs and native wrinkled frogs and how these effects are modified by the presence of common carp, a resident shared predator, in a farm pond system in Japan. The distribution pattern analysis using a hierarchical Bayesian modelling indicated that bullfrogs had negative effects on wrinkled frogs, and that these negative effects were enhanced with increasing habitat connectivity owing to the metapopulation structure of bullfrogs. The analysis also suggested that common carp mitigated these impacts, presumably owing to a top-down trophic cascade through preferential predation on bullfrog tadpoles. These presumed interspecific interactions were supported by evidence from laboratory experiments, i.e. predation by carp was more intense on bullfrog tadpoles than on wrinkled frog tadpoles owing to the difference in refuge use. Our results indicate that metacommunity perspectives could provide useful insights for establishing effective management strategies of invasive species living in patchy habitats.

  4. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forbes, P.A.; Siegmund, G.P.; Schouten, A.C.; Blouin, J.S.

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular informati

  5. Chemical composition of saccular endolymph and otolith in fish inner ear: lack of spatial uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, P; Edeyer, A; de Pontual, H; Borelli, G; Boeuf, G; Mayer-Gostan, N

    1999-07-01

    Fish otoliths provide a record of age, growth, and environmental influences. In both trout and turbot, spatial chemical investigation of the endolymph surrounding the otolith (sagitta) showed a lack of uniformity. Proteins, PO(3-)(4), and Mg(2+) were significantly more concentrated in the proximal (facing the macula) than distal zone, whereas the opposite was observed for K(+) and total CO(2) (totCO(2)). Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]) was 20% higher in the proximal zone in trout but not in turbot. Total Ca and Cl(-) contents were uniformly distributed in both species. We propose that the endolymphatic gradients of protein and totCO(2) concentration within the endolymph are involved in the otolithic biocalcification process. Microchemical analyses of otolith sections by wavelength dispersive spectrometry showed a lack of spatial uniformity in the K/Ca and Na/Ca ratios, whereas the Sr/Ca ratio was uniform. There is a clear relationship between endolymph and otolith [K(+)], but the interpretation of the results for [Na(+)] needs further investigation. Thus the lack of uniformity in the otolith composition must be taken into account when investigating otolith microchemistry.

  6. Low-frequency physiological activation of the vestibular utricle causes biphasic modulation of skin sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Tarandeep; Dawood, Tye; Hammam, Elie; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation, a means of selectively modulating vestibular afferent activity, can cause partial entrainment of sympathetic outflow to muscle and skin in human subjects. However, it influences the firing of afferents from the entire vestibular apparatus, including the semicircular canals. Here, we tested the hypothesis that selective stimulation of one set of otolithic organs-those located in the utricle, which are sensitive to displacement in the horizontal axis-could entrain sympathetic nerve activity. Skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 10 awake subjects, seated (head vertical, eyes closed) on a motorised platform. Slow sinusoidal accelerations-decelerations (~4 mG) were applied in the X (antero-posterior) or Y (medio-lateral) direction at 0.08 Hz; composite movements in both directions were also applied. Subjects either reported feeling a vague sense of movement (with no sense of direction) or no movement at all. Nevertheless, cross-correlation analysis revealed a marked entrainment of SSNA for all types of movements: vestibular modulation was 97 ± 3 % for movements in the X axis and 91 ± 5 % for displacements in the Y axis. For each sinusoidal cycle, there were two major peaks of modulation-one associated with acceleration as the platform moved forward or to the side, and one associated with acceleration in the opposite direction. We interpret these observations as reflecting inertial displacement of the stereocilia within the utricle during acceleration, which causes a robust vestibulosympathetic reflex.

  7. Effects of vibrotactile vestibular substitution on vestibular rehabilitation - preliminary study,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Brugnera

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Some patients with severe impairment of body balance do not obtain adequate improvement from vestibular rehabilitation (VR. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of Vertiguard(tm biofeedback equipment as a sensory substitution (SS of the vestibular system in patients who did not obtain sufficient improvement from VR. METHODS: This was a randomized prospective clinical study. Thirteen patients without satisfactory response to conventional VR were randomized into a study group (SG, which received the vibrotactile stimulus from Vertiguard(tm for ten days, and a control group (CG, which used equipment without the stimulus. For pre- and post-treatment assessment, the Sensory Organization Test (SOT protocol of the Computerized Dynamic Posturography (CDP and two scales of balance self-perception, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, were used. RESULTS: After treatment, only the SG showed statistically significant improvement in C5 (p = 0.007 and C6 (p = 0.01. On the ABC scale, there was a significant difference in the SG (p= 0.04. The DHI showed a significant difference in CG and SG with regard to the physical aspect, and only in the SG for the functional aspect (p = 0.04. CONCLUSION: The present findings show that sensory substitution using the vibrotactile stimulus of the Vertiguard(tm system helped with the integration of neural networks involved in maintaining posture, improving the strategies used in the recovery of body balance.

  8. Special (vestibular training of servicemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonin V.M.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that conditions of professional activity of airmobile servicemen require from them, in addition to excellent proficiency in military armament and materiel, high level of physical qualities and movement coordination development. It is essential to have high practice of vestibular apparatus, which helps to resist such negative feature as air sickness. The essences of term air sickness, its negative consequences for professional activity are highlighted. Possible tendencies of work in terms of enhancing organism resistance to air sickness (according to the analysis of publications and practical experience are investigated.

  9. An evaluation of agreement between pectoral spines and otoliths for estimating ages of catfishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J.A.; Schramm, Harold; Gerard, Patrick D.; Irwin, E.

    2011-01-01

    Otoliths have been shown to provide more accurate ages than pectoral spine sections for several catfish populations; but sampling otoliths requires euthanizing the specimen, whereas spines can be sampled non-lethally. To evaluate whether, and under what conditions, spines provide the same or similar age estimates as otoliths, we examined data sets of individual fish aged from pectoral spines and otoliths for six blue catfish Ictalurus furcatus populations (n=420), 14 channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus populations (n=997), and 10 flathead catfish Pylodictus olivaris populations (n=947) from lotic and lentic waters throughout the central and eastern U.S. Logistic regression determined that agreement between ages estimated from otoliths and spines was consistently related to age, but inconsistently related to growth rate. When modeled at mean growth rate, we found at least 80% probability of no difference in spine- and otolith-assigned ages up to ages 4 and 5 for blue and channel catfish, respectively. For flathead catfish, an 80% probability of agreement between spine- and otolith-assigned ages did not occur at any age due to high incidence of differences in assigned ages even for age-1 fish. Logistic regression models predicted at least 80% probability that spine and otolith ages differed by ≤1 year up to ages 13, 16, and 9 for blue, channel, and flathead catfish, respectively. Age-bias assessment found mean spine-assigned age differed by less than 1 year from otolith-assigned age up to ages 19, 9, and 17 for blue catfish, channel catfish, and flathead catfish, respectively. These results can be used to help guide decisions about which structure is most appropriate for estimating catfish ages for particular populations and management objectives.

  10. A bioenergetic approach to model and reconstruct individual life traits from fish otoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; Høie, Hans;

    2012-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm‐following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history, and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosy...... observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  11. Aging of the Human Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Christopher K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging affects every sensory system in the body, including the vestibular system. Although its impact is often difficult to quantify, the deleterious impact of aging on the vestibular system is serious both medically and economically. The deterioration of the vestibular sensory end organs has been known since the 1970s; however, the measurable impact from these anatomical changes remains elusive. Tests of vestibular function either fall short in their ability to quantify such anatomical deterioration, or they are insensitive to the associated physiologic decline and/or central compensatory mechanisms that accompany the vestibular aging process. When compared with healthy younger individuals, a paucity of subtle differences in test results has been reported in the healthy older population, and those differences are often observed only in response to nontraditional and/or more robust stimuli. In addition, the reported differences are often clinically insignificant insomuch that the recorded physiologic responses from the elderly often fall within the wide normative response ranges identified for normal healthy adults. The damaging economic impact of such vestibular sensory decline manifests itself in an exponential increase in geriatric dizziness and a subsequent higher prevalence of injurious falls. An estimated $10 to $20 billion dollar annual cost has been reported to be associated with falls-related injuries and is the sixth leading cause of death in the elderly population, with a 20% mortality rate. With an estimated 115% increase in the geriatric population over 65 years of age by the year 2050, the number of balanced-disordered patients with a declining vestibular system is certain to reach near epidemic proportions. An understanding of the effects of age on the vestibular system is imperative if clinicians are to better manage elderly patients with balance disorders, dizziness, and vestibular disease. PMID:27516717

  12. Recovery of vestibular ocular reflex function and balance control after a unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allum, J H J

    2012-01-01

    This review describes the effect of unilateral peripheral vestibular deficit (UPVD) on balance control for stance and gait tests. Because a UPVD is normally defined based on vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) tests, we compared recovery observed in balance control with patterns of recovery in VOR function. Two general types of UPVD are considered; acute vestibular neuritis (AVN) and vestibular neurectomy. The latter was subdivided into vestibular loss after cerebellar pontine angle tumor surgery during which a vestibular neurectomy was performed, and vestibular loss following neurectomy to eliminate disabling Ménière's disease. To measure balance control, body-worn gyroscopes, mounted near the body's center of mass (CoM), were used. Measurement variables were the pitch (anterior-posterior) and roll (lateral) sway angles and angular velocities of the lower trunk/pelvis. Both patient groups showed balance deficits during stance tasks on foam, especially with eyes closed when stable balance control is normally highly dependent on vestibular inputs. Deficits during gait were also present and were more profound for complex gait tasks such as tandem gait than simple gait tasks. Major differences emerged between the groups concerning the severity of the deficit and its recovery. Generally, the effects of acute neuritis on balance control were more severe but recovered rapidly. Deficits due to vestibular neurectomy were less severe, but longer lasting. These results mostly paralleled recovery of deficits in VOR function. However, questions need to be raised about the effect on balance control of the two modes of neural plasticity occurring in the vestibular system following vestibular loss due to neuritis: one mode being the limited central compensation for the loss, and the second mode being some restoration of peripheral vestibular function. Future work will need to correlate deficits in balance control during stance and gait more exactly with VOR deficits and carefully

  13. Leukotriene C4 binds to receptors and has positive inotropic effects in bullfrog heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiono, M; Heller, R S; Andazola, J J; Herman, C A

    1991-03-01

    Leukotriene (LT) C4, LTD4 and LTE4 have positive inotropic effects on contractility of the isolated perfused bullfrog heart. The effects of LTD4 and LTE4 but not LTC4 can be blocked by the mammalian antagonist L-649,923. Characterization of specific binding sites for [3H]LTC4 on membrane preparations from American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) ventricle was carried out. Binding assays were done in the presence of serine (5 mM) and borate (10 mM) for 30 min at 23 degrees C. Under these conditions, no metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4 occurred. Specific binding of [3H]LTC4 reached steady state within 10 min, remained constant for 60 min, and was reversible with the addition of 1000-fold excess unlabeled LTC4. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated a single class of binding sites with a Kd of 33.9 nM and maximal binding capacity of 51.6 pmol/mg of protein. Competition binding studies revealed an order of potency of LTC4 greater than LTD4 greater than LTE4 with Ki values of 47, 11766 and 32248 nM, respectively. Glutathione and hematin had Ki values of 50566 and 6014 nM, respectively, suggesting that the LTC4 receptor is not a site on glutathione transferase. Two mammalian LTD4 antagonists, L-649,923 and LY171883 failed to inhibit specific binding of [3H]LTC4, suggesting that the LTC4 receptor is distinct from the LTD4 receptor. Guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate did not affect specific binding of [3H]LTC4 indicating that, like mammalian LTC4 receptors, a Gi protein is not involved in the transduction mechanism. LTC4 acts on bullfrog hearts through specific membrane receptors and is similar to its mammalian counterpart.

  14. Off-vertical axis rotation: a test of the otolith-ocular reflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, J. M.; Schor, R. H.; Schumann, T. L.

    1992-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex was studied via off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) in the dark. The axis of the turntable could be tilted from vertical by up to 30 degrees. Eye movements were measured with electro-oculography. Results from healthy asymptomatic subjects indicated that 1) a reliable otolith-induced response could be obtained during constant velocity OVAR using a velocity of 60 degrees/s with a tilt of 30 degrees; 2) constant velocity OVAR rotation was nausea-producing and, especially if subjects were rotated in the dark about an earth-vertical axis prior to being tilted, disorienting; and 3) sinusoidal OVAR produced minimal nausea; the eye movement response appeared to be the result of a combination of semicircular canal and otolith components. We conclude that OVAR has the potential of becoming a useful method for clinically assessing both the otolith-ocular reflex and semicircular canal-otolith interaction.

  15. Strontium content in otoliths of common fish species in the northern Baltic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, J-O.; Heselius, S-J. [Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Himberg, M.; Hagerstand, H. [Cell Biology, Department of Biosciences, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Harju, L. [Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemical Engineering, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Lindroos, A. [Geology and Mineralogy, Department of Natural Sciences, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Gunnelius, K.; Smâtt, J-H. [Physical Chemistry, Department of Natural Sciences, Abo Akademi University, Turku (Finland)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: The salinity of water in the northern Baltic Sea forms a gradient as it receives fresh water from several large rivers in the north and salty water by infrequent inflows of North Sea water in the south. The salinity of brackish water in the north-south direction (700 km) changes from about 3 to 7%. In an attempt to use the salinity gradient to study migration patterns, sagittae otoliths were collected from common fish species caught at different locations along the Finnish west coast. Otoliths from fishes caught in fresh-water lakes in Finland and Estonia were also included in the study for comparison. Part of the otoliths was grind and the powder was pressed to pellets which were irradiated in air with an ion beam from the Abo Akademi cyclotron and the emitted X-rays were measured. Other otoliths were embedded in epoxy and polished to reveal the ring structure. These prepared otoliths were irradiated with the ion beam to determine elemental profiles. Furthermore, XRD was applied to study the crystal structure and to identify the minerals in the otoliths. The strontium level of water is usually related to its salinity, and as the strontium ions are able to replace calcium ions in fish otoliths [1], the strontium content in fish otoliths from the same locations is expected to be very similar. However, the PIXE analyses revealed large differences in the strontium content between otoliths from different species of fish caught at the same locations. The strontium concentration in otoliths of perch and pike from the Aland Islands was about 1600 μg/g and of common whitefish 3600 μg/g. The strontium concentration in perch otoliths from the Oravais archipelago, about 400 km north of the Aland Islands, was 1400 μg/g. Corresponding concentration in otoliths of perch and pike caught in fresh-water lakes was 200 μg/g and of common whitefish from Saadjarve 400 μg/g and from Lake Inari 1000 μg/g. Otoliths of perch contained no detectable amounts of zinc (Iower

  16. When local anesthesia becomes universal: pronounced systemic effects of subcutaneous lidocaine in bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, catherine; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Bertelsen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Sodium channel blockers are commonly injected local anesthesia but are also routinely used in general immersion anesthesia for fish and amphibians. Here we report the effects of subcutaneous injection of lidocaine (5 or 50 mg kg-1) in the hind limb of bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) on reflexes......). Reflexes were regained over 4 h. Systemic sedative effects were not coupled to local anti-nociception, as a forceps pinch test at the site of injection provoked movement at the height of the systemic effect (tested at 81 ± 4 min). Amphibians are routinely subject to general anesthesia via exposure...

  17. Growth characteristics and Otolith analysis on Age-0 American Shad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Sally T.; Wetzel, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Otolith microstructure analysis provides useful information on the growth history of fish (Campana and Jones 1992, Bang and Gronkjaer 2005). Microstructure analysis can be used to construct the size-at-age growth trajectory of fish, determine daily growth rates, and estimate hatch date and other ecologically important life history events (Campana and Jones 1992, Tonkin et al. 2008). This kind of information can be incorporated into bioenergetics modeling, providing necessary data for estimating prey consumption, and guiding the development of empirically-based modeling scenarios for hypothesis testing. For example, age-0 American shad co-occur with emigrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon originating from Hanford Reach and the Snake River in the lower Columbia River reservoirs during the summer and early fall. The diet of age-0 American shad appears to overlap with that of juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Chapter 1, this report), but juvenile fall Chinook salmon are also known to feed on age-0 American shad in the reservoirs (USGS unpublished data). Abundant, energy-dense age-0 American shad may provide juvenile fall Chinook salmon opportunities for rapid growth during the time period when large numbers of age-0 American shad are available. Otolith analysis of hatch dates and the growth curve of age-0 American shad could be used to identify when eggs, larvae, and juveniles of specific size classes are temporally available as food for fall Chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River reservoirs. This kind of temporally and spatially explicit life history information is important to include in bioenergetics modeling scenarios. Quantitative estimates of prey consumption could be used with spatially-explicit estimates of prey abundance to construct a quantitative assessment of the age-0 American shad impact on a reservoir food web.

  18. Documenting utility of paddlefish otoliths for quantification of metals using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James M.; Schaffler, James J.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE The otoliths of the inner ear of fishes record the environment of their surrounding water throughout their life. For paddlefish (Polyodon spathula), otoliths have not been routinely used by scientists since their detriments were outlined in the early 1940s. We sought to determine if paddlefish otoliths were useful for resolving elemental information contained within. METHODS Adult paddlefish were collected from two wild, self-sustaining populations in Oklahoma reservoirs in the Arkansas River basin. Juveniles were obtained from a hatchery in the Red River basin of Oklahoma. Otoliths were removed and laser ablation, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to quantify eight elements (Li, Mg, Mn, Rb, Sr, Y, Ba, and Pb) along the core and edge portions, which were analyzed for differences between otolith regions and among paddlefish sources. RESULTS Differences were found among samples for six of the eight elements examined. Otoliths from Red River basin paddlefish born in a hatchery had significantly lower amounts of Mg and Mn, but higher levels of Rb than otoliths from wild paddlefish in the Arkansas River basin. Concentrations of Y, Sr, and Ba were reduced on the edges of adult paddlefish from both reservoirs compared with the cores. CONCLUSIONS This research shows the utility of using an ICP-MS analysis of paddlefish otoliths. Future research that seeks to determine sources of paddlefish production, such as which reservoir tributaries are most important for reproduction or what proportion of the population is composed of wild versus hatchery-produced individuals, appears promising. Published in 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Vestibular Schwannoma (Acoustic Neuroma) and Neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the inner ear. The tumor comes from an overproduction of Schwann cells—the cells that normally wrap ... begin to develop new therapies to control the overproduction of Schwann cells in individuals with vestibular schwannoma. ...

  20. Sensory Dissociation in Vestibular Function Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolmachev Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The project aims to create а solution to the problem of early diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders, accompanied by imbalance, and to develop rehabilitation methods for patients with vestibular disorders. The balanced upright position is a result of interaction between vestibular system, skeleton and muscles, visual, and proprioceptive systems. Postural abnormalities are caused by morphological or functional alteration of the components of the equilibrioception system. These disorders weaken the ability of the central nervous system to process vestibular, visual and proprioceptive signals, which are responsible for the sense of balance. Moreover, it also decreases the plasticity of the nervous system, resulting in adaptation disfunctionality. Unfortunately, premorbid detection of vestibular dysfunctions is quite a complicated test because available methods to evaluate postural reflexes have low sensitivity and specifity. Consequently, the development of methods to assess functional state of the equilibrioception system becoming viable in order to detect neurodegenerative disorders as early as possible, to control treatment and rehabilitation procedures.

  1. Current drug treatments for vestibular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valeryevich Zamergrad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There has recently been significant progress in the treatment of different diseases accompanied by dizziness. First and foremost, this is due to the development of highly effective medical positioning maneuvers for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and to their introduction into practice. At the same time, drug treatments for vertigo are being continued under development. The paper considers the current methods of symptomatic and pathogenetic treatment for different diseases of the vestibular system. It gives data on current medicinal approaches to the treatment of vestibular neuronitis, Mеniеre's disease, migraine-associated vertigo, and central vestibulopathies. Furthermore, prospects for the use of drugs together with vestibular exercises to stimulate central vestibular compensation are discussed.

  2. Ultrastructural aspects of otoliths and sensory epithelia of fish inner ear exposed to hypergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M.; Nindl, G.; Anken, R. H.; Körtje, K. H.; Rahmann, H.

    The present electron microscopical investigations were directed to the question, whether alterations in the gravitational force might induce structural changes in the morphology of otoliths or/and inner ear sensory epithelia of developing and adult swordtail fish (Xiphophorus helleri) that had been kept either under long-term moderate hypergravity (8 days; 3g) or under short-time extreme hypergravity (10 minutes up to 9g). The otoliths of adult and neonate swordtail fish were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Macular epithelia of adult fish were examined both by SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The saccular otoliths (sagittae) of normally hatched adult fish revealed an enormous inter- (and even intra-; i.e. left vs. right) individual diversity in shape and size, whereas the otoliths of utricles (lapilli) and lagenae (asterisci) seemed to be more constant regarding morphological parameters. The structural diversity of juvenile otoliths was found to be less prominent as compared to the adults, differing from the latter regarding their peculiar crystalline morphology. Qualitative differences in the fine structure (SEM) of otoliths taken from adult and larval animals kept under 3g in comparison to 1g controls could not be observed. The SEM and TEM investigations of sensory epithelia also did not reveal any effects due to 3g stimulation. Even extreme hypergravity (more than 7g) for 10 minutes did not result in distinct pathological changes.

  3. Fast-Growing Vestibular Schwannoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcioni, Maurizio; Taibah, Abdelkader; De Donato, Giuseppe; Piccirillo, Enrico; Russo, Alessandra; Sanna, Mario

    2000-01-01

    A case of a Jehovah's witness affected by an intracanalicular vestibular schwannoma with an extremely fast growth rate is presented. Nine months after presentation, the tumor reached 23 mm in the cerebellopontine angle. A partial removal through a retrosigmoid approach was planned. Because of the presence of a dominant high jugular bulb masquering the internal auditory canal, the intracanalicular portion of the tumor was left in place. The residual tumor grew 12 mm in 2 months. Even after a gross total removal through a middle cranial fossa approach, the tumor recurred, reaching the size of 30 mm in 17 months. A modified transcochlear approach was then performed, and the patient was free of disease at the last radiologic follow-up, 8 months after the surgery. We illustrate our strategy in treating this aggressive benign lesion with unusual behavior. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10 PMID:17171109

  4. BASIC CONCEPTS IN UNDERSTANDING RECOVERY OF FUNCTION IN VESTIBULAR REFLEX NETWORKS DURING VESTIBULAR COMPENSATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenna ePeusner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions produce a syndrome of oculomotor and postural deficits with the symptoms at rest, the static symptoms, partially or completely normalizing shortly after the lesion due to a process known as vestibular compensation. The symptoms are thought to result from changes in the activity of vestibular sensorimotor reflexes. Since the vestibular nuclei must be intact for recovery to occur, many investigations have focused on studying these neurons after lesions. At present, the neuronal plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Here we propose that knowledge of the reflex identity and input-output connections of the recorded neurons is essential to link the responses to animal behavior. We further propose that the cellular mechanisms underlying vestibular compensation can be sorted out by characterizing the synaptic responses and time course for change in morphologically-defined subsets of vestibular reflex projection neurons. Accordingly, this review focuses on the perspective gained by performing electrophysiological and immunolabeling studies on a specific subset of morphologically-defined, glutamatergic vestibular reflex projection neurons, the principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus. Reference is made to pertinent findings from other studies on vestibular nuclei neurons, but no comprehensive review of the literature is intended since broad reviews already exist. From recording excitatory and inhibitory spontaneous synaptic activity in principal cells, we find that the rebalancing of excitatory synaptic drive bilaterally is essential for vestibular compensation to proceed. This work is important for it defines for the first time the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the changing synaptic inputs and the time course for changes in a morphologically-defined subset of vestibular reflex projection neurons during early stages of vestibular compensation.

  5. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and

  6. Current treatment options in vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eObermann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed even despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are only now emerging.This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations.To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcommings. There is an on-going a multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial. Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion.

  7. Dynamic transformation of vestibular signals for orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osler, Callum J; Reynolds, Raymond F

    2012-11-01

    The same pattern of vestibular afferent feedback may signify a loss of balance or a change in body orientation, depending upon the initial head posture. To resolve this ambiguity and generate an appropriate motor response, the CNS must transform vestibular information from a head-centred reference frame into relevant motor coordinates. But what if the reference frame is continuously moving? Here, we ask if this neural transformation process is continuously updated during a voluntary change in head posture. Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was used to induce a sensation of head roll motion in blindfolded subjects marching on the spot. When head orientation was fixed, this caused unconscious turning behaviour that was maximal during neck flexion, minimal with the head level and reversed direction with neck extension. Subjects were then asked to produce a continuous voluntary change in head pitch, while GVS was applied. As the neck moved from full flexion into extension, turn velocity was continuously modulated and even reversed direction, reflecting the pattern observed during the head-fixed condition. Hence, an identical vestibular input resulted in motor output which was dynamically modulated by changes in head pitch. However, response magnitude was significantly reduced, suggesting possible suppression of vestibular input during voluntary head movement. Nevertheless, these results show that the CNS continuously reinterprets vestibular exafference to account for ongoing voluntary changes in head posture. This may explain why the head can be moved freely without losing the sense of balance and orientation.

  8. [Vestibular neuronitis: pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaper, Dinka; Adamec, Ivan; Gabelić, Tereza; Krbot, Magdalena; Isgum, Velimir; Hajnsek, Sanja; Habek, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis (VN) is one of the most common causes of peripheral vertigo. Caloric testing has been the traditional gold standard for detecting a peripheral vestibular deficit, but some recently developed bedside tests (head thrust, head heave, head shake and vibration test) were evaluated as a good alternative with similar sensitivity and specificity. These tests have shown both diagnostic value in the short term and prognostic value in the long term, and have availability and ease of use as an advantage. As an addition to clinical examination, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials can differentiate between involvement of superior and inferior branch of the vestibular nerve, but also between peripheral and central lesions. Although glucocorticoids are currently widely used in the treatment of VN, there is a lack of evidence for the validity of their administration. There are a number of high quality clinical trials that suggest vestibular rehabilitation exercises, which are based on the mechanisms of vestibular compensation, in the managment of VN. This review will focus on the latest developments in the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of patients with VN.

  9. [Study of the structure of receptor organs of the vestibular apparatus of rats after space flight on "Kosmos-1667"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychakov, D V; Pashchinin, A N; Boiadzhieva-Mikhaĭlova, A; Khristov, I

    1989-01-01

    The receptor organs of the vestibular apparatus of rats flown for 7 days on Cosmos-1667 were examined. Serial sections were examined by light microscopy, some utriculus sections by electron microscopy, and otolith membranes by scanning electron microscopy. The fixation method used revealed a distinct structural heterogeneity of the receptor epithelium. In the striola area of the utriculus and sacculus as well as in the central apical area of cristae there are receptor cells surrounded by enlarged cup-like nerve endings. The nerve endings occupy over 70% of the cup-receptor cell complex. The area incorporating the enlarged nerve endings differs in size from animal to animal and from left to right ear in the same animal. The flown rat that was the first to be killed after recovery showed a very well pronounced asymmetry: in the right ear enlarged cups were seen all over the epithelium while in the left ear they were located in distinct spots. Since such changes were not identified in the remaining flown and control rats, it is concluded that they were produced by space flight effects but remained reversible and disappeared after recovery. This paper describes the causes responsible of the changes and their structural and functional relevances as well as other structural modifications that should be considered during vestibular studies.

  10. Vestibular function and quality of life in vestibular schwannoma: does size matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eWagner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS frequently suffer from disabling vestibular symptoms. This prospective follow-up study evaluates vestibular and auditory function and impairment of quality of life due to vertigo, dizziness and imbalance in patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma of different sizes before/ after microsurgical or radiosurgical treatment. Methods. 38 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma were included. 22 received microsurgery, 16 cyberknife radiosurgery. Two follow-ups took place after a median of 50 and 186.5 days. Patients received a standardized neuro-ophthalmological examination, electronystagmography with bithermal caloric testing, and pure-tone audiometry. Quality of life was evaluated with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. Patient data was grouped and analyzed according to the size of the VS (group 1: < 20mm vs group 2: ≥ 20mm. Results. In group 1, the median loss of vestibular function was +10.5% as calculated by Jongkees Formula (range –43;+52; group 2: median + 36%, range –56; +90. The median change of DHI scores was –9 in group 1 (range –68;30 and +2 in group 2 (–54;+20. Median loss of hearing was 4dB (-42;93 in group 1 and 12dB in group 2 (5;42.Conclusions. Loss of vestibular function in vestibular schwannoma clearly correlates with tumor size. However, loss of vestibular function was not strictly associated with a long-term deterioration of quality of life. This may be due to central compensation of vestibular deficits in long-standing large tumors. Loss of hearing before treatment was significantly influenced by the age of the patient but not by tumor size. At follow-up 1 and 2, hearing was significantly worse in those patients with a large VS and after microsurgical treatment.

  11. Near-reef elemental signals in the otoliths of settling Pomacentrus amboinensis (Pomacentridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sih, Tiffany L.; Kingsford, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Settlement is a key life history transition for coral reef fishes, and how long a fish spends close to a reef prior to settlement is poorly understood. We used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) and otolith microstructure analysis (daily increments and settlement marks) to determine the length of time larval fish spend near a reef prior to settlement. The otoliths of Pomacentrus amboinensis collected from four neighbouring reefs in the southern Great Barrier Reef showed clear and consistent differences in their elemental signatures prior to and following settlement. Elevated Ba:Ca near settlement and post-settlement was found in fish from all four reefs. However, there was individual variation in elemental profiles, with an increased otolith Ba-to-Ca ratio (near-reef signature) at settlement in 33 % of fish, and up to 8 d prior to settlement in others. Increment widths, often used as a proxy for growth, decreased approaching the settlement mark for all fish, providing further evidence for a "search phase" in larvae. We demonstrated experimentally that otoliths of fish kept in reefal or inter-reefal waters had different elemental chemistry. There were differences in the elemental composition of water samples within the study area, but no consistent trends with distance from reefs. There was poor discrimination of multi-element signatures among fish from different reefs during their pre-settlement phases. However, discrimination improved in the settlement and post-settlement phases of otoliths, indicating that reef waters and perhaps stage of ontogeny affected otolith chemistry. This study demonstrated clear near-reef elemental signatures in fish around settlement. We suggest these differences are due to a combination of water chemistry and physiological influences (e.g., growth). Combining LA-ICP-MS with otolith microstructure analysis can provide high-resolution information on the early life history of reef fishes. Further, a

  12. Carbon isotopes in otolith amino acids identify residency of juvenile snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) in coastal nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, K. W.; Berumen, M. L.; Mateo, I.; Elsdon, T. S.; Thorrold, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    This study explored the potential for otolith geochemistry in snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) to identify residency in juvenile nursery habitats with distinctive carbon isotope values. Conventional bulk otolith and muscle stable isotope analyses (SIA) and essential amino acid (AA) SIA were conducted on snapper collected from seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs in the Red Sea, Caribbean Sea, and Pacific coast of Panama. While bulk stable isotope values in otoliths showed regional differences, they failed to distinguish nursery residence on local scales. Essential AA δ13C values in otoliths, on the other hand, varied as a function of habitat type and provided a better tracer of residence in different juvenile nursery habitats than conventional bulk otolith SIA alone. A strong linear relationship was found between paired otolith and muscle essential AA δ13C values regardless of species, geographic region, or habitat type, indicating that otolith AAs recorded the same dietary information as muscle AAs. Juvenile snapper in the Red Sea sheltered in mangroves but fed in seagrass beds, while snapper from the Caribbean Sea and Pacific coast of Panama showed greater reliance on mangrove-derived carbon. Furthermore, compound-specific SIA revealed that microbially recycled detrital carbon, not water-column-based new phytoplankton carbon, was the primary carbon source supporting snapper production on coastal reefs of the Red Sea. This study presented robust tracers of juvenile nursery residence that will be crucial for reconstructing ontogenetic migration patterns of fishes among coastal wetlands and coral reefs. This information is key to determining the importance of nursery habitats to coral reef fish populations and will provide valuable scientific support for the design of networked marine-protected areas.

  13. Carbon isotopes in otolith amino acids identify residency of juvenile snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) in coastal nurseries

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Kelton

    2011-08-26

    This study explored the potential for otolith geochemistry in snapper (Family: Lutjanidae) to identify residency in juvenile nursery habitats with distinctive carbon isotope values. Conventional bulk otolith and muscle stable isotope analyses (SIA) and essential amino acid (AA) SIA were conducted on snapper collected from seagrass beds, mangroves, and coral reefs in the Red Sea, Caribbean Sea, and Pacific coast of Panama. While bulk stable isotope values in otoliths showed regional differences, they failed to distinguish nursery residence on local scales. Essential AA δ13C values in otoliths, on the other hand, varied as a function of habitat type and provided a better tracer of residence in different juvenile nursery habitats than conventional bulk otolith SIA alone. A strong linear relationship was found between paired otolith and muscle essential AA δ13C values regardless of species, geographic region, or habitat type, indicating that otolith AAs recorded the same dietary information as muscle AAs. Juvenile snapper in the Red Sea sheltered in mangroves but fed in seagrass beds, while snapper from the Caribbean Sea and Pacific coast of Panama showed greater reliance on mangrove-derived carbon. Furthermore, compound-specific SIA revealed that microbially recycled detrital carbon, not water-column-based new phytoplankton carbon, was the primary carbon source supporting snapper production on coastal reefs of the Red Sea. This study presented robust tracers of juvenile nursery residence that will be crucial for reconstructing ontogenetic migration patterns of fishes among coastal wetlands and coral reefs. This information is key to determining the importance of nursery habitats to coral reef fish populations and will provide valuable scientific support for the design of networked marine-protected areas. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Interactive Healthcare Systems in the Home: Vestibular Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarhus, Rikke; Grönvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon Bo

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular dysfunction is a balance disorder, causing dizziness that provokes discomfort and fall situations. This paper discusses early results from a project that aims to develop assistive technologies to support home-based rehabilitation for elderly affected by Vestibular dysfunction....

  15. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick A Forbes; Gunter P Siegmund; Schouten, Alfred C.; Jean-Sébastien eBlouin

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwid...

  16. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituatio...

  17. Major diseases manifesting by vestibular vertigo: Treatment and rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Betahistine hydrochloride is the drug of choice for the treatment of vestibular vertigo in the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, and vestibular neuronitis. Effective combination therapy regimens that contain, along with drugs from other pharmacological groups, betahistine hydrochloride that improves blood circulation in the vestibular structures, accelerates vestibular compensation, and prevents recurrent dizzy spells, have been elaborated to treat central v...

  18. Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Cousins

    Full Text Available Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI. The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36-80 had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35° error vs. 3.39° respectively, p = 0.03. Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques.

  19. Vestibular stimulation for management of premenstrual syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johny, Minu; Kumar, Sai Sailesh; Rajagopalan, Archana; Mukkadan, Joseph Kurien

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was undertaken to observe the effectiveness of vestibular stimulation in the management of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Materials and Methods: The present study was an experimental study; twenty female participants of age group 18–30 years were recruited in the present study. Conventional swing was used to administer vestibular stimulation. Variables were recorded before and after vestibular stimulation and compared. Results: Depression and stress scores are significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Anxiety scores decreased followed by vestibular stimulation. However, it is no statistically significant. Serum cortisol levels significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. WHOQOL-BREF-transformed scores were not significantly changed followed by the intervention. However, psychological domain score (T2) and social relationships domain score (T3) were increased followed by intervention. Systolic blood pressure was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. No significant change was observed in diastolic pressure and pulse rate. Pain score was significantly decreased after 2 months of intervention. Mini mental status examination scores and spatial and verbal memory score were significantly improved followed by intervention. Conclusion: The present study provides preliminary evidence for implementing vestibular stimulation for management of PMS as a nonpharmacological therapy. Hence, we recommend further well-controlled, detailed studies in this area with higher sample size. PMID:28250680

  20. Vestibular Schwannoma or acoustic neuroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hekmatara M

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular schwannoma is the most common tumor of the posterior fossa of the skull. Patients referred with the primary otologic symptoms such as hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, imbalance, and the cranial nerve palsy. Thirty-three patients were operated and treated by a team of otolaryngologist and neurosurgeon, anudiometrist, and internist. Patients'chiefcomplaint was due to 94% hearing loss and 27% tinnitus. They scarcely complain of vertigo. If a patient refers with the palsy or paralysis of facial nerve preoperation, we must think of the facial nerve schwannoma or hemangioma or congential cholestoma or malignant metastases rather than acoustic neuroma. The best way for preoperative diagnosis is audiometry, ABR (Auditory Brain Response, and SDS (speech discrimination score with 90% success, but computer Tomography (CT scan and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Image are the valuable anatomic diagnostic radiographic devices. The best method of operation is translabirynthine approach (TLA, since it has the advantages such as an easy access to nerve paths and being the nearest path to CPA (Cerebellopontine Angle. Physicians ought to talk to patients about the importance of the microscopic surgery, surgical methods, and their probable diverse effects such as hearing loss, facial nerve palsy, and intracranial problems.

  1. Growth characteristics and otolith analysis on age-0 American shad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Sally T.; Wetzel, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Otolith microstructure analysis provides useful information on the growth history of fish (Campana and Jones 1992, Bang and Gronkjaer 2005). Microstructure analysis can be used to construct the size-at-age growth trajectory of fish, determine daily growth rates, and estimate hatch date and other ecologically important life history events (Campana and Jones 1992, Tonkin et al. 2008). This kind of information can be incorporated into bioenergetics modeling, providing necessary data for estimating prey consumption, and guiding the development of empirically-based modeling scenarios for hypothesis testing. For example, age-0 American shad co-occur with emigrating juvenile fall Chinook salmon originating from Hanford Reach and the Snake River in the lower Columbia River reservoirs during the summer and early fall. The diet of age-0 American shad appears to overlap with that of juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Chapter 1, this reoprt), but juvenile fall Chinook salmon are also known to feed on age-0 American shad in the reservoirs (USGS unpublished data). Abundant, energy-dense age-0 American shad may provide juvenile fall Chinook salmon opportunities for rapid growth during the time period when large number of age-0 American shad are available. Otolith analysis of hatch dates and the growth curve of age-0 American shad could be used to identify when eggs, larvae, and juveniles of specific size classes are temporally available as food for fall Chinook salmon in the lower Columbia River reservoirs. This kind of temporally and spatially explicit life history information is important to include in bioenergetics modeling scenarios. Quantitive estimates of prey consumption could be used with spatially-explicit estimates of prey abundance to construct a quantitative assessment of the age-0 American shad impact on a reservoir food web. Analysis of the age-0 American shad growth trajectory or individual growth records may show evidence of differential growth rates over time that may

  2. Origin of vestibular dysfunction in Usher syndrome type 1B.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    It is still debated to what extent the vestibular deficits in Usher patients are due to either central vestibulocerebellar or peripheral vestibular problems. Here, we determined the origin of the vestibular symptoms in Usher 1B patients by subjecting them to compensatory eye movement tests and by in

  3. Major diseases manifesting by vestibular vertigo: Treatment and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Parfenov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Betahistine hydrochloride is the drug of choice for the treatment of vestibular vertigo in the presence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, and vestibular neuronitis. Effective combination therapy regimens that contain, along with drugs from other pharmacological groups, betahistine hydrochloride that improves blood circulation in the vestibular structures, accelerates vestibular compensation, and prevents recurrent dizzy spells, have been elaborated to treat central vestibular vertigo in migraine-associated dizziness and in acute cerebrovascular accident. Of great importance is a combination of drug therapy and the current rehabilitation methods for vestibular diseases, which contribute to prompter and complete recovery of vestibular function. Biofeedback instrumental rehabilitation techniques using a stabilographic platformare highly effective. Successful treatment depends on the correctness of the established diagnosis. The diagnosis of peripheral and central vestibular vertigo frequently poses challenges. The essential reason for this is physicians’ unawareness about outpatient methods for the diagnosis of major vestibular diseases when the patient is at a doctor. It is important to follow a vestibular system study protocol since the use and correct assessment of diagnostic tests in most cases make it possible to estimate the degree of vestibular analyzer injury and to make an accurate diagnosis. The paper describes the diseases that are the most common causes of vestibular vertigo. The most effective methods for their treatment and current rehabilitation methods are discussed.

  4. Can a finding of cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials contribute to vestibular migraine diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihana Vešligaj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate differences in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP results with patients suffering from vestibular migraine and healthy people, taking into consideration values of threshold and latency of occurrence of the characteristic wave complex, size of amplitude, and interaural amplitude ratio. According to the results, determine the importance and usefulness of VEMP in vestibular migraine diagnostics. Methods A total number of 62 subjects were included in the study, 32 of them belonging to a group of patients suffering from vestibular migraine (VM, while other 30 were in a control group of healthy subjects. Information was collected during the diagnostic evaluation. General and otoneurological history of patients and bedside tests, audiological results, videonystagmography and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP were made. Results There was a difference in an interaural ratio of amplitudes in the experimental and control groups, but it was not found to be clinically significant. By ToneBurst 500 Hz method, the interaural amplitude ratio higher than 35% was measured in 46.97% subjects, while the response was totally unilaterally missing in 28.8% patients. Conclusion Even the sophisticated method as cVEMP does not give the ultimate result confirming the vestibular migraine diagnosis, and neither do other diagnostic methods. cVEMP result can contribute to the completion of full mosaic of vestibular migraine diagnostics.

  5. Comparison of rainbow smelt age estimates from fin rays and otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M.G.; Maloy, A.P.; O'Brien, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, although nonnative, are an important component of the offshore food web in the Laurentian Great Lakes. In Lake Ontario, we estimate ages of rainbow smelt annually to study population dynamics such as year-class strength and age-specific growth and mortality. Since the early 1980s, we have used pectoral fin rays to estimate rainbow smelt ages, but the sectioning and mounting of fin rays are time and labor intensive. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of using otoliths rather than fin rays to estimate rainbow smelt ages. Three readers interpreted the ages of 172 rainbow smelt (60-198 mm total length) based on thin sections of pectoral fin rays, whole otoliths with no preparation, and whole otoliths that had been cleared for 1 month in a 70:30 ethanol : glycerin solution. Bias was lower and precision was greater for fin rays than for otoliths; these results were consistent for comparisons within readers (first and second readings by one individual; three readers were used) and between readers (one reading for each reader within a pair). Both otolith methods appeared to misclassify age-1 rainbow smelt. Fin ray ages had the highest precision and provided the best approximation of age estimates inferred from the Lake Ontario population's length frequency distribution and from our understanding of this population. ?? American Fisheries Society 2008.

  6. A bioenergetic approach to model and reconstruct individual life traits from fish otoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; Høie, Hans;

    2012-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm‐following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history, and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosy...... observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...... for ecosystem and fisheries monitoring. They often lack validation, however, and the poor understanding of biomineralization mechanisms has led to striking examples of misinterpretations and subsequent erroneous conclusions in fish ecology and fisheries management. From the characterization of the physico......‐chemical characteristics of fish otoliths, we present a numerical model of otolith biomineralization. Based on a general bioenergetic theory, it disentangles the complex interplay between metabolic and temperature effects on biomineralization. This model resolves controversial issues and explains poorly understood...

  7. Determination of interannual variability in early life history of Pleuronectes platessa (L. using otolith microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Filipa Moreira De Sousa

    2015-11-01

    Plaice 0-group juveniles were sampled from an inshore nursery ground (Valosen, Bodø, Norway between 2005 and 2006, and otolith microstructure was examined. For that, sagitta otoliths were mounted in microscope slides using a thermoplastic cement (crystalbond™, with the concave side down. Otoliths were then hand-ground to the otolith core using sandpaper (3, 1 µm and examined under transmitted light in a microscope linked to an image analysis system. This technique exposed the daily increments in the otoliths that once counted allowed to determine hatch dates, larval duration, settlement dates and total age of the fish. A one-month difference in hatching and settlement times was found between 2005 and 2006, occurring later in 2006, but larval stage duration was similar in both years. Compared to other areas located further south, hatching and settlement occurred earlier showing a latitudinal cline. Interannual differences in growth were also detected, with higher rates in 2006 which could be related to warmer temperatures during plaice first summer of life. Yet, growth rates were similar to other locations across the species distributional range which suggest the existence of a countergradient growth compensation mechanism in this northern population. This means that despite the lower environmental temperature at high latitudes, other factors such as productivity and photoperiod may play a key role during the growing season. Nevertheless, further work needs to be done in order to fully understand temporal variation in plaice early life dynamics.

  8. CONTRIBUTION OF THE AUDIOLOGICAL AND VESTIBULAR ASSESSMENT TO THE DIFFERENTIAL AND ETIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERIPHERIC VESTIBULAR SYNDROMES

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Scope of the study: Vestibular pathology is a complex one, requiring a minute clinical evaluation, as well as numerous paraclinical investigations. The present study analyzes the contribution of the modern methods of vestibular and auditive investigation to the diagnosis of dizziness. Materials and method: The results of the investigations performed on 84 patients with peripheric vestibular syndrome, on whom a complete audiological and vestibular assessment had been...

  9. A new method to reconstruct fish diet and movement patterns from δ 13 C values in otolith amino acids

    KAUST Repository

    McMahon, Kelton W.

    2011-08-01

    Fish ecologists have used geochemical values in otoliths to examine habitat use, migration, and population connectivity for decades. However, it remains difficult to determine an unambiguous dietary δ 13C signature from bulk analysis of otolith. Studies to date have focused on the aragonite component of otoliths with less attention paid to the organic fraction. We describe the application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (SIA) to analyze amino acid (AA) δ 13C values from small amounts (<1 mg) of otolith powder. We examined δ 13C values of otolith and muscle AAs from a reef-associated snapper (Lutjanus ehrenbergii (Peters, 1869)) collected along a carbon isotope gradient (isoscape) from seagrass beds to coral reefs. Carbon isotope values in otolith and muscle samples were highly correlated within and among coastal habitats. Moreover, δ 13C values of otolith AAs provided a purely dietary record that avoided dilution from dissolved inorganic carbon. Otolith AAs served as a robust tracer of δ 13C values at the base of the food web, making compound-specific SIA a powerful tool for dietary reconstructions and tracking the movement of fishes across isoscapes.

  10. Population activity changes during a trial-to-trial adaptation of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Jing, Wei; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-07-09

    A 'trial-to-trial adaptation' of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells in response to a repetitive light stimulus was investigated in the present study. Using the multielectrode recording technique, we studied the trial-to-trial adaptive properties of ganglion cells and explored the activity of population neurons during this adaptation process. It was found that the ganglion cells adapted with different degrees: their firing rates were decreased in different extents from early-adaptation to late-adaptation stage, and this was accompanied by a decrease in cross-correlation strength. In addition, adaptation behavior was different for ON-response and OFF-response, which implied that the mechanism of the trial-to-trial adaptation might involve bipolar cells and/or their synapses with other neurons and the stronger adaptation in the ganglion cells' OFF-responses might reflect the requirement to avoid possible saturation in the OFF circuit.

  11. Evaluation of otoliths Salt Creek pupfish (Cyprinodon salinus salinus) for use in analyses of age and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzul, Maria C.; Gaines, D. Bailey; Fischer, Jesse R.; Quist, Michael C.; Dinsmore, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    We collected Salt Creek pupfish (Cyprinodon salinus salinus) from Salt Creek, Death Valley, California, in November 2009 and May 2010. The purpose of our study was to determine whether otoliths displayed interpretable marks that might be used for estimating age and growth. Otoliths exhibited alternating bands of opaque and translucent material. Kendall rank correlation between number of bands on otoliths and length of fish were high for two readers (τ = 0.65 and 0.79) and exact agreement between readers was 51%. Otoliths exhibited 0–5 bands, which provided evidence that longevity of Salt Creek pupfish likely is >1 year. Total length of fish collected in spring and autumn differed for fish with one and three bands on otoliths.

  12. Vestibular schwannoma: anatomical, medical and surgical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Ul Hassan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The term "acoustic" is a misnomer, as the tumor rarely arises from the acoustic (or cochlear division of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The correct medical term is vestibular schwannoma, because it involves the vestibular portion of the 8th cranial nerve. They are benign, rather rare tumors. They expand in size and grow larger; they can push against the brain. While the tumor does not actually invade the brain, the pressure of the tumor can displace brain tissue. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 178-182

  13. Otolith microchemistry: Insights into bioavailable pollutants in a man-made, urban inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronis, Christina; Evans, Noreen J; McDonald, Bradley J; Nice, Helen E; Gagnon, Marthe Monique

    2017-02-23

    Black bream (Acanthopagrus butcheri) were collected from an artificial inlet, Claisebrook Cove, Western Australia. Claisebrook Cove is adjacent to an historic contaminated site that was remediated during the 1990s. It was later identified as a priority area due to elevated levels of sediment contaminants including Zn, Cu, and Pb. Black bream were collected from this cove in 2005 and 2012 and their otoliths were analysed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry of the most recent growth zone. Levels of Zn and Mn, which are metabolically regulated, did not correlate with sediment contamination. However, reduction in sediment Cu levels over time coincided with reduced Cu otolith levels from 2005 to 2012. Results indicate that the elemental composition of the marginal edge of Black bream otoliths can identify bioavailable contaminants in an urban estuary and, with monitoring, can be utilized to establish long-term trends.

  14. Establishing nursery estuary otolith geochemical tags for Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Is temporal stability estuary dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Diarmuid; Wögerbauer, Ciara; Roche, William

    2016-12-01

    The ability to determine connectivity between juveniles in nursery estuaries and adult populations is an important tool for fisheries management. Otoliths of juvenile fish contain geochemical tags, which reflect the variation in estuarine elemental chemistry, and allow discrimination of their natal and/or nursery estuaries. These tags can be used to investigate connectivity patterns between juveniles and adults. However, inter-annual variability of geochemical tags may limit the accuracy of nursery origin determinations. Otolith elemental composition was used to assign a single cohort of 0-group sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax to their nursery estuary thus establishing an initial baseline for stocks in waters around Ireland. Using a standard LDFA model, high classification accuracies to nursery sites (80-88%) were obtained. Temporal stability of otolith geochemical tags was also investigated to assess if annual sampling is required for connectivity studies. Geochemical tag stability was found to be strongly estuary dependent.

  15. Micro-PIXE study of whole otolith of Anguilla japonica at elver stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Guo, H.; Wei, K.; Tang, W. [Institute of Life Science, Shanghai Fisheries University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Satoh, T.; Ohkubo, T.; Yamazaki, A.; Takano, K.; Kamiya, T. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, JAEA, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Shen, H., E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.c [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Yang, M.; Mi, Y. [Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2010-06-15

    Strontium and calcium contents, within the otolith of Anguilla japonica, were measured by external micro-PIXE. According to the measured metamorphic checks, each otolith was divided into three stages. Comparing with the Sr:Ca ratios in stage 2, the ratios in stage 1 had two different trends. Among these fish, it may reflect their maternal condition was not the same. The ratios in stage 3 which was corresponding to the estuarine habitat were smaller than that in any other stage which was corresponding to the ocean habitat in each otolith. Suggested by our results, the eels from the spawning site may separate into two groups when they are near to the south of Taiwan, and then move to the different estuaries in China. It could be proposed that, in general, the migration direction is from south to north along the east coast in China.

  16. PIXE analyses of polished otoliths for identification of anadromous whitefish in the Baltic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lill, Jan-Olof, E-mail: jlill@abo.fi [Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Heimbrand, Yvette [Institute of Coastal Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Slotte, Joakim [Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Himberg, Mikael [Laboratory of Aquatic Pathobiology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland); Florin, Ann-Britt [Institute of Coastal Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (Sweden); Hägerstrand, Henry [Laboratory of Aquatic Pathobiology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Turku (Finland)

    2015-11-15

    In this work we describe an application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) to the elemental analysis of polished otoliths of whitefish. Two spots on polished otoliths were irradiated; one spot in the core region of the otolith and another one close to the edge. The irradiations were performed in air with a collimated 0.5 mm proton beam. The ratio of the strontium concentrations in the two spots was used to distinguish between different ecotypes (river, sea, lake) of whitefish. Criteria on the ratios were suggested for identification of the whitefish forms. The results were compared to results of μ-beam PIXE scans as well as multi-point scans with the 0.5 mm proton beam. The measuring set-up and the results are discussed.

  17. Spatial variation in elemental composition of otoliths of three species of fish (family Sparidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillanders, B. M.; Kingsford, M. J.

    2003-08-01

    Determining the nursery habitat of fishes that have moved from estuarine nursery habitats is difficult. The elemental fingerprints of otoliths of three species of sparids were determined to investigate their utility as a natural tag of the nursery habitat. Juvenile Pagrus auratus (snapper), Rhabdosargus sarba (tarwhine) and Acanthopagrus australis (bream) were collected from two sites in each of 15, six and three estuaries, respectively, and their otoliths analysed by solution-based inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Significant differences in otolith chemistry were found for all three species of juveniles collected from different estuaries. The same patterns among estuaries were not seen for all species, although it was not possible to sample the same sites within an estuary for all species. For bream, significant differences in otolith chemistry were found among all three estuaries, whereas for tarwhine the six estuaries were separated into three groups. For snapper, a number of estuaries could be separated, but there was some overlap for other estuaries. All three species were collected from the same site within one estuary and their otoliths analysed. Significant differences were found among species, but the implication of this finding remains unclear as the three species show differences in microhabitat use and may also differ in age. Because the elemental fingerprints of juveniles vary among estuaries or groups of estuaries, the nursery or recruitment estuary of adult fish could now be determined by analysing the juvenile region of adult otoliths. Thus, connectivity between estuaries and open coastal populations could be determined. Such information will have major implications for fisheries management because it will provide information on the distance that fish have moved from their recruitment estuary and the number of estuaries that contribute to each adult population.

  18. From ear to uncertainty: Vestibular contributions to cognitive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the deficits in the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that occur following vestibular dysfunction, there is substantial evidence that vestibular loss also causes cognitive disorders, some of which may be due to the reflexive deficits and some of which are related to the role that ascending vestibular pathways to the limbic system and cortex play in spatial orientation. In this review we summarise the evidence that vestibular loss causes cognitive disorders, especially spatial memory deficits, in animals and humans and critically evaluate the evidence that these deficits are not due to hearing loss, problems with motor control, oscillopsia or anxiety and depression. We review the evidence that vestibular lesions affect head direction and place cells as well as the emerging evidence that artificial activation of the vestibular system, using galvanic vestibular stimulation, can modulate cognitive function.

  19. Interactions between Stress and Vestibular Compensation – A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saman, Yougan; Bamiou, D. E.; Gleeson, Michael; Dutia, Mayank B.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of stress and anxiety often accompany vestibular dysfunction, while conversely complaints of dizziness and loss of balance are common in patients with panic and other anxiety disorders. The interactions between stress and vestibular function have been investigated both in animal models and in clinical studies. Evidence from animal studies indicates that vestibular symptoms are effective in activating the stress axis, and that the acute stress response is important in promoting compensatory synaptic and neuronal plasticity in the vestibular system and cerebellum. The role of stress in human vestibular disorders is complex, and definitive evidence is lacking. This article reviews the evidence from animal and clinical studies with a focus on the effects of stress on the central vestibular pathways and their role in the pathogenesis and management of human vestibular disorders. PMID:22866048

  20. Using otolith microstructure to analyse growth of juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Mosegaard, Henrik; Hinrichsen, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    otolith growth rates before settling continued to grow fast after settling. On the slope, no relationship between growth before and after settling was found. These results indicate that the different settling habitats occupied by juvenile Baltic cod have different potential for settling and nursery areas.......Pelagic and demersal juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua L. were collected on the slope and the top of Rønne bank in the Baltic Sea during 2 cruises in November and December 1998. The growth, age at settling and vertical migration pattern were studied by otolith microstructure analysis...

  1. Otoliths in situ from Sarmatian (Middle Miocene) fishes of the Paratethys. Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzhans, Werner; Carnevale, Giorgio; Bannikov, Alexandre F.

    2017-01-01

    Several well-preserved otoliths were extracted from four slabs containing fish specimens of Atherina suchovi. Atherina suchovi is one of the five Atherina species recorded from the Middle Miocene of the Central and Eastern Paratethys established on articulated skeletal remains. This corresponds...... it appears to be closely related to A. gidjakensis. A list is presented and briefly discussed showing Sarmatian skeleton-based fish records from the Central and Eastern Paratethys with an overview of known and currently studied fishes with otoliths in situ....

  2. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patient...

  3. Vestibular function tests for vestibular migraine: clinical implication of video head impulse and caloric tests

    OpenAIRE

    Woo Seok Kang; Sang Hun Lee; Chan Joo Yang; Joong Ho Ahn; Jong Woo Chung; Hong Ju Park

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patient...

  4. Central Vestibular Dysfunction in an Otorhinolaryngological Vestibular Unit: Incidence and Diagnostic Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Introduction  Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective  The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of th...

  5. Ghrelin receptor in two species of anuran amphibian, bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana and Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eKaiya

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We identified cDNA encoding a functional growth hormone secretagogue-receptor 1a (GHS-R1a, ghrelin receptor in two species of anuran amphibian, bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana and Japanese tree frog (Hyla japonica. Deduced receptor protein for bullfrog and Japanese tree frog (tree frog was comprised of 374- and 371-amino acids, respectively. The two receptors showed 86% identity with each other, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two receptors belong to the same category with tetrapods. In functional analyses, ghrelin and GHS-R1a agonists increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration in HEK293 cell that transfected each receptor cDNA, but ligand selectivity of ghrelin with Ser3 and Thr3 was not observed between the two receptors. Bullfrog GHS-R1a mRNA was mainly expressed in the brain, stomach and testis. In the brain, the gene expression was detected in the diencephalon and mesencephalon, but not in the pituitary. Tree frog GHS-R1a mRNA was predominantly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and ovary, but not detected in the pituitary. In bullfrog stomach, GHS-R1a mRNA expression increased at 10 days after fasting, but not in the brain. In tree frog, GHS-R1a mRNA expression increased in the brain, stomach and ventral skin by 10-days fasting, and in the stomach and ventral skin by a dehydration treatment. Intracerebroventricular injection of ghrelin in dehydrated tree frog did not affect water absorption from the ventral skin. These results suggest that ghrelin is involved in energy homeostasis and possibly in osmoregulation in frogs.

  6. Central Vestibular Dysfunction in an Otorhinolaryngological Vestibular Unit: Incidence and Diagnostic Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa, Badr E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years. Provisional videonystagmography (VNG results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41 had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23% were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus. Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  7. Vestibular Dysfunctions in Cochlear Implant Patients; A Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Motasaddi Zarandy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential in response to click or short tone burst stimuli have been used as a clinical test for distinguish saccule and inferior vestibular nerve diseases. Different studies show that cochlear implant could have inverse effects on vestibular structures. We aimed to investigate vestibular evoked myogenic potential in unilateral cochlear implanted individuals in compare to normal individuals.Methods: Thirty-three unilateral cochlear implanted patients (mean age 19.96 years and 30 normal hearing individuals (mean age 24-27 years as control group were enrolled in this cross- sectional study. Absolute latencies and amplitudes of myogenic potential responses were measured and compared in both groups.Results: Myogenic potential recorded in both ears of all controls were normal. No response could be recorded in 16 patients (48.48% from both ears. In three patients, responses were recorded in both ears though the amplitude of waves was reduced in implanted ear. Unilateral response could be recorded in 14 patients only in their non-implanted ear.Conclusion: Vestibular evoked myogenic potential test is a useful tool for assessing saccular function in cochlear implant patients. Damages of osseous spiral lamina and basilar membrane after cochlear implantation could result in dysfunctions of vestibular organs specially saccule. It seems that saccule could be easily damaged after cochlear implantation. This would cause absence or reduced amplitudes in myogenic potential.

  8. Central vestibular dysfunction in an otorhinolaryngological vestibular unit: incidence and diagnostic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Badr E; Kahky, Ayman O El; Kader, Hisham M Abdel; Rizk, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Vertigo can be due to a variety of central and peripheral causes. The relative incidence of central causes is underestimated. This may have an important impact of the patients' management and prognosis. Objective The objective of this work is to determine the incidence of central vestibular disorders in patients presenting to a vestibular unit in a tertiary referral academic center. It also aims at determining the best strategy to increase the diagnostic yield of the patients' visit. Methods This is a prospective observational study on 100 consecutive patients with symptoms suggestive of vestibular dysfunction. All patients completed a structured questionnaire and received bedside and vestibular examination and neuroimaging as required. Results There were 69 women and 31 men. Their ages ranged between 28 and 73 (mean 42.48 years). Provisional videonystagmography (VNG) results were: 40% benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), 23% suspicious of central causes, 18% undiagnosed, 15% Meniere disease, and 4% vestibular neuronitis. Patients with an unclear diagnosis or central features (41) had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler studies. Combining data from history, VNG, and imaging studies, 23 patients (23%) were diagnosed as having a central vestibular lesion (10 with generalized ischemia/vertebra basilar insufficiency, 4 with multiple sclerosis, 4 with migraine vestibulopathy, 4 with phobic postural vertigo, and 1 with hyperventilation-induced nystagmus). Conclusions Combining a careful history with clinical examination, VNG, MRI, and Doppler studies decreases the number of undiagnosed cases and increases the detection of possible central lesions.

  9. CONTRIBUTION OF THE AUDIOLOGICAL AND VESTIBULAR ASSESSMENT TO THE DIFFERENTIAL AND ETIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERIPHERIC VESTIBULAR SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreta Ungureanu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study: Vestibular pathology is a complex one, requiring a minute clinical evaluation, as well as numerous paraclinical investigations. The present study analyzes the contribution of the modern methods of vestibular and auditive investigation to the diagnosis of dizziness. Materials and method: The results of the investigations performed on 84 patients with peripheric vestibular syndrome, on whom a complete audiological and vestibular assessment had been also made, have been retrospectively analyzed. Results: Anamnestic data and the results of evaluation permitted classification of peripheric vestibular pathology according to topo-lesional and etiological criteria. The most frequently diagnosed diseases were: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière syndrome and vestibular neuronitis. Conclusions: Testing of the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes through videonystagmoscopy and, respectively, computerized dynamic posturography, besides tonal vocal audiometry and precocious auditive potentials, is especially important for a positive diagnosis and etiological differentiation of vestibular syndromes.

  10. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients had had headache for a longer period than dizziness. A correlation was detected between VM symptoms and the menstrual period. 61.53% of patients had auditory symptoms, with tinnitus the most common, although tonal audiometry was normal in 68.51%. Vectoelectronystagmography was normal in 67.34%, 10.20% had hyporeflexia, and 22.44% had vestibular hyperreflexia. Electrophysiological assessment showed no abnormalities in most patients. Fasting plasma glucose and glycemic curve were normal in most patients, while the insulin curve was abnormal in 75%. 82% of individuals with MV showed abnormalities on the metabolism of carbohydrates. CONCLUSION: VM affects predominantly middle-aged women, with migraine headache representing the first symptom, several years before vertigo. Physical, auditory, and vestibular evaluations are usually normal. The most frequent vestibular abnormality was hyperreflexia. Most individuals showed abnormality related to carbohydrate metabolism.

  11. Perspectives in vestibular diagnostics and therapy [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst, Arneborg

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Vestibular diagnostics and therapy ist the mirror of technological, scientific and socio-economics trends as are other fields of clinical medicine. These trends have led to a substantial diversification of the field of neurotology.The improvements in diagnostics have been characterized by the introduction of new receptor testing tools (e.g., VEMPs, progress in imaging (e.g., the endolymphatic hydrops and in the description of central-vestibular neuroplasticity. The etiopathology of vestibular disorders has been updated by geneticists (e.g., the description of the COCH gene mutations, the detection of structural abnormalities (e.g., dehiscence syndromes and related disorders (e.g. migraine-associated vertigo. The therapeutic options were extended by re-evaluation of techniques known a long time ago (e.g., saccus exposure, the development of new approaches (e.g., dehiscence repair and the introduction of new drug therapy concepts (e.g., local drug delivery. Implantable, neuroprosthetic solutions have not yet reached experimental safety and validity and are still far away. However, externally worn neuroprosthetic solution were introduced in the rehab of vestibular disorders (e.g., VertiGuard system.These and related trends point into a medical future which is characterized by presbyvertigo as classical sign of the demographic changes ahead, by shortage of financial resources and a medico-legally over-regulated, even hostile environment for physicians in clinical medicine.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance and Heavy Metals Tolerance in Gram-Negative Bacteria from Diseased American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) Cultured in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Na-jian; S W Lee; W Wendy; L W Tee; M Nadirah; S H Faizah

    2009-01-01

    A total of 140 bacterial isolates have been successfully isolated from various organs of diseased American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) cultured in Malaysia. The most frequently isolated bacteria was Edwardsiella spp. (46 isolates) followed by Aeromonas spp. (33 isolates), Flavobacterium spp. (31 isolates), and Vibrio spp. (30 isolates). Majority of the bacterial isolates were found sensitive to furazolidone (85.0%), chloramphenicol (85.0%), oxolinic acid (90.0%), florfenicol (95.0%), and flumequine (97.5%). On the other hand, most of the bacterial isolates were resistant to oleandomycin (77.5%) and lincomycin (87.5%). Nitrofurantoin and flumequine can be inhibited the growth of all of Vibrio spp. whereas all isolates of Edwardsiella spp. were found sensitive to florfenicol and flumequine. Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) index were in range of 0.30-0.40, indicating that bacterial isolates from cultured bullfrogs may have received high risk exposure to the tested antibiotics. In addition, 90-100% of the isolates were resistant to copper, cadmium, and chromium. These results provided insight information on tolerance level of bacterial isolates from cultured bullfrogs to 21 antibiotics as well as heavy metals.

  13. ZAG-Otolith: Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control during Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, radius), the effects of stimulus frequency (0.15 - 0.6 Hz) are examined on eye movements and motion perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolithocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of postflight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control

  14. ZAG-Otolith: Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control during Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S. J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. METHODS. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. PRELIMINARY RESULTS. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. DISCUSSION. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolithocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of postflight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved with vibrotactile feedback of orientation.

  15. New insights into pathophysiology of vestibular migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Espinosa-Sanchez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal grey, locus coeruleus and nucleus raphe magnus are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory-inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic

  16. New Insights into Pathophysiology of Vestibular Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Sanchez, Juan M.; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is a common disorder in which genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors probably contribute to its development. The pathophysiology of VM is unknown; nevertheless in the last few years, several studies are contributing to understand the neurophysiological pathways involved in VM. The current hypotheses are mostly based on the knowledge of migraine itself. The evidence of trigeminal innervation of the labyrinth vessels and the localization of vasoactive neuropeptides in the perivascular afferent terminals of these trigeminal fibers support the involvement of the trigemino-vascular system. The neurogenic inflammation triggered by activation of the trigeminal-vestibulocochlear reflex, with the subsequent inner ear plasma protein extravasation and the release of inflammatory mediators, can contribute to a sustained activation and sensitization of the trigeminal primary afferent neurons explaining VM symptoms. The reciprocal connections between brainstem vestibular nuclei and the structures that modulate trigeminal nociceptive inputs (rostral ventromedial medulla, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray, locus coeruleus, and nucleus raphe magnus) are critical to understand the pathophysiology of VM. Although cortical spreading depression can affect cortical areas involved in processing vestibular information, functional neuroimaging techniques suggest a dysmodulation in the multimodal sensory integration and processing of vestibular and nociceptive information, resulting from a vestibulo-thalamo-cortical dysfunction, as the pathogenic mechanism underlying VM. The elevated prevalence of VM suggests that multiple functional variants may confer a genetic susceptibility leading to a dysregulation of excitatory–inhibitory balance in brain structures involved in the processing of sensory information, vestibular inputs, and pain. The interactions among several functional and structural neural networks could explain the pathogenic mechanisms of VM

  17. Oxygen isotope record of the 1997-1998 El Niño in Peruvian sea catfish (Galeichthys peruvianus) otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, C. Fred T.; Crowe, Douglas E.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2002-12-01

    Sagittal otoliths of the Peruvian sea catfish Galeichthys peruvianus were collected from the north coast of Peru during and after the 1997-1998 El Niño. The otoliths were analyzed via laser microprobe and micromilling techniques for oxygen isotope composition through ontogeny to document their use as an El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) proxy. Results were compared to theoretical calculations for the δ18O of otolith aragonite using measured sea surface temperatures (SST) and δ18O values for local seawater assuming equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation was achieved. All otoliths recorded the 1997-1998 El Niño event as well as seasonal temperature variations. These ENSO events were recorded in otolith aragonite as significant negative excursions in δ18O that reflected the increased temperature of local marine waters. The combined otolith data were used to create a 10-year SST record, including ENSO events and local seasonal temperature variation, validating the use of otolith δ18O as a temperature proxy.

  18. Otolith morphology and hearing abilities in cave- and surface-dwelling ecotypes of the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana (Teleostei: Poeciliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Ladich, Friedrich; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Cave fish have rarely been investigated with regard to their inner ear morphology, hearing abilities, and acoustic communication. Based on a previous study that revealed morphological differences in the saccular otolith between a cave and two surface populations of Poecilia mexicana, we checked for additional differences in utricular and lagenar otoliths and tested whether different populations have similar hearing sensitivities. We found pronounced differences in the shape of all three otoliths. Otoliths of the saccule and lagena from cave fish differed from those of surface fish in the features of the face oriented towards the sensory epithelium. In addition, otoliths of the utricle and lagena were significantly heavier in cave fish. Auditory sensitivities were measured between 100 and 1500Hz, utilizing the auditory evoked potential recording technique. We found similar hearing abilities in cave and surface fish, with greatest sensitivity between 200 and 300Hz. An acoustic survey revealed that neither ecotype produced species-specific sounds. Our data indicate that cave dwelling altered the otolith morphology in Atlantic mollies, probably due to metabolic differences. Different otolith morphology, however, did not affect general auditory sensitivity or acoustic behavior.

  19. Effect of bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana oil administered by gavage on the fatty acid composition and oxidative stress of mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Silva

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of daily intragastric administration of bullfrog oil (oleic, linoleic and palmitoleic acid-rich oil, corresponding to 0.4% of body weight for four weeks, on fatty acid composition and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation and catalase activity in mouse liver. The activities of aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT, biomarkers of tissue injury, were determined in liver homogenates and serum. The proportions of 18:2n-6, 20:4n-6, 20:5n-3, and 22:6n-3 (polyunsaturated fatty acids, from 37 to 60% in the total fatty acid content were increased in the liver of the bullfrog oil-treated group (P < 0.05 compared to control. At the same time, a significant decrease in the relative abundance of 14:0, 16:0, and 18:0 (saturated fatty acids, from 49 to 25% was observed. The hepatic content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS was increased from 2.3 ± 0.2 to 12.3 ± 0.3 nmol TBA-MDA/mg protein and catalase activity was increased from 840 ± 32 to 1110 ± 45 µmol reduced H2O2 min-1 mg protein-1 in the treated group. Bullfrog oil administration increased AST and ALP activities in the liver (from 234.10 ± 0.12 to 342.84 ± 0.13 and 9.38 ± 0.60 to 20.06 ± 0.27 U/g, respectively and in serum (from 95.41 ± 6.13 to 120.32 ± 3.15 and 234.75 ± 11.5 to 254.41 ± 2.73 U/l, respectively, suggesting that this treatment induced tissue damage. ALT activity was increased from 287.28 ± 0.29 to 315.98 ± 0.34 U/g in the liver but remained unchanged in serum, whereas the GGT activity was not affected by bullfrog oil treatment. Therefore, despite the interesting modulation of fatty acids by bullfrog oil, a possible therapeutic use requires care since some adverse effects were observed in liver.

  20. Otolith development in larval and juvenile Schizothorax davidi: ontogeny and growth increment characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Taiming; Hu, Jiaxiang; Cai, Yueping; Xiong, Sen; Yang, Shiyong; Wang, Xiongyan; He, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory-reared Schizothorax davidi larvae and juveniles were examined to assess the formation and characteristics of David's schizothoracin otoliths. Otolith development was observed and their formation period was verified by monitoring larvae and juveniles of known age. The results revealed that lapilli and sagittae developed before hatching, and the first otolith increment was identified at 2 days post hatching in both. The shape of lapilli was relatively stable during development compared with that of sagittae; however, growth of four sagittae and lapilli areas was consistent, but the posterior area grew faster than the anterior area and the ventral surface grew faster than the dorsal surface. Similarly, the sum length of the radius of the anterior and posterior areas on sagittae and lapilli were linearly and binomially related to total fish length, respectively. Moreover, daily deposition rates were validated by monitoring known-age larvae and juveniles. The increase in lapilli width was 1.88±0.080 0 μm at the ninth increment, which reached a maximum and the decreased gradually toward the otolith edge, whereas that of sagittae increased more slowly. These results illustrate the developmental biology of S. davidi, which will aid in population conservation and fish stock management.

  1. Marking pike fry otoliths with alizarin complexone and strontium : an evaluation of methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Christian; Grønkjær, P.; Nielsen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrated that both alizarin complexone and strontium are useful in mass marking of pike Esox lucius fry otoliths. Visual detection of alizarin complexone marks was considered more reliable than the quantitative analysis of strontium for differentiating marked and unmarked...

  2. Migratory Patterns of American Shad (Alosa Sapidissima) Revealed by Natural Geochemical Tags in Otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    200-201. Nolan, K., Grossfield, J., & Wirgin, I. 1991. Discrimination among Atlantic coast populations of American shad (A losa sapidissima) using...element signatures in otoliths record natal river of juvenile American shad (A losa sapidissima). Limnology and Oceanography 43: 1826-1835. Thorrold

  3. Otoliths in situ from Sarmatian (Middle Miocene) fishes of the Paratethys. Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarzhans, Werner; Carnevale, Giorgio; Bratishko, Andriy

    2017-01-01

    previously described by Fedotov (1976). The new data allow further synonymization of otolith-based species, such as P. insectus (Weiler 1943) and possibly also P. irregularis (Gaemers 1973). Moreover, Properca sabbai Pauca 1929 is removed from the faunal list of Sarmatian fishes in the Paratethys. Kner...

  4. Identifying blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) stock structure in the Northeast Atlantic by otolith shape analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahe, Kélig; Oudard, Clémence; Mille, Tiphaine;

    2016-01-01

    Information on stock identification and spatial stock structure provide a basis for understanding fish population dynamics and improving fisheries management. In this study, otolith shape analysis was used to study the stock structure of blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) in the northeast At...

  5. Coupling otolith microstructure analysis and hydrographic backtracking suggests a mechanism for the 2000s North Sea herring recruitment failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Stine Dalmann; Payne, Mark; Worsøe Clausen, Lotte

    2012-01-01

    . Individual larval growth rates, averaged over the 30 days prior to capture, were estimated for 200 larval otoliths from four different years using a model‐based analysis of the ring widths. The otolith measurements were complemented with additional information derived from hydrographic backtracking models (e...... stock productivity) as taking place during the larval overwintering phase: however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study we analysed archived larval samples captured both before and after the onset of the reduced survival to test the hypothesis of a reduction in the larval growth rate...... demonstrates how coupling two different techniques (otolith microstructure analysis and hydrographic modelling) can yield unique insights into fish ecology...

  6. Functional and anatomic alterations in the gentamicin-damaged vestibular system in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, MLYM; Segenhout, HM; Dijk, T; Stokroos, [No Value; van der Want, TJL; Albers, FWJ

    2004-01-01

    Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to investigate the expected functional and morphologic effect of gentamicin on the vestibular system simultaneously by measurement of vestibular evoked potentials and electron microscopic evaluation. Background: Vestibular short-latency evoked potentials to

  7. Microscopic morphology and testis morphometry of captivity-bred Adult bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus Shaw, 1802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Carlos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the testicular morphometry of captivity-bred adult bullfrogs. Fifteen young adult male were studied, in the rainy season and a lengthy photoperiod. The GSI was established at 0.15%. The nuclear diameter of germinative and Leydig cells, the nucleolus diameter of Sertoli cells and the area of cysts and tubules were determined and the mean number of ISPC, IISPC and SPT per cyst and the mean number of cysts per tubule was estimated. The nucleoplasmatic proportion of the nucleus of the Leydig cell was 76.22%, indicating less cytoplasmic activity. Eight generations of spermatogonia were found. The spermatogenesis efficiency in meiosis and in mitosis was 63 and 49%, respectively. The spermatogenesis of bullfrog fited in the pattern of other captivity Anurans, with differences as the morphology of Sertoli and Leydig cells nuclei.A morfometria é uma importante ferramenta para a biologia estrutural, permitindo estudos estereológicos e análises quantitativas. Existem muitos pontos a serem esclarecidos sobre a morfometria testicular desta espécie, que objetivamos desvendar neste trabalho. Quinze machos adultos foram estudados, em período chuvoso e de fotoperíodo longo (dezembro, 2000. O IGS encontrado foi de 0.15%. O diâmetro nuclear das células germinativas e da célula de Leydig, o diâmetro nucleolar das células de Sertoli e a área dos cistos e túbulos foram determinados. O número médio de ISPC, IISPC e SPT por cisto e o número médio de cisto por túbulo foi estimado. A proporção nucleoplasmática do núcleo da célula de Leydig foi de 76.22%, indicando pouca atividade citoplasmática. Oito gerações de espermatogônia foram estimadas. A eficiência da espermatogênese na meiose e mitose foi de 63% e49%, respectivamente. A espermatogênese de rãtouro segue os padrões dos demais Anuros de cativeiro, apresentando diferenças nos núcleos das c��lulas de Sertoli e Leydig.

  8. Pharmacological and physiological properties of the after-hyperpolarization current of bullfrog ganglion neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, J W; Pennefather, P S

    1987-12-01

    1. The slowly decaying, calcium-dependent after-hyperpolarization (a.h.p.) that follows action potentials in bullfrog ganglion B cells has previously been shown to be generated by a potassium current called IAHP. We have recorded IAHP using a switched, single-electrode hybrid clamp where current-clamp mode was changed to voltage-clamp mode immediately after repolarization of a spike or the last spike of a train. 2. Reduction of extracellular calcium reduced the decay time of IAHP following a single spike. At all levels of extracellular calcium tested (0.5-4 mM), the decay time of IAHP was longer following a train of action potentials than following a single action potential. Thus, the time course of IAHP evoked by action potentials is a function of the calcium load induced by the action potentials. Conversely, agents that reduce the amount of IAHP activated without affecting its rate of decay, probably do not affect calcium influx. 3. Muscarine (2 or 10 microM) inhibits IAHP following an action potential by at most 30% and has no effect on decay rate of IAHP. These results suggest that muscarine has little or no effect on either calcium influx or sequestration. Decay of the a.h.p. is accelerated by muscarine but this effect is due to an increased leak conductance. 4. Charybdotoxin (CTX) between 4 and 20 nM, prolongs action potential duration in a manner consistent with blockade of the voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium current (Ic) involved in spike repolarization in these cells. This action is consistent with its reported action on analogous channels in other systems. However, CTX also reduces IAHP. Thus, in bullfrog ganglion neurones, two distinct calcium-dependent potassium currents exhibit a comparable sensitivity to CTX. This cannot be due to a decreased influx of calcium because the decay rate of IAHP following an action potential is unchanged. The action of CTX was observed with both crude and purified preparations of CTX. 5. Apamin (25 nM) and

  9. Ocean acidification alters the otoliths of a pantropical fish species with implications for sensory function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignami, Sean; Enochs, Ian C; Manzello, Derek P; Sponaugle, Su; Cowen, Robert K

    2013-04-30

    Ocean acidification affects a wide diversity of marine organisms and is of particular concern for vulnerable larval stages critical to population replenishment and connectivity. Whereas it is well known that ocean acidification will negatively affect a range of calcareous taxa, the study of fishes is more limited in both depth of understanding and diversity of study species. We used new 3D microcomputed tomography to conduct in situ analysis of the impact of ocean acidification on otolith (ear stone) size and density of larval cobia (Rachycentron canadum), a large, economically important, pantropical fish species that shares many life history traits with a diversity of high-value, tropical pelagic fishes. We show that 2,100 μatm partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) significantly increased not only otolith size (up to 49% greater volume and 58% greater relative mass) but also otolith density (6% higher). Estimated relative mass in 800 μatm pCO2 treatments was 14% greater, and there was a similar but nonsignificant trend for otolith size. Using a modeling approach, we demonstrate that these changes could affect auditory sensitivity including a ∼50% increase in hearing range at 2,100 μatm pCO2, which may alter the perception of auditory information by larval cobia in a high-CO2 ocean. Our results indicate that ocean acidification has a graded effect on cobia otoliths, with the potential to substantially influence the dispersal, survival, and recruitment of a pelagic fish species. These results have important implications for population maintenance/replenishment, connectivity, and conservation efforts for other valuable fish stocks that are already being deleteriously impacted by overfishing.

  10. Evaluation of postural control in unilateral vestibular hypofunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Maia Quitschal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction. METHOD: This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tetrax Interactive Balance System posturography in eight different sensory conditions. RESULTS: For different positions, vertiginous patients with unilateral vestibular hypofunction showed significantly higher values of general stability index, weight distribution index, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation index and fall index than controls. CONCLUSION: Increased values in the indices of weight distribution, right/left and tool/heel synchronizations, Fourier transformation and fall risk characterize the impairment of postural control in patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

  11. How vestibular stimulation interacts with illusory hand ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Christophe; Lenggenhager, Bigna; Blanke, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Artificial stimulation of the peripheral vestibular system has been shown to improve ownership of body parts in neurological patients, suggesting vestibular contributions to bodily self-consciousness. Here, we investigated whether galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) interferes with the mechanisms underlying ownership, touch, and the localization of one's own hand in healthy participants by using the "rubber hand illusion" paradigm. Our results show that left anodal GVS increases illusory ow...

  12. Quality of life of individuals submitted to vestibular rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Patatas, Olívia Helena Gomes [UNIFESP; Ganança, Cristina Freitas; Ganança,Fernando Freitas

    2009-01-01

    Balance disorders affect social, family and professional activities. Vestibular rehabilitation can reduce the impact of these disorders on the quality of life of individuals with vertigo. AIM: to study the influence of vestibular rehabilitation on the quality of life of individuals, correlating it with gender, age, results from computerized vectoelectronystagmography and vertigo. Study type: Retrospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS:Twenty-two individuals were submitted to customized vestibular re...

  13. Experiment M131. Human vestibular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II; Homick, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The lower susceptibility to vestibular stimulation aloft, compared with that on ground under experimental conditions, is attributed to a precondition, namely, either there is no need to adapt, or, as exemplified by the Skylab 3 pilot, adaptation to weightlessness is achieved. Findings in some of the astronauts emphasize the distinction between two categories of vestibular side effects: immediate reflex phenomena (illusions, sensations of turning, etc.), and delayed epiphenomena that include the constellation of symptoms and syndromes comprising motion sickness. The drug combinations 1-scopolamine and d-amphetamine and promethazine hydrochloride and ephedrine sulfate are effective in prevention and treatment of motion sickness. It is concluded that prevention of motion sickness in any stressful motion environment involves selection, adaptation, and the use of drugs.

  14. [The vestibular system: from structure to function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collard, M

    1994-02-01

    The two vestibular receptors, right and left, hidden in the petrous part of the temporal bone with the cochlear receptors, receive information from angular and linear movements of the head and transform them into a nerve message sent to the nuclei of the brainstem, which are connected directly on the one hand to the oculomotor nuclei, at the origin of the oculovestibular reflex (induction of nystagmus), and on the other hand, to the spinal motor neurons, at the origin of the vestibulospinal reflex. These reflexes are associated with responses to visual and somaesthetic information for maintenance or return to the standing position, which characterises the function of equilibrium. Vertigo and disorders of balance reflect a conflict of information between these two labyrinths, or between the vestibular apparatus and the messages issued by other captors, and sometimes also dysfunction of central nervous system treatment of information or a lesion of the effector motor systems.

  15. Inferior vestibular neuritis in a fighter pilot: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Su Jiang; Jia, Hong Bo; Xu, Po; Zheng, Ying Juan

    2013-06-01

    Spatial disorientation in airplane pilots is a leading factor in many fatal flying accidents. Spatial orientation is the product of integrative inputs from the proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual systems. One condition that can lead to sudden pilot incapacitation in flight is vestibular neuritis. Vestibular neuritis is commonly diagnosed by a finding of unilateral vestibular failure, such as a loss of caloric response. However, because caloric response testing reflects the function of only the superior part of the vestibular nerve, it cannot detect cases of neuritis in only the inferior part of the nerve. We describe the case of a Chinese naval command fighter pilot who exhibited symptoms suggestive of vestibular neuritis but whose caloric response test results were normal. Further testing showed a unilateral loss of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). We believe that this pilot had pure inferior nerve vestibular neuritis. VEMP testing plays a major role in the diagnosis of inferior nerve vestibular neuritis in pilots. We also discuss this issue in terms of aeromedical concerns.

  16. Periosteal Pedicle Flap Harvested during Vestibular Extension for Root Coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Root exposure along with inadequate vestibular depth is a common clinical finding. Treatment option includes many techniques to treat such defects for obtaining predictable root coverage. Normally, the vestibular depth is increased first followed by a second surgery for root coverage. The present case report describes a single-stage technique for vestibular extension and root coverage in a single tooth by using the Periosteal Pedicle Flap (PPF. This technique involves no donor site morbidity and allows for reflection of sufficient amount of periosteal flap tissue with its own blood supply at the surgical site, thus increasing the chances of success of root coverage with simultaneous increase in vestibular depth.

  17. The action and metabolism of peptide leukotrienes in the isolated bullfrog lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R S; Herman, R P; Herman, C A

    1989-04-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) have been shown to cause contraction of mammalian airway smooth muscle. In this study, LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 were tested on isolated strips of bullfrog lung. LTC4, LTD4, and LTE4 (10(-7) to 3 x 10(-10) M) stimulated lung contraction. LTC4 was the most potent, with LTD4 and LTE4 being of equal but lower potency. The cyclooxygenase inhibitors, indomethacin and ibuprofen, had no effect on the strength of leukotriene-induced contraction. In addition, the effects of three mammalian LTD4 receptor antagonists, L-649,923, L-648,051, and LY171883 were tested. All three antagonists failed to block LTC4-simulated contraction, but were effective blockers of LTD4. LTE4-stimulated contractions were significantly blunted by all three antagonists, but the extent of blockade was less than for LTD4. Significant bioconversion of [3H]LTC4 to LTD4 and LTE4 occurred in minced lung preparations but not in lung strips. Peptide leukotrienes caused contraction in amphibian lung, though the order of potency differs from mammals. Like mammals, frogs appear to have two classes of leukotriene receptors, one for LTC4 and one for LTD4-LTE4. These results support the hypothesis that leukotriene receptors have been highly conserved through evolution, despite the fact that the nature of tissue responsiveness to leukotrienes has changed over evolutionary time.

  18. Toxicity of atrazine, glyphosate, and quinclorac in bullfrog tadpoles exposed to concentrations below legal limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelles, M F; Oliveira, G T

    2016-01-01

    This work sought to ascertain survival and possible changes in levels of glycogen, triglycerides, total lipids, cholesterol, protein, and lipid peroxidation in gills, liver, and muscle of bullfrog tadpoles (Lithobates catesbeianus) exposed to low concentrations of atrazine (2.5 μg L(-1)), glyphosate (18 μg L(-1)), and quinclorac (0.025 μg L(-1)) at laboratorial conditions. Tadpoles showed a reduction of glycogen and triglyceride in all organs and an increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) compared with control animals. Total lipid in gills and muscle increased in exposure to atrazine, and gills alone in exposure to glyphosate, but decreased in gills, liver, and muscle after quinclorac. Cholesterol increased in gills and liver after atrazine, in gills and muscle after glyphosate, and decreased in liver after quinclorac. Total protein in gills decreased after exposure to all herbicides, increased in muscle after atrazine, and in liver and muscle after quinclorac. These findings show that at concentrations of these herbicides tested can lead to an increase in energy expenditure to maintain homeostasis and survival of these animals despite the increase in lipid peroxidation levels in all organs analyzed. Responses observed can be one of the factors responsible for the decline in the number of amphibians around the world.

  19. Vestibular migraine: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Ligia Oliveira Gonçalves Morganti; Márcio Cavalcante Salmito; Juliana Antoniolli Duarte; Karina Cavalcanti Sumi; Juliana Caminha Simões; Fernando Freitas Ganança

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most often common diagnoses in neurotology, but only recently has been recognized as a disease. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with VM. METHODS: This was a retrospective, observational, and descriptive study, with analysis of patients' records from an outpatient VM clinic. RESULTS: 94.1% of patients were females and 5.9% were males. The mean age was 46.1 years; 65.6% of patients h...

  20. Evaluation of Steroid Therapy for Vestibular Neuronitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Sekitani, Toru; Okami, Kenji; Endo, Shiro

    1989-01-01

    The effect of steroid therapy for vestibular neuronitis was evaluated comparing with that of non-steroid therapy. Twelve cases were treated with steroid therapy and fourteen cases ware treated with non-steroid therapy. All cases had no response of caloric test at the onset and underwent therapy within one month since onset. The results ware as follows : Dizziness was significantly reduced by steroid therapy compared with non-steroid therapy. However, there was no difference of subsiding perio...

  1. Herpes encephalitis preceded by ipsilateral vestibular neuronitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Stephen J; Archer, John S

    2005-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman developed vertigo and jerk nystagmus to the left with normal cerebral imaging. Three days later she developed fever, altered mental state and left medial temporal lobe hypodensity, confirmed on lumbar puncture to be due to herpes simplex type 1 encephalitis. We propose that the patient had vestibular neuronitis caused by HSV-1 that progressed to ipsilateral temporal lobe encephalitis.

  2. Neurons excitability changes in rat medial vestibular nucleus following vestibular neurectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金麟毅

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic excitabilities of acutely isolated medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons of rats with normal labyrinth and with undergoingvestibular compensation from 30 min to 24 h after unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) were compared. In control rats, proportions of type A andB cells were 30 and 70%, respectively, however, the proportion of type A cells increased following UVD. Bursting discharge and irregular firingpatterns were recorded from 2 to 12 h post UVD. The spontaneous discharge rate of neurons in the ipsilesional MVN increased significantly at 2 hpost-UVD and remained high until 12 h post-UVD in both type A and type B cells. Mter-hyperpolarization (AHP) of the MVN neurons decreasedsignificantly from 2 h post-UVD in both types of cells. These results suggest that the early stage of vestibular compensation after peripheralneurectomy is associated with an increase in intrinsic excitability due to reduction of AHP in MVN neurons.

  3. Galvanic vestibular stimulation: a novel modulatory countermeasure for vestibular-associated movement disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos V. Rizzo-Sierra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Motion sickness or kinetosis is the result of the abnormal neural output originated by visual, proprioceptive and vestibular mismatch, which reverses once the dysfunctional sensory information becomes coherent. The space adaptation syndrome or space sickness relates to motion sickness; it is considered to be due to yaw, pith, and roll coordinates mismatch. Several behavioural and pharmacological measures have been proposed to control these vestibular-associated movement disorders with no success. Galvanic vestibular stimulation has the potential of up-regulating disturbed sensory-motor mismatch originated by kinetosis and space sickness by modulating the GABA-related ion channels neural transmission in the inner ear. It improves the signal-to-noise ratio of the afferent proprioceptive volleys, which would ultimately modulate the motor output restoring the disordered gait, balance and human locomotion due to kinetosis, as well as the spatial disorientation generated by gravity transition.

  4. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials: an overview Potencial evocado miogênico vestibular: uma visão geral

    OpenAIRE

    Renato Cal; Fayez Bahmad Jr

    2009-01-01

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test is a relatively new diagnostic tool that is in the process of being investigated in patients with specific vestibular disorders. Briefly, the VEMP is a biphasic response elicited by loud clicks or tone bursts recorded from the tonically contracted sternocleidomastoid muscle, being the only resource available to assess the function of the saccule and the lower portion of the vestibular nerve. AIM: In this review, we shall highlight the histo...

  5. Torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex measurements for identifying otolith asymmetries possibly related to space motion sickness susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    Recent studies by Diamond and Markham 1,2 have identified significant correlations between space motion sickness susceptibility and measures of disconjugate torsional eye movements recorded during parabolic flights. These results support an earlier proposal by von Baumgarten and Thümler 3 which hypothesized that an asymmetry of otolith function between the two ears is the cause of space motion sickness. It may be possible to devise experiments that can be performed in the 1 g environment on earth that could identify and quantify the presence of asymmetric otolith function. This paper summarizes the known physiological and anatomical properties of the otolith organs and the properties of the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex which are relevant to the design of a stimulus to identify otolith asymmetries. A specific stimulus which takes advantage of these properties is proposed.

  6. Variation of Ca, Sr, Ba and Mg in the otolith of mudskipper in west coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarimin, A S; Ghaffar, M A; Mohamed, C A R

    2009-02-01

    A study on elemental composition in the otolith of giant mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, was done from June to October 2003. Specimens were obtained from the mangrove areas of Kuala Selangor, Sepang and Melaka in the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 70 sagitta otoliths were analyzed to detect variation of Sr, Ba and Mg, replacing the natural chemical composition of the otolith, which is the calcium carbonate (CaCO3). The average ratio of Sr:Ca was 0.11 x 10(-4), Ba:Ca was 5.7 x 10(-3) and Mg:Ca was 0.2 x 10(-3). Strong correlation (R > 0.8) between fish body size and otolith weight ofmudskipper (p < 0.01) also found during this study.

  7. Assessment of vestibular function by videonystagmoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitte, E; Sémont, A

    1995-01-01

    Videonystagmoscopy has been used to subjectively observe the responses of the vestibular system in a population of patients with vestibular deficits. These results were compared with those of a control group of healthy, age-matched volunteers. The videonystagmoscopy device is made of one or two CCD cameras mounted on lightproof goggles, allowing a subjective observation of ocular movements on a video monitor. The eye movements, as well as the position of the head in space, can be recorded on videotape. The eyes are illuminated by infrared light emitting diodes placed on each side of the camera lens. The subjects are seated on a manually driven Barany chair. Subjects went through a protocol of passive roll head tilt on each side, followed by a slow, whole body rotation of 180 degrees amplitude, clockwise and counterclockwise, and then a head shaking test (HST). The eyes were subjectively observed, and we focussed on: torsional eye movements during head tilt, nystagmus when the rotation had stopped, and nystagmus induced by HST. With this simple and noninvasive examining procedure, screening of vestibular function at the bedside or during E.N.T. clinical investigations is possible.

  8. Application of otolith shape analysis in identifying different ecotypes of Coilia ectenes in the Yangtze Basin, China

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Radhakrishnan, K.V.; Li, Y.; Jayalakshmy, K.V.; Liu, M.; Murphy, B.R.; Xie, S.

    the sampling areas. The classification success of the discriminant 154 analysis was checked using jackknifed cross-validation (SPSS Inc., 1999). To visualize 155 the shape differences between the groups, average otolith shapes were... 3.2. Shape visualization 190 191 The average shape of the otoliths showed distinct differences among the three 192 ecotypes (Fig. 4). There was a well-developed antirostrum for both the anadromous and 193 the land...

  9. Temporal stability of otolith elemental fingerprints discriminates among lagoon nursery habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournois, Jennifer; Ferraton, Franck; Velez, Laure; McKenzie, David J.; Aliaume, Catherine; Mercier, Lény; Darnaude, Audrey M.

    2013-10-01

    The chemical composition of fish otoliths reflects that of the water masses that they inhabit. Otolith elemental compositions can, therefore, be used as natural tags to discriminate among habitats. However, for retrospective habitat identification to be valid and reliable for any adult, irrespective of its age, significant differences in environmental conditions, and therefore otolith signatures, must be temporally stable within each habitat, otherwise connectivity studies have to be carried out by matching year-classes to the corresponding annual fingerprints. This study investigated how various different combinations of chemical elements in otoliths could distinguish, over three separate years, between four coastal lagoon habitats used annually as nurseries by gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean). A series of nine elements were measured in otoliths of 301 S. aurata juveniles collected in the four lagoons in 2008, 2010 and 2011. Percentages of correct re-assignment of juveniles to their lagoon of origin were calculated with the Random Forest classification method, considering every possible combination of elements. This revealed both spatial and temporal variations in accuracy of habitat identification, with correct re-assignment to each lagoon ranging from 44 to 99% depending on the year and the lagoon. There were also annual differences in the combination of elements that provided the best discrimination among the lagoons. Despite this, when the data from the three years were pooled, a combination of eight elements (B, Ba, Cu, Li, Mg, Rb, Sr and Y) provided greater than 70% correct re-assignment to each single lagoon, with a multi-annual global accuracy of 79%. When considering the years separately, discrimination accuracy with these elemental fingerprints was above 90% for 2008 and 2010. It decreased to 61% in 2011, when unusually heavy rainfall occurred, which presumably reduced chemical differences among several of the

  10. Effects of extreme habitat conditions on otolith morphology: a case study on extremophile live bearing fishes (Poecilia mexicana, P. sulphuraria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja; Riesch, Rüdiger; García de León, Francisco J; Plath, Martin

    2011-12-01

    Our study was designed to evaluate if, and to what extent, restrictive environmental conditions affect otolith morphology. As a model, we chose two extremophile livebearing fishes: (i) Poecilia mexicana, a widespread species in various Mexican freshwater habitats, with locally adapted populations thriving in habitats characterized by the presence of one (or both) of the natural stressors hydrogen sulphide and darkness, and (ii) the closely related Poecilia sulphuraria living in a highly sulphidic habitat (Baños del Azufre). All three otolith types (lapilli, sagittae, and asterisci) of P. mexicana showed a decrease in size ranging from the non-sulphidic cave habitat (Cueva Luna Azufre), to non-sulphidic surface habitats, to the sulphidic cave (Cueva del Azufre), to sulphidic surface habitats (El Azufre), to P. sulphuraria. Although we found a distinct differentiation between ecotypes with respect to their otolith morphology, no clear-cut pattern of trait evolution along the two ecological gradients was discernible. Otoliths from extremophiles captured in the wild revealed only slight similarities to aberrant otoliths found in captive-bred fish. We therefore hypothesize that extremophile fishes have developed coping mechanisms enabling them to avoid aberrant otolith growth - an otherwise common phenomenon in fishes reared under stressful conditions.

  11. Texture and nano-scale internal microstructure of otoliths in the Atlantic molly, Poecilia mexicana: a high-resolution EBSD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz-Mirbach, T; Götz, A; Griesshaber, E; Plath, M; Schmahl, W W

    2013-08-01

    Otoliths of modern bony fishes are massive polycrystalline structures consisting mainly of calcium carbonate (primarily aragonite), and 1-10% organic residuals. Unlike other biomineralisates like shells, teeth and bones, they are not optimized for mechanical loads but serve the senses of hearing and balance in the inner ear. We examined internal structural variation of otoliths through microstructural and texture analyses. Our study applied the electron backscattered diffraction technique (EBSD) to whole sections of saccular otoliths on cave- and surface-dwelling fish. Application of high spatial resolution EBSD on otoliths of the livebearing fish Poecilia mexicana allowed for an investigation of crystal orientation despite the small size (<150 nm) of aragonite crystallites. Crystallites at the rims of otoliths had a higher structural organization than those situated near the center, where no dominant orientation pattern was discernible. Moreover, the medial (sulcal) face of otoliths, which makes contact with the sensory epithelium, was more structured than the lateral (antisulcal) face.

  12. Effects of the organophosphorus pesticide Folisuper 600 (methyl parathion on the heart function of bullfrog tadpoles, Lithobates catesbeianus (Shaw, 1802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Costa

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the heart function of bullfrog tadpoles (25 Gosner stage is affected by their acute exposure (48 h to a sub-lethal concentration (10 µg.L–1 of the active principle of the organophosphorus pesticide Folisuper 600R (methyl parathion - MP. Our results demonstrated that MP causes not only a reduction in tadpoles’ cardiac ventricular mass, resulting in a marked reduction in their cardiac twitch force, but also impairs their swimming performance, irrespective of increasing their heart rate. Together, these findings indicate that low and realistic concentration of MP have a negative impact on tadpoles’ performance, jeopardizing their survival.

  13. Evidence for cognitive vestibular integration impairment in idiopathic scoliosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercier Pierre

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is characterized by a three-dimensional deviation of the vertebral column and its etiopathogenesis is unknown. Various factors cause idiopathic scoliosis, and among these a prominent role has been attributed to the vestibular system. While the deficits in sensorimotor transformations have been documented in idiopathic scoliosis patients, little attention has been devoted to their capacity to integrate vestibular information for cognitive processing for space perception. Seated idiopathic scoliosis patients and control subjects experienced rotations of different directions and amplitudes in the dark and produced saccades that would reproduce their perceived spatial characteristics of the rotations (vestibular condition. We also controlled for possible alteration of the oculomotor and vestibular systems by measuring the subject's accuracy in producing saccades towards memorized peripheral targets in absence of body rotation and the gain of their vestibulo-ocular reflex. Results Compared to healthy controls, the idiopathic scoliosis patients underestimated the amplitude of their rotations. Moreover, the results revealed that idiopathic scoliosis patients produced accurate saccades to memorized peripheral targets in absence of body rotation and that their vestibulo-ocular reflex gain did not differ from that of control participants. Conclusion Overall, results of the present study demonstrate that idiopathic scoliosis patients have an alteration in cognitive integration of vestibular signals. It is possible that severe spine deformity developed partly due to impaired vestibular information travelling from the cerebellum to the vestibular cortical network or alteration in the cortical mechanisms processing the vestibular signals.

  14. Facial myokymia as a presenting symptom of vestibular schwannoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph B

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Facial myokymia is a rare presenting feature of a vestibular schwannoma. We present a 48 year old woman with a large right vestibular schwannoma, who presented with facial myokymia. It is postulated that facial myokymia might be due to a defect in the motor axons of the 7th nerve or due to brain stem compression by the tumor.

  15. Vestibular and proprioceptive influences on trunk movements during quiet standing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, C.G.; Kung, U.M.; Honegger, F.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Alfen, N. van; Bloem, B.R.; Allum, J.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    We characterized upper trunk and pelvis motion in normal subjects and in subjects with vestibular or proprioceptive loss, to document upper body movement modes in the pitch and roll planes during quiet stance. Six bilateral vestibular loss (VL), six bilateral lower-leg proprioceptive loss (PL) and 2

  16. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin.

  17. Vestibular function and temporal bone imaging in DFNB1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, A.M.M.; Beynon, A.J.; Peters, T.A.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Admiraal, R.J.C.; Kremer, H.; Verbist, B.M.; Pennings, R.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    DFNB1 is the most prevalent type of hereditary hearing impairment known nowadays and the audiometric phenotype is very heterogeneous. There is, however, no consensus in literature on vestibular and imaging characteristics. Vestibular function and imaging results of 44 DFNB1 patients were evaluated i

  18. Vestibular vertigo in emergency neurology and cervical osteochondrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Barykova

    2010-01-01

    had acute peripheral vestibular pathology that required cerebral stroke or hemorrhage to be ruled out according to clinical data in most cases. Intermittent, recurrent, short-term vestibular crisis in the examined group of patients is temporarily or clinically unrelated to an exacerbation of cervical osteochondrosis.

  19. Modelling the mixing of herring stocks between the Baltic and the North Sea from otolith data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Clara; Post, Søren Lorentzen; Worsøe Clausen, Lotte;

    2012-01-01

    Herring catches in the western Baltic, Kattegat and Skagerrak consist of a mixture of stocks, mainly North Sea autumn spawners (NSAS) and western Baltic spring spawners (WBSS), which is managed through a single TAC. Catches of these two stocks are split using otolith microstructures from Danish...... as provide solutions to the complex management of this mix. The stock‐specific seasonal trends in distribution of the two main stocks from otolith data were analysed using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) of stock composition. The results show a clear seasonal and age‐related pattern...... and are consistent with existing ideas about the migration patterns of WBSS and NSAS within Division IIIa and adjacent waters. This work therefore provides the foundation for the development of a more rational management of the herring stocks in this area...

  20. Validation of daily ring deposition in the otoliths of age-0 channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaris, P.C.; Irwin, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    We developed and validated methods for estimating the daily age of age-0 channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Two clutches of channel catfish eggs were hatched in the laboratory; subsequently, one was stocked in a 186-m2 earthen nursery pond and the other in a 757-L outdoor circular tank. Before stocking, subsamples of fish were collected at swim-up and 3 d after swim-up to evaluate early ring formation. Fish were sampled from the pond and tank on eight occasions ranging from 30 to 119 d posthatch. Distinct differences in early ring formation were found between yolk sac and free-swimming larval stages. Mean ring count and known age were closely related for tank- and pond-raised fish, indicating that daily ring deposition occurred in the otoliths of age-0 channel catfish up to 119 d posthatch. The accuracy of daily age estimation was similar between tank and pond samples, and daily ring counts were considerably accurate up to 60 d posthatch. Pond-raised fish were more difficult to age than tank-raised fish, which we attributed to ring compression resulting from slower growth among pond-raised fish after 30 d. The total length of tank- and pond-raised fish was positively related to otolith size; however, the slopes of the relationships between fish length and otolith radius were different between treatments. Therefore, we could not confirm that the relationship between fish length and otolith size was directly proportional for age-0 channel catfish. We encourage researchers to use this aging technique to determine how abiotic and biotic factors influence early life history characteristics and ultimately the population dynamics of catfishes (Ictaluridae). ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  1. Factors determining variations in otolith microincrement width of demersal juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Mosegaard, Henrik; Hinrichsen, H.H.;

    2003-01-01

    Pelagic and demersal juvenile Baltic cod Gadus morhua L. were collected on the slope and the top of Rønne bank in the Baltic Sea during 2 cruises in November and December 1998. The objective of this study was to evaluate distinct changes in otolith increment width observed in demersal juveniles b......, performed vertical migrations during the second interval, and stayed in association with the seafloor in the subsequent interval, corresponding to the time after the breakdown of the thermocline....

  2. How vestibular stimulation interacts with illusory hand ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe; Lenggenhager, Bigna; Blanke, Olaf

    2010-03-01

    Artificial stimulation of the peripheral vestibular system has been shown to improve ownership of body parts in neurological patients, suggesting vestibular contributions to bodily self-consciousness. Here, we investigated whether galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) interferes with the mechanisms underlying ownership, touch, and the localization of one's own hand in healthy participants by using the "rubber hand illusion" paradigm. Our results show that left anodal GVS increases illusory ownership of the fake hand and illusory location of touch. We propose that these changes are due to vestibular interference with spatial and/or temporal mechanisms of visual-tactile integration leading to an enhancement of visual capture. As only left anodal GVS lead to such changes, and based on neurological data on body part ownership, we suggest that this vestibular interference is mediated by the right temporo-parietal junction and the posterior insula.

  3. Vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghodsi Mohammad

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma most commonly presents with ipsilateral disturbances of acoustic, vestibular, trigeminal and facial nerves. Presentation of vestibular schwannoma with contralateral facial pain is quite uncommon. Case presentation Among 156 cases of operated vestibular schwannoma, we found one case with unusual presentation of contralateral hemifacial pain. Conclusion The presentation of contralateral facial pain in the vestibular schwannoma is rare. It seems that displacement and distortion of the brainstem and compression of the contralateral trigeminal nerve in Meckel's cave by the large mass lesion may lead to this atypical presentation. The best practice in these patients is removal of the tumour, although persistent contralateral pain after operation has been reported.

  4. Congenital and compensated vestibular dysfunction in childhood: an overlooked entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Avery H; Phillips, James O

    2006-07-01

    We report five children with previously unrecognized vestibular dysfunction detected by clinical examination and confirmed by quantitative vestibular testing. Patient 1 presented with fluctuating visual acuity and intermittent nystagmus. Patient 2 had congenital hearing loss associated with imbalance, delayed motor development, and cyclic vomiting. Patient 3 had neurotrophic keratitis with an intermittent head tilt, imbalance, and motor delays. Patient 4 showed ataxia and eye movement abnormalities following traumatic brain injury and had reading difficulties. Patient 5 had episodic vertigo and eye movement abnormalities from infancy. Clinical vestibular testing emphasized spontaneous nystagmus, rapid head thrust, and assessment of post-rotatory nystagmus. Quantitative vestibular testing included the sinusoidal chair rotation and velocity step tests, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, post-head-shake nystagmus, and computerized platform posturography. Pediatric neurologists encounter children with congenital and compensated vestibular dysfunction, which can be recognized on the basis of relevant history and clinical abnormalities of the ocular-ocular reflex.

  5. Neural Network Model of Vestibular Nuclei Reaction to Onset of Vestibular Prosthetic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiovanna, Jack; Nguyen, T A K; Guinand, Nils; Pérez-Fornos, Angelica; Micera, Silvestro

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly, due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of "optimal" stimulation configurations for humans. Here, we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate modulation (PRM) and pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). PAM was more effective than PRM for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically, the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost PAM. Comodulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both excitatory and inhibitory eye movements even at high baseline

  6. Neural network model of vestibular nuclei reaction to onset of vestibular prosthetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack eDigiovanna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system incorporates multiple sensory pathways to provide crucial information about head and body motion. Damage to the semicircular canals, the peripheral vestibular organs that sense rotational velocities of the head, can severely degrade the ability to perform activities of daily life. Vestibular prosthetics address this problem by using stimulating electrodes that can trigger primary vestibular afferents to modulate their firing rates, thus encoding head movement. These prostheses have been demonstrated chronically in multiple animal models and acutely tested in short-duration trials within the clinic in humans. However, mainly due to limited opportunities to fully characterize stimulation parameters, there is a lack of understanding of ‘optimal’ stimulation configurations for humans. Here we model possible adaptive plasticity in the vestibular pathway. Specifically, this model highlights the influence of adaptation of synaptic strengths and offsets in the vestibular nuclei to compensate for the initial activation of the prosthetic. By changing the synaptic strengths, the model is able to replicate the clinical observation that erroneous eye movements are attenuated within 30 minutes without any change to the prosthetic stimulation rate. Although our model was only built to match this time-point, we further examined how it affected subsequent pulse rate and pulse amplitude modulation. Pulse amplitude modulation was more effective than pulse rate modulation for nearly all stimulation configurations during these acute tests. Two non-intuitive relationships highlighted by our model explain this performance discrepancy. Specifically the attenuation of synaptic strengths for afferents stimulated during baseline adaptation and the discontinuity between baseline and residual firing rates both disproportionally boost pulse amplitude modulation. Co-modulation of pulse rate and amplitude has been experimentally shown to induce both

  7. Vestibular characterization in the menstrual cycle Caracterização vestibular no ciclo menstrual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Ishii

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Hormonal disorders in the menstrual cycle can affect labyrinthine fluid homeostasis, causing balance and hearing dysfunctions. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical prospective. AIM: compare the results from vestibular tests in young women, in the premenstrual and postmenstrual periods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: twenty women were selected with ages ranging from 18 to 35 years, who were not using any kind of contraceptive method for at least six months, and without vestibular or hearing complaints. The test was carried out in each subject before and after the menstrual period, respecting the limit of ten days before or after menstruation. RESULTS: there was a statistically significant difference in the menstrual cycle phases only in the following vestibular tests: calibration, saccadic movements, PRPD and caloric-induced nystagmus. We also noticed that age; a regular menstrual cycle; hearing loss or dizziness cases in the family; and premenstrual symptoms such as tinnitus, headache, sleep disorders, anxiety, nausea and hyperacusis can interfere in the vestibular test. CONCLUSION: there are differences in the vestibular tests of healthy women when comparing their pre and postmenstrual periods.As alterações hormonais do ciclo menstrual podem comprometer a homeostase dos fluidos labirínticos, gerando alterações no equilíbrio e na audição. FORMA DO ESTUDO: Clínico prospectivo. OBJETIVO: Comparar os resultados dos testes do exame vestibular em mulheres jovens, nos períodos pré e pós-menstrual. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram selecionadas vinte mulheres, entre dezoito e trinta e cinco anos, que não fizessem uso de qualquer tipo de anticoncepcional, com audição normal e sem queixas vestibulares. O exame vestibular foi realizado em cada participante no período pré e no período pós-menstrual, em ordem aleatória, e respeitando o limite de até dez dias antes do início da menstruação e até dez dias após o início da menstruação. RESULTADO: Foi observada

  8. Energetics of coupled Na+ and Cl- entry into epithelial cells of bullfrog small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, W M; Bixenman, W R; Frey, K F; Garcia-Diaz, J F; O'Regan, M G; Owens, J L

    1979-02-20

    Na+, K+ and Cl- concentrations (cij) and activities (aij), and mucosal membrane potentials (Em) were measured in epithelial cells of isolated bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) small intestine. Segments of intestine were stripped of their external muscle layers, and bathed (at 25 degrees C and pH 7.2) in oxygenated Ringer solutions containing 105 mM Na+ and Cl- and 5.4 mM K+. Na+ and K+ concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry and Cl- concentrations by conductometric titration following extraction of the dried tissue with 0.1 M HNO3. 14C-labelled inulin was used to determine extracellular volume. Em was measured with conventional open tip microelectrodes, aiCl with solid-state Cl-selective silver microelectrodes and aiNa and aiK with Na+ and K+-selective liquid ion-exchanger microelectrodes. The average Em recorded was -34mV. ciNa, ciK and ciCl were 51, 105 and 52 mM. The corresponding values for aiNa, aiK and aiCl were 18, 80 and 33 mM. These results suggest that a large fraction of the cytoplasmic Na+ is 'bound' or sequestered in an osmotically inactive form, that all, or virtually all the cytoplasmic K+ behaves as if in free solution, and that there is probably some binding of cytoplasmic Cl-. aiCl significantly exceeds the level corresponding to electrochemical equilibrium across the mucosal and baso-lateral cell membranes. Earlier studies showed that coupled mucosal entry of Na+ and Cl- is implicated in intracellular Cl- accumulation in this tissue. This study permitted estimation of the steady-state transapical Na+ and Cl- electrochemical potential differences (deltamuNa and deltamuCl). deltamuNa (-7000 J . mol-1; cell minus mucosal medium) was energetically more than sufficient to account for deltamuCl (1000--2000 J . mol-1).

  9. Chromosome Aberrations of East Asian Bullfrog (Hoplobatrachus rugulosus around a Gold Mine Area with Arsenic Contamination

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    Atidtaya Suttichaiya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to investigate the chromosome aberrations of the East Asian Bullfrog (Hoplobatrachus rugulosus in the gold mine area compared to an unaffected area. Three H. rugulosus were collected, and chromosome aberrations were studied using bone marrow. The level of arsenic was measured in water, sediment and H. rugulosus samples. The average concentrations of arsenic in the water and sediment samples from the gold mine and unaffected areas were 0.03 ± 0.003 mg/l and not detected in water as well as 351.59 ± 5.73 and 1.37 ± 1.07 mg/kg in sediment, respectively. The gold mine values were higher than the permissible limit of the water and soil quality standards, but the arsenic concentrations in the samples from the unaffected area were within prescribed limit. The average concentrations of arsenic in H. rugulosus samples from the gold mine and unaffected areas were 0.39 ± 0.30 and 0.07 ± 0.01 mg/kg, respectively, which were both lower than the standard of arsenic contamination in food. The diploid chromosome number of H. rugulosus in both areas was 2n=26, and the percentage of chromosome breakages of H. rugulosus in the gold mine area were higher than the unaffected area. There were eight types of chromosome aberrations, including a single chromatid gap, isochromatid gap, single chromatid break, isochromatid break, centric fragmentation, deletion, fragmentation and translocation. The most common chromosome aberration in the samples from the affected area was deletion. The difference in the percentage of chromosome breakages in H. rugulosus from both areas was statistically significant (p<0.05.

  10. Cathelicidins from the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana provides novel template for peptide antibiotic design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiying Ling

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins, a class of gene-encoded effector molecules of vertebrate innate immunity, provide a first line of defense against microbial invasions. Although cathelicidins from mammals, birds, reptiles and fishes have been extensively studied, little is known about cathelicidins from amphibians. Here we report the identification and characterization of two cathelicidins (cathelicidin-RC1 and cathelicidin-RC2 from the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. The cDNA sequences (677 and 700 bp, respectively encoding the two peptides were successfully cloned from the constructed lung cDNA library of R. catesbeiana. And the deduced mature peptides are composed of 28 and 33 residues, respectively. Structural analysis indicated that cathelicidin-RC1 mainly assumes an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation, while cathelicidin-RC2 could not form stable amphipathic structure. Antimicrobial and bacterial killing kinetic analysis indicated that the synthetic cathelicidin-RC1 possesses potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial potency, while cathelicidin-RC2 exhibited very weak antimicrobial activity. Besides, the antimicrobial activity of cathelicidin-RC1 is salt-independent and highly stable. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis indicated that cathelicidin-RC1 kills microorganisms through the disruption of microbial membrane. Moreover, cathelicidin-RC1 exhibited low cytotoxic activity against mammalian normal or tumor cell lines, and low hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. The potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial activity combined with the salt-independence, high stability, low cytotoxic and hemolytic activities make cathelicidin-RC1 an ideal template for the development of novel peptide antibiotics.

  11. Analysis of matrix proteins of otolith in upside-down catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, K.; Okamoto, N.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, T.

    We have previously suggested that the calcium density of the otolith in upside-down swimming Synodontis nigriventris is lower than that in upside-up swimming Synodontis multipunctatus Biol Space Sci 2002 In this study we examined EDTA-soluble matrix proteins of otolith in the utricle of the catfish S nigriventris S multipunctatus and upside-up swimming Synodontis brichadi and goldfish Carassius auratus We detected two main bands about 55 kD and 80 kD with SDS-PAGE in the 3 species of the catfish In cntrast goldfish had the about 55 kD band alone The band of about 80 kD was consisted of two sub-bands a lighter and a heavier band A lighter band was observed in S brichadi and a heavier band was observed in S nigriventris S multipunctatus had the both bands Furthermore mass spectrometric analysis showed there were some proteins of molecular weight under 14 kD The molecular weights of the proteins were different among the fishes These results suggest that many different kinds of matrix protein may cause different degree of calcification in otolith formation

  12. Temporal variability in estuarine fish otolith elemental fingerprints: Implications for connectivity assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis-Santos, Patrick; Gillanders, Bronwyn M.; Tanner, Susanne E.; Vasconcelos, Rita P.; Elsdon, Travis S.; Cabral, Henrique N.

    2012-10-01

    The chemical composition of fish otoliths can provide valuable information for determining the nursery value of estuaries to adult populations of coastal fishes. However, understanding temporal variation in elemental fingerprints at different scales is important as it can potentially confound spatial discrimination among estuaries. Otolith elemental ratios (Li:Ca, Mg:Ca, Mn:Ca, Cu:Ca, Sr:Ca, Ba:Ca and Pb:Ca) of Platichthys flesus and Dicentrarchus labrax, from several estuaries along the Portuguese coast in two years and three seasons (spring, summer and autumn) within a year, were determined via Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Elemental fingerprints varied significantly among years and seasons within a year but we achieved accurate classifications of juvenile fish to estuarine nursery of origin (77-96% overall cross-validated accuracy). Although elemental fingerprints were year-specific, variation among seasons did not hinder spatial discrimination. Estuarine fingerprints of pooled seasonal data were representative of the entire juvenile year class and attained high discrimination (77% and 80% overall cross-validated accuracy for flounder and sea bass, respectively). Incorporating seasonal variation resulted in up to an 11% increase in correct classification of individual estuaries, in comparison to seasons where accuracies were lowest. Overall, understanding the implications of temporal variations in otolith chemistry for spatial discrimination is key to establish baseline data for connectivity studies.

  13. New insights into early history traits of Lypophrys pholis inferred from otolith microstructural studies

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    Henrique Queiroga

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenetic development of the sagittal otoliths of Lypophris pholis during embryonic, larval, settlement and recruitment stages was examined from eggs, new settlers and recruits collected during low tides in several Portuguese rocky beaches. The eggs were reared under controlled-laboratory conditions until the larval stage. Viewed by scanning electron microscopy, sagittae recorded eight to ten micro-increments before hatching in late embryo phases. In larval otoliths a visible hatching check was observed and micro-increments were deposited on a daily basis. Early settlers presented in the otolith edge two types of settlement marks (Ia and Ib. Furthermore micro-increments in sagittae were also shown to be deposited daily in early juveniles using fluorescent dyes. Pelagic larval duration estimated from micro-increments counts until the settlement marks in recruits collected along the occidental Portuguese coasts ranged from 57 to 73 days. Moreover pelagic larval duration showed a latitudinal reduction trend from North to South probably related the regional seawater temperatures. Settlement sizes did not show however any regional differences suggesting to be a more conservative character within species. Age at coastal recruitment varied between 85 and 109 days, but northern individuals were recruit with an older age. Back calculated spawning, hatching and settlement dates appear to be unrelated to the lunar cycle for L. pholis.

  14. Acoustically Induced Streaming Flows near a Model Cod Otolith and their Potential Implications for Fish Hearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotas, Charlotte W [ORNL; Rogers, Peter [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yoda, Minami [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    The ears of fishes are remarkable sensors for the small acoustic disturbances associated with underwater sound. For example, each ear of the Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) has three dense bony bodies (otoliths) surrounded by fluid and tissue, and detects sounds at frequencies from 30 to 500 Hz. Atlantic cod have also been shown to localize sounds. However, how their ears perform these functions is not fully understood. Steady streaming, or time-independent, flows near a 350% scale model Atlantic cod otolith immersed in a viscous fluid were studied to determine if these fluid flows contain acoustically relevant information that could be detected by the ear s sensory hair cells. The otolith was oscillated sinusoidally at various orientations at frequencies of 8 24 Hz, corresponding to an actual frequency range of 280 830 Hz. Phaselocked particle pathline visualizations of the resulting flows give velocity, vorticity, and rate of strain fields over a single plane of this mainly two-dimensional flow. Although the streaming flows contain acoustically relevant information, the displacements due to these flows are likely too small to explain Atlantic cod hearing abilities near threshold. The results, however, may suggest a possible mechanism for detection of ultrasound in some fish species.

  15. Lake trout otolith chronologies as multidecadal indicators of high-latitude freshwater ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, B.A.; Von Biela, V.R.; Zimmerman, C.E.; Brown, Randy J.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude ecosystems are among the most vulnerable to long-term climate change, yet continuous, multidecadal indicators by which to gauge effects on biology are scarce, especially in freshwater environments. To address this issue, dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) techniques were applied to growth-increment widths in otoliths from lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Chandler Lake system, Alaska (68.23°N, 152.70°W). All otoliths were collected in 1987 and exhibited highly synchronous patterns in growth-increment width. Increments were dated, the widths were measured, and age-related growth declines were removed using standard dendrochronology techniques. The detrended time series were averaged to generate an annually resolved chronology, which continuously spanned 1964–1984. The chronology positively and linearly correlated with August air temperature over the 22-year interval (p productivity. Given the broad distribution of lake trout within North America, this study suggests that otolith chronologies could be used to examine responses between freshwater ecosystems and environmental variability across a range of temporal and spatial scales.

  16. Labyrinthectomy and Vestibular Neurectomy for Intractable Vertiginous Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Alfredo Vega; Hidalgo, Lourdes Olivia Vales; Arévalo, Rodrigo Jácome; Diaz, Marite Palma

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy are considered the surgical procedures with the highest possibility of controlling medically untreatable incapacitating vertigo. Ironically, after 100 years of the introduction of both transmastoid labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy, the choice of which procedure to use rests primarily on the evaluation of the hearing and of the surgical morbidity. Objective To review surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy for the treatment of incapacitating vestibular disorders. Data Sources PubMed, MD consult and Ovid-SP databases. Data Synthesis In this review we describe and compare surgical labyrinthectomy and vestibular neurectomy. A contrast between surgical and chemical labyrinthectomy is also examined. Proper candidate selection, success in vertigo control and complication rates are discussed on the basis of a literature review. Conclusions Vestibular nerve section and labyrinthectomy achieve high and comparable rates of vertigo control. Even though vestibular neurectomy is considered a hearing sparing surgery, since it is an intradural procedure, it carries a greater risk of complications than transmastoid labyrinthectomy. Furthermore, since many patients whose hearing is preserved with vestibular nerve section may ultimately lose that hearing, the long-term value of hearing preservation is not well established. Although the combination of both procedures, in the form of a translabyrinthine vestibular nerve section, is the most certain way to ablate vestibular function for patients with no useful hearing and disabling vertigo, some advocate for transmastoid labyrinthectomy alone, considering that avoiding opening the subarachnoid space minimizes the possible intracranial complications. Chemical labyrinthectomy may be considered a safer alternative, but the risks of hearing loss when hearing preservation is desired are also high. PMID:28382129

  17. Evaluation of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, I. S.; Warren, E.; DeSoto, R.; Moroney, G.; Chastain, J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Taylor, L.; Peters, B. T.; Allen, E.; Reschke, M. F.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity exposure results in an adaptive central reinterpretation of information from multiple sensory sources to produce a sensorimotor state appropriate for motor actions in this unique environment, but this new adaptive state is no longer appropriate for the 1-g gravitational environment on Earth. During these gravitational transitions, astronauts experience deficits in both perceptual and motor functions including impaired postural control, disruption in spatial orientation, impaired control of locomotion that include alterations in muscle activation variability, modified lower limb kinematics, alterations in head-trunk coordination as well as reduced dynamic visual acuity. Post-flight changes in postural and locomotor control might have adverse consequences if a rapid egress was required following a long-duration mission, where support personnel may not be available to aid crewmembers. The act of emergency egress includes, but is not limited to standing, walking, climbing a ladder, jumping down, monitoring displays, actuating discrete controls, operating auxiliary equipment, and communicating with Mission Control and recovery teams while maintaining spatial orientation, mobility and postural stability in order to escape safely. The average time to recover impaired postural control and functional mobility to preflight levels of performance has been shown to be approximately two weeks after long-duration spaceflight. The postflight alterations are due in part to central reinterpretation of vestibular information caused by exposure to microgravity. In this study we will use a commonly used technique of transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied across the vestibular end organs (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS) to disrupt vestibular function as a simulation of post-flight disturbances. The goal of this project is an engineering human-in-the-loop evaluation of a device that can degrade performance of functional tasks (e.g. to maintain upright balance

  18. Vestibular and cerebellar contribution to gaze optimality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Murat; Glasauer, Stefan; Lehnen, Nadine

    2014-04-01

    Patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss have large gaze variability and experience disturbing oscillopsia, which impacts physical and social functioning, and quality of life. Gaze variability and oscillopsia in these patients are attributed to a deficient vestibulo-ocular reflex, i.e. impaired online feedback motor control. Here, we assessed whether the lack of vestibular input also affects feed-forward motor learning, i.e. the ability to choose optimal movement parameters that minimize variability during active movements such as combined eye-head gaze shifts. A failure to learn from practice and reshape feed-forward motor commands in response to sensory error signals to achieve appropriate movements has been proposed to explain dysmetric gaze shifts in patients with cerebellar ataxia. We, therefore, assessed the differential roles of both sensory vestibular information and the cerebellum in choosing optimal movement kinematics. We have previously shown that, in the course of several gaze shifts, healthy subjects adjust the motor command to minimize endpoint variability also when movements are experimentally altered by an increase in the head moment of inertia. Here, we increased the head inertia in five patients with chronic complete bilateral vestibular loss (aged 45.4±7.1 years, mean±standard deviation), nine patients with cerebellar ataxia (aged 56.7±12.6 years), and 10 healthy control subjects (aged 39.7±6.3 years) while they performed large (75° and 80°) horizontal gaze shifts towards briefly flashed targets in darkness and, using our previous optimal control model, compared their gaze shift parameters to the expected optimal movements with increased head inertia. Patients with chronic bilateral vestibular loss failed to update any of the gaze shift parameters to the new optimum with increased head inertia. Consequently, they displayed highly variable, suboptimal gaze shifts. Patients with cerebellar ataxia updated some movement parameters to

  19. Can analysis of Platichthys flesus otoliths provide relevant data on historical metal pollution in estuaries? Experimental and in situ approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selleslagh, Jonathan, E-mail: Jonathan.Selleslagh@u-bordeaux.fr [Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, UMR EPOC 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, place du docteur Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Echard, Aurélie [IRSTEA Centre de Bordeaux, unité EABX, 50 avenue de Verdun, 33612 Cestas (France); Pécheyran, Christophe [Université de Pau et des pays de l' Adour, CNRS, LCABIE-IPREM UMR 5254, 64053 Pau (France); Baudrimont, Magalie [Université de Bordeaux, CNRS, UMR EPOC 5805, Station Marine d' Arcachon, place du docteur Peyneau, 33120 Arcachon (France); Lobry, Jérémy; Daverat, Françoise [IRSTEA Centre de Bordeaux, unité EABX, 50 avenue de Verdun, 33612 Cestas (France)

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent efforts to manage them more efficiently, estuaries are natural sinks for a wide range of metal contaminants, many of which accumulate at potentially toxic concentrations for fish populations, posing a threat to recruitment and stocks. While analysis of metal concentrations in soft tissue and water samples calls for continuous and long-term sampling operations, the use of otoliths to study metal pollution may be one way of providing a historical record of pollutant exposure. In this study, we examine the potential use of otoliths as natural tracers of metal contamination. A “cocktail” of different metals (Cd, Pb and Ni) was used to test bio-accumulation in otoliths and tissue (liver, kidney, muscle and gills) extracted from juvenile flounder (Platichthys flesus). Assessment took place under controlled conditions over a three month period, with water exposure concentrations increasing every 3 weeks. The concentrations used were natural (T1), X5 (T2), X10 (T3), and null (T4). Chemical analyses were carried out using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer ICP-OES and atomic absorption spectrometer AAS for water and tissue, while otolith microchemistry analyses were performed using a femtosecond laser ablation-high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (fsLA-ICP-MS-HR). Significant differences between control and exposed individuals, as well as an increase in metal concentrations according to exposure level, were observed in all tissues except in muscle tissue. Significant increases in Pb were also detected in contaminated fish otoliths compared with control specimens, with the highest concentrations occurring in T3. Cartographies of Pb distribution in otoliths of both control and contaminated fish only showed high concentrations of Pb at the edge of contaminated fish otoliths, indicating an accumulation of metal during the experiment. Although the relationships between exposure level and Pb concentration in

  20. Human Vestibular Function - Skylab Experiment M131

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    This set of photographs details Skylab's Human Vestibular Function experiment (M131). This experiment was a set of medical studies designed to determine the effect of long-duration space missions on astronauts' coordination abilities. This experiment tested the astronauts susceptibility to motion sickness in the Skylab environment, acquired data fundamental to an understanding of the functions of human gravity reception under prolonged absence of gravity, and tested for changes in the sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Data from this experiment was collected before, during, and after flight. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  1. Experiment M-131 - Human vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. F., II; Graybiel, A.

    1973-01-01

    The purpose of the M-131 experiment is to measure responses in astronauts throughout orbital flight that reflect vestibular function and compare them with measurements made before and after flight. Three subtasks require measurement of (1) susceptibility to motion sickness, (2) thresholds of response to stimulation of the semicircular canals, and (3) space perception, viz, visual and nonvisual localization, using external spacecraft and internal morphological frames of reference. Four astronauts will be available for all measurements in Skylab 2 and 3 and two additional astronauts for only the 'static' measurements during the flights.

  2. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIURON ON SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF PACIFIC TREEFROG, BULLFROG, RED-LEGGED FROG, AND AFRICAN CLAWED FROG EMBRYOS AND TADPOLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of the herbicide diuron on survival and growth of Pacific treefrog (Pseudacris regilla),bullfrog(Rana catesbeiana), red-legged frog(Rana aurora),and African clawed frog(Xenopus laevis)embryos and tadpoles were determined in static-renewal tests. P.regilla and X.laevis...

  3. Stimulatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on visual sensitivity and electroretinography b-waves in the bullfrog eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Fazli; Ul-Islam, Mazhar; Khan, Romana; Khan, Taous; Khattak, Waleed Ahmad; Hwang, Kyung-Hee; Park, Jong Seok; Chang, Su-Chan; Kim, You Young

    2013-08-01

    During the last decade, a large number of studies have focused on the development of nanomaterials for medical applications. Therefore, the present study was designed to evaluate the stimulatory effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the vertebrate visual system. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized through photoluminescence, ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Furthermore, various electrophysiological recordings were obtained from the bullfrog eyecup preparations under various treatment conditions. Photoluminescence data showed a central peak at 386 nm while the UV-visible spectrum showed a sharp absorption band centered around 367 nm. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements showed that synthesized zinc oxide nanoparticles have a polycrystalline wurtzite structure, with a round to oval shape and an average particle size of > 40 nm. Electroretinography (ERG) demonstrated that zinc oxide nanoparticles significantly increased the ERG b-wave amplitude in dark-adapted bullfrog eyecups and in the presence of background illumination. Zinc oxide nanoparticles also improved the visual sensitivity by 0.7 log unit of light intensity and shortened the duration of rhodopsin regeneration. Based on the results obtained, it was concluded that zinc oxide nanoparticles may be used to improve visual functions. The present study may add new dimensions to the biomedical applications of nanomaterials in eye research.

  4. Effects of testosterone on contractile properties of sexually dimorphic forelimb muscles in male bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana, Shaw 1802

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R. Kampe

    2013-07-01

    This study examined the effects of testosterone (T on the contractile properties of two sexually dimorphic forelimb muscles and one non-dimorphic muscle in male bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana, Shaw 1802. The dimorphic muscles in castrated males with testosterone replacement (T+ achieved higher forces and lower fatigability than did castrated males without replaced testosterone (T0 males, but the magnitude of the differences was low and many of the pair-wise comparisons of each muscle property were not statistically significant. However, when taken as a whole, the means of seven contractile properties varied in the directions expected of masculine values in T+ animals in the sexually dimorphic muscles. Moreover, these data, compared with previous data on male and female bullfrogs, show that values for T+ males are similar to normal males and are significantly different from females. The T0 males tended to be intermediate in character between T+ males and females, generally retaining masculine values. This suggests that the exposure of young males to T in their first breeding season produces a masculinizing effect on the sexually dimorphic muscles that is not reversed between breeding seasons when T levels are low. The relatively minor differences in contractile properties between T+ and T0 males may indicate that as circulating T levels rise during breeding season in normal males, contractile properties can be enhanced rapidly to maximal functional levels for breeding success.

  5. STATE ANXIETY, SUBJECTIVE IMBALANCE AND HANDICAP IN VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yougan Saman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTEvidence is emerging of a significant clinical and neuro-anatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. Aims1.To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit.2.To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. MethodsTwo separate cohorts Vestibular Schwannoma (VS patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and caloric responses and questionnaire assessment (Vertigo handicap Questionnaire, Vertigo Symptom Scale, State Trait Anxiety InventoryFifteen post resection Vestibular schwannoma patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1. Forty-five patients with VS in-situ and with preserved vestibular function formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2. Experiment 1: VS subjects (N=15 with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a State anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterwards with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1. Experiment 2: State anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1 N=26 and without balance symptoms (Group 2 N=11 (Aim 2. The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER.ResultsIn experiment 1, a significant difference (p<0.01 was found when comparing

  6. Analysis of Conservative Tracer Tests in the Bullfrog, Tram, and Prow Pass Tuffs, 1996 to 1998, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umari, Amjad; Fahy, Michael F.; Earle, John D.; Tucci, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the potential for transport of radionuclides in ground water from the proposed high-level nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted among three boreholes, known as the C-hole Complex, and values for transport (or flow) porosity, storage (or matrix) porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and the extent of matrix diffusion were obtained. The C-holes are completed in a sequence of Miocene tuffaceous rock, consisting of nonwelded to densely welded ash-flow tuff with intervals of ash-fall tuff and volcaniclastic rocks, covered by Quaternary alluvium. The lower part of the tuffaceous-rock sequence includes the Prow Pass, Bullfrog, and Tram Tuffs of the Crater Flat Group. The rocks are pervaded by tectonic and cooling fractures. Paleozoic limestone and dolomite underlie the tuffaceous rocks. Four radially convergent and one partially recirculating conservative (nonsorbing) tracer tests were conducted at the C-hole Complex from 1996 to 1998 to establish values for flow porosity, storage porosity, longitudinal dispersivity, and extent of matrix diffusion in the Bullfrog and Tram Tuffs and the Prow Pass Tuff. Tracer tests included (1) injection of iodide into the combined Bullfrog-Tram interval; (2) injection of 2,6 difluorobenzoic acid into the Lower Bullfrog interval; (3) injection of 3-carbamoyl-2-pyridone into the Lower Bullfrog interval; and (4) injection of iodide and 2,4,5 trifluorobenzoic acid, followed by 2,3,4,5 tetrafluorobenzoic acid, into the Prow Pass Tuff. All tracer tests were analyzed by the Moench single- and dual-porosity analytical solutions to the advection-dispersion equation or by superposition of these solutions. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to corroborate tracer solution results, to obtain optimal parameter values from the solutions, and to quantify parameter uncertainty resulting from analyzing two of the three radially convergent conservative tracer tests

  7. Characterization of estuary use by Nisqually Hatchery Chinook based on Otolith analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind-Null, Angie M.; Larsen, Kim A.; Reisenbichler, Reg

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Nisqually Fall Chinook population is one of 27 stocks in the Puget Sound evolutionarily significant unit listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA). Preservation and extensive restoration of the Nisqually delta ecosystem are planned to assist in recovery of the stock. A pre-restoration baseline including life history types, estuary residence time, growth rates, and habitat use are needed to evaluate the potential response of hatchery and wild Chinook salmon to restoration. Otolith analysis has been selected as a means to examine Chinook salmon life history, growth, and residence in the Nisqually estuary. Over time, the information from the otolith analyses will be used to: 1) determine if estuary restoration actions cause changes to the population structure (i.e. frequency of the different life history trajectories) for Nisqually River Chinook, 2) compare pre- and post- restoration residence times and growth rates, 3) suggest whether estuary restoration yields substantial benefits for Chinook salmon through (1) and (2), and 4) compare differences in habitat use between hatchery and wild Chinook to further protect ESA listed stock. Otoliths are calcium carbonate structures in the inner ear that grow in proportion to the overall growth of the fish. Daily growth increments can be measured so date and fish size at various habitat transitions can be back-calculated. Careful analysis of otolith microstructure can be used to determine the number of days that a fish resided in the estuary as a juvenile (increment counts), size at entrance to the estuary, size at egress, and the amount that the fish grew while in the estuary. Juvenile hatchery Chinook salmon are generally released as smolts that move quickly through the delta with much shorter residence times than for many wild fish and are not dependent on the delta as nursery habitat (Myers and Horton 1982; Mace 1983; Levings et al. 1986). The purpose of this study is to use and

  8. Pre-Restoration Habitat Use by Chinook Salmon in the Nisqually Estuary Using Otolith Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind-Null, Angela; Larsen, Kimberly; Reisenbichler, Reginald

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Nisqually Fall Chinook population is one of 27 stocks in the Puget Sound evolutionarily significant unit listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. The preservation of the Nisqually delta ecosystem coupled with extensive restoration of approximately 1,000 acres of diked estuarine habitat is identified as the highest priority action for the recovery of naturally spawning Nisqually River Fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Nisqually Chinook Recovery Plan. In order to evaluate the response of Chinook salmon to restoration, a pre-restoration baseline of life history diversity and estuary utilization must be established. Otolith analysis has been proposed as a means to measure Chinook salmon life history diversity, growth, and residence in the Nisqually estuary. Over time, the information from the otolith analyses will be used to: (1) determine if estuary restoration actions cause changes to the population structure (i.e. frequency of the different life history trajectories) for Nisqually River Chinook, (2) compare pre and post restoration residence times and growth rates, and (3) suggest whether estuary restoration yields substantial benefits for Chinook salmon. Otoliths are calcium carbonate structures in the inner ear that grow in proportion to the overall growth of the fish. Daily growth increments can be measured so date and fish size at various habitat transitions can be back-calculated. Careful analysis of otolith microstructure can be used to determine the number of days that a fish resided in the estuary as a juvenile (increment counts), size at entrance to the estuary, size at egress, and the amount that the fish grew while in the estuary. Juvenile Chinook salmon can exhibit a variety of life history trajectories ? some enter the sea (or Puget Sound) as fry, some rear in the estuary before entering the sea, and some rear in the river and then move rapidly through the estuary into the sea as smolts. The

  9. Identification of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica from American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana farmed in Sabah, Malaysia using PCR method and future management of outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainuri, N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: High demand for frog meat in Malaysia especially the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana has promoted intensive farming of the animal. However, the farming of American bullfrog is restricted by the occurrence of diseases. This study reports the first isolation of Elizabethkingia meningoseptica from specimens of American bullfrog that suffer from cataract and ‘red-leg’ syndrome.Methodology and Result: The pathogen was isolated from eyes and internal organs (liver, kidney and spleen of thediseased bullfrog specimens. All the bacterial isolates were subjected to phenotypic characterization and antibiotic susceptibility assay, and further identified by using the 16S rDNA sequencing analysis. We designed two pair of specific PCR primers (22-25 mers which are complimentary to the β-lactamase gene in the reference strain ofE. meningoseptica ATCC49470. The result showed all the bacterial isolates shared similar phenotypic characters and antibiotic susceptibility. BLAST analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the bacterial isolates had very high sequence homology (100% with E. meningospetica ATCC49470 and E. meningoseptica isolates from mosquito. The two PCR primers were very specific to E. meningoseptica isolates of this study. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: This is the first isolation and characterization of bacterial pathogen, E. meningoseptica in cultured American bullfrog (Rana catesbeina that suffered from eye cataract and ‘red-leg’syndrome in Sabah, Malaysia. It is suspected that one of the possible transmission routes of the bacterial pathogen could be via mosquito bites. The findings suggest that there is urgent requirement for standard guideline of good farming practice to be adopted in frog farms throughout the country. Such a guideline can help in minimizing economic losses, preventing transmission of the zoonotic bacterial pathogen to farm workers, and sustaining the industry in Malaysia andupgrading

  10. Vestibular compensation: the neuro-otologist's best friend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Michel; Helmchen, Christoph; Vidal, Pierre-Paul

    2016-04-01

    Why vestibular compensation (VC) after an acute unilateral vestibular loss is the neuro-otologist's best friend is the question at the heart of this paper. The different plasticity mechanisms underlying VC are first reviewed, and the authors present thereafter the dual concept of vestibulo-centric versus distributed learning processes to explain the compensation of deficits resulting from the static versus dynamic vestibular imbalance. The main challenges for the plastic events occurring in the vestibular nuclei (VN) during a post-lesion critical period are neural protection, structural reorganization and rebalance of VN activity on both sides. Data from animal models show that modulation of the ipsilesional VN activity by the contralateral drive substitutes for the normal push-pull mechanism. On the other hand, sensory and behavioural substitutions are the main mechanisms implicated in the recovery of the dynamic functions. These newly elaborated sensorimotor reorganizations are vicarious idiosyncratic strategies implicating the VN and multisensory brain regions. Imaging studies in unilateral vestibular loss patients show the implication of a large neuronal network (VN, commissural pathways, vestibulo-cerebellum, thalamus, temporoparietal cortex, hippocampus, somatosensory and visual cortical areas). Changes in gray matter volume in these multisensory brain regions are structural changes supporting the sensory substitution mechanisms of VC. Finally, the authors summarize the two ways to improve VC in humans (neuropharmacology and vestibular rehabilitation therapy), and they conclude that VC would follow a "top-down" strategy in patients with acute vestibular lesions. Future challenges to understand VC are proposed.

  11. Vestibular effects of lidocaine intratympanic injection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H H; Kim, M J; Jo, Y K; Kim, J Y; Han, G C

    2014-11-01

    When lidocaine is locally delivered into the inner ear, it rapidly paralyzes the peripheral vestibular afferent neurons and induces unilateral vestibular loss. The goals of this study were to explore the possibility of developing intratympanic injection (IT) of lidocaine as a modality for treating acute vertigo. To evaluate the minimum concentration required, latent time, action duration, and possibility of lidocaine IT readministration to the vestibular system, we compared the development of horizontal nystagmus after IT of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10% lidocaine solutions in rats. To identify the induction of vestibular compensation, c-Fos-like protein expression was observed in the vestibular nucleus. Results of our investigation showed that lidocaine IT concentrations greater than 4% induced vestibular hyporeflexia in the injected ear. In order to induce hyporeflexia 4 and 6% lidocaine solutions could also be repeatedly injected. Regardless of concentration, effects of the lidocaine IT dissipated gradually over time. Our findings could be used to develop novel methods for symptom control in vestibular disorder patients.

  12. Cultured Vestibular Ganglion Neurons Demonstrate Latent HSV1 Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Camarena, Vladimir; Nayak, Shruti; Gardner, James B.; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Vestibular neuritis is a common cause of both acute and chronic vestibular dysfunction. Multiple pathologies have been hypothesized to be the causative agent of vestibular neuritis; however, whether herpes simplex type I (HSV1) reactivation occurs within the vestibular ganglion has not been demonstrated previously by experimental evidence. We developed an in vitro system to study HSV1 infection of vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) using a cell culture model system. Study design basic science study. Results Lytic infection of cultured rat VGNs was observed following low viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Inclusion of acyclovir suppressed lytic replication and allowed latency to be established. Upon removal of acyclovir, latent infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization for the latency-associated transcript (LAT). 29% cells in latently infected cultures were LAT positive. The lytic IPC27 transcript was not detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Reactivation of HSV1 occurred at a high frequency in latently infected cultures following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deactylase inhibitor. Conclusions VGNs can be both lytically and latently infected with HSV1. Furthermore, latently infected VGNs can be induced to reactivate using TSA. This demonstrates that reactivation of latent HSV1 infection in the vestibular ganglion can occur in a cell culture model, and suggests that reactivation of HSV1 infection a plausible etiologic mechanism of vestibular neuritis. PMID:21898423

  13. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy: review of indications, mechanisms, and key exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals.

  14. Betahistine treatment in managing vertigo and improving vestibular compensation: clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacour, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Betahistine dihydrochloride (betahistine) is currently used in the management of vertigo and vestibular pathologies with different aetiologies. The main goal of this review is to clarify the mechanisms of action of this drug, responsible for the symptomatic relief of vertigo and the improvement of vestibular compensation. The review starts with a brief summary recalling the role of histamine as a neuromodulator/neurotransmitter in the control of the vestibular functions, and the role of the histaminergic system in vestibular compensation. Then are presented data recorded in animal models demonstrating that betahistine efficacy can be explained by mechanisms targeting the histamine receptors (HRs) at three different levels: the vascular tree, with an increase of cochlear and vestibular blood flow involving the H1R; the central nervous system, with an increase of histamine turnover implicating the H3R, and the peripheral labyrinth, with a decrease of vestibular input implying the H3R/H4R. Clinical data from vestibular loss patients show the impact of betahistine treatment for the long-term control of vertigo, improvement of balance and quality of life that can be explained by these mechanisms of action. However, two conditions, at least, are required for reaching the betahistine therapeutic effect: the dose and the duration of treatment. Experimental and clinical data supporting these requirements are exposed in the last part of this review.

  15. Improving Sensorimotor Function Using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transition phases. Post flight sensorimotor changes may include postural and gait instability, spatial disorientation, and visual performance decrements, all of which can degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. Crewmember safety would be improved if these detrimental effects of spaceflight could be mitigated by a sensorimotor countermeasure and even further if adaptation to baseline could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through stochastic resonance (SR). The SR phenomenon occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. Two studies have been initiated to investigate the beneficial effects and potential practical usage of SVS. In both studies, electrical vestibular stimulation is applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes using a constant current stimulator. The first study aims to determine the repeatability of the effect of vestibular stimulation on sensorimotor performance and perception in order to better understand the practical use of SVS. The beneficial effect of low levels of SVS on balance performance has been shown in the past. This research uses the same balance task repeated multiple times within a day and across days to study the repeatability of the stimulation effects. The balance test consists of 50 sec trials in which the subject stands with his or her feet together, arms crossed, and eyes closed on compliant foam. Varying levels of SVS, ranging from 0-700 micro A, are applied across different trials. The subject-specific optimal SVS level is that which results in the best balance performance as measured by inertial

  16. Using otolith weight to predict the age of Pennahia macrocephalus in the mouth of the Beibu Gulf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Yunrong; WU Yanfang; LU Huosheng; LI Zhonglu; JIN Xianshi

    2009-01-01

    The relation between otolith weight (OW) and the age of marine fish is studied. A total of 222 individuals of bighead white croaker, Pennahia macrocephalus were sampled seasonally in the mouth of the Beibu Gulf, the South China Sea, in 2007. Since there are no significant differences in sagittal OW between otolith in pairs (P≧>0.05), the undamaged left sagittal otolith is used for age determination. The highest correlations among standard length, OW and fish ages are confirmned by linear, exponential and multinomial regression. Results show that sagittal OW overlaps only occasionally among age groups, and to individuals with similar standard length, the older and slower-growing fish has a heavier otolith because of the continued otolith material deposition. There are differences in sagittal OW among different age groups and significant positive linear relationship with age (P<0.05). The age readings can be verified by plotting the sagittal OW versus the standard length for age groups, and the individuals with similar standard length but in different ages can be separated by sagittal OW frequency analysis. Mostly, the predicted ages using the regression between sagittai OW and ages are closed to the observed ages by counting annulus on scale. It indicates that the sagittal OW analysis is a useful technique for validating the accuracy of age determination by annuli counts, especially for individuals of similar size. Furthermore,the technique is applied for Pennahia macrocephalus with discussion in this paper.

  17. Basic problems in the diagnosis and treatment of vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksim Valeryevich Zamergrad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the basic problems in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases accompanied by vertigo. In particular, it discusses the specific features of vertigo terminology, the overestimation of the value of cerebrovascular diseases and degenerative cervical spine changes in the development of vertigo and the underestimation of a role of peripheral vestibular diseases and psychogenic disorders in the genesis of different forms of vertigo. Emphasis is placed on the importance of vestibular exercises in the complex treatment of diseases manifesting themselves as vertigo. In addition, the possibilities of drug-induced stimulation of vestibular compensation are discussed.

  18. [The significance of vestibular function assessment in sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Rui

    2015-11-01

    Hearing loss caused by cochlear damage is the main symptom of sudden deafness (SD). Some patients also suffer from vestibular symptoms. In recent years, more attention has been paid to the vestibular dysfunction in patients with SD. The lesions could involve the whole inner ear in SD patients with and without vertigo. Comprehensive evaluation of vestibular function may help us understand the extent of lesions in sudden deafness and analyze the pathogenesis of disease. A less involvement of inner ear lesion may indicate a better hearing recovery.

  19. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  20. Vestibular function tests for vestibular migraine: clinical implication of video head impulse and caloric tests

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    Woo Seok Kang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular migraine (VM is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT, caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP, and sensory organization test (SOT at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11% exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19% exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38% exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11% exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27% exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78% no longer required medication (CR, while 18 (22% still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively. Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  1. Vestibular Function Tests for Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Implication of Video Head Impulse and Caloric Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Woo Seok; Lee, Sang Hun; Yang, Chan Joo; Ahn, Joong Ho; Chung, Jong Woo; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is one of the most common causes of episodic vertigo. We reviewed the results of multiple vestibular function tests in a cohort of VM patients who were diagnosed with VM according to the diagnostic criteria of the Barany Society and the International Headache Society and assessed the efficacy of each for predicting the prognosis in VM patients. A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 81 VM patients at a tertiary care center from June 2014 to July 2015. Patients were assessed by the video head impulse test (vHIT), caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs), and sensory organization test (SOT) at the initial visit and then evaluated for symptomatic improvement after 6 months. Complete response (CR) was defined as no need for continued medication, partial response (PR) as improved symptoms but need for continued medication, and no response (NR) as no symptomatic improvement and requiring increased dosage or change in medications. At the initial evaluation, 9 of 81 patients (11%) exhibited abnormal vHIT results, 14 of 73 (19%) exhibited abnormal caloric test results, 25 of 65 (38%) exhibited abnormal SOT results, 8 of 75 (11%) exhibited abnormal cervical VEMP results, and 20 of 75 (27%) exhibited abnormal ocular VEMP results. Six months later, 63 of 81 patients (78%) no longer required medication (CR), while 18 (22%) still required medication, including 7 PR and 11 NR patients. Abnormal vHIT gain and abnormal caloric results were significantly related to the necessity for continued medication at 6-month follow-up (OR = 5.67 and 4.36, respectively). Abnormal vHIT and caloric test results revealed semicircular canal dysfunction in VM patients and predicted prolonged preventive medication requirement. These results suggest that peripheral vestibular abnormalities are closely related to the development of vertigo in VM patients.

  2. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  3. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Stephanie E; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C; Ramirez, Claire A; Malpas, Janae M; Propper, Catherine R

    2015-07-15

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring of endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10(-9)M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10(-9)M, 10(-8)M, and 10(-7)M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10(-7)M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10(-9) and 10(-8)M OP, but not 10(-7)M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed within

  4. 与耳石器官有关的前庭系统可塑性的变化%Neuronal Plasticity of Otolith-related Vestibular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎淑琼; 黎振航; 张富兴; 马俊伟; 岑国欣; 陈应城

    2008-01-01

    本文主要探讨与耳石器官有关的中枢神经系统在成年动物前庭器官受损后可塑性的变化.当单侧前庭器官受损后,左右两侧前庭核内神经细胞对平衡刺激的反应和空间定向能力明显出现不对称性.这项发现将为空间定向能力的失调、平衡障碍和运动病等提供细胞病理基础.另外,前庭代偿能力与双侧前庭核内神经营养冈子和谷氨酸受体的改变有密切关系,该类受体在前庭神经细胞发育过程中均有不同的表达.这些实验数据不但对研究成年动物脑平衡感觉图谱的空间调控和前庭系统的修补和代偿提供重要资料,并为太空科学和临床医学,特别是研制药物治疗因耳石问题引发的眩晕疾病等各方面提供理论基础.

  5. Behavioral Assessment of the Aging Mouse Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Victoria W. K.; Burton, Thomas J.; Dababneh, Edward; Quail, Stephanie L.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Age related decline in balance performance is associated with deteriorating muscle strength, motor coordination and vestibular function. While a number of studies show changes in balance phenotype with age in rodents, very few isolate the vestibular contribution to balance under either normal conditions or during senescence. We use two standard behavioral tests to characterize the balance performance of mice at defined age points over the lifespan: the rotarod test and the inclined balance beam test. Importantly though, a custom built rotator is also used to stimulate the vestibular system of mice (without inducing overt signs of motion sickness). These two tests have been used to show that changes in vestibular mediated-balance performance are present over the murine lifespan. Preliminary results show that both the rotarod test and the modified balance beam test can be used to identify changes in balance performance during aging as an alternative to more difficult and invasive techniques such as vestibulo-ocular (VOR) measurements. PMID:25045963

  6. Evaluation of Response Patterns in Somatic and Otolith Features of Laboratory- Reared and Wild Clarias gariepinus Exposed to Industrial Effluent

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    Aina O. Adeogun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at comparing the responses of somatic and otolith features in Clarias gariepinus under chronic exposure conditions to industrial effluents in the laboratory for 60 days and in the wild for 6 months. Fish were collected upstream and downstream bi-monthly from a river receiving composite mixtures of industrial effluent while laboratory-rearedC. gariepinus were exposed to the same effluent mixtures in 60 days static renewal/bioassay using concentrations of 6.11, 3.05 and 2.23%, respectively and control series. A total of 21 variables representing saggital otolith and somatic data from both wild and laboratory fish were subjected to factor analysis. For laboratory reared fish, PC 1 indexed as ‘otolith factor’, PC 2 indexed as ‘condition factor’ and PC 3 indexed as ‘paired fin factor’ accounted for 26.15, 19.01 and 12.55% of the total variance, respectively. For wild fish, otolith factor (PC 1 and condition factor (PC 2 accounted for 38.24 and 22.69% of the variance respectively. The first 3 components and the first 2 components for laboratory and wild fish accounted for more than 50% of total variance in data. Reliability index (Cronbach’s alpha (&alpha>0.70 showed that the ‘otolith factor’ had strong internal consistency and is reliable as a primary and viable index of stress for both laboratory and wild fish. The complementary role of condition factor in stress detection was also highlighted. The emergence of paired features (otolith, pectoral and pelvic fins as sensitive parameters in toxicity responses may be an indication of the onset of asymmetry in these structures.

  7. The morphology of saccular otoliths as a tool to identify different mugilid species from the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callicó Fortunato, Roberta; Benedito Durà, Vicent; Volpedo, Alejandra

    2014-06-01

    In the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea there are 8 species of the Mugilidae family: Mugil cephalus, Liza aurata, Liza ramada, Oedalechilus labeo, Chelon labrosus, Liza saliens, Liza carinata and Liza haematocheila. The identification of mugilids is very important for local fisheries management and regulations, but it is difficult using gross morphological characters. This work aims to contribute to the identification of mullets present in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea using saccular otolith features of each species. Specimens of C. labrosus, L. aurata, L. ramada, L. saliens and M. cephalus were obtained from Delta del Ebro (40°38'N-0°44'E) in artisanal catches. For L. carinata and O. labeo photographs extracted from AFORO online database were used. L. haematocheila was not studied for lack of otolith samples. A general pattern of the saccular otoliths for this family was identified: the shape of the otoliths are rectangular to oblong with irregular margins; they present a heterosulcoid, ostial sulcus acusticus, with an open funnel-like ostium to the anterior margin and a closed, tubular cauda, ending towards the posterior ventral corner, always larger than the ostium. In the present study, the mugilid species could be recognized using their saccular otolith morphology. Here we give the first key to identify Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean mullets. The distinctive features between the species were the position and centrality of the sulcus, the curvature of the cauda, the presence of areal depositions and plateaus, and the type of anterior and posterior regions. These features could be used not only to reinforce the identification keys through morphological and meristic characters of the species, but also to identify the species consumed by piscivores, being the otoliths the only identifiable remains of the individuals.

  8. The cerebellar nodulus/uvula integrates otolith signals for the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex.

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    Mark F Walker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The otolith-driven translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (tVOR generates compensatory eye movements to linear head accelerations. Studies in humans indicate that the cerebellum plays a critical role in the neural control of the tVOR, but little is known about mechanisms of this control or the functions of specific cerebellar structures. Here, we chose to investigate the contribution of the nodulus and uvula, which have been shown by prior studies to be involved in the processing of otolith signals in other contexts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We recorded eye movements in two rhesus monkeys during steps of linear motion along the interaural axis before and after surgical lesions of the cerebellar uvula and nodulus. The lesions strikingly reduced eye velocity during constant-velocity motion but had only a small effect on the response to initial head acceleration. We fit eye velocity to a linear combination of head acceleration and velocity and to a dynamic mathematical model of the tVOR that incorporated a specific integrator of head acceleration. Based on parameter optimization, the lesion decreased the gain of the pathway containing this new integrator by 62%. The component of eye velocity that depended directly on head acceleration changed little (gain decrease of 13%. In a final set of simulations, we compared our data to the predictions of previous models of the tVOR, none of which could account for our experimental findings. CONCLUSIONS/ SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide new and important information regarding the neural control of the tVOR. Specifically, they point to a key role for the cerebellar nodulus and uvula in the mathematical integration of afferent linear head acceleration signals. This function is likely to be critical not only for the tVOR but also for the otolith-mediated reflexes that control posture and balance.

  9. The great melting pot. Common sole population connectivity assessed by otolith and water fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morat, Fabien; Letourneur, Yves; Dierking, Jan; Pécheyran, Christophe; Bareille, Gilles; Blamart, Dominique; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying the scale and importance of individual dispersion between populations and life stages is a key challenge in marine ecology. The common sole (Solea solea), an important commercial flatfish in the North Sea, Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea, has a marine pelagic larval stage, a benthic juvenile stage in coastal nurseries (lagoons, estuaries or shallow marine areas) and a benthic adult stage in deeper marine waters on the continental shelf. To date, the ecological connectivity among these life stages has been little assessed in the Mediterranean. Here, such an assessment is provided for the first time for the Gulf of Lions, NW Mediterranean, based on a dataset on otolith microchemistry and stable isotopic composition as indicators of the water masses inhabited by individual fish. Specifically, otolith Ba/Ca and Sr/Ca profiles, and δ(13)C and δ(18)O values of adults collected in four areas of the Gulf of Lions were compared with those of young-of-the-year collected in different coastal nurseries. Results showed that a high proportion of adults (>46%) were influenced by river inputs during their larval stage. Furthermore Sr/Ca ratios and the otolith length at one year of age revealed that most adults (∼70%) spent their juvenile stage in nurseries with high salinity, whereas the remainder used brackish environments. In total, data were consistent with the use of six nursery types, three with high salinity (marine areas and two types of highly saline lagoons) and three brackish (coastal areas near river mouths, and two types of brackish environments), all of which contributed to the replenishment of adult populations. These finding implicated panmixia in sole population in the Gulf of Lions and claimed for a habitat integrated management of fisheries.

  10. Effect of ocean acidification on growth and otolith condition of juvenile scup, Stenotomus chrysops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Dean M; Redman, Dylan H; Widman, James C; Meseck, Shannon; King, Andrew; Pereira, Jose J

    2015-09-01

    Increasing amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) from human industrial activities are causing changes in global ocean carbonate chemistry, resulting in a reduction in pH, a process termed "ocean acidification." It is important to determine which species are sensitive to elevated levels of CO2 because of potential impacts to ecosystems, marine resources, biodiversity, food webs, populations, and effects on economies. Previous studies with marine fish have documented that exposure to elevated levels of CO2 caused increased growth and larger otoliths in some species. This study was conducted to determine whether the elevated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) would have an effect on growth, otolith (ear bone) condition, survival, or the skeleton of juvenile scup, Stenotomus chrysops, a species that supports both important commercial and recreational fisheries. Elevated levels of pCO2 (1200-2600 μatm) had no statistically significant effect on growth, survival, or otolith condition after 8 weeks of rearing. Field data show that in Long Island Sound, where scup spawn, in situ levels of pCO2 are already at levels ranging from 689 to 1828 μatm due to primary productivity, microbial activity, and anthropogenic inputs. These results demonstrate that ocean acidification is not likely to cause adverse effects on the growth and survivability of every species of marine fish. X-ray analysis of the fish revealed a slightly higher incidence of hyperossification in the vertebrae of a few scup from the highest treatments compared to fish from the control treatments. Our results show that juvenile scup are tolerant to increases in seawater pCO2, possibly due to conditions this species encounters in their naturally variable environment and their well-developed pH control mechanisms.

  11. Fish otolith geochemistry, environmental conditions and human occupation at Lake Mungo, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kelsie; Stern, Nicola; Williams, Ian S.; Kinsley, Les; Wood, Rachel; Sporcic, Katarina; Smith, Tegan; Fallon, Stewart; Kokkonen, Harri; Moffat, Ian; Grün, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    Fish otoliths from the Willandra Lakes Region World Heritage Area (south-western New South Wales, Australia) have been analysed for oxygen isotopes and trace elements using in situ techniques, and dated by radiocarbon. The study focused on the lunettes of Lake Mungo, an overflow lake that only filled during flooding events and emptied by evaporation, and Lake Mulurulu, which was part of the running Willandra Creek system. Samples were collected from two different contexts: from hearths directly associated with human activity, and isolated surface finds. AMS radiocarbon dating constrains the human activity documented by five different hearths to a time span of less than 240 years around 19,350 cal. BP. These hearths were constructed in aeolian sediments with alternating clay and sand layers, indicative of fluctuating lake levels and occasional drying out. The geochemistry of the otoliths confirms this scenario, with shifts in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca marking the entry of the fish into Lake Mungo several years before their death, and a subsequent increase in the δ18O by ˜4‰ indicating increasing evaporation of the lake. During sustained lake-full conditions there are considerably fewer traces of human presence. It seems that the evaporating Lake Mungo attracted people to harvest fish that might have become sluggish through oxygen starvation in an increasingly saline water body (easy prey hypothesis). In contrast, surface finds have a much wider range in radiocarbon age as a result of reworking, and do not necessarily indicate evaporative conditions, as shown by comparison with otoliths from upstream Lake Mulurulu.

  12. Natural growth, otolith shape and diet analyses of Odontesthes nigricans Richardson (Atherinopsidae) from southern Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattuca, M. E.; Lozano, I. E.; Brown, D. R.; Renzi, M.; Luizon, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Age and growth, otolith shape and diet of Odontesthes nigricans were analysed in order to provide an insight into the life history of the species and furthermore, to assess their possible use as a tool for discriminating silverside populations from the South Atlantic Ocean (Punta María) and Beagle Channel waters (Varela Bay). The age and growth analysis was performed by counting daily increments and annual marks in sagittae otoliths. Length-at-age data of individuals Gompertz model (SLt = 6.22 exp 2.45 [1-exp (-0.02t)]), which provided an excellent description of the pattern of daily growth for O. nigricans juveniles from Varela Bay. The spawning period was also assessed through back-calculation of hatching dates and it extended from November to February. The count of annual marks in larger individuals identified 7 year classes (0+ to 6+) in Varela Bay and 6 year classes (0+ to 5+) in Punta María. The von Bertalanffy growth model explained more than 95% of the growth patterns observed in O. nigricans from Varela Bay (SLt = 245.49 [1 - exp -0.24(t+0.46)]) and Punta María (SLt = 345.09 [1 - exp -0.15(t+0.31)]). Particularly, k and SL∞ varied significantly between sampling sites; reaching Punta María a larger SL∞ value with a lower k. Otolith shape variation was also explored using elliptical Fourier analysis and it showed significant differences between Varela Bay and Punta María populations. Furthermore, gut content analysis characterized O. nigricans as an invertebrate predator, being benthic organisms the most important components of its diet, which also showed significant site dependence. The use of all these analyses contributed to a holistic approach which maximized the likelihood of correctly identifying both O. nigricans populations in the southernmost limit of the species distribution.

  13. Using otolith shape for intraspecific discrimination: the case of gurnards (Scorpaeniformes, Triglidae

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    Stefano Montanini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The sagittal otoliths are sound transducers and play an important role in fish hearing. Triglidae (Teleostei, Scorpaeniformes are known for sound producing ability in agonistic contexts related to territorial defence, reproduction and competitive feeding (Amorim et al., 2004. Chelidonichthys cuculus and C. lucerna show a significant body size-depth relationship and specie-specific feeding strategies with growth. Both juveniles and adults of C. cuculus prey necto-benthic invertebrates while C. lucerna specimens change diet from crustaceans to teleost during growth (Stagioni et al., 2012; Vallisneri et al., 2014; Montanini et al., 2015. The goal of this study was to analyze intraspecific shape variations in sagitta of model species of gurnards. 217 specimens were collected during bottom trawl surveys in Adriatic sea (northeastern Mediterranean. Each left sagitta was removed, cleaned in ultrasounds bath and kept dry. The otolith digital images were processed to calculate five shape indices (aspect ratio, roundness, rectangularity, ellipticity and circularity. Indices were normalised to avoid allometric effects according to Lleonart et al. (2000, than processed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA. The SHAPE program was used to extract the outline and to assess the variability of shapes (EFA method and estimated it through the study of principal component analysis (PCA. Considering the first two discriminant functions, LDA plot showed a clearly separation between juvenile and adults for both species. About EFA, the first 4 principal component discriminated over 80% of variance and significant differences were found at critical size between juveniles and adults for all the components analysed. The allometric trends corresponded to a relative elongation of the sulcus acusticus and an increase of excisura ostii. The combined use of the two external outlines methods should be highly informative for intraspecific discrimination and might be related to

  14. Otolith shape analysis as a tool for stock identification of the southern blue whiting, Micromesistius australis

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    Javier Leguá

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The southern blue whiting, Micromesistius australis (Norman, 1937, is an important demersal resource associated with the slope and continental shelf of southern Chile, Argentina and the Malvinas/Falkland Islands. Recent studies have reported schools of adult fish from Atlantic waters migrating along the southern Chilean coast in mid-winter, moving northwards to spawn in August (47°-51°S, and then returning to Atlantic waters, presumably to feed. The migratory pattern suggests the presence of one or more stock units associated with the South American coast. In the present study, "otolith morphometry" is used to determine the stock structure of M. australis based on applications of basic size descriptors (SDs (area, perimeter and otolith size, shape indices (SIs (circularity, squareness, shape factor, roundness, ellipticity, and normalised elliptical Fourier descriptors (NEFDs. Samples were collected during the winter and spring of 2010, during the reproductive period, in the economic zone of southern Chile (36°-57°S, in the Pacific Ocean and around the Falkland Islands economic zone (50°-52°S in the Atlantic Ocean. Analyses were conducted to include the effects of size, sex and age. A stepwise canonical discriminant analysis showed that fish were successfully discriminated with SDs, SIs and NEFDs. In this analysis, 86.4% and 70.1% of the fish were correctly classified as belonging to the Atlantic and Pacific stocks, respectively. A multivariate analysis of variance showed that the mean values of the NEFDs, SDs, and SIs did not vary significantly between sexes within areas (P > 0.05, but varied significantly between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans (P < 0.05. These results highlighted that otolith shape analysis can be a useful tool to evaluate the potential level of mixing in feeding areas where both stocks, the Pacific and Atlantic units, are expected to co-occur.

  15. Effects of caloric vestibular stimulation on serotoninergic system in the media vestibular nuclei of guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Fu-rong; LIU Jun-xiu; LI Xue-pei; MAO Jian-jun; ZHANG Qun-dan; JIA Hong-bo; MAO Lan-quan; ZHAO Rui

    2007-01-01

    Background Anatomic and electrophysiological studies have revealed that the neurons located in the media vestibular nuclei (MVN) receive most of the sensory vestibular input coming from the ipsilateral labyrinth and the responses of MVN neurons to caloric stimulation directly reflect changes in primary vestibular afferent activity. The aim of this study was to clarify the intrinsic characteristics of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) release in the MVN during the period of vertigo induced by caloric stimulation.Methods We used an in vivo microdialysis technique to examine the effects of caloric stimulation on the serotoninergic system in MVN. Twenty four guinea pigs were randomly divided into the groups of irrigation of the ear canal with hot water (n=6), ice water (n=6) and 37℃ water (n=4), and the groups of irrigation of the auricle with hot water (n=4) and ice water (n=4), according to different caloric vestibular stimulation. We examined the animal's caloric nystagmus with a two-channel electronystagmographic recorder (ENG), and meanwhile examine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) level in the MVN with microdialysis technique after caloric stimulation. Results In the caloric test the hot water (44℃) irrigation of the right external auditory canal induced horizontal nystagmus towards the right side lasting about 60 seconds and the ice water irrigation of the right external auditory canal induced it towards the left side lasting for about 90 seconds. No nystagmus was induced by 37℃ water irrigation of the external ear canal. Therefore, it was used as a negative control stimulation to the middle ear. The MVN 5-HT levels significantly increased in the first 5-minute collecting interval and increased to 254% and 189% of the control group in the second collecting interval in response to caloric vestibular stimulation with ice water and hot water respectively. The serotonin release was not distinctly changed by the irrigation of the auricle with ice water

  16. LITERACY SENSES: WRITING IN VESTIBULAR (ENTRANCE EXAMS

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    Victoria Wilson da Costa Coelho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to pose a reflection on explicit or underlying literacy practices in a literacy event such as the Brazilian university entrance exams (vestibular using, as an object of study, the essays written during that event. We aim to understand the educated writing culture, or Brazilian literacy, in its very extreme, that is, the end of High School, based on Bakhtin’s theory of enunciation. Despite pedagogical measures focused on elaborate (argumentative writing in view of college assessment exams and ENEM (National High School Exam, we know how unsatisfactory its results still are, in terms of the school literacy practices, which still remains to be sufficiently reflected on. It is also worth highlighting that we understand writing (school writing more as a set of social practices than as a set of skills alone.

  17. Caloric vestibular stimulation in aphasic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWilkinson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS is commonly used to diagnose brainstem disorder but its therapeutic application is much less established. Based on the finding that CVS increases blood flow to brain structures associated with language and communication, we assessed whether the procedure has potential to relieve symptoms of post-stroke aphasia. Three participants, each presenting with chronic, unilateral lesions to the left hemisphere, were administered daily CVS for 4 consecutive weeks. Relative to their pre-treatment baseline scores, two of the three participants showed significant improvement on both picture and responsive naming at immediate and one-week follow-up. One of these participants also showed improved sentence repetition, and another showed improved auditory word discrimination. No adverse reactions were reported. These data provide the first, albeit tentative, evidence that CVS may relieve expressive and receptive symptoms of aphasia. A larger, sham-controlled study is now needed to further assess efficacy.

  18. Effects of vestibular rehabilitation in the elderly complaining of dizziness

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Oliveira, Andréa; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (PUC-SP).; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa M.; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (PUC-SP).; Bohlsen, Yara Aparecida; Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo (PUC-SP).; Vargas, Ana Laura; Instituto de Estudos Avançados da Audição.

    2014-01-01

    Changes of body balance are among the most common complaints of the elderly. Vestibular rehabilitation is one of the most effective methods in the recovery of the body balance. The objective to investigate the effects of vestibular rehabilitation in body balance of a group of elderly people with dizziness complain through dizziness handicap inventory. The sample was comprised of 10 seniors (6 women and 4 men) with mean age of 68.9 years. The elderly complaining of dizziness showed high score ...

  19. [Membrane model of the cupula of the vestibular semicircular canals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachuk, A V; Shipov, A A; Sirenko, S P

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model of the time-course variations of the cupula of the semicircular canals of the vestibular apparatus is presented. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data which suggests that the cupular matter has viscosity-elasticity properties. Their role in the functioning of the vestibular apparatus is discussed in qualitative terms. The applicability of the membrane model to the description of the time-course variations of the cupula is considered.

  20. Morphological analysis of the vestibular aqueduct by computerized tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Sergio Ricardo [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: sergioanat.morf@epm.br; Smith, Ricardo Luiz [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Isotani, Sadao [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Alonso, Luis Garcia [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Anadao, Carlos Augusto [Otorhinolaryngology Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Prates, Jose Carlos [Morphology and Genetics Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Disciplina de Anatomia Descritiva e Topografica, Rua Botucatu, 740-Edificio Leitao da Cunha, CEP 04023-900, Vila Clementino, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lederman, Henrique Manoel [Image Diagnosis Department, Sao Paulo Federal University-Paulista Medical School, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-01-15

    Objective: In the last two decades, advances in the computerized tomography (CT) field revise the internal and medium ear evaluation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to analyze the morphology and morphometric aspects of the vestibular aqueduct on the basis of computerized tomography images (CTI). Material and method: Computerized tomography images of vestibular aqueducts were acquired from patients (n = 110) with an age range of 1-92 years. Thereafter, from the vestibular aqueducts images a morphometric analysis was performed. Through a computerized image processing system, the vestibular aqueduct measurements comprised of its area, external opening, length and the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus. Results: The morphology of the vestibular aqueduct may be funnel-shaped, filiform or tubular and the respective proportions were found to be at 44%, 33% and 22% in children and 21.7%, 53.3% and 25% in adults. The morphometric data showed to be of 4.86 mm{sup 2} of area, 2.24 mm of the external opening, 4.73 mm of length and 11.88 mm of the distance from the vestibular aqueduct to the internal acoustic meatus, in children, and in adults it was of 4.93 mm{sup 2}, 2.09 mm, 4.44 mm, and 11.35 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Computerized tomography showed that the vestibular aqueduct presents high morphological variability. The morphometric analysis showed that the differences found between groups of children and adults or between groups of both genders were not statistically significant.

  1. [Vestibularly displaced flap with bone augmentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalian, V L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to achieve esthetic gingival contours with the help of less traumatic mucogingival surgeries. 9 Patients were operated with horizontal deficiencies in 9 edentulous sites, planned to be restored with fixed partial dentures. In all cases there was lack of keratinized tissues. Temporary bridges were fabricated to all patients. Before surgery the bridges were removed and the abutment teeth were additionally cleaned with ultrasonic device. A horizontal incision was made from lingual (palatal) side between the abutment teeth, which was connected with two vertical releasing incisions to the mucogingival junction from the vestibular side. The horizontal incision was made on a distance 6-10 mm from the crest of the alveolar ridge. A partial thickness flap in the beginning 3-5 mm, then a full thickness flap up to the mucogingival junction, then a partial thickness flap was made. The flap was mobilized and displaced vestibularly. In the apical part the cortical bone was perforated, graft material was put and the flap was sutured. In all 9 cases the horizontal defect was partially or fully eliminated. The width of the keratinized tissues was also augmented in all cases. The postoperative healing was without complications, discomfort and painless. The donor sites also healed without complications. The application of Solcoseryl Dental Adhesive Paste 3 times a day for 7-10 days helped for painless healing of the donor site. The offered method of soft tissue and bone augmentation is effective in the treatment of horizontal defects of edentulous alveolar ridges of not big sizes. It makes possible to achieve esthetic results without traumatizing an additional donor-site.

  2. Onset of maturity and cohort composition at spawning of Baltic sprat Sprattus sprattus on the basis of otolith macrostructure analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reglero, P.; Mosegaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Data on catch per unit effort (CPUE) from the Danish commercial fishery showed dense aggregations of sprat Sprattus sprattus born in 1997 in the main spawning area of the Baltic Sea during May 1999. After the analysis of their otolith macrostructure, these fish were found to have a shorter distance...... predictor of sprat total length (L-T) and mass (M) in age group 0 years. Changes in the otolith size distribution over time were related to variations in cohort composition depending on the L-T and M attained during the juvenile stage. Examination of the gonads suggested two life history patterns: 1...

  3. Attention to Invasive Risk of American Bullfrog for Hainan Island%警惕北美牛蛙入侵海南的风险

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李闯; 王力军; 史海涛; 汪继超; 刘丹; 马凯

    2013-01-01

    Key words: The invasion of bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) has become one of the main factors leading to native amphibian population decline and extinction. Bullfrog has distributed widely in China, but no any record in Hainan. In the duration of February to April in 2011, eight adult bullfrogs (including 1 pregnancy) were captured in three locations around Shazhou Island at Wanquan River, Hainan. The habitat bullfrogs were captured had the following characteristics; ① soil was mud or sand, ② distance from water about 0. 5 - 1. 5 m, ③ overall slope as 6° -25°, ④ vegetation coverage between 75% and 90% , and ⑤ native amphibian species were abundant around location. The bullfrog has been sold at local market and about 120 individuals were traded each day. Bullfrog found in Wanquan River may come from breeding escape or wildlife released by Buddhist. More survey is required to identify whether the breeding population has been built in the study area.%牛蛙(Lithobates catesbeianus)的入侵已成为本地两栖动物种群下降的主要因素之一,该物种在中国广泛分布,但在海南尚无分布记录.2011年2~4月,在海南省万泉河沙洲岛附近3个点捕捉到8只成体,其中1只个体已有卵.捕捉点的土壤基质为沙质或泥质,距水边距离0.5~1.5 m,整体坡度为6°~ 25°,植被盖度75% ~ 90%,生境附近本地两栖动物种类较为丰富.调查结果显示,市场上有牛蛙销售,销量约120只/d;琼海市有饲养牛蛙的记录,且存在粗放式(放养于田间)养殖情况,不排除养殖逃逸的可能;捕捉点附近有佛教组织定期放生,也存在个人放生行为.综合以上结果,万泉河发现牛蛙可能是养殖逃逸或放生所致,是否形成可繁殖的种群尚需进一步调查和研究.

  4. Community Structure and Function of Amphibian Skin Microbes: An Experiment with Bullfrogs Exposed to a Chytrid Fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer B Walke

    Full Text Available The vertebrate microbiome contributes to disease resistance, but few experiments have examined the link between microbiome community structure and disease resistance functions. Chytridiomycosis, a major cause of amphibian population declines, is a skin disease caused by the fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. In a factorial experiment, bullfrog skin microbiota was reduced with antibiotics, augmented with an anti-Bd bacterial isolate (Janthinobacterium lividum, or unmanipulated, and individuals were then either exposed or not exposed to Bd. We found that the microbial community structure of individual frogs prior to Bd exposure influenced Bd infection intensity one week following exposure, which, in turn, was negatively correlated with proportional growth during the experiment. Microbial community structure and function differed among unmanipulated, antibiotic-treated, and augmented frogs only when frogs were exposed to Bd. Bd is a selective force on microbial community structure and function, and beneficial states of microbial community structure may serve to limit the impacts of infection.

  5. Respiration and hemoglobin function in the giant African bullfrog Pyxicephalus adspersus Tschudi (Anura: Pyxicephalidae) during rest, exercise and dormancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Aardt, W.J; Weber, Roy E.

    2010-01-01

    of dormancy in soil without forming cocoons. With virtually no information available on the associated respiratory adaptations, we measured oxygen consumption rates of resting and exercising bullfrogs together with haematological and gas-binding properties of blood and haemoglobin (Hb) solutions from non......-dormant frogs and cocoon-less dormant frogs. Treadmill (0.054 ms-1) exercising frogs consumed nearly seven times more oxygen than resting individuals (8.45 and 1.25 mmol O2 kg-1h-1, respectively). During a six-month dormancy period Pyxicephalus lost an average of 13.7% of its body mass, while plasma osmotic...... oxygen affinity, the affinity of 'stripped' (cofactor-free) Pyxicephalus Hb shows low sensitivity to this effector. Hb-oxygen affinity is moreover insensitive to Cl- ions (that depress O2 affinity of most vertebrate haemoglobins) but oxygen affinity is strongly increased by urea and metHb formation...

  6. Preservation of auditory and vestibular function after surgical removal of bilateral vestibular schwannomas in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. O.; Brackmann, D. E.; Hitselberger, W. E.; Purdy, J.

    1995-01-01

    The outcome of acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) surgery continues to improve rapidly. Advances can be attributed to several fields, but the most important contributions have arisen from the identification of the genes responsible for the dominant inheritance of neurofibromatosis types 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2) and the development of magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement for the early anatomic confirmation of the pathognomonic, bilateral vestibular schwannomas in NF2. These advances enable early diagnosis and treatment when the tumors are small in virtually all subjects at risk for NF2. The authors suggest that advising young NF2 patients to wait until complications develop, especially hearing loss, before diagnosing and operating for bilateral eighth nerve schwannomas may not always be in the best interest of the patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of preservation of both auditory and vestibular function in a patient after bilateral vestibular schwannoma excision.

  7. Current treatment of nasal vestibular stenosis with CO2-laser surgery: prolonged vestibular stenting versus intraoperative mitomycin application. A case series of 3 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schijndel, Olaf; van Heerbeek, Niels; Ingels, Koen J A O

    2014-12-01

    These case studies describe three cases of unilateral nasal vestibular stenoses caused by chemical cauterization. Each case was treated with CO2-laser surgery together with intraoperative topic application of mitomycin or prolonged vestibular stenting for prevention of restenosis. Two patients received intraoperative mitomycin application and one patient received prolonged vestibular stenting. Results were documented using high-resolution photographs. The follow up period ranged from 1 year and 3 months to 4 years and 9 months. All patients improved after CO2-laser surgery. No complications were reported. We consider CO2-laser surgery for relief of nasal vestibular stenosis as a feasible surgical technique for relieve of nasal vestibular stenosis. Prolonged vestibular stenting seems to be an important factor for the prevention of restenosis in which the value of intraoperative mitomycin application without prolonged vestibular stenting remains uncertain.

  8. Connectivity between migrating and landlocked populations of a diadromous fish species investigated using otolith microchemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Tulp

    Full Text Available Smelt Osmerus eperlanus has two different life history strategies in The Netherlands. The migrating population inhabits the Wadden Sea and spawns in freshwater areas. After the closure of the Afsluitdijk in 1932, part of the smelt population became landlocked. The fresh water smelt population has been in severe decline since 1990, and has strongly negatively impacted the numbers of piscivorous water birds relying on smelt as their main prey. The lakes that were formed after the dike closure, IJsselmeer and Markermeer have been assigned as Natura 2000 sites, based on their importance for (among others piscivorous water birds. Because of the declining fresh water smelt population, the question arose whether this population is still supported by the diadromous population. Opportunities for exchange between fresh water and the sea are however limited to discharge sluices. The relationship between the diadromous and landlocked smelt population was analysed by means of otolith microchemistry. Our interpretation of otolith strontium ((88Sr patterns from smelt specimens collected in the fresh water area of Lake IJsselmeer and Markermeer, compared to those collected in the nearby marine environment, is that there is currently no evidence for a substantial contribution from the diadromous population to the spawning stock of the landlocked population.

  9. Bullfrog tadpole (Rana catesbeiana) and red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) predation on early life stages of endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, G.A.; Carpenter, J.; Thornbrugh, D.

    2006-01-01

    Bullfrog tadpoles (Rana catesbeiana) and red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) are widespread introduced taxa that are problematic throughout the western United States. Their impact on native amphibians and crustaceans is well documented, but less is known regarding their influence on native fishes. Predator-prey tank tests showed both species consumed eggs and larvae of the endangered razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) in a laboratory setting. Tadpoles consumed 2.2 razorback sucker eggs/d and 1.4 razorback sucker larvae/d, while crayfish ate 6.0 eggs/d and 3.5 larvae/d. Relatively high densities of bullfrog tadpoles and crayfish in razorback sucker spawning areas suggest that these nonnative taxa might pose a threat to the recruitment success of this and other imperiled native fish.

  10. Avaliação vestibular no tremor essencial Vestibular evaluation in the essential tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: o tremor essencial é familial em cerca de 50% dos casos, com uma herança autossômica, possui início insidioso e é lentamente progressivo. PROCEDIMENTOS: avaliou-se no Setor de Otoneurologia de um Hospital Particular em fevereiro de 2007, uma paciente do sexo feminino, branca, 59 anos, casada, artista plástica, com história de tremor na cabeça desde os dois anos de idade (sic. A paciente relata queixa de tontura há vários meses de origem súbita sem acompanhamento de náusea e/ou queda. Nega perda de força muscular e formigamento em membros superiores e inferiores, rebaixamento da acuidade auditiva e zumbido. A paciente relata que um de seus filhos possuiu tremor nas mãos há dois anos e avós maternos e paternos com Parkinson. Realizaram-se os seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica e avaliação vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia. RESULTADOS: observaram-se os seguintes achados ao exame vestibular: nistagmo de posicionamento com características centrais, nistagmo espontâneo presente com os olhos abertos, nistagmo semi-espontâneo do tipo múltiplo e hiper-reflexia em valor absoluto à prova calórica 20ºC (OD e OE. CONCLUSÃO: o exame vestibular mostrou-se sensível e importante para captar alterações em provas que sugerissem envolvimento do sistema nervoso central.BACKGROUND: essential tremors are family-related in about 50% of the cases with an autosomal inheritance and they register an insidious beginning with a slow progression. PROCEDURE: a 59 year old, white female patient, married and whose occupation is a plastic artist with a history of head tremors since she was two years (sic old was evaluated in the Otoneurology sector of a private hospital, during the period from February 2007. The patient had been complaining of dizziness from unknown origin for several months without accompanying nausea and/or falls. She denied any loss of muscular strength or tingling in her upper and lower

  11. Not All Inner Ears are the Same: Otolith Matrix Proteins in the Inner Ear of Sub-Adult Cichlid Fish, Oreochromis Mossambicus, Reveal Insights Into the Biomineralization Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigele, Jochen; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    The fish ear stones (otoliths) consist mainly of calcium carbonate and have lower amounts of a proteinous matrix. This matrix consists of macromolecules, which directly control the biomineralization process. We analyzed the composition of this proteinous matrix by mass spectrometry in a shotgun approach. For this purpose, an enhanced protein purification technique was developed that excludes any potential contamination of proteins from body fluids. Using this method we identified eight proteins in the inner ear of Oreochromis mossambicus. These include the common otolith matrix proteins (OMP-1, otolin-1, neuroserpin, SPARC and otoconin), and three proteins (alpha tectorin, otogelin and transferrin) not previously localized to the otoliths. Moreover, we were able to exclude the occurrence of two matrix proteins (starmaker and pre-cerebellin-like protein) known from other fish species. In further analyses, we show that the absence of the OMP starmaker corresponds to calcitic otoliths and that pre-cerebellin-like protein is not present at any stage during the development of the otoliths of the inner ear. This study shows O. mossambicus does not have all of the known otolith proteins indicating that the matrix proteins in the inner ear of fish are not the same across species. Further functional studies of the novel proteins we identified during otolith development are required.

  12. Effects of Inactivated Streptococcus Aglactiae Vaccineon Immunity in Bullfrog%牛蛙源无乳链球菌全菌疫苗免疫效果研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周冬仁; 陈莎莎; 杭小英; 施伟达; 罗毅志; 叶雪平

    2012-01-01

    将分离鉴定的无乳链球菌用0.4%的甲醛灭活,加弗氏完全佐剂制成灭活全菌苗,对牛蛙进行注射免疫.通过测定受免牛蛙血清中凝集抗体效价,总蛋白、免疫球蛋白的测定及免疫保护率的测定,探讨疫苗的免疫应答状况.研究结果表明,无乳链球菌全菌疫苗能够提高牛蛙的血清抗体水平及总蛋白、免疫球蛋白含量.此外,无乳链球菌全菌苗对牛蛙抗人工感染也具有较好的免疫保护作用,其免疫保护率为67%.因此,将无乳链球菌全菌苗用于牛蛙链球菌病的防治具有广阔的发展前景.%The isolated and identified Streptococcus agalactiae inactivated with 0.4% formaldehyde, made inactivated whole bacteria vaccine with CFA, immunity Bullfrog by injections. By measuring serum agglutinate titer, total protein, the determination of immunoglobulin and immune protection rate, determinate of status of the vaccine immune response. The results showed that all bacteria vaccine can improve the bullfrog serum antibody levels and total protein, immunoglobulin content. In addition, all bacteria vaccine infected bullfrog also has good resistance to the immune protective effects on the immune protection rate. Therefore, there is a potential to apply whole bacteria Streptococcus agalactiae to prevention and cure of Bullfrog suffering with Streptococcus agalactiae.

  13. Prevalence of Vestibular Disorder in Older People Who Experience Dizziness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Allan T.; Menant, Jasmine C.; Hübner, Patrick P.; Lord, Stephen R.; Migliaccio, Americo A.

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people, it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological, and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim is to accurately identify the prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy-six participants aged 51–92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years) were tested using the head thrust dynamic visual acuity (htDVA) test, dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for htDVA score, DHI score, sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1–2 Hz with peak velocity at 30°/s) vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) gain and phase, transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150°/s2 to a constant velocity rotation of 50°/s) VOR gain and time constant (TC), optokinetic nystagmus (OKN) gain, and TC (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50°/s). We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38 and 1% of participants, respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5–1 Hz), and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction. PMID:26733940

  14. Altered cupular mechanics: a cause of peripheral vestibular disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, Kai; Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Jijiwa, Hiroyasu; Mizuno, Yoshio; Watanabe, Satoru; Scherer, Hans

    2002-06-01

    It has taken many decades to arrive at today's concept of cupula mechanics in the stimulation of endolymphatic flows on the hair cells in the ampullae of the semicircular canal. While Steinhausen assumed free swing-door movement of the cupula in the 1930s, Hillman was the first to demonstrate firm cupula attachment to the ampulla wall as a physiological necessity in the 1970s. In contrast to the present clinical concepts of acute peripheral vestibular functional disorders (circulatory disturbances, viral or bacterial infection, altered electrolytes in the endolymph), this study examines the extent to which an impaired attachment mechanism can trigger peripheral vestibular disorders. For this purpose, we used a pigeon model (n = 8), in which mechanical detachment of the cupula from the ampulla wall was achieved by means of a targeted pressure increase in the ampulla of the lateral semicircular canal. In two additional animals the labyrinth was completely destroyed on one side in order to directly compare partial and complete vestibular disorders. In this way partial damage to the lateral semicircular canal ampulla presents a clinical picture whose symptoms are very similar to those of an idiopathic vestibular disorder in humans. Their intensity and course of compensation differ markedly from the symptoms of complete vestibular destruction. Subsequent histological examination revealed that the hair cells remained intact during the experimental detachment of the cupula. Our results thus show that only altered cupula mechanics seem to trigger the clinical picture of a peripheral vestibular disorder. This may result in completely new approaches to differential diagnosis and the therapy of vestibular neuronitis.

  15. Prevalence of vestibular disorder in older people who experience dizziness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan T Chau

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness and imbalance are clinically poorly defined terms, which affect ~30% of people over 65 years of age. In these people it is often difficult to define the primary cause of dizziness, as it can stem from cardiovascular, vestibular, psychological and neuromuscular causes. However, identification of the primary cause is vital in determining the most effective treatment strategy for a patient. Our aim was to accurately identify the prevalence of: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV, peripheral, and central vestibular hypofunction in people aged over 50 years who had experienced dizziness within the past year. Seventy six participants aged 51 to 92 (mean ± SD = 69 ± 9.5 years were tested using the Head Thrust Dynamic Visual Acuity (htDVA test, Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, as well as sinusoidal and unidirectional rotational chair testing, in order to obtain data for: htDVA score; DHI score; sinusoidal (whole-body, 0.1 - 2 Hz with peak-velocity at 30deg/s Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR gain and phase; transient (whole-body, acceleration at 150deg/s/s to a constant velocity rotation of 50deg/s VOR gain and time constant; OptoKinetic Nystagmus (OKN gain and time constant (whole-body, constant velocity rotation at 50deg/s. We found that BPPV, peripheral and central vestibular hypofunction were present in 38% and 1% of participants respectively, suggesting a likely vestibular cause of dizziness in these people. Of those with a likely vestibular cause, 63% had BPPV; a figure higher than previously reported in dizziness clinics of ~25%. Our results indicate that htDVA, sinusoidal (particularly 0.5 - 1 Hz and transient VOR testing were the most effective at detecting people with BPPV or vestibular hypofunction, whereas DHI and OKN were effective at only detecting non-BPPV vestibular hypofunction.

  16. Listening in on the past: what can otolith δ18O values really tell us about the environmental history of fishes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnaude, Audrey M; Sturrock, Anna; Trueman, Clive N; Mouillot, David; Campana, Steven E; Hunter, Ewan

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios from fish otoliths are used to discriminate marine stocks and reconstruct past climate, assuming that variations in otolith δ18O values closely reflect differences in temperature history of fish when accounting for salinity induced variability in water δ18O. To investigate this, we exploited the environmental and migratory data gathered from a decade using archival tags to study the behaviour of adult plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) in the North Sea. Based on the tag-derived monthly distributions of the fish and corresponding temperature and salinity estimates modelled across three consecutive years, we first predicted annual otolith δ18O values for three geographically discrete offshore sub-stocks, using three alternative plausible scenarios for otolith growth. Comparison of predicted vs. measured annual δ18O values demonstrated >96% correct prediction of sub-stock membership, irrespective of the otolith growth scenario. Pronounced inter-stock differences in δ18O values, notably in summer, provide a robust marker for reconstructing broad-scale plaice distribution in the North Sea. However, although largely congruent, measured and predicted annual δ18O values did not fully match [ corrected]. Small, but consistent, offsets were also observed between individual high-resolution otolith δ18O values measured during tag recording time and corresponding δ18O predictions using concomitant tag-recorded temperatures and location-specific salinity estimates. The nature of the shifts differed among sub-stocks, suggesting specific vital effects linked to variation in physiological response to temperature. Therefore, although otolith δ18O in free-ranging fish largely reflects environmental temperature and salinity, we counsel prudence when interpreting otolith δ18O data for stock discrimination or temperature reconstruction until the mechanisms underpinning otolith δ18O signature acquisition, and associated variation, are clarified.

  17. Listening in on the past: what can otolith δ18O values really tell us about the environmental history of fishes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey M Darnaude

    Full Text Available Oxygen isotope ratios from fish otoliths are used to discriminate marine stocks and reconstruct past climate, assuming that variations in otolith δ18O values closely reflect differences in temperature history of fish when accounting for salinity induced variability in water δ18O. To investigate this, we exploited the environmental and migratory data gathered from a decade using archival tags to study the behaviour of adult plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L. in the North Sea. Based on the tag-derived monthly distributions of the fish and corresponding temperature and salinity estimates modelled across three consecutive years, we first predicted annual otolith δ18O values for three geographically discrete offshore sub-stocks, using three alternative plausible scenarios for otolith growth. Comparison of predicted vs. measured annual δ18O values demonstrated >96% correct prediction of sub-stock membership, irrespective of the otolith growth scenario. Pronounced inter-stock differences in δ18O values, notably in summer, provide a robust marker for reconstructing broad-scale plaice distribution in the North Sea. However, although largely congruent, measured and predicted annual δ18O values did not fully match [ corrected]. Small, but consistent, offsets were also observed between individual high-resolution otolith δ18O values measured during tag recording time and corresponding δ18O predictions using concomitant tag-recorded temperatures and location-specific salinity estimates. The nature of the shifts differed among sub-stocks, suggesting specific vital effects linked to variation in physiological response to temperature. Therefore, although otolith δ18O in free-ranging fish largely reflects environmental temperature and salinity, we counsel prudence when interpreting otolith δ18O data for stock discrimination or temperature reconstruction until the mechanisms underpinning otolith δ18O signature acquisition, and associated variation, are

  18. Slave to the rhythm: seasonal signals in otolith microchemistry reveal age of eastern Baltic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüssy, Karin; Gröger, J.; Heidemann, F.

    2016-01-01

    Annual growth zones in cod otoliths from the eastern Baltic stock are less discrete than in other cod stocks leading to biased age reading, which recently led to a failure of age-based assessment in the eastern Baltic cod stock. In this study, we explored the applicability of minor and trace elem...

  19. Expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in male American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) and preliminary evaluation of the response to TNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paden, Norka E; Carr, James A; Kendall, Ronald J; Wages, Mike; Smith, Ernest E

    2010-06-01

    We examined the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein mRNA in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). Primers and probes were designed to obtain a partial sequence of bullfrog StAR cDNA consisting of 349 base pairs. Quantitative PCR analysis of StAR mRNA equivalents was performed in tissues of juvenile and adult bullfrogs. In this study 18S mRNA was used as an internal standard. There were no differences in the expression of 18S RNA among tissues or between age groups. In juvenile males, the rank order for the constitutive levels of StAR was testes>skin>brain>kidneys. In adult males, StAR mRNA equivalent was greatest in testes, followed by kidneys, brain, and skin. In addition, stimulation and induction of testicular StAR by human chorionic gonadotropin significantly increased expression of StAR at 2, 4, and 6h after injection. Preliminary evaluation of 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) revealed that acute exposure is associated with reduction of StAR mRNA expression. The information provided in this study will be useful for future research on StAR gene expression in amphibian reproductive biology and the development of reproductive biomarkers.

  20. Spatial and temporal variability in the otolith chemistry of the Brazilian snapper Lutjanus alexandrei from estuarine and coastal environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschenbrenner, A; Ferreira, B P; Rooker, J R

    2016-07-01

    Otolith chemistry of juvenile and adult individuals of the Brazilian snapper Lutjanus alexandrei was measured to assess the utility of natural markers for investigating individual movements. Individuals were collected over a 3-year period (2010-2012) along the north-eastern coast of Brazil from both estuarine (juvenile to sub-adult stages) and coastal (sub-adult to adult stages) areas. Six elements ((7) Li, (24) Mg, (55) Mn, (59) Co, (88) Sr and (137) Ba) were measured in sectioned otoliths of L. alexandrei using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). Edge composition analysis indicated that element:Ca ratios in the otoliths of juvenile and sub-adult L. alexandrei from estuaries were not significantly different among the three consecutive years (2010, 2011 and 2012), suggesting that physicochemical conditions within the nursery area investigated were temporally stable. Similarly, apart from two elements (Ba and Co), element:Ca ratios for larger L. alexandrei inhabiting coastal waters were also similar. In contrast, otolith chemistry of similar sized L. alexandrei from estuarine and coastal areas was significantly different (based on recently accreted material). Otolith Mn:Ca and Ba:Ca were both significantly higher for L. alexandrei collected in estuaries compared to fish from adjacent coastal reefs, while the opposite trend was observed for Sr:Ca. Given the pronounced differences in otolith chemistry between estuarine and coastal areas, element:Ca transects were constructed from the core to margin of the otoliths for adults (age 7+ years) collected on reefs to determine the timing of movement (ontogenetic migration) from estuarine to coastal areas. Based on observed patterns of decline for both Mn:Ca and Ba:Ca, it appears that L. alexandrei begin the move to more coastal habitats (i.e. lower element:Ca ratios) after age 2 years. The patterns observed for this species highlight the importance of conserving connectivity between

  1. Avaliação do controle postural na hipofunção vestibular unilateral

    OpenAIRE

    Rafaela Maia Quitschal; Jackeline Yumi Fukunaga; Maurício Malavasi Ganança; Heloísa Helena Caovilla

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION:Patients with vestibular hypofunction, a typical finding in peripheral vestibular disorders, show body balance alterations.OBJECTIVE:To evaluate the postural control of patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction.METHOD:This is a clinical cross-sectional study. Twenty-five patients with vertigo and unilateral vestibular hypofunction and a homogeneous control group consisting of 32 healthy individuals were submitted to a neurotological evaluation including the Tet...

  2. Optimal duration of therapy in the recovery period of vestibular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    M V Zamergrad; V. A. Parfenov; N N Yakhno

    2014-01-01

    Dizziness is a common symptom in neurological and general medical practice. In most cases it is caused by diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The most common vestibular system diseases include benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, dizziness, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, and cerebrovascular diseases. One of the main treatments for the diseases accompanied by dizziness is vestibular rehabilitation that is a complex of exercises, the goal of which is to stimulate ...

  3. Modification of Otolith-Ocular Reflexes, Motion Perception and Manual Control During Variable Radius Centrifugation Following Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Scott J.; Clarke, A. H.; Rupert, A. H.; Harm, D. L.; Clement, G. R.

    2009-01-01

    Two joint ESA-NASA studies are examining changes in otolith-ocular reflexes and motion perception following short duration space flights, and the operational implications of post-flight tilt-translation ambiguity for manual control performance. Vibrotactile feedback of tilt orientation is also being evaluated as a countermeasure to improve performance during a closed-loop nulling task. Data is currently being collected on astronaut subjects during 3 preflight sessions and during the first 8 days after Shuttle landings. Variable radius centrifugation is utilized to elicit otolith reflexes in the lateral plane without concordant roll canal cues. Unilateral centrifugation (400 deg/s, 3.5 cm radius) stimulates one otolith positioned off-axis while the opposite side is centered over the axis of rotation. During this paradigm, roll-tilt perception is measured using a subjective visual vertical task and ocular counter-rolling is obtained using binocular video-oculography. During a second paradigm (216 deg/s, less than 20 cm radius), the effects of stimulus frequency (0.15 - 0.6 Hz) are examined on eye movements and motion perception. A closed-loop nulling task is also performed with and without vibrotactile display feedback of chair radial position. Data collection is currently ongoing. Results to date suggest there is a trend for perceived tilt and translation amplitudes to be increased at the low and medium frequencies on landing day compared to pre-flight. Manual control performance is improved with vibrotactile feedback. One result of this study will be to characterize the variability (gain, asymmetry) in both otolith-ocular responses and motion perception during variable radius centrifugation, and measure the time course of post-flight recovery. This study will also address how adaptive changes in otolith-mediated reflexes correspond to one's ability to perform closed-loop nulling tasks following G-transitions, and whether manual control performance can be improved

  4. Prediction of Balance Compensation After Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Frère, Julien; Perrin, Philippe P; Beurton, Renaud; Gauchard, Gérome C

    2016-06-01

    Background Balance compensation after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery is under the influence of specific preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Objective To prospectively identify potential prognostic factors for balance recovery, we compared the respective influence of these preoperative characteristics on balance compensation after VS surgery. Methods In 50 patients scheduled for VS surgical ablation, we measured postural control before surgery (BS), 8 (AS8) days after, and 90 (AS90) days after surgery. Based on factors found previously in the literature, we evaluated age, body mass index and preoperative physical activity (PA), tumor grade, vestibular status, and preference for visual cues to control balance as potential prognostic factors using stepwise multiple regression models. Results An asymmetric vestibular function was the sole significant explanatory factor for impaired balance performance BS, whereas the preoperative PA alone significantly contributed to higher performance at AS8. An evaluation of patients' balance recovery over time showed that PA and vestibular status were the 2 significant predictive factors for short-term postural compensation (BS to AS8), whereas none of these preoperative factors was significantly predictive for medium-term postoperative postural recovery (AS8 to AS90). Conclusions We identified specific preoperative patient and vestibular function characteristics that may predict postoperative balance recovery after VS surgery. Better preoperative characterization of these factors in each patient could inform more personalized presurgical and postsurgical management, leading to a better, more rapid balance recovery, earlier return to normal daily activities and work, improved quality of life, and reduced medical and societal costs.

  5. Recent Advances in the Understanding of Vestibular Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hee Sohn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 1% of the general population and 10% of patients with migraine suffer from vestibular migraine (VM. However, this condition remains relatively unknown; therefore, it is often underdiagnosed despite the recent adoption of international diagnostic criteria for VM. The diagnosis of VM is based on the symptoms, degree, frequency, and duration of the vestibular episodes, a history of migraine, the temporal association of migraine symptoms with vestibular episodes in at least 50% of cases, and the exclusion of other causes. Physical examination and laboratory findings are usually normal in patients with VM but can be used to rule out other vestibular disorders with similar symptoms. The pathophysiology of VM remains incompletely understood; however, several mechanisms link the trigeminal system, which is activated during migraine attacks, and the vestibular system. Because few controlled trials have specifically investigated VM, the treatment options for this order are largely the same as those for migraine and include antiemetics for severe acute attacks, pharmacological migraine prophylaxis, and lifestyle changes.

  6. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.

  7. Morphology and electrophysiology of the vestibular organ in the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, Markus Lee Yang Murti

    2003-01-01

    To obtain more information about the anatomy and function of the vestibular organ in normal and pathological conditions, evaluation methods are needed. For experimental purposes, the vestibular organ of the guinea pig is often used as a model for the human vestibular organ. The purpose of the resear

  8. Evidence for the utricular origin of the vestibular short-latency-evoked potential (VsEP) to bone-conducted vibration in guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihara, Yasuhiro; Wang, Vivian; Brown, Daniel J

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that the vestibular short-latency-evoked potential (VsEP) in response to the brief head acceleration stimulus is a compound action potential of neurons innervating the otolith organs. However, due to the lack of direct evidence, it is currently unclear whether the VsEP is primarily generated by the activity of utricular or saccular afferent neurons, or some mixture of the two. Here, we investigated the origin of the VsEP evoked by brief bone-conducted vibration pulses in guinea pigs, using selective destruction of the cochlea, semicircular canals (SCCs), saccule, or utricle, along with neural blockade with tetrodotoxin (TTX) application, and mechanical displacements of the surgically exposed utricular macula. To access each end organ, either a dorsal or a ventral surgical approach was used. TTX application abolished the VsEP, supporting the neurogenic origin of the response. Selective cochlear, SCCs, or saccular destruction had no significant effect on VsEP amplitude, whereas utricular destruction abolished the VsEP completely. Displacement of the utricular membrane changed the VsEP amplitude in a non-monotonic fashion. These results suggest that the VsEP evoked by BCV in guinea pigs represents almost entirely a utricular response. Furthermore, it suggests that displacements of the utricular macula may alter its response to bone-conduction stimuli.

  9. BETAHISTINE DIHYDROCHLORIDE IN CANINE PERIPHERAL VESTIBULAR SYNDROME DICLORIDRATO DE BETAISTINA NA SÍNDROME VESTIBULAR PERIFÉRICA CANINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Champion

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular disease is a common syndrome in small animals that  may resulst of central or peripheral disease. The pathophysiology of peripheral vestibular syndrome is unknown, however it can be related to an abnormal dynamic of endolymphatic fluid or neuritis of the vestibular portion of the VIII cranial nerve.  The recovery of neurological sings is slow and, in chronic cases, the neurological deficits can be irreversible. In veterinary medicine, thera are few medical options to treat this condition, however, in Medicine, betahistine dihydrochloride is used to treat peripheral vestibular disorders. These drug  was used in four dogs with vestibular syndrome. The results showed clinical improvement in 7 to 10 days of treatment and completed recovery in 20 to 30 days, followed by the cure. One year after the treatment, the dogs did not have recurrence of the syndrome. This report shows the use of betahistine dihydrochloride in dogs with peripheral vestibular syndrome, with rapid clinical recover, without laboratorial abnormalities or recurrence of the clinical signs .The results encourage the use of betahistine dihydrochloride in the treatment of  peripheral vestibular disorders in small animals.

    KEY WORDS: Betahistine, dog, vestibular syndrome.
    A síndrome vestibular periférica é uma condição clínica comum em cães. Várias doenças podem causar essa síndrome. Entretanto, sua patofisiologia ainda é pouco conhecida. As alterações clínicas geralmente são autolimitantes, a recuperação pode ser longa e, em casos crônicos, os déficits neurológicos podem ser irreversíveis. Em medicina veterinária, há poucas opções terapêuticas. Na Medicina, o dicloridrato de betaístina é amplamente utilizado. Essa medicação foi empregada em seis cães com síndrome vestibular periférica. Os resultados mostraram melhora clínica com sete a dez dias de tratamento e recuperação quase completa entre vinte e trinta dias. Este

  10. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Teixeira Maranhão

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs.Objective To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls.Method Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals – thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls.Results Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity.Conclusion Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  11. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  12. Auditory evoked potentials in peripheral vestibular disorder individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matas, Carla Gentile

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The auditory and vestibular systems are located in the same peripheral receptor, however they enter the CNS and go through different ways, thus creating a number of connections and reaching a wide area of the encephalon. Despite going through different ways, some changes can impair both systems. Such tests as Auditory Evoked Potentials can help find a diagnosis when vestibular alterations are seen. Objective: describe the Auditory Evoked Potential results in individuals complaining about dizziness or vertigo with Peripheral Vestibular Disorders and in normal individuals having the same complaint. Methods: Short, middle and long latency Auditory Evoked Potentials were performed as a transversal prospective study. Conclusion: individuals complaining about dizziness or vertigo can show some changes in BAEP (Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential, MLAEP (Medium Latency Auditory Evoked Potential and P300.

  13. Effects of vestibular rehabilitation in the elderly complaining of dizziness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Paz-Oliveira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes of body balance are among the most common complaints of the elderly. Vestibular rehabilitation is one of the most effective methods in the recovery of the body balance. The objective to investigate the effects of vestibular rehabilitation in body balance of a group of elderly people with dizziness complain through dizziness handicap inventory. The sample was comprised of 10 seniors (6 women and 4 men with mean age of 68.9 years. The elderly complaining of dizziness showed high score in the DHI in the physical, functional and emotional aspects in the condition pre-VR and these values decreased after vestibular rehabilitation program. Complaints of dizziness also decreased after the implementation of the programmee.  

  14. An electronic prosthesis mimicking the dynamic vestibular function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkel, Andrei M.

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports our progress toward development of a unilateral vestibular prosthesis. The sensing element of the prosthesis is a custom designed one-axis MEMS gyroscope. Similarly to the natural semicircular canal, the microscopic gyroscope senses angular motion of the head and generates voltages proportional to the corresponding angular accelerations. Then, voltages are sent to the pulse generating unit where angular motion is translated into voltage pulses. The voltage pulses are converted into current pulses and are delivered through specially designed electrodes, conditioned to stimulate the corresponding vestibular nerve branch. Our preliminary experimental evaluations of the prosthesis on a rate table indicate that the device's output matches the average firing rate of vestibular neurons to those in animal models reported in the literature. The proposed design is scalable; the sensing unit, pulse generator, and the current source can be potentially implemented on a single chip using integrated MEMS technology.

  15. Correlation between vestibular habituation and postural recovery in cerebellar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, H; Caffa, C; Macadar, O

    1992-01-01

    Vestibular habituation was studied in normal subjects and in patients with cerebellar disease using a stimulation paradigm proposed in this paper. Six caloric stimuli were repeated daily in the same ear during six days and electronystagmographic responses at the beginning and the end of that period were compared. The normal behaviour was a clear reduction of the response across time. Two groups of cerebellar patients were identified by their ability to recover from positional imbalance after treatment. Compensated patients responded to repeated caloric stimulation in the same way as normal subjects. Conversely, uncompensated patients increased their response after the stimulation paradigm. The role played by the cerebellum in vestibular plasticity is discussed together with the observed correlation between vestibular habituation and the ability for postural recovery to occur.

  16. Does betahistine treatment have additional benefits to vestibular rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapolat, Hale; Celebisoy, Nese; Kirazli, Yesim; Bilgen, Cem; Eyigor, Sibel; Gode, Sercan; Akyuz, Aycan; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-dose betahistine treatment added to vestibular rehabilitation (VR) on the disability, balance and postural stability in patients with unilateral vestibular disorder. The VR group (group 1, n = 24) and the VR + betahistine group (group 2, n = 23) were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were evaluated before and after an 8-week customized VR in terms of disability (Dizziness Handicap Inventory, DHI), dynamic balance [Dynamic Gait Index (DGI)] and postural stability (static posturography). In group 1 and group 2, differences between DHI, DGI and falling index score on static posturography before and after the exercise program were significant (p betahistine + VR have a positive effect on disability and balance in patients with unilateral vestibular disorder. Betahistine treatment added to VR was effective in increasing postural stability.

  17. Sensory substitution in bilateral vestibular a-reflexic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Bart B G T; Selen, Luc P J; Verhagen, Wim I M; Medendorp, W Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss have balance problems in darkness, but maintain spatial orientation rather effectively in the light. It has been suggested that these patients compensate for vestibular cues by relying on extravestibular signals, including visual and somatosensory cues, and integrating them with internal beliefs. How this integration comes about is unknown, but recent literature suggests the healthy brain remaps the various signals into a task-dependent reference frame, thereby weighting them according to their reliability. In this paper, we examined this account in six patients with bilateral vestibular a-reflexia, and compared them to six age-matched healthy controls. Subjects had to report the orientation of their body relative to a reference orientation or the orientation of a flashed luminous line relative to the gravitational vertical, by means of a two-alternative-forced-choice response. We tested both groups psychometrically in upright position (0°) and 90° sideways roll tilt. Perception of body tilt was unbiased in both patients and controls. Response variability, which was larger for 90° tilt, did not differ between groups, indicating that body somatosensory cues have tilt-dependent uncertainty. Perception of the visual vertical was unbiased when upright, but showed systematic undercompensation at 90° tilt. Variability, which was larger for 90° tilt than upright, did not differ between patients and controls. Our results suggest that extravestibular signals substitute for vestibular input in patients’ perception of spatial orientation. This is in line with the current status of rehabilitation programs in acute vestibular patients, targeting at recognizing body somatosensory signals as a reliable replacement for vestibular loss. PMID:25975644

  18. Exploration of Circadian Rhythms in Patients with Bilateral Vestibular Loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristan Martin

    Full Text Available New insights have expanded the influence of the vestibular system to the regulation of circadian rhythmicity. Indeed, hypergravity or bilateral vestibular loss (BVL in rodents causes a disruption in their daily rhythmicity for several days. The vestibular system thus influences hypothalamic regulation of circadian rhythms on Earth, which raises the question of whether daily rhythms might be altered due to vestibular pathology in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate human circadian rhythmicity in people presenting a total bilateral vestibular loss (BVL in comparison with control participants.Nine patients presenting a total idiopathic BVL and 8 healthy participants were compared. Their rest-activity cycle was recorded by actigraphy at home over 2 weeks. The daily rhythm of temperature was continuously recorded using a telemetric device and salivary cortisol was recorded every 3 hours from 6:00AM to 9:00PM over 24 hours. BVL patients displayed a similar rest activity cycle during the day to control participants but had higher nocturnal actigraphy, mainly during weekdays. Sleep efficiency was reduced in patients compared to control participants. Patients had a marked temperature rhythm but with a significant phase advance (73 min and a higher variability of the acrophase (from 2:24 PM to 9:25 PM with no correlation to rest-activity cycle, contrary to healthy participants. Salivary cortisol levels were higher in patients compared to healthy people at any time of day.We observed a marked circadian rhythmicity of temperature in patients with BVL, probably due to the influence of the light dark cycle. However, the lack of synchronization between the temperature and rest-activity cycle supports the hypothesis that the vestibular inputs are salient input to the circadian clock that enhance the stabilization and precision of both external and internal entrainment.

  19. Plasticity during vestibular compensation: the role of saccades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish Gavin MacDougall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focussed on one major aspect of compensation: the recent behavioural findings concerning oculomotor responses in human vestibular compensation and their possible implications for recovery after unilateral vestibular loss (UVL. New measurement techniques have provided new insights into how patients recover after UVL and have given clues for vestibular rehabilitation. Prior to this it has not been possible to quantify the level of function of all the peripheral vestibular sense organs. Now it is. By using vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials to measure utricular and saccular function and by new video head impulse testing to measure semicircular canal function to natural values of head accelerations. With these new video procedures it is now possible to measure both slow phase eye velocity and also saccades during natural head movements. The present evidence is that there is little or no recovery of slow phase eye velocity responses to natural head accelerations. It is doubtful as to whether the modest changes in slow phase eye velocity to small angular accelerations are functionally effective during compensation. On the other hand it is now clear that saccades can play a very important role in helping patients compensate and return to a normal lifestyle. Preliminary evidence suggests that different patterns of saccadic response may predict how well patients recover. It may be possible to train patients to produce more effective saccadic patterns in the first days after their unilateral loss. Some patients do learn new strategies, new behaviours, to conceal their inadequate VOR but when those strategies are prevented from operating by using passive, unpredictable, high acceleration natural head movements, as in the head impulse test, their vestibular loss can be demonstrated. It is those very strategies which the tests exclude, which may be the cause of their successful compensation.

  20. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Cutfield

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz and low level (30 Hz control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution

  1. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D; Sharp, David J; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  2. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances L Meredith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K+ channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K+ channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space.

  3. Experimental hemispherectomy and hemicerebellectomy and their influence on vestibular habituation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, H; Pawlak-Osińska, K; Osiński, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of hemispherectomy and hemicerebellectomy on acquisition and retention of vestibular habituation in pigeons. The habituation training was performed using a rotatory test. The frequency of head nystagmus and postural reflexes was examined before and after acquisition of habituation and some days later, for the evaluation of the retention process. Our results suggested that the hemispherectomy did not inhibit the acquisition of habituation but retention of this phenomenon was shorter at that time. The hemicerebellectomy made it impossible to reveal the vestibular habituation.

  4. Why do subjective vertigo and dizziness persist over one year after a vestibular vertigo syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Christoph; Eckhardt-Henn, Annegret; Tschan, Regine; Dieterich, Marianne

    2009-05-01

    The overlap and interlinkage of dizzy symptoms in patients with psychiatric and vestibular vertigo/dizziness disorders is the subject of an ongoing debate. In a one-year follow up in 68 patients with vestibular vertigo syndromes, the persistency of vertigo and dizziness symptoms was examined and correlated with vestibular parameters and results from a psychiatric evaluation. Patients with vestibular migraine showed poorest improvement of vertigo and dizziness symptoms over time. In addition, patients who developed anxiety or depressive disorder after the onset of the vestibular disorder showed poor improvement and high persistency of symptoms.

  5. Parabolic flight reveals independent binocular control of otolith-induced eye torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, C. H.; Diamond, S. G.; Stoller, D. F.

    2000-01-01

    To examine otolith-governed ocular torsion in hyper- and hypogravity, eight subjects, including two astronauts, underwent parabolic flight while seated upright with head fixed. A mask fitted with two video cameras provided synchronized images of both eyes at a rate of 25/sec during 15 parabolas, the individual parabolas separated by a few minutes of level 1 G flight. Three main findings emerged: 1) After the first parabola, most subjects showed differential torsional offset of the two eyes in the 1 G portions between parabolas, compared to the conjugate baseline position of the eyes prior to the first parabola. 2) Changes in binocular torsion in the 0 G and 1.8 G portions of parabolic flight revealed in most subjects systematic reversal of direction. The reversal was consistent within, but not across subjects. 3) Disconjugacy defined as the moment-to-moment difference in the movements of the two eyes, and evaluated without the contribution of the differential offset, found two subjects with relatively high disconjugacy scores, and the remaining six with low scores. On the basis of prior studies (9, 20), we would predict the first two would be subject to SMS, the remainder not. The two astronauts, who did not have SMS on their space missions, fell into the low scoring group. We propose that the disconjugacies may be due to intrinsic asymmetries in the otolith receptors on the two sides of the head, which appear to be independently linked to the extraocular muscles of the two eyes, a phenomenon masked in normal 1 G states by adaptation. The apparently independent control of the two sides cannot be detected by the simpler and more common monocular studies.

  6. Surgical outcome in cystic vestibular schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Suresh; Baldawa, Sachin S.; Gopalakrishnan, Chittur Viswanathan; Menon, Girish; Vikas, Vazhayil; Sudhir, Jayanand B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cystic vestibular schwannomas (VS) form a rare subgroup that differs from the solid variant clinically, radiologically, and histopathologically. These tumors also vary in their surgical outcome and carry a different risk of post-operative complications. We analyzed our series of 64 patients with cystic VS and discuss the technical difficulties related to total excision of these tumors and focus on complication avoidance. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of cystic VS surgically managed over a span of 11 years. The case records were evaluated to record the clinical symptoms and signs, imaging findings, surgical procedure, complications, and follow-up data. Post-operative facial nerve palsy was analyzed with respect to tumor size and tumor type. Results: Progressive hearing impairment was the most common initial symptom (76.6%). Atypical initial symptoms were present in 15 patients (23.4%). Preoperatively, 78% patients had good facial nerve function (HB grade 1, 2) and 22% had intermediate (HB grade 3, 4) to poor (HB grade 5 and 6) function. Mean tumor size was 4.1 cm. Complete tumor removal was achieved in 53 patients (83%). The facial nerve was anatomically intact but thinned out after tumor excision in 38 patients (59.4%). Ninety percent patients had either intermediate or poor facial nerve function at follow-up. Poor facial nerve outcome was associated with giant tumors and peripherally located, thin-walled cystic tumors. Conclusion: Resection of cystic VS is complicated by peritumoral adhesions of the capsule to the nerve. Extensive manipulation of the nerve in order to dissect the tumor–nerve barrier results in worse facial nerve outcome. The outcome is worse in peripherally located, thin-walled cystic VS as compared to centrally located, thick-walled cystic tumors. Subtotal excision may be justified, especially in tumors with dense adhesion of the cyst wall to the facial nerve in order to preserve nerve integrity. PMID:27366248

  7. Objective evaluation of otolithic end organs in sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients%突发性聋患者前庭耳石器传导通路功能的客观评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张青; 胡娟; 许信达; 陈彦飞; 张滟; 韦俊荣; 张全安; 许珉; 加我君孝

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察突发性聋(简称突聋)患者耳蜗受损时前庭耳石器传导通路受影响的范围、程度以及客观评价方法.方法 选择2011年5月至2012年5月住院接受治疗的单侧突聋患者40例,分别进行气导短纯音诱发的眼肌前庭诱发肌源性电位(ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential,oVEMP)和颈肌前庭诱发肌源性电位(cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential,cVEMP)检测,计算两种反射的引出率;分别以突聋对侧相对健康耳和30名健康人(60耳)为对照,分析前庭上成分(椭圆囊/前庭上神经)和前庭下成分(球囊/前庭下神经)功能受损状况.结果 突聋组患耳oVEMP引出率为40.0% (16/40),cVEMP引出率为62.5% (25/40);突聋组对侧健耳oVEMP引出率为57.5%(23/40),cVEMP引出率为75.0% (30/40);对照组oVEMP引出率为71.7%(43/60),cVEMP引出率为81.7% (49/60).组间对比显示突聋组患耳与对侧健耳oVEMP和cVEMP引出率差异无统计学意义(x2=2.452,P=0.117;x2 =0.251,P=0.617),突聋组患耳与对照组比较,oVEMP和cVEMP引出率差异均具有统计学意义(x2 =9.949,P=0.002;x2=4.582,P=0.032);突聋组患耳、对侧健耳、对照组正常耳组间比较,oVEMP和cVEMP的阈值、N1潜伏期、P1潜伏期、波间期、振幅等各参数差异均无统计学意义(P值均>0.05).结论 突聋患者在耳蜗受损的同时可以伴有前庭耳石器传导通路功能受损,这种功能受损的状况可以通过oVEMP和cVEMP检测进行客观评估.%Objective To observe the function of the otolithic end organs and their input pathways in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) patients.Methods Forty cases of unilateral SSHL were enrolled as the observing group from May,2011 to May,2012.Thirty age-and gender-matched normal subjects were recruited as the control group.Both patients and normal subjects underwent conventional airconducted ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) and cervical vestibular evoked

  8. Quality of life of individuals submitted to vestibular rehabilitation Qualidade de vida de indivíduos submetidos à reabilitação vestibular

    OpenAIRE

    Olívia Helena Gomes Patatas; Cristina Freitas Ganança; Fernando Freitas Ganança

    2009-01-01

    Balance disorders affect social, family and professional activities. Vestibular rehabilitation can reduce the impact of these disorders on the quality of life of individuals with vertigo. AIM: to study the influence of vestibular rehabilitation on the quality of life of individuals, correlating it with gender, age, results from computerized vectoelectronystagmography and vertigo. Study type: Retrospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS:Twenty-two individuals were submitted to customized vestibular re...

  9. Fingerprints of lagoonal life: Migration of the marine flatfish Solea solea assessed by stable isotopes and otolith microchemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Jan; Morat, Fabien; Letourneur, Yves; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille

    2012-06-01

    The commercially important marine flatfish common sole (Solea solea) facultatively uses NW Mediterranean lagoons as nurseries. To assess the imprint left by the lagoonal passage, muscle carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope values of S. solea juveniles caught in Mauguio lagoon in spring (shortly after arrival from the sea) and in autumn (before the return to the sea) were compared with values of juveniles from adjacent coastal marine nurseries. In addition, in the lagoon, sole otolith stable isotope (C and oxygen (O)) and elemental (11 elements) composition in spring and autumn, and the stable isotope composition (C and N) of organic matter sources in autumn, were determined. Overall, our data indicate that a distinct lagoonal signature existed. Specifically, lagoon soles showed a strong enrichment in muscle tissue 15N (>6‰) compared to their coastal relatives, likely linked to sewage inputs (see below), and a depletion in 13C (1-2‰), indicative of higher importance of 13C depleted terrestrial POM in the lagoon compared to coastal nurseries. In addition, over the time spent in the lagoon, sole otolith δ13C and δ18O values and otolith elemental composition changed significantly. Analysis of the lagoon sole foodweb based on C and N isotopes placed sediment particulate organic matter (POM) at the base. Seagrasses, formerly common but in decline in Mauguio lagoon, played a minor role in the detritus cycle. The very strong 15N enrichment of the entire foodweb (+7 to +11‰) compared to little impacted lagoons and coastal areas testified of important human sewage inputs. Regarding the S. solea migration, the analysis of higher turnover and fast growth muscle tissue and metabolically inert and slower growth otoliths indicated that soles arrived at least several weeks prior to capture in spring, and that no migrations took place in summer. In the autumn, the high muscle δ15N value acquired in Mauguio lagoon would be a good marker of recent return to the sea, whereas

  10. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in The VOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eRanjbaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which can be distorted in case of peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain.In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e. different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies.

  11. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in the VOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Katsarkas, Athanasios; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which otherwise can be distorted by peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain. In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e., different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies.

  12. Vestibular Compensation in Unilateral Patients Often Causes Both Gain and Time Constant Asymmetries in the VOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Katsarkas, Athanasios; Galiana, Henrietta L.

    2016-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is essential in our daily life to stabilize retinal images during head movements. Balanced vestibular functionality secures optimal reflex performance which otherwise can be distorted by peripheral vestibular lesions. Luckily, vestibular compensation in different neuronal sites restores VOR function to some extent over time. Studying vestibular compensation gives insight into the possible mechanisms for plasticity in the brain. In this work, novel experimental analysis tools are employed to reevaluate the VOR characteristics following unilateral vestibular lesions and compensation. Our results suggest that following vestibular lesions, asymmetric performance of the VOR is not only limited to its gain. Vestibular compensation also causes asymmetric dynamics, i.e., different time constants for the VOR during leftward or rightward passive head rotation. Potential mechanisms for these experimental observations are provided using simulation studies. PMID:27065839

  13. Quality of life of individuals submitted to vestibular rehabilitation Qualidade de vida de indivíduos submetidos à reabilitação vestibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olívia Helena Gomes Patatas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Balance disorders affect social, family and professional activities. Vestibular rehabilitation can reduce the impact of these disorders on the quality of life of individuals with vertigo. AIM: to study the influence of vestibular rehabilitation on the quality of life of individuals, correlating it with gender, age, results from computerized vectoelectronystagmography and vertigo. Study type: Retrospective. MATERIALS AND METHODS:Twenty-two individuals were submitted to customized vestibular rehabilitation and the Brazilian Dizziness Handicap Inventory - DHI before and after vestibular rehabilitation. Results from this questionnaire were correlated with gender, age, vestibular assessment and the presence of vertigo. RESULTS: all the DHI scores reduced significantly after vestibular rehabilitation. There were no differences among genders; adults and elderly patients; irritative peripheral vestibular syndromes; deficiency syndromes and normal exams; the presence or absence of vertigo. CONCLUSION: all the individuals had improvements in their quality of life after customized vestibular rehabilitation.Desordens do equilíbrio comprometem atividades sociais, familiares e profissionais. A reabilitação vestibular pode reduzir o impacto dessas desordens na qualidade de vida dos indivíduos vertiginosos. OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência da reabilitação vestibular sobre a qualidade de vida dos indivíduos, correlacionando-a com gênero, idade, resultado da vectoeletronistagmografia computadorizada e presença de vertigem. Forma de Estudo: Retrospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Vinte e dois indivíduos foram submetidos à reabilitação vestibular personalizada e ao Dizziness Handicap Inventory - DHI brasileiro - pré e pós-reabilitação vestibular. Os resultados desse questionário foram correlacionados com as variáveis gênero, idade, avaliação vestibular e presença de tontura do tipo vertigem. RESULTADOS: Todos os escores do DHI diminu

  14. Vertigo Perception and Quality of Life in Patients after Surgical Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma with Pretreatment Prehabituation by Chemical Vestibular Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Čada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma causes acute vestibular symptoms, including postoperative vertigo and oscillopsia due to nystagmus. In general, the dominant symptom postoperatively is vertigo. Preoperative chemical vestibular ablation can reduce vestibular symptoms postoperatively. We used 1.0 mL of 40 mg/mL nonbuffered gentamicin in three intratympanic installations over 2 days, 2 months preoperatively in 10 patients. Reduction of vestibular function was measured by the head impulse test and the caloric test. Reduction of vestibular function was found in all gentamicin patient groups. After gentamicin vestibular ablation, patients underwent home vestibular exercising for two months. The control group consisted of 10 patients who underwent only home vestibular training two months preoperatively. Postoperative rates of recovery and vertigo in both groups were evaluated with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI, the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI, and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaires, as well as survey of visual symptoms by specific questionnaire developed by us. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups with regard to the results of questionnaires. Patients who received preoperative gentamicin were more resilient to optokinetic and optic flow stimulation (p<0.05. This trial is registered with clinical study registration number NCT02963896.

  15. Stimulus Characteristics for Vestibular Stochastic Resonance to Improve Balance Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott; Serrado, Jorge; Cohen, Helen; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can enhance the response of neural systems to relevant sensory signals. Studies have shown that imperceptible stochastic vestibular electrical stimulation, when applied to normal young and elderly subjects, significantly improved their ocular stabilization reflexes in response to whole-body tilt as well as balance performance during postural disturbances. The goal of this study was to optimize the amplitude characteristics of the stochastic vestibular signals for balance performance during standing on an unstable surface. Subjects performed a standard balance task of standing on a block of foam with their eyes closed. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation was applied to the vestibular system using constant current stimulation through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. Amplitude of the signals varied in the range of 0-700 microamperes. Balance performance was measured using a force plate under the foam block, and inertial motion sensors were placed on the torso and head. Balance performance with stimulation was significantly greater (10%-25%) than with no stimulation. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-300 microamperes. Optimization of the amplitude of the stochastic signals for maximizing balance performance will have a significant impact on development of vestibular SR as a unique system to aid recovery of function in astronauts after long-duration space flight or in patients with balance disorders.

  16. Treatment of Vestibular Dysfunction Using a Portable Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Project Role: Research Engineer Nearest person month worked: 3 Contribution to Project: no change Has there been a change in the active other...dysfunction we will optimize stimulation using a portable stochastic noise electrical stimulator and determine the effectiveness of subsensory electrical ...stochastic noise electrical stimulator to improve driving performance and determine what effect subsensory electrical stimulation has on vestibular

  17. Astronauts Conrad and Kerwin practice Human Vestibular Function experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission, goes over a checklist. The two men are in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC.

  18. Congenital nasal piriform aperture stenosis with vestibular abnormality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Smitha; Raghavan, Ashok [Sheffield Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Bateman, Neil [Sheffield Children' s Hospital, ENT Department, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    We present a neonate with congenital nasal piriform aperture stenosis associated with an abnormal vestibular aperture. Radiological evaluation with CT is essential to confirm the diagnosis and delineate the anatomy for surgical planning. Extension of the scan field of view to include the petrous temporal bone is essential to identify associated abnormalities of the vestibule. (orig.)

  19. Asymmetric vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in unilateral Meniere patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, C. M.; Wit, H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were measured in 22 unilateral MeniSre patients with monaural and binaural stimulation with 250 and 500 Hz tone bursts. For all measurement situations significantly lower VEMP amplitudes were on average measured at the affected side compared to the unaff

  20. What is the real incidence of vestibular schwannoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tos, Mirko; Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Cayé-Thomasen, Per;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present the incidence of vestibular schwannoma (VS) in Denmark, compare the incidence with that of previous periods, and discuss the real incidence of VS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: Prospective registration of all diagnosed VS in Denmark, with a population of 5.1 to 5.2 million...

  1. 前庭神经鞘瘤%Vestibular schwannoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦德让

    2003-01-01

    @@ 前庭神经鞘瘤(vestibular schwannoma,VS)亦称听神经瘤(acoustic neuroma),是颅内较为常见的良性肿瘤之一,约占颅内良性肿瘤的10%,占小脑桥脑角(cerebellopontine angle,CPA)肿瘤的65%~72%.

  2. Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannomas accelerates hearing loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hear...

  3. Sociodemographic factors and vestibular schwannoma: a Danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schüz, Joachim; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Hansen, Søren;

    2010-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) (or acoustic neuroma) accounts for about 5%-6% of all intracranial tumors; little is known about the etiology. We investigated the association between various sociodemographic indicators and VS in a cohort of 3.26 million Danish residents, with 1087 cases identified in 35...

  4. Increasing annual incidence of vestibular schwannoma and age at diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangerup, Sven-Eric; Tos, Mirko; Caye-Thomasen, Per;

    2004-01-01

    During the last 26 years the annual number of diagnosed vestibular schwannomas (VS) has been increasing. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse this increase. Since 1976, 1446 new cases of VS have been diagnosed at the authors' centre. Special focus was on the age at diagnosis, the loca...

  5. Treatment of Vestibular Dysfunction Using a Portable Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Vestibular symptoms seem to be a common problem with ~20% of veterans complaining of dizziness and those with dizziness demonstrating increased...follow up with phone calls • ~229 Veterans evaluated at the WRIISC screened positive for dizziness – 25 letters per week will be mailed to this

  6. Glutamatergic Signaling at the Vestibular Hair Cell Calyx Synapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Pyott, Sonja J.; Yu, Zhou; Glowatzki, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    In the vestibular periphery a unique postsynaptic terminal, the calyx, completely covers the basolateral walls of type I hair cells and receives input from multiple ribbon synapses. To date, the functional role of this specialized synapse remains elusive. There is limited data supporting glutamaterg

  7. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  8. Reabilitação vestibular no tratamento da tontura e do zumbido Vestibular rehabilitation in the treatment of dizziness and tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Simone Zeigelboim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a efetividade dos exercícios de reabilitação vestibular na melhora do zumbido e da tontura por meio de avaliação pré e pós-aplicação do questionário Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI e Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI, ambos adaptados à população brasileira. MÉTODOS: Avaliaram-se seis pacientes (dois do sexo masculino e quatro do sexo feminino, na faixa etária de 43 a 70 anos. Os pacientes foram submetidos aos seguintes procedimentos: anamnese, inspeção otológica, avaliação vestibular por meio da vectoeletronistagmografia e aplicação dos questionários pré e pós-reabilitação vestibular, utilizando-se o protocolo de Cawthorne e Cooksey. RESULTADOS: a com relação às queixas mais referidas, observou-se desequilíbrio à marcha (83,3%, dor de cabeça (66,6% e depressão (66,6%; b no exame vestibular todos os pacientes apresentaram alteração na prova calórica, sendo a maior freqüência das síndromes vestibulares periféricas irritativas (83,3%; c constataram-se no exame vestibular dois casos de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa, dois casos de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa unilateral; um caso de síndrome vestibular periférica irritativa bilateral e um caso de síndrome vestibular periférica deficitária unilateral; d na aplicação do DHI, observou-se melhora nos aspectos: funcional e emocional, mantendo-se inalterado o aspecto físico; e na aplicação do THI, observou-se melhora em todos os aspectos avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: O protocolo utilizado de reabilitação vestibular promoveu diminuição do zumbido e da tontura, melhorando a qualidade de vida dos pacientes.PURPOSE: To verify the effectiveness of vestibular rehabilitation exercises in the improvement of tinnitus and dizziness through an evaluation carried out before and after the administration of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (DHI questionnaires, both adapted to the

  9. Migration behaviour of twaite shad Alosa fallax assessed by otolith Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magath, V; Marohn, L; Fietzke, J; Frische, M; Thiel, R; Dierking, J

    2013-06-01

    Individual migration behaviour during the juvenile and adult life phase of the anadromous twaite shad Alosa fallax in the Elbe estuary was examined using otolith Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca profiles. Between hatching and the end of the first year of life, juveniles showed two migration patterns. Pattern one exhibited a single downstream migration from fresh water to the sea with no return into fresh water. In contrast, pattern two showed a first migration into the sea, then a return into fresh water and, finally, a second downstream migration into marine water. This first report of migration plasticity for A. fallax points to different exposure times to estuarine threats depending on the migration strategy. In adults, high Sr:Ca and low Ba:Ca in the majority of individuals confirmed prior reports of a primarily marine habitat use. Patterns reflecting spawning migrations were rarely observed on otoliths, possibly due to the short duration of visits to fresh water.

  10. Spatial orientation of the vestibular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphan, T.; Dai, M.; Cohen, B.

    1992-01-01

    1. A simplified three-dimensional state space model of visual vestibular interaction was formulated. Matrix and dynamical system operators representing coupling from the semicircular canals and the visual system to the velocity storage integrator were incorporated into the model. 2. It was postulated that the system matrix for a tilted position was a composition of two linear transformations of the system matrix for the upright position. One transformation modifies the eigenvalues of the system matrix while another rotates the pitch and roll eigenvectors with the head, while maintaining the yaw axis eigenvector approximately spatially invariant. Using this representation, the response characteristics of the pitch, roll, and yaw eye velocity were obtained in terms of the eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. 3. Using OKAN data obtained from monkeys and comparing to the model predictions, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system matrix were identified as a function of tilt to the side or of tilt to the prone positions, using a modification of the Marquardt algorithm. The yaw eigenvector for right-side-down tilt and for downward pitch cross-coupling was approximately 30 degrees from the spatial vertical. For the prone position, the eigenvector was computed to be approximately 20 degrees relative to the spatial vertical. For both side-down and prone positions, oblique OKN induced along eigenvector directions generated OKAN which decayed to zero along a straight line with approximately a single time constant. This was verified by a spectral analysis of the residual sequence about the straight line fit to the decaying data. The residual sequence was associated with a narrow autocorrelation function and a wide power spectrum. 4. Parameters found using the Marquardt algorithm were incorporated into the model. Diagonal matrices in a head coordinate frame were introduced to represent the direct pathway and the coupling of the visual system to the integrator. Model

  11. Correlação entre resultado do exame vestibular e queixas psicológicas autorrelatadas de pacientes com sintomas vestibulares Correlation between vestibular test results and self-reported psychological complaints of patients with vestibular symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léia Gonçalves Gurgel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fatores cognitivos e emocionais podem afetar o equilíbrio, portanto, condições psiquiátricas são comuns em pacientes otoneurológicos. O tratamento dado ao sujeito vertiginoso pode ser mais influenciado pelo sofrimento e comportamento da doença do que pela gravidade da patologia orgânica. OBJETIVO: Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar a associação entre os resultados do exame vestibular e queixa psicológica autorrelatada, em indivíduos atendidos no ano de 2009, no serviço de audiologia de um hospital em Porto Alegre. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo, descritivo-exploratório, consultando-se a base de dados dos softwares VecWin® e VecWin® 2 da marca Neurograff®. Foram investigados os resultados do exame vestibular, as queixas referentes aos sintomas psicológicos relatados espontaneamente e idade, sexo e queixa de vertigem e/ou tontura. O trabalho foi realizado em três etapas: agrupamento, exclusão/inclusão e quantificação. CONCLUSÃO: A faixa etária da amostra, o sexo e a presença ou ausência de vertigem e/ou tontura não foram variáveis de influência sobre o resultado do exame vestibular. Houve associação significativa entre a presença de queixa psicológica autorrelatada e o resultado normal do exame vestibular. Assim, é fundamental que os profissionais deem atenção às questões psicológicas relatadas pelo indivíduo na ocasião da anamnese vestibular.Cognitive and emotional factors may affect balance; psychiatric conditions are a common component in patient dizziness. The treatment of patients with vertigo may be affected to a greater degree by the suffering due to this disease than by the severity of organic changes. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate associations between vestibular test results and self-reported psychological complaints in patients evaluated during 2009 in an audiology unit at a hospital in Porto Alegre. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective, descriptive

  12. [Characteristics of motion sickness during prolonged otolith stimulation in anti-orthostatic position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsnev, E I; Iakovleva, I Ia; Serebrennikov, M I; Gavrilin, B K; Zakharova, L N; Nichiporuk, I A; Isupov, V G; Markin, A S

    1990-01-01

    Thirty healthy volunteers were tested for an extended period of time (up to 4 hours) on modified parallel swings during a head-down tilt (-8 degrees) study. The pattern of motion sickness that developed in this situation was evaluated in terms of physiological parameters (electrocardiography, rheoencephalography, arterial pressure, respiration rate electrooculography, etc.), hormonal status, fluid-electrolyte balance, sensory function. The test subjects developed a vestibulo-hemodynamic syndrome that included vestibular disorders, spatial illusions, fluid displacement in the cranial direction, excitation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system, changes in fluid-electrolyte balance. The resulting data may help better understand mechanisms underlying motion sickness.

  13. Paciente com cefaleia e síndrome vestibular periférica: relato de caso Patient with headache and peripheral vestibular dysfunction: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiane Maria Rossi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: a Reabilitação Vestibular constitui-se numa opção de tratamento para pacientes portadores de síndrome vestibular periférica e cefaleia. PROCEDIMENTOS: o paciente, do sexo feminino com 26 anos de idade apresentava síndrome vestibular periférica acompanhada de crises de cefaleia. Foi realizada avaliação e terapia fonoaudiológica com exercícios de habituação vestibular além de fisioterapia e dieta recomendada pelo nutricionista. RESULTADOS: no período de 3 meses com reabilitação vestibular realizada semanalmente observou-se melhora no quadro vertiginoso e da cefaleia da paciente. CONCLUSÕES: evidenciou-se boa eficácia clínica para o tratamento desta paciente através da reabilitação vestibular com exercícios de habituação vestibular. Salienta-se a eficácia da reabilitação para a melhora na qualidade de vida da paciente e minimização das crises de cefaleia.BACKGROUND: vestibular rehabilitation is an option for treating peripheral vestibular syndrome and headache patients. PROCEDURES: the patient is a 29-year old woman and has Peripheral Vestibular Syndrome along with headache attacks. Evaluation and Phonoaudiological therapy with exercises of habituation tests with physical and nutritional therapy were carried out. RESULTS: in 3 month period with weekly vestibular rehabilitation therapy, we observed an improvement in the condition of the patient's vertigo and migraine. CONCLUSIONS: it was evident that the patient's treatment through the rehabilitation test with habituation test exercises had good efficiency. Please note the effectiveness of the rehabilitation for the improvement in the patient's life quality and minimization of headache attacks.

  14. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Otolith Growth of Larval Zebrafish using a Rotating-Wall Vessel: Appropriate Rotation Speed and Fish Developmental Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Anken, Ralf; Liu, Liyue; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding

    2016-10-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing animal sensory systems. In this respect, it has extensively been shown earlier that fish inner ear otoliths can act as test masses as their growth is strongly affected by altered gravity such as hypergravity obtained using centrifuges, by (real) microgravity achieved during spaceflight or by simulated microgravity using a ground-based facility. Since flight opportunities are scarce, ground-based simulators of microgravity, using a wide variety of physical principles, have been developed to overcome this shortcoming. Not all of them, however, are equally well suited to provide functional weightlessness from the perspective of the biosystem under evaluation. Therefore, the range of applicability of a particular simulator has to be extensively tested. Earlier, we have shown that a Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) can be used to provide simulated microgravity for developing Zebrafish regarding the effect of rotation on otolith development. In the present study, we wanted to find the most effective speed of rotation and identify the appropriate developmental stage of Zebrafish, where effects are the largest, in order to provide a methodological basis for future in-depth analyses dedicated to the physiological processes underlying otolith growth at altered gravity. Last not least, we compared data on the effect of simulated microgravity on the size versus the weight of otoliths, since the size usually is measured in related studies due to convenience, but the weight more accurately approximates the physical capacity of an otolith. Maintaining embryos at 10 hours post fertilization for three days in the RWV, we found that 15 revolutions per minute (rpm) yielded the strongest effects on otolith growth. Maintenance of Zebrafish staged at 10 hpf, 1 day post fertilization (dpf), 4 dpf, 7 dpf and 14 dpf for three days at 15 rpm resulted in the most prominent effects in 7 dpf larvae. Weighing versus measuring the size of otoliths

  15. Effects of Simulated Microgravity on Otolith Growth of Larval Zebrafish using a Rotating-Wall Vessel: Appropriate Rotation Speed and Fish Developmental Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Anken, Ralf; Liu, Liyue; Wang, Gaohong; Liu, Yongding

    2017-02-01

    Stimulus dependence is a general feature of developing animal sensory systems. In this respect, it has extensively been shown earlier that fish inner ear otoliths can act as test masses as their growth is strongly affected by altered gravity such as hypergravity obtained using centrifuges, by (real) microgravity achieved during spaceflight or by simulated microgravity using a ground-based facility. Since flight opportunities are scarce, ground-based simulators of microgravity, using a wide variety of physical principles, have been developed to overcome this shortcoming. Not all of them, however, are equally well suited to provide functional weightlessness from the perspective of the biosystem under evaluation. Therefore, the range of applicability of a particular simulator has to be extensively tested. Earlier, we have shown that a Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) can be used to provide simulated microgravity for developing Zebrafish regarding the effect of rotation on otolith development. In the present study, we wanted to find the most effective speed of rotation and identify the appropriate developmental stage of Zebrafish, where effects are the largest, in order to provide a methodological basis for future in-depth analyses dedicated to the physiological processes underlying otolith growth at altered gravity. Last not least, we compared data on the effect of simulated microgravity on the size versus the weight of otoliths, since the size usually is measured in related studies due to convenience, but the weight more accurately approximates the physical capacity of an otolith. Maintaining embryos at 10 hours post fertilization for three days in the RWV, we found that 15 revolutions per minute (rpm) yielded the strongest effects on otolith growth. Maintenance of Zebrafish staged at 10 hpf, 1 day post fertilization (dpf), 4 dpf, 7 dpf and 14 dpf for three days at 15 rpm resulted in the most prominent effects in 7 dpf larvae. Weighing versus measuring the size of otoliths

  16. Stable isotopic composition of otoliths in identification of stock structure of small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yukun; HUANG Jiansheng; TANG Xuexi; JIN Xianshi; SUN Yao

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios (δ18O andδ13C) in otoliths were used to identify the stock structure of small yellow croaker,Larimichthys polyactis. Otoliths were collected from fish at five locations across the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea representing most of their distributional range and fisheries areas. The significant differences in the isotopic signatures showed that the five locations could be chemically distinguished and clearly separated, indicating stock subdivision. Correlation ofδ18O andδ13C values suggested that population ofL. polyactis could be divided into the Bohai Sea group, the southern Yellow Sea group and the central Yellow Sea group. Discriminant analysis ofδ18O andδ13C values demonstrated a high significant difference with 85.7% classification accuracy. The spatial separation ofL. polyactis indicated a complex stock structure across the Yellow Sea and the Bohai Sea. These results indicate that optimal fisheries management may require a comprehensive consideration on the current spatial arrangements. This study has provided further evidence that measurement of the stable isotopes ratios in otolith can be a valuable tool in the delineation of fishery management units.

  17. Otolith morphology varies between populations, sexes and male alternative reproductive tactics in a vocal toadfish Porichthys notatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, A P H; Adragna, J B; Balshine, S

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the morphology of sagittal otoliths of the plainfin midshipman fish Porichthys notatus was compared between populations, sexes and male alternative reproductive phenotypes (known as 'type I males or guarders' and 'type II males or sneakers'). Sagitta size increased with P. notatus size and changes in shape were also detected with increasing body size. Porichthys notatus sagittae begin as simple rounded structures, but then elongate as they grow and take on a more triangular and complex shape with several prominent notches and indentations along the dorsal and caudal edges. Moreover, the sagittae of the two geographically and genetically distinct populations of P. notatus (northern and southern) differed in shape. Porichthys notatus from the north possessed taller sagittae with deeper caudal indentations compared to P. notatus from the south. Sagitta shape also differed between females and males of the conventional guarder tactic. Furthermore, guarder males had smaller sagittae for their body size than did sneaker males or females. These differences in sagittal otolith morphology are discussed in relation to ecological and life history differences between the sexes and male tactics of this species. This is the first study to investigate teleost otolith morphology from the perspective of alternative reproductive tactics.

  18. Estimating contemporary early life-history dispersal in an estuarine fish: integrating molecular and otolith elemental approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, I R; Campana, S E; Bentzen, P

    2008-03-01

    Dispersal during the early life history of the anadromous rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, was examined using assignment testing and mixture analysis of multilocus genotypes and otolith elemental composition. Six spawning areas and associated estuarine nurseries were sampled throughout southeastern Newfoundland. Samples of adults and juveniles isolated by > 25 km displayed moderate genetic differentiation (F(ST) ~ 0.05), whereas nearby (nursery samples displayed low differentiation (F(ST) 80% self-assignment) with nearby runs self-assigning at rates between 50 % and 70%. Assignment and mixture analysis of juveniles using adult baselines indicated high local recruitment at several locations (70-90%). Nearby (estuaries at the head of St Mary's Bay showed mixtures of individuals (i.e. 20-40% assignment to adjacent spawning location). Laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry transects across otoliths of spawning adults of unknown dispersal history were used to estimate dispersal among estuaries across the first year of life. Single-element trends and multivariate discriminant function analysis (Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca) classified the majority of samples as estuarine suggesting limited movement between estuaries (juveniles evident in the genetic data at nearby sites and a lack of evidence of straying in the otolith data support a hypothesis of selective mortality of immigrants. If indeed selective mortality of immigrants reduces the survivorship of dispersers, estimates of dispersal in marine environments that neglect survival may significantly overestimate gene flow.

  19. Growth conditions of 0-group plaice Pleuronectes platessa in the western Wadden Sea as revealed by otolith microstructure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; Freitas, Vânia; de Paoli, Hélène; Witte, Johannes IJ.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2016-05-01

    Growth studies based on population-based growth estimates are limited by the fact that they do not take into account differences in age/size structure within the population. To overcome these problems, otolith microstructure analysis is often used to estimate individual growth. Here, we analyse growth of 0-group plaice in the western Wadden Sea in two years: a year preceded by a mild winter (1995) and a year preceded by a severe winter (1996). Growth was analysed by combining information on individual growth based on otolith analysis with predictions of maximum growth (= under optimal food conditions) based on a Dynamic Energy Budget model. Otolith analysis revealed that settlement occurred earlier in 1995 than in 1996. In both years, one main cohort was found, followed by a group of late settlers. No differences in mean length-at-age were found between these groups. DEB modelling suggested that growth was not maximal during the whole growing season: realized growth (the fraction of maximum growth realized by 0-group plaice) declined in the summer, although this decline was relatively small. In addition, late settling individuals exhibited lower realized growth than individuals from the main cohort. This study confirms that growth conditions for 0-group plaice are not optimal and that a growth reduction occurs in summer, as suggested in previous studies.

  20. Electronmicroscopic Investigations on the Role of Vesicle-like Bodies in Inner Ear Maculae for Fish Otolith Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsch, M.; Vöhringer, P.; Anken, R. H.; Rahmann, H.

    The presence, morphology and possible origin of vesicle-like bodies (VBs) within the inner ear otolithic membrane of developmental stages of cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus and adult swordtail fish Xiphophorus helleri was analysed by means of transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM, respectively) employing various fixation procedures. The VBs are believed to be involved in the formation of the otolith (or statolith in birds and mammals) regarding the supply of the otolith's organic material. Increasing the osmolarity of the fixation medium decreased the number of VBs seen. Decalcification ended up in a complete disappearance of the VBs. Whilst a fixation with glutaraldehyde followed by OS04 fixation yielded numerous VBs, only few of them were observed when the tissue was fixed with glutaraldehyde and OSO4 simultaneously. Therefore, the results strongly suggest that the VBs are fixative (i.e., glutaraldehyde) induced artifacts, so-called blisters. With this, the supply of an oto- or statolith's organic material remains obscure. Possibly, it is provided by secretion from the supporting cells as has been hypothesized earlier

  1. Otolith chemistry of fishes from Kosi Bay, South Africa: A preliminary multiple analytical methods approach to reconstruct fish migrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbach, Andreas; Cowley, Paul D.; Kramar, Utz; Neumann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Over exploitation of fish stocks in coastal areas is a subject of global concern. Increasing numbers of traditional fish traps, recreational fishing effort and unknown extents of illegal gillnetting are blamed for the declining abundance of estuarine-dependent fish species in the Kosi Bay estuarine lake system in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Otoliths from four important fishery species (Lutjanus argentimaculatus, Pomadasys commersonnii, Acanthopagrus vagus, and Rhabdosargus sarba) and water samples collected from throughout the Kosi Bay system were analyzed for trace element constituents and δ18O values, in an attempt to reconstruct fish movements. The applied microscopic X-ray fluorescence analysis proved valuable in detecting μm-scale spatially resolved Sr/Ca ratio distributions across otolith thin sections. Sr/Ca ratios and δ18O in otoliths correlated well with ambient water conditions and, thus, enabled us to reconstruct migratory histories of individual fish in the estuarine lake system. The findings are representative of the known biology of these species, although exact spatial and temporal ranges of migrations remain unclear. Interestingly, samples of two species (L. argentimaculatus and R. sarba) did not show any clue of migrations back to sea, which would be necessary for successful spawning. Further laboratory and field investigations with larger sample sizes are necessary to detect fishery impacts on migratory behavior at a population level.

  2. Age validation of canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) using two independent otolith techniques: lead-radium and bomb radiocarbon dating.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Cailliet, G M; Brown, T A; Lundstrom, C C; Stanley, R D

    2007-11-04

    Canary rockfish (Sebastes pinniger) have long been an important part of recreational and commercial rockfish fishing from southeast Alaska to southern California, but localized stock abundances have declined considerably. Based on age estimates from otoliths and other structures, lifespan estimates vary from about 20 years to over 80 years. For the purpose of monitoring stocks, age composition is routinely estimated by counting growth zones in otoliths; however, age estimation procedures and lifespan estimates remain largely unvalidated. Typical age validation techniques have limited application for canary rockfish because they are deep dwelling and may be long lived. In this study, the unaged otolith of the pair from fish aged at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada was used in one of two age validation techniques: (1) lead-radium dating and (2) bomb radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) dating. Age estimate accuracy and the validity of age estimation procedures were validated based on the results from each technique. Lead-radium dating proved successful in determining a minimum estimate of lifespan was 53 years and provided support for age estimation procedures up to about 50-60 years. These findings were further supported by {Delta}{sup 14}C data, which indicated a minimum estimate of lifespan was 44 {+-} 3 years. Both techniques validate, to differing degrees, age estimation procedures and provide support for inferring that canary rockfish can live more than 80 years.

  3. Life history inhomogeneity in Baltic Sea whitefish populations revealed by otolith strontium signatures – identification of stocked fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Hägerstrand

    2015-11-01

    The strontium concentrations in the otolith cores of whitefish from River Tornionjoki were higher than that of the four otoliths with low core strontium from fishes caught at sea (Table 1. Supposing that this latter group represent stocked fish raised in freshwater ponds, the vast majority of River Tornionjoki whitefish is naturally reproduced fish. This is plausible because in River Tornionjoki, the major whitefish spawning river in Finland, no larger stocking have been made since 1990s (Jokikokko and Huhmarniemi 2014. In conclusion, the concentration of otolith core strontium differs in whitefish hatched in fresh-water and in whitefish hatched in river water or in brackish Baltic Sea water. This difference can be used to reveal stocked whitefish. Barium concentration may be an even better indicator in this respect than strontium, as previous results indicate (Hägerstrand et al., 2015. Stocked river spawning whitefish appear in large amount at the southern feeding grounds around the Åland Islands, as already indicated by e.g. Leskelä et al. (2009.

  4. Hair cell specific NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in vestibular end organs: potential role of purinergic signaling in vestibular sensory transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Mary G; Thorne, Peter R; Housley, Gary D; Robson, Simon C; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2012-01-01

    A complex extracellular nucleotide signalling system acting on P2 receptors is involved in regulation of cochlear function in the mammalian inner ear. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) are ectonucleotidases that regulate P2 receptor signalling pathways in mammalian tissues by hydrolysing extracellular nucleotides to the respective nucleosides. All enzymes from the CD39/ENTPD family (NTPDase1-8) are expressed in the adult rat cochlea, but their expression and distribution in the vestibular end organ is unknown. This report demonstrates selective expression of NTPDase6 by rat vestibular hair cells. Hair cells transducing both angular acceleration (crista ampullaris) and static head position (maculae of the utricle and saccule) exhibited strong immunolabelling with a bias towards the sensory pole and in particular, the hair cell bundle. NTPDase6 is an intracellular enzyme that can be released in a soluble form from cell cultures and shows an enzymatic preference for nucleoside 5'-diphosphates, such as guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) and uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP). The main function of NTPDase6 may be the regulation of nucleotide levels in cellular organelles by regulating the conversion of nucleotides to nucleosides. NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in the vestibular end organ could be linked to the regulation of P2 receptor signalling and sensory transduction, including maintenance of vestibular hair bundles.

  5. The vestibular evoked response to linear, alternating, acceleration pulses without acoustic masking as a parameter of vestibular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, MLYM; Segenhout, JM; Wit, HP; Albers, FWJ

    2001-01-01

    In this study, short latency vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) were recorded in five guinea pigs in response to alternating linear acceleration pulses with and without acoustic masking. A steel bolt was implanted in the skull and coupled to a shaker. Linear acceleration pulses (n = 400) in upward

  6. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  7. Artificial balance: restoration of the vestibulo-ocular reflex in humans with a prototype vestibular neuroprosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica ePerez Fornos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex (VOR, the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

  8. Current treatment of nasal vestibular stenosis with CO2-laser surgery; prolonged vestibular stenting versus intraoperative mitomycin application. A case series of 3 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijndel, O. van; Heerbeek, N. van; Ingels, K.J.A.O.

    2014-01-01

    These case studies describe three cases of unilateral nasal vestibular stenoses caused by chemical cauterization. Each case was treated with CO2-laser surgery together with intraoperative topic application of mitomycin or prolonged vestibular stenting for prevention of restenosis. Two patients recei

  9. Oldest isotopically characterized fish otoliths provide insight to Jurassic continental climate of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, William P.

    1999-03-01

    Large, shallow, epeiric seas and adjacent lagoons such as those described herein likely played a significant role in moderating Jurassic coastal and continental climate. Jurassic (Bathonian) ocean surface temperatures in Scotland have been calculated from δ18O(CaCO3) values of a suite of the oldest well-preserved fish otoliths analyzed to date. Otolith δ18O values range from -4.7‰ to -1.9‰ (Vienna Peedee belemnite, VPDB), while δ13C(CaCO3) values vary from -5.4‰ to +1.5‰ (VPDB), representing the oldest stable isotopic record of paleodiet, paleoecology, and fish migration to date. Using a global ocean δ18O(H2O) value of -1.0‰ (Vienna standard mean ocean water, VSMOW) for an ice-free Jurassic, fish species that migrated from estuarine to open marine water record time-averaged temperatures of 23 °C. Estuarine fish, assuming a similar temperature, record variation in δ18O(H2O) values from -3.7‰ to -2.0‰ (VSMOW). That significant mixing of fresh water and seawater occurred in the Jurassic in Scotland is in general agreement with data presented by others (molluscan fauna, lithostratigraphy, paleogeography, and paleocirculation models). The δ18O values and temperatures derived in this study correspond to the meteorologic and hydrologic parameters of a mid-latitude maritime climate with low seasonality, a mean temperature of 23 °C, and abundant precipitation and humidity. The δ18O(H2O) values calculated from estuarine fish indicate that rainfall must have a δ18O(H2O) value lower than -3.7‰ (VSMOW). Values of δ18O and δ13C suggest an environment hydrologically similar to that observed in the Everglades of south Florida or the estuaries of south Texas, both notable fish nurseries today. However, sea-surface temperatures were lower than those of modern Florida or Texas as evidenced by reduced evaporative enrichment of δ18O(H2O) values.

  10. [The development OF THE vestibular apparatus under conditions of weightlessness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinikov, Ia A; Gazenko, O G; Titovo, L K; Bornshteĭn, A A; Govardovskiĭ, V I

    1976-01-01

    The spawn of the aquarium fish Brachydanio rerio was developing during 5--6 days under conditions of weightlessness (first on board the spaceship "Sojuz-16", then in the space station "Salut-4") in special aquariums "EMKON", in thermostable installations. Electron microscopically the embryos were found to have a well developed labyrinth in early developmental histologically and cytologically differentiated receptory structures of the macula utriculi and macula saccili. In contrast to controls, the experimental animals showed certain alterations in the otolite organization. In similar experiments the embryos of clawed frog Xenopus laevis in the stage of the tail bud were also placed in special containers "EMKON" and thermostable apparatus "Biotherm-4" and by the spaceship "Sojuz-17" were brought to the space station "Salut-4", where it stayed for 16 days. The initial embryos had already had a well developed acoustic vesicle with macula communis. Inspite of the preliminary load by start acceleration and staying under conditions of weightlessness, they reached the general development fairly similar to controls. As it was shown electron microscopically their labyrinth had highly histologically and cytologically differentiated structures. However, a disturbance of the development of the otolithic membrane and otoconia should be noted. The alterations observed in the otolithic membrane organization in experimental fishes and frogs may be explained by general disorders in calcium metabolism.

  11. Schwanoma vestibular como causa de surdez súbita Vestibular schwannoma presenting as sudden hearing loss

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    Eduardo M. Kosugi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A Surdez Súbita (SS é um sintoma causado por mais de 60 doenças diferentes, dentre elas, o Schwanoma Vestibular (SV. Shaia & Sheehy (1976 apresentaram uma incidência de 1% de SV em 1220 casos de SS. Não há características específicas para o diagnóstico do SV, sendo a ressonância magnética (RM o exame de escolha. OBJETIVO: Verificar a real incidência de SV em casuísticas de SS com a realização de RM. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Coorte transversal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo com a realização de RM com contraste de gadolínio em todos os pacientes com SS do serviço de urgência em Otorrinolaringologia do Hospital São Paulo no período de abril de 2001 a maio de 2003. RESULTADOS: Foram realizados exames de RM em 49 pacientes que apresentaram SS, sendo diagnosticados 3 (6,1% casos de SV. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência real de SV em casuísticas de SS pode ser maior do que o classicamente descrito na literatura, devido ao subdiagnóstico pela não-utilização da RM de rotina nestes casos.The sudden Hearing Loss (SHL is a symptom caused by more than 60 different diseases, including Vestibular Schwannoma (VS. Shaia & Sheehy (1976 presented a study with 1,220 cases of SHL reporting 1% incidence of VS. There is no specific characteristic for the diagnosis of VS and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is the gold standard exam to diagnose such disease. AIM: To determine the real incidence of VS presenting as SHL performing MRI in all patients with SHL. STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohort. MATERIL AND METHOD: Prospective study in which MRI with gadolinium was performed in all patients with SHL in the Emergency Service of Sao Paulo Hospital from April 2001 through May 2003. RESULTS: MRI was performed in 49 patients with symptoms of SHL, with three cases (6.1% of VS found. CONCLUSION: The real incidence of VS presenting as SHL may be greater than that mentioned in conventional reports probably because MRI had not been performed in all patients with

  12. Optimal duration of therapy in the recovery period of vestibular diseases

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    M. V. Zamergrad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness is a common symptom in neurological and general medical practice. In most cases it is caused by diseases of the central or peripheral vestibular system. The most common vestibular system diseases include benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, dizziness, Meniere's disease, vestibular neuronitis, and cerebrovascular diseases. One of the main treatments for the diseases accompanied by dizziness is vestibular rehabilitation that is a complex of exercises, the goal of which is to stimulate vestibular compensation. Adequate vestibular compensation allows a patient to get rid of dizziness and unsteadiness even though vestibular system injury is irreversible. Some medications are able to enhance the efficiency of vestibular rehabilitation. At the same time, the optimal duration of treatment for the most common vestibular disorders has not beenadequately explored. The paper gives the results of an observational program, whose purpose was to determine the optimal duration of vestibular rehabilitation in combination with the use of tanakan in patients with non-progressive unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder.Patients and methods. Data on 46 patients aged 19 to 70 years who underwent vestibular rehabilitation and took tanakan for vertigo caused by vestibular neuronitis (n = 44, labyrinthitis (n =1, or Ramsay Hunt syndrome (n = 1 were analyzed. All the patients were examined four times. The symptoms were recorded and the histories of disease were considered. The degree of vestibular disorders, including vertigo, was assessed when collecting complaints. The symptoms of vertigo were objectivized using its vertigo rating scale and five-point subjective rating scale for vertigo. All the patients underwent standard somatic and neurological examinations and videonystagmography. During the first visit after diagnosis, vestibular exercises were chosen for the patients and tanakan was used in a dose of 40 mg thrice daily to accelerate

  13. Physiological features of the opercularis muscle and their effects on vibration sensitivity in the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetherington, T E

    1987-09-01

    The amphibian opercularis muscle connects a movable otic element (the operculum) to the pectoral girdle and can act in reception of ground vibrations. Various physiological parameters of the opercularis muscle of the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana were measured and compared with similar measurements on the iliofibularis muscle of the hindlimb. The opercularis muscle is a very slowly contracting muscle, with a Vmax of 1.81 muscle lengths s-1 compared to a Vmax of 6.24 muscle lengths s-1 for the iliofibularis muscle. The opercularis muscle develops tension slowly, taking about 10 s to attain maximum isometric tension when stimulated at 100 Hz. The muscle can retain high levels of tension for several minutes, and following stimulation has a time to half-relaxation of about 4-6 s. The slow velocity of contraction, slow rate of tension development, fatigue-resistance and slow rate of relaxation of the opercularis muscle support morphological evidence that it consists mostly of tonic muscle fibres. Experiments were also made to examine the effects of muscle tension on reception of ground vibrations as measured by inner ear microphonics. Severing the nerve supplying the opercularis muscle produced slight decreases of no more than 2 dB in responses to vibrations from 25 to 200 Hz. Artificial stimulation of the opercularis muscle after severing the nerve supplying the muscle increased responses to vibration across the entire frequency range. Higher tension levels produced greater increases in responses; at the highest tensions used (about 120 kN m-2) responses were increased by as much as 4.5 dB. The opercularis muscle is therefore specialized for slow but prolonged contractions, and tension is important in its sensory function. A tensed opercularis muscle appears to transmit faithfully motion of the forelimb, produced by vibrations, to the operculum such that the latter moves relative to the inner ear fluids.

  14. Phylogeography of the arid-adapted Malagasy bullfrog, Laliostoma labrosum, influenced by past connectivity and habitat stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabijan, Maciej; Brown, Jason L; Chan, Lauren M; Rakotondravony, Hery A; Raselimanana, Achille P; Yoder, Anne D; Glaw, Frank; Vences, Miguel

    2015-11-01

    The rainforest biome of eastern Madagascar is renowned for its extraordinary biodiversity and restricted distribution ranges of many species, whereas the arid western region of the island is relatively species poor. We provide insight into the biogeography of western Madagascar by analyzing a multilocus phylogeographic dataset assembled for an amphibian, the widespread Malagasy bullfrog, Laliostoma labrosum. We find no cryptic species in L. labrosum (maximum 1.1% pairwise genetic distance between individuals in the 16S rRNA gene) attributable to considerable gene flow at the regional level as shown by genetic admixture in both mtDNA and three nuclear loci, especially in central Madagascar. Low breeding site fidelity, viewed as an adaptation to the unreliability of standing pools of freshwater in dry and seasonal environments, and a ubiquitous distribution within its range may underlie overall low genetic differentiation. Moreover, reductions in population size associated with periods of high aridity in western Madagascar may have purged DNA variation in this species. The mtDNA gene tree revealed seven major phylogroups within this species, five of which show mostly non-overlapping distributions. The nested positions of the northern and central mtDNA phylogroups imply a southwestern origin for all extant mtDNA lineages in L. labrosum. The current phylogeography of this species and paleo-distributions of major mtDNA lineages suggest five potential refugia in northern, western and southwestern Madagascar, likely the result of Pleistocene range fragmentation during drier and cooler climates. Lineage sorting in mtDNA and nuclear loci highlighted a main phylogeographic break between populations north and south of the Sambirano region, suggesting a role of the coastal Sambirano rainforest as a barrier to gene flow. Paleo-species distribution models and dispersal networks suggest that the persistence of some refugial populations was mainly determined by high population

  15. Role of the insula and vestibular system in patients with chronic subjective dizziness: An fMRI study using sound-evoked vestibular stimulation

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    Iole eIndovina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic subjective dizziness (CSD is a common vestibular disorder characterized by persistent non-vertiginous dizziness, unsteadiness, and heightened sensitivity to motion stimuli that may last for months to years after events that cause acute vestibular symptoms or disrupt balance. CSD is not associated with abnormalities of basic vestibular or oculomotor reflexes. Rather, it is thought to arise from persistent use of high-threat postural control strategies and greater reliance on visual cues for spatial orientation (i.e., visual dependence, long after triggering events resolve. Anxiety-related personality traits confer vulnerability to CSD. Anomalous interactions between the central vestibular system and neural structures related to anxiety may sustain it. Vestibular- and anxiety-related processes overlap in the brain, particularly in the insula and hippocampus. Alterations in activity and connectivity in these brain regions in response to vestibular stimuli may be the neural basis of CSD.We examined this hypothesis by comparing brain activity from 18 patients with CSD and 18 healthy controls measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging during loud short tone bursts, which are auditory stimuli that evoke robust vestibular responses. Relative to controls, patients with CSD showed reduced activations to sound-evoked vestibular stimulation in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC including the posterior insula, and in the anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate cortex. Patients with CSD also showed altered connectivity between the anterior insula and PIVC, anterior insula and middle occipital cortex, hippocampus and PIVC, and anterior cingulate cortex and PIVC.We conclude that reduced activation in PIVC, hippocampus, anterior insula, inferior frontal gyrus, and anterior cingulate cortex, as well as connectivity changes among these regions, may be linked to long-term vestibular symptoms in patients

  16. A neuroscientific account of how vestibular disorders impair bodily self-consciousness

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    Christophe eLopez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of vestibular disorders on balance, oculomotor control and self-motion perception have been extensively described in humans and animals. More recently, vestibular disorders have been related to cognitive deficits in spatial navigation and memory tasks. Less frequently, abnormal bodily perceptions have been described in patients with vestibular disorders. Altered forms of bodily self-consciousness include distorted body image and body schema, disembodied self-location (out-of-body experience, altered sense of agency, as well as more complex experiences of dissociation and detachment from the self (depersonalization. In this article, I suggest that vestibular disorders create sensory conflict or mismatch in multisensory brain regions, producing perceptual incoherence and abnormal body and self perceptions. This hypothesis is based on recent functional mapping of the human vestibular cortex, showing vestibular projections to the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and in several multisensory areas found to be crucial for bodily self-consciousness.

  17. A neuroscientific account of how vestibular disorders impair bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of vestibular disorders on balance, oculomotor control, and self-motion perception have been extensively described in humans and animals. More recently, vestibular disorders have been related to cognitive deficits in spatial navigation and memory tasks. Less frequently, abnormal bodily perceptions have been described in patients with vestibular disorders. Altered forms of bodily self-consciousness include distorted body image and body schema, disembodied self-location (out-of-body experience), altered sense of agency, as well as more complex experiences of dissociation and detachment from the self (depersonalization). In this article, I suggest that vestibular disorders create sensory conflict or mismatch in multisensory brain regions, producing perceptual incoherence and abnormal body and self perceptions. This hypothesis is based on recent functional mapping of the human vestibular cortex, showing vestibular projections to the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and in several multisensory areas found to be crucial for bodily self-consciousness.

  18. Origins of invasive piscivores determined from the strontium isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr) of otoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Brian A.; Johnson, Brett M.; Breton, Andre R.; Martinez, Patrick J.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Gillanders, Bronwyn

    2012-01-01

    We examined strontium isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr) in fish otoliths to determine the origins of invasive piscivores in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB, western USA). We examined 87Sr/86Sr from fishes in different reservoirs, as well as the temporal stability and interspecies variability of 87Sr/86Sr of fishes within reservoirs, determined if 87Sr/86Sr would be useful for "fingerprinting" reservoirs where invasive piscivores may have been escaping into riverine habitat of endangered fishes in the UCRB, and looked for evidence that such movement was occurring. Our results showed that in most cases 87Sr/86Sr was unique among reservoirs, overlapped among species in a given reservoir, and was temporally stable across years. We identified the likely reservoir of origin of river-caught fish in some cases, and we were also able to determine the year of possible escapement. The approach allowed us to precisely describe the 87Sr/86Sr fingerprint of reservoir fishes, trace likely origins of immigrant river fish, and exclude potential sources, enabling managers to focus control efforts more efficiently. Our results demonstrate the potential utility of 87Sr/86Sr as a site-specific and temporally stable marker for reservoir fish and its promise for tracking fish movements of invasive fishes in river-reservoir systems.

  19. Effects of functional groups and soluble matrices in fish otolith on calcium carbonate mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Dongni; Li Zhuo; Gao Yonghua; Feng Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-10-01

    Calcium carbonate mineralization is significantly influenced by organic matrices in vivo. The effect mainly relies on functional groups in proteins. In order to study the influence of functional groups on calcium carbonate mineralization, -OH, -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups were grafted onto single crystal silicon chips, and such modified chips were used as substrates in in vitro mineralization experiments. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) test was conducted to examine the grafting efficiency, and the three groups were successfully grafted. Calcium carbonate mineralization on a modified silicon substrate was examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the results showed that the effects of -OH, -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups were quite different. Furthermore, a water-soluble protein matrix (WSM) and an acid-soluble protein matrix (ASM) extracted from fish otolith were adsorbed onto the -COOH-modified silicon substrate, and the effects of the protein matrices on calcium carbonate mineralization were studied. The results showed that both WSM and ASM of lapillus could mediate aragonite crystallization, but the size and morphology of the formed crystals were different. The WSM and ASM of asteriscus adsorbed on the silicon substrate had little effect on calcium carbonate mineralization; almost all the crystals were calcite, while both asteriscus WSM and ASM in solution could mediate vaterite crystals, and the morphologies of vaterite crystal aggregates were different.

  20. On Strongly Coupled Linear Elliptic Systems with Application to Otolith Membrane Distortion

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    I. K. Youssef

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: In this research, the author discussed the problems associated with the approximation of the mixed derivative terms appearing in strongly coupled linear elliptic systems by the finite difference method over irregular domains. To avoid the appearance of mixed derivative terms the author introduced a reformulation for the system through introducing a new dependent variable which adds one supplementary (simple differential equation to the system but does not change its elliptic character. Approach: The basic idea in the reformulation is the direct generation of the Laplacian operator which has an efficient finite difference treatment. Results: Two finite difference formulae with symmetric appearance approximating the first order derivatives on curved boundaries up to O(h2 are established, that can be considered as a generalization to the well known central formula. Applications to the otolith membrane model have proved the reliability and efficiency of the present treatment in comparison with other methods. Conclusions/Recommendations: Although, this treatment has increased the number of algebraic equations approximating the system linearly 3n instead of 2n, the overall accuracy is increased quadratically. The band width of matrix of coefficients of the algebraic system is decreased and there is no need to interpolate along the diagonals due to the absence of mixed derivatives. The treatment is promising and other extensions are mentioned.

  1. Preliminary results of Sr:Ca ratios of Coilia nasus in otoliths by micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Guo, H. [Institute of Life Science, Shanghai Fisheries University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Shen, H. [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)]. E-mail: haoshen@fudan.edu.cn; Li, X. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Tang, W. [Institute of Life Science, Shanghai Fisheries University, Shanghai 200090 (China); Liu, J. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 201800 (China); Jin, J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Mi, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, Applied Ion Beam Physics Laboratory, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2007-07-15

    Coilia nasus, distributed in Changjiang River as well as northwest Pacific, has a high economic value owing to its delicacy and nutritional value. Recently, the fishing yields in Changjiang River have decreased dramatically due to excessive fishing and changes in the aquatic ecology. In order to prevent excessive fishing effectively, the life history pattern of C. nasus should be known in detail. Ootoliths contain much information about a fish's life history, because elemental concentrations remain unaltered after deposition, and can be analysed. C. nasus collected from Jing Jiang (lower reaches of the Changjiang River) and Jiu Duan Sha (the estuary of the Changjiang River) were studied by measuring Sr:Ca ratios in their otoliths using micro-PIXE. On average, the Sr:Ca ratios of estuarine C. nasus were found to be higher. The Sr:Ca ratios were higher in the core regions and lower in the outermost marginal regions, and shows fluctuations in certain regions. Possible corresponding life history patterns are discussed.

  2. Reabilitação vestibular: tendências e indicações

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, Clarissa Stefani; Pereira,Érico Felden; Rossi, Angela Garcia; Daronco, Luciane Sanchotene Etchepare

    2012-01-01

    The vestibular rehabilitation, generally recommended for the treatment of dysfunctions in the vestibular system, has been prescribed for people with other problems related to balance and to spacial orientation. This study, with a bibliographic basis, had as objective to make a synthesis of the studies about vestibular rehabilitation that are focused in other morbidities besides the vestibulopathies, pointing out the tendencies of investigations and the main results, specially the ones with in...

  3. Effect of propolis on vestibular compensation following unilateral labyrinthectomy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金麟毅

    2008-01-01

    Unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL) results in the vestibular syndrome including nausea, vomiting, vertigo, spontaneous nystagrnus (SN) and postural disturbance which abate over time in a process of behavioral recovery known as vestibular compensation. In order to investigate the effect of propolis on bestibular compensation, SN and expression of c-Fos protein in the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) were measured in unilateral labyrinthectomized Sprague-Dawley rats with pretreatment of propolis.

  4. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Patrick A; Dakin, Christopher J; Vardy, Alistair N; Happee, Riender; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain between-muscle differences. Two hypotheses were evaluated: 1) that muscle-specific motor-unit properties influence the bandwidth of vestibular reflexes; and 2) that frequency responses of vestibular reflexes differ between neck, back, and lower limb muscles because of neural filtering. Subjects were exposed to electrical vestibular stimuli over bandwidths of 0-25 and 0-75 Hz while recording activity in sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, erector spinae, soleus, and medial gastrocnemius muscles. Coherence between stimulus and muscle activity revealed markedly larger vestibular reflex bandwidths in neck muscles (0-70 Hz) than back (0-15 Hz) or lower limb muscles (0-20 Hz). In addition, vestibular reflexes in back and lower limb muscles undergo low-pass filtering compared with neck-muscle responses, which span a broader dynamic range. These results suggest that the wider bandwidth of head-neck biomechanics requires a vestibular influence on neck-muscle activation across a larger dynamic range than lower limb muscles. A computational model of vestibular afferents and a motoneuron pool indicates that motor-unit properties are not primary contributors to the bandwidth filtering of vestibular reflexes in different muscles. Instead, our experimental findings suggest that pathway-dependent neural filtering, not captured in our model, contributes to these muscle-specific responses. Furthermore, gain-phase discontinuities in the neck-muscle vestibular reflexes provide evidence of destructive interaction between different reflex components, likely via indirect vestibular-motor pathways.

  5. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignaux, G. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Chabbert, C.; Gaboyard-Niay, S.; Travo, C. [INSERM U1051, Institut des Neurosciences de Montpellier, Montpellier, F-34090,France (France); Machado, M.L. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); Denise, P. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Comoz, F. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Hitier, M. [CHRU Caen, Service d' Otorhinolaryngologie, Caen, F-14000,France (France); Landemore, G. [CHRU Caen, Laboratoire d' anatomopathologie, Caen, F-14000 (France); Philoxène, B. [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France); Besnard, S., E-mail: besnard-s@phycog.org [INSERM, ERI27, Caen, F-14000 (France); Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000 (France); CHRU Caen, Explorations Fonctionnelles, Caen, F-14000 (France)

    2012-01-01

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, the oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.

  6. Determination of the functional status of vestibular apparatus at children aged 5-6 years old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moiseenko E.K.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The physiological methods of determination of the functional state of vestibular analyzer are considered. The indexes of systole and diastole pressure, frequencies of heart-throbs, are chosen. Methods were used before and after standard vestibular irritation. Research was conducted on the base of child's preschool establishment. In it took part 120 children in age 5 - 6 years. Insufficient development of vestibular analyzer is set for children. Selected exercise for the improvement of spatial orientation and statodynamic stability.

  7. [Vestibular neuronitis in a teenager with sickle cell disease. Treatment is urgent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runel-Belliard, C; Lesprit, E; Quinet, B; Wiener-Vacher, S; Saizou, C; Grimprel, E

    2008-09-01

    Vestibular syndrome is not frequently described in patients with sickle cell disease. We report the case of a teenager with sickle cell disease who had a vestibular syndrome with vertigo that successfully responded to exchange transfusion. We discuss guidelines and review the literature in view of this case report. Sensorineural disorders should be considered as stroke syndromes. They require urgent treatment consisting of exchange transfusion or maintaining optimal hydration associated with blood withdrawal. Treatment of vestibular syndrome in sickle cell disease is urgent.

  8. Experimental vestibular pharmacology: a minireview with special reference to neuroactive substances and antivertigo drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, I; Ito, J; Takahashi, H; Sasa, M; Takaori, S

    1984-01-01

    Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators involved in the function of vestibular nuclei were reviewed with special reference to drugs used for treatment of motion sickness and vertigo. Biochemical, histochemical and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated that acetylcholine is a transmitter candidate from the afferent vestibular nerve to the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN), because acetylcholine satisfies most criteria for a chemical transmitter in the central nervous system. It is unlikely, however, that monoamines such as noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin are transmitters in the vestibular neurons, since cell bodies and nerve terminals containing the monoamines have not been detected yet in the vestibular nuclei. Although histamine and H1-receptor blockers inhibit neuron activities in the vestibular nuclei, it is unclear at present whether histaminergic system is directly related to the function of vestibular neurons. It has been established that GABA is an inhibitory transmitter from the cerebellar Purkinje cells to the LVN neurons. Diazepam is considered to enhance the GABA effect on the LVN, thereby modifying the vestibular neuronal firing. Enkephalin-containing cell bodies and nerve terminals are found in the medial vestibular nucleus, and a few substance P-containing neurons have been observed in the vestibular nuclei. However, the functional role of these peptides on the vestibular system remains to be determined. Unlike histamine H1-receptor blockers, vasodilators such as cinnarizine, ifenprodil and adenosine triphosphate, which are effective in treatment of vertigo, produce an enhancement of responsiveness of neuron activities in the vestibular nuclei, probably as a result of an increase in blood flow in the brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Betahistine in the treatment of tinnitus in patients with vestibular disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ganança,Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena [UNIFESP; Gazzola, Juliana Maria [UNIFESP; Ganança, Cristina Freitas; Ganança,Fernando Freitas

    2011-01-01

    Betahistine is a medicine used to treat vestibular disorders that has also been used to treat tinnitus. AIM: To assess the effects of betahistine on tinnitus in patients with vestibular disorders. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Retrospective data were collected from patient records for individuals presenting with vestibular dysfunction and tinnitus. Patients included had received betahistine 48 mg/day and clinical outcomes were compared with a control group comprising individuals who were unable to rec...

  10. Atlas of marine bony fish otoliths (Sagittae of Southeastern - Southern Brazil Part I: Gadiformes (Macrouridae, Moridae, Bregmacerotidae, Phycidae and Merlucciidae; Part II: Perciformes (Carangidae, Sciaenidae, Scombridae and Serranidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Lucia Del Bianco Rossi-Wongtschowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The drawings, detailed pictures, precise descriptions and measurements that characterize otoliths must be made available for studies in various areas, including taxonomy, phylogeny, ecology, fisheries, paleontology, diversity, predator-prey relationships and modeling. The Collection of Teleostei Fish Otoliths of Southeastern-Southern Brazil (COSS-Brasil of IOUSP contains 45,000 pairs of otoliths from 210 species. This publication is the first in a series that will constitute an atlas of Teleostei otoliths for southeastern-southern Brazil and presents the results of the morphologic and morphometric analyses of 11 Gadiformes and 36 Perciformes species by means of the most commonly used features, measurements and indices. Three otoliths of each species were illustrated and photographed whenever possible. The frequency of occurrence was calculated for each characteristic by total length classes (TL, and the ontogenetic differences were analyzed (multiple χ2 test; significance 0.05. Morphometric analyses were conducted for each characteristic per total length (TL class and for the whole sample, and the ontogenetic differences were analyzed.

  11. Species and life-history affects the utility of otolith chemical composition to determine natal stream-of-origin in Pacific salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Christian E.; Swanson, Heidi K.; Volk, Eric C.; Kent, Adam J.R.

    2013-01-01

    To test the utility of otolith chemical composition as a tool for determining the natal stream of origin for salmon, we examined water chemistry and otoliths of juvenile and adult Chum Salmon Oncorhynchus keta and Coho Salmon O. kisutch from three watersheds (five rivers) in the Norton Sound region of Alaska. The two species are characterized by different life histories: Coho Salmon rear in freshwater for up to 3 years, whereas Chum Salmon emigrate from freshwater shortly after emergence. We used laser ablation (LA) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) mass spectrometry (MS) to quantify element: Ca ratios for Mg, Mn, Zn, Sr, and Ba, and we used multicollector LA-ICP-MS to determine 87Sr:86Sr ratios in otolith regions corresponding to the period of freshwater residence. Significant differences existed in both water and otolith elemental composition, suggesting that otolith composition could be used to discriminate the natal origin of Coho Salmon and Chum Salmon but only when 87Sr:86Sr ratios were included in the discriminant function analyses. The best discriminant model included 87Sr:86Sr ratios, and without 87Sr:86Sr ratios it was difficult to discriminate among watersheds and rivers. Classification accuracy was 80% for Coho Salmon and 68% for Chum Salmon, indicating that this method does not provide sufficient sensitivity to estimate straying rates of Pacific salmon at the scale we studied.

  12. Significance of Vestibular Testing on Distinguishing the Nerve of Origin for Vestibular Schwannoma and Predicting the Preservation of Hearing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Bo He; Chun-Jiang Yu; Hong-Ming Ji; Yan-Ming Qu; Ning Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Determining the nerve of origin for vestibular schwannoma (VS),as a method for predicting hearing prognosis,has not been systematically considered.The vestibular test can be used to investigate the function of the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) and the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN).This study aimed to preoperatively distinguish the nerve of origin for VS patients using the vestibular test,and determine if this correlated with hearing preservation.Methods:A total of 106 patients with unilateral VS were enrolled in this study prospectively.Each patient received a caloric test,vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test,and cochlear nerve function test (hearing) before the operation and 1 week,3,and 6 months,postoperatively.All patients underwent surgical removal of the VS using the suboccipital approach.During the operation,the nerve of tumor origin (SVN or IVN) was identified by the surgeon.Tumor size was measured by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.Results:The nerve of tumor origin could not be unequivocally identified in 38 patients (38/106,35.80%).These patients were not subsequently evaluated.In 26 patients (nine females,seventeen males),tumors arose from the SVN and in 42 patients (18 females,24 males),tumors arose from the IVN.Comparing with the nerve of origins (SVN and IVN) of tumors,the results of the caloric tests and VEMP tests were significantly different in tumors originating from the SVN and the IVN in our study.Hearing was preserved in 16 of 26 patients (61.54%) with SVN-originating tumors,whereas hearing was preserved in only seven of 42 patients (16.67%) with IVN-originating tumors.Conclusions:Our data suggest that caloric and VEMP tests might help to identify whether VS tumors originate from the SVN or IVN.These tests could also be used to evaluate the residual function of the nerves after surgery.Using this information,we might better predict the preservation of hearing for patients.

  13. Hepatic effects of the clomazone herbicide in both its free form and associated with chitosan-alginate nanoparticles in bullfrog tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Cristiane Ronchi; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Rizzi, Gisele Miglioranza; Salla, Raquel Fernanda; Abdalla, Fábio Camargo; Costa, Monica Jones; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine Cristina Mathias

    2016-04-01

    The use of agrochemicals in agriculture is intense and most of them could be carried out to aquatic environment. Nevertheless, there are only few studies that assess the effects of these xenobiotics on amphibians. Clomazone is an herbicide widely used in rice fields, where amphibian species live. Thus, those species may be threatened by non-target exposure. However, nanoparticles are being developed to be used as a carrier system for the agrochemicals. Such nanoparticles release the herbicide in a modified way, and are considered to be more efficient and less harmful to the environment. The aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the effect of clomazone in its free form and associated with nanoparticles, in the liver of bullfrog tadpoles (Lithobates catesbeianus) when submitted to acute exposure for 96 h. According to semi-quantitative analysis, there was an increase in the frequency of melanomacrophage centres, in the accumulation of eosinophils and in lipidosis in the liver of experimental groups exposed to clomazone - in its free form and associated with nanoparticles - in comparison with the control group, and the nanotoxicity of chitosan-alginate nanoparticles. The increase of melanomacrophage centres in all exposed groups was significant (P clomazone herbicide and organic nanoparticles, which act as carriers of agrochemicals, on the bullfrog tadpole liver.

  14. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  15. Pediatric fibromyalgia and dizziness: evaluation of vestibular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusy, L M; Harvey, S A; Beste, D J

    1999-08-01

    Twelve children with fibromyalgia and complaints of chronic dizziness were evaluated with both clinical office maneuvers of vestibular function and laboratory tests composed of electronystagmography and sinusoidal harmonic acceleration rotary chair testing. All test results were normal for spontaneous nystagmus with or without visual fixation, oculocephalic reflex, dynamic visual acuity, head-shaking nystagmus, Quix test, and Dix-Hallpike maneuver. Electronystagmography test results were essentially normal for saccades, gaze, Dix-Hallpike, pendular tracking, and caloric evaluation. Rotary chair testing was normal in all 12 patients. These findings suggest that central (brainstem) and peripheral vestibular (inner ear) mechanisms do not account for the complaints of dizziness in the pediatric patient with fibromyalgia. The common musculoskeletal abnormalities of fibromyalgia may affect their proprioceptive orientation, therefore giving them a sense of imbalance.

  16. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the "I". Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where "I" experience the world) and self-location (the feeling where "I" am located in space). We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation showing vestibular contributions to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss the role for four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction, parietoinsular vestibular cortex, ventral intraparietal region, and medial superior temporal region. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is critical in linking multisensory signals from the body (personal and peripersonal space) with external (extrapersonal) space. Therefore, the vestibular system plays a critical role for neural representations of spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness.

  17. Focal increase of blood flow in the cerebral cortex of man during vestibular stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friberg, L; Olsen, T S; Roland, P E

    1985-01-01

    This study is an attempt to reveal projection areas for vestibular afferents to the human brain. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were measured over 254 cortical regions during caloric vestibular stimulation with warm water (44 degrees C). rCBF was measured when the external auditory...... meatus was irrigated with water at body temperature as a control to vestibular stimulation. During vestibular stimulation there was only a single cortical area, located in the superior temporal region, which showed a consistent focal activation in the hemisphere contralateral to the stimulated side...

  18. Interaction of brain areas of visual and vestibular simultaneous activity with fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Justina, Hellen M; Gamba, Humberto R; Lukasova, Katerina; Nucci-da-Silva, Mariana P; Winkler, Anderson M; Amaro, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Static body equilibrium is an essential requisite for human daily life. It is known that visual and vestibular systems must work together to support equilibrium. However, the relationship between these two systems is not fully understood. In this work, we present the results of a study which identify the interaction of brain areas that are involved with concurrent visual and vestibular inputs. The visual and the vestibular systems were individually and simultaneously stimulated, using flickering checkerboard (without movement stimulus) and galvanic current, during experiments of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-four right-handed and non-symptomatic subjects participated in this study. Single visual stimulation shows positive blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses (PBR) in the primary and associative visual cortices. Single vestibular stimulation shows PBR in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex, inferior parietal lobe, superior temporal gyrus, precentral gyrus and lobules V and VI of the cerebellar hemisphere. Simultaneous stimulation shows PBR in the middle and inferior frontal gyri and in the precentral gyrus. Vestibular- and somatosensory-related areas show negative BOLD responses (NBR) during simultaneous stimulation. NBR areas were also observed in the calcarine gyrus, lingual gyrus, cuneus and precuneus during simultaneous and single visual stimulations. For static visual and galvanic vestibular simultaneous stimulation, the reciprocal inhibitory visual-vestibular interaction pattern is observed in our results. The experimental results revealed interactions in frontal areas during concurrent visual-vestibular stimuli, which are affected by intermodal association areas in occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes.

  19. Ondansetron reduces lasting vestibular deficits in a model of severe peripheral excitotoxic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyhrfjeld-Johnsen, Jonas; Gaboyard-Niay, Sophie; Broussy, Audrey; Saleur, Aurélie; Brugeaud, Aurore; Chabbert, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Vestibular neuritis is a neuroinflammatory, peripheral vestibular pathology leading to chronic deficits and long-term disability. While current corticosteroid-based therapy does not appear to positively influence the long term outcome for the patient, a recent clinical pilot study suggested a functional vestibuloprotective effect of the anti-emetic ondansetron in the treatment of vestibular neuritis. We here demonstrate that systemic post-insult administration of ondansetron in a novel rat model of severe excitotoxic vestibular insult reproduces the clinically demonstrated functional benefits. This ondansetron-conferred reduction of functional deficits stems from the protection of synapses between sensory hair cells and primary neurons from excitotoxically induced lesion.

  20. Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation in Hemi-Spatial Neglect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eWilkinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemi-spatial neglect is an attentional disorder in which the sufferer fails to acknowledge or respond to stimuli appearing in contralesional space. In recent years, it has become clear that a measurable reduction in contralesional neglect can occur during galvanic vestibular stimulation, a technique by which transmastoid, small amplitude current induces lateral, attentional shifts via asymmetric modulation of the left and right vestibular nerves. However, it remains unclear whether this reduction persists after stimulation is stopped. To estimate longevity of effect, we therefore conducted a double-blind, randomized, dose-response trial involving a group of stroke patients suffering from left-sided neglect (n=52, mean age=66 years. To determine whether repeated sessions of galvanic vestibular stimulation more effectively induce lasting relief than a single session, participants received 1, 5, or 10 sessions, each lasting 25mins, of sub-sensory, left-anodal right-cathodal noisy direct current (mean amplitude=1mA. Ninety five percent confidence intervals indicated that all three treatment arms showed a statistically significant improvement between the pre-stimulation baseline and the final day of stimulation on the primary outcome measure, the conventional tests of the Behavioural Inattention Test. More remarkably, this change (mean change=28%, SD=18 was still evident 1month later. Secondary analyses indicated an allied increase of 20% in median Barthel Index score, a measure of functional capacity, in the absence of any adverse events or instances of participant non-compliance. Together these data suggest that galvanic vestibular stimulation, a simple, cheap technique suitable for home-based administration, may produce lasting reductions in neglect that are clinically important. Further protocol optimization is now needed ahead of a larger effectiveness study.

  1. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation in Subjects with Unilateral Labyrinthine Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2014-01-01

    We recently discovered that static magnetic fields from high-strength MRI machines induce nystagmus in all normal humans, and that a magneto-hydrodynamic Lorentz force, derived from ionic currents in the endolymph and pushing on the cupula, best explains this effect. Individuals with no labyrinthine function have no nystagmus. The influence of magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS) in individuals with unilateral deficits in labyrinthine function is unknown and may provide insight into the mechanism of MVS. These individuals should experience MVS, but with a different pattern of nystagmus consistent with their unilateral deficit in labyrinthine function. We recorded eye movements in the static magnetic field of a 7 T MRI machine in nine individuals with unilateral labyrinthine hypofunction, as determined by head impulse testing and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). Eye movements were recorded using infrared video-oculography. Static head positions were varied in pitch with the body supine, and slow-phase eye velocity (SPV) was assessed. All subjects exhibited predominantly horizontal nystagmus after entering the magnet head-first, lying supine. The SPV direction reversed when entering feet-first. Pitching chin-to-chest caused subjects to reach a null point for horizontal SPV. Right unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) subjects developed slow-phase-up nystagmus and left UVH subjects, slow-phase-down nystagmus. Vertical and torsional components were consistent with superior semicircular canal excitation or inhibition, respectively, of the intact ear. These findings provide compelling support for the hypothesis that MVS is a result of a Lorentz force and suggest that the function of individual structures within the labyrinth can be assessed with MVS. As a novel method of comfortable and sustained labyrinthine stimulation, MVS can provide new insights into vestibular physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:24659983

  2. Prevalence of vestibular dysfunction and associated factors in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Koo, Ja-Won; Chang, Mun Young; Woo, Sook-Young; Kim, Seonwoo; Cho, Yang-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the nationwide prevalence of dizziness and vestibular dysfunction in the Korean population and determine the associated factors. Design Cross-sectional analysis of a nationwide health survey. Methods We obtained data from the 2009 to 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, which were cross-sectional surveys of the South Korean civilian, non-institutionalised population aged 40 years and older (N=3267). A field survey team performed interviews and phys...

  3. Comparative anatomy of the vestibular nuclear complex in submammalian vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    A synopsis of the literature on the natural history of the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) in lower vertebrates is presented in an attempt to assess the knowledge available. The review discloses that there is considerable descriptive information that is widely dispersed in the literature. However, information about the topology, number, and cellular composition of the cell groups that compose the VNC is sketchy. Major cytological and hodological information is still needed to establish which parts of the VNC actually are homologous.

  4. Magnetic Vestibular Stimulation in Subjects with Unilateral Labyrinthine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Kevin Ward

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We recently discovered that static magnetic fields from high-strength MRI machines induce nystagmus in all normal humans, and that a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD Lorentz force, derived from ionic currents in the endolymph and pushing on the cupula, best explains this effect. Individuals with no labyrinthine function have no nystagmus. The influence of magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS in individuals with unilateral loss of labyrinthine function is unknown and may provide insight into mechanism of MVS. These individuals should experience MVS, but with differences consistent with their residual labyrinthine function. We recorded eye movements in the static magnetic field of a 7T MRI machine in nine individuals with unilateral labyrinthine hypofunction, as determined by head impulse testing and vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP. Eye movements were recorded using infrared videooculography. Static head positions were varied in pitch with the body supine, and slow-phase eye velocity (SPV was assessed. All subjects exhibited predominantly horizontal nystagmus after entering the magnet head-first, lying supine. The SPV direction reversed when entering feet-first. Pitching chin-to-chest caused subjects to reach a null point for horizontal SPV. Right unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH subjects developed slow-phase-up nystagmus and left UVH subjects, slow-phase-down nystagmus. Vertical and torsional components were consistent with superior semicircular canal excitation or inhibition, respectively, of the intact ear. These findings provide compelling support for the hypothesis that MVS is a result of a Lorentz force and suggest that the function of individual structures within the labyrinth can be assessed with MVS. As a novel method of comfortable and sustained labyrinthine stimulation, MVS can provide new insights into vestibular physiology and pathophysiology.

  5. Control of hair cell excitability by vestibular primary sensory neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Brugeaud, Aurore; Travo, Cécile; Demêmes, Danielle; Lenoir, Marc; Llorens, Jordi; Puel, Jean-Luc; Chabbert, Christian

    2007-01-01

    International audience; In the rat utricle, synaptic contacts between hair cells and the nerve fibers arising from the vestibular primary neurons form during the first week after birth. During that period, the sodium-based excitability that characterizes neonate utricle sensory cells is switched off. To investigate whether the establishment of synaptic contacts was responsible for the modulation of the hair cell excitability, we used an organotypic culture of rat utricle in which the setting ...

  6. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  7. Purchase decision-making is modulated by vestibular stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Nora; Mast, Fred W; Hasler, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Purchases are driven by consumers' product preferences and price considerations. Using caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), we investigated the role of vestibular-affective circuits in purchase decision-making. CVS is an effective noninvasive brain stimulation method, which activates vestibular and overlapping emotional circuits (e.g., the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)). Subjects were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation while they performed two purchase decision-making tasks. In Experiment 1 subjects had to decide whether to purchase or not. CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product. In Experiment 2 subjects had to rate desirability of the products and willingness to pay (WTP) while they were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation. CVS modulated desirability of the products but not WTP. The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability. The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making.

  8. Measurement of oscillopsia induced by vestibular Coriolis stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Jeffrey; Oman, Charles M; Harris, Laurence R

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method for measuring the time constant of head-movement-contingent oscillopsia (HMCO) produced by vestibular Coriolis stimulation. Subjects briskly rotated their heads around pitch or roll axes whilst seated on a platform rotating at constant velocity. This induced a cross-coupled vestibular Coriolis illusion. Simultaneous with the head movement, a visual display consisting of either a moving field of white dots on a black background or superimposed on a subject-stationary horizon, or a complete virtual room with conventional furnishings appeared. The scene's motion was driven by a simplified computer model of the Coriolis illusion. Subjects either nulled (if visual motion was against the illusory body rotation) or matched (if motion was in the same direction as the illusory motion) the sensation with the exponentially slowing scene motion, by indicating whether its decline was too fast or too slow. The model time constant was approximated using a staircase technique. Time constants comparable to that of the Coriolis <