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Sample records for bulk vitrification technology

  1. BULK VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARD KE

    2011-04-11

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

  2. Bulk Vitrification Technology For The Treatment And Immobilization Of Low-Activity Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

  3. DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM (DBVS) EXTERNAL REVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford mission to retrieve and immobilize 53 million gallons of radioactive waste from 177 underground storage tanks will be accomplished using a combination of processing by the waste treatment plant currently under construction, and a supplemental treatment that would process low-activity waste. Under consideration for this treatment is bulk vitrification, a versatile joule-heated melter technology which could be deployed in the tank farms. The Department proposes to demonstrate this technology under a Research, Development and Demonstration (RD and D) permit issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology using both non-radioactive simulant and blends of actual tank waste. From the demonstration program, data would be obtained on cost and technical performance to enable a decision on the potential use of bulk vitrification as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford. An independent review by sixteen subject matter experts was conducted to assure that the technical basis of the demonstration facility design would be adequate to meet the objectives of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) program. This review explored all aspects of the program, including flowsheet chemistry, project risk, vitrification, equipment design and nuclear safety, and was carried out at a time when issues can be identified and corrected. This paper describes the mission need, review approach, technical recommendations and follow-on activities for the DBVS program

  4. A COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 2006, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project. However, a number of technical issues were found that could significantly affect the project's ability to meet its overall mission as stated in the project ''Justification of Mission Need'' document, if not satisfactorily resolved. The ERP recognizes that the project has changed from an accelerated schedule demonstration project to a formally chartered project that must be in full compliance with DOE 413.3 requirements. The perspective of the ERP presented herein, is measured against the formally chartered project as stated in the approved Justification of Mission Need document. A justification of Mission Need document was approved in July 2006 which defined the objectives for the DBVS Project. In this document, DOE concluded that bulk vitrification is a viable technology that requires additional development to determine its potential applicability to treatment of a portion of the Hanford low activity waste. The DBVS mission need statement now includes the following primary objectives: (1) process approximately 190,000 gallons of Tank S-109 waste into fifty 100 metric ton boxes of vitrified product; (2) store and dispose of these boxes at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); (3) evaluate the waste form characteristics; (4) gather pilot plant operability data, and (5) develop the overall life cycle system performance of bulk vitrification and produce a comparison of the bulk vitrification process to building a second LAW Immobilization facility or other

  5. A COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2006-09-29

    In May 2006, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project. However, a number of technical issues were found that could significantly affect the project's ability to meet its overall mission as stated in the project ''Justification of Mission Need'' document, if not satisfactorily resolved. The ERP recognizes that the project has changed from an accelerated schedule demonstration project to a formally chartered project that must be in full compliance with DOE 413.3 requirements. The perspective of the ERP presented herein, is measured against the formally chartered project as stated in the approved Justification of Mission Need document. A justification of Mission Need document was approved in July 2006 which defined the objectives for the DBVS Project. In this document, DOE concluded that bulk vitrification is a viable technology that requires additional development to determine its potential applicability to treatment of a portion of the Hanford low activity waste. The DBVS mission need statement now includes the following primary objectives: (1) process approximately 190,000 gallons of Tank S-109 waste into fifty 100 metric ton boxes of vitrified product; (2) store and dispose of these boxes at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); (3) evaluate the waste form characteristics; (4) gather pilot plant operability data, and (5) develop the overall life cycle system performance of bulk vitrification and produce a comparison of the bulk vitrification process to building a second LAW

  6. A study of advanced vitrification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JNFL have developed the vitrification technology of a high level liquid waste with a modification in discharge performance of the noble metal by changing the bottom structure and adding heating means. Cold test was conducted by using a full scale mock-up melter which introduced the new vitrification technology. In the cold test, we confirmed the discharge performance of the noble metal. (author)

  7. Vitrification assistance program: international co-operation on vitrification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With 10 vitrification lines in operation (3 on WVP in Sellafield, 1 on AVM in Marcoule and 6 on AVH in La Hague), Sellafield Ltd and Areva NC benefit from the most in-depth experience worldwide in the vitrification of highly active liquors within a framework of commercial operations. Based on the two-step process design, using a calciner and an induction-heated hot melter, which was initially deployed in Marcoule in 1978, core vitrification equipment has been continuously improved by the independent development programmes of the two companies. In March 2005, Sellafield Ltd and Areva NC signed the Vitrification Assistance Program (hereafter referred to as VAP); a co-operative project lasting 4 years during which Areva NC is to share some areas of their experience and expertise with Sellafield Ltd. Now at the halfway point of this project, this paper summarises the work performed by the VAP team to date, highlighting the early benefits and lessons learned. The following points will be developed: - Equipment delivery and preparation for implementation on WVP - Training organization and dissemination to WVP teams - Lessons learned from the early changes implemented in operations (Calciner, Melter, Dust Scrubber and Primary off gas system), and initial feedback from the first campaign using a VAP equipped line. In conclusion: The vitrification process and technology implemented at Sellafield and at La Hague, based on the two-step process, have proved to be efficient in treating high active liquor of various types. Ten lines based on this principle have been successfully operated for more than 15 years in France and in the UK. The process has also been demonstrated to be sufficiently versatile to benefit from continuous improvement and development programmes. VAP, as a complete package to support vitrification technology and knowledge transfer from AREVA NC to Sellafield Ltd, has provided the framework for fruitful technical exchanges and discussions between the two

  8. Feed Variability and Bulk Vitrification Glass Performance Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The supplemental treatment (ST) bulk vitrification process will obtain its feed, consisting of low-activity waste (LAW), from more than one source. One purpose of this letter report is to describe the compositional variability of the feed to ST. The other is to support the M-62-08 decision by providing a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of bulk vitrification (BV), the process that has been selected to perform supplemental treatment, in handling the ST feed envelope. Roughly nine-tenths of the ST LAW feed will come from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment. This processed waste is expected to combine (1) a portion of the same LAW feed sent to the WTP melters and (2) a dilute stream that is the product of the condensate from the submerged-bed scrubber (SBS) and the drainage from the electrostatic precipitator (WESP), both of which are part of the LAW off-gas system. The manner in which the off-gas-product stream is concentrated to reduce its volume, and the way in which the excess LAW and off-gas product streams are combined, are part of the interface between WTP and ST and have not been determined. This letter report considers only one possible arrangement, in which half of the total LAW is added to the off-gas product stream, giving an estimated ST feed stream from WTP. (Total LAW equals that portion of LAW sent to the WTP LAW vitrification plant (WTP LAW) plus the LAW not currently treatable in the LAW vitrification plant due to capacity limitations (excess))

  9. SAFETY ANALYSIS OF THE DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and CH2M HILL, Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) [also referred to as the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC)] are evaluating the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) as a supplemental treatment technology for low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford Site. As a new facility at Hanford, the safety analysis for the DBVS is being subjected to new and evolving DOE requirements. Hazard categorization for the facility is being closely examined since this determines whether performance category (PC)-2 or PC-3 requirements are to be applied for natural phenomena hazards, as well as differing requirements under Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2004-2, Active Confinement Systems. Questions have also arisen regarding application of DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, or DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, format and content, as well as full implementation of DOE-STD-1186-2004, Specific Administrative Controls and naming conventions and content requirements for the interim safety analysis documents under DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets (e.g., Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis or Preliminary Safety Design Report). Another challenge is the integration of the programmatic chapters of the safety document with those of the Hanford tank farms, since the tank farms Safety Management Programs (SMP) are relied upon for the DBVS facility. All of these issues and their resolutions, as well as the level of scrutiny to which internal and external regulators have held this project's safety analysis, will be discussed in this paper

  10. CALCULATION OF DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM MELTER INLEAKAGE AND OFF-GAS GENERATION RATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAY TH

    2008-04-16

    The River Protection Project (RPP) mission is to safely store, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of the Hanford Site tank waste. The Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) is a research and development project whose objective is to demonstrate the suitability of Bulk Vitrification treatment technology waste form for disposing of low-activity waste from the Tank Farms. The objective of this calculation is to determine the DBVS melter inleakage and off-gas generation rate based on full scale testing data from 38D. This calculation estimates the DBVS melter in leakage and gas generation rate based on test data. Inleakage is estimated before the melt was initiated, at one point during the melt, and at the end of the melt. Maximum gas generation rate is also estimated.

  11. Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Strachan, Denis M.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2006-07-31

    The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc

  12. Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant applied technology plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Applied Technology Plan describes the process development, verification testing, equipment adaptation, and waste form qualification technical issues and plans for resolution to support the design, permitting, and operation of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. The scope of this Plan includes work to be performed by the research and development contractor, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, other organizations within Westinghouse Hanford Company, universities and companies with glass technology expertise, and other US Department of Energy sites. All work described in this Plan is funded by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project and the relationship of this Plan to other waste management documents and issues is provided for background information. Work to performed under this Plan is divided into major areas that establish a reference process, develop an acceptable glass composition envelope, and demonstrate feed processing and glass production for the range of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feeds. Included in this work is the evaluation and verification testing of equipment and technology obtained from the Defense Waste Processing Facility, the West Valley Demonstration Project, foreign countries, and the Hanford Site. Development and verification of product and process models and other data needed for waste form qualification documentation are also included in this Plan. 21 refs., 4 figs., 33 tabs

  14. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant applied technology plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruger, O.L.

    1990-09-01

    This Applied Technology Plan describes the process development, verification testing, equipment adaptation, and waste form qualification technical issues and plans for resolution to support the design, permitting, and operation of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. The scope of this Plan includes work to be performed by the research and development contractor, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, other organizations within Westinghouse Hanford Company, universities and companies with glass technology expertise, and other US Department of Energy sites. All work described in this Plan is funded by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project and the relationship of this Plan to other waste management documents and issues is provided for background information. Work to performed under this Plan is divided into major areas that establish a reference process, develop an acceptable glass composition envelope, and demonstrate feed processing and glass production for the range of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feeds. Included in this work is the evaluation and verification testing of equipment and technology obtained from the Defense Waste Processing Facility, the West Valley Demonstration Project, foreign countries, and the Hanford Site. Development and verification of product and process models and other data needed for waste form qualification documentation are also included in this Plan. 21 refs., 4 figs., 33 tabs.

  15. Innovative technology summary report: Transportable vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the end of the cold war, many of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) major nuclear weapons facilities refocused their efforts on finding technically sound, economic, regulatory compliant, and stakeholder acceptable treatment solutions for the legacy of mixed wastes they had produced. In particular, an advanced stabilization process that could effectively treat the large volumes of settling pond and treatment sludges was needed. Based on this need, DOE and its contractors initiated in 1993 the EM-50 sponsored development effort required to produce a deployable mixed waste vitrification system. As a consequence, the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) effort was undertaken with the primary requirement to develop and demonstrate the technology and associated facility to effectively vitrify, for compliant disposal, the applicable mixed waste sludges and solids across the various DOE complex sites. After 4 years of development testing with both crucible and pilot-scale melters, the TVS facility was constructed by Envitco, evaluated and demonstrated with surrogates, and then successfully transported to the ORNL ETTP site and demonstrated with actual mixed wastes in the fall of 1997. This paper describes the technology, its performance, the technology applicability and alternatives, cost, regulatory and policy issues, and lessons learned

  16. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology is a treatment process for contaminated soils. he process was evaluated to determine its ability to destroy semivolatile organics and to isolate metals and simulated radionuclides into a non-leachable slag materi...

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK VITRIFICATION TREATMENT PROCESS FOR THE LOW ACTIVITY FRACTION OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK WASTES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc. and RWE NUKEM Corporation have teamed to develop and apply a waste pre-treatment and bulk vitrification process for low activity waste (LAW) from Hanford Single Shell Tanks (SSTs). The pretreatment and bulk vitrification process utilizes technologies that have been successfully deployed to remediate both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes at nuclear power plants, DOE sites, and commercial waste sites in the US and abroad. The process represents an integrated systems approach. The proposed AMEC/NUKEM process follow the extraction and initial segregation activities applied to the tank wastes carried out by others. The first stage of the process will utilize NUKEM's concentrate dryer (CD) system to concentrate the liquid waste stream. The concentrate will then be mixed with soil or glass formers and loaded into refractory-lined steel containers for bulk vitrification treatment using AMEC's In-Container Vitrification (ICV) process. Following the vitrification step, a lid will be placed on the container of cooled, solidified vitrified waste, and the container transported to the disposal site. The container serves as the melter vessel, the transport container and the disposal container. AMEC and NUKEM participated in the Mission Acceleration Initiative Workshop held in Richland, Washington in April 2000 [1]. An objective of the workshop was to identify selected technologies that could be combined into viable treatment options for treatment of the LAW fraction from selected Hanford waste tanks. AMEC's ICV process combined with NUKEM's CD system and other remote operating capabilities were presented as an integrated solution. The Team's proposed process received some of the highest ratings from the Workshop's review panel. The proposed approach compliments the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) by reducing the amount of waste that the WTP would have to process. When combined with the capabilities of the WTP, the proposed

  18. LFCM vitrification technology. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkholder, H.C.; Jarrett, J.H.; Minor, J.E. (comps.)

    1986-09-01

    This report is compiled by the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to document progress on liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) vitrification technology. Progress in the following technical subject areas during the first quarter of FY 1986 is discussed: melting process chemistry and glass development, feed preparation and transfer systems, melter systems, canister filling and handling systems, off-gas systems, process/product modeling and control, and supporting studies.

  19. Evaluation of Exothermic Reactions from Bulk-Vitrification Melter Feeds Containing Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Bos, Stanley J.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Berry, Pam

    2007-06-25

    PNNL has demonstrated that cellulose effectively reduces the amount of molten ionic salt during Bulk Vitrification of simulated Hanford Low Level Waste (LLW). To address concerns about the potential reactivity of cellulose-LLW, PNNL used thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, and accelerating rate calorimetry to determine in these preliminary studies that these mixtures will support a self-sustaining reaction if heated to 110°C at adiabatic conditions. Additional testing is recommended.

  20. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF BULK VITRIFICATION PROCESS/ PRODUCT FOR TANK WASTE TREATMENT AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being constructed to immobilize both high-level waste (IUW) for disposal in a national repository and low-activity waste (LAW) for onsite, near-surface disposal. The schedule-controlling step for the WTP Project is vitrification of the large volume of LAW, current capacity of the WTP (as planned) would require 50 years to treat the Hanford tank waste, if the entire LAW volume were to be processed through the WTP. To reduce the time and cost for treatment of Hanford Tank Waste, and as required by the Tank Waste Remediation System Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision and the Hanford Federal Facility Consent Agreement (Tn-Party Agreement), DOE plans to supplement the LAW treatment capacity of the WTP. Since 2002, DOE, in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and State of Washington Department of Ecology has been evaluating technologies that could provide safe and effective supplemental treatment of LAW. Current efforts at Hanford are intended to provide additional information to aid a joint agency decision on which technology will be used to supplement the WTP. A Research, Development and Demonstration permit has been issued by the State of Washington to build and (for a limited time) operate a Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) facility to provide information for the decision on a supplemental treatment technology for up to 50% of the LAW. In the Bulk Vitrification (BV) process, LAW, soil, and glass-forming chemicals are mixed, dried, and placed in a refractory-lined box, Electric current, supplied through two graphite electrodes in the box, melts the waste feed, producing a durable glass waste-form. Although recent modifications to the process have resulted in significant improvements, there are continuing technical concerns

  1. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF BULK VITRIFICATION PROCESS & PRODUCT FOR TANK WASTE TREATMENT AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2006-07-21

    At the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being constructed to immobilize both high-level waste (IUW) for disposal in a national repository and low-activity waste (LAW) for onsite, near-surface disposal. The schedule-controlling step for the WTP Project is vitrification of the large volume of LAW, current capacity of the WTP (as planned) would require 50 years to treat the Hanford tank waste, if the entire LAW volume were to be processed through the WTP. To reduce the time and cost for treatment of Hanford Tank Waste, and as required by the Tank Waste Remediation System Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision and the Hanford Federal Facility Consent Agreement (Tn-Party Agreement), DOE plans to supplement the LAW treatment capacity of the WTP. Since 2002, DOE, in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and State of Washington Department of Ecology has been evaluating technologies that could provide safe and effective supplemental treatment of LAW. Current efforts at Hanford are intended to provide additional information to aid a joint agency decision on which technology will be used to supplement the WTP. A Research, Development and Demonstration permit has been issued by the State of Washington to build and (for a limited time) operate a Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) facility to provide information for the decision on a supplemental treatment technology for up to 50% of the LAW. In the Bulk Vitrification (BV) process, LAW, soil, and glass-forming chemicals are mixed, dried, and placed in a refractory-lined box, Electric current, supplied through two graphite electrodes in the box, melts the waste feed, producing a durable glass waste-form. Although recent modifications to the process have resulted in significant improvements, there are continuing technical concerns.

  2. Bulk Vitrification Performance Enhancement: Refractory Lining Protection Against Molten Salt Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Evans, Michael B.; Smith, Benjamin T.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Matyas, Josef; Buchmiller, William C.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Fluegel, Alexander

    2007-08-06

    Bulk vitrification (BV) is a process that heats a feed material that consists of glass-forming solids and dried low-activity waste (LAW) in a disposable refractory-lined metal box using electrical power supplied through carbon electrodes. The feed is heated to the point that the LAW decomposes and combines with the solids to generate a vitreous waste form. This study supports the BV design and operations by exploring various methods aimed at reducing the quantities of soluble Tc in the castable refractory block portion of the refractory lining, which limits the effectiveness of the final waste form.

  3. Development of vitrification line technology and the manufacture of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development is described of technology and the production of equipment for the vitrification of liquid radioactive wastes. For vitrification, frit Frita F270 is used containing up to 20% titanium and featuring a corrosion effect lower by one order than that of lead glass. The liquid waste is discharged in a measuring tank where it is mixed with formic acid. It is then pumped into an evaporator. Breed vapor is carried via a condenser to a condensate tank. The evaporator concentrate is transported to a homogenizer where it is gradually mixed with Frita. The viscous mush thus produced is carried into a furnace where the remaining water is evaporated. The furnace decontamination factor is 102 to 103. At a temperature of up to 1,050 degC the frit melts and is discharged into a case. Currently, technology has been developed of mush preparation and the design has been completed of a vitrification furnace featuring remote lid opening and closing, and of equipment for processing furnace emissions. (J.B.). 3 figs., 1 tab., 1 ref

  4. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-10-31

    This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology.

  5. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

    2001-07-13

    This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

  6. Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vortex has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation'' program with the Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and will not leach to the environment--as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC system design. This topical report will present a summary of the activities conducted during Phase 1 of the ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation'' program. The report includes the detail technical data generated during the experimental program and the design and cost data for the preliminary Phase 2 plant

  7. High-level waste vitrification off-gas cleanup technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This brief overview is intended to be a basis for discussion of needs and problems existing in the off-gas clean-up technology. A variety of types of waste form and processes are being developed in the United States and abroad. A description of many of the processes can be found in the Technical Alternative Documents (TAD). Concurrently, off-gas processing systems are being developed with most of the processes. An extensive review of methodology as well as decontamination factors can be found in the literature. Since it is generally agreed that the most advanced solidification process is vitrification, discussion here centers about the off-gas problems related to vitrification. With a number of waste soldification facilities around the world in operation, it can be shown that present technology can satisfy the present requirement for off-gas control. However, a number of areas within the technology base show potential for improvement. Fundamental as well as verification studies are needed to obtain the improvements

  8. TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION SUMMARY. BABCOCK AND WILCOX CYCLONE FURNACE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY (EPA/540/SR-92/017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Demonstration of the Babcock & Wilcox Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology was conducted in November 1991. This Demonstration occurred at the Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Alliance Research Center (ARC) in Alliance, OH. The B&W cyc...

  9. Technology evaluation report: Babcock and Wilcox Cyclone Furnace Vitrification technology. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project consists of an analysis of the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification process. The SITE Demonstration took place at the B and W Research and Development Division in Alliance, Ohio. The vitrification process was performed on a synthetic soil matrix (SSM) that was spiked with known concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds, metals, and simulated radionuclides. The Demonstration effort was directed at obtaining information on the performance and cost of the process for use at other sites. Documentation will consist of two reports. This Technology Evaluation Report (TER) is contained in two volumes and describes the field activities and laboratory results

  10. DESIGN OF THE DEMOSNTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VAN BEEK JE

    2008-02-14

    In June 2004, the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) was initiated with the intent to design, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford Tank 241-S-109. The DBVS facility uses In-Container Vitrification{trademark} (ICV{trademark}) at the core of the treatment process. The basic process steps combine liquid low-activity waste (LAW) and glassformers; dry the mixture; and then vitrify the mixture in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. Off-gases are processed through a state-of-the-art air pollution control system including sintered-metal filtration, thermal oxidation, acid gas scrubbing, and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and high-efficiency gas adsorber (HEGA) filtration. Testing has focused on development and validation of the waste dryer, ICV, and sintered-metal filters (SMFs) equipment, operations enhancements, and glass formulation. With a parallel testing and design process, testing has allowed improvements to the DBVS equipment configuration and operating methodology, since its original inception. Design improvements include optimization of refractory panels in the ICV, simplifying glassformer addition equipment, increasing the number of waste feed chutes to the ICV, and adding capability for remote clean-out of piping, In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided an independent review of the entire DBVS process. While the review did not find any fatal flaws, some technical issues were identified that required a re-evaluation of the DBVS design and subsequent changes to the design. A 100 percent design package for the pilot plant will be completed and submitted to DOE for review in early 2008 that incorporates process improvements substantiated through testing and reviews. This paper provides a description of the bulk vitrification process and a discussion of major equipment design changes that have occurred based on full

  11. DESIGN OF THE DEMOSNTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June 2004, the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) was initiated with the intent to design, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford Tank 241-S-109. The DBVS facility uses In-Container Vitrification(trademark) (ICV(trademark)) at the core of the treatment process. The basic process steps combine liquid low-activity waste (LAW) and glassformers; dry the mixture; and then vitrify the mixture in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. Off-gases are processed through a state-of-the-art air pollution control system including sintered-metal filtration, thermal oxidation, acid gas scrubbing, and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and high-efficiency gas adsorber (HEGA) filtration. Testing has focused on development and validation of the waste dryer, ICV, and sintered-metal filters (SMFs) equipment, operations enhancements, and glass formulation. With a parallel testing and design process, testing has allowed improvements to the DBVS equipment configuration and operating methodology, since its original inception. Design improvements include optimization of refractory panels in the ICV, simplifying glassformer addition equipment, increasing the number of waste feed chutes to the ICV, and adding capability for remote clean-out of piping, In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided an independent review of the entire DBVS process. While the review did not find any fatal flaws, some technical issues were identified that required a re-evaluation of the DBVS design and subsequent changes to the design. A 100 percent design package for the pilot plant will be completed and submitted to DOE for review in early 2008 that incorporates process improvements substantiated through testing and reviews. This paper provides a description of the bulk vitrification process and a discussion of major equipment design changes that have occurred based on full

  12. PNL vitrification technology development project glass formulation strategy for LLW vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Glass Formulation Strategy describes development approaches to optimize glass compositions for Hanford's low-level waste vitrification between now and the projected low-level waste facility start-up in 2005. The objectives of the glass formulation task are to develop optimized glass compositions with satisfactory long-term durability, acceptable processing characteristics, adequate flexibility to handle waste variations, maximize waste loading to practical limits, and to develop methodology to respond to further waste variations

  13. Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vortec has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation'' program. The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment-as confirmed by both ANS 16.1 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and did not leach to the environment as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC subsystem design

  14. LFCM [liquid-fed ceramic melter] vitrification technology: Quarterly progress report, January--March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is compiled by the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to describe the progress in developing, testing, applying and documenting liquid-fed ceramic melter vitrification technology. Progress in the following technical subject areas during the second quarter of FY 1987 is discussed: melting process chemistry and glass development, feed preparation and transfer systems, melter systems, canister filling and handling systems, and process/product modeling. 23 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs

  15. Technology evaluation report: Babcock and Wilcox Cyclone Furnace Vitrification technology. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) Cyclone Furnace Vitrification Technology is a treatment process for contaminated soils. The process was evaluated to determine its ability to destroy semivolatile organics and to isolate metals and simulated radionuclides into a non-leachable slag material. The feed material for the system was a prepared synthetic soil matrix (SSM) that was spiked with two organic compounds and six metals. This volume contains the appendices

  16. Melter system technology testing for Hanford Site low-level tank waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following revisions to the Tri-Party Agreement for Hanford Site cleanup, which specified vitrification for Complete melter feasibility and system operability immobilization of the low-level waste (LLW) tests, select reference melter(s), and establish reference derived from retrieval and pretreatment of the radioactive LLW glass formulation that meets complete systems defense wastes stored in 177 underground tanks, commercial requirements (June 1996). Available melter technologies were tested during 1994 to 1995 as part of a multiphase program to select reference Submit conceptual design and initiate definitive design technologies for the new LLW vitrification mission

  17. Vitrification of Simulated LILW Using Induction Cold Crucible Melter Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification destroys hazardous organics, and immobilizes heavy metals and radioactive elements to form a chemically durable and highly leach-resistant vitrified form. The vitrification process provides exceptional volume reduction and is attractive for minimizing disposal volume. A pilot plant test using an induction Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) fitted with an off-gas treatment system (OGTS) has been conducted to vitrify a simulated low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) generated from Korean nuclear power plants. The CCM process is based on the use of a water-cooled metallic structure assembled in sectors which is transparent to the electromagnetic field supplied by a high-frequency generator. A solidified glass layer because of the water-cooled structure of the CCM protects the structure against corrosion. By creating the solidified glass auto-crucible on the inner surface of the wall, corrosion damage to the steel in contact with the molten glass is prevented. In order to start-up the CCM, the glass frits were loaded in the CCM. The glass melting was initiated by heating of a short-circuited titanium ring in an electromagnetic field followed by ring burnout and incorporation of the titania in the glass frits. The melter has one drain that exits through the bottom. It is a direct bottom drain from the floor of the melt tank. It is sealed by the solidified glass layer and can be activated by removing the water cooling system. This drain is used if it is desired to drain the melter. The melter employs oxygen bubbling to promote mixing and to increase the melting rate. The bubblers are desired to produce a curtain of bubbles rising from the melter floor. In addition to mixing, the bubbling of oxygen tends to keep the melt well oxidized. The top of the melter is equipped with a number of ports. These provide access for feed, viewing, off-gas discharge, etc. The normal method of feeding is dry feeding through a feed pipe mounted through the top of the

  18. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION. SUMMARY REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem

  19. Radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolutionary development of a radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology is reviewed. The metal gate hardened CMOS status is summarized, including both radiation and reliability data. The development of a radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate process which was successfully implemented to a commercial microprocessor family and applied to a new, radiation-hardened, LSI standard cell family is also discussed. The cell family is reviewed and preliminary characterization data is presented. Finally, a brief comparison of the various radiation-hardened technologies with regard to performance, reliability, and availability is made

  20. Development of Plasma Vitrification Technology for Contaminated Soil at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) of the United States Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development is developing treatment technologies for a wide variety of materials containing mixed low-level waste, i.e., having low levels of radioactivity along with hazardous constituents. Vitrification is a promising treatment technology for many of these wastes, including contaminated soil such as that found at the Savannah River Site. Proof-of-principle tests were performed to demonstrate the feasibility of both ex-situ and in-situ vitrification of contaminated soil by means of a plasma torch. A mixture of 89 percent as-excavated Savannah River Site sandy clay loam with 11 percent lime addition was tested. Vitrification of a mixture of this feed, in a 10 in. diameter crucible with a non-transferred arc plasma torch at a nominal 160 kW, was successful. The process produced homogeneous glass (albeit with local compositional variations), surrounded by a skull of incompletely reacted feed. Characterization of the resultant product durability using the Product Consistency Test showed elemental leaching well below the Environmental Assessment glass (which is often used as a minimum standard of glass acceptability in high-level waste glass assessment) for both the glass and the skull regions. Future tests should include doping the soil with hazardous constituents to enable further verification of the wasteform integrity via the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure. In-situ operation was mimicked in the test crucible by segregating the lime additive from the soil within the crucible. Making full use of the available torch maneuvering capabilities (which would likely exceed those of a torch used in-situ) failed to produce a homogeneous melt. Therefore, intimate mechanical mixture of the additive with the soil appears crucial to the success of SRS soil vitrification, and must be included in design considerations for in-situ operation

  1. Development of the vitrification compositional envelope to support complex-wide application of MAWS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results from a study of the application of the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) approach using vitrification as a treatment technology to a variety of waste streams across the DOE complex. This work has involved both experimental vitrification work using actual mixed wastes and surrogate waste streams from several DOE sites (Hanford, Idaho, and Oak Ridge) as well as the development of a computer-based, integrated glass property-composition database. The long-term objective is that this data base will assist glass formulation studies with single waste streams or combinations of waste streams subject to a variety of user-imposed constraints including waste stream usage priorities, process related constraints (e.g., melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, etc.), and waste form performance related constraints (e.g., TCLP and PCT leaching results). 79 refs., 143 figs., 65 tabs

  2. Development of the vitrification compositional envelope to support complex-wide application of MAWS technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazer, J.J. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Muller, I.S.; Gan, H.; Buechele, A.C.; Lai, S.T.; Pegg, I.L. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.]|[GTS Duratek, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the results from a study of the application of the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) approach using vitrification as a treatment technology to a variety of waste streams across the DOE complex. This work has involved both experimental vitrification work using actual mixed wastes and surrogate waste streams from several DOE sites (Hanford, Idaho, and Oak Ridge) as well as the development of a computer-based, integrated glass property-composition database. The long-term objective is that this data base will assist glass formulation studies with single waste streams or combinations of waste streams subject to a variety of user-imposed constraints including waste stream usage priorities, process related constraints (e.g., melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, etc.), and waste form performance related constraints (e.g., TCLP and PCT leaching results). 79 refs., 143 figs., 65 tabs.

  3. BABCOCK & WILCOX CYCLONE VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTAMINATED SOIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Babcock & Wilcox 6 million Btu/hr pilot cyclone furnace was successfully used in a 2-yr Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Emerging Technology project to melt and vitrify an EPA Synthetic Soil Matrix (SSM) spiked with 7,000 ppm lead, 1,000 ppm cadmium, and 1,5...

  4. INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION. FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology

  5. SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES PROJECT: BABCOCK & WILCOX CYCLONE VITRIFICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Babcock & Wilcox 6 million Btu/hr pilot cyclone furnace was successfully used in a 2-year SITE Emerging Technology project to melt and vitrify an EPA Synthetic Soil Matrix (SSM) spiked with 7,000 ppm lead, 1,000 ppm cadmium, and 1,500 ppm chromium. n advantage of vitrificatio...

  6. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for best available radionuclide control technology demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, A.B.; Skone, S.S.; Rodenhizer, D.G.; Marusich, M.V. (Ebasco Services, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    This report provides the background documentation to support applications for approval to construct and operate new radionuclide emission sources at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) near Richland, Washington. The HWVP is required to obtain permits under federal and state statutes for atmospheric discharges of radionuclides. Since these permits must be issued prior to construction of the facility, draft permit applications are being prepared, as well as documentation to support these permits. This report addresses the applicable requirements and demonstrates that the preferred design meets energy, environmental, and economic criteria for Best Available Radionuclide Control Technology (BARCT) at HWVP. 22 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

  7. Commercial LFCM vitrification technology. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the first in a series of quarterly reports compiled by the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program Office at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to document progress on commercial liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) vitrification technology. Progress in the following technical subject areas during the first quarter of FY 1985 is discussed: pretreatment systems, melting process chemistry, glass development and characterization, feed preparation and transfer systems, melter systems, canister filling and handling systems, off-gas systems, process/product modeling and control, and supporting studies. 33 figs., 12 tabs

  8. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for best available radionuclide control technology demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the background documentation to support applications for approval to construct and operate new radionuclide emission sources at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) near Richland, Washington. The HWVP is required to obtain permits under federal and state statutes for atmospheric discharges of radionuclides. Since these permits must be issued prior to construction of the facility, draft permit applications are being prepared, as well as documentation to support these permits. This report addresses the applicable requirements and demonstrates that the preferred design meets energy, environmental, and economic criteria for Best Available Radionuclide Control Technology (BARCT) at HWVP. 22 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs

  9. Proceedings of the theme meeting on status of vitrification technology for treatment of high level liquid waste: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the theme meeting was to summarize all recent developments on high level waste management with respect to technology, matrix and process development on a single platform. Following topics were covered in the theme meeting: Development and deployment of various vitrification technologies, Processing of HLW using various vitrification techniques, Recovery of valuables, Development of actinide partitioning and ceramic matrices, Challenges in treatment of HLW arising from reprocessing AHWR and FBR spent fuels, Remote control aspects in HLW management and its transportation, HAW management aspects at Integrated Recycle projects. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately. (author)

  10. Establishment of vitrification technology in Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. The result of the active test of Rokkasho vitrification facility, the current status of new glass melter development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprocessing plant is one of the important issues from the viewpoints of the establishment of Japan's nuclear fuel cycle technology and the use of long-term stable nuclear energy. The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant started a test for the vitrification of high-level radioactive liquid waste in 2007. Vitrification process, which is a domestic technology in Japan, was completed in 2013 after overcoming a number of encountered problems. The glass melter of the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant adopted a ceramic melter system (LFCM system: Liquid Fed Ceramic Melter) that uses Joule heating through direct electrification. In order to achieve a more stable processing operation, the development of a new type of glass melter has been started. In this development, a full-scale test glass melter was fabricated, and a mock-up test using a simulated waste liquid is being held. The present stage is the second half of the test phase II, and operational performance under design conditions and the maximum processing capacity are being tested. For the design of a new glass melter, the results of this test will be reflected. In the field of software, a specific program for heat balance evaluation, and a manual preparation for operation purpose are under development. (A.O.)

  11. Vitrification melter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study performed to identify the most promising vitrification melter technologies that the Department of Energy (EM-50) might pursue with available funding. The primary focus was on plasma arc systems and graphite arc melters. The study was also intended to assist EM-50 in evaluating competing technologies, formulating effective technology strategy, developing focused technology development projects, and directing the work of contractors involved in vitrification melter development

  12. Evaluation of melter technologies for vitrification of Hanford site low-level tank waste - phase 1 testing summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.N., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-27

    Following negotiation of the fourth amendment to the Tri- Party Agreement for Hanford Site cleanup, commercially available melter technologies were tested during 1994 and 1995 for vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream to be derived from retrieval and pretreatment of the radioactive defense wastes stored in 177 underground tanks. Seven vendors were selected for Phase 1 testing to demonstrate vitrification of a high-sodium content liquid LLW simulant. The tested melter technologies included four Joule-heated melters, a carbon electrode melter, a combustion melter, and a plasma melter. Various dry and slurry melter feed preparation processes also were tested. The technologies and Phase 1 testing results were evaluated and a preliminary technology down-selection completed. This report describes the Phase 1 LLW melter vendor testing and the tested technologies, and summarizes the testing results and the preliminary technology recommendations.

  13. Novel incineration technology integrated with drying, pyrolysis, gasification, and combustion of MSW and ashes vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangsheng; Liu, Yushan

    2005-05-15

    The conventional mass burn systems for municipal solid waste (MSW) emit large amount of acidic gases and dioxins as well as heavy metals due to the large excess air ratio. Additionally, the final process residues, bottom ash with potential leachability of heavy metals and fly ash with high level of heavy metals and dioxins, also constitute a major environmental problem. To deal with these issues more effectively, a novel MSW incineration technology was developed in this study. MSW drying, pyrolysis, gasification, incineration, and ash vitrification were achieved as a spectrum of combustion by the same equipment (primary chamber) in one step. In practice, the primary chamber of this technology actually acted as both gasifier for organic matter and vitrifying reactor for ashes, and the combustion process was mainly completed in the secondary chamber. Experiments were carried outto examine its characteristics in an industrial MSW incineration plant, located in Taiyuan, with a capability of 100 tons per day (TPD). Results showed that (1) the pyrolysis, gasification, and vitrification processes in the primary chamber presented good behaviors resulting in effluent gases with high contents of combustibles (e.g., CO and CH4) and bottom ash with a low loss-on-ignition (L.o.l), low leachability of heavy metals, and low toxicity of cyanide and fluoride. The vitrified bottom ash was benign to its environment and required no further processing for its potential applications. (2) Low stack emissions of dioxins (0.076 ng of TEQ m(-3)), heavy metals (ranging from 0.013 to 0.033 mg m(-3)), and other air pollutants were achieved. This new technology could effectively dispose Chinese MSW with a low calorific value and high water content; additionally, it also had a low capital and operating costs compared with the imported systems. PMID:15952396

  14. Sustainable development of nuclear fuel cycle technology. Development of HLLW vitrification technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes primarily the development of the liquid fed joule-heated ceramic melter (LFCM) process for the vitrification of high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLLW) since 1997 in Japan. In 2013 the active test at the vitrification facility (K-facility) in Rokkasho commercial reprocessing plant was successfully completed for the final acceptance test. During this period many development activities have been carried out in engineering scale or the full-scale inactive cold tests including the radioactive laboratory and demonstration scale hot tests. In particular, the design of melter bottom structure and the operating method should be optimized in order to avoid the operational problems caused by accumulation of noble metals (Ru, Rh, Pd), viscous and electro-conductive deposits on the melter bottom. (author)

  15. Task 19 - Sampling, Analysis, and Vitrification Study for Thermochem's Steam Reformer Treatment Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillemoen, C.M.; McCollor, D.P.; Qi Sun

    1998-11-01

    The overall objective of the project is to provide support to Thermochem, Inc., in the demonstration of the steam reformer treatment technology to treat LLMW. Within this program, specific objectives include the following: (1) Analyze cerium, chlorine, and fluorine concentrations in samples from the pilot-scale steam reformer tests to determine partitioning of these elements, mass balances, and changes in concentration with time. (2) Perform experimental characterization of temperature--viscosity profiles to aid in determining vitrification viability for long-term stabilization. Additionally, calculations of viscosity will be performed for several blend combinations to complement the experimentally determined values. (3) Conduct leachability tests on the vitrified slags to aid in determining if product leachability falls within EPA guidelines and to assess the suitability of the vitrified material for long-term disposal.

  16. Large-scale commercial applications of the in situ vitrification remediation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first large-scale commercial application of the innovative In Situ Vitrification (ISV) remediation technology was completed at the Parsons Chemical/ETM Enterprises Superfund site in Michigan State midyear 1994. This project involved treating 4,800 tons of pesticide and mercury-contaminated soil. The project also involved performance of the USEPA SITE Program demonstration test for the ISV technology. The Parsons project involved consolidation and staging of contaminated soil from widespread locations on and nearby the site. This paper presents a brief description of the ISV technology along with case-study type information on these two sites and the performance of the ISV technology on them. The paper also reviews other remediation projects where ISV has been identified as the/a preferred remedy, and where ISV is currently planned for use. These sites include soils contaminated with pesticides, dioxin, PCP, paint wastes, and a variety of heavy metals. This review of additional sites also includes a description of a planned radioactive mixed waste remediation project in Australia that contains large amounts of plutonium, uranium, lead, beryllium, and metallic and other debris buried in limestone and dolomitic soil burial pits. Initial test work has been completed on this application, and preparations are now underway for pilot testing in Australia. This project will demonstrate the applicability of the ISV technology to the challenging application of buried mixed wastes

  17. Technology status of spray calcination--vitrification of high-level liquid waste for full-scale application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spray calcination and vitrification technology for stabilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been developed to the point that initiation of technology transfer to an industrial-sized facility could begin. This report discusses current process and equipment development status together with additional R and D studies and engineering evaluations needed. Preliminary full-scale process and equipment descriptions are presented. Technology application in a full-scale plant would blend three distinct maintenance design philosophies, depending on service life anticipated: (1) totally remote maintenance with limited viewing and handling equipment, (2) totally remote maintenance with extensive viewing and handling equipment, and (3) contact maintenance

  18. Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, D.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

  19. Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: technology development - annotated bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a collection of annotated bibliographies for documents prepared under the Hanford High-Level Waste Vitrification (Plant) Program. The bibliographies are for documents from Fiscal Year 1983 through Fiscal Year 1995, and include work conducted at or under the direction of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The bibliographies included focus on the technology developed over the specified time period for vitrifying Hanford pretreated high-level waste. The following subject areas are included: General Documentation; Program Documentation; High-Level Waste Characterization; Glass Formulation and Characterization; Feed Preparation; Radioactive Feed Preparation and Glass Properties Testing; Full-Scale Feed Preparation Testing; Equipment Materials Testing; Melter Performance Assessment and Evaluations; Liquid-Fed Ceramic Melter; Cold Crucible Melter; Stirred Melter; High-Temperature Melter; Melter Off-Gas Treatment; Vitrification Waste Treatment; Process, Product Control and Modeling; Analytical; and Canister Closure, Decontamination, and Handling

  20. A Method for Determining Bulk Density, Material Density, and Porosity of Melter Feed During Nuclear Waste Vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilliard, Zachary J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2016-01-31

    Abstract Glass making efficiency largely depends on heat transfer to reacting glass batch (melter feed), which in turn is influenced by the bulk density (ρb) and porosity (Φ) as functions of temperature (T). Neither b(T) nor Φ(T) functions are readily accessible to direct measurement, but they can be determined based on monitoring the profile area of heated glass batch pellets and material density of batches quenched at various stages of conversion via pycnometry. For the determination of Φb, the bulk volume must be calculated as a function of temperature. This is done via a program constructed in MATLAB which takes an image of a pellet profile at a given temperature and calculates the volume of said pellet. The quenched density measured by pycnometry must be converted to the density at heat treatment temperature. This is done by taking into account the volume change due to thermal expansion/contraction.

  1. An evaluation of vitrification technology: Application to mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is evaluating the feasibility of using vitrification to treat mixed wastes. This program is in the process of identifying glass compositions that can be produced from mixed wastes and additives, with an emphasis on maximizing the waste loading in the glass, and the overall waste volume reduction. Preliminary crucible glass studies with surrogate mixed waste streams have produced a glass composition that could be produced in commercially available melters. This same glass composition, spiked with Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, pass the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Thus, the final waste form is a low-level radioactive waste. Additional crucible melts with actual mixed waste streams are in progress and will define a compositional envelope of acceptable glasses that will eventually be produced during full-scale melter operations. Evaluations of the likely off-gases from vitrification indicate that the primary off-gases produced during vitrification will include compounds of SOx, NOx and CO2. These compounds are routinely treated in the off-gas portion of vitrification systems. The composition of the melter feed can be adjusted to control some of the off-gases produced, if necessary. The economics suggest that annual cost savings resulting from volume reduction and conversion of mixed waste to low-level waste may be substantial

  2. The role of Tetronics plasma vitrification technology in the management and conditioning of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma Arc Technology is finding wider application in the treatment of hazardous waste materials an area which has a lot of synergy with radioactive waste management. It is being stimulated by the increasing demands of regulatory and economic drivers; currently, within the Integrated Waste Management (IWM) sector, there is a climate of rising costs, limited numbers of technological solutions, restricted access to traditional disposal based solutions and a significant levels of market consolidation. Traditionally, the IWM sector has operated with basic mixing technology solutions: e.g. physiochemical consolidation, physiochemical separation, neutralisation and basic material bulking, with ultimate reliance on landfill, cement based encapsulation and high temperature incineration (HTI). The impact of national statutes, the value of national liabilities and infra-structural deficiencies is demanding constant technological advancement for continued regulatory compliance. This paper presents information on Tetronics' plasma based solution, for the treatment of Asbestos Containing Materials (ACM) and Plutonium Containing Material (PCM). (authors)

  3. Subsurface Planar Vitrification Treatment of Problematic TRU Wastes: Status of a Technology Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a status of the In Situ Transuranic Waste Delineation and Removal Project in which the GeoMeltR Subsurface Planar VitrificationTM (SPVTM) process is being evaluated for the in situ treatment of burial sites containing remote handled mixed transuranic (TRU) waste. The GeoMeltR SPVTM process was invented and patented by Geosafe Corporation. AMEC holds the exclusive worldwide license to use this technology. The current project is part of a three-phase demonstration program to evaluate the effectiveness of the GeoMeltR SPVTM process to treat waste contained in vertical pipe units (VPUs) and caissons that were used for the disposal of remote handled transuranic wastes located at Hanford's 618-10 and 618-11 burial grounds. This project is being performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for use at the Hanford site and other DOE installations. The Phase I evaluation determined that removal and treatment of the 618-10/11 VPUs are beyond what can be safely accomplished using conventional excavation methods. Accordingly, a careful stepwise non-intrusive delineation approach and treatment using the GeoMeltR SPVTM technology, followed by removal, characterization, and disposal of the resulting inert vitrified mass was identified as the preferred alternative. Phase II of the project, which started in July 2004, included a full-scale non-radioactive demonstration of AMEC's GeoMeltR SPVTM process on a mock VPU configured to match the actual VPUs. The non-radioactive demonstration (completed in May 2005) was performed to confirm the approach and design before proceeding to a radioactive ('hot') demonstration on an actual VPU. This demonstration took approximately 130 hours, processed the entire mock VPU, and resulted in a vitrified monolith weighing an estimated 90 tonnes. [1] Plans for a radioactive demonstration on an actual VPU are being developed for CY 2006. In addition to demonstrating GeoMeltR SPVTM, delineation techniques are being evaluated as

  4. Joule heated ceramic melter for vitrification of high level liquid waste mastering the technology. Contributed Paper IT-04

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of operations in Nuclear Fuel Cycle, various types of liquid wastes are generated. Power and Research Reactors generate large quantities of low level liquid waste. India has opted for closed loop fuel cycle i.e. reprocessing of spent fuel to power energy security. Reprocessing of spent fuel/generates small volumes of High Level Liquid Wastes (HLLWs) and slightly more Intermediate Level Liquid Wastes (ILLWs). This High Level Liquid Waste (HLLW) contains more than 99% of long lived radioactivity encountered in the entire fuel cycle. Vitrification has been the accepted technology for management of HLLW throughout the world. This vitrification is a very complex process involving extensive multi disciplinary efforts, that is, the chemistry of glass which will survive millions of years and the chemical engineering to meet the stringent quality requirements. Also the power electronics of induction and joule heating and robotics/remotisation. Presently, India has mastered both these technologies. Hundreds of Vitrified Waste products Canisters (VWP) containing millions of Curies have been produced by these processes

  5. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for toxics best available control technology demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides information on toxic air pollutant emissions to support the Notice of Construction for the proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) to be built at the the Department of Energy Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Because approval must be received prior to initiating construction of the facility, state and federal Clean Air Act Notices of construction are being prepared along with necessary support documentation

  6. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical background document for toxics best available control technology demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-10-01

    This document provides information on toxic air pollutant emissions to support the Notice of Construction for the proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) to be built at the the Department of Energy Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Because approval must be received prior to initiating construction of the facility, state and federal Clean Air Act Notices of construction are being prepared along with necessary support documentation.

  7. Safeguardability of the vitrification option for disposal of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillay, K.K.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Safeguardability of the vitrification option for plutonium disposition is rather complex and there is no experience base in either domestic or international safeguards for this approach. In the present treaty regime between the US and the states of the former Soviet Union, bilaterial verifications are considered more likely with potential for a third-party verification of safeguards. There are serious technological limitations to applying conventional bulk handling facility safeguards techniques to achieve independent verification of plutonium in borosilicate glass. If vitrification is the final disposition option chosen, maintaining continuity of knowledge of plutonium in glass matrices, especially those containing boron and those spike with high-level wastes or {sup 137}Cs, is beyond the capability of present-day safeguards technologies and nondestructive assay techniques. The alternative to quantitative measurement of fissile content is to maintain continuity of knowledge through a combination of containment and surveillance, which is not the international norm for bulk handling facilities.

  8. Vitrification of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification offers many attractive waste stabilization options. Versatility of waste compositions, as well as the inherent durability of a glass waste form, have made vitrification the treatment of choice for high-level radioactive wastes. Adapting the technology to other hazardous and radioactive waste streams will provide an environmentally acceptable solution to many of the waste challenges that face the public today. This document reviews various types and technologies involved in vitrification

  9. Nanoscale Bulk MOSFET Design and Process Technology for Reduced Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xin

    2010-01-01

    Historically, the steady miniaturization of the conventional (planar bulk) MOSFET by simply scaling the device dimensions with minimal changes to the conventional transistor design and CMOS process flow has been effective to provide for continual improvements in integrated circuit performance and cost per function with every technology node. However, transistor scaling has become increasingly difficult in the sub-100 nm regime. Increased leakage current and variability in transistor perform...

  10. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS trademark) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB's as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology

  11. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Georgia Tech Final Report Demonstration In Situ Plasma Vitrification Technology for Savannah River Site Contaminated Soils (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous experience with in-situ (Joule-heated) vitrification (ISV) of Savannah River site (SRS) highly weathered soil, has shown that the SRS soil is very refractory and a poor electrical conductor. These findings bring into question the likelihood of utilizing the Joule-heat type of vitrification treatment for waste sites and basins at SRS. An alternative approach may be in-situ plasma vitrification (ISPV). The ISPV approach provides a similar vitrified product and also has a safety advantage in that the melting is initiated at the bottom of a borehole compared to top-down melting for Joule heated ISV

  13. Secondary Waste Considerations for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center FY-2001 Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes from the melter off-gas clean up systems. Projected secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates

  14. Vitrification apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vitrification apparatus was installed on November 1981 in No.2 cell of Waste Safty Testing Facility(WASTEF) in order to prepare samples for safety performance tests of HLW vitrified forms under the simulated conditions of long-term storage and disposal. The apparatus is capable to make a vitrified product of 5 litters in maximum volume and of 50,000 Ci in maximum radioactivity including actual HLW. On November 1982 the hot operation of the apparatus has been started after cold test oparations of 53 runs. The report describes outlines of the design and results of the performance tests. (author)

  15. Test plan for evaluation of plasma melter technology for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384212] is the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC) in Pittsburgh, PA. WSTC authors of the test plan are D. F. McLaughlin, E. J. Lahoda, W. R. Gass, and N. D'Amico. The WSTC Program Manager for this test is D. F. McLaughlin. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes melting of glass frit with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a plasma arc fired furnace

  16. Fabrication of silicon bolometers with bulk micromachining technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monolithic silicon bolometers with implanted thermistors, micromachined thermal masses and suspension beams have been developed. These devices are intended for accurate β-decay spectrum measurements in the Milano neutrino mass experiment. By means of a dedicated micromachining fabrication process very small thermal masses (700x430x15 μm3) and links (2150x22x15 μm3) have been directly integrated in the device, thus obtaining reproducible bolometers which are suitable for use in detector arrays. The fabrication process involves a combination of standard IC technologies and bulk micromachining techniques, based on wet etching steps in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) water solutions. Protection of aluminum metal lines and surface roughness control are two important features of the developed technique. The proposed micromachining approach eventually aims at fabricating hundreds of highly reproducible bolometers, to be used simultaneously in order to improve the sensitivity of the neutrino mass experiment

  17. Fabrication of silicon bolometers with bulk micromachining technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faes, A. E-mail: alesfaes@itc.it; Giacomozzi, F.; Margesin, B.; Nucciotti, A

    2004-03-11

    Monolithic silicon bolometers with implanted thermistors, micromachined thermal masses and suspension beams have been developed. These devices are intended for accurate {beta}-decay spectrum measurements in the Milano neutrino mass experiment. By means of a dedicated micromachining fabrication process very small thermal masses (700x430x15 {mu}m{sup 3}) and links (2150x22x15 {mu}m{sup 3}) have been directly integrated in the device, thus obtaining reproducible bolometers which are suitable for use in detector arrays. The fabrication process involves a combination of standard IC technologies and bulk micromachining techniques, based on wet etching steps in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) water solutions. Protection of aluminum metal lines and surface roughness control are two important features of the developed technique. The proposed micromachining approach eventually aims at fabricating hundreds of highly reproducible bolometers, to be used simultaneously in order to improve the sensitivity of the neutrino mass experiment.

  18. Commercialization project of Ulchin vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ulchin Vitrification Facility (UVF), to be used for the vitirification of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) generated by nuclear power plants (NPPs), is the world's first commercial facility using Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology. The construction of the facility was begun in 2005 and was completed in 2007. From December 2007 to September 2009, all key performance tests, such as the system functional test, the cold test, the hot test, and the real waste test, were successfully carried out. The UVF commenced commercial operation in October 2009 for the vitrification of radioactive waste. (author)

  19. Vitrification development for mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification is a promising approach to waste-form immobilization. It destroys hazardous organic compounds and produces a durable and highly stable glass. Vitrification tests were performed on three surrogate wastes during fiscal year 1994; 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin waste from Hanford, bottom ash from the Oak Ridge TSCA incinerator, and saltcrete from Rocky Flats. Preliminary glass development involved melting trials followed by visual homogeneity examination, short-duration leach tests on glass specimens, and long-term leach tests on selected glasses. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements were taken for the most durable glass formulations. Results for the saltcrete are presented in this paper and demonstrate the applicability of vitrification technology to this mixed waste

  20. Environmental Management vitrification activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumrine, P.H. [Waste Policy Institute, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Both the Mixed Waste and Landfill Stabilization Focus Areas as part of the Office of Technology Development efforts within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Division have been developing various vitrification technologies as a treatment approach for the large quantities of transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed and Mixed Low Level Wastes that are stored in either landfills or above ground storage facilities. The technologies being developed include joule heated, plasma torch, plasma arc, induction, microwave, combustion, molten metal, and in situ methods. There are related efforts going into development glass, ceramic, and slag waste form windows of opportunity for the diverse quantities of heterogeneous wastes needing treatment. These studies look at both processing parameters, and long term performance parameters as a function of composition to assure that developed technologies have the right chemistry for success.

  1. Application of advanced large-scale ceramic melter technology for HLLW vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the current status and application of KIT-INE's advanced large-scale liquid-fed Joule-heated ceramic melter technology. The design of the major sub-components of the melter is briefly described and the progress addressed. The application of the technique in an industrial-scale facility is illustrated. The construction of this facility is scheduled to start in the year 2012. Also given are technical test results of a waste glass developed for use in this facility which will vitrify high sodium/high sulfur bearing HLLW. The plant has a design throughput of 65 l/h feed corresponding to a glass production rate of about 41 kg/h. (author)

  2. Melter technology evaluation for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current plan at the Hanford Site, in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement among Washington State, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Department of Energy, is to convert the low-level tank waste fraction into a silicate glass. The low-level waste will be composed primarily of sodium nitrate and nitrite salts concentrated in a highly alkaline aqueous solution. The capability to process up to 200 metric tons/day off glass will be established to produce an estimated 210,000 m3 for onsite disposal. A program to test and evaluate high-capacity melter technologies is in progress. Testing performed by seven different industrial sources using Joule heating, combustion, plasma, and carbon arc melters is described

  3. Eco Issues in Bulk Materials Handling Technologies in Ports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Zrnić

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with eco issues in bulk materials handling in ports. Solid, free-flowing materials are said to be in bulk. Bulk materials handling is very difficult, because it incorporates all the features of liquids, gasses and mass solids. Energy efficiency, dust emissions in nearby environment, dust explosions, jamming, noise, handling of hazardous materials and protection of materials from contamination are issues that will be considered in this paper. Here are also presented possible solutions for some of these issues

  4. Engineering report of plasma vitrification of Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides an analysis of vendor-derived testing and technology applicability to full scale glass production from Hanford tank wastes using plasma vitrification. The subject vendor testing and concept was applied in support of the Hanford LLW Vitrification Program, Tank Waste Remediation System

  5. Radioactive wastes vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glass is capable to solidify the liquid wastes and to confine the radionuclides present in fission product solutions, not by coating, but thanks to the existence of chemical bonds with the glass oxides. Glass materials have a large chemical flexibility in comparison with crystal structures. In parallel to the studies of nuclear glass formulation, a continuous vitrification process has been developed in France which allows to generate glass in a highly radioactive environment. The first demonstration of the feasibility of this process was done at Marcoule in 1969 with the vitrification pilot system PIVER. The industrial vitrification facility of Marcoule started in 1978 for the confinement of spent fuel reprocessing wastes. This process was implemented at the R7 and T7 facilities of La Hague in 1989 and 1992, respectively. The process used today at La Hague comprises two steps: a calcination of fission products liquid solutions at 400 deg. C and a melting at 1100 deg. C in a crucible heated by magnetic induction. The molten mixture of glass and fission products is cast and solidified in 400 kg containers. Other vitrification processes have been developed like the cold crucible vitrification process and the vitrification in electrode heated ceramic melter. This article presents: 1 - the formulation of nuclear glasses: constraints, choice of vitreous systems, chemical reactivity between the waste and the vitrification catalyst, some basic properties of nuclear glasses, confining properties, perspectives of evolution of glass compositions; 2 - vitrification processes: vitrification with induction-heated metal crucible, with cold crucible, with electrode-heated ceramic melters; 3 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  6. A study on safety assessment methodology for a vitrification plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Y. C.; Lee, G. S.; Choi, Y. C.; Kim, G. H. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    In this study, the technical and regulatory status of radioactive waste vitrification technologies in foreign and domestic plants is investigated and analyzed, and then significant factors are suggested which must be contained in the final technical guideline or standard for the safety assessment of vitrification plants. Also, the methods to estimate the stability of vitrified waste forms are suggested with property analysis of them. The contents and scope of the study are summarized as follows : survey of the status on radioactive waste vitrification technologies in foreign and domestic plants, survey of the characterization methodology for radioactive waste form, analysis of stability for vitrified waste forms, survey and analysis of technical standards and regulations concerned with them in foreign and domestic plants, suggestion of significant factors for the safety assessment of vitrification plants, submission of regulated technical standard on radioactive waste vitrification plats.

  7. Nanolaminate - bulk multilayered Nb-Cu composite: technology, structure, properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cu-Nb multilayered composite as a ribbon 50 mm in width and 0,35 mm in thickness was produced by the following procedures constituting a technological cycle: integration of a packet of specific number of layers (16 layers 0,35 mm in thickness both for Cu and Nb), rolling of the packet in vacuum at a temperature of 750-800 oC, cold rolling in air down to the thickness equal to that of one initial layer constituting the composite. The structure of the composites was examined by optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction at all the stages. The hardness was measured in the course of cold rolling for each of 3 technological cycles. Upon completion of 3 cycles a nanolaminate was produced consisting of 32768 layers of 11 nm in thickness, the ribbon thickness being 0,35 mm. A change in the hardness as a function of true deformation has an ordinary parabolic behavior in the first and second cycles. A significant growth of hardness and the change over from the parabolic to the linear behavior of the dependence is observable at a thickness of the layers less than 200 nm in the 3rd cycle. The hardness amounting to 350 HB was observed at layers thickness of 11 nm. Noticeable changes of the hardness and half width of x-ray peaks of Nb and Cu occur after annealing at temperatures above 400 oC. After annealing at 1000 oC copper grains of about 200 - 600 nm in size form which comprise niobium inclusions of about 1-10 nm in size. The hardness drops down to 135 HB. (author)

  8. Vitrification of NORM wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of wastes is a relatively new application of none of man's oldest manufacturing processes. During the past 25 years it has been developed and accepted internationally for immobilizing the most highly radioactive wastes from spent nuclear fuel. By the year 2005, there will be nine operating high-level radioactive vitrification plants. Many of the technical ''lessons learned'' from this international program can be applied to much less hazardous materials such as naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). With the deployment of low capital and operating cost systems, vitrification should become a broadly applied process for treating a large variety of wastes. In many situations, the wastes can be transformed into marketable products. This paper will present a general description of waste vitrification, summarize some of its key advantages, provide some test data for a small sample of one NORM, and suggest how this process may be applied to NORM

  9. Modeling in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process is being assessed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine its applicability to transuranic and mixed wastes buried at INEL'S Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. This paper outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclides and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  10. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of hign-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing

  11. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, B.A.

    1995-03-15

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

  12. World first in high level waste vitrification - A review of French vitrification industrial achievements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brueziere, J.; Chauvin, E. [AREVA, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense (France); Piroux, J.C. [Joint Vitrification Laboratory - LCV, Marcoule, BP171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2013-07-01

    AREVA has more than 30 years experience in operating industrial HLW (High Level radioactive Waste) vitrification facilities (AVM - Marcoule Vitrification Facility, R7 and T7 facilities). This vitrification technology was based on borosilicate glasses and induction-heating. AVM was the world's first industrial HLW vitrification facility to operate in-line with a reprocessing plant. The glass formulation was adapted to commercial Light Water Reactor fission products solutions, including alkaline liquid waste concentrates as well as platinoid-rich clarification fines. The R7 and T7 facilities were designed on the basis of the industrial experience acquired in the AVM facility. The AVM vitrification process was implemented at a larger scale in order to operate the R7 and T7 facilities in-line with the UP2 and UP3 reprocessing plants. After more than 30 years of operation, outstanding record of operation has been established by the R7 and T7 facilities. The industrial startup of the CCIM (Cold Crucible Induction Melter) technology with enhanced glass formulation was possible thanks to the close cooperation between CEA and AREVA. CCIM is a water-cooled induction melter in which the glass frit and the waste are melted by direct high frequency induction. This technology allows the handling of highly corrosive solutions and high operating temperatures which permits new glass compositions and a higher glass production capacity. The CCIM technology has been implemented successfully at La Hague plant.

  13. Treatment of NPP wastes using vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-based materials to immobilize various liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated at nuclear power plants (NPP) were designed. Glassy waste forms can be produced using electric melting including a cold crucible melting. Leach rate of cesium was found to be 10-5-10-6 g/(cm2 day) (IAEA technique). Volume reduction factor after vitrification reached 4-5. Various technologies for NPP waste vitrification were developed. Direct vitrification means feeding of source waste into the melter with formation of glassy waste form to be disposed. Joule heated ceramic melter, and cold crucible were tested. Process variables at treatment of Kursk, Chernobyl (RBMK), Kalinin, Novovoronezh (VVER) NPP wastes were determined. The most promising melter was found to be the cold crucible. Pilot plant based on the cold crucibles has been designed and constructed. Solid burnable NPP wastes are incinerated and slags are incorporated in glass. (author)

  14. Prospects for vitrification of mixed wastes at ANL-E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes a study evaluating the prospects for vitrification of some of the mixed wastes at ANL-E. This project can be justified on the following basis: Some of ANL-E's mixed waste streams will be stabilized such that they can be treated as a low-level radioactive waste. The expected volume reduction that results during vitrification will significantly reduce the overall waste volume requiring disposal. Mixed-waste disposal options currently used by ANL-E may not be permissible in the near future without treatment technologies such as vitrification

  15. Prospects for vitrification of mixed wastes at ANL-E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazer, J.; No, Hyo

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes a study evaluating the prospects for vitrification of some of the mixed wastes at ANL-E. This project can be justified on the following basis: Some of ANL-E`s mixed waste streams will be stabilized such that they can be treated as a low-level radioactive waste. The expected volume reduction that results during vitrification will significantly reduce the overall waste volume requiring disposal. Mixed-waste disposal options currently used by ANL-E may not be permissible in the near future without treatment technologies such as vitrification.

  16. Treatment of Spent Argentine Ion Exchange Resin Using Vitrification - Results of FY01 Testing at the Savannah River Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Science and Technology Implementing Arrangement for Cooperation on Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management (JCCRM), the Department of Energy (DOE) is helping to transfer waste treatment technology to international atomic energy commissions. In 1996, as part of the JCCRM, DOE established a collaborative research agreement with Argentina's Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA). A primary mission of the CNEA is to direct waste management activities for Argentina's nuclear industry

  17. Testing and Disposal Strategy for Secondary Wastes from Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory simulated sludge vitrification demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies are being developed to convert hazardous and mixed wastes to a form suitable for permanent disposal. Vitrification, which has been declared the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for high-level radioactive waste disposal by the EPA, is capable of producing a highly durable wasteform that minimizes disposal volumes through organic destruction, moisture evaporation, and porosity reduction. However, this technology must be demonstrated over a range of waste characteristics, including compositions, chemistries, moistures, and physical characteristics to ensure that it is suitable for hazardous and mixed waste treatment. This project plans to demonstrate vitrification of simulated wastes that are considered representatives of wastes found throughout the DOE complex. For the most part, the primary constituent of the wastes is flocculation aids, such as Fe(OH)3, and natural filter aids, such as diatomaceous earth and perlite. The filter aids consist mostly of silica, which serves as an excellent glass former; hence, the reason why vitrification is such a viable option. LANL is currently operating a liquid waste processing plant which produces an inorganic sludge similar to other waste water treatment streams. Since this waste has characteristics that make it suitable for vitrification and the likelihood of success is high, it shall be tested at CU. The objective of this task is to characterize the process behavior and glass product formed upon vitrification of simulated LANL sludge. The off-gases generated from the production runs will also be characterized to help further develop vitrification processes for mixed and low level wastes

  19. Review of FY2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification

  20. Review of FY 2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Dean Dalton; Barnes, Charles Marshall

    2002-09-01

    Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification.

  1. Review of FY2001 Development Work for Vitrification of Sodium Bearing Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.M.; Taylor, D.D.

    2002-09-09

    Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated by the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. This report discusses significant findings from vitrification technology development during 2001 and their impacts on the design basis for SBW vitrification.

  2. Feasibility study and related issues for technology development of 350 MHz bulk niobium SCRF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present the feasibility study for the development of bulk niobium re-entrant type 350 MHz Super-conducting RF cavities (SCRF). The work is part of technology development programme in the field of SCRF under XI plan project proposals for Proton LINAC. 350 MHz Cavity has been designed using SUPERFISH to work in low β region. Structural analysis was done by ANSYS to optimise the thickness, stiffeners and to select the material for outer vessel. Various stages of manufacturing and special processing have been studied and the design for manufacturing of bulk niobium double wall cavity has been done. Broad specifications of the special infrastructure have been framed. (author)

  3. Worst-Case" Simulant for INTEC Soduim-Bearing Waste Vitrification Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Jerry Dale; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2001-09-01

    species of concern that will be present in current and future wastes from different tanks. Because most of the species of concern are at small concentrations relative to the bulk components that are fairly constant, maximizing them individually into a single waste composition does not substantially affect the general vitrification chemistry. The evaluation and results are reported here. This simulant is suitable for performing laboratory and pilot-scale tests in order to develop the vitrification technology.

  4. Waste Vitrification Projects Throughout the US Initiated by SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies are being developed by the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert high-level, low-level, and mixed wastes to a solid stabilized waste form for permanent disposal. Vitrification is one of the most important and environmentally safest technologies being developed. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared vitrification the best demonstrated available technology for high-level radioactive waste and produced a Handbook of Vitrification Technologies for Treatment of Hazardous and Radioactive Waste. The Defense Waste Processing Facility being tested at will soon start vitrifying the high-level waste at. The DOE Office of Technology Development has taken the position that mixed waste needs to be stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible to ensure that the resulting waste forms will meet both current and future regulatory specifications. Vitrification produces durable waste forms at volume reductions up to 97%. Large reductions in volume minimize long-term storage costs making vitrification cost effective on a life cycle basis

  5. Waste Vitrification Projects Throughout the US Initiated by SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Whitehouse, J.C.; Smith, M.E.; Pickett, J.B.; Peeler, D.K.

    1998-05-01

    Technologies are being developed by the U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert high-level, low-level, and mixed wastes to a solid stabilized waste form for permanent disposal. Vitrification is one of the most important and environmentally safest technologies being developed. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared vitrification the best demonstrated available technology for high-level radioactive waste and produced a Handbook of Vitrification Technologies for Treatment of Hazardous and Radioactive Waste. The Defense Waste Processing Facility being tested at will soon start vitrifying the high-level waste at. The DOE Office of Technology Development has taken the position that mixed waste needs to be stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible to ensure that the resulting waste forms will meet both current and future regulatory specifications. Vitrification produces durable waste forms at volume reductions up to 97%. Large reductions in volume minimize long-term storage costs making vitrification cost effective on a life cycle basis.

  6. Waste vitrification projects throughout the US initiated by SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert high-level, low-level, and mixed wastes to a solid stabilized waste form for permanent disposal. Vitrification is one of the most important and environmentally safest technologies being developed. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared vitrification the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for high-level radioactive waste and produced a Handbook of Vitrification Technologies for Treatment of Hazardous and Radioactive Waste. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) being tested at Savannah River Site (SRS) will soon begin vitrifying the high-level waste at SRS. The DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) has taken the position that mixed waste needs to be stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible to ensure that the resulting waste forms will meet both the current and future regulatory specifications. Vitrification produces durable waste forms at volume reductions up to 97%. Large reductions in volume minimize long-term storage costs making vitrification cost effective on a life cycle basis

  7. Waste vitrification projects throughout the US initiated by SRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Whitehouse, J.C.; Smith, M.E.; Ramsey, W.G.; Pickett, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert high-level, low-level, and mixed wastes to a solid stabilized waste form for permanent disposal. Vitrification is one of the most important and environmentally safest technologies being developed. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared vitrification the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for high-level radioactive waste and produced a Handbook of Vitrification Technologies for Treatment of Hazardous and Radioactive Waste. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) being tested at Savannah River Site (SRS) will soon begin vitrifying the high-level waste at SRS. The DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) has taken the position that mixed waste needs to be stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible to ensure that the resulting waste forms will meet both the current and future regulatory specifications. Vitrification produces durable waste forms at volume reductions up to 97%. Large reductions in volume minimize long-term storage costs making vitrification cost effective on a life cycle basis.

  8. Vitrification of copper flotation waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanov, Alexander; Aloisi, Mirko; Pelino, Mario

    2007-02-01

    The vitrification of an hazardous iron-rich waste (W), arising from slag flotation of copper production, was studied. Two glasses, containing 30wt% W were melted for 30min at 1400 degrees C. The first batch, labeled WSZ, was obtained by mixing W, blast furnace slag (S) and zeolite tuff (Z), whereas the second, labeled WG, was prepared by mixing W, glass cullet (G), sand and limestone. The glass frits showed high chemical durability, measured by the TCLP test. The crystallization of the glasses was evaluated by DTA. The crystal phases formed were identified by XRD resulting to be pyroxene and wollastonite solid solutions, magnetite and hematite. The morphology of the glass-ceramics was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. WSZ composition showed a high rate of bulk crystallization and resulted to be suitable for producing glass-ceramics by a short crystallization heat-treatment. WG composition showed a low crystallization rate and good sinterability; glass-ceramics were obtained by sinter-crystallization of the glass frit. PMID:17064848

  9. Vitrification of plutonium at Rocky Flats the argument for a pilot plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, L. [Rocky Mountain Peace Center, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Current plans for stabilizing and storing the plutonium at Rocky Flats Plant fail to put the material in a form suitable for disposition and resistant to proliferation. Vitrification should be considered as an alternate technology. The vitrification should begin with a small-scale pilot plant.

  10. Vitrification publication bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was compiled by a group of about 12 graduate students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science at Washington State University and was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The literature search resulting in the compilation of this bibliography was designed to be an exhaustive search for research and development work involving the vitrification of mixed wastes, published by domestic and foreign researchers, primarily during 1989-1994. The search techniques were dominated by electronic methods and this bibliography is also available in electronic format, Windows Reference Manager

  11. Vitrification publication bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieman, E.; Johns, W.E.

    1996-02-01

    This document was compiled by a group of about 12 graduate students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science at Washington State University and was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The literature search resulting in the compilation of this bibliography was designed to be an exhaustive search for research and development work involving the vitrification of mixed wastes, published by domestic and foreign researchers, primarily during 1989-1994. The search techniques were dominated by electronic methods and this bibliography is also available in electronic format, Windows Reference Manager.

  12. Infrared Imaging for the Control and Optimization of Waste Treatment by Vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) contracted with AMEC, GeoMelt Division (GeoMelt), to develop and demonstrate its Bulk Vitrification (Bulk Vit) technology using the In-Container VitrificationTM, a.k.a. ICVTM, (ICV) process. This process is being evaluated as a potential supplemental treatment process for a large fraction of the DOE Hanford Site low-activity waste (LAW). The ICV process is a batch or hybrid batch-feed thermal waste treatment process that is performed in a refractory-lined steel container. Waste and glass-formers (if needed) are placed into the ICV container and are melted using Joule (resistive) heating. Most waste constituents are either destroyed or decomposed during treatment and any remaining hazardous constituents, such as radionuclides, are encapsulated in the highly durable glass product. GeoMelt recently demonstrated Bulk Vit to the DOE at full-scale using a 24-ft x 8-ft x 8-ft ICV melter, processing 56 metric tons (MT) of liquid Hanford LAW waste simulant and glass formers in a single contained melt. This test, the most recent of five full-scale tests for the project, called Test FS-38D, also incorporated a full-scale liquid waste drying system, which dried and mixed the liquid LAW simulant with glass forming minerals prior to vitrification. After drying and mixing, the waste simulant was then periodically fed to the ICV melter, where it was vitrified into a borosilicate glass block weighing 44 MT. Accurately monitoring and controlling the amount of waste material added to the ICV is an essential and sometimes challenging task. It was determined during early project testing that direct visual observation of conditions within the melt container was needed to ensure that feed was being properly supplied and optimally distributed and incorporated across the melt surface. Standard video systems have historically been used for GeoMelt operations, but only with marginal results. Little or no lighting, high

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant capacity increase options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies are being conducted by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project on ways to increase the waste processing capacity within the current Vitrification Building structural design. The Phase 1 study on remote systems concepts identification and extent of capacity increase was completed. The study concluded that the HWVP capacity could be increased to four times the current capacity with minor design adjustments to the fixed facility design, and the required design changes would not impact the current footprint of the vitrification building. A further increase in production capacity may be achievable but would require some technology development, verification testing, and a more systematic and extensive engineering evaluation. The primary changes included a single advance melter with a higher capacity, new evaporative feed tank, offgas quench collection tank, ejector venturi scrubbers, and additional inner canister closure station,a smear test station, a new close- coupled analytical facility, waste hold capacity of 400,000 gallon, the ability to concentrate out-of-plant HWVP feed to 90 g/L waste oxide concentration, and limited changes to the current base slab construction package

  14. Highly active vitrification plant remote handling operational experience and improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operational experience and technological innovation in the area of remote handling is described for the Sellafield Waste Vitrification Plant (WVP). This plant turns Highly Active Liquid Wastes (HALW) into radioactively immobile, solid forms. The technology needed for remote handling of HALWs, such as ejectors and power fluidics is described as is the mechanical handling needed after the vitrification process. Key features of WVP are described, such as the in-cell cranes, master-slave manipulators and swabbing robots. The severity of the in-cell environment has highlighted the need for innovation in the remote handling equipment and these changes are also described. (UK)

  15. Characterization and assessment of novel bulk storage technologies : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, Georgianne; Tong, Nellie (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA); Fioravanti, Richard (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA); Gordon, Paul (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Markel, Larry (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Agrawal, Poonum (Sentech/SRA International, Bethesda, MD); Nourai, Ali (KEMA Consulting, Fairfax, VA)

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports the results of a high-level study to assess the technological readiness and technical and economic feasibility of 17 novel bulk energy storage technologies. The novel technologies assessed were variations of either pumped storage hydropower (PSH) or compressed air energy storage (CAES). The report also identifies major technological gaps and barriers to the commercialization of each technology. Recommendations as to where future R&D efforts for the various technologies are also provided based on each technology's technological readiness and the expected time to commercialization (short, medium, or long term). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned this assessment of novel concepts in large-scale energy storage to aid in future program planning of its Energy Storage Program. The intent of the study is to determine if any new but still unproven bulk energy storage concepts merit government support to investigate their technical and economic feasibility or to speed their commercialization. The study focuses on compressed air energy storage (CAES) and pumped storage hydropower (PSH). It identifies relevant applications for bulk storage, defines the associated technical requirements, characterizes and assesses the feasibility of the proposed new concepts to address these requirements, identifies gaps and barriers, and recommends the type of government support and research and development (R&D) needed to accelerate the commercialization of these technologies.

  16. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  17. Mixed Wastes Vitrification by Transferred Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.TAPIA-FABELA; G.ZlSSIS; M.PACHECO-PACHECO; J.PACHECO-SOTELO; C.TORRES-REYES; R.VALDIVIA-BARRIENTOS; J.BENITEZ-READ; R.LOPEZ-CALLEJAS; F.RAMOS-FLORES; S.BOSHLE

    2007-01-01

    Thermal plasma technology provides a stable and long term treatment of mixed wastes through vitrification processes.In this work,a transferred plasma system was realized to vitrify mixed wastes,taking advantage of its high power density,enthalpy and chemical reactivity as well as its rapid quenching and high operation temperatures.To characterize the plasma discharge,a temperature diagnostic is realized by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES).To typify the morphological structure of the wastes samples,scanning electron microscopy (SEM),and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were applied before and after the plasma treatment.

  18. Functional description of the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is the solidification of approximately 2.1 million liters (560,000 gallons) of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) which resulted from the operation of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Since the original plant was not built to accommodate the processing of waste beyond storage in underground tanks, HLW solidification by vitrification presented numerous engineering challenges. Existing facilities required redesign and conversion to meet their new purpose. Vitrification technology and systems needed to be created and then tested. Equipment modifications, identified from cold test results, were incorporated into the final equipment configuration to be used for radioactive (hot) operations. Cold operations have defined the correct sequence and optimal functioning of the equipment to be used for vitrification and have verified the process by which waste will be solidified into borosilicate glass

  19. Engineering-scale vitrification of commercial high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, technology for immobilizing commercial high-level waste (HLW) has been extensively developed, and two major demonstration projects have been completed, the Waste Solidification Engineering Prototypes (WSEP) Program and the Nuclear Waste Vitrification Project (NWVP). The feasibility of radioactive waste solidification was demonstrated in the WSEP program between 1966 and 1970 (McElroy et al. 1972) using simulated power-reactor waste composed of nonradioactive chemicals and HLW from spent, Hanford reactor fuel. Thirty-three engineering-scale canisters of solidified HLW were produced during the operations. In early 79, the NWVP demonstrated the vitrification of HLW from the processing of actual commercial nuclear fuel. This program consisted of two parts, (1) waste preparation and (2) vitrification by spray calcination and in-can melting. This report presents results from the NWVP

  20. Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts

  1. Feasibility Study for Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. J. Quigley; B. D. Raivo; S. O. Bates; S. M. Berry; D. N. Nishioka; P. J. Bunnell

    2000-09-01

    Treatment of sodium-bearing waste (SBW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is mandated under a Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One of the requirements of the Settlement Agreement is the complete calcination (i.e., treatment) of all SBW by December 31, 2012. One of the proposed options for treatment of SBW is vitrification. This study will examine the viability of SBW vitrification. This study describes the process and facilities to treat the SBW, from beginning waste input from INTEC Tank Farm to the final waste forms. Schedules and cost estimates for construction and operation of a Vitrification Facility are included. The study includes a facility layout with drawings, process description and flow diagrams, and preliminary equipment requirements and layouts.

  2. Vitrification of low level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes: Lessons learned from high level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Simultaneously, tehnologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to immobilize low-level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes (LLMW) in durable glass formulations for permanent disposal or long-term storage. Vitrification of LLMW achieves large volume reductions (86--97 %) which minimize the associated long-term storage costs. Vitrification of LLMW also ensures that mixed wastes are stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible, e.g. equivalent to HLLW, in order to meet both current and future regulatory waste disposal specifications The tehnologies being developed for vitrification of LLMW rely heavily on the technologies developed for HLLW and the lessons learned about process and product control

  3. Vitrification of low level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes: Lessons learned from high level waste vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1994-07-01

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Simultaneously, tehnologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to immobilize low-level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes (LLMW) in durable glass formulations for permanent disposal or long-term storage. Vitrification of LLMW achieves large volume reductions (86--97 %) which minimize the associated long-term storage costs. Vitrification of LLMW also ensures that mixed wastes are stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible, e.g. equivalent to HLLW, in order to meet both current and future regulatory waste disposal specifications The tehnologies being developed for vitrification of LLMW rely heavily on the technologies developed for HLLW and the lessons learned about process and product control.

  4. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10-5 parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables

  5. Nuclear Waste Vitrification in the U.S.: Recent Developments and Future Options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plays a key role in maintaining current world wide energy growth while minimizing the greenhouse gas emissions. A disposition path for used nuclear fuel (UNF) must be found for this technology to achieve its promise. One likely option is the recycling of UNF and immobilization of the high-level waste (HLW) by vitrification. Vitrification is the technology of choice for immobilizing HLW from defense and commercial fuel reprocessing around the world. Recent advances in both recycling technology and vitrification show great promise in closing the nuclear fuel cycle in an efficient and economical fashion. This article summarizes the recent trends developments and future options in waste vitrification for both defense waste cleanup and closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the U.S.

  6. A New Soil Water and Bulk Electrical Conductivity Sensor Technology for Irrigation and Salinity Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Existing soil water content sensing systems based on electromagnetic (EM) properties of soils often over estimate and sometimes underestimate water content in saline and salt-affected soils due to severe interference from the soil bulk electrical conductivity (BEC), which varies strongly with temperature and which can vary greatly throughout an irrigation season and across a field. Many soil water sensors, especially those based on capacitance measurements, have been shown to be unsuitable in salt-affected or clayey soils (Evett et al., 2012a). The ability to measure both soil water content and BEC can be helpful for the management of irrigation and leaching regimes. Neutron probe is capable of accurately sensing water content in salt-affected soils but has the disadvantages of being: (1) labour-intensive, (2) not able to be left unattended in the field, (3) subject to onerous regulations, and (4) not able to sense salinity. The Waveguide-On-Access-Tube (WOAT) system based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) principles, recently developed by Evett et al. (2012) is a new promising technology. This system can be installed at below 3 m in 20-cm sensor segments to cover as much of the crop root zone as needed for irrigation management. It can also be installed to measure the complete soil profile from the surface to below the root zone, allowing the measurement of crop water use and water use efficiency - knowledge of which is key for irrigation and farm management, and for the development of new drought tolerant and water efficient crop varieties and hybrids, as well as watershed and environmental management

  7. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations

  8. Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment

  9. Vitrification of fission product wastes: industrial experience and construction of the new vitrification units at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first industrial-scale unit for vitrification of fission product wastes was commissioned at Marcoule in France in 1978. Operating experience has been applied in design and construction of the R7 and T7 units at La Hague for vitrification of fission product solutions from the new UP2-800 and UP3 reprocessing plants, (annual capacity of 1,600 tonnes of LWR spent fuel). After outlining the vitrification process, this paper presents the sustained throughput performances achieved during 9 years operation of the continuous vitrification line at Marcoule, plus information concerning technologies, maintenance, process effluents and safety. It then describes the new R7 and T7 units with their six 25 kg/hour glass production lines. Emphasis is placed on the process-related and technological changes, layout optimizations and main innovations decided to improve operation and achieve economies of scale in extrapolating from the 15 kg/hour line at Marcoule. Storage facility design for vitrified waste containers is briefly presented

  10. Selecting a plutonium vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouan, A. [Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    1996-05-01

    Vitrification of plutonium is one means of mitigating its potential danger. This option is technically feasible, even if it is not the solution advocated in France. Two situations are possible, depending on whether or not the glass matrix also contains fission products; concentrations of up to 15% should be achievable for plutonium alone, whereas the upper limit is 3% in the presence of fission products. The French continuous vitrification process appears to be particularly suitable for plutonium vitrification: its capacity is compatible with the required throughout, and the compact dimensions of the process equipment prevent a criticality hazard. Preprocessing of plutonium metal, to convert it to PuO{sub 2} or to a nitric acid solution, may prove advantageous or even necessary depending on whether a dry or wet process is adopted. The process may involve a single step (vitrification of Pu or PuO{sub 2} mixed with glass frit) or may include a prior calcination step - notably if the plutonium is to be incorporated into a fission product glass. It is important to weigh the advantages and drawbacks of all the possible options in terms of feasibility, safety and cost-effectiveness.

  11. Vitrification in La Hague plant achievement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development at the CEA (the French Atomic Energy Commission) about vitrification process of radioactive wastes have focused on two main points: the glass formulation to obtain the best physical, thermal and mechanical properties for the best homogeneity, stability and resistance to radiations and leaches, and the industrial process to obtain the best flexibility for the production of different homogeneous glasses and for the minimization of technological wastes. This has led to the establishment of glass specifications, agreed by the French authorities, independent commission of nuclear experts, and foreign customers, and to the construction of the R7 and T7 industrial facilities at La Hague (France) which started-up in 1989 and 1992, respectively. A description of the process units and of the quality controls are given. Various improvements have been achieved and have demonstrated the industrial mastery of vitrification of fission products. The process has proven to be flexible since fine particles from the dissolution step and alkaline effluents from the solvent regeneration steps have been incorporated to the glass matrix. (J.S.). 1 fig., 2 tabs

  12. Update on the Hanford waste vitrification plant technical developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to dispose a defense high-level waste is formally described in the Defense Waste Management Plan submitted to Congress in 1983. This plan outlines the strategy of sequencing the disposal efforts at the three DOE sites that have high-level waste: Savannah River, Hanford site, and Idaho. A key element of the Hanford Site waste-management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. An earlier paper presented at Waste Management '86 describes design aspects of the HWVP. This paper presents a brief description of the HWVP Project and describes the progress made by the HWVP Project on key applied technology issues. The HWVP technology approach is to identify key HWVP waste-form qualification and design issues, identify sources of applicable vitrification technology, and maximize the use of existing DOE vitrification technology and design resources. The HWVP issues are resolved through technology exchange, support from other Hanford Site waste-management programs, and a limited HWVP applied technology development effort

  13. The R7/T7 vitrification at La Hague: 10 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of high level wastes from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels has been carried out at La Hague on an industrial scale for ten years. This paper presents an historical overview of the facilities, and describes the facilities and their operations, startup performance, facility upgrading that has been done, and process control functions. The paper concludes that the technology for vitrification of high level wastes is mature and has been mastered. (author)

  14. Feasibility Study on the Vitrification of Concentrated Boric Acid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification technology has been gradually recognized as one of effective solidification methods for concentrated boric acid wastes generated in PWR. Vitrification for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes has a large volume reduction and good durability for the final products. A feasibility study for the vitrification of concentrated boric acid wastes has been performed with developing the pre-treatment methods of powdered wastes, glass compositions using glass formulation and demonstration test. The pre-treatment method is pelletizing the powder type for stable feeding within cold crucible melter. The glass compositions should be developed considering molten glass are related with wastes reduction. High contents of sodium and boron within borate wastes give influence to waste loading. A variety of factors obtained from the demonstration test are reviewed, which is wastes feeding rate, off-gas characteristics on stack and glass characteristics of final products such as durability for implementing the wastes disposal requirement. The aim of this paper is to present the feasibility of vitrification and review the solidification method for concentrated boric acid wastes and obtain the physicochemical characteristics of solidified glass.

  15. High temperature vitrification of surrogate Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been funded through the DOE Office of Technology Development (DOE-OTD) to investigate high-temperature vitrification technologies for the treatment of diverse low-level and mixed wastes. High temperature vitrification is a likely candidate for processing heterogeneous solid wastes containing low levels of activity. Many SRS wastes fit into this category. Plasma torch technology is one high temperature vitrification method. A trial demonstration of plasma torch processing is being performed at the Georgia Institute of Technology on surrogate SRS wastes. This effort is in cooperation with the Engineering Research and Development Association of Georgia Universities (ERDA) program. The results of phase 1 of these plasma torch trials will be presented

  16. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  17. Vitrification of actinide solutions in SRS separations facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actinide vitrification system being developed at SRS provides the capability to convert specialized or unique forms of nuclear material into a stable solid glass product that can be safely shipped, stored or reprocessed according to the DOE complex mission. This project is an application of technology developed through funds from the Office of Technology Development (OTD). This technology is ideally suited for vitrifying relatively small quantities of fissile or special nuclear material since it is designed to be critically safe. Successful demonstration of this system to safely vitrify radioactive material could open up numerous opportunities for transferring this technology to applications throughout the DOE complex

  18. Vitrification for stability of scrap and residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A conference breakout discussion was held on the subject of vitrification for stabilization of plutonium scrap and residue. This was one of four such sessions held within the vitrification workshop for participants to discuss specific subjects in further detail. The questions and issues were defined by the participants.

  19. The phenomena of swelling and growth-expansion during the vitrification of MTR type waste material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been carried out on the foaming effect which occurs during the calcination of MTR type waste materials, in order to improve the in-pot vitrification technology. Foaming is accompanied by swelling and growth-expansion phenomena, and is influenced by the initial composition of the waste and by the operating parameters in the applied vitrification process (in particular the heating conditions). The waste studied is made of a mixture of alkaline sludges and zeolites coming from the treatment of simulated high aluminum content nitric liquid waste (the so-called 'alkaline declassification' process), and the vitrifying additives. During the heat treatment of the samples, attention has been focused on: - softening temperature, - thermal decomposition, examined by differential thermogravimetric analysis, - residual nitrate ion and released gas composition, - iron oxidation state after heat treatment in air and in nitrogen. The foaming effect on the calcined material occurred in the temperature range 923/1023 K and it is due to gas release at temperatures higher than the softening temperature of the calcined material. The most effective remedy in minimizing foaming was found to be the addition of organic substances, such as sugar to the material to be calcined. A weight ratio between sugar and the nitrate content of 1.5 : 1 was found to be sufficient to eliminate the foaming effect. During the waste heating process in presence of sugar, nitrates are totally destroyed at temperatures much lower than the bulk softening point of the material. In addition, within 1273 K in nitrogen, only a partial reduction of iron occurs. (author)

  20. French nuclear waste vitrification. State of the art and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of the French vitrification process has demonstrated at industrial scale for disposal of very high-level radioactive liquid wastes. The CEA has acquired extensive experience in the area of waste containment materials, and has developed an effective melting technology. Three major objectives were assigned to the French vitrification research and development program: specify the chemical composition of the glass according to the composition of the waste solutions; characterize glass as a containment medium; and implement the technology necessary to fabricate the containment glass under both non-radioactive and radioactive conditions. A two-steps continuous vitrification process is implemented by COGEMA in the Marcoule Vitrification Facility and in two vitrification units at La Hague. A new cold crucible direct-induction melting technology is now being developed. It will allow new containment matrices to be produced in facilities with larger capacities. The technology may be applied to nuclear wastes, but also to toxic inorganic industrial wastes. (J.S.). 3 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper

  2. Independent engineering review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was initiated in June 1987. The HWVP is an essential element of the plan to end present interim storage practices for defense wastes and to provide for permanent disposal. The project start was justified, in part, on efficient technology and design information transfer from the prototype Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Development of other serial Hanford Waste Vitrification System (HWVS) elements, such as the waste retrieval system for the double-shell tanks (DSTs), and the pretreatment system to reduce the waste volume converted into glass, also was required to accomplish permanent waste disposal. In July 1991, at the time of this review, the HWVP was in the Title 2 design phase. The objective of this technical assessment is to determine whether the status of the technology development and engineering practice is sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the HWVP and the balance of the HWVS system will operate in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The criteria used to facilitate a judgment of potential successful operation are: vitrification of high-level radioactive waste from specified DSTs on a reasonably continuous basis; and glass produced with physical and chemical properties formally acknowledge as being acceptable for disposal in a repository for high-level radioactive waste. The criteria were proposed specifically for the Independent Engineering Review to focus that assessment effort. They are not represented as the criteria by which the Department will judge the prudence of the Project. 78 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs

  3. Independent engineering review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was initiated in June 1987. The HWVP is an essential element of the plan to end present interim storage practices for defense wastes and to provide for permanent disposal. The project start was justified, in part, on efficient technology and design information transfer from the prototype Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Development of other serial Hanford Waste Vitrification System (HWVS) elements, such as the waste retrieval system for the double-shell tanks (DSTs), and the pretreatment system to reduce the waste volume converted into glass, also was required to accomplish permanent waste disposal. In July 1991, at the time of this review, the HWVP was in the Title 2 design phase. The objective of this technical assessment is to determine whether the status of the technology development and engineering practice is sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the HWVP and the balance of the HWVS system will operate in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The criteria used to facilitate a judgment of potential successful operation are: vitrification of high-level radioactive waste from specified DSTs on a reasonably continuous basis; and glass produced with physical and chemical properties formally acknowledge as being acceptable for disposal in a repository for high-level radioactive waste. The criteria were proposed specifically for the Independent Engineering Review to focus that assessment effort. They are not represented as the criteria by which the Department will judge the prudence of the Project. 78 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coordes, D.; Ruggieri, M.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility`s construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment.

  5. Preliminary hazards analysis -- vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for mixed waste vitrification by joule heating. The purpose of performing a PHA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PHA is then followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title 1 and 2 design. The PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during the facility's construction and testing. It should be completed before routine operation of the facility commences. This PHA addresses the first four chapters of the safety analysis process, in accordance with the requirements of DOE Safety Guidelines in SG 830.110. The hazards associated with vitrification processes are evaluated using standard safety analysis methods which include: identification of credible potential hazardous energy sources; identification of preventative features of the facility or system; identification of mitigative features; and analyses of credible hazards. Maximal facility inventories of radioactive and hazardous materials are postulated to evaluate worst case accident consequences. These inventories were based on DOE-STD-1027-92 guidance and the surrogate waste streams defined by Mayberry, et al. Radiological assessments indicate that a facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous materials assessment indicates that a Mixed Waste Vitrification facility will be a Low Hazard facility having minimal impacts to offsite personnel and the environment

  6. Development of technology and equipment for trapping emissions from a vitrification line, including the manufacture of selected nodes (flow separator, NOx absorber, aerosol filters)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology was designed of a processing line for trapping nitrogen oxides emerging during the treatment of liquid wastes from nuclear power plants. In this design, absorption with a chemical reaction is combined with subsequent trapping of the then formed aerosols of the acids on a sprayed fibrous insert flown through by the gas treated. The degree of absorption is 94% and more for NO2, and 43% on average for NO. (J.B). 10 tabs., 3 figs., 11 refs

  7. Filtration characteristics of long-term operation in vitrification pilot facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most promising technologies for the treatment of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (LILWs) is vitrification technology. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power. Co. Ltd. (KHNP) has launched the vitrification pilot facility with High Temperature Filter (HTF) system, which is one of air pollution control technologies with high collection efficiency for particulate matters and no need to cool off-gases below 200 .deg. C before treatment of off-gas. Ion Exchange Resins(IERs) and Dry Active Wastes(DAWs) are vitrified in cold crucible melter and off-gas is generated during this vitrification process. Particulate Matters(PMs) in off-gas were cleaned at first while passing by HTF system. Operation parameters for HTF system was derived from previous mid-term operation of vitrification and a long-term operation was performed in order to evaluate and adjust them. As a results, pressure drop was maintained stably in the range of 50 ± 10 mmAq during the long-term operation and temperature increased with time of operation and was stabilized eventually. PMs collection efficiency by HTF system increased than that of the mid-term operation. Hence, HTF system was operated stably in the long-term operation and its performance was good. The results of the operation will be used as basic data for the design of a future commercial vitrification facility for nuclear power plant

  8. Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction 2O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils

  9. Vitrification of high active waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main stream of high level radioactive materials generated as wastes by the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is composed of fission products solutions. The storage of these liquids has been operated until now in stainless steel tanks almost everywhere. From a general standpoint, it is now assumed that these solutions, in which long-life actinides are also present, must be solidified owing to the hazards related to a long term disposal. Vitrification has generally been taken more into consideration than other processes owing to a relatively simple implementation and mainly because glass is a medium flexible enough to house the various elements bound to be present in the radioactive liquids without inducing drastic changes in the physicochemical properties. Among these properties a particular attention is paid to the ones connected to the fabrication: corrosiveness, volatilization, viscosity as well as to the interim storage and long term disposal: thermal stability, chemical stability versus #betta# #betta# and α irradiation including the subsequent effects of helium build up. Investigations in those fields have been carried out principally on borosilicate and aluminoborosilicate glasses. The manufacture techniques under development are numerous. Some of them are continuous processes, other are batch ones. Both can involve either a one stage or a two stage fabrication. The most advanced technique is a 2 stages continuous process involving calcination in a rotary tube and vitrification in a metallic melter. (orig./HW)

  10. Remotisation aspects of vitrification facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities such as handling of HLW for its transfer from the reprocessing facility, concentration in thermo-siphon evaporators, feeding the concentrate into the furnaces, decontamination of the gases emanating during evaporation and vitrification, handling of vitrified waste product (VWP) for its filling into the canisters, capping, decontamination and overpacking etc. are carried out remotely inside concrete shielded cells. Further, handling of VWP overpacks for its loading into the shielding casks for its transportation and emplacing the same into interim storage/disposal facilities, are also done remotely. Liquid sampling and handling of filters for cleaning of vessel off gases (VOG) are some of other major activities requiring remote handling. A new dimension in remote operations has been added while dismantling melter components and subsequently managing the secondary wastes generated at Trombay and Tarapur as well. Having equipped with rich experience and broad analysis of the operations involved in vitrification of HLW and handling the VWP, we can embark on design of the new facilities having much higher degree of automation and use of robots

  11. Cold Test Operation of the German VEK Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2007 the German High-Level Liquid Waste (HLLW) Vitrification plant VEK (Verglasungseinrichtung Karlsruhe) has passed a three months integral cold test operation as final step before entering the hot phase. The overall performance of the vitrification process equipment with a liquid-fed ceramic glass melter as main component proved to be completely in line with the requirements of the regulatory body. The retention efficiency of main radioactive-bearing elements across melter and wet off-gas treatment system exceeded the design values distinctly. The strategy to produce a specified waste glass could be successfully demonstrated. The results of the cold test operation allow entering the next step of hot commissioning, i.e. processing of approximately 2 m3 of diluted HLLW. In summary: An important step of the VEK vitrification plant towards hot operation has been the performance of the cold test operation from April to July 2007. This first integral operation was carried out under boundary conditions and rules established for radioactive operation. Operation and process control were carried out following the procedure as documented in the licensed operational manuals. The function of the process technology and the safe operation could be demonstrated. No severe problems were encountered. Based on the positive results of the cold test, application of the license for hot operation has been initiated and is expected in the near future. (authors)

  12. Sensing with Advanced Computing Technology: Fin Field-Effect Transistors with High-k Gate Stack on Bulk Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Sara; Scarbolo, Paolo; Wipf, Mathias; Stoop, Ralph L; Bedner, Kristine; Buitrago, Elizabeth; Bazigos, Antonios; Bouvet, Didier; Calame, Michel; Schönenberger, Christian; Ionescu, Adrian M

    2015-05-26

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) form an established technology for sensing applications. However, recent advancements and use of high-performance multigate metal-oxide semiconductor FETs (double-gate, FinFET, trigate, gate-all-around) in computing technology, instead of bulk MOSFETs, raise new opportunities and questions about the most suitable device architectures for sensing integrated circuits. In this work, we propose pH and ion sensors exploiting FinFETs fabricated on bulk silicon by a fully CMOS compatible approach, as an alternative to the widely investigated silicon nanowires on silicon-on-insulator substrates. We also provide an analytical insight of the concept of sensitivity for the electronic integration of sensors. N-channel fully depleted FinFETs with critical dimensions on the order of 20 nm and HfO2 as a high-k gate insulator have been developed and characterized, showing excellent electrical properties, subthreshold swing, SS ∼ 70 mV/dec, and on-to-off current ratio, Ion/Ioff ∼ 10(6), at room temperature. The same FinFET architecture is validated as a highly sensitive, stable, and reproducible pH sensor. An intrinsic sensitivity close to the Nernst limit, S = 57 mV/pH, is achieved. The pH response in terms of output current reaches Sout = 60%. Long-term measurements have been performed over 4.5 days with a resulting drift in time δVth/δt = 0.10 mV/h. Finally, we show the capability to reproduce experimental data with an extended three-dimensional commercial finite element analysis simulator, in both dry and wet environments, which is useful for future advanced sensor design and optimization. PMID:25817336

  13. Vitrification pilot plant experiences at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates containing high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1,150 to 1,350 C. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and path forward will be presented

  14. Hanford waste vitrification systems risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic Risk Assessment was performed to identify the technical, regulatory, and programmatic uncertainties and to quantify the risks to the Hanford Site double-shell tank waste vitrification program baseline (as defined in December 1990). Mitigating strategies to reduce the overall program risk were proposed. All major program elements were evaluated, including double-shell tank waste characterization, Tank Farms, retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and grouting. Computer-based techniques were used to quantify risks to proceeding with construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant on the present baseline schedule. Risks to the potential vitrification of single-shell tank wastes and cesium and strontium capsules were also assessed. 62 refs., 38 figs., 26 tabs

  15. Radioactive waste vitrification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development of an immobilization process for the containment of nuclear high-level liquid waste has been underway for well-over the past four decades. The method that has become the state-of-the-art is the liquid-fed ceramic melter process which converts a mixture of high-level liquid waste and glass forming frit to a borosilicate glass product. This report gives a chronological review of the various vitrification processes starting with the very first reported process in 1960. Information on the early methods of frit selection as well as information on the currently computerized method are presented. The importance of all these parameters is discussed with regard to product durability. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. Technical and physical-chemical aspects of chrompik vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification technology has been chosen for treatment and conditioning of liquid radioactive waste - chrompik, which has been used as a heat-transfer medium for cooling off fuel assemblies at the A1 NPP. The original chrompik had been 1-3 % K2Cr2O7 solution (with 0,5 % of KF addition) or 1-3 % K2CrO4 solution. Chrompik, which has been used in the short-term pools and been so-called Chrompik I, had 137Cs activity approximately 109 Bq/dm3, pH of Chrompic I solution was from 7 to 7,5 in time of its treatment and it contained mainly K and Cr. The entire volume of Chrompik I - 18.5 m3 was conditioned by vitrification technology on VICHR facility in 1996-2001. The vitrification of Chrompik I was being developed in the 80's and at the beginning of the 90's at the UJV Rez. The following technological aspects were resolved: (1) High temperature reduction of CrO42- into Cr2O3 oxide form during melting of salts with glass, (2) Composition of boric-silicate glass, which will support above mentioned reduction, create bond with K2O a Cr2O3 which ensure low leachability of radionuclides from vitrified products. The technical facility - VICHR, dedicated for safe treatment and conditioning of Chrompik I with 137Cs activity up to 1 GBq/dm3, was developed in the frame of that research too. (authors)

  17. Development of a Transportable Vitrification System for Mixed Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US DOE through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program, has identified a need to move mixed waste vitrification technology from the laboratory to the field as rapidly as possible. A great deal of work over the last few years has shown the feasibility of immobilizing selected hazardous waste streams in a vitrified product. Lab-scale work has been extended to pilot-scale tests, usually with surrogates of the actual waste. DOE felt that the technology was mature enough to allow demonstration in the field, on actual wastes, with units that would be prototypic of full sized waste treatment equipment. To this end, DOE's Office of Technology Development sponsored the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to specify, procure, test, and operate a field scale demonstration using mobile equipment. Oak Ridge Reservation was chosen as the initial location for the field demonstration and Martin Marietta Reservation was chosen as the initial location for the field demonstration and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (MMES) tasked with all permitting, site preparation, and field support activities. During September 1993, WSRC used a ''Vendor Forum'' to solicit preliminary proposals for the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS). A number of quality proposals were received and evaluated. A vendor was selected and detailed negotiations were completed in August 1994, at which time a contract was signed for the TVS. In parallel, WSRC opened a dialogue with MMES to explore candidate waste streams at the Oak Ridge Reservation for the first TVS vitrification campaign. After some preliminary work, a group of waste water sludges were selected. The first of these to be demonstrated with the TVS will be the West End Treatment Facility (WETF) sludge. This paper describes the development of the specification for the TVS, the design and construction activities to date, and ongoing efforts for permitting and site support. The schedule for field application is also discussed

  18. Time domain reflectometry instrumentation used for in-situ plasma vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An application of TDR (Time Domain Reflectometry) was developed and demonstrated for use with the in-situ plasma vitrification (ISPV) environmental restoration project. The technique was simple, using an inexpensive sacrificial TDR probe made out of ordinary coaxial cable. This technique proved its viability for field operation in support of the vitrification process. This presentation will detail the design, construction, operation and field results of the TDR instrumentation that was developed and used in this project. Other practical applications of this technology will be suggested

  19. Vitrification of isolated mice blastomeres using a closed loading device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Isolated blastomeres obtained by embryo biopsy serve mainly for preimplantation genetic screening. Blastomeres are undifferentiated embryonic cells that include all the embryo genetic information. A lot of developing technologies may benefit by the efficient cryopreservation of blastomeres for future potential use, especially for stem cell culture and differentiation control. We are hereby reporting for the first time the feasibility of preserving individual isolated blastomeres in microvolumes in a closed vitrification system. Using a cryotip and propagation in microvolumes, isolated mice blastomeres were vitrified and warmed with 100% post-warming survival.

  20. Vitrification development for sludge and ash mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary glass development was carried out on four surrogate wastes. The surrogate wastes evaluated were ash and sludge from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sludge from Rocky Flats, and sludge from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The work involved numerous melting trails followed by visual homogeneity examination and short-duration leach testing on glass specimens. Melter testing on selected compositions was performed with a laboratory-scale joule-heated furnace. With proper formulations and melter operating parameters, these mixed wastes appear to be readily adaptable to available vitrification technology

  1. Economic assessment on vitrification facility of low-and intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of vitrification technology of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes was demonstrated due to volume reduction and mechanical and chemical stability of final waste forms. Therefore economic assessment that is considering by the economic propriety and predicted cost is needed at the preliminary of facility operation. Economic assessment of vitrification facility that is expected to construct in Ulchin 5 and 6 is established. In this study, characteristics and yearly generation of radioactive wastes are based on Ulchin 5 and 6 PSAR. The present worth analysis is worked through the cost-benefit when the vitrification facility will be installed. In conclusion, it would be good choices if it treats radioactive wastes from more than 4 nuclear power plants

  2. A review of French vitrification industrial achievements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the end of the 50's, research has been ongoing in France to immobilize High Level Waste into a stable and durable waste form. Very early, borosilicate glass was selected as the best compromise between technological feasibility and long term performance. In parallel, the first developments were initiated to design a robust technology able to produce this waste form in the very demanding environment of High Level Waste industrial facilities. These developments led to the start-up of the first industrial HLW vitrification facility based on a calciner and a hot, induction-heated, metallic crucible, at Marcoule (AVM) in 1978. Based on the lessons learned from operating this facility, the technology was further improved to be compatible with a large commercial facility. The R7 facility came into active operation at La Hague, France, in 1989, followed very closely by the WVP facility in Sellafield, UK, which uses the same core technology, and then by the sister facility of R7, T7, which was started in 1992 at La Hague. Since then, these facilities have been operated continuously, while implementing improvements all along their operation life. In parallel, and in order to deal with new waste streams and new industrial requirements, a technology based on cold crucible induction melter was developed and finally implemented in one of the R7 lines in 2010. In parallel with the development of the technology, a specific waste form, the R7T7 glass, was designed, tested, and qualified for this application. The resulting product is a good compromise between industrial feasibility in the technology, flexibility towards waste composition and fuel burn-up evolutions, long term behavior in geological disposal conditions, and waste volume optimization to minimize the burden on the overall glass product management chain, from interim storage to transportation and geological disposal. The paper will describe the technology and logic of these developments, the lessons learned from

  3. Bench-scale vitrification studies with Savannah River Site mercury contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been charted by the Department of Energy (DOE)--Office of Technology Development (OTD) to investigate vitrification technology for the treatment of Low Level Mixed Wastes (LLMW). In fiscal year 1995, mercury containing LLMW streams were targeted. In order to successfully apply vitrification technology to mercury containing LLMW, the types and quantities of glass forming additives necessary for producing homogeneous glasses from the wastes have to be determined and the treatment for the mercury portion must also be determined. Selected additives should ensure that a durable and leach resistant waste form is produced, while the mercury treatment should ensure that hazardous amounts of mercury are not released into the environment. The mercury containing LLMW selected for vitrification studies at the SRTC was mercury contaminated soil from the TNX pilot-plant facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Samples of this soil were obtained so bench-scale vitrification studies could be performed at the SRTC to determine the optimum waste loading obtainable in the glass product without sacrificing durability and leach resistance. Vitrifying this waste stream also required offgas treatment for the capture of the vaporized mercury

  4. Programmatic challenges and the value of testing on the West Valley demonstration project's vitrification facility design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the solidification of approximately 2.1 million liters (560 thousand gallons) of high-level waste (HLW) which has resulted from the operation of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Existing facilities' requirement of redesign and conversion to meet their new purpose are addressed. Vitrification technology and systems creation are presented

  5. Konjac-based oil bulking system for development of improved-lipid pork patties: technological, microbiological and sensory assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo-Sandoval, Lorena; Cofrades, Susana; Ruiz-Capillas, Claudia; Carballo, José; Jiménez-Colmenero, Francisco

    2015-03-01

    Improved-lipid pork patties were manufactured following two different reformulation strategies: fat reduction by replacement of pork backfat with konjac gel (KG), and fat reduction/lipid improvement by replacement of pork backfat with an improved oil combination (olive, linseed and fish oils) bulking system based on konjac gel (O-KG). Technological, microbiological and sensory properties were analyzed as affected by the type of formulation and by chilled storage (9days, 2°C). Fat was reduced by between 30 and 86%. In the cases where O-KG was incorporated, 12 and 41% of total fat in patties came from the oil combination. There was no observable effect on color parameters in samples with O-K. Higher KG levels produced harder cooked patties. Animal fat replacement in patties promoted an increase in lipid oxidation, which was more pronounced in samples with an oil combination. In general, during chilled storage no major changes were observed in the studied properties as a result of the different treatments. PMID:25485511

  6. La Hague Continuous Improvement Program: Enhancement of the Vitrification Throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vitrification of high-level liquid waste produced from nuclear fuel reprocessing has been carried out industrially for over 25 years by AREVA/COGEMA, with two main objectives: containment of the long lived fission products and reduction of the final volume of waste. At the 'La Hague' plant, in the 'R7' and 'T7' facilities, vitrified waste is obtained by first evaporating and calcining the nitric acid feed solution-containing fission products in calciners. The product-named calcinate- is then fed together with glass frit into induction-heated metallic melters to produce the so-called R7/T7 glass, well known for its excellent containment properties. Both facilities are equipped with three processing lines. In the near future the increase of the fuel burn-up will influence the amount of fission product solutions to be processed at R7/T7. As a consequence, in order to prepare these changes, it is necessary to feed the calciner at higher flow-rates. Consistent and medium-term R and D programs led by CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission, the AREVA/COGEMA's R and D and R and T provider), AREVA/COGEMA (Industrial Operator) and AREVA/SGN (AREVA/COGEMA's Engineering), and associated to the industrial feed back of AREVA/COGEMA operations, have allowed continuous improvement of the process since 1998: - The efficiency and limitation of the equipment have been studied and solutions for technological improvements have been proposed whenever necessary, - The increase of the feeding flow-rate has been implemented on the improved CEA test rig (so called PEV, Evolutional Prototype of Vitrification) and adapted by AREVA/SGN for the La Hague plant using their modeling studies; the results obtained during this test confirmed the technological and industrial feasibility of the improvements achieved, - After all necessary improved equipments have been implemented in R7/T7 facilities, and a specific campaign has been performed on the R7 facility by AREVA/COGEMA. The flow-rate to the

  7. Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process

  8. In situ vitrification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in situ vitrification process (ISV) converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. The process appears to be ideally suited for on site treatment of both wet and dry wastes. Basically, the system requires four molybdenum electrodes, an electrical power system for vitrifying the soil, a hood to trap gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system, an off-gas cooling system, and a process control station. Mounted in three transportable trailers, the ISV process can be moved from site to site. The process has the potential for treating contaminated soils at most 13 m deep. The ISV project has won a number of outstanding achievement awards. The process has also been patented with exclusive worldwide rights being granted to Battelle Memorial Institute for nonradioactive applications. While federal applications still belong to the Department of Energy, Battelle transferred the rights of ISV for non-federal government, chemical hazardous wastes to a separate corporation in 1989 called Geosafe. This report gives a review of the process including current operational behavior and applications

  9. Laboratory scale vitrification of low-level radioactive nitrate salts and soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INEL has radiologically contaminated nitrate salt and soil waste stored above and below ground in Pad A and the Acid Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Pad A contain uranium and transuranic contaminated potassium and sodium nitrate salts generated from dewatered waste solutions at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Acid Pit was used to dispose of liquids containing waste mineral acids, uranium, nitrate, chlorinated solvents, and some mercury. Ex situ vitrification is a high temperature destruction of nitrates and organics and immobilizes hazardous and radioactive metals. Laboratory scale melting of actual radionuclides containing INEL Pad A nitrate salts and Acid Pit soils was performed. The salt/soil/additive ratios were varied to determine the range of glass compositions (resulted from melting different wastes); maximize mass and volume reduction, durability, and immobilization of hazardous and radioactive metals; and minimize viscosity and offgas generation for wastes prevalent at INEL and other DOE sites. Some mixtures were spiked with additional hazardous and radioactive metals. Representative glasses were leach tested and showed none. Samples spiked with transuranic showed low nuclide leaching. Wasteforms were two to three times bulk densities of the salt and soil. Thermally co-processing soils and salts is an effective remediation method for destroying nitrate salts while stabilizing the radiological and hazardous metals they contain. The measured durability of these low-level waste glasses approached those of high-level waste glasses. Lab scale vitrification of actual INEL contaminated salts and soils was performed at General Atomics Laboratory as part of the INEL Waste Technology Development and Environmental Restoration within the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

  10. Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Bruce Edward

    2001-09-01

    This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

  11. High-temperature vitrification of low-level radioactive and hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex has numerous radioactive waste streams which cannot be easily treated with joule-heated vitrification systems. However, it appears these streams could be treated With certain robust, high-temperature, melter technologies. These technologies are based on the use of plasma torch, graphite arc, and induction heating sources. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), with financial support from the Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development (OTD) and in conjunction with the sites within the DOE weapons complex, has been investigating high-temperature vitrification technologies for several years. This program has been a cooperative effort between a number of nearby Universities, specific sites within the DOE complex, commercial equipment suppliers and the All-Russian Research Institute of Chemical Technology. These robust vitrification systems appear to have advantages for the waste streams containing inorganic materials in combination with significant quantities of metals, organics, salts, or high temperature materials. Several high-temperature technologies were selected and will be evaluated and employed to develop supporting technology. A general overview of the SRTC ''High-Temperature Program'' will be provided

  12. Vitrification experience and projects in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on the vitrification of concentrated fission product solutions has been conducted in France for over a quarter of a century. This work has resulted in the formulation of a series of borosilicate glasses applicable to the high level wastes produced at the Marcoule and La Hague reprocessing plants. The properties of these nuclear glasses permit interim storage and future long-term disposal under safe conditions. A continuous vitrification process has also been developed and implemented on an industrial scale at Marcoule since 1978; a larger facility will begin operation at La Hague in late 1986

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version

  14. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, D.E. [ed.; Watrous, R.A.; Kruger, O.L. [and others

    1996-03-01

    A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version.

  15. Glass melter and process development for the PNC Tokai vitrification facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors' company has developed liquid fed joule-heated ceramic melter (LFCM) process for the vitrification of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) since 1977. Major developments in process technology during this period are improvements of both the design of glass melter and performance of the melter off-gas clean-up system. Technology developments include design of the melter bottom structure in order to avoid the operational problems caused by accumulation of electroconductive sludge, bottom freeze valve with induction heating, a continuous feed system for liquid and glass fiber additive, improvement of decontamination factor for submicron particles, and associated monitoring instruments. Related technologies such as remote maintenance and melter dismantling have also been developed. All these developmental works have been focussed on the Tokai vitrification facility (TVF), which is under construction aiming at the start of hot operation in early 1992. In this paper, the development experiences in process technology are described

  16. Evaluation of Vitrification Processing Step for Rocky Flats Incinerator Ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1997, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff developed a processing option for incinerator ash at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sites (RFETS). This work was performed with support from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Safe Sites of Colorado (SSOC). A description of the remediation needs for the RFETS incinerator ash is provided in a report summarizing the recommended processing option for treatment of the ash (Lucy et al. 1998). The recommended process flowsheet involves a calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material followed by a vitrification processing step for a mixture of glass tit and calcined incinerator ash. Using the calcination pretreatment step to remove carbonaceous material reduced process upsets for the vitrification step, allowed for increased waste loading in the final product, and improved the quality of the final product. Figure 1.1 illustrates the flow sheet for the recommended processing option for treatment of RFETS incinerator ash. In 1998, work at PNNL further developed the recommended flow sheet through a series of studies to better define the vitrification operating parameters and to address secondary processing issues (such as characterizing the offgas species from the calcination process). Because a prototypical rotary calciner was not available for use, studies to evaluate the offgas from the calcination process were performed using a benchtop rotary calciner and laboratory-scale equipment (Lucy et al. 1998). This report focuses on the vitrification process step after ash has been calcined. Testing with full-scale containers was performed using ash surrogates and a muffle furnace similar to that planned for use at RFETS. Small-scale testing was performed using plutonium-bearing incinerator ash to verify performance of the waste form. Ash was not obtained from RFETS because of transportation requirements to calcine the incinerator ash prior to shipment of the material. Because part of

  17. Industrial start-up of a cold crucible induction melter for high level waste vitrification in an existing hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With over 15 000 glass canisters produced at the end of 2010, AREVA benefits from the largest experience worldwide in commercial vitrification of highly active liquid waste. AREVA has demonstrated the group's capabilities and experience to deploy innovative high level waste (HLW) processing technologies in industrial facilities. AREVA and CEA have continuously improved the hot metallic crucible melter vitrification technology through operational feedback as well as ongoing research and development. The resulting know-how paved the way for the development and implementation of Cold Crucible Induction Melter technology (CCIM). The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which radioactive waste and glass are heated and molten by direct high frequency induction. This technology can withstand highly corrosive solutions and high operating temperatures, and allows, among other things: a greater flexibility in matrix compositions, a higher production throughput. AREVA and CEA developed together the cold crucible technology, and adapted it for vitrification of high active liquid waste vitrification. They pursued cooperation to put CCIM into commercial operation in one of the existing vitrification lines of AREVA La Hague plant in 2010. One of the main challenges for the project team was to replace the hot metallic crucible melter with the CCIM in an existing hot cell that had already been operated for 20 years. The paper will describe why this event is a major milestone for the vitrification of HLW and how the change to a brand new technology was performed in an existing Hot Cell and succeeded in record time, without any impact on the La Hague plant's production. The start-up sequence and the results of first industrial production campaigns of the CCIM will also be presented. (author)

  18. Utilization of the Pilot Scale Demonstration Facility for Vitrification of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of maintenance and repair work for normalization of the pilot scale vitrification demonstration facility was completed successfully to develop the waste treatment in high temperature and melting technology. It was investigated that the treatment of combustible and non-combustible wastes produced at the KAERI site is technically feasible in the pilot scale vitrification demonstration facility which is designed to be able to treat various kinds of radioactive wastes such as combustible and non-combustible wastes including soil and concrete. The vitrification test facility can be used as the R and D and the technology demonstration facility for melt decontamination of the metallic wastes which have a fixed specification. The modification of the RI storage room in the pilot scale vitrification demonstration facility and the licensing according to the facility modification were completed for the R and D on melt decontamination of dismantled metallic wastes which is carrying out as one of the national long-term R and D projects on nuclear energy. The lab-scale melt decontamination apparatus was installed in modified RI storage room and the characteristics of melt decontamination will be examined using various metallic wastes. It is expected that the economical feasibility on the volume reduction and recycle of metallic wastes will be escalated in the present situation when the unit cost for waste disposal has the tendency to grow up gradually. Therefore, the pilot scale vitrification demonstration facility can be used for the technology development for the volume reduction and recycle of the metallic wastes generated from on-going projects on the decommissioning of research reactors and the environmental restoration of uranium conversion plant, and for the treatment of radioactive solid wastes produced at the KAERI site

  19. A Joint USA - Argentina Study on Vitrification of Spent Ion-Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Science and Technology Implementing Arrangement for Cooperation on Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management (JCCRM), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is helping to transfer waste treatment technology to international atomic energy commissions. The results obtained thus far show that spent ion exchange resins can be effectively treated using vitrification to immobilize the contained radionuclides. This work is continuing into FY01

  20. Parametric melting studies for in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a series of simulation studies which examine heat conduction and electric heating during in situ vitrification (ISV). The simulation studies determine the effects of soil parameter changes on the ISV process. Changes in heat capacity, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity are considered. The results of these studies provide a basis for experimental measurement accuracy requirements

  1. Corrosion assessment of refractory materials for high temperature waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of vitrification technologies are being evaluated to immobilize radioactive and hazardous wastes following years of nuclear materials production throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The compositions and physical forms of these wastes are diverse ranging from inorganic sludges to organic liquids to heterogeneous debris. Melt and off-gas products can be very corrosive at the high temperatures required to melt many of these waste streams. Ensuring material durability is required to develop viable treatment processes. Corrosion testing of materials in some of the anticipated severe environments is an important aspect of the materials identification and selection process. Corrosion coupon tests on typical materials used in Joule heated melters were completed using glass compositions with high salt contents. The presence of chloride in the melts caused the most severe attack. In the metal alloys, oxidation was the predominant corrosion mechanism, while in the tested refractory material enhanced dissolution of the refractory into the glass was observed. Corrosion testing of numerous different refractory materials was performed in a plasma vitrification system using a surrogate heterogeneous debris waste. Extensive corrosion was observed in all tested materials

  2. The role of frit in nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of nuclear waste requires additives which are often vitrified independently to form a frit. Frit composition is formulated to meet the needs of glass composition and processing. The effects of frit on melter feed and melt processing, glass acceptance, and waste loading is of practical interest in understanding the trade-offs associated with the competing demands placed on frit composition. Melter feed yield stress, viscosity and durability of frits and corresponding waste glasses as well as the kinetics of elementary melting processes have been measured. The results illustrate the competing requirements on frit. Four frits (FY91, FY93, HW39-4, and SR202) and simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) were used in this study. The experimental evidence shows that optimization of frit for one processing related property often results in poorer performance for the remaining properties. The difficulties associated with maximum waste loading and durability are elucidated for glasses which could be processed using technology available for the previously proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

  3. Vitrification treatability studies of actual waste water treatment sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatability studies have been conducted at the laboratory-scale to evaluate vitrification of waste water sludges at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). These studies are being conducted jointly by Westinghouse Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These studies include testing with surrogate waste formulations at both the laboratory-scale and pilot-scale, and testing with actual waste at the laboratory-scale, pilot-scale, and field-scale. ORR was chosen as the host site for the field-scale demonstration. The Y12 West End Treatment Facility (WETF) waste water treatment sludges, which are RCRA F-listed wastes, were chosen as the candidate waste stream for the first field-scale demonstration. The laboratory-scale ''proof-of-principle'' demonstrations reported in this study and the pilot-scale studies planned for FY95 on the WETF sludge will provide needed operating parameters for the planned field-scale demonstration. These laboratory-scale ''proof-of-principle'' and pilot-scale studies also provide needed data for the evaluation of the feasibility of vitrification as a stabilization option for a variety of wastes which do not currently meet RCRA/LDR (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Land Disposal Restrictions) requirements for storage/disposal and/or those for which treatment capacity does not presently exist

  4. Remediation of contaminated underground tanks by in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination associated with underground tanks at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other sites may be effectively remediated by application of the int situ vitrification (ISV) process. ISV converts the tank, tank contents, and associated contaminated soil to a glass and crystalline block. Compared to current retrieval and treatment options, in-place vitrification may reduce remediation costs, risk of environmental releases, worker exposure, and secondary waste generation by an order of magnitude. To prepare ISV technology for this use, the DOE is funding development activities at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Testing to date has included simulated wastes vitrified in scaled down tanks. During a radioactive engineering-scale test, a 30-cm-diameter buried steel and concrete tank containing simulated tank sludge from Oak Ridge National Laboratory was vitrified, producing a solid block. Hazardous components of the tank sludge, including cesium, strontium, technetium, uranium, lead, mercury, chrome, and cobalt, were immobilized or removed and captured in the off-gas treatment system. The steel tank was converted to ingots near the bottom of the block and concrete walls were dissolved into the resulting glass and crystalline block. The block produced was shown to pass Toxic Characteristic Leach Procedure and other Environmental Protection Agency tests. In a pilot-scale test planned for Summer 1990, a 1-m-diameter tank containing simulated waste will be vitrified

  5. Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations

  6. Hanford tank waste simulants specification and their applicability for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GR Golcar; NG Colton; JG Darab; HD Smith

    2000-04-04

    A wide variety of waste simulants were developed over the past few years to test various retrieval, pretreatment and waste immobilization technologies and unit operations. Experiments can be performed cost-effectively using non-radioactive waste simulants in open laboratories. This document reviews the composition of many previously used waste simulants for remediation of tank wastes at the Hanford reservation. In this review, the simulants used in testing for the retrieval, pretreatment, and vitrification processes are compiled, and the representative chemical and physical characteristics of each simulant are specified. The retrieval and transport simulants may be useful for testing in-plant fluidic devices and in some cases for filtration technologies. The pretreatment simulants will be useful for filtration, Sr/TRU removal, and ion exchange testing. The vitrification simulants will be useful for testing melter, melter feed preparation technologies, and for waste form evaluations.

  7. Vitrification of surrogate non-radioactive waste using a bench-scale cold crucible melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEPCO(Korea Electric Power Corporation) is responsible for safe operation of nuclear power plants. One of its social responsibility is, thus, the safe storage and ultimately, complete isolation of radioactive waste from the environment. However, selection of disposal site is very difficult in Korea as well as in other countries with vast amount of land. In this regard, NETEC/KEPCO launched a research project for developing a high volume reduction technology, i.e., vitrification process. The objective of this paper is to present test results which were obtained in a small scale cold crucible melter(CCM) in order to acquire basic design parameters for design of the pilot plant of 1/4 scale of the commercial vitrification plant. The tests were performed in Marcoule, France using the induction melter of diameter of 300 mm combined with an off-gas treatment system. Ion exchange resin, combustible dry waste, and boron concentrates were simulated and vitrified. The experiments showed that the direct vitrification process could effectively destroy organic compounds in the waste and the off-gas could be treated in compliance with the environmental regulation. Maximum capacity of the CCM was found to be 12 kg/h. Off-gas characteristics such as flow rate, temperature and dust concentration had been measured, based on which the pilot vitrification plant of the maximum throughout of 50 kg/h was designed. It is under construction to be completed by the first half of the year and pilot tests will be carried out with a view to develop vitrification process for commercial plant

  8. Bulk materials handling review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-02-15

    The paper provides details of some of the most important coal handling projects and technologies worldwide. It describes development by Aubema Crushing Technology GmbH, Bedeschi, Cimbria Moduflex, DBT, Dynamic Air Conveying Systems, E & F Services, InBulk Technologies, Nord-Sen Metal Industries Ltd., Pebco Inc, Primasonics International Ltd., R.J.S. Silo Clean (International) Ltd., Takraf GmbH, and The ACT Group. 17 photos.

  9. Vitrification of ion-exchange (IEX) resins: Advantages and technical challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the commercial sector to convert low-level radioactive ion exchange (IEX) resin wastes from the nuclear utilities to solid stabilized waste forms for permanent disposal. One of the alternative waste stabilization technologies is vitrification of the resin into glass. Wastes can be vitrified at elevated temperatures by thermal treatment. One alternative thermal treatment is conventional Joule heated melting. Vitrification of wastes into glass is an attractive option because it atomistically bonds both hazardous and radioactive species in the glass structure, and volume reduces the wastes by 70-80%. The large volume reductions allow for large associated savings in disposal and/or long term storage costs

  10. Vitrification in the presence of salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass is an advantageous material for the immobilization of nuclear wastes because of the simplicity of processing and its unique ability to accept a wide variety of waste elements into its network structure. Unfortunately, some anionic species which are present in the nuclear waste streams have only limited solubility in oxide glasses. This can result in either vitrification concerns or it can affect the integrity, of the final vitrified waste form. The presence of immiscible salts can also corrode metals and refractories in the vitrification unit as well as degrade components in the off-gas system. The presence of a molten salt layer on the melt may alter the batch melting rate and increase operational safety concerns. These safety concerns relate to the interaction of the molten salt and the melter cooling fluids. Some preliminary data from ongoing experimental efforts examining the solubility of molten salts in glasses and the interaction of salts with melter component materials is included

  11. [Successful pregnancies after oocyte and embryo vitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Francisco Hernández; Loza, Erik Omar Okhuysen; Lucas, Maria Teresa Huerta J; Gutiérrez, Gustavo Romero

    2008-02-01

    Cryopreservation of human oocytes represents a solution for ethic conflict about frozen embryo storage for patients with risk to develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome; also is an available technique to preserve fertility in women with cancer under treatment, in poor response patients, in case of premature ovarian failure or aging and for other medical or social conditions that require to delay pregnancies, as well as to make easier oocyte donation programs. This paper reports two cases of successful pregnancies after embryo and oocyte vitrification, as well as their results. The technique of vitrification with the cryotop method is an excellent alternative, efficient, fast and cheap for oocyte and embryo cryopreservation with high ranges of fertilization, cleavage and pregnancies with a normal evolution. PMID:18798404

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Project overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) is being constructed at the US DOE's Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Engineering and design are being accomplished by Fluor Daniel Inc. in Irvine, CA. Technical input is furnished by Westinghouse Hanford Co. and construction management services by UE ampersand C-Catalytic Inc. The HWVP will immobilize high level nuclear waste in a glass matrix for eventual disposal in the federal repository. The HWVP consists of several structures, the major ones being the Vitrification Building, the Canister Storage Building, fan house, sand filter, waste hold tank, pump house, and administration and construction facilities. Construction started in April 1992 with the clearing and grubbing activities that prepared the site for fencing and construction preparation. Several design packages have been released for procurement activities. The most significant package release is for the Canister Storage Building, which will be the first major structure to be constructed

  13. Technical baseline description for in situ vitrification laboratory test equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IN situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as possible waste treatment technology. ISV was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, Washington, as a thermal treatment process to treat contaminated soils in place. The process, which electrically melts and dissolves soils and associated inorganic materials, simultaneously destroys and/or removes organic contaminants while incorporating inorganic contaminants into a stable, glass-like residual product. This Technical Baseline Description has been prepared to provide high level descriptions of the design of the Laboratory Test model, including all design modifications and safety improvements made to data. Furthermore, the Technical Baseline Description provides a basic overview of the interface documents for configuration management, program management interfaces, safety, quality, and security requirements. 8 figs

  14. Vitrification of spent mordenite molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of cesium loaded inorganic ion exchangers (mordenite type molecular sieves/zeolite AR-1) was studied empolying borosilicate glass systems. Direct vitrification of aluminosilicates is rather difficult mainly on account of volatility of cesium at processing temperatures of 1100 degC-1300 degC. In the borosilicate glass system, oxides of lead, sodium and zinc along with boric oxide were employed as major glass formers. Homogeneous glass matrix was obtained incorporating simulated composition of mordenite along with oxides of sodium, lead and boron at the processing temperature of 950 degC. The waste oxide loading up to 50% on dry weight basis was incorporated in this glass formulation. Partial replacement of PbO by TeO2, Bi2O3 and CaF2 resulted in lowering of the processing temperature and also increasing homogeneity of matrix. Based on these results, a glass matrix was prepared with actual cesium AR-1 molecular sieves with processing temperature limited to 925 degC. Powdered samples of glass matrix were subjected to leaching as per ASTM-1285 Product Consistency Test in high purity water at 90 degC for 28 days. The normalised cesium leach rate of this glass was found to be 3.92 x 10-6 g/cm2/day, which is comparable to sodium borosilicate glass matrices currently in use for immobilisation of high level waste. The molecular sieves are also amenable to immobilization in cement matrix. As expected, there is substantial volume reduction by factor 3 in vitrification compared to their immobilization in cementious matrices. Also the quantity of cesium leached from vitrified product was nearly 10,000 times lower compared to cement based matrix. Vitrification of mordenite molecular sieves would lead to high capacity utilisation of zeolite AR-1 for the treatment of low and intennediate levelliquid effluents. (author)

  15. UK Full-Scale Non-Active vitrification development and implementation of research findings onto the waste vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the historic and current status of inactive research in support of UK Highly Active (HA) waste vitrification. Experimental work performed to date on the UK's inactive vitrification research facility is summarised along with estimates of the potential impact of this research work on the reduction of HA Liquor (HAL) stocks stored in the UK at Sellafield. The current position regarding implementation of research learning onto the UK's operational vitrification plants is described. (authors)

  16. Development of a melter system for actinide vitrification. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stabilization of actinides in glass was a technology considered for repository disposal of weapons-grade plutonium. Accelerated development efforts of a suitable glass composition (lanthanide borosilicate; LaBS) and melter system were completed in 1997. The other form involved in the down-selection process was a crystalline ceramic based on Synroc. As part of the glass development program, melter design activities and component testing were completed to demonstrate the feasibility of using glass as an immobilization medium. A prototypical melter was designed and built in 1997. The melter system centered on a Pt/Rh-alloy melter vessel and drain tube that were heated by two separate induction systems. An optional Pt/Rh stirrer was incorporated into the design to facilitate homogenization of the melt. Integrated powder feeding and off-gas systems completed the overall design. Concurrent with the design efforts, testing was conducted using a plutonium surrogate LaBS composition in an existing (near-scale) induction melter to demonstrate the feasibility of processing the LaBS glass on a production scale. Additionally, the drain tube configuration was successfully tested using a plutonium surrogate LaBS glass. The down-selection resulted in the selection of the ceramic option for future development. The successful testing of the induction melter system, however, showed that it is a viable technology for actinide vitrification. Currently, the melter system, complete with control and offgas components, is being successfully utilized to support the Americium/Curium vitrification program at the Savannah River Site

  17. Thermal energy recovering device for vitrification product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of vitrification products in which high level radioactive wastes are vitrified and sealed are contained in a low temperature flon evaporation furnace. A predetermined amount of liquefied flon is contained in the low temperature flon evaporation furnace as a recovering coolant for thermal energy released from the glass vitrification products. The top portion (on the side of a gas layer) and a bottom portion (on the side of a liquid layer) of the low temperature flon evaporation furnace are connected by a cycle line equipped with a turbine electric generator and a condensator in the midway. The liquid flon is gassified by the thermal energy released from the vitrification products, and flon vapors are generated. The flon vapors are introduced to the turbine of a turbo-electric generator by the cycle line to generate electricity. Then, the flon vapors are cooled and condensed by a condensator and returned to the liquid layer of the low temperature flon evaporation furnace. (I.N.)

  18. Slow freezing and vitrification differentially modify the gene expression profile of human metaphase II oocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Monzo, Cécile; Haouzi, Delphine; Roman, K.; Assou, Said; Dechaud, Hervé; Hamamah, Samir

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cryopreservation is now considered as an efficient way to store human oocytes to preserve fertility. However, little is known about the effects of this technology on oocyte gene expression. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of the two cryopreservation procedures, slow freezing and vitrification, on the gene expression profile of human metaphase II (MII) oocytes. METHODS: Unfertilized MII oocytes following ICSI failure were cryopreserved either by slow freezing or by ...

  19. Search for a new greener technology for separation of NCA 97Ru from bulk Nb: ionic liquid based aqueous biphasic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionic-liquid (IL) based aqueous biphasic system was developed for the separation of no-carrier-added (NCA) 97Ru from bulk niobium target for the first time as greener separation technology. Room temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium Chloride ((Bmim)Cl) against K2HPO4 as salt rich phase was employed to construct this IL-ABS system. In the typical experimental condition, 50 % NCA 97Ru was extracted into the ionic liquid phase without any contamination of Nb, with a separation factor of 5.3x103. (author)

  20. Vitrification: a solution for the wastes of wastes; La vitrification: ca chauffe pour les ultimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guihard, B. [Europlasma, 33 - Saint Medard en Jalles (France)

    1997-07-01

    The incineration of wastes generates other wastes (fly ashes) that concentrate a large amount of polluting substances (heavy metals, salts..). French law requires a stabilization of this kind of wastes before their storage. Today vitrification can be considered as an alternative to the stabilization and storage way, the vitrified products could be seen as an interesting material in the building industry or in road works. A few years ago the municipality of Bordeaux decided to launch a demonstration program and a REFIOM (fly ashes) vitrification unit has been operating since 1997. (A.C.)

  1. 生产高缩率膨体毛条的两种技术%The Two Technologies of Producing the High Shrinkage Bulk Tow-to-Tops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐秀忠

    2013-01-01

    By improving the high shrinkage acrylon bulk tow-to-top’s shrinkage ratio to satisfy the requirements of enterprise research and development of textile industry for new products, experiments concerning about the influence of high shrinkage acrylon bulk tow-to-top’s shrinkage ratio were conducted in aspects of using two acrylon continuous filament materials and the optimization of technological parameters of stretch-breaking machine. The results of the experiments indicated that the new product of the high shrinkage acrylon bulk tow-to-top with higher shrinkage ratio, like higher than 28%can be produced effectively by using high shrinkage acrylon continuous filament material.%  为了提高高缩率腈纶膨体毛条(简称高缩条)的缩率,以满足纺织企业研发新产品的要求,采用两种腈纶长丝原料及分别优化的拉断机工艺,对高缩条缩率的影响进行了试验。试验结果表明:采用高缩率长丝原料可有效提高高缩条的缩率,生产出缩率大于28%的高缩条新产品。

  2. Soil density and mass attenuation coefficients for use in shielding calculations at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compacted, backfilled soil excavated during construction may be used to provide shielding from gamma radiation at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). To provide a reasonable estimate of the shielding offered by this backfilled soil, the bulk density and the composition of the emplaced soil must be specified. This study provides an estimate of the bulk density and the mass attenuation coefficients of soil used for calculating gamma-ray shielding attenuation at the HWVP. These estimates are based on measurements taken from soil samples and underlying rock samples at the Hanford Site

  3. Label-free characterization of vitrification-induced morphology changes in single-cell embryos with full-field optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnescu, Livia; Leung, Michael C.; Abeyta, Michael; Sudkamp, Helge; Baer, Thomas; Behr, Barry; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2015-09-01

    Vitrification is an increasingly popular method of embryo cryopreservation that is used in assisted reproductive technology. Although vitrification has high post-thaw survival rates compared to other freezing techniques, its long-term effects on embryo development are still poorly understood. We demonstrate an application of full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) to visualize the effects of vitrification on live single-cell (2 pronuclear) mouse embryos without harmful labels. Using FF-OCT, we observed that vitrification causes a significant increase in the aggregation of structures within the embryo cytoplasm, consistent with reports in literature based on fluorescence techniques. We quantify the degree of aggregation with an objective metric, the cytoplasmic aggregation (CA) score, and observe a high degree of correlation between the CA scores of FF-OCT images of embryos and of fluorescence images of their mitochondria. Our results indicate that FF-OCT shows promise as a label-free assessment of the effects of vitrification on embryo mitochondria distribution. The CA score provides a quantitative metric to describe the degree to which embryos have been affected by vitrification and could aid clinicians in selecting embryos for transfer.

  4. Depth enhancement techniques for the in situ vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ vitrification (ISV) is a process by which electrical energy is supplied to a soil/waste matrix. The resulting Joule heat raises the temperature of the soil/waste matrix, producing a pool of molten soil. Since its inception, there have been many successful applications of the technology to both staged and actual waste sites. However, there has been some difficulty in extending the attainable treatment melt depth to levels greater than 5 m. Results obtained from application of two novel approaches for extending the ultimate treatment depth attainable with in-situ vitrification (ISV) are presented. In the first, the electrode design is modified to concentrate the Joule heat energy delivered to the soil/waste matrix in the lower region of the target melt zone. This electrode design has been dubbed the hot-tip electrode. Results obtained from both computational and experimental investigations of this design concept indicate that some benefit toward ISV depth enhancement was realized with these hot-tip electrodes. A second, alternative approach to extending process depth with ISV involves initiating the melt at depth and propagating it in either vertical direction (e.g., downward, upward, or both) to treat the target waste zone. A series of engineering-scale experiments have been conducted to assess the benefits of this approach. The results from these tests indicate that ISV may be effectively initiated and sustained using this subsurface start-up technique. A survey of these experiments and the associated results are presented herein, together with brief discussion of some considerations regarding setup and implementation of this subsurface start-up technique

  5. Bulk chemicals from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the current robust forces driving sustainable production, and available biomass conversion technologies, biomass-based routes are expected to make a significant impact on the production of bulk chemicals within 10 years, and a huge impact within 20-30 years. In the Port of Rotterdam there is a

  6. Bulk undercooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattamis, T. Z.

    1984-01-01

    Bulk undercooling methods and procedures will first be reviewed. Measurement of various parameters which are necessary to understand the solidification mechanism during and after recalescence will be discussed. During recalescence of levitated, glass-encased large droplets (5 to 8 mm diam) high speed temperature sensing devices coupled with a rapid response oscilloscope are now being used at MIT to measure local thermal behavior in hypoeutectic and eutectic binary Ni-Sn alloys. Dendrite tip velocities were measured by various investigators using thermal sensors or high speed cinematography. The confirmation of the validity of solidification models of bulk-undercooled melts is made difficult by the fineness of the final microstructure, the ultra-rapid evolution of the solidifying system which makes measurements very awkward, and the continuous modification of the microstructure which formed during recalescence because of precipitation, remelting and rapid coarsening.

  7. An overview of micro-optical components and system technology: bulk, planar, and thin-film for laser initiated devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte, Todd

    2010-08-01

    There are a number of attractive micro optical elements or combinations of elements that are currently used or could be employed in optically initiated ordnance systems. When taking a broad-spectrum examination of optically initiated devices, the required key parameters become obviously straightforward for micro optics. Plainly stated, micro optics need to be simple, inexpensive, reliable, robust and compatible within their operational environment. This presentation focuses on the variety of optical elements and components available in the market place today that could be used to realize micro-optical beam shaping and delivery systems for optically initiated devices. A number of micro optical elements will be presented with specific bulk, planar optical and thin film optical devices, such as diffractive optics, micro prisms, axicons, waveguides, micro lenses, beam splitters and gratings. Further descriptions will be presented on the subject of coupling light from a laser beam into a multimode optical fiber. The use of micro optics for collimation of the laser source and conditioning of the laser beam to achieve the highest efficiency and matching the optical fiber NA will be explained. An emphasis on making these optical assemblies compact and rugged will be highlighted.

  8. A Technique to Measure Focal Length of a Lens with no Bulk Motion using Tunable Optics and Optical MEMS Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Reza, Syed Azer

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a motion-free technique for characterizing the focal length of any spherical convex or concave lens. The measurement system uses a Gaussian Beam from a Laser Source (LS), an Electronically Controlled Variable Focus Lens (ECVFL), a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) and a Photo-Detector (PD). As the proposed method does not involve any motion-stages or other moving components, the focal length is measured without requiring any mechanical motion of bulk components. The method requires measuring the spot size of the Gaussian Beam at the DMD plane for various settings of the ECVFL focal length. These beam spot size measurements, are used to estimate the focal length of a lens sample by employing standard polynomial-fitting techniques. Due to the inherent motion-free nature of the proposed setup, the measurements are fast, repeatable, reliable and ideal for use in industrial lens production, manufacturing of imaging systems and sensitive laboratory experiments. Using a DMD and an ECVFL also allow...

  9. Design and operation of high level waste vitrification and storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of high level wastes (HLW) into solids has been studied for the past 30 years, primarily in those countries engaged in the reprocessing of nuclear fuels. Production and demonstration calcination and solidification plants have been operated by using waste solutions from fuels irradiated at various burnup rates, depending on the reactor type. Construction of more advanced solidification processes is now in progress in several countries to permit the handling of high burnup power reactor fuel wastes. The object of this report is to provide detailed information and references for those vitrification systems in advanced stages of implementation. Some less detailed information will be provided for previously developed immobilization systems. The report will examine the HLLW arising from the various locations, the features of each process as well as the stage of development, scale-up potential and flexibility of the processes. Since the publication of IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 176, Techniques for the Solidification of High-Level Wastes great progress on this subject has been made. The AVM in France has been operated successfully for 11 years and France has completed construction at La Hague of two vitrification plants that are based on the AVM rotary calciner/metallic melter process. A similar plant is under construction at Sellafield. The ceramic melter process has been chosen by several countries. Germany has successfully operated the PAMELA vitrification plant. Since 1986, Belgoprocess has continued to operate this facility. The former USSR operated the EP-500 plant from 1986 to 1988. In addition, two ceramic melter vitrification plants are nearing completion in the USA at Savannah River and West Valley and plans are being made to use this technology at Hanford as well as in Japan, Germany and India. This major progress attests to the maturity of these technologies for vitrifying HLLW to make a borosilicate glass for disposal of the waste. 67

  10. Atomic mechanisms of unalloyed iron vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown within the frames of the molecular dynamic method on the iron model with the pair potential of the Pak-Doyama interatomic interaction that the structural stabilization of the pure iron amorphous phase in the process of hardening from the melt is based on the percolation cluster formation from the interpenetrating and mutually contacting icosahedrons, in the tops and centers whereof the atoms are positioned. The revealed regularities of the icosahedral substructure self-organization by vitrification correlated well with the temperature dependences of the basic thermodynamic characteristics

  11. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Vitrification has been selected as a final waste form technology in the US for long-term storage of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). However, a foreseeable problem during vitrification in some waste feed streams lies in the presence of elements (e.g., transition metals) in the HLW that may cause instabilities in the final glass product. The formation of spinel compounds, such as Fe3O4 and FeCrO4, results in glass phase separation and reduces vitrifier lifetime, and durability of the final waste form. A superconducting open gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) system maybe suitable for the removal of the deleterious transition elements (e.g. Fe, Co, and Ni) and other elements (lanthanides) from vitrification feed streams due to their ferromagnetic or paramagnetic nature. The OGMS systems are designed to deflect and collect paramagnetic minerals as they interact with a magnetic field gradient. This system has the potential to reduce the volume of HLW for vitrification and ensure a stable product. In order to design efficient OGMS and High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the waste feed streams is required. Using HLW simulant and radioactive fly ash and sludge samples from the Savannah River Technology Center, Rocky Flats site, and the Hanford reservation, several techniques were used to characterize and predict the separation capability for a superconducting OGMS system.'

  12. Superconducting open-gradient magnetic separation for the pretreatment of radioactive or mixed waste vitrification feeds. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doctor, R.; Nunez, L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Cicero-Herman, C.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (US). Savannah River Technology Center; Ritter, J.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (US). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    1997-01-01

    'Vitrification has been selected as a final waste form technology in the US for long-term storage of high-level radioactive wastes (HLW). However, a foreseeable problem during vitrification in some waste feed streams lies in the presence of elements (e.g., transition metals) in the HLW that may cause instabilities in the final glass product. The formation of spinel compounds, such as Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and FeCrO{sub 4}, results in glass phase separation and reduces vitrifier lifetime, and durability of the final waste form. A superconducting open gradient magnetic separation (OGMS) system maybe suitable for the removal of the deleterious transition elements (e.g. Fe, Co, and Ni) and other elements (lanthanides) from vitrification feed streams due to their ferromagnetic or paramagnetic nature. The OGMS systems are designed to deflect and collect paramagnetic minerals as they interact with a magnetic field gradient. This system has the potential to reduce the volume of HLW for vitrification and ensure a stable product. In order to design efficient OGMS and High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the waste feed streams is required. Using HLW simulant and radioactive fly ash and sludge samples from the Savannah River Technology Center, Rocky Flats site, and the Hanford reservation, several techniques were used to characterize and predict the separation capability for a superconducting OGMS system.'

  13. 'Cold Crucible' vitrification project of low and high active waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In continuity of the CEA HLW vitrification process experienced for more than 20 years in industrial operations in Cogema French reprocessing plants (Marcoule and La Hague, France), CEA has developed an advanced extended performance glass melter to address a wider range of waste like LLW, MLW or HLW in particular waste with very corrosive species or requiring glass with high temperature of preparation. In the cold crucible melter the bath of molten glass is directly heated by induction while the walls are cooled to freeze a protective glass layer. This technology with direct heating of the glass and its outstanding resistance to corrosion allows high temperatures, and high glass throughput while keeping the flexibility, the maintainability and low secondary waste generation related to a small metallic melter. Its use in the conventional glass industry and the different pilot tests performed on inactive surrogates have already showed that cold crucible melting is a fully mature technique for successfully contributing to the final stabilisation of the waste at many nuclear facilities. SGN has therefore selected this advanced technology for different projects and facilities planned in Italy, Korea and USA. This poster presents the cold crucible technology through a short technical description of the process and the different projects in progress. Some pilot results are also given. (author)

  14. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most promising method for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear wastes is a vitrification process in which the wastes are incorporated into borosilicate glass logs, the logs are sealed into welded stainless steel canisters, and the canisters are buried in suitably protected burial sites for disposal. The purpose of the research supported by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project of the Department of Energy through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and summarized in this report was to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen generation process and to predict the rate and amount of hydrogen generation during the treatment of HWVP feed simulants with formic acid. The objectives of the study were to determine the key feed components and process variables which enhance or inhibit the.production of hydrogen. Information on the kinetics and stoichiometry of relevant formic acid reactions were sought to provide a basis for viable mechanistic proposals. The chemical reactions were characterized through the production and consumption of the key gaseous products such as H2. CO2, N20, NO, and NH3. For this mason this research program relied heavily on analyses of the gases produced and consumed during reactions of the HWVP feed simulants with formic acid under various conditions. Such analyses, used gas chromatographic equipment and expertise at the University of Georgia for the separation and determination of H2, CO, CO2, N2, N2O and NO

  15. Design of the vitrification plant for HLLW generated from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) is now designing a vitrification plant. This plant is for the solidification of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) which is generated from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant, and for the demonstration of the vitrification technology. The detailed design of the plant which started in 1982 was completed in 1984. At present the design improvement is being made for the reduction of construction cost and for the licensing which is going to be applied in 1986. The construction will be started in autumn 1987. The plant has a large shielded cell with low flow ventilation, and employs rack-mounted module system and high performance two-armed servomanipulator system to accomplish the fully remote operations and maintenance. The vitrification of HLLW is based on the liquid-fed Joule-heated ceramic melter process. The processing capacity is equivalent to the reprocessing of 0.7 ton of heavy metals per day. The glass production rate is about 9 kg/h, and about 300 kg of glass is poured periodically from the bottom of the melter into a canister. Produced glass is stored under the forced air cooling condition

  16. Transportable vitrification system pilot demonstration with surrogate Oak Ridge WETF sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.E.; Singer, R.P.; Young, S.R.; Zamecnik, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation West End Treatment Facility (WETF) sludge was vitrified in a pilot-scale EnVitCo melter at the Clemson University Environmental Systems Engineering Department (ESED) Vitrification Facility. Although much smaller than the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) melter, this melter is similar in design to the one in the TVS. The TVS was built by EnVitCo for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for the treatment of low level and mixed wastes. A total of three tests were done by ESED personnel with guidance from SRTC TVS personnel. The purpose of these tests was to determine what problems might occur during the vitrification of WETF sludge feed in the TVS. The demonstration was successfully completed and the glasses produced passed the TCLP tests for all the hazardous waste components (Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Ni). An overview of these tests and experimental results on glass container testing, glass pouring, glass product characterization, electrode and refractory wear, and offgas composition and particulate measurements will be given.

  17. Process technique and safety features of the German VEK vitrification plant currently under commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of the VEK vitrification plant is the immobilization of approx. 70 m3 of a highly radioactive waste solution, in total containing 7.7·1017 Bq of β/γ-radioactivity. The solidification of the waste is a major step on the way to the further decommissioning and dismantling of the former German pilot reprocessing plant WAK. The VEK plant, which recently entered the phase of commissioning, will use the German vitrification technology based on a liquid-fed ceramic melter. The advanced melter design enables the vitrification of highly noble metals-containing wastes. Other special features of the glass melter include the mature bottom drain system, improved process control equipment and an effective cleaning system for the melter off-gas pipe. The multi-stage off-gas treatment system along with two recycling pathways for secondary liquid waste ensures the minimization of radioactive effluents and emissions. The safety features of the plant cover resistance against external impacts occurring from potential earthquakes and aircraft accidents. The core process is installed in highly shielded cells for remote maintenance. A process control system that includes also a safety-related system serves for operational control and protection against severe accidents. The safety concept of VEK has been confirmed by a detailed accident analysis. (author)

  18. Pecularities of carrying out radioactive wastes vitrification process without preliminary calcination of wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification technology is considered for liquid radioactive wastes by means of electric furnace where heating of glass-paste is done by electric current passing through the melt. Continious process of gehydration, calcination and vitrification is going on in one apparatus. Testing if the method has been performed by use of a model solution, containing sodium and aluminium nitrates. To obtain phosphoric acid has been added into the solution. Lay-out of the device and its description as well as technical parameters of the electric furnace are given. The results are stated for determination of the optimum operation conditions for the device. To reduce entrainment of solid components, molasses has been added in the solution. Parameters are given for the process of the solution containing 80 g/l molasses processing. It has been shown that edding molasses to the solution permitted to reduse power consumption of the process due to the heat generation during oxidation-reduction reaction on the melt surface. The results are given for investigations of the nitrogen oxides catching in scrubbers. These results have shown that introduction of molasses reduces nitrigen oxides concentration. The results of the experimental works have shown the possibility of the continious process of dehydration, calcination and vitrification in single device with application of remote control and monitoring by means of automatics. (I.T.)

  19. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plan (HWVP) process demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutson, N.D.

    1992-08-10

    Vitrification facilities are being developed worldwide to convert high-level nuclear waste to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. Facilities in the United States include the Department of Energy`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. At each of these sites, highly radioactive defense waste will be vitrified to a stable borosilicate glass. The DWPF and WVDP are near physical completion while the HWVP is in the design phase. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. Because of the similarities of the DWPF and HWVP processes, the IDMS facility has also been used to characterize the processing behavior of a reference NCAW simulant. The demonstration was undertaken specifically to determine material balances, to characterize the evolution of offgas products (especially hydrogen), to determine the effects of noble metals, and to obtain general HWVP design data. The campaign was conducted from November, 1991 to February, 1992.

  20. Test Summary Report INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste Vitrification Demonstration RSM-01-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goles, Ronald W.; Perez, Joseph M.; Macisaac, Brett D.; Siemer, Darryl D.; Mccray, John A.

    2001-05-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is storing large amounts of radioactive and mixed wastes. Most of the sodium-bearing wastes have been calcined, but about a million gallons remain uncalcined, and this waste does not meet current regulatory requirements for long-term storage and/or disposal. As a part of the Settlement Agreement between DOE and the State of Idaho, the tanks currently containing SBW are to be taken out of service by December 31, 2012, which requires removing and treatment the remaining SBW. Vitrification is the option for waste disposal that received the highest weighted score against the criteria used. Beginning in FY 2000, the INEEL high-level waste program embarked on a program for technology demonstration and development that would lead to conceptual design of a vitrification facility in the event that vitrification is the preferred alternative for SBW disposal. The Pacific Northwest National Laborator's Research-Scale Melter was used to conduct these initial melter-flowsheet evaluations. Efforts are underway to reduce the volume of waste vitrified, and during the current test, an overall SBW waste volume-reduction factor of 7.6 was achieved.

  1. Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) campaign report: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plan (HWVP) process demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification facilities are being developed worldwide to convert high-level nuclear waste to a durable glass form for permanent disposal. Facilities in the United States include the Department of Energy's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) at the Hanford Site and the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) at West Valley, NY. At each of these sites, highly radioactive defense waste will be vitrified to a stable borosilicate glass. The DWPF and WVDP are near physical completion while the HWVP is in the design phase. The Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) is a vitrification test facility at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). It was designed and constructed to provide an engineering-scale representation of the DWPF melter and its associated feed preparation and off-gas treatment systems. Because of the similarities of the DWPF and HWVP processes, the IDMS facility has also been used to characterize the processing behavior of a reference NCAW simulant. The demonstration was undertaken specifically to determine material balances, to characterize the evolution of offgas products (especially hydrogen), to determine the effects of noble metals, and to obtain general HWVP design data. The campaign was conducted from November, 1991 to February, 1992

  2. Development of vitrification procedure for radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process was studied of vitrification of radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants in laboratory and pilot plant experiments. As against the vitrification of high-level wastes which is based on phosphoric acid as being the glass forming component, in the case of intermediate-level radioactive wastes, the phosphate system of glass was abandoned because the highly corrosive effect of phosphates complicated technical implementation, and attention was devoted solely to silicate systems. Two variants have ensued from the development of the vitrification process. The first is a two-step process with previous removal of water by calcination when the calcinate is batched into the melting unit together with glass forming admixtures. The second variant is a one-step process when a thickened paste of wastes and glass forming admixtures is batched into the unit. Up to now, neither of the two variants completely eliminates difficulties with the charging of the material into the furnace, the escape of ashes into the filtration part and the corrosion of the melting vessel. It is, however, possible to reduce these difficulties to minimum by a suitable choice of technological conditions of the process. Briefly described is the development of the equipment, mainly the melting furnace. Equipment with direct electric heating is recommended. (Z.M.)

  3. Transportable vitrification system pilot demonstration with surrogate Oak Ridge WETF sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation West End Treatment Facility (WETF) sludge was vitrified in a pilot-scale EnVitCo melter at the Clemson University Environmental Systems Engineering Department (ESED) Vitrification Facility. Although much smaller than the Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) melter, this melter is similar in design to the one in the TVS. The TVS was built by EnVitCo for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for the treatment of low level and mixed wastes. A total of three tests were done by ESED personnel with guidance from SRTC TVS personnel. The purpose of these tests was to determine what problems might occur during the vitrification of WETF sludge feed in the TVS. The demonstration was successfully completed and the glasses produced passed the TCLP tests for all the hazardous waste components (Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Ni). An overview of these tests and experimental results on glass container testing, glass pouring, glass product characterization, electrode and refractory wear, and offgas composition and particulate measurements will be given

  4. Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions

  5. Selection of melter systems for the DOE/Industrial Center for Waste Vitrification Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, D.F.

    1993-12-31

    The EPA has designated vitrification as the best developed available technology for immobilization of High-Level Nuclear Waste. In a recent federal facilities compliance agreement between the EPA, the State of Washington, and the DOE, the DOE agreed to vitrify all of the Low Level Radioactive Waste resulting from processing of High Level Radioactive Waste stored at the Hanford Site. This is expected to result in the requirement of 100 ton per day Low Level Radioactive Waste melters. Thus, there is increased need for the rapid adaptation of commercial melter equipment to DOE`s needs. DOE has needed a facility where commercial pilot scale equipment could be operated on surrogate (non-radioactive) simulations of typical DOE waste streams. The DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research (Center) was established in 1992 at the Clemson University Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Clemson, SC, to address that need. This report discusses some of the characteristics of the melter types selected for installation of the Center. An overall objective of the Center has been to provide the broadest possible treatment capability with the minimum number of melter units. Thus, units have been sought which have broad potential application, and which had construction characteristics which would allow their adaptation to various waste compositions, and various operating conditions, including extreme variations in throughput, and widely differing radiological control requirements. The report discusses waste types suitable for vitrification; technical requirements for the application of vitrification to low level mixed wastes; available melters and systems; and selection of melter systems. An annotated bibliography is included.

  6. Selection of melter systems for the DOE/Industrial Center for Waste Vitrification Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EPA has designated vitrification as the best developed available technology for immobilization of High-Level Nuclear Waste. In a recent federal facilities compliance agreement between the EPA, the State of Washington, and the DOE, the DOE agreed to vitrify all of the Low Level Radioactive Waste resulting from processing of High Level Radioactive Waste stored at the Hanford Site. This is expected to result in the requirement of 100 ton per day Low Level Radioactive Waste melters. Thus, there is increased need for the rapid adaptation of commercial melter equipment to DOE's needs. DOE has needed a facility where commercial pilot scale equipment could be operated on surrogate (non-radioactive) simulations of typical DOE waste streams. The DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research (Center) was established in 1992 at the Clemson University Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Clemson, SC, to address that need. This report discusses some of the characteristics of the melter types selected for installation of the Center. An overall objective of the Center has been to provide the broadest possible treatment capability with the minimum number of melter units. Thus, units have been sought which have broad potential application, and which had construction characteristics which would allow their adaptation to various waste compositions, and various operating conditions, including extreme variations in throughput, and widely differing radiological control requirements. The report discusses waste types suitable for vitrification; technical requirements for the application of vitrification to low level mixed wastes; available melters and systems; and selection of melter systems. An annotated bibliography is included

  7. Design of microwave vitrification systems for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in the research and development of high-power microwave heating systems for the vitrification of DOE radioactive sludges. Design criteria for a continuous microwave vitrification system capable of processing a surrogate filtercake sludge representative of a typical waste-water treatment operation are discussed. A prototype 915 MHz, 75 kW microwave vitrification system or 'microwave melter' is described along with some early experimental results that demonstrate a 4 to 1 volume reduction of a surrogate ORNL filtercake sludge

  8. Design of microwave vitrification systems for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in the research and development of high-power microwave heating systems for the vitrification of Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive sludges. Design criteria for a continuous microwave vitrification system capable of processing a surrogate filtercake sludge representative of a typical waste-water treatment operation are discussed. A prototype 915-MHz, 75-kW microwave vitrification system or ''microwave melter'' is described along with some early experimental results that demonstrate a 4 to 1 volume reduction of a surrogate ORNL filtercake sludge

  9. Design of microwave vitrification systems for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.L.; Wilson, C.T.; Schaick, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bostick, W.D. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in the research and development of high-power microwave heating systems for the vitrification of DOE radioactive sludges. Design criteria for a continuous microwave vitrification system capable of processing a surrogate filtercake sludge representative of a typical waste-water treatment operation are discussed. A prototype 915 MHz, 75 kW microwave vitrification system or `microwave melter` is described along with some early experimental results that demonstrate a 4 to 1 volume reduction of a surrogate ORNL filtercake sludge.

  10. Design of microwave vitrification systems for radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, T.L.; Wilson, C.T.; Schaich, C.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bostick, T.L. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is involved in the research and development of high-power microwave heating systems for the vitrification of Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive sludges. Design criteria for a continuous microwave vitrification system capable of processing a surrogate filtercake sludge representative of a typical waste-water treatment operation are discussed. A prototype 915-MHz, 75-kW microwave vitrification system or ``microwave melter`` is described along with some early experimental results that demonstrate a 4 to 1 volume reduction of a surrogate ORNL filtercake sludge.

  11. Vitrification facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a description of the West Valley Demonstration Project's vitrification facilities from the establishment of the West Valley, NY site as a federal and state cooperative project to the completion of all activities necessary to begin solidification of radioactive waste into glass by vitrification. Topics discussed in this report include the Project's background, high-level radioactive waste consolidation, vitrification process and component testing, facilities design and construction, waste/glass recipe development, integrated facility testing, and readiness activities for radioactive waste processing

  12. Summary of radioactive operations for Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program (ZVDP) has successfully vitrified the zeolite used in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) at Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 to a borosilicate glass product. Under the ZVDP, the US Department of Energy authorized the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to demonstrate the vitrification process on a full scale by use of the in-can melter process. This program was accomplished in two phases. The first phase developed a glass formulation and demonstrated the vitrification process with nonradioactive materials. The second phase received three radioactive liners from the SDS and vitrified the zeolite contained in each. These studies concluded that emission of melter-generated aerosols is responsible for most radioactive, process-related losses to the off-gas system. Tritium, in the form of water vapor, is the only significant gaseous radioactive effluent generated by the vitrification of TMI zeolite waste

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major mission of the US DOE is the permanent disposal of Hanford defense wastes by safe, environmentally acceptable, and cost effective methods which meet applicable regulations. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Project was initiated to immobilize the Hanford high-level waste (HLW) and provide interim storage. The HWVP will vitrify the pre-treated HLW into borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters on site until they are shipped to a federal geologic repository. The HWVP project objective is to design, construct, and operate a facility for immobilizing defense high-level waste for storage. Technical objectives include using the Defense Waste Processing Facility designed plants systems or elements, where practical, and the exchange and review of information on plants in foreign countries. More definitive objectives for quality, reliability, environmental, and safety are provided in the HWVP Project Management Plan

  14. Defense waste vitrification studies during FY 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During FY-1980, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) tested three vitrification processes on simulated high-level radioactive waste typical of that stored or being produced at US defense facilities. Processes tested included a spray calciner/in-can melter, spray calciner/ceramic melter and direct liquid feeding of a ceramic melter. Tests were made on pilot-scale as well as fullscale equipment. Over 16,000 kg of glass product were produced from 68,000 L of simulated waste. Several compositions were tested, and the glass products were evaluated. Emphasis was placed on determining the processing rates and the ability of the waste to be processed. Off-gas data were collected on several runs. Major conclusions drawn from this test program are divided into processing results, glass-product results, and general information

  15. Defense waste vitrification studies during FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorklund, W.J.

    1981-08-01

    During FY-1980, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) tested three vitrification processes on simulated high-level radioactive waste typical of that stored or being produced at US defense facilities. Processes tested included a spray calciner/in-can melter, spray calciner/ceramic melter and direct liquid feeding of a ceramic melter. Tests were made on pilot-scale as well as fullscale equipment. Over 16,000 kg of glass product were produced from 68,000 L of simulated waste. Several compositions were tested, and the glass products were evaluated. Emphasis was placed on determining the processing rates and the ability of the waste to be processed. Off-gas data were collected on several runs. Major conclusions drawn from this test program are divided into processing results, glass-product results, and general information.

  16. Technical summary: Nuclear Waste Vitrification Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six PWR fuel assemblies, containing 2.3 metric tons uranium from Point Beach, have been processed by a conventional Purex-type process. U and other chemicals were added to the dilute HLLW, and the waste was then vitrified to produce two canisters of glass. The on-stream efficiency of the waste preparation facility exceeded 90% for the first 3 weeks; the overall average was 62%. The only processing difficulty in the vitrification facility was a partial failure in the spray calciner nozzle. The Pu byproduct of waste preparation was purified by ion exchange and calcined to oxide; one can of oxide ruptured due to self-heating. 27 figures, 16 tables

  17. Vitrification-based cryopreservation of Drosophila embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreuders, P.D.; Mazur, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Currently, over 30,000 strains of Drosophila melanogaster are maintained by geneticists through regular transfer of breeding stocks. A more cost effective solution is to cryopreserve their embryos. Cooling and warming rates >10,000{degrees}C/min. are required to prevent chilling injury. To avoid the lethal intracellular ice normally produced at such high cooling rates, it is necessary to use {ge}50% (w/w) concentrations of glass-inducing solutes to vitrify the embryos. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to develop and evaluate ethylene glycol and polyvinyl pyrrolidone based vitrification solutions. The resulting solution consists of 8.5M ethylene glycol + 10% polyvinylpyrrolidone in D-20 Drosophila culture medium. A two stage method is used for the introduction and concentration of these solutes within the embryo. The method reduces the exposure time to the solution and, consequently, reduces toxicity. Both DSC and freezing experiments suggest that, while twelve-hour embryos will vitrify using cooling rates >200{degrees}C/min., they will devitrify and be killed with even moderately rapid warming rates of {approximately}1,900{degrees}C/min. Very rapid warming ({approximately}100,000{degrees}C/min.) results in variable numbers of successfully cryopreserved embryos. This sensitivity to warming rite is typical of devitrification. The variability in survival is reduced using embryos of a precisely determined embryonic stage. The vitrification of the older, fifteen-hour, embryos yields an optimized hatching rate of 68%, with 35 - 40% of the resulting larvae developing to normal adults. This Success rite in embryos of this age may reflect a reduced sensitivity to limited devitrification or a more even distribution of the ethylene glycol within the embryo.

  18. Evaluation of glass vitrification techniques on iron ratio determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level liquid waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be processed into borosilicate glass at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Waste glass will be transported to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. Control of the redox properties of the melter feed is necessary for smooth operation of the melter. The Fe(II)/total Fe ratio in glass is a measure of the redox conditions in the melter. To simulate final glass product conditions, melter feed samples will be vitrified at the DWPF laboratory. A colorimetric method was used to determine the Fe(II)/total Fe ratio on vitrified melter feed samples. Because the crucible vitrification technique can have a large effect on the Fe(II)/total Fe ratio, crucible sealing during vitrification of the waste feed sample, and the type of heating applied during vitrification, were the variables investigated for Fe(II)/total Fe ratio measurement effects. Various lid sealants were used for determining crucible sealing effects. Microwave and conventional heating were tested for glass vitrifications. Microwave heating and a nepheline gel sealant, to exclude oxygen from the alumina crucibles during vitrification, was adopted for use at the DWPF laboratory. This paper discusses microwave vitrification and crucible sealing techniques

  19. Commissioning Tests of the Ulchin LLW Vitrification Facility In Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1994, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has, together with SGN in France and Hyundai ROTEM, investigated and developed a vitrification process using a Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) to treat low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste. A commercialization project was launched in 2002 as a governmental nuclear power technology development project. The installation of the first commercial plant, Ulchin Vitrification Facility (UVF), was completed in 2007 inside Ulchin nuclear power plants no. 5 and 6. Combustible dry active waste and low-level ion exchange resin will be treated in the UVF. The UVF has a waste feeding capacity of 20 kg/h and consists of waste pretreatment and feeding systems, a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) system, an off-gas treatment system, a dust recycling system, as well as other systems. In order to assure that systems and equipments meet their design objectives and that the UVF complies with applicable regulations, equipment tests, system functional tests and inactive performance tests were conducted. Furthermore, a long-term inactive test was carried out for 202 hours to evaluate the overall performance and stability of the facility. During the test, about 1,700 kg of surrogate waste was vitrified and 302 kg of waste glass was poured into a glass mould. As the gaseous emission from the UVF was one of the key issues for the operational license and public acceptance, 25 hazardous gases and dusts were analyzed. The compressive strength of the waste glasses was also measured. Results showed that effluent concentrations of the off-gases and the quality of the waste glass met the regulatory limits with sufficient margins. Operation procedures of the UVF were revised based on experiences gained from the tests. By demonstrating satisfactory performance of the UVF, KHNP acquired an operational license in October, 2008 as an amendment to the operational license of the Ulchin NPPs. We are planning to conduct a simulated

  20. Telemetry system for monitoring melt depth during in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A depth telemetry system has been selected for monitoring the melting progress during in situ vitrification (ISV). The ISV technology is being developed and tested by Pacific Northwest Lab. (PNL) for the US Dept. of Energy Richland Operations office as a potential method for in-place stabilization of existing transuranic contaminated soil sites. The ISV process is carried out by inserting four electrodes into the soil in a square array at the appropriate electrode spacing for the specific waste site. Electrode separations up to 5.5 m (18 ft) are possible with existing ISV equipment. A conductive mixture of flaked graphite and glass frit is placed in an X pattern between the electrodes in shallow trenches on the soil surface to permit initial electrical conductance. A specially designed power system applies voltage to the electrodes, quickly heating the graphite mixture to soil-melting temperatures (1100 to 16000C). As the surrounding soil melts, it becomes electrically conductive and grows downward and outward until the desired soil volume has been completely vitrified. A depth-monitoring system is needed to verify the depth of the molten soil at specific times during ISV and to assure that the desired depth is reached before the ISV operation is stopped. After an extensive evaluation of several concepts, the depth telemetry system was selected for further development and demonstration

  1. Strategy for product composition control in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will immobilize transuranic and high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass. The major objective of the Process/Product Model Development (PPMD) cost account of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory HWVP Technology Development (PHTD) Project is the development of a system for guiding control of feed slurry composition (which affects glass properties) and for checking and documenting product quality. This document lays out the broad structure of HWVP's product composition control system, discusses five major algorithms and technical issues relevant to this system, and sketches the path of development and testing

  2. Melter Technologies Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J.M. Jr. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Schumacher, R.F. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States); Forsberg, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The problem of controlling and disposing of surplus fissile material, in particular plutonium, is being addressed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). Immobilization of plutonium by vitrification has been identified as a promising solution. The Melter Evaluation Activity of DOE`s Plutonium Immobilization Task is responsible for evaluating and selecting the preferred melter technologies for vitrification for each of three immobilization options: Greenfield Facility, Adjunct Melter Facility, and Can-In-Canister. A significant number of melter technologies are available for evaluation as a result of vitrification research and development throughout the international communities for over 20 years. This paper describes an evaluation process which will establish the specific requirements of performance against which candidate melter technologies can be carefully evaluated. Melter technologies that have been identified are also described.

  3. Cryopreservation of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes by vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, M; Rawson, D M; Zhang, T

    2010-01-01

    Cryopreservation of fish oocytes is challenging because these oocytes have low membrane permeability to water and cryoprotectant and are highly chilling sensitive. Vitrification is considered to be a promising approach for their cryopreservation as it involves rapid freezing and thawing of the oocytes and therefore minimising the chilling injury. In the present study, vitrification properties and the toxicity of a range of vitrification solutions containing different concentrations of Me2SO, methanol, propylene glycol and ethylene glycol were investigated. Two different base media and vitrification methods were compared. The effect of different post-thaw dilution solutions together with incubation periods on oocyte viability were also investigated. Stage III zebrafish oocytes were equilibrated in increasing concentrations of cryoprotectants for 30 min in 3 steps. Oocytes were thawed rapidly in a water bath and cryoprotectants were removed in 4 steps. Oocyte viability was assessed using trypan blue staining. The results showed that vitrification solutions V3 and V4 in KCl buffer had low toxicity and vitrified well. The survivals of oocytes after stepwise dilution using solutions containing permeable cryoprotectants were significant higher than those diluted in 0.5M glucose, and the use of CVA65 vitrification system improved oocyte survival when compared with plastic straws after 30 min at 22 degrees C post-thawing. Cryopreservation of zebrafish oocytes by vitrification is reported here for the first time, although oocyte survivals after cryopreservation assessed by trypan blue staining were relatively high shortly after thawing, they became swollen and translucent after incubation in KCl buffer. Further studies are needed to optimise the post-thaw culturing conditions. PMID:20919452

  4. Vitrification of nuclear power plant wastes in a cold crucible melter from R and D to implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of using vitrification technologies to process low and intermediate level waste was considered by SGN and KHNP/NETEC (Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd./Nuclear Environment Technology Institute) in 1995. The Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) technology has been developed by CEA, AREVA/COGEMA and SGN to further increase the performance of vitrification facilities since the beginning of the 1980s. A joint NETEC-AREVA/COGEMA-SGN-CEA-MOBIS program was launched in 1997 to develop the industrial application of the CCM for the incineration/vitrification of waste produced in the Korean Nuclear Power Plants. The second step of the joint collaboration, completed in October 1999, was devoted to the design and construction of an industrial pilot plant in Daejeon. This pilot facility has been in operation since October 1999. After the completion of the development program, KHNP has decided to implement the process on one of its NPP site: ULCHIN in South Korea. A commercial facility is being constructed. This unit will process the wastes produced by the Ulchin 3, 4, 5 and 6 Nuclear Power Plants. The basic design of the facility has been completed by SGN and HD MOBIS. The detailed design is in progress. The main features of the design are presented in the paper. (author)

  5. Vitrification of nuclear power plant waste in a cold crucible melter form R and D to implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of using vitrification technologies to process low and intermediate level waste was considered by SGN and KHNP/NETEC (Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd/ Nuclear Environment Technology Institute) in 1995. The Cold Crucible Melter (CCM) technology has been developed by CEA, AREVA/COGEMA and AREVA/SGN to further increase the performance of vitrification facilities since the beginning of the 1980s. A joint NETEC-AREVA/COGEMA/SGN-CEA- MOBIS program was launched in 1997 to develop the industrial application of the CCM for the incineration/ vitrification of waste produced in the Korean Nuclear Power Plants. The second step of the joint collaboration, completed in October 1999, was devoted to the design and construction of an industrial pilot plant in Daejeon. This pilot facility has been in operation since October 1999. After the completion of the development program, KHNP has decided to implement the process on one of its NPP site:Ulchin in South Korea. A commercial facility is being constructed. This unit will process the wastes produced by the Ulchin 3, 4, 5 and 6 Nuclear Power Plants. The basic design of the facility has been completed by SGN and HD MOBIS. The detailed design is in progress. The main features of the design are presented in the paper

  6. Run plan for simulated B ampersand C Pond sludge vitrification demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This run plan will serve as formal guidance for performing and meeting the objectives of the demonstration. Objective is to show the feasibility of vitrification of surrogate B ampersand C Pond sludge for applicability to the Transportable Vitrification System

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory West End Treatment Facility simulated sludge vitrification demonstration, Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert hazardous and mixed wastes to a form suitable for permanent disposal. Vitrification, which has been declared the Best Demonstrated Available Technology for high-level radioactive waste disposal by the EPA, is capable of producing a highly durable wasteform that minimizes disposal volumes through organic destruction, moisture evaporation, and porosity reduction. However, this technology must be demonstrated over a range of waste characteristics, including compositions, chemistries, moistures, and physical characteristics to ensure that it is suitable for hazardous and mixed waste treatment. These wastes are typically wastewater treatment sludges that are categorized as listed wastes due to the process origin or organic solvent content, and usually contain only small amounts of hazardous constituents. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) West End Treatment Facility's (WETF) sludge is considered on of these representative wastes. The WETF is a liquid waste processing plant that generates sludge from the biodenitrification and precipitation processes. An alternative wasteform is needed since the waste is currently stored in epoxy coated carbon steel tanks, which have a limited life. Since this waste has characteristics that make it suitable for vitrification with a high likelihood of success, it was identified as a suitable candidate by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) for testing at CU. The areas of special interest with this sludge are (1) minimum nitrates, (2) organic destruction, and (3) waste water treatment sludges containing little or no filter aid

  8. Vitrification of low-level radioactive waste in a slagging combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability of a Babcock ampersand Wilcox cyclone furnace to vitrify a low-level radioactive liquid waste was evaluated. The feed stream contained a mixture of simulated radioactive liquid waste and glass formers. The U.S. Department of Energy is testing technologies to vitrify over 60,000,000 gallons of this waste at the Hanford site. The tests reported here demonstrated the technical feasibility of Babcock ampersand Wilcox's cyclone vitrification technology to produce a glass for near surface disposal. Glass was produced over a period of 24-hours at a rate of 100 to 150 lb/hr. Based on glass analyses performed by an independent laboratory, all of the glass samples had leachabilities at least as low as those of the laboratory glass that the recipe was based upon. This paper presents the results of this demonstration, and includes descriptions of feed preparation, glass properties, system operation, and flue gas composition. The paper also provides discussions on key technical issues required to match cyclone furnace vitrification technology to this U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site application

  9. Ultra-rapid vitrification of mouse oocytes in low cryoprotectant concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ho-Joon; Elmoazzen, Heidi; Wright, Diane; Biggers, John; Rueda, Bo R; Heo, Yun Seok; Toner, Mehmet; Toth, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    The ideal cryopreservation protocol would combine the benefits of slow freezing with the benefits of vitrification. This report describes a method for the ultra-rapid vitrification of oocytes using slush nitrogen in quartz capillaries. The approach minimizes the thermal mass of the vitrification vessel by using open microcapillaries made of highly conductive quartz and achieves cooling rates of 250,000°C/min. The process of vitrification can be optimized by maximizing the rate at which the sa...

  10. Advances in bulk port development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soros, P. (Soros Associates Consulting Engineers, New York, NY (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The article features several recently developed bulk ports which illustrate aspects of new technology or concepts in maritime transport. Low handling capacity bulk terminals at Ponta da Madeira, Brazil and Kooragang Island, Australia and the low-cost bulk port at Port of Corpus Christi, Texas are described. Operations at the ports of Pecket and Tocopilla in Chile, which had special technical problems, are mentioned. Coal terminals at Port Kembla, Australia and St. Johns River in Florid Jacksonville, Florida are featured as examples of terminals which had to be designed to meet high environmental standards. 13 refs., 2 figs., 14 photos.

  11. MAVIS: An integrated system for live microscopy and vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koning, Roman I., E-mail: r.i.koning@lumc.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Faas, Frank G. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Boonekamp, Michael; Visser, Bram de; Janse, Jan [Department of Instrumental Development, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Wiegant, Joop C. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Breij, Anna de [Department of Infectious Diseases, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Willemse, Joost [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Nibbering, Peter H. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Tanke, Hans J.; Koster, Abraham J. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy of vitrified biological samples can provide three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecules and organelles within bacteria and cells at nanometer scale resolution, even in native conditions. Localization of specific structures and imaging of cellular dynamics in cellular cryo-electron microscopy is limited by (i) the use of cryo-fixation to preserve cellular structures, (ii) the restricted availability of electron dense markers to label molecules inside cells and (iii) the inherent low contrast of cryo electron microscopy. These limitations can be mitigated to a large extend by correlative light and electron microscopy, where the sample is imaged by both light and electron microscopy. Here we present a Microscopy and Vitrification Integrated System (MAVIS) that combines a light microscope with a plunger to vitrify thin specimens. MAVIS provides the capability for fluorescence light microscopic imaging of living cells and bacteria that are adhered to an electron microscopy grid and subsequent vitrification within a time frame of seconds. The instrument allows targeting of dynamic biological events in time and space by fluorescence microscopy for subsequent cryo light and electron microscopy. Here we describe the design and performance of the MAVIS, illustrated with biological examples. - Highlights: • We developed new plunger: a Microscopy and Vitrification Integrated System (MAVIS). • The MAVIS is a new tool for integrating of live microscopy and vitrification. • The MAVIS allows fluorescence LM of living cells and vitrification within seconds. • Here we describe the MAVIS design and performance, and show biological examples.

  12. MAVIS: An integrated system for live microscopy and vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryo-electron microscopy of vitrified biological samples can provide three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecules and organelles within bacteria and cells at nanometer scale resolution, even in native conditions. Localization of specific structures and imaging of cellular dynamics in cellular cryo-electron microscopy is limited by (i) the use of cryo-fixation to preserve cellular structures, (ii) the restricted availability of electron dense markers to label molecules inside cells and (iii) the inherent low contrast of cryo electron microscopy. These limitations can be mitigated to a large extend by correlative light and electron microscopy, where the sample is imaged by both light and electron microscopy. Here we present a Microscopy and Vitrification Integrated System (MAVIS) that combines a light microscope with a plunger to vitrify thin specimens. MAVIS provides the capability for fluorescence light microscopic imaging of living cells and bacteria that are adhered to an electron microscopy grid and subsequent vitrification within a time frame of seconds. The instrument allows targeting of dynamic biological events in time and space by fluorescence microscopy for subsequent cryo light and electron microscopy. Here we describe the design and performance of the MAVIS, illustrated with biological examples. - Highlights: • We developed new plunger: a Microscopy and Vitrification Integrated System (MAVIS). • The MAVIS is a new tool for integrating of live microscopy and vitrification. • The MAVIS allows fluorescence LM of living cells and vitrification within seconds. • Here we describe the MAVIS design and performance, and show biological examples

  13. Comparison of Efficacy of Two Vitrification Solutions for Mouse Morulae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-fu ZHENG; Zai-xian CHEN; Yu-ping DAI; Chun-hua DENG; Ke-li ZHENG; Kai HU

    2004-01-01

    Objective To study the efficacy of two vitrification solutions for mouse morulae Methods Good morulaes of NIH mice were collected and used to test toxicity of the vitrification solutions EDS40 (40% ethylene glycol 18% dextran and 0. 5 mol sucrose) and EFS40 (40% ethylene glycol, 18% ficoll and 0. 5 mol sucrose). Fine vitrified morulae were packaged in 0.25 mL plastic straws and immersed into liquid nitrogen and cryopreserved for about 2-3 months. Then the straws were heated rapidly, washed in Ham's F12 medium and cultured. The viability was determined by morphology and blastocyst formation after being cultured for 48 h. Some embryos were transplanted to recipients after being cultured for 12-14 h. The number of pregnant recipients and young born was counted and analyzed by Chi-squared test.Results The toxicity of EDS40 solution was significantly lower than that of EFS40 (P<0. 05) and the number of embryos developed to the blastocysts after vitrification in EDS40 was significantly higher than in EFS40 (P<0. 05). The number of zona pellucida and the number of pregnancy and birth integrated after vitrification cryopreservation had no significant difference between EDS40 and EFS40 (P>0. 05). However, the embryo fineness rates after vitrification in EDS40 was significantly better than in EFS40 (P<0. 01).Conclusion EDS40 solution has less toxicity and better cryoprotect effect on embryos than EFS 40.

  14. Vitrification development plan for US Department of Energy mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is a general plan for conducting vitrification development for application to mixed wastes owned by the US Department of Energy. The emphasis is a description and discussion of the data needs to proceed through various stages of development. These stages are (1) screening at a waste site to determine which streams should be vitrified, (2) waste characterization and analysis, (3) waste form development and treatability studies, (4) process engineering development, (5) flowsheet and technical specifications for treatment processes, and (6) integrated pilot-scale demonstration. Appendices provide sample test plans for various stages of the vitrification development process. This plan is directed at thermal treatments which produce waste glass. However, the study is still applicable to the broader realm of thermal treatment since it deals with issues such as off-gas characterization and waste characterization that are not necessarily specific to vitrification. The purpose is to provide those exploring or considering vitrification with information concerning the kinds of data that are needed, the way the data are obtained, and the way the data are used. This will provide guidance to those who need to prioritize data needs to fit schedules and budgets. Knowledge of data needs also permits managers and planners to estimate resource requirements for vitrification development

  15. Characteristics of MSWI fly ash during vitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shu-lei; WANG Qi; WANG Qun-hui; MA Hong-zhi

    2009-01-01

    The vitrification characteristics of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash were investigated. Effects of temperature on the binding efficiency of heavy metals, the change of chemical compositions and the weight loss of fly ash in the range of 800 - 1350 ℃ were studied. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the United States was used to analyze the leaching characteristics of heavy metals in fly ash and molten slag. Results indicate that chemical compositions, the weight loss of fly ash and the binding efficiency of heavy metals in fly ash have a tremendous change in the range of 1150 - 1260 ℃. The percentage of CaO, SiO2and AI203 increases with the increasing temperature, whereas it is contrary for SO3 , K2O, Na20 and CI; especially when the temperature is 1260 ℃, the percentage of these four elements decreases sharply from 43.72%to 0. 71%. The weight loss occurs obviously in the range of 1150 - 1260 ℃. Heavy metals of Pb and Cd are almost vaporized above 1000 ℃. Cr is not volatile and its binding efficiency can reach 100% below 1000 ℃. Resuits of TCLP indicate that the heavy metal content of molten slag is beyond stipulated limit values.

  16. Confinement-induced vitrification in polyethylene terephthalate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltá Calleja, F. J.; di Marco, G.; Flores, A.; Pieruccini, M.

    2007-06-01

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis performed on cold-drawn polyethylene terephthalate (PET), cold crystallized (annealed) in the temperature interval 100-140°C , reveals the presence of marginally glassy domains above the annealing temperature Ta . This suggests that the thermodynamic force driving crystallization causes the structural arrest of some noncrystalline domains. The latter thus need a temperature higher than Ta to completely defreeze. Differential scanning calorimetry supports this point of view. Analogous investigations on unoriented PET, cold crystallized in the same conditions, do not show the same peculiarities; thus, chain orientation is relevant to vitrification. This phenomenology is first cast in the language of thermodynamics by introducing an excess chemical potential δμ describing the presence of structural constraints in the amorphous domains and the effect of chain orientation. For a first test of this picture, the orientation contribution to δμ is calculated by means of the Gaussian chain model (this implicitly assumes that δμ is related to the density fluctuations). The resulting expression is then used to discuss the structural differences between cold-drawn and unoriented PET samples reported in the literature.

  17. In situ vitrification of radioactive underground tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a treatment process with great potential for remediating underground tanks previously used for storing radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Tests at several scales have demonstrated the utility of ISV for these tanks. An engineering-scale test vitrified a 30-cm-diameter buried steel and concrete tank that contained simulated tank sludge. Hazardous components of the tank sludge were immobilized, or removed and captured in the off-gas treatment system, and the tank walls were melted or incorporated into the ISV block. A pilot-scale ISV test vitrified a 1-m simulated underground tank than contained a simulated refractory sludge. The ISV process completely vitrified the tank, its contents, and the soil below the tank to a depth of 2.4 m, producing a uniform glass and crystalline monolith with an estimated mass of 30 tons. A large-scale underground tank test is scheduled for early 1991. 5 refs., 4 figs

  18. Vitrification of high-level liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced in the fuel elements reprocessing require, for their disposal, a preliminary treatment by which, through a series of engineering barriers, the dispersion into the biosphere is delayed by 10 000 years. Four groups of compounds are distinguished among a great variety of final products and methods of elaboration. From these, the borosilicate glasses were chosen. Vitrification experiences were made at a laboratory scale with simulated radioactive wastes, employing different compositions of borosilicate glass. The installations are described. A series of tests were carried out on four basic formulae using always the same methodology, consisting of a dry mixture of the vitreous matrix's products and a dry simulated mixture. Several quality tests of the glasses were made 1: Behaviour in leaching following the DIN 12 111 standard; 2: Mechanical resistance; parameters related with the facility of the different glasses for increasing their surface were studied; 3: Degree of devitrification: it is shown that devitrification turns the glasses containing radioactive wastes easily leachable. From all the glasses tested, the composition SiO2, Al2O3, B2O3, Na2O, CaO shows the best retention characteristics. (M.E.L.)

  19. Fully front-side bulk-micromachined single-chip micro flow sensors for bare-chip SMT (surface mounting technology) packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports novel single-wafer-based piezoresistive micro flow sensors, which are bulk micromachined only from the front side of the silicon wafer to facilitate the sensor-bare chips directly packaged into micro-fluidic systems with low-cost surface mounting technology (SMT). With neither double-sided micromachining nor multiwafer bonding needed, two structural types of the piezoresistive flow sensors are designed and fabricated in (1 1 1) wafers, where ‘type A’ sensor has a smaller channel cross section area compared to ‘type B’ sensor. After the bare sensor chip directly attached on a printed circuit board (PCB), wire bonded between the pads and the PCB for electric interconnection and the inlet/outlet front side connected, deionized water is flowed into the both types of flow sensors to characterize piezoresistive output of the differential pressure sensing elements in terms of the flow rate. For ‘type A’ and ‘type B’ sensors that are both power supplied with DC 5 V, the sensitivities are sequentially measured as 766.80 mV (µL s−1)−1 and 19.12 mV (µL s−1)−1, with the nonlinearities as 0.4% FS and 0.9% FS, respectively. Compared with traditionally fabricated micro flow sensors, the single-chip fabricated differential-pressure flow sensors can be low-cost volume manufactured. Moreover, the bare sensor chips can be simply SMT packaged for low-cost micro-system applications. (paper)

  20. Design, operation, and evaluation of the transportable vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a transportable melter system designed to demonstrate the treatment of low-level and mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes such as wastewater treatment sludges, contaminated soils and incinerator ash. The TVS is a large-scale, fully integrated vitrification system consisting of melter feed preparation, melter, offgas, service, and control modules. The TVS was tested with surrogate waste at the Clemson University Environmental Systems Engineering Department's (ESED) DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research prior to being shipped to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) K-25 site for treatment of mixed waste. This testing, along with additional testing at ORR, proved that the TVS would be able to successfully treat mixed waste. These surrogate tests consistently produced glass that met the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). Performance of the system resulted in acceptable emissions of regulated metals from the offgas system. The TVS is scheduled to begin mixed waste operations at ORR in June 1997

  1. High-temperature vitrification of Hanford residual-liquid waste in a continuous melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 270 kg of high-temperature borosilicate glass have been produced in a series of three short-term tests in the High-Temperature Ceramic Melter vitrification system at PNL. The glass produced was formulated to vitrify simulated Hanford residual-liquid waste. The tests were designed to (1) demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing high-temperature, continuous-vitrification technology for the immobilization of the residual-liquid waste, (2) test the airlift draining technique utilized by the high-temperature melter, (3) compare glass produced in this process to residual-liquid glass produced under laboratory conditions, (4) investigate cesium volatility from the melter during waste processing, and (5) determine the maximum residual-liquid glass production rate in the high-temperature melter. The three tests with the residual-liquid composition confirmed the viability of the continuous-melting vitrification technique for the immobilization of this waste. The airlift draining technique was demonstrated in these tests and the glass produced from the melter was shown to be less porous than the laboratory-produced glass. The final glass produced from the second test was compared to a glass of the same composition produced under laboratory conditions. The comparative tests found the glasses to be indistinguishable, as the small differences in the test results fell within the precision range of the characterization testing equipment. The cesium volatility was examined in the final test. This examination showed that 0.44 wt % of the cesium (assumed to be cesium oxide) was volatilized, which translates to a volatilization rate of 115 mg/cm2-h

  2. In situ vitrification engineering-scale test ES-INEL-5 test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1952, the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) was established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). RWMC is located on approximately 144 acres in the southwestern corner of the INEL site and was established as a controlled area for the burial of solid low-level wastes generated by INEL operations. In 1954, the 88-acre Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of RWMC began accepting solid transuranic-contaminated waste. From 1954 to 1970, transuranic-contaminated waste was accepted from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) near Golden, CO, as well as from other US Department of Energy (DOE) locations. In 1987, the Buried Waste Program (BWP) was established by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., the prime contractor at INEL. Following the Environmental Restoration guidelines of the Buried Waste Program, the In Situ Vitrification Program is participating in a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for permanent disposal of INEL waste, in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This study was requested and is being funded by the Office of Technology Development of the Idaho Operations Office of DOE (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an in situ vitrification (ISV) scoping study on the treatability of mixed low-level and mixed transuranic-contaminated waste is being performed to determine applicability of ISV to remediation of waste at SDA. This In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test ES-INEL-5 Test Plan considers the data needs of engineering, regulatory, health, and safety activities for all sampling and analysis activities in support of engineering scale test ES-INEL-5. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celary, Piotr; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta

    2014-12-01

    Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with flotation sewage sludge, and 45% v/v and 5% v/v, respectively, for precipitation sewage sludge. These combinations allowed for obtaining products with negligible heavy metal leaching levels and hardness similar to commercial glass, which suggests they could be potentially used as construction aggregate substitutes. Incineration of sewage sludge before the vitrification process lead to

  4. Effect of geometric curvature on vitrification behavior for polymer nanotubes confined in anodic aluminum oxide templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiao; Li, Linling; Zhou, Dongshan; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xue, Gi

    2015-09-01

    The glass transition behavior of polystyrene (PS) nanotubes confined in cylindrical alumina nanopores was studied as a function of pore diameter (d ) and polymer tube thickness (δ). Both the calorimetric glass transition temperature and the microstructure measured by a nonradiative energy transfer method indicated that the polymer nanotube, or concave polymer thin film, exhibited significant differences in vitrification behavior compared to the planar one. A closer interchain proximity and an increased Tg were observed for polymer nanotubes with respect to the bulk polymer. Tg for polymer nanotubes was primarily dependent on the curvature radius d of the template, while it was less dependent on the thickness δ of the PS tube wall in the range of 11-23 nm. For small nanotubes (d =55 nm ) , the Tg increased as high as 18 °C above the bulk value. This vitrified property reverted back to the bulk value when the substrate was chemically removed, which indicated the crucial importance of the interfacial effect imposed by the hard wall with a concave geometry.

  5. Rocky Flats Plant precipitate sludge surrogate vitrification demonstration. Technical Task Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to convert hazardous and mixed wastes to a form suitable for permanent disposal. The preferred disposal method would be one that is capable of consistently producing a durable leach resistant wasteform, while simultaneously minimizing disposal volumes. Vitrification, which has been declared the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for high-level radioactive waste disposal by the EPA, is capable of producing a highly durable wasteform that minimizes disposal volumes through organic destruction, moisture evaporation, and porosity reduction. However, this technology must be demonstrated over a range of waste characteristics, including compositions, chemistries, moistures, and physical characteristics to ensure that it is suitable for hazardous and mixed waste treatment

  6. Vitrification of low-level and mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and nuclear utilities have large quantities of low-level and mixed wastes that must be treated to meet repository performance requirements, which are likely to become even more stringent. The DOE is developing cost-effective vitrification methods for producing durable waste forms. However, vitrification processes for high-level wastes are not applicable to commercial low-level wastes containing large quantities of metals and small amounts of fluxes. New vitrified waste formulations are needed that are durable when buried in surface repositories

  7. Optimal developmental stage for vitrification of parthenogenetically activated porcine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Rong; Li, Juan; Kragh, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this experiment was to determine the optimal developmental stage to vitrify in-vitro cultured porcine parthenogenetically activated (PA) embryos. Embryos were vitrified by Cryotop on Day 4, 5 or 6 after oocyte activation (Day 0), and immediately after warming they were either time......>0.05), no matter if tehy were morulae or blastocysts. These results demonstrate that porcine PA embryos can survive successfully after vitrification/warming that the optimal time for vitrification was Day 4 for both morulae and blastocysts, and that 8 h after warming was the time needed to make an...

  8. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celary, Piotr, E-mail: pcelary@is.pcz.czest.pl; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta, E-mail: jszoltysek@is.pcz.czest.pl

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The possibility of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge was investigated. • Glass cullet was substituted with different wastes of mineral character. • Component ratio in the processed mixtures was optimized. • Environmental safety of the acquired vitrificates was verified. • An alternative management approach of usually landfilled waste was presented. - Abstract: Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with

  9. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The possibility of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge was investigated. • Glass cullet was substituted with different wastes of mineral character. • Component ratio in the processed mixtures was optimized. • Environmental safety of the acquired vitrificates was verified. • An alternative management approach of usually landfilled waste was presented. - Abstract: Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with

  10. Equipment experience in a radioactive LFCM [liquid-fed ceramic melter] vitrification facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since October 1984, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has operated a pilot-scale radioactive liquid-fed ceramic melter (RLFCM) vitrification process in shielded manipulator hot cells. This vitrification facility is being operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) to remotely test vitrification equipment components in a radioactive environment and to develop design and operation data that can be applied to production-scale projects. This paper summarizes equipment and process experience obtained from the operations of equipment systems for waste feeding, waste vitrification, canister filling, canister handling, and vitrification off-gas treatment

  11. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, T.N. Jr. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  12. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass

  13. Development of three vitrification-based cryopreservation procedures for shoot tips of China's potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Wang, R R; Li, J W; Ma, Y L; Sheng, W M; Li, M F; Wang, Q C

    2013-01-01

    China is now the largest potato producing country worldwide. The establishment of efficient conservation techniques for potato germplasm is a prerequisite for breeding of elite cultivars. Potato viral diseases have been a great threat for sustainable potato production in China. Use of virus-free seed tubers is an effective and practical means to control viral diseases. In the present study, three vitrification-based cryopreservation techniques, i.e. droplet-vitrification, encapsulation-vitrification and vitrification were successfully developed for the first time for China's potato. Cultivar 'Zihuabai' was used to optimize key parameters involved in the three vitrification-based procedures. With the optimized parameters, shoot regrowth percentages of 71%, 76% and 43% were obtained for droplet-vitrification, encapsulation-vitrification and vitrification, respectively. The three protocols developed were further tested with eight China's major cultivars, with average shoot regrowth of 61%, 38% and 28% for droplet-vitrification, encapsulation-vitrification and vitrification, respectively. Successful development of the three cryopreservation procedures using a single cultivar will facilitate a number of comparative studies such as cryo-injury, regrowth pattern, genetic stability and efficiency of virus elimination. Testing these three cryogenic procedures for potato major cultivars representing a wide range of genetic background, will help the establishment of potato cryobanking in China and the production of virus-free plants. PMID:23995404

  14. Solvent extraction technology of 99Mo-99mTc system re-visited : re-engineering of the technology for the faster preparation of a purer form of bulk 99mTcO-4 in the hospital radiopharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The liquid-liquid (MEK-aqueous alkali) method of separation and purification of 99mTc from 99Mo, though unpopular worldwide because of its relative complexity, has been the work-horse of Indian nuclear medicine since 1971, owing to its cheapness and ready availability of low specific activity 99Mo. The main issues to be considered while perfecting this technology are: simplicity of operation, yield, purity, radiation health and safety of operator and environment, time element to obtain the product and cost. Any modifications in process technology that help to improve these are welcome. In the past we had made many alternations in the process and process design and these have been incorporated into the relevant technology (IAEA 1984). In keeping with our objectives we have systematically introduced a few more innovations/improvisations in the process chemistry and technology viz. (i) substitution of dil (1.0 M) NaOH for conc. 5.0 M as the aqueous alkaline liquid phase, (ii) use of excess (∼40 ml) MEK as the extractant, (iii) total elimination of the back extraction (stripping) step, and (iv) effecting multiple (∼3) aerations + removal of liquid MEK at interphase (0.1-0.3 ml after each aeration) subsequent to the initial separation. The characteristics of the bulk 99mTcO4- were closely monitored for yield and purity while studying each of these parameters. It was found that the alterations did not affect these features. These changes have resulted in simplifying the process technology while ensuring optimum yields and purity even when performed by novices. (The assurance of purity is an important pharmacopoeial requirement for guaranteeing the quality of derived 99mTc- radiodiagnostics). It also reduced the time element involved to an extent, as well as the radiation exposures to operators. Some of these procedures have the potential for reducing operating costs. Presently all these are tried and tested methodologies and form a part of the standard

  15. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant project overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being constructed at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Engineering and design are being accomplished by Fluor Daniel, Inc. in Irvine, California. Technical input is furnished by Westinghouse Hanford Company and construction management services by UE ampersand C-Catalytic Inc

  16. Probing the structure of a liquid metal during vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using aerodynamic levitation, vitrification of a ternary Zr–Cu–Al alloy was observed in-situ by high energy synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in the temperature range from above the liquidus Tliq to well below the glass transition temperature Tg. The evolution of the atomic structure was studied using pair distribution functions (PDF) and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. Vitrification was rendered possible due to the enhanced stability of the undercooled Zr–Cu melt after Al addition. Results indicate three regimes in the liquid alloy’s structural pathway to vitrification. Short (SRO) and medium range order (MRO) develop significantly during cooling the liquid phase to the glassy state. The rate of structural rearrangements is enhanced in the super-cooled liquid between Tliq-140 K and Tg. The populations of atomic clusters with icosahedral local symmetry become predominant as Tg is approached and facilitate vitrification and suppression of crystal nucleation and growth. The scenario of a possible fragile to strong transition in the super-cooled liquid is discussed

  17. Evaluation of high-level waste vitrification feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant, FY 1994: Alternate flowsheets (DRAFT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site will be pretreated to concentrate radioactive constituents and fed to the vitrification plant A flowsheet for feed preparation within the vitrification plant (based on the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) design) called for HCOOH addition during the feed preparation step to adjust rheology and glass redox conditions. However, the potential for generating H2 and NH3 during treatment of high-level waste (HLW) with HCOOH was identified at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Studies at the University of Georgia, under contract with Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and PNL, have verified the catalytic role of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru), present in the waste, in the generation of H2 and NH3. Both laboratory-scale and pilot-scale studies at SRTC have documented the H2 and NH3 generation phenomenal Because H2 and NH3 may create hazardous conditions in the vessel vapor space and offgas system of a vitrification plant, reducing the H2 generation rate and the NH3 generation to the lowest possible levels consistent with desired melter feed characteristics is important. The Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 studies were conducted with simulated (non-radioactive), pre-treated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). Neutralized current acid waste is a high-level waste originating from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) plant that has been partially denitrated with sugar, neutralized with NaOH, and is presently stored in double-shell tanks. The non-radioactive simulant used for the present study includes all of the trace components found in the waste, or substitutes a chemically similar element for radioactive or very toxic species. The composition and simulant preparation steps were chosen to best simulate the chemical processing characteristics of the actual waste

  18. Grout and vitrification formula development for immobilization of hazardous radioactive tank sludges at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) has been identified as the preferred treatment option for hazardous radioactive sludges, and currently grouting and vitrification are considered the leading candidate S/S technologies. Consequently, a project was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define composition envelopes, or operating windows, for acceptable grout and glass formulations containing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) sludges. The resulting data are intended to be used as guidance for the eventual treatment of the MVST sludges by the government and/or private sector. Wastewater at ORNL is collected, evaporated, and stored in the MVSTs pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supernate. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating for several years and contain a high amount of radioactivity, with some classified as transuranic (TRU) sludges. The available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge indicates that the Resource and Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be potentially RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges have the potential to be designated as mixed TRU waste. S/S treatment must be performed to remove free liquids and reduce the leach rate of RCRA metals. This paper focuses on initial results for the development of the operating window for vitrification. However, sufficient data on grouting are presented to allow a comparison of the two options.

  19. Grout and vitrification formula development for immobilization of hazardous radioactive tank sludges at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) has been identified as the preferred treatment option for hazardous radioactive sludges, and currently grouting and vitrification are considered the leading candidate S/S technologies. Consequently, a project was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define composition envelopes, or operating windows, for acceptable grout and glass formulations containing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) sludges. The resulting data are intended to be used as guidance for the eventual treatment of the MVST sludges by the government and/or private sector. Wastewater at ORNL is collected, evaporated, and stored in the MVSTs pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supernate. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating for several years and contain a high amount of radioactivity, with some classified as transuranic (TRU) sludges. The available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge indicates that the Resource and Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be potentially RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges have the potential to be designated as mixed TRU waste. S/S treatment must be performed to remove free liquids and reduce the leach rate of RCRA metals. This paper focuses on initial results for the development of the operating window for vitrification. However, sufficient data on grouting are presented to allow a comparison of the two options

  20. Transportable Vitrification System RCRA Closure Practical Waste Disposition Saves Time And Money

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brill, Angie; Boles, Roger; Byars, Woody

    2003-02-26

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) was a large-scale vitrification system for the treatment of mixed wastes. The wastes contained both hazardous and radioactive materials in the form of sludge, soil, and ash. The TVS was developed to be moved to various United States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to vitrify mixed waste as needed. The TVS consists of four primary modules: (1) Waste and Additive Materials Processing Module; (2) Melter Module; (3) Emissions Control Module; and (4) Control and Services Module. The TVS was demonstrated at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) during September and October of 1997. During this period, approximately 16,000 pounds of actual mixed waste was processed, producing over 17,000 pounds of glass. After the demonstration was complete it was determined that it was more expensive to use the TVS unit to treat and dispose of mixed waste than to direct bury this waste in Utah permitted facility. Thus, DOE had to perform a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the facility and find a reuse for as much of the equipment as possible. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful RCRA closure project: TVS site closure design and implementation; characterization activities focused on waste disposition; pollution prevention through reuse; waste minimization efforts to reduce mixed waste to be disposed; and lessons learned that would be integrated in future projects of this magnitude.

  1. Vitrification demonstration with surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation K-25 B and C pond sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) K-25 B ampersand C Pond sludge was vitrified in a pilot-scale EnVit Co melter operated by Clemson University at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research Center. This demonstration was performed for the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in support of a Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Technology Development (OTD) Technical Task Plan. The intent of the demonstration was to determine the feasibility of vitrifying actual K-25 B ampersand C Pond sludge in an EnVitCo type melter. B ampersand C Pond sludge is a mixed waste consisting primarily of various amounts of Ca, Fe, and Si, with Ni and U as the principal hazardous and radioactive components. The demonstration was successfully completed and homogeneous, durable glass was produced. Characterization of the glass product, as well as details of the demonstration, will be discussed

  2. Cryopreservation of human embryonic stem cells by vitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周灿权; 麦庆云; 李涛; 庄广伦

    2004-01-01

    Background The efficiency of traditional cryopreservation of human embryonic stem (ES) cells is low, and there have been few attempts to prove new cryopreservation methods effective. This study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of cryopreservation of human ES cells using vitrification method.Methods Human ES cells clumped from an identical cell line were randomly allocated to be cryopreserved by vitrification or by slow freezing. The recovery rates, the growth and differentiation potential of thawed human ES cells were compared between these two groups. The pluripotency of human ES cells after thawing was identified.Results Eighty-one point nine percent (59/72) of human ES cell clumps were recovered after vitrification, while only 22.8% (16/70) were recovered after slow freezing (P<0.01). The colonies after vitrification manifested have not only faster growth but also a lower level of differentiation when compared to colonies subjected to the slow freezing protocol. However, the rates of growth and differentiation in undifferentiated colonies from both groups were identical to the rates in those of non-cryopreserved stem cells after a prolonged culture period. Passage 6 of vitrified human ES cells retained the properties of pluripotent cells, a normal karyotype and expressed the transcription factor OCT-4, stage specific expressed antigen-4 (SSEA-4) and SSEA-3. Teratoma growth of these cells demonstrated the ability to develop into all three germ layers.Conclusions Vitrification is effective in cryopreserving human ES cells. During a prolonged culture, human ES cells retain their pluripotency after cryopreservation.

  3. Performance enhancement of poly(3-hexylthiophene):methanofullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells. : Section Title: Electrochemical, Radiational, and Thermal Energy Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, L. Jan Anton; Mihailetchi, Valentin D.; Hummelen, Jan C.; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2006-01-01

    Using a newly developed device model we have studied the effect of controlled thermal annealing on charge transport and photogeneration in bulk-heterojunction solar cells made from blend films of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and methanofullerene (PCBM). With respect to the charge trans

  4. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Final report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes two in situ vitrification field tests conducted on simulated buried waste pits during June and July 1990 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to access the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste. Test results indicate the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 33 refs., 109 figs., 39 tabs

  5. APPLICATIONS OF LASERS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER PHYSICS AND TECHNOLOGY: Switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with laser plasma initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleshakova, R. P.; Shikanov, A. E.

    1987-10-01

    An analysis was made of the results of an investigation of switching of a pulsed ionic diode through the bulk of an ion source with a laser plasma and a vacuum arc. The dependences of the neutron yield on the electrical energy of the diode were recorded and analyzed. The results indicated a possible way of simple construction of an acceleration tube with switching via a laser-plasma source.

  6. Process Control for Simultaneous Vitrification of Two Mixed Waste Streams in the Transportable Vitrification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cozzi, A.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Jantzen, C.M.; Brown, K.G.; Cicero-Herman, C.

    1998-05-01

    Two highly variable mixed (radioactive and hazardous) waste sludges were simultaneously vitrified in an EnVitCo Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) deployed at the Oak Ridge Reservation. The TVS was the result of a cooperative effort between the Westinghouse Savannah River Company and EnVitCo to design and build a transportable melter capable of vitrifying a variety of mixed low level wastes.The two waste streams for the demonstration were the dried B and C Pond sludges at the K-25 site and waste water sludge produced in the Central Neutralization Facility from treatment of incinerator blowdown. Large variations occurred in the sodium, calcium, silicon, phosphorus, fluorine and iron content of the co- blended waste sludges: these elements have a significant effect on the process ability and performance of the final glass product. The waste sludges were highly reduced due to organics added during processing, coal-pile runoff (coal and sulfides), and other organics, including wood chips. A batch-by-batch process control model was developed to control glass viscosity, liquidus, and reduction/oxidation, assuming that the melter behaved as a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor.

  7. Cryopreservation of Galanthus elwesii Hook. apical meristems by droplet vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanka, M; Panis, B; Bach, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient cryopreservation protocol for the geophyte giant snowdrop (Galanthus elwesii Hook.) that guarantees a high rate of survival and plant regeneration after cryopreservation. The excised apical meristems were obtained from cultures of in vitro grown bulb scales. Using a vitrification procedure and optimizing the duration of the exposure to the loading solution (LS), meristem post-rewarm survival rates higher than 90 percent were achieved. Also regrowth percentages were very high, ranging from 87 to 91 percent. After optimizing the time of exposure to the plant vitrification solution (PVS2), the survival rate was between 83 and 97 percent. During post-rewarm regeneration, good growth recovery was as high as 76 percent; however, hyperhydration and callusing were also observed. The results demonstrate that cryopreservation of Galanthus elwesii germplasm seems to be feasible. PMID:23435704

  8. Vitrification of spent ion exchange resin from Korean NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent resin is the main wet waste generated by nuclear power plants (NPPs). Vitrification is conceptually attractive because of the potential durability of the final product and the large volume reduction. The vitrification of spent resin from NPPs is examined. There is a large amount of sulfate in spent resin ash. However, the limited solubility of sulfate in glass resulted in the low waste loading of spent resin. High sulfate in glass led to the phase separation. Some well-developed glasses frits have been used to vitrify spent resin from Korean NPPs. The waste loading is less than 5 wt percent of resin ash. Spent resin also was added to the borate waste glasses, 20 g of dry resin could be vitrified in 100 g of borate waste glass without phase separation and final waste from has good durability. (author). 12 refs., 6 tabs

  9. Development of glass melter for the PNC Tokai Vitrification Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the glass melter which will be used in the HLLW vitrification facility has been performed since 1977. The design and operational experiences has been accumulated through the process tests in the cold engineering facilities. The results obtained in these periods have been considered in the design of the Tokai Vitrification Facility (TVF), the construction of which has already been started in the spring of 1988. The present PNC melter system includes several features as the result of PNC's own improvements and modifications. The results of the melter development will be described in this paper mainly on the special features which are developed in PNC, such as glass fiber additives, induction-heated bottom drain nozzle and remote handling technique. The mock-up test using the new mock up melter which was constructed following the TVF final design has started to verify the process performance. (author)

  10. New developments for medium and low level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Converting ultimate waste material into a stable, inert product is beneficial, notably in the case of potentially very toxic wastes. Vitrification, in which a glass or glass-ceramic material is fabricated from a particular waste form, is now a proven solution. This high-temperature process uses additives-notably silica-if necessary to form a glass network. Vitrification confines the waste by forming a stable, inert, nontoxic material suitable for safe disposal; it usually also results in a significant volume reduction having a major effect on the disposal cost. France is actively engaged in an ongoing research effort in this area, not only to enhance the production capacity and the containment quality, but also to extend the process to low and medium level wastes such as those produced in nuclear power stations

  11. Evaluation of vitrification factors from DWPF's macro-batch 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is evaluating new sampling and analytical methods that may be used to support future Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) batch acceptability decisions. This report uses data acquired during DWPF's processing of macro-batch 1 to determine a set of vitrification factors covering several SME and Melter Feed Tank (MFT) batches. Such values are needed for converting the cation measurements derived from the new methods to a ''glass'' basis. The available data from macro-batch 1 were used to examine the stability of these vitrification factors, to estimate their uncertainty over the course of a macro-batch, and to provide a recommendation on the use of a single factor for an entire macro-batch. The report is in response to Technical Task Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-980015

  12. The role of troublesome components in plutonium vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong; Vienna, J.D.; Peeler, D.K.; Hrma, P.; Schweiger, M.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    One option for immobilizing surplus plutonium is vitrification in a borosilicate glass. Two advantages of the glass form are (1) high tolerance to feed variability and, (2) high solubility of some impurity components. The types of plutonium-containing materials in the United States inventory include: pits, metals, oxides, residues, scrap, compounds, and fuel. Many of them also contain high concentrations of carbon, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide. To vitrify plutonium-containing scrap and residues, it is critical to understand the impact of each component on glass processing and chemical durability of the final product. This paper addresses glass processing issues associated with these troublesome components. It covers solubility limits of chlorine, fluorine, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide in several borosilicate based glasses, and the effect of each component on vitrification (volatility, phase segregation, crystallization, and melt viscosity). Techniques (formulation, pretreatment, removal, and/or dilution) to mitigate the effect of these troublesome components are suggested.

  13. Treatment of gaseous wastes in vitrification plants for fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to solidify highly active fission product solutions from reprocessing of nuclear fuels, a discontinuous as well as continuous vitrification process has been developed and the appropriate plants been put into operation in Marcoule, France. The waste gases formed in the part processes of vitrification, evaporation, calcination and melting, are described according to their origin, chemical composition and their technical, chemical, radioactive or toxic effects and the effectivity of the equipment used in both methods to purify the waste gas are demonstrated. The behaviour and treatment of the volatile ruthenium, fluorine and mercury, as well as volatile components in the molten glass which are released when filling into storage containers (Cs 137, Ce 144, Ru 106) are particularly dealt with. In a bad case, decontamination factors of 1010 are reached. (RB)

  14. Test plan for BWID Phase 2 electric arc melter vitrification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This test plan describes the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID), Phase 2, electric arc melter, waste treatment evaluation tests to be performed at the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) Albany Research Center. The BWID Arc Melter Vitrification Project is being conducted to evaluate and demonstrate existing industrial arc melter technology for thermally treating mixed transuranic-contaminated wastes and soils. Phase 1 baseline tests, performed during fiscal year 1993 at the USBM, were conducted on waste feeds representing incinerated buried mixed wastes and soils. In Phase 2, surrogate feeds will be processed that represent actual as-retrieved buried wastes from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex

  15. Low-level waste vitrification phase 1 vendor test sample analysis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-phase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests was performed in vendor test facilities using simulated LLW and was completed during FY-1995. Test samples taken during Phase 1 testing were analyzed by independent laboratories who reported the analyses results to Westinghouse Hanford Company for integration and evaluation. The reported analytical results were integrated into an electronic data base using Microsoft Excel*5.0. This report documents this data base as of the end of FY-1995, and is supplemental to the Phase 1 LLW melter testing summary report, WHC-SD-WM-ER-498, revision 0

  16. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  17. Test plan for BWID Phase 2 electric arc melter vitrification tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Turner, P.C.; Oden, L.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1994-10-01

    This test plan describes the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID), Phase 2, electric arc melter, waste treatment evaluation tests to be performed at the US Bureau of Mines (USBM) Albany Research Center. The BWID Arc Melter Vitrification Project is being conducted to evaluate and demonstrate existing industrial arc melter technology for thermally treating mixed transuranic-contaminated wastes and soils. Phase 1 baseline tests, performed during fiscal year 1993 at the USBM, were conducted on waste feeds representing incinerated buried mixed wastes and soils. In Phase 2, surrogate feeds will be processed that represent actual as-retrieved buried wastes from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

  18. Potential for using a six-phase alternating current power supply system for in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as a potential treatment technology for stabilizing underground tanks at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. A key requirement for this application is an electrical system that can supply the power needed to vitrify a tank in a single setting. This paper describes an engineering-scale test conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to assess the efficiency of a six-electrode, six-phase energy supply system in melting soil. The test was conducted with a 30-kW six-phase system. Based on the test results, a six-electrode, six-phase system shows potential for scaleup to larger systems. 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Design and commissioning of a continuous transferred arc plasma melter for the vitrification of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 40-kW transferred arc plasma melter has been designed and constructed to test the potential of this type of system for the vitrification of high level nuclear waste. Present technology relies on joule or induction heaters which are limited in operating temperature and are characterized by large liquid holdup and long residence times. The use of a plasma melter allows the production of higher melting glasses and glass ceramics which are more durable and leach resistant in underground storage. The use of a plasma greatly decreases residence times in the heater and may even reduce the loss of volatiles by control of the melting atmosphere and continuous removal of the product as a solid ingot. Standard borosilicate glass has been melted with continuous withdrawal of product in a series of commissioning runs

  20. In-situ vitrification of transuranic wastes: systems evaluation and applications assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major advantages of in-situ vitrification (ISV) as a means of stabilizing radioactive waste are: long term durability of the waste form; cost effectiveness; safety in terms of minimizing worker and public exposure; and applicability to different kinds of soils and buried wastes. This document describes ISV technology that is available as another viable tool for in place stabilization of waste sites. The following sections correspond to the chapters in the body of this document: description of the ISV process; analysis of the performane of the ISV tests conducted thus far; parameters of the ISV process; cost analysis for the ISV process; analysis of occupational and public exposure; and assessment of waste site applications

  1. In-situ vitrification of transuranic wastes: systems evaluation and applications assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oma, K.H.; Brown, D.R.; Buelt, J.L.; FitzPatrick, V.F.; Hawley, K.A.; Mellinger, G.B.; Napier, B.A.; Silviera, D.J.; Stein, S.L.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1983-09-01

    Major advantages of in-situ vitrification (ISV) as a means of stabilizing radioactive waste are: long term durability of the waste form; cost effectiveness; safety in terms of minimizing worker and public exposure; and applicability to different kinds of soils and buried wastes. This document describes ISV technology that is available as another viable tool for in place stabilization of waste sites. The following sections correspond to the chapters in the body of this document: description of the ISV process; analysis of the performane of the ISV tests conducted thus far; parameters of the ISV process; cost analysis for the ISV process; analysis of occupational and public exposure; and assessment of waste site applications.

  2. SECONDARY WASTE MANAGEMENT FOR HANFORD EARLY LOW ACTIVITY WASTE VITRIFICATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 200 million liters (53 million gallons) of highly radioactive and hazardous waste is stored at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The DOE's Hanford Site River Protection Project (RPP) mission includes tank waste retrieval, waste treatment, waste disposal, and tank farms closure activities. This mission will largely be accomplished by the construction and operation of three large treatment facilities at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP): (1) a Pretreatment (PT) facility intended to separate the tank waste into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW); (2) a HLW vitrification facility intended to immobilize the HLW for disposal at a geologic repository in Yucca Mountain; and (3) a LAW vitrification facility intended to immobilize the LAW for shallow land burial at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The LAW facility is on target to be completed in 2014, five years prior to the completion of the rest of the WTP. In order to gain experience in the operation of the LAW vitrification facility, accelerate retrieval from single-shell tank (SST) farms, and hasten the completion of the LAW immobilization, it has been proposed to begin treatment of the low-activity waste five years before the conclusion of the WTP's construction. A challenge with this strategy is that the stream containing the LAW vitrification facility off-gas treatment condensates will not have the option of recycling back to pretreatment, and will instead be treated by the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Here the off-gas condensates will be immobilized into a secondary waste form; ETF solid waste

  3. Savannah River Site chemical, metal, and pesticide (CMP) waste vitrification treatability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as well as Department of Defense (DOD) and commercial facilities, have used earthen pits for disposal of chemicals, organic contaminants, and other waste materials. Although this was an acceptable means of disposal in the past, direct disposal into earthen pits without liners or barriers is no longer a standard practice. At the Savannah River Site (SRS), approximately three million pounds of such material was removed from seven chemical, metal, and pesticide disposal pits. This material is known as the Chemical, Metal, and Pesticide (CMP) Pit waste and carries several different listed waste codes depending on the contaminants in the respective storage container. The waste is not classified as a mixed waste because it is believed to be non-radioactive; however, in order to treat the material in a non-radioactive facility, the waste would first have to be screened for radioactivity. The Defense Waste Processing Technology (DWPT) Section of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested by the DOE-Savannah River (SR) office to determine the viability of vitrification of the CMP Pit wastes. Radioactive vitrification facilities exist which would be able to process this waste, so the material would not have to be analyzed for radioactive content. Bench-scale treatability studies were performed by the DWPT to determine whether a homogeneous and durable glass could be produced from the CMP Pit wastes. Homogeneous and durable glasses were produced from the six pits sampled. The optimum composition was determined to be 68.5 wt% CMP waste, 7.2 wt% Na2O, 9 wt% CaO, 7.2 wt% Li2O and 8.1 wt% Fe2O3. This glass melted at 1,150 C and represented a two fold volume reduction

  4. Design, operation, and evaluation of the transportable vitrification system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.R.; Young, S.R.; Hansen, E.K.; Whitehouse, J.C.

    1997-02-20

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a transportable melter system designed to demonstrate the treatment of low-level and mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes such as wastewater treatment sludges, contaminated soils and incinerator ash. The TVS is a large-scale, fully integrated vitrification system consisting of melter feed preparation, melter, offgas, service, and control modules. The TVS was tested with surrogate waste at the Clemson University Environmental Systems Engineering Department`s (ESED) DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research prior to being shipped to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) K-25 site for treatment of mixed waste. This testing, along with additional testing at ORR, proved that the TVS would be able to successfully treat mixed waste. These surrogate tests consistently produced glass that met the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). Performance of the system resulted in acceptable emissions of regulated metals from the offgas system. The TVS is scheduled to begin mixed waste operations at ORR in June 1997.

  5. Design and construction of PNC's Tokai vitrification facility (TVF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) constructed the TVF to vitrify high level liquid waste (HLLW) originating from the Tokai Fuel Reprocessing Plant of PNC. Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. delivered the facility to PNC in April, 1992, and at present, PNC carries out the cold test operation using simulated liquid waste. Most equipments in the HLLW facility are installed in shielded cells, therefore, the maintenance requires remote operation. A large integrated cell and the racks for grouping equipment in the cell were adopted. In the vitrification cell, two-arm manipulators, cranes and industrial television system are installed for remote operation and maintenance. A low flow ventilation system was adopted for ventilating the vitrification cell, and the air is processed with the off-gas treatment facility. The direct digital control system controls and monitors the process. The HLLW generated in the reprocessing of 1 ton of spent fuel is processed into one vitrified waste package of 110 kg. The TVF consists of the vitrification development building, the administration building and a stack. The processes comprise the receiving of HLLW, pretreatment, glass melting, vitrified waste handling, liquid waste treatment, off-gas treatment and vitrified waste storage. A liquid-fed ceramic melter, the off-gas and liquid waste treatment equipments, and the vitrified waste handling and storing equipment are the main components. (K.I.)

  6. Redox forecasting in the West Valley vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The charter of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is to develop a reliable process to convert high-level radioactive waste into a borosilicate glass form to ensure safe, permanent disposal in a federal repository. The West Valley vitrification process combines the wastes with glass forming oxides and reducing agents, then melts the resulting slurry in a joule heated, Slurry Fed Ceramic Melter (SFCM) at 1150 degrees C. In preparation for safe and reliable radioactive operations, full-scale vitrification tests using simulated high-level radioactive waste were conducted at the WVDP from December 1984 to December 1989. The full-scale testing was supported by laboratory testing to provide data to validate process models and to qualify the glass product composition. Included in this program was a series of tests designed to develop a model, based on feed characteristics, to forecast the redox behavior during vitrification. In this study, feed characteristics (e.g., reductants and oxidizers) impacting the redox behavior were varied over a wide range. The redox data collected from the laboratory studies were analyzed and were used to forecast redox in the final, full-scale product based on the feed characteristics. Results indicate that redox is sensitive to the shifts in TC, NO3, and H2O concentrations in the feed. As expected, total carbon acts as a reducing agent while NO3 and H2O act as oxidizing agents

  7. A simple vitrification method for cryobanking avian testicular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Cheng, K M; Purdy, P H; Silversides, F G

    2012-12-01

    Cryopreservation of testicular tissue is a promising method of preserving male reproductive potential for avian species. This study was conducted to assess whether a vitrification method can be used to preserve avian testicular tissue, using the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) as a model. A simple vitrification method that included dimethyl sulphoxide, ethylene glycol, and sucrose as cryoprotective agents, and allowed the storage of tissue in a sealed macrotube was applied to the testicular tissue from 1-wk-old Japanese quail. The vitrified tissue was warmed at room temperature or at 40°C. After warming, tissue was implanted onto the chorioallantoic membrane of 8- to 9-d-old chicken embryos and the vascularization of the grafts was evaluated. When compared with fresh tissue, the tissue that had been warmed at 40°C showed no difference in vascularization. The tissue that had been warmed at room temperature was significantly less vascularized than the fresh tissue. Vitrification of testicular tissue and storage in macrotubes provide a promising model for preservation and recovery of male germplasm of avian species. PMID:23155032

  8. Lessons learned from vitrification campaigns at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six vitrification campaigns on surrogate low-level radioactive mixed wastes have been completed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University. Two glass melters were utilized in these trials: the EnVitco EV-16 Joule heated glass melter and the Stir-Melter WV-0.25 stiffed melter. The quality of glass made in the melters was excellent. In all cases, glass durabilities (measured by the Product Consistency Test - PCT) were much better than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass and leachabilities (measured by Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure - TCLP) were lower than Land Disposal Requirements (LDR). A few processing difficulties were encountered during the melter campaigns. These difficulties were due in part to a desire to obtain high waste loadings and aggressive operation of the melters. Devitrification of the melts was especially evident with high calcium compositions. In the EnVitco melter, corrosion of molybdenum electrodes occurred by alloying with reduced metals in the melt and significant corrosion of flux block refractory occurred when operating at high temperatures. In the stirred melter, rapid degradation of the impeller was observed in two instances likely due to localized melting of Inconel trademark 690 caused by a malfunctioning power supply. The focus of this paper is to describe the performance of the melters and convey open-quotes lessons learnedclose quotes from these campaigns for application to current and future vitrification efforts

  9. Behavior of mercury and iodine during vitrification of simulated alkaline Purex waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current plans indicate that the high-level wastes stored at the Savannah River Plant will be solidified by vitrification. The behavior of mercury and iodine during the vitrification process is of concern because: mercury is present in the waste in high concentrations (0.1 to 2.8 wt%); mercury will react with iodine and the other halogens present in the waste during vitrification and; the mercury compounds formed will be volatilized from the vitrification process placing a high particulate load in the vitrification system off-gas. Twelve experiments were completed to study the behavior of mercury during vitrification of simulated SRP Purex waste. The mercury was completely volatized from the vitrification system in all experiments. The mercury reacted with iodine, chlorine and oxygen to form a fine particulate solid. Quantitative recovery of mercury compounds formed in the vitrification system off-gas was not possible due to high (37 to 90%) deposition of solids in the off-gas piping. The behavior of mercury and iodine was most strongly influenced by the vitrification system atmosphere. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was low (< 1 vol%); iodine retention in the glass product was 27 to 55%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 75 to 85 wt%, and a small quantity of metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was high (20 vol%), iodide retention in the glass product was 3 to 15%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 60 to 80 wt%, and very little metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution

  10. Plasma Hearth Process vitrification of DOE low-level mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) demonstration project is one of the key technology projects in the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development Mixed Waste Focus Area. The PHP is recognized as one of the more promising solutions to DOE's mixed waste treatment needs, with potential application in the treatment of a wide variety of DOE mixed wastes. The PHP is a high temperature vitrification process using a plasma arc torch in a stationary, refractory lined chamber that destroys organics and stabilizes the residuals in a nonleaching, vitrified waste form. This technology will be equally applicable to low-level mixed wastes generated by nuclear utilities. The final waste form will be volume reduced to the maximum extent practical, because all organics will have been destroyed and the inorganics will be in a high-density, low void-space form and little or no volume-increasing glass makers will have been added. Low volume and high integrity waste forms result in low disposal costs. This project is structured to ensure that the plasma technology can be successfully employed in radioactive service. The PHP technology will be developed into a production system through a sequence of tests on several test units, both non-radioactive and radioactive. As the final step, a prototype PHP system will be constructed for full-scale radioactive waste treatment demonstration

  11. Viability of zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles after vitrification in a metal container.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Lis S; Bos-Mikich, Adriana; Godoy, Leandro C; Silva, Laura A; Maschio, Daniel; Zhang, Tiantian; Streit, Danilo P

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue has been studied for female germline preservation of farm animals and endangered mammalian species. However, there are relatively few reports on cryopreservation of fish ovarian tissue and especially using vitrification approach. Previous studies of our group has shown that the use of a metal container for the cryopreservation of bovine ovarian fragments results in good primordial and primary follicle morphological integrity after vitrification. The aim of this study was to assess the viability and in vitro development of zebrafish follicles after vitrification of fragmented or whole ovaries using the same metal container. In Experiment 1, we tested the follicular viability of five developmental stages following vitrification in four vitrification solutions using fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide fluorescent probes. These results showed that the highest viability rates were obtained with immature follicles (Stage I) and VS1 (1.5 M methanol + 4.5 M propylene glycol). In Experiment 2, we used VS1 to vitrify different types of ovarian tissue (fragments or whole ovaries) in two different carriers (plastic cryotube or metal container). In this experiment, Stage I follicle survival was assessed following vitrification by vital staining after 24 h in vitro culture. Follicular morphology was analyzed by light microscopy after vitrification. Data showed that the immature follicles morphology was well preserved after cryopreservation. Follicular survival rate was higher (P < 0.05) in vitrified fragments, when compared to whole ovaries. There were no significant differences in follicular survival and growth when the two vitrification devices were compared. PMID:26408854

  12. Development of Cryopreservation Techniques for Gorgonian (Junceella juncea) Oocytes through Vitrification

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Sujune; Yen, Wish; Chavanich, Suchana; Viyakarn, Voranop; Lin, Chiahsin

    2015-01-01

    Gorgonian corals are slowly declining due to human interaction and environmental impacts. Cryopreservation of gorgonian corals is an ex-situ method of conservation, ensuring future reproduction. The present study assessed the vitrification properties of cryoprotectant (CPT) mixtures using the cryotop, cryoloop and open pulled straw (OPS) cryopereservation methods prior to experimentation on gorgonian (Junceella juncea) oocytes. Investigations of the equilibration and vitrification solutions’ ...

  13. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description: Overview and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document (Parts 1 and 2) describes the requirements that must be implemented during the design and construction phases for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Quality Assurance Program. This program is being implemented to ensure the acceptability of high-level radioactive canistered waste forms produced by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant for disposal in a licensed federal repository

  14. Design of equipment used for high-level waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equipment as designed, started, and operated for high-level radioactive waste vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project in western New York State is described. Equipment for the processes of melter feed make-up, vitrification, canister handling, and off-gas treatment are included. For each item of equipment the functional requirements, process description, and hardware descriptions are presented

  15. Thermal oxidation vitrification flue gas elimination system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With minor modifications to a Best Demonstrated Available Technology hazardous waste incinerator, it is possible to obtain combustion without potentially toxic emissions by using technology currently employed in similar applications throughout industry. Further, these same modifications will reduce waste handling over an extended operating envelope while minimizing energy consumption. Three by-products are produced: industrial grade carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and a final waste form that will exceed Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedures requirements and satisfy nuclear waste product consistency tests. The proposed system utilizes oxygen rather than air as an oxidant to reduce the quantities of total emissions, improve the efficiency of the oxidation reactions, and minimize the generation of toxic NOx emissions. Not only will less potentially hazardous constituents be generated; all toxic substances can be contained and the primary emission, carbon dioxide -- the leading ''greenhouse gas'' contributing to global warming -- will be converted to an industrial by-product needed to enhance the extraction of energy feedstocks from maturing wells. Clearly, the proposed configuration conforms to the provisions for Most Achievable Control Technology as defined and mandated for the private sector by the Clear Air Act Amendments of 1990 to be implemented in 1997 and still lacking definition

  16. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al2O3 to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition

  17. Modeling requirements for in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to (1) help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclide and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, (2) help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and (3) help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results therefrom

  18. Modeling requirements for in situ vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Mecham, D.C.; Hagrman, D.L.; Johnson, R.W.; Murray, P.E.; Slater, C.E.; Marwil, E.S.; Weaver, R.A.; Argyle, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    This document outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to (1) help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclide and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, (2) help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and (3) help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results therefrom.

  19. Biophysical characteristics of successful oilseed embryo cryoprotection and cryopreservation using vacuum infiltration vitrification: an innovation in plant cell preservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanthi Nadarajan

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity in morphology, physiology and cellular chemistry of plant tissues can compromise successful cryoprotection and cryopreservation. Cryoprotection is a function of exposure time × temperature × permeability for the chosen protectant and diffusion pathway length, as determined by specimen geometry, to provide sufficient dehydration whilst avoiding excessive chemical toxicity. We have developed an innovative method of vacuum infiltration vitrification (VIV at 381 mm (15 in Hg (50 kPa that ensures the rapid (5 min, uniform permeation of Plant Vitrification Solution 2 (PVS2 cryoprotectant into plant embryos and their successful cryopreservation, as judged by regrowth in vitro. This method was validated on zygotic embryos/embryonic axes of three species (Carica papaya, Passiflora edulis and Laurus nobilis up to 1.6 mg dry mass and 5.6 mm in length, with varying physiology (desiccation tolerances and 80 °C variation in lipid thermal profiles, i.e., visco-elasticity properties, as determined by differential scanning calorimetry. Comparisons between the melting features of cryoprotected embryos and embryo regrowth indicated an optimal internal PVS2 concentration of about 60% of full strength. The physiological vigour of surviving embryos was directly related to the proportion of survivors. Compared with conventional vitrification, VIV-cryopreservation offered a ∼ 10-fold reduction in PVS2 exposure times, higher embryo viability and regrowth and greater effectiveness at two pre-treatment temperatures (0 °C and 25 °C. VIV-cryopreservation may form the basis of a generic, high throughput technology for the ex situ conservation of plant genetic resources, aiding food security and protection of species from diverse habitats and at risk of extinction.

  20. Mechanical handling systems in the Sellefield vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) has over 40 years experience in the design, construction and operation of nuclear reprocessing plants and of waste management. Many of these plants have required extensive mechanical handling systems, the handling and control systems designed and developed for the Sellafield Vitrification Plant and Product Store are described. These systems are now fully operational and illustrate many of the features and techniques developed by BNFL for nuclear package handling. Utilisation of these systems and similar systems in other Sellafield Plants has demonstrated notable advantages in ease/flexibility of operations, product quality and costs. (author)

  1. Process for the storage of radioactive wastes by vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for storage of radioactive waste by vitrification is carried out as follows: low and medium active waste concentrates from borate-containing liquids are mixed with glassforming aggregates in maximum proportions 1:3 and heated to produce a glass-forming melt. In addition, ion exchange resins are added to approx. 10 wt% of the total mass prior to the melting process. Off-gases are drawn off and cleansed with a gas scrubber and/or filter whilst the solid radionuclides are stored in the glass. (orig./WI)

  2. Vitrification processing method and device for high level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A freeze-drying device is assembled to the midway of a line which connects a liquid waste tank and a melter in order to remove water. A freezing facility and a vacuum facility are connected to a drying box. With such a constitution, water is removed before supplying the high level liquid wastes to the melter, and the solid material removed with water is charged into the melter, and a vitrification material is formed. Accordingly, scattering of nuclides generated upon removing water can be reduced, and there is no need to dispose complicated equipments in the melter, thereby simplifying installation. (T.M.)

  3. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Waste Form Qualification Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randklev, E.H.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy has created a waste acceptance process to help guide the overall program for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a federal repository. This Waste Form Qualification Program Plan describes the hierarchy of strategies used by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project to satisfy the waste form qualification obligations of that waste acceptance process. A description of the functional relationship of the participants contributing to completing this objective is provided. The major activities, products, providers, and associated scheduling for implementing the strategies also are presented.

  4. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project Waste Form Qualification Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy has created a waste acceptance process to help guide the overall program for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a federal repository. This Waste Form Qualification Program Plan describes the hierarchy of strategies used by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project to satisfy the waste form qualification obligations of that waste acceptance process. A description of the functional relationship of the participants contributing to completing this objective is provided. The major activities, products, providers, and associated scheduling for implementing the strategies also are presented

  5. Alternatives to High-Level Waste Vitrification: The Need for Common Sense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The competition for government funding for remediation of defense wastes (and for other legitimate government functions) is intensifying as the United States moves toward a balanced national budget. Determining waste remediation priorities for the use of available tax dollars will likely depend on established international agreements and on the real risks posed to human health.Remediation of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive tank wastes has been described as the most important priority in the DOE system. The proposed tank waste remediation at three DOE sites will include retrieval of the wastes from the aging storage tanks, immobilization of the wastes, and safe disposal of the processed waste. Vitrification, the current immobilization technology chosen by DOE, is very costly. The U.S. Congress and the American people may not be aware that the present cost of preparing just 1 m3 of processed waste product at the Savannah River Site is ∼$2 million! In a smaller waste remediation project at the West Valley Site, similar waste treatment is costing >$2 million/m3 of waste product. Privatization efforts at the Hanford Site are now estimated to cost >$4 million/m3 of waste product. Even at the lowest current cost of $2 million/m3 of HLW glass product, the total estimated costs for remediating the tank wastes at the three DOE sites of Savannah River, Hanford, and Idaho Falls is $75 billion.Whether our nation can afford treatment costs of this magnitude and whether Congress will be willing to appropriate these huge sums for waste vitrification when alternative technologies can provide safe disposal at considerably lower cost are questions that need to be addressed. The hazard levels posed by the DOE tank wastes do not warrant high priority in comparison to the hazards of other defense wastes. Unless DOE selects a lower-cost technology for tank waste remediation, such efforts are likely to continue in a holding pattern, with little actually

  6. Alternatives to high-level waste vitrification: The need for common sense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The competition for government funding for remediation of defense wastes (and for other legitimate government functions) is intensifying as the United states moves toward a balanced national budget. Determining waste remediation priorities for the use of available tax dollars will likely depend on established international agreements and on the real risks posed to human health. Remediation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive tank wastes has been described as the most important priority in the DOE system. The proposed tank waste remediation at three DOE sites will include retrieval of the wastes from the aging storage tanks, immobilization of the wastes, and safe disposal of the processed waste. Vitrification, the current immobilization technology chosen by DOE, is very costly. The US Congress and the American people may not be aware that the present cost of preparing just 1 m3 of processed waste product at the Savannah River Site is approximately$2 million. In a smaller waste remediation project at the West Valley Site, similar waste treatment is costing $2 million/m3 of waste product. Privatization efforts at the Hanford Site are now estimated to cost $4 million/m3 of waste product. Even at the lowest current cost of $2 million/m3 of HLW glass product, the total estimated costs for remediating the tank wastes at the three DOE sites of Savannah River, Hanford, and Idaho Falls is $75 billion. Whether the nation can afford treatment costs of this magnitude and whether Congress will be willing to appropriate these huge sums for waste vitrification when alternative technologies can provide safe disposal at considerably lower cost are questions that need to be addressed. The hazard levels posed by the DOE tank wastes do not warrant high priority in comparison to the hazards of other defense wastes. Unless DOE selects a lower-cost technology for tank waste remediation, such efforts are likely to continue in a holding pattern, with little actually

  7. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the acid pit and transuranic pits and trenches (TRU-PTs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues lated with ISV application at the SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in a three-volume report. Volume I identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. Volumes 2 and 3 discuss each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTS, respectively. The three-volume report is a working document that will be updated as necessary to reflect current evaluation strategy for the ISV technology. This is Volume 3

  8. Evaluation of high-level waste vitrification feed preparation chemistry for an NCAW simulant, FY 1994: Alternate flowsheets (DRAFT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.D.; Merz, M.D.; Wiemers, K.D.; Smith, G.L.

    1996-02-01

    High-level radioactive waste stored in tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site will be pretreated to concentrate radioactive constituents and fed to the vitrification plant A flowsheet for feed preparation within the vitrification plant (based on the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) design) called for HCOOH addition during the feed preparation step to adjust rheology and glass redox conditions. However, the potential for generating H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} during treatment of high-level waste (HLW) with HCOOH was identified at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Studies at the University of Georgia, under contract with Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and PNL, have verified the catalytic role of noble metals (Pd, Rh, Ru), present in the waste, in the generation of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. Both laboratory-scale and pilot-scale studies at SRTC have documented the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} generation phenomenal Because H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} may create hazardous conditions in the vessel vapor space and offgas system of a vitrification plant, reducing the H{sub 2} generation rate and the NH{sub 3} generation to the lowest possible levels consistent with desired melter feed characteristics is important. The Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 studies were conducted with simulated (non-radioactive), pre-treated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). Neutralized current acid waste is a high-level waste originating from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX) plant that has been partially denitrated with sugar, neutralized with NaOH, and is presently stored in double-shell tanks. The non-radioactive simulant used for the present study includes all of the trace components found in the waste, or substitutes a chemically similar element for radioactive or very toxic species. The composition and simulant preparation steps were chosen to best simulate the chemical processing characteristics of the actual waste.

  9. Melter performance during surrogate vitrification campaigns at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results from seven melter campaigns performed at the DOE/Industrial Center for Vitrification Research at Clemson University. A brief description of the EnVitco EV-16 Joule heated glass melter and the Stir-Melter WV-0.25 stirred melter are included for reference. The report discusses each waste stream examined, glass formulations developed and utilized, specifics relating to melter operation, and a synopsis of the results from the campaigns. A 'lessons learned' section is included for each melter to emphasize repeated processing problems and identify parameters which are considered extremely important to successful melter operation

  10. Development of the plutonium oxide vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repository disposal of plutonium in a suitable, immobilized form is being considered as one option for the disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. Accelerated development efforts were completed in 1997 on two potential immobilization forms to facilitate downselection to one form for continued development. The two forms studied were a crystalline ceramic based on Synroc technology and a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. As part of the glass development program, melter design activities and component testing were completed to demonstrate the feasibility of using glass as an immobilization medium. A prototypical melter was designed and built in 1997. The melter vessel and drain tube were constructed of a Pt/Rh alloy. Separate induction systems were used to heat the vessel and drain tube. A Pt/Rh stirrer was incorporated into the design to facilitate homogenization of the melt. Integrated powder feeding and off-gas systems completed the overall design. Concurrent with the design efforts, testing was conducted using a plutonium surrogate LaBS composition in an existing (near-scale) melter to demonstrate the feasibility of processing the LaBS glass on a production scale. Additionally, the drain tube configuration was successfully tested using a plutonium surrogate LaBS glass

  11. Process Testing to Support the Conceptual Design of a Plutonium Vitrification Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has identified up to 50 metric tonnes of excess plutonium that needs to be dispositioned. The bulk of the material is slated to be blended with uranium and fabricated into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for subsequent burning in commercial nuclear reactors. Excess plutonium-containing materials that are not suitable for fabrication into MOX fuel will need to be dispositioned via other means. A lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass was identified as a preferred form for the disposition of the impure plutonium-containing feeds. The LaBS glass formulation uses a lanthanide borosilicate frit rather than the alkali borosilicate frit used to vitrify high level waste. The LaBS glass has been shown to be able to accommodate high quantities of fissile material (greater than 10 wt % elemental plutonium) and tolerate the impurities expected in the plutonium feed streams. A conceptual design effort is now underway at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to design a vitrification facility to immobilize the excess Pu feeds that are not slated for disposition via MOX fuel. The conceptual design phase is planned to complete in FY07. A test program was initiated at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to provide input data to the conceptual design effort. A major component of this test effort involves vitrification process testing. A cylindrical induction melter (CIM) was developed for the vitrification of actinide feed streams. Due to the high temperatures required to incorporate high plutonium oxide contents into the glass by dissolution and melting, the melter vessel is constructed out of Pt/Rh alloy and can be operated at temperatures up to 1600 deg. C. Additionally, the melter design is compact to facilitate installation in a glovebox (the size of the conceptual facility melter is approximately 6'' in diameter by 18'' tall). The CIM has proven to be a viable means to process the LaBS glass at processing

  12. Quality assurance program description: Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant, Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the Department of Energy's Richland Field Office (DOE-RL) quality assurance (QA) program for the processing of high-level waste as well as the Vitrification Project Quality Assurance Program for the design and construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). It also identifies and describes the planned activities that constitute the required quality assurance program for the HWVP. This program applies to the broad scope of quality-affecting activities associated with the overall HWVP Facility. Quality-affecting activities include designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, inspecting, testing, maintaining, repairing, and modifying. Also included are the development, qualification, and production of waste forms which may be safely used to dispose of high-level radioactive waste resulting from national defense activities. The HWVP QA program is made up of many constituent programs that are being implemented by the participating organizations. This Quality Assurance program description is intended to outline and define the scope and application of the major programs that make up the HWVP QA program. It provides a means by which the overall program can be managed and directed to achieve its objectives. Subsequent parts of this description will identify the program's objectives, its scope, application, and structure

  13. Dismantling and decontamination of Piver prototype vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIVER prototype was targeted for dismantling in order to install a new pilot facility for the french continuous vitrification process. Most of the work involved the vitrification cell containing the process equipments, which had to be cleared out and thoroughly decontaminated; this implied disassembling, cutting up, conditioning and removing all the equipment installed in the cell. Remote manipulation, handling and cutting devices were used and some prior modifications were implemented in the cell environment. The dismantling procedure was conducted under a detailed programme defining the methodology for each operation. After equipment items and active zones were identified, the waste materials were removed, and several liquid decontamination operations were implemented. Removed activity, levels of irradiation in the cell and doses integrated by personnel were monitored to control progress and to adapt procedures to the conditions encountered. At the end of December 1989, the PIVER cleanup programme was at 87% complete and the total activity removed was 2.11 X 1014 Bq (5712 Ci). The objective now is to obtain suitable working conditions in order to allow operators to enter the cell to remove items that are inaccessible or which cannot be dismantled by remote manipulators and to complete the decontamination procedure

  14. Defense waste vitrification studies during FY-1981. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorklund, W.J. (comp.)

    1982-09-01

    Both simulated alkaline defense wastes and simulated acidic defense wastes (formed by treating alkaline waste with formic acid) were successfully vitrified in direct liquid-fed melter experiments. The vitrification process was improved while using the formate-treated waste. Leach resistance was essentially the same. Off-gas entrainment was the primary mechanism for material exiting the melter. When formate waste was vitrified, the flow behavior of the off gas from the melter changed dramatically from an erratic surging behavior to a more quiet, even flow. Hydrogen and CO were detectable while processing formate feed; however, levels exceeding the flamability limits in air were never approached. Two types of melter operation were tested during the year, one involving boost power. Several boosting methods located within the melter plenum were tested. When lid heating was being used, water spray cooling in the off gas was required. Countercurrent spray cooling was more effective than cocurrent spray cooling. Materials of construction for the off-gas system were examined. Inconel-690 is preferred in the plenum area. Inspection of the pilot-scale melter found that corrosion of the K-3 refractory and Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal. An overheating incident occurred with the LFCM in which glass temperatures up to 1480/sup 0/C were experienced. Lab-scale vitrification tests to study mercury behavior were also completed this year. 53 figures, 63 tables.

  15. Defense-waste vitrification studies during FY-1981. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both simulated alkaline defense wastes and simulated acidic defense wastes (formed by treating alkaline waste with formic acid) were successfully vitrified in direct liquid-fed melter experiments. The vitrification process was improved while using the formate-treated waste. Leach resistance was essentially the same. Off-gas entrainment was the primary mechanism for material exiting the melter. When formate waste was vitrified, the flow behavior of the off gas from the melter changed dramatically from an erratic surging behavior to a more quiet, even flow. Hydrogen and CO were detectable while processing formate feed; however, levels exceeding the flamability limits in air were never approached. Two types of melter operation were tested during the year, one involving boost power. Several boosting methods located within the melter plenum were tested. When lid heating was being used, water spray cooling in the off gas was required. Countercurrent spray cooling was more effective than cocurrent spray cooling. Materials of construction for the off-gas system were examined. Inconel-690 is preferred in the plenum area. Inspection of the pilot-scale melter found that corrosion of the K-3 refractory and Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal. An overheating incident occurred with the LFCM in which glass temperatures up to 14800C were experienced. Lab-scale vitrification tests to study mercury behavior were also completed this year. 53 figures, 63 tables

  16. Hot operation performance of the German vitrification plant VEK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The German VEK project has been established to vitrify approx. 55 m3 of high-level liquid waste (HLLW) with a total radioactive inventory of 7.7E+17 Bq in the new VEK vitrification plant erected from 1999 to 2004. Immobilization of the waste solution stored at the site of the former German WAK pilot reprocessing facility is the precursor to further decommissioning and dismantling of the WAK facilities which have been underway since the mid-nineties. Within a minimum operation period of only 9 months from September 2009 until June 2010 the highly noble metals containing HLLW was successfully processed and the storage tanks of WAK were finally emptied. Subsequent to hot vitrification of the concentrated HLLW solution an extensive cleaning of the storage tanks and VEK plant components was performed. Rinsing liquids were vitrified after mixing with simulated inactive HLLW solutions. This paper gives an overview of the successful hot operation of the VEK plant. Operational data, results and lessons learned during one year of hot operation are described in detail. (author)

  17. Ash from a pulp mill boiler--characterisation and vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana S M; Monteiro, Regina C C; Davim, Erika J R; Fernandes, M Helena V

    2010-07-15

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical characterisation of the ash resulting from a pulp mill boiler was performed in order to investigate the valorisation of this waste material through the production of added-value glassy materials. The ash had a particle size distribution in the range 0.06-53 microm, and a high amount of SiO(2) (approximately 82 wt%), which was present as quartz. To favour the vitrification of the ash and to obtain a melt with an adequate viscosity to cast into a mould, different amounts of Na(2)O were added to act as fluxing agent. A batch with 80 wt% waste load melted at 1350 degrees C resulting in a homogeneous transparent green-coloured glass with good workability. The characterisation of the produced glass by differential thermal analysis and dilatometry showed that this glass presents a stable thermal behaviour. Standard leaching tests revealed that the concentration of heavy metals in the leaching solution was lower than those allowed by the Normative. As a conclusion, by vitrification of batch compositions with adequate waste load and additive content it is possible to produce an ash-based glass that may be used in similar applications as a conventional silicate glass inclusively as a building ecomaterial. PMID:20346582

  18. Cryopreservation of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) somatic embryos by vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Raphael; Wetten, Andy

    2012-01-01

    Losses of cultivated cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) due to diseases and continued depletion of forests that harbour the wild progenitors of the crop make ex situ conservation of cocoa germplasm of paramount importance. In order to enhance security of in situ germplasm collections, 2-3 mm floral-derived secondary somatic embryos were cryopreserved by vitrification. This work demonstrates the most uncomplicated clonal cocoa cryopreservation. Optimal post-cryostorage survival (74.5 percent) was achieved by 5 d preculture of SSEs on 0.5 M sucrose medium followed by 60 min dehydration in cold PVS2. To minimise free radical related cryo-injury, cation sources were removed from the embryo development solution and/or the recovery medium, the former treatment resulting in a significant benefit. After optimisation with cocoa genotype AMAZ 15, the same protocol was effective across all five additional cocoa genotypes tested. For the multiplication of clones, embryos regenerated following cryopreservation were used as explant sources, and vitrification was found to maintain their embryogenic potential. PMID:23250409

  19. Effects of oocyte vitrification on epigenetic status in early bovine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Zhang, Lei; Deng, Tengfei; Zou, Pengda; Wang, Yongsheng; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Oocyte cryopreservation has a great impact on subsequent embryonic development. Currently, several studies have primarily focused on the consequences of vitrification and the development potential of cellular structures. This study determined whether oocyte vitrification caused epigenetic instabilities of bovine embryos. The effects of oocyte vitrification on DNA methylation, histone modifications, and putative imprinted genes' expression in early embryos derived by intracytoplasmic sperm injection were examined. Results showed that oocyte vitrification did not affect zygote cleavage rates (67.0% vs. 73.8% control, P > 0.05) but reduced the blastocyst rate (9.6% vs. 23.0%, P < 0.05). The levels of DNA methylation and H3K9me3 in oocytes and early cleavage embryos were lower (P < 0.05) than those in control group, but the level of acH3K9 increased (P < 0.05) in the vitrification group during the early cleavage phases. No differences were observed for DNA methylation, H3K9me3, and acH3K9 in the inner cell mass of blastocysts, whereas decreased levels of DNA methylation and acH3K9 (P < 0.05) existed in TE cells after vitrification. The expression of putative-imprinted genes PEG10, XIST, and KCNQ1O1T was upregulated in blastocysts. These epigenetic abnormalities may be partially explained by altered expression of genes associated with epigenetic regulations. DNA methylation and H3K9 modification suggest that oocyte vitrification may excessively relax the chromosomes of oocytes and early cleavage embryos. In conclusion, these epigenetic indexes could be used as damage markers of oocyte vitrification during early embryonic development, which offers a new insight to assess oocyte vitrification. PMID:27068359

  20. Results of a 50% Waste Loading Vitrification Test Using the Cold Crucible Melter for Savannah River Site Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) is a promising alternative compared to the Joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) reference technology for vitrification of high level radioactive waste (HLW). Successful tests with 45 wt.% waste loading in the glass facilitated the transition to the third task of the work with waste loading increased to 50 wt.%. The third test was performed using the Radon full-scale vitrification plant equipped with a new cylindrical cold crucible with an inner diameter of 418 mm. Average glass pour rate (average amount of glass poured per 1 hour of run) and specific glass pour rate (average pour rate per melter surface area) reached 16.2 kg/h and ∼118.2 kg/(m2h), respectively. Neither formation of sulfate/chloride salts ('yellow phase') nor melt foaming were observed. Occurrence of a spinel-type phase in the glass didn't reduce chemical durability of the glass. Product Consistency Testing (PCT) demonstrated that leaching of lithium, boron, sodium and silicon from glass samples produced in the CCIM were 15 to 30 times lower than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used for waste form repository acceptance. (authors)

  1. NEXT GENERATION MELTER(S) FOR VITRIFICATION OF HANFORD WASTE: STATUS AND DIRECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification technology has been selected to treat high-level waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site, the West Valley Demonstration Project and the Savannah River Site (SRS), and low activity waste (LAW) at Hanford. In addition, it may potentially be applied to other defense waste streams such as sodium bearing tank waste or calcine. Joule-heated melters (already in service at SRS) will initially be used at the Hanford Site's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to vitrify tank waste fractions. The glass waste content and melt/production rates at WTP are limited by the current melter technology. Significant reductions in glass volumes and mission life are only possible with advancements in melter technology coupled with new glass formulations. The Next Generation Melter (NGM) program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) to develop melters with greater production capacity (absolute glass throughput rate) and the ability to process melts with higher waste fractions. Advanced systems based on Joule-Heated Ceramic Melter (JHCM) and Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technologies will be evaluated for HLW and LAW processing. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), DOE's tank waste contractor, is developing and evaluating these systems in cooperation with EM-31, national and university laboratories, and corporate partners. A primary NGM program goal is to develop the systems (and associated flowsheets) to Technology Readiness Level 6 by 2016. Design and testing are being performed to optimize waste glass process envelopes with melter and balance of plant requirements. A structured decision analysis program will be utilized to assess the performance of the competing melter technologies. Criteria selected for the decision analysis program will include physical process operations, melter performance, system compatibility and other parameters.

  2. The vitrification of high-level wastes in France: from the Lab to industrial plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research in the area of vitrifying concentrated fission product solutions began in France in the 1950s. Vitrification processes were developed along with suitable materials, notably borosilicate glasses. The primary objective of glass investigations is to determine and assess the alteration phenomena that occur during ultimate storage in a geological repository. With the development of glass fabrication processes, a continuous vitrification technique has been implemented in three vitrification units, associated with the three French reprocessing plants; the units were commissioned in 1978, 1989 and 1992. (author). 1 fig., 5 tabs., 37 refs

  3. The modulation effect of substrate doping on multi-node charge collection and single-event transient propagation in 90-nm bulk complementary metal-oxidesemiconductor technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Jun-Rui; Chen Shu-Ming; Liu Bi-Wei; Liu Zheng; Liang Bin; Du Yan-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Variation of substrate background doping will affect the charge collection of active and passive MOSFETs in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technologies,which are significant for charge sharing,thus affecting the propagated single event transient pulsewidths in circuits.The trends of charge collected by the drain of a positive channel metal-oxide semiconductor (PMOS) and an N metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS) are opposite as the substrate doping increases.The PMOS source will inject carriers after strike and the amount of charge injected will increase as the substrate doping increases,whereas the source of the NMOS will mainly collect carriers and the source of the NMOS can also inject electrons when the substrate doping is light enough.Additionally,it indicates that substrate doping mainly affects the bipolar amplification component of a single-event transient current,and has little effect on the drift and diffusion.The change in substrate doping has a much greater effect on PMOS than on NMOS.

  4. In situ vitrification of transuranic wastes: An updated systems evaluation and applications assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a process whereby joule heating immobilizes contaminated soil in place into a durable glass and crystalline waste form. Numerous technological advances made during the past three years in the design, fabrication, and testing of the ISV process are discussed. Performance analysis of ISV focuses on process equipment, element retention (in the vitrified soil during processing), melt geometry, depth monitors, and electrodes. The types of soil and waste processed by ISV are evaluated as process parameters. Economic data provide the production costs of the large-scale unit for radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes (wet and dry). The processing of transuranic-contaminated soils are discussed with respect to occupational and public safety. Alternative applications and operating sequences for various waste sites are identified. The technological data base warrants conducting a large-scale radioactive test at a contaminated soil site at Hanford to provide a representative waste form that can be evaluated to determine its suitability for in-place stabilization of transuranic-contaminated soils

  5. The plasma torch for the vitrification of low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma torch technology provides a possible solution for radioactive material storage. During the past decade, plasma torches have been developed that produce temperatures as high as 25,000 F. Currently, the plasma torch finds application in solid waste vitrification and pyrolysis plants. Low-level radioactive waste is a topic of considerable interest for baseline technologies development, generally by means of low-temperature arc heating to characterize surrogate or low-level waste streams. High temperature plasma torches, the hottest members belonging to the family of plasma arc heaters, are efficient devices for reducing matter to its constituent elements but also the most complex in theory and operation. Characterization of the high energy density plasma instability that produces the intense heat, ranges from MHD computer modeling to stimulated Raman scattering by laser diagnostics. This paper describes the history of the plasma torch and the possible use of a 1-megawatt reverse polarity torch in a low-level radioactive waste testbed. Issues such as torch diagnostics, control, and the monitoring of radioactive gaseous, aqueous, solid, and plasma effluent streams are discussed

  6. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the Acid Pit and Transuranic Pits and Trenches (TRU-PTs) that are present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues exist that must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues associated with ISV application at the INEL SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in three volumes of this report. Volume 1 identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues, and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. This document Volume 2 and Volume 3 discusses each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTs, respectively

  7. Glass optimization for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactive defense wastes stored in 177 underground single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) at the Hanford Site will be separated into low-level and high-level fractions. One technology activity underway at PNNL is the development of glass formulations for the immobilization of the low-level tank wastes. A glass formulation strategy has been developed that describes development approaches to optimize glass compositions prior to the projected LLW vitrification facility start-up in 2005. Implementation of this strategy requires testing of glass formulations spanning a number of waste loadings, compositions, and additives over the range of expected waste compositions. The resulting glasses will then be characterized and compared to processing and performance specifications yet to be developed. This report documents the glass formulation work conducted at PNL in fiscal years 1994 and 1995 including glass formulation optimization, minor component impacts evaluation, Phase 1 and Phase 2 melter vendor glass development, liquidus temperature and crystallization kinetics determination. This report also summarizes relevant work at PNNL on high-iron glasses for Hanford tank wastes conducted through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program and work at Savannah River Technology Center to optimize glass formulations using a Plackett-Burnam experimental design

  8. Interlock recovery during the drying, calcination and vitrification phase of Am/Cm processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes the results of five CIM5 [5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter] runs designed to demonstrate power interlock recovery methods during the drying, calcination and vitrification phases of the Am/Cm melter cycle

  9. SUPERCONDUCTING OPEN-GRADIENT MAGNETIC SEPARATION FOR THE PRETREATMENT OF RADIOACTIVE OR MIXED WASTE VITRIFICATION FEEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists need to gain a better understanding of the magnetic separation processes that can be used to separate deleterious constituents (crystalline, amorphous, and colloidal) in vitrification feed streams for borosilicate glass production without adding chemicals or generating...

  10. Off-Gas Analysis During the Vitrification of Hanford Radioactive Waste Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the off-gas analysis of samples collected during the radioactive vitrification experiments. Production and characterization of the Hanford waste-containing LAW and HAW glasses are presented in related reports from this conference

  11. High level radioactive waste vitrification process equipment component testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote operability and maintainability of vitrification equipment were assessed under shielded-cell conditions. The equipment tested will be applied to immobilize high-level and transuranic liquid waste slurries that resulted from plutonium production for defense weapons. Equipment tested included: a turntable for handling waste canisters under the melter; a removable discharge cone in the melter overflow section; a thermocouple jumper that extends into a shielded cell; remote instrument and electrical connectors; remote, mechanical, and heat transfer aspects of the melter glass overflow section; a reamer to clean out plugged nozzles in the melter top; a closed circuit camera to view the melter interior; and a device to retrieve samples of the glass product. A test was also conducted to evaluate liquid metals for use in a liquid metal sealing system

  12. Vitrification of Bovine Oocytes by Open Pulled Straw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shi-en; ZENG Shen-ming; WU Tong-yi; MENG Qing-gang; ZHANG Zhong-cheng; CHEN Yong-fu

    2002-01-01

    Bovine oocytes cultured in vitro for 6 hours or 22 hours were cryopreserved in different vitrification solutions (EFS40, EFS50, EDFS30 or EDFS40) by the two-step method with OPS (open pulled straw).The best results were achieved by using EDFS30 to cryopreserve the oocytes either for in vitro fertilization or for chemical activation. The blastocyst rates were 12% and 17% in 6 hour and 22 hour cultures respectively following in vitro fertilization. If frozen-thawed oocytes were continued in culture up to 24 hours, and were activated by chemicals, the blastocyst rates were 22% and 24% in 6-hour and 22-hour groups respectively.There were no statistical differences between frozen and fresh oocytes (P > 0.05).

  13. Vitrification of TRU wastes at Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilization of incinerator ash and various noncombustible TRU wastes was investigated. In three different research projects borosilicate glass proved to be the best candidate for TRU waste fixation. This glass has excellent chemical durability, long-term stability in the presence of radiation, and will withstand continuous temperatures up to 4000C without devitrification. In addition, wastes prepared in the form of glass will attain densities of approximately 2500 kg/m3 (2.5 g/cc). The free forming method of producing glass buttons provides a very simple, consistent, low maintenance way of producing a final waste form for transporting and either retrievable or permanent storage for TRU waste. The vitrification process produces a durable glass from the low density ash generated by the fluidized bed incinerator process and provides volume and weight reductions that are superior to other fixation processes. This results in decreased transportation and storage costs

  14. Mock-up tests for a hot vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vitrification system for high-level wastes has been designed to prepare actural glass products used for the safety evaluation. For the final design making, mock-up tests of the system were performed. Heating ability and temperature location, prevention method of blocking phenomenum in the melter, homogenization of the glass products, mechanics of freeze valve, durability of used materials, and remote handling of the system were tested on the engineering points. The prevention of blocking by the heating of the upper zone, the homogenization of the glass products by the bubbling with N2 gas and its caused volatilization of the waste components, and new mechanics of freeze valve were found as the results. (author)

  15. Competition between crystallization and vitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction in poly(3-hydroxybutyrate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Maria Laura; Righetti, Maria Cristina; Gazzano, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    Semicrystalline polymers have a metastable nanophase structure, where the various nanophases can be crystal, liquid, glass, or mesophase. This multi-level structure is determined by a competition among self-organization, crystallization, and vitrification of the amorphous segments and is established during material processing. The kinetics of such competition is here determined for poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), as vitrification/devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction strongly affects crystallization kinetics of PHB.

  16. Cryoprotectant Delivery and Removal from Murine Insulinomas at Vitrification-Relevant Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Indra Neil; Song, Ying C.; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2007-01-01

    Development of optimal cryopreservation protocols requires delivery and removal of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) in such a way that negative osmotic and cytotoxic effects on cells are minimized. This is especially true for vitrification, where high CPA concentrations are employed. In this study, we report on the determination of cell membrane permeability parameters for water (Lp) and solute (Ps), and on the design and experimental verification of CPA addition and removal protocols at vitrific...

  17. Vitrification by Cryotop and the Maturation, Fertilization, and Developmental Rates of Mouse Oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Abedpour, Neda; Rajaei, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oocyte cryopreservation is an important part of modern fertility treatment. The effect of vitrification on the fertilization and developmental rates of embryo is still a matter of debate. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of vitrification on the success of mouse oocyte maturation, fertilization, and preimplantation development in vitro. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, a total of 200 germinal vesicle (GV) and 200 metaphase II (MII) oocytes we...

  18. Overview of the West Valley Vitrification Facility transfer cart control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has designed the control system for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Facility transfer cart. The transfer cart will transfer canisters of vitrified high-level waste remotely within the Vitrification Facility. The control system will operate the cart under battery power by wireless control. The equipment includes cart mounted control electronics, battery charger, control pendants, engineer's console, and facility antennas

  19. Heavy Metals Behavior During Thermal Plasma Vitrification Of Incineration Residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incineration of wastes, widely and increasingly used nowadays, produces residues, mainly bottom ash and filter fly ash. Fly ash is especially problematic because of its high content in heavy metals easily drawn out. Thermal processes, based mainly on electrical arc processes, are used to melt the residues at high temperature and convert them into a relatively inert glass. Consequently, to improve the process and get a glass satisfying regulation, control of heavy metals (lead, zinc, cadmium and chromium...) volatility during plasma fly ash melting and vitrification is needed and basic data concerning vaporization of these metals are required. According to the volatility of these compounds observed during vitrification of fly ash, a predictive model has been used to simulate the elimination of Pb, Zn and S from the melt as a function of time and temperature for a system including chlorides, oxides and sulfates. The objective of this work was the experimental study of heavy metals volatility using optical emission spectroscopy. A twin torch plasma system, mounted above a cold crucible with Ar (or Ar + O2) as plasma gas, has been used. The crucible was filled with synthetic glass in which known amounts of metallic salts were added to obtain the same chemical composition as used in the model. From spectral lines intensities of Ar, the plasma temperature profiles along the observation direction has been first established, before using ratios of spectral lines of Ar and metallic (Pb, Zn) or Cl vapors to reach the evolution of the elements concentrations above the melt. Off-gases have been analyzed by mass spectrometry. The influence of the atmosphere (Ar or Ar + O2) above the crucible has been studied and differences in elements behaviors have been pointed out. The results of the spectroscopic measurements have been compared to the ones issued of modeling, in order to validate our model of vaporization

  20. Off-gas behavior in the Harvest pot vitrification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conversion of highly radioactive waste liquor into glass by the pot vitrification process has been studied at Harwell using a full-scale inactive pilot plant. A summary of the off-gas behavior and its interpretation is presented. Experimental runs were carried out on 3 representative wastes (MAGNOX - thermal reactor, metal fuel, THORP - thermal oxide fuel and PFR - fast reactor oxide fuel) using 2 methods of feeding the glass-formers (slurry and crizzle). Materials were carried over from the vitrification vessel into the off-gas system by entrainment supplemented by volatilization. The overall behavior of the off-gas was consistent with the presence in it of 5 separate aerosols of particulate matter. Sources of entrainment gave rise to 3 aerosols, and a further 2 aerosols were formed as a result of chemical reaction (Ru) and condensation (Cs) processes involving the volatile species. Entrainment was enhanced when the feed contained free alkali nitrate. The Ru volatility correlated directly with the amount of salt nitrates in the feed. The off-gas equipment consisted of a condenser followed by two packed tower scrubbers. The variation in equipment performance between different sets of experiments could be attributed entirely to changes in the proportion of air present in the off-gas. The entrainment aerosols were the easiest to remove from the off-gas, whilst the Cs aerosol proved to the most difficult. The overall process decontamination factors of the pilot was about 2x104 for vapor-Ru, 2.5-5x103 for particulate-Ru, and 5x103-1x104 for Cs. Non-volatile fission products were about 103 better. These results emphasize the need for a high efficiency filter and a Ru vapor absorber in an off-gas system. (Auth.)

  1. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack

  2. Development of Cryopreservation Techniques for Gorgonian (Junceella juncea) Oocytes through Vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sujune; Yen, Wish; Chavanich, Suchana; Viyakarn, Voranop; Lin, Chiahsin

    2015-01-01

    Gorgonian corals are slowly declining due to human interaction and environmental impacts. Cryopreservation of gorgonian corals is an ex-situ method of conservation, ensuring future reproduction. The present study assessed the vitrification properties of cryoprotectant (CPT) mixtures using the cryotop, cryoloop and open pulled straw (OPS) cryopereservation methods prior to experimentation on gorgonian (Junceella juncea) oocytes. Investigations of the equilibration and vitrification solutions' (ES and VS) effect on oocytes throughout different incubation periods were conducted. The cryotop method was found to be the most successful in ensuring vitrification. The most favourable VS was composed of propylene glycol (PG), ethylene glycol (EG) and methanol with concentrations of 3.5 M, 1.5 M and 2 M respectively. Experiments were performed using the cryotop method to cryopreserve Junceella juncea oocytes using VS2, the solution had the least impact on oocytes at 5°C rather than at 26°C. The success of the vitrification procedures was determined by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in cooled-thaw oocytes and the highest viability obtained from the present study was 76.6 ± 6.2%. This study provides information regarding gorgonian corals' tolerance and viability throughout vitrification to further advance the vitrification protocol on whip corals. PMID:26010144

  3. Vitrification as a method for genome resource banking oocytes from the endangered Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarny, N A; Rodger, J C

    2010-06-01

    Populations of Australia's largest terrestrial marsupial carnivore, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), are rapidly declining in the wild due to Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (TDFTD). One tool which can reduce the loss of genetic diversity is genome resource banking. This study examines the application of an oocyte vitrification protocol, initially developed in a model marsupial carnivore, to the endangered Tasmanian devil. Ovarian tissue was transported to the laboratory on ice from Tasmania which took up to 48 h. Individual granulosa oocyte complexes (GOC) were isolated enzymatically and the viability of oocytes from primary GOC was assessed immediately following isolation or after exposure to cold shock, vitrification and thawing media without exposure to liquid nitrogen or the full vitrification and thawing process. There was no decline in oocyte viability following cold shock or exposure to the vitrification and thawing media. Following the full vitrification and thawing process there was a decline in oocyte viability (chi(2)=20.0, P<0.001) but approximately 70% of oocytes remained viable. This study provides further evidence that oocyte vitrification is a promising strategy for genome resource banking in carnivorous marsupials and suggests that it should be considered in conservation plans for the survival of the iconic Tasmanian devil. PMID:20219455

  4. Development of Cryopreservation Techniques for Gorgonian (Junceella juncea Oocytes through Vitrification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujune Tsai

    Full Text Available Gorgonian corals are slowly declining due to human interaction and environmental impacts. Cryopreservation of gorgonian corals is an ex-situ method of conservation, ensuring future reproduction. The present study assessed the vitrification properties of cryoprotectant (CPT mixtures using the cryotop, cryoloop and open pulled straw (OPS cryopereservation methods prior to experimentation on gorgonian (Junceella juncea oocytes. Investigations of the equilibration and vitrification solutions' (ES and VS effect on oocytes throughout different incubation periods were conducted. The cryotop method was found to be the most successful in ensuring vitrification. The most favourable VS was composed of propylene glycol (PG, ethylene glycol (EG and methanol with concentrations of 3.5 M, 1.5 M and 2 M respectively. Experiments were performed using the cryotop method to cryopreserve Junceella juncea oocytes using VS2, the solution had the least impact on oocytes at 5°C rather than at 26°C. The success of the vitrification procedures was determined by adenosine triphosphate (ATP levels in cooled-thaw oocytes and the highest viability obtained from the present study was 76.6 ± 6.2%. This study provides information regarding gorgonian corals' tolerance and viability throughout vitrification to further advance the vitrification protocol on whip corals.

  5. Ferromagnetic bulk glassy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the review on the formation, thermal stability and magnetic properties of the Fe-based bulk glassy alloys in as-cast bulk and melt-spun ribbon forms. A large supercooled liquid region over 50 K before crystallization was obtained in Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si), Fe-(Cr, Mo, Nb)-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B) and (Fe, Co, Ni)-Zr-M-B (M=Ti, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo and W) systems and bulk glassy alloys were produced in a thickness range below 2 mm for the Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) system and 6 mm for the Fe-Co-(Zr, Nb, Ta)-(Mo, W)-B system by copper-mold casting. The ring-shaped glassy Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) alloys exhibit much better soft magnetic properties as compared with the ring-shaped alloy made from the melt-spun ribbon because of the formation of the unique domain structure. The good combination of high glass-forming ability and good soft magnetic properties indicates the possibility of future development as a new bulk glassy magnetic material

  6. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description for high-level waste form development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project has been established to convert the high-level radioactive waste associated with nuclear defense production at the Hanford Site into a waste form suitable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will mix processed radioactive waste with borosilicate material, then heat the mixture to its melting point (vitrification) to forin a glass-like substance that traps the radionuclides in the glass matrix upon cooling. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program has been established to support the mission of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. This Quality Assurance Program Description has been written to document the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program

  7. Vitrification of noble metals containing NCAW simulant with an engineering scale melter (ESM): Campaign report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.; Weisenburger, S.; Weiss, K.; Elliott, M.; Eyler, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    ESM has been designed as a 10th-scale model of the DWPF-type melter, currently the reference melter for nitrification of Hanford double shell tankwaste. ESM and related equipment have been integrated to the existing mockup vitrification plant VA-WAK at KfK. On June 2-July 10, 1992, a shakedown test using 2.61 m{sup 3} of NCAW (neutralized current acid waste) simulant without noble metals was performed. On July 11-Aug. 30, 1992, 14.23 m{sup 3} of the same simulant with nominal concentrations of Ru, Rh, and Pd were vitrified. Objective was to investigate the behavior of such a melter with respect to discharge of noble metals with routine glass pouring via glass overflow. Results indicate an accumulation of noble metals in the bottom area of the flat-bottomed ESM. About 65 wt% of the noble metals fed to the melter could be drained out, whereas 35 wt% accumulated in the melter, based on analysis of glass samples from glass pouring stream in to the canisters. After the melter was drained at the end of the campaign through a bottom drain valve, glass samples were taken from the residual bottom layer. The samples had significantly increased noble metals content (factor of 20-45 to target loading). They showed also a significant decrease of the specific electric resistance compared to bulk glass (factor of 10). A decrease of 10- 15% of the resistance between he power electrodes could be seen at the run end, but the total amount of noble metals accumulated was not yet sufficient enough to disturb the Joule heating of the glass tank severely.

  8. Heat transport in bulk/nanoporous/bulk silicon devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criado-Sancho, M. [Departamento de Ciencias y Técnicas Físicoquimicas, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Senda del Rey 9, 20040 Madrid (Spain); Jou, D., E-mail: David.Jou@uab.cat [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Catalans, Carme 47, 08001 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-02-04

    We study heat transport in bulk/nanoporous/bulk silicon devices; we show that, despite bulk/nanoporous devices may act as thermal rectifiers, the non-linear aspects of their joint thermal conductance are not strong enough to lead to a negative differential thermal resistance, necessary to allow bulk/nanoporous/bulk Si devices to act as thermal transistors. Furthermore, we explicitly study the effective thermal conductivity of the mentioned devices for several temperatures, geometries, porosities, and pore size.

  9. Cost effectiveness studies of environmental technologies: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines cost effectiveness studies of environmental technologies including the following: (1) In Situ Air Stripping, (2) Surface Towed Ordinance Locator System, (3) Ditch Witch Horizontal Boring Technology, (4) Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer, (5) In Situ Vitrification, (6) Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System, (7) In Situ Bioremediation, and (8) SEAMIST Membrane System Technology

  10. Computer modeling of fluid flow and combustion in the ISV (In Situ Vitrification) confinement hood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.W.; Paik, S.

    1990-09-01

    Safety and suitability objectives for the application of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) technology at the INEL require that the physical processes involved in ISVV be modeled to determine their operational behavior. The mathematical models that have been determined to address the modeling needs adequately for the ISV analysis package are detailed elsewhere. The present report is concerned with the models required for simulating the reacting flow that occurs in the ISV confinement hood. An experimental code named COYOTE has been secured that appears adequate to model the combustion in the confinement hood. The COYOTE code is a two-dimensional, transient, compressible, Eulerian, gas dynamics code for modeling reactive flows. It recognizes nonuniform Cartesian and cylindrical geometry and is based on the ICE (Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) family of solution methods. It includes models for chemical reactions based on chemical kinetics as well as equilibrium chemistry. The mathematical models contained in COYOTE, their discrete analogs, the solution procedure, code structure and some test problems are presented in the report. 12 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Computer modeling of fluid flow and combustion in the ISV [In Situ Vitrification] confinement hood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and suitability objectives for the application of the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) technology at the INEL require that the physical processes involved in ISVV be modeled to determine their operational behavior. The mathematical models that have been determined to address the modeling needs adequately for the ISV analysis package are detailed elsewhere. The present report is concerned with the models required for simulating the reacting flow that occurs in the ISV confinement hood. An experimental code named COYOTE has been secured that appears adequate to model the combustion in the confinement hood. The COYOTE code is a two-dimensional, transient, compressible, Eulerian, gas dynamics code for modeling reactive flows. It recognizes nonuniform Cartesian and cylindrical geometry and is based on the ICE (Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian) family of solution methods. It includes models for chemical reactions based on chemical kinetics as well as equilibrium chemistry. The mathematical models contained in COYOTE, their discrete analogs, the solution procedure, code structure and some test problems are presented in the report. 12 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  12. An alternative approach for reusing slags from a plasma vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Y.-M. [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, 89, Wenhwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 71703, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: yiming@mail.hwai.edu.tw; Tseng, H.-J. [Department of Foundry Engineering, National Tainan Industrial Vocational High School, Tainan 71075, Taiwan (China); Chang, J.-E. [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Wang, J.-W.; Wang, C.-T. [Department of Safety Health and Environmental Engineering, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, 89, Wenhwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 71703, Taiwan (China); Chen, H.-T. [Sustainable Environment Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2008-08-15

    Vitrification is widely applied to transform hazardous materials into inert slags. Raising the value of the recycled slag is an important issue from an economic point of view. In this study, an alternative approach for mixing a plasma slag with unsaturated polyester resin for making the dough-like molding composites is proposed. Physical properties, including ultimate tensile strength, Rockwell hardness, and the elongation at break, were measured to evaluate the characteristics of the composites. A scanning electron microscope and an X-ray diffractometer were used to examine the micro characteristics of the specimens. The chemical stability of the composites was estimated using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and a hot water bathing process. In an optimal slag loading (mass ratio of slag to unsaturated polyester resin) ranged from 0.1 to 0.2, the slag powder improved the physical properties of the composites. With an increased slag loading, excess slag powder weakened the structure of the resin, reducing the ultimate tensile strength and Rockwell hardness. The acid and water bathing tests indicated that the resin is decomposed in a hot environment. However, the slag was not destructed nor were the hazardous metals leached out. The results show that the molding method is an effective technology to recycle the slag.

  13. An alternative approach for reusing slags from a plasma vitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Ming; Tseng, Ho-Jung; Chang, Juu-En; Wang, Jian-Wen; Wang, Chih-Ta; Chen, Hung-Ta

    2008-08-15

    Vitrification is widely applied to transform hazardous materials into inert slags. Raising the value of the recycled slag is an important issue from an economic point of view. In this study, an alternative approach for mixing a plasma slag with unsaturated polyester resin for making the dough-like molding composites is proposed. Physical properties, including ultimate tensile strength, Rockwell hardness, and the elongation at break, were measured to evaluate the characteristics of the composites. A scanning electron microscope and an X-ray diffractometer were used to examine the micro characteristics of the specimens. The chemical stability of the composites was estimated using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure and a hot water bathing process. In an optimal slag loading (mass ratio of slag to unsaturated polyester resin) ranged from 0.1 to 0.2, the slag powder improved the physical properties of the composites. With an increased slag loading, excess slag powder weakened the structure of the resin, reducing the ultimate tensile strength and Rockwell hardness. The acid and water bathing tests indicated that the resin is decomposed in a hot environment. However, the slag was not destructed nor were the hazardous metals leached out. The results show that the molding method is an effective technology to recycle the slag. PMID:18243535

  14. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program. Volume 1, Literature review: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  15. Superconducting RF cavities film of bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Darriulat, Pierre

    1999-01-01

    The successful operation of LEP2 has demonstrated the feasibility of using on a large scale copper accelerating cavities coated with a thin superconducting niobium film. Yet other existing or planned installations such as CEBAF and TESLA, rely instead on the bulk niobium technology. The reason is a wide spread belief that the film technology would suffer from fundamental limitations preventing high gradients to be reached...

  16. Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yafei

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators mainly introduces the theory, design, fabrication technology and application of a recently developed new type of device, multilayer integrated film bulk acoustic resonators, at the micro and nano scale involving microelectronic devices, integrated circuits, optical devices, sensors and actuators, acoustic resonators, micro-nano manufacturing, multilayer integration, device theory and design principles, etc. These devices can work at very high frequencies by using the newly developed theory, design, and fabrication technology of nano and micro devices. Readers in fields of IC, electronic devices, sensors, materials, and films etc. will benefit from this book by learning the detailed fundamentals and potential applications of these advanced devices. Prof. Yafei Zhang is the director of the Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory for Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology, PRC; Dr. Da Chen was a PhD student in Prof. Yafei Zhang’s research group.

  17. FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING (FBSR) OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) ORGANIC AND NITRATE DESTRUCTION PRIOR TO VITRIFICATION: CRUCIBLE SCALE TO ENGINEERING SCALE DEMONSTRATIONS AND NON-RADIOACTIVE TO RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M; Gene Daniel, G; Paul Burket, P; Charles Crawford, C

    2009-02-07

    Over a decade ago, an in-tank precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from radioactive high level waste (HLW) supernates was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The full scale demonstration with actual HLW was performed in SRS Tank 48 (T48). Sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) was added to enable Cs-137 extraction as CsTPB. The CsTPB, an organic, and its decomposition products proved to be problematic for subsequent processing of the Cs-137 precipitate in the SRS HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal in a HLW repository. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a technology for destroying the organics and nitrates in the T48 waste to render it compatible with subsequent HLW vitrification. During FBSR processing the T48 waste is converted into organic-free and nitrate-free carbonate-based minerals which are water soluble. The soluble nature of the carbonate-based minerals allows them to be dissolved and pumped to the vitrification facility or returned to the tank farm for future vitrification. The initial use of the FBSR process for T48 waste was demonstrated with simulated waste in 2003 at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a specially designed sealed crucible test that reproduces the FBSR pyrolysis reactions, i.e. carbonate formation, organic and nitrate destruction. This was followed by pilot scale testing of simulants at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science & Technology Application Research (STAR) Center in Idaho Falls, ID by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and SRNL in 2003-4 and then engineering scale demonstrations by THOR{reg_sign} Treatment Technologies (TTT) and SRS/SRNL at the Hazen Research, Inc. (HRI) test facility in Golden, CO in 2006 and 2008. Radioactive sealed crucible testing with real T48 waste was performed at SRNL in 2008, and radioactive Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was performed in the SRNL Shielded Cell Facility (SCF) in 2008.

  18. Human ovarian tissue preservation: is vitrification acceptable method for assisted reproduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isachenko, Evgenia; Isachenko, Vladimir; Nawroth, Frank; Rahimi, Gohar; Kreienberg, Rolf; Reinsberg, Jochen; Weiss, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the most successful vitrification protocol. The ovarian tissue pieces were randomly distributed into seven groups including fresh control. Each experimental group was divided into three subgroups according to the following cooling modes: a) in 1.8 ml cryo-vials with 1ml vitrification medium, b) in 1.8 ml cryo-vials with 0.1 ml vitrification medium, or c) by direct dropping with 0.05 ml vitrification medium into liquid nitrogen. The best results were observed in the protocol using 2.62 M dimethylsulphoxide + 2.6 M acetamide + 1.31 M propylene glycol + 0.0075M polyethylene glycol in combination with direct dropping of ovarian tissue pieces into liquid nitrogen. The vitrified and rewarmed samples after in vitro culture with this protocol showed 86 percent normally developed follicles, compared with 92 percent in fresh non-treated control. The concentrations of hormones in spent medium from culture of the same samples were 319 pg/ml for 17beta-estradiol and 2.6 ng/ml for progesterone compared with fresh non-treated control (253 pg/ml and 6 ng/ml, respectively). The results obtained by vitrification of ovarian tissue with this protocol were compatible with those of the fresh ovarian tissue. PMID:19137193

  19. Cryopreservation of Thymus cariensis and T. vulgaris shoot tips: comparison of three vitrification-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozudogru, E A; Kaya, E

    2012-01-01

    Thymus is an important genus of the Lamiaceae family, comprising more than 400 perennial aromatic thyme species, which are used extensively for medicinal and culinary purposes. The present study focused on the development of cryopreservation procedures for Thymus vulgaris and T. cariensis, the latter being an endemic and endangered species of Turkey. For cryopreservation of T. vulgaris shoot tips, PVS2-based one-step freezing methods, i.e., PVS2 vitrification, encapsulation-vitrification and droplet-vitrification, were compared. Cold hardening and sucrose preculture were also optimized before the cryopreservation trials. For T. cariensis, a droplet-vitrification method was applied to cold-hardened shoot tips, and after sucrose preculture. In all the methods tested, PVS2 was applied for up to 120 min. The best T. vulgaris cryopreservation was achieved with a droplet-vitrification method, that involved 2-weeks cold hardening of shoot cultures, 48 h preculture of shoot tips on MS medium supplemented with 0.25 M sucrose, and a 90 min PVS2 treatment in droplets. After direct immersion in LN, thawing and plating, 80% of shoot-tips recovered. Post-thaw recovery was significantly lower when the same procedure was applied to T. cariensis shoot tips; however also here 90 min PVS2 treatment produced the highest survival (25 percent) and recovery (25 percent) levels. PMID:23224369

  20. Risk Assessment supporting the decision on the initial selection of supplemental ILAW technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-09-29

    A risk assessment on the long-term environmental impact of various potential waste forms was conducted at the request of the Hanford Site's Mission Acceleration Initiative Team. These potential waste forms (bulk vitrification, cast stone, and steam reformer) may treat some of the low-activity waste currently planned to be treated at the Waste Treatment Plant.

  1. Risk Assessment supporting the decision on the initial selection of supplemental ILAW technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A risk assessment on the long-term environmental impact of various potential waste forms was conducted at the request of the Hanford Site's Mission Acceleration Initiative Team. These potential waste forms (bulk vitrification, cast stone, and steam reformer) may treat some of the low-activity waste currently planned to be treated at the Waste Treatment Plant

  2. Vitrification of sulphate bearing high level waste (HLW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian strategy for the management of spent fuel is based on Reprocessing-Conditioning- Recycle (RCR) option. Reprocessing of spent fuel by the PUREX process leads to the generation of high-level radioactive liquid waste. Strategy for the management of high-level waste in India involves: a) Immobilization of HLW in borosilicate matrices b) Interim storage of vitrified HLW for a period of about 50 years c) Ultimate disposal of vitrified HLW in deep geological repository Borosilicate matrices have found wide acceptance for immobilization of high level wastes. Suitable glass compositions within the borosilicate family have been formulated and characterized for sulphate bearing high-level radioactive waste. Presence of sulphate in HLW, generated earlier, is on account of ferrous sulphamate as a reducing agent, added during partitioning stage of reprocessing. Solubility of sulphur in the form of sodium sulphate is very less (<1% wt) in normally deployed borosilicate melts for vitrification of HLW. The soluble alkali sulphate gets phase separated in the glass melt and its presence is not desirable since this phase is enriched with radio Cs and has high solubility in water. In addition, volatility of sulphates during glass formation is another area of concern. Attempts to address this problem were made and alternative glass forming systems based on lead and barium borosilicate systems were studied for immobilization of this sulphate bearing waste. (author)

  3. Underground tank vitrification: Field-scale experiments and computational analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a thermal waste remediation process developed by researchers at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for stabilization and treatment of soils contaminated with hazardous, radioactive, or mixed wastes. Many underground tanks containing radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes at U.S. Department of Energy sites will soon require remediation. Recent development activities have been pursued to determine if the ISV process is applicable to underground storage tanks. As envisioned, ISV will convert the tank, tank contents, and associated contaminated soil to a glass and crystalline block. Development activities include testing and demonstration on three scales and computational modeling and evaluation. In this paper, the authors describe engineering solutions implemented on the field scale to mitigate unique problems posed by ISV of a confined underground structure along with the associated computational analysis. The ISV process, as applied to underground storage tanks, is depicted. The process is similar to ISV of contaminated soils except the tank also melts and forms a metal ingot at the bottom of the melt

  4. Ion Exchange Resin and Clay Vitrification by Plasma Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of treatment of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILRW) lead us to propose a vitrification process based on a plasma discharge; this technique incorporates LILRW into a matrix glass composed of ceramic clays material. The Mexican Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ), uses an ion exchange resin IRN 150 (styrene-divinilbence copolymer) in the TRIGA MARK III nuclear reactor. The principal objective of this resin is to absorb particles containing heavy metals and low-level radioactive particles. Once the IRN 150 resin filter capacity has been exceeded, it should be replaced and treated as LILRW. In this work, a transferred plasma system was realized to vitrify this resin taking advantage of its high power density, enthalpy and chemical reactivity as well as its rapid quenching and high operation temperatures. In order to characterize the morphological structure of these clay samples, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques were applied before and after the plasma treatment

  5. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-03-30

    A vendor was selected for the diamond wire technology demonstration scheduled for this summer at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team consisting of personnel from FIU-HCET, PPPL, and AEA Technology reviewed the submitted bids. FIU-HCET will contract this vendor. At the SRS Ninth ICT teleconference, the ICT team discussed the status of the following demonstrations: LRAD; x-ray, K-edge; Strippable Coatings; Thermal Spray Vitrification; Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction; and Electrets. The LRAD demo is complete, and the x-ray/K-edge, Strippable Coatings, and Electrets demos are ongoing. The Asbestos and Thermal Spray Vitrification demos require more laboratory testing. The Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction demo is undergoing procurement. Five FIU-HCET staff members took the 1S0 14000 environmental auditor training course February 22-26, 1999, given by ASC. The test plan for the Facility Dismantlement Technology Assessment is finished and ready for internal review.

  6. Wormholes in Bulk Viscous Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Jamil, Mubasher

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effects of the accretion of phantom energy with non-zero bulk viscosity onto a Morris-Thorne wormhole. We have found that if the bulk viscosity is large then the mass of wormhole increases rapidly as compared to small or zero bulk viscosity.

  7. Commissioning and operation of high level radioactive waste vitrification and storage facilities: the Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In India, R and D work for management of high-level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) was started along with inception of the Indian Atomic Energy Programme. This culminated in the setting up of the first vitrification facility at the Waste Immobilisation Plant (WIP) at Tarapur. The second vitrification facility has been commissioned at WIP at Trombay and the third such facility is being set up at Kalpakkam. Vitrified waste product (VWP) canisters generated from both Tarapur and Trombay are destined for storage at solid storage surveillance facility (SSSF) at Tarapur, which is the first Indian facility for interim storage vitrified waste product. This paper presents the details of commissioning and operation of these facilities along with work being done on long-term characterisation of vitrified waste product and future vitrification programme. (author)

  8. Testing of the West Valley Vitrification Facility transfer cart control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has designed and tested the control system for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Facility transfer cart. The transfer cart will transfer canisters of vitrified high-level waste remotely within the Vitrification Facility. The control system operates the cart under battery power by wireless control. The equipment includes cart-mounted control electronics, battery charger, control pendants, engineer's console, and facility antennas. Testing was performed in several phases of development: (1) prototype equipment was built and tested during design, (2) board-level testing was then performed at ORNL during fabrication, and (3) system-level testing was then performed by ORNL at the fabrication subcontractor's facility for the completed cart system. These tests verified (1) the performance of the cart relative to design requirements and (2) operation of various built-in cart features. The final phase of testing is planned to be conducted during installation at the West Valley Vitrification Facility

  9. Hanford Waste Vitrification program pilot-scale ceramic melter Test 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goles, R.W.; Nakaoka, R.K.

    1990-02-01

    The pilot-scale ceramic melter test, was conducted to determine the vitrification processing characteristics of simulated Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant process slurries and the integrated performance of the melter off-gas treatment system. Simulated melter feed was prepared and processed to produce glass. The vitrification system, achieved an on-stream efficiency of greater than 98%. The melter off-gas treatment system included a film cooler, submerged bed scrubber, demister, high-efficiency mist eliminator, preheater, and high-efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA). Evaluation of the off-gas system included the generation, nature, and capture efficiency of gross particulate, semivolatile, and noncondensible melter products. 17 refs., 48 figs., 61 tabs.

  10. Treatability study work plan for in situ vitrification of seepage pit 1 in Waste Area Grouping 7 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A treatability study is described that encompasses the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage pit 1 by the end of fiscal year 1995. This treatability study will establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlapping melt settings that are necessary to achieve fused melt segments; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of 137Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. The initial step of this treatability study will be to gather the required site characterization data about pit 1 so that the in situ vitrification can be effectively and safely planned. The second phase will be the field ISV operations at pit 1 employing at least two settings to achieve overlapping and fused melts. Such field operations are likely to require 6 to 8 weeks. Following termination of ISV melting operations at pit 1 and demobilization of portable ISV equipment and the off-gas hood, posttest characterization activities will begin

  11. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  12. Explosive bulk charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  13. The Incredible Bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Keita; Kumar, Jason; Sandick, Pearl; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental results from the LHC have placed strong constraints on the masses of colored superpartners. The MSSM parameter space is also constrained by the measurement of the Higgs boson mass, and the requirement that the relic density of lightest neutralinos be consistent with observations. Although large regions of the MSSM parameter space can be excluded by these combined bounds, leptophilic versions of the MSSM can survive these constraints. In this paper we consider a scenario in which the requirements of minimal flavor violation, vanishing $CP$-violation, and mass universality are relaxed, specifically focusing on scenarios with light sleptons. We find a large region of parameter space, analogous to the original bulk region, for which the lightest neutralino is a thermal relic with an abundance consistent with that of dark matter. We find that these leptophilic models are constrained by measurements of the magnetic and electric dipole moments of the electron and muon, and that these models have ...

  14. Bulk muscles, loose cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Chamari R D G; Kodali, Venkata

    2014-01-01

    The accessibility and usage of body building supplements is on the rise with stronger internet marketing strategies by the industry. The dangers posed by the ingredients in them are underestimated. A healthy young man came to the emergency room with palpitations and feeling unwell. Initial history and clinical examination were non-contributory to find the cause. ECG showed atrial fibrillation. A detailed history for any over the counter or herbal medicine use confirmed that he was taking supplements to bulk muscle. One of the components in these supplements is yohimbine; the onset of symptoms coincided with the ingestion of this product and the patient is symptom free after stopping it. This report highlights the dangers to the public of consuming over the counter products with unknown ingredients and the consequential detrimental impact on health. PMID:25326558

  15. A study on the vitrification of stage III zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Leandro Cesar; Streit, Danilo P; Zampolla, Tiziana; Bos-Mikich, Adriana; Zhang, Tiantian

    2013-10-24

    Attempts to cryopreserve fish embryos have been conducted over the past three decades, nevertheless successful cryopreservation protocol for long-term storage still remains elusive. Fish oocytes offer some advantages when compared to embryos, which may help in improving the chances of cryopreservation. In the present study, a series of cryo-solutions were designed and tested for their vitrifying ability using different devices (0.25 ml plastic straw, vitrification block and fibreplug(TM)). Toxicity of vitrification solutions was evaluated by assessing follicle membrane integrity with trypan blue staining. In addition, the effect of vitrification protocol on stage III zebrafish ovarian follicles was investigated by measuring the cytoplasmic ATP content and the mitochondrial distribution and activity using JC-1 probe and confocal microscopy. After vitrification, follicles showed membrane integrity of 59.9 ± 18.4% when fibreplug and V16 (1.5 M methanol + 4.5 M propylene glycol) solution were employed. When vitrified in V2 (1.5 M methanol + 5.5 M Me2SO) the membrane integrity decreased to 42.0 ± 21.0%. It was observed that follicles located in the middle of the fragments were more protected from injuries and some of them showed good morphological appearance two hours post-warming. Mitochondria integrity of granulosa cells layer was clearly damaged by the vitrification protocol and ATP level in the follicles declined significantly after warming. Vitrification of zebrafish follicles in ovarian tissue fragments and its effect at sub-cellular level is reported here for the first time. Information gained from this study will help in guiding development of optimal protocol for cryopreservation of fish oocytes. PMID:24513460

  16. Slow cryopreservation is not superior to vitrification in human spermatozoa; an experimental controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shehata Ali Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spermatozoa cryopreservation is used for the management of infertility and some other medical conditions. The routinely applied cryopreservation technique depends on permeating cryoprotectants, whose toxic effects have raised the attention towards permeating cryoprotectants-free vitrification technique. Objective: To compare between the application of slow cryopreservation and vitrification on human spermatozoa. Materials and Methods: This was an experimental controlled study involving 33 human semen samples, where each sample was divided into three equal parts; fresh control, conventional slow freezing, and permeating cryoprotectants-free vitrification. Viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP of control and post-thawing spermatozoa were assessed with the sperm viability kit and the JC-1 kit, respectively, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Results: Significant reduction of the progressive motility, viability and MMP was observed by the procedure of freezing and thawing, while there was not any significant difference between both cryopreservation techniques. Cryopreservation resulted in 48% reduction of the percentage of viable spermatozoa and 54.5% rise in the percentage of dead spermatozoa. In addition, high MMP was reduced by 24% and low MMP was increased by 34.75% in response to freezing and thawing. Progressive motility of spermatozoa was correlated significantly positive with high MMP and significantly negative with low MMP in control as well as post-thawing specimens (r=0.8881/ -0.8412, 0.7461/ -0.7510 and 0.7603/ -0.7839 for control, slow and vitrification respectively, p=0.0001. Conclusion: Although both cryopreservation techniques have similar results, vitrification is faster, easier and associated with less toxicity and costs. Thus, vitrification is recommended for the clinical application.

  17. Obesity does not aggravate vitrification injury in mouse embryos: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Wenhong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is associated with poor reproductive outcomes, but few reports have examined thawed embryo transfer in obese women. Many studies have shown that increased lipid accumulation aggravates vitrification injury in porcine and bovine embryos, but oocytes of these species have high lipid contents (63 ng and 161 ng, respectively. Almost nothing is known about lipids in human oocytes except that these cells are anecdotally known to be relatively lipid poor. In this regard, human oocytes are considered to be similar to those of the mouse, which contain approximately 4 ng total lipids/oocyte. To date, no available data show the impact of obesity on vitrification in mouse embryos. The aim of this study was to establish a murine model of maternal diet-induced obesity and to characterize the effect of obesity on vitrification by investigating the survival rate and embryo developmental competence after thawing. Methods Prospective comparisons were performed between six–eight-cell embryos from obese and normal-weight mice and between fresh and vitrified embryos. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed standard rodent chow (normal-weight group or a high-fat diet (obese group for 6 weeks. The mice were mated, zygotes were collected from oviducts and cultured for 3 days, and six–eight-cell embryos were then selected to assess lipid content in fresh embryos and to evaluate differences in apoptosis, survival, and development rates in response to vitrification. Results In fresh embryos from obese mice, the lipid content (0.044 vs 0.030, Pvs.9.3%, Pvs. 93.1%, P Conclusions This study demonstrated that differences in survival and developmental rates between embryos from obese and normal-weight mice were eliminated after vitrification. Thus, maternal obesity does not aggravate vitrification injury, but obesity alone greatly impairs pre-implantation embryo survival and development.

  18. Plasma arc and cold crucible furnace vitrification for medium level waste: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poitou, S.; Fiquet, O.; Bourdeloie, C.; Gramondi, P.; Rebollo, F. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Dechets, DED, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Girold, C.; Charvillat, J.P.; Boen, R.; Jouan, A.; Ladirat, C.; Nabot, J.P.; Ochem, D. [CEA Marcoule, Dept. d' Ingenierie et d' Etudes des Confinements DIEC, 30 (France); Baronnet, J.M. [Limoges Univ., Lab. de Chimie des Plasma, 87 (France)

    2001-07-01

    Initially developed for high-level waste reprocessing, several vitrification processes have been under study since the 80's at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) for other waste categories. According to the French law concerning waste management research passed on December 30, 1991, vitrification may be applied to mixed medium-level waste. A review of processes developed at CEA is presented: cold crucible furnace heated by induced current, refractory furnace heated by nitrogen transferred arc plasma torch, and coupling of cold crucible furnace with oxygen transferred plasma arc twin torch. Furthermore, gas post-combustion has been studied with an oxygen non-transferred plasma torch. (authors)

  19. Plasma arc and cold crucible furnace vitrification for medium level waste: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initially developed for high-level waste reprocessing, several vitrification processes have been under study since the 80's at the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) for other waste categories. According to the French law concerning waste management research passed on December 30, 1991, vitrification may be applied to mixed medium-level waste. A review of processes developed at CEA is presented: cold crucible furnace heated by induced current, refractory furnace heated by nitrogen transferred arc plasma torch, and coupling of cold crucible furnace with oxygen transferred plasma arc twin torch. Furthermore, gas post-combustion has been studied with an oxygen non-transferred plasma torch. (authors)

  20. NPP bulk equipment dismantling problems and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPP bulk equipment dismantling problems and experience are summarized. 'ECOMET-S' JSC is shown as one of the companies which are able to make NPPs industrial sites free from stored bulk equipment with its further utilization. 'ECOMET-S' JSC is the Russian Federation sole specialized metallic LLW (MLLW) treatment and utilization facility. Company's main objectives are waste predisposal volume reduction and treatment for the unrestricted release as a scrap. Leningrad NPP decommissioned main pumps and moisture separators/steam super heaters dismantling results are presented. Prospective fragmentation technologies (diamond and electro-erosive cutting) testing results are described. The electro-erosive cutting machine designed by 'ECOMET-S' JSC is presented. The fragmentation technologies implementation plans for nuclear industry are presented too. (author)

  1. Flammability Control In A Nuclear Waste Vitrification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, John R.; Choi, Alexander S.; Johnson, Fabienne C.; Miller, Donald H.; Lambert, Daniel P.; Stone, Michael E.; Daniel, William E. Jr.

    2013-07-25

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site processes high-level radioactive waste from the processing of nuclear materials that contains dissolved and precipitated metals and radionuclides. Vitrification of this waste into borosilicate glass for ultimate disposal at a geologic repository involves chemically modifying the waste to make it compatible with the glass melter system. Pretreatment steps include removal of excess aluminum by dissolution and washing, and processing with formic and nitric acids to: 1) adjust the reduction-oxidation (redox) potential in the glass melter to reduce radionuclide volatility and improve melt rate; 2) adjust feed rheology; and 3) reduce by steam stripping the amount of mercury that must be processed in the melter. Elimination of formic acid in pretreatment has been studied to eliminate the production of hydrogen in the pretreatment systems, which requires nuclear grade monitoring equipment. An alternative reductant, glycolic acid, has been studied as a substitute for formic acid. However, in the melter, the potential for greater formation of flammable gases exists with glycolic acid. Melter flammability is difficult to control because flammable mixtures can be formed during surges in offgases that both increase the amount of flammable species and decrease the temperature in the vapor space of the melter. A flammable surge can exceed the 60% of the LFL with no way to mitigate it. Therefore, careful control of the melter feed composition based on scaled melter surge testing is required. The results of engineering scale melter tests with the formic-nitric flowsheet and the use of these data in the melter flammability model are presented.

  2. Behavior of ruthenium, cesium and antimony during simulated HLLW vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of ruthenium, cesium, and antimony during the vitrification of simulated high-level radioactive liquid wastes (HLLW) in a liquid fed melter was studied on a laboratory scale and on a semi-pilot scale. In the laboratory melter of a 2.5 kg capacity, a series of tests with the simulate traced with 103Ru, 134Cs and 124Sb, has shown that the Ru and Cs losses to the melter effluent are generally higher than 10% whereas the antimony losses remain lower than 0.4%. A wet purification system comprising in series, a dust scrubber, a condenser, an ejector venturi and an NOx washing column retains most of the activity present in the off-gas so that the release fractions for Ru at the absolute filter inlet ranges between 5.10-3 to 5.10-5% of the Ru fed, for Cs the corresponding release fraction ranges between 3.10-3 to 10-4% and for Sb the release fraction ranges between 1.7 10-4 to 1.7 10-5%. The same experiments were performed at a throughput of 1 to 2 1 h-1 of simulated solution in the semi-pilot scale unit RUFUS. The RUFUS unit comprises a glass melter with a 50 kg molten glass capacity and the wet purification train comprises in series a dust scrubber, a condenser, an ejector venturi and an NOx washing column. The tracer tests were restricted to 103Ru and 134Cs since the laboratory tests had shown that the antimony losses were very low. The results of the tests are presented

  3. Mechanism of ruthenium dioxide crystallization during high level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruthenium, arising from the reprocessing of spent uranium oxide fuel, has a low solubility in glass melt. It crystallizes in the form of particles of RuO2 of acicular or polyhedral morphology dispersed in fission product and actinides waste containment glass. Since the morphology of these particles strongly influences the physico-chemical properties, the knowledge and the control of their mechanism of formation are of major importance. The goal of this work is to determine the chemical reactions responsible for the formation of RuO2 particles of acicular or polyhedral shape during glass synthesis. Using a simplification approach, the reactions between RuO2-NaNO3, and more complex calcine RuO2-Al2O3-Na2O and a sodium borosilicate glass are studied. In situ scanning electron microscopy and XANES at increasing temperatures are used to follow changes in composition, speciation and morphology of the ruthenium intermediate species. Those compounds are thoroughly characterised by SEM, XRD, HRTEM, and ruthenium K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This combined approach allows us to show that the ruthenium speciation modification during vitrification is the key of control of the morphology of RuO2 particles in the glass. In particular, the formation of a specific intermediate compound (Na3RuO4) is one of the main steps that lead to the precipitation of needle-shaped RuO2 particles in the melt. The formation of polyhedral particles, on the contrary, results from the direct incorporation of RuO2 crystals in the melt followed by an Ostwald ripening mechanism. (author)

  4. Cold crucible vitrification of defense waste surrogate and vitrified product characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the contract 'Advanced Melter Technology Application to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) - Cold Crucible Induction Heated Melter (CCIM)', vitrification tests with Savannah River Site defense waste surrogate were performed at the SIA Radon facility. Cold crucible melters with inner diameter of 216 mm and 418 mm were used in the testing. Commercially available (USA) frits 200 and 320 were used as glass-forming additives. In three different test campaigns, waste additive mixtures were fed as slurries with ∼60 wt.%, ∼30 wt.%, and 45 wt.% water content. Maximum slurry capacity and glass productivity under steady-state conditions were 35.4 kg/h and 16.2 kg/h, respectively. Specific glass productivity reached up to ∼3000 kg/(m2xday). The average melt process temperature was 1250- 1350 deg. C. Waste loadings in glass were 45 wt.% in tests 1 and 2 and 50 wt.% in test 3. The glasses produced were found to be homogeneous but contained a magnetite-type phase with the spinel structure due to high iron and manganese content in waste. Spinel was observed in the glassy matrix as individual regular crystals and their aggregates. All the waste uranium entered the vitreous phase. Infra-red spectra consist of strong absorption bands due to bridging Si-O-Si and non-bridging Si-O- bonds, some weak bands due to B-O bonds, and a number of narrow bands due to occurrence of the crystalline phase. The glassy products demonstrate high leach resistance. Normalized release of major glass elements (Na, Li, B, Si) is by 10 to 50 times lower than the values required for repository disposition by EPA. (author)

  5. Melt Grown ZnO Bulk Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Detlev; Ganschow, Steffen; Klimm, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Bulk crystals of zinc oxide can be grown from the melt by a Bridgman technique under pressure. This new technology using an iridium crucible shows the potential to yield large single crystals of good crystalline perfection. Crystals with diameters up to 33 mm and a length of up to 50 mm have been demonstrated. The impurity content can be strongly reduced by using the crucibles repeatedly.

  6. Vitrification of radioactive waste. Application to other kinds of waste; Vitrification des dechets radioactifs. Application a d`autres types de dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouan, A.

    1993-12-31

    The containment by vitrification of radioactive waste is applied to concentrate solutions of fission products coming from the spent fuel reprocessing. By the way of liquid state to solid state, it is possible to reduce the volume of waste, to get a material with safety guarantees necessary to long storage and the glass by its chemical resistance, its thermal stability and its well resistance to irradiation answers particularly well to these necessities.

  7. Inflation from bulk viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2015-01-01

    We explore the perfect fluid description of the inflationary universe. In particular, we investigate a fluid model with the bulk-viscosity term. We find that the three observables of inflationary cosmology: the spectral index of the curvature perturbations, the tensor-to-scalar ratio of the density perturbations, and the running of the spectral index, can be consistent with the recent Planck results. We also reconstruct the explicit equation of state (EoS) of the viscous fluid from the spectral index of the curvature perturbations compatible with the Planck analysis. In the reconstructed models of the viscous fluid, the tensor-to-scalar ratio of the density perturbations can satisfy the constraints obtained from the Planck satellite. The running of the spectral index can explain the Planck data. In addition, it is demonstrated that in the reconstructed models of the viscous fluid, the graceful exit from inflation can be realized. Furthermore, we show that the singular inflation can occur in the viscous fluid ...

  8. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and...... three low-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low...

  9. Bulk metallic glasses: A new class of engineering materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joysurya Basu; S Ranganathan

    2003-06-01

    Bulk glass-forming alloys have emerged over the past fifteen years with attractive properties and technological promise. A number of alloy systems based on lanthanum, magnesium, zirconium, palladium, iron, cobalt and nickel have been discovered. Glass-forming ability depends on various factors like enthalpy of mixing, atomic size and multicomponent alloying. A number of processes is available to synthesise bulk metallic glasses. The crystallisation behaviour and mechanical properties of these alloys pose interesting scientific questions. Upon crystallisation many of these glasses transform to bulk nanocrystals and nanoquasicrystals. A detailed study of the structure and the crystallisation behaviour of glasses has enabled the elucidation of the possible atomic configuration in liquid alloys. Their crystallisation behaviour can be exploited to synthesise novel nanocomposite microstructures and their mechanical properties can be enhanced. A broad overview of the present status of the science and technology of bulk metallic glasses and their potential technological uses is presented.

  10. Cryopreservation of Endothelial Cells in Various Cryoprotective Agents and Media – Vitrification versus Slow Freezing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bomhard, Achim; Elsässer, Alexander; Ritschl, Lucas Maximilian; Schwarz, Silke; Rotter, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Vitrification of endothelial cells (MHECT-5) has not previously been compared with controlled slow freezing methods under standardized conditions. To identify the best cryopreservation technique, we evaluated vitrification and standardized controlled-rate -1°C/minute cell freezing in a -80°C freezer and tested four cryoprotective agents (CPA), namely dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), and glycerol (GLY), and two media, namely Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium Ham’s F-12 (DMEM)and K+-modified TiProtec (K+TiP), which is a high-potassium-containing medium. Numbers of viable cells in proliferation were evaluated by the CellTiter 96® AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (Promega Corporation, Mannheim, Germany). To detect the exact frozen cell number per cryo vial, DNA content was measured by using Hoechst 33258 dye prior to analysis. Thus, results could be evaluated unconstrained by absolute cell number. Thawed cells were cultured in 25 cm2 cell culture flasks to confluence and examined daily by phase contrast imaging. With regard to cell recovery immediately after thawing, DMSO was the most suitable CPA combined with K+TiP in vitrification (99 ±0.5%) and with DMEM in slow freezing (92 ±1.6%). The most viable cells in proliferation after three days of culture were obtained in cells vitrificated by using GLY with K+TiP (308 ±34%) and PG with DMEM in slow freezing (280 ±27%). PMID:26890410

  11. Vitrification of low-level radioactive mixed waste at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is proceeding with plans to use vitrification to treat low-level radioactive mixed wastes (LLMW) generated on-site. The objective is to install a full-scale vitrification system at ANL-E capable of processing the entire annual generation of selected LLMW streams. Crucible glass studies with actual mixed waste streams have produced sodium borosilicate glasses under conditions achievable in commercially available melters. These same glass compositions, spiked with toxic metals above the expected levels in actual wastes, pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. Earlier evaluations of the likely off-gases that will result from vitrification indicated that the primary off-gases will include compounds of SOx, NOx, and CO2. These evaluations are being experimentally confirmed with a mass spectrometer analysis of the gases evolved from samples of the ANL-E wastes. The composition of the melter feed can be adjusted to minimize volatilization of some components, if necessary. The full-scale melter will be designed to handle the annual generation of at least three LLMW waste streams: evaporator concentrator bottoms sludge (ECB), storage tank sludge (STS), and HEPA filter media. Each waste stream is mixed waste by virtue of its failure to pass the TCLP test with respect to toxic metal leaching. Additional LLMW streams under consideration for vitrification include historical mixed waste glass from past operations and spent abrasive from a planned decontamination facility

  12. An experimental feasibility study on vitrification of Low - and medium-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory and pilot tests(all cold tests) were carried out to examine the possibility of vitrification of low-level radioactive waste such as combustible DAW(protection clothes and vinyl seat), ion exchange resins, and evaporator bottoms with three types of vitrification equipment. Pyrolyzed or dried waste material and glass formers were fed into the melting cavity, converted to molten glassy mixture, and poured into a canister. For examination of the optimal ash contents in borosilicate glass waste forms with respect to waste types, compressive strength tests were conducted for several samples of ash contents. In the case of protection clothes, vinyl seat, and spent resin was rapidly reduced up to 5 or 6 times lower than that of neat glass, but hardly changed for dried evaporator bottoms. In order to investigate the possibility of direct vitrification, combustible DAW and spent resin were directly fed into the in-can melter and Pt crucible. Pilot scale joule-heated melter in which plate type electrodes were employed to generate heat and whose melting cavity maintained a near constant molten glass level throughout the vitrification process, was designed and constructed. The total amount of molten glass in the melter was about 125 Kg and the average processing rate was 10 ∼ 15 Kg/h. At least 10 hr of retention time was considered for the best quality of the glassy waste form throughout the long-term tests

  13. The present state of research on the vitrification of concentrated solutions of fission products (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report gives the actual point of studies on vitrification of concentrated solutions of fission products. An active cell, giving glasses in crucibles, permitted to study various glass compositions. The leaching rate from the glass raises 1 to 2 10-7 g of glass/cm2/day. Activity loss by volatility during vitrification remains weak and often below 0.1 per cent of total activity. Off gas cleaning is made easier by presence of filter which is compound of granules including iron oxide. After saturation the content of this filter can be melt. Moreover different processes are in experimentation for a more important production. Daily 72 liters of solution containing tracer activity are treated in a continuous calcination and vitrification plant. The loss in 106Ru is still important and a modification of installation has been necessary. A pot vitrification plant is in study. In order to reduce cost of processing the possibility to pour glass after melting is actuality in study. A production set of very active glass is also in project. (authors)

  14. 76 FR 13605 - Notice of Availability of Draft Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Vitrification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and certain treatment material) at the West Valley... a solid glass waste form. DOE used the vitrification melter as part of this process, specifically to melt glass frit (material used in making glass) together with reprocessing waste sludge and...

  15. Waste vitrification: prediction of acceptable compositions in a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is presented based upon calculated bridging oxygens which allows the prediction of the region of acceptable glass compositions for a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system containing mixed waste. The model can be used to guide glass formulation studies (e.g., treatability studies) or assess the applicability of vitrification to candidate waste streams

  16. Thermal treatment and vitrification of boiler ash from a municipal solid waste incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Xiao, Y; Voncken, J H L; Wilson, N

    2008-06-15

    Boiler ash generated from municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators is usually classified as hazardous materials and requires special disposal. In the present study, the boiler ash was characterized for the chemical compositions, morphology and microstructure. The thermal chemical behavior during ash heating was investigated with thermal balance. Vitrification of the ash was conducted at a temperature of 1400 degrees C in order to generate a stable silicate slag, and the formed slag was examined with chemical and mineralogical analyses. The effect of vitrification on the leaching characteristics of various elements in the ash was evaluated with acid leaching. The study shows that the boiler ash as a heterogeneous fine powder contains mainly silicate, carbonate, sulfates, chlorides, and residues of organic materials and heavy metal compounds. At elevated temperatures, the boiler ash goes through the initial moisture removal, volatilization, decomposition, sintering, melting, and slag formation. At 1400 degrees C a thin layer of salt melt and a homogeneous glassy slag was formed. The experimental results indicate that leaching values of the vitrified slag are significantly reduced compared to the original boiler ash, and the vitrification could be an interesting alternative for a safer disposal of the boiler ash. Ash compacting, e.g., pelletizing can reduce volatilization and weight loss by about 50%, and would be a good option for the feed preparation before vitrification. PMID:18077086

  17. HIGH LEVEL WASTE (HLW) VITRIFICATION EXPERIENCE IN THE US: APPLICATION OF GLASS PRODUCT/PROCESS CONTROL TO OTHERHLW AND HAZARDOUS WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C; James Marra, J

    2007-09-17

    Vitrification is currently the most widely used technology for the treatment of high level radioactive wastes (HLW) throughout the world. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) actual HLW tank waste has successfully been processed to stringent product and process constraints without any rework into a stable borosilicate glass waste since 1996. A unique 'feed forward' statistical process control (SPC) has been used rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. In SQC, the glass product is sampled after it is vitrified. Individual glass property models form the basis for the 'feed forward' SPC. The property models transform constraints on the melt and glass properties into constraints on the feed composition. The property models are mechanistic and depend on glass bonding/structure, thermodynamics, quasicrystalline melt species, and/or electron transfers. The mechanistic models have been validated over composition regions well outside of the regions for which they were developed because they are mechanistic. Mechanistic models allow accurate extension to radioactive and hazardous waste melts well outside the composition boundaries for which they were developed.

  18. Suitability of pressed-fired Alumina Zirconia Silica (AZS) as backup refractory in joule heated ceramic melter for vitrification of HLW at AVS, Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitrification of high level liquid waste (HLW) by single step joule heated ceramic melter (JHCM) based technology developed indigenously and operated successfully for vitrification of HLW generated during reprocessing of spent fuel. In a ceramic melter glass is contained in a ceramic lined furnace. The glass-contact refractory is designed with indigenous Alumina-Zirconia-Silica (AZS) refractory. Bubble alumina is used as backup refractory to reduce molten glass migration. Backup refractory, as the name suggests is the second line of thermally and chemically stable material which supports the primary glass-contact refractory. Acidic vapour and/or molten vitreous mass can seep through the joints of blocks of primary refractory. As a result, acidic vapour and/or molten vitreous mass can come in contact with backup refractory. Bubble alumina has not shown adequate durability in nitric acid/molten vitreous mass because of carbonaceous material used as binder. Therefore rearrangement of suitable backup refractory up to the glass pool level in contact with primary glass-contact refractory is desired to increase the path-length of the molten mass before it reaches castable. In addition, backup refractory should have good durability with respect to HNO3 and molten glass. Here, corrosive environment is not that aggressive in terms of temperature of vitreous mass (800-850 deg C) and concentration of nitric acid (3

  19. Effect of Vitrification on Sperm Parameters and Apoptosis in Fertile Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Adib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Today, cryopreservation of the human sperm is a common technique for treating infertility. It has been indicated that cryopreservation by different methods decrease the sperm motility and viability in fertile men, but still effect of freezing of the sperm by vitrification method have not been evaluated on sperm parameters and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vitrification of sperm of fertile men on different sperm parameters (motility, morphology, viability and count and apoptosis after thawing. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study which was conducted at Yazd Infertility Research and Clinical Center in 2009, seventeen semen samples were collected by masturbation from people who came to this centre. Semen analysis was performed according to WHO standards. Smear was provided from these samples and fixed for TUNEL staining. Some samples were directly cryopreserved by cryoloope in liquid nitrogen and stored at least for Seven days. After thawing, samples were evaluated for sperm parameters. The collected data was analyzed by the SPSS software using paired T-test and Willcoxon statistical test. Results: The progressive movement of sperm was significantly decreased by vitrification. Also significant decrease in viability and morphology of the sperm and increase in the rate of apoptosis was observed after vitrification. The amount of apoptosis had negatively correlated with normal parameters of spermatozoa (especially progressive motility and viability. Conclusion: These results indicated that vitrification is harmful for sperm parameters and of apoptosis rate in fertile men. However, the apoptosis rate was lower compared to other freezing methods.

  20. Effect of vitrification temperature upon the solar average absorptance properties of Pyromark Series 2500 black paint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C.; Mahoney, A.R.

    1986-06-01

    A significant drop in production efficiency has occurred over time at the Solar One facility at Barstow, California, primarily as a result of the degradation of the Pyromark Series 2500 black paint used as the absorptive coating on the receiver panels. As part of the investigation of the problem, the solar-averaged adsorptance properties of the paint were determined as a function of vitrification temperature, since it is known that a significant amount of the panel surface area at Solar One was vitrified at temperatures below those recommended by the paint manufacturer (540/sup 0/C, 1000/sup 0/F). Painted samples initially vitrified at 230/sup 0/C (450/sup 0/F), 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F), 371/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F), and 480/sup 0/C (900/sup 0/F) exhibited significantly lower solar-averaged absorptance values (0.02 absorptance units) compared to samples vitrified at 540/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F). Thus, Solar One began its service life below optimal levels. After 140 h of thermal aging at 370/sup 0/C (700/sup 0/F) and 540/sup 0/C (1000/sup 0/F), all samples regardless of their initial vitrification temperatures, attained the same solar-averaged absorptance value (..cap alpha../sub s/ = 0.973). Therefore, both the long-term low-temperature vitrification and the short-term high-temperature vitrification can be used to obtain optimal or near-optimal absorptance of solar flux. Futher thermal aging of vitrified samples did not result in paint degradation, clearly indicating that high solar flux is required to produce this phenomenon. The panels at Solar One never achieved optimal absorptance because their exposure to high solar flux negated the effect of long-term low-temperature vitrification during operation. On future central receiver projects, every effort should be made to properly vitrify the Pyromark coating before its exposure to high flux conditions.

  1. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  2. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of 137Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997

  3. Integration of bulk piezoelectric materials into microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    Bulk piezoelectric ceramics, compared to deposited piezoelectric thin-films, provide greater electromechanical coupling and charge capacity, which are highly desirable in many MEMS applications. In this thesis, a technology platform is developed for wafer-level integration of bulk piezoelectric substrates on silicon, with a final film thickness of 5-100microm. The characterized processes include reliable low-temperature (200°C) AuIn diffusion bonding and parylene bonding of bulk-PZT on silicon, wafer-level lapping of bulk-PZT with high-uniformity (+/-0.5microm), and low-damage micro-machining of PZT films via dicing-saw patterning, laser ablation, and wet-etching. Preservation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties is confirmed with hysteresis and piezo-response measurements. The introduced technology offers higher material quality and unique advantages in fabrication flexibility over existing piezoelectric film deposition methods. In order to confirm the preserved bulk properties in the final film, diaphragm and cantilever beam actuators operating in the transverse-mode are designed, fabricated and tested. The diaphragm structure and electrode shapes/sizes are optimized for maximum deflection through finite-element simulations. During tests of fabricated devices, greater than 12microm PP displacement is obtained by actuation of a 1mm2 diaphragm at 111kHz with properties of bulk-PZT5A are mostly preserved without any necessity of repolarization. Three generations of resonant vibration energy harvesters are designed, simulated and fabricated to demonstrate the competitive performance of the new fabrication process over traditional piezoelectric deposition systems. An unpackaged PZT/Si unimorph harvester with 27mm3 active device volume produces up to 205microW at 1.5g/154Hz. The prototypes have achieved the highest figure-of-merits (normalized-power-density x bandwidth) amongst previously reported inertial energy harvesters. The fabricated energy harvester is

  4. Development and adoption of low sodium glass frit for vitrification of high level radioactive liquid waste at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level Liquid Waste (HLW) is generated during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel which is used to recover uranium and plutonium. More than 99% of the fission product activity generated during the burning of nuclear fuel in the reactor is present in HLW. For the efficient management of HLW by vitrification, sodium borosilicate glass has been adopted worldwide. Sodium oxide acts as modifier in glass matrix and variation in its concentration may vary the properties of the glass and hence the melter parameters. The HLW presently used for vitrification has higher concentration of sodium. As the composition of the base glass is fixed the concentration of Na in the HLW is one of the limiting factors for the waste loading for the vitrification process. Present article gives a brief account of the formulation of a base glass frit with lower sodium content and the feedback after implementing in the vitrification plant. (author)

  5. Mining the bulk positron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aourag, H.; Guittom, A. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger (CRNA), Alger Gare - Algiers (Algeria)

    2009-02-15

    We introduce a new approach to investigate the bulk positron lifetimes of new systems based on data-mining techniques. Through data mining of bulk positron lifetimes, we demonstrate the ability to predict the positron lifetimes of new semiconductors on the basis of available semiconductor data already studied. Informatics techniques have been applied to bulk positron lifetimes for different tetrahedrally bounded semiconductors in order to discover computational design rules. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Mining the bulk positron lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a new approach to investigate the bulk positron lifetimes of new systems based on data-mining techniques. Through data mining of bulk positron lifetimes, we demonstrate the ability to predict the positron lifetimes of new semiconductors on the basis of available semiconductor data already studied. Informatics techniques have been applied to bulk positron lifetimes for different tetrahedrally bounded semiconductors in order to discover computational design rules. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Cryopreservation of Rat Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Two Conventional and Open-pulled Straw Vitrification Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hadi Bahadori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are obtained from a variety of sources, mainlythe bone marrow. These cells have a great potential for clinical research, however they cannotstay alive for long periods in culture. The aim of this study is to determine whether vitrificationcan be a useful freezing method for the storage of MSCs.Materials and Methods: Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat bone marrow basedon their capacity to adhere to plastic culture surfaces. MSCs were cryopreserved using boththe vitrification method and open-pulled straw (OPS vitrification and stored in liquid nitrogenwith ethylene glycol ficoll (EFS as a cryoprotectant for two months. The morphology andviability of thawed MSCs were evaluated by trypan blue staining. Furthermore, pre and postcryopreserved MSCs were induced to osteocyte and adipocyte with corresponding osteogenicand adipogenic medium.Results: After thawing, the viability rates were 81.33% ± 6.83 for the vitrification method and80.83% ± 6.4 for OPS vitrification, while the values in the pre-vitrification control group were88.16% ± 6.3 (Mean ± SD, n = 6. Post-cryopreserved cells from both the vitrification methodand OPS vitrification also had a similar cellular morphology and colony-formation that wasindistinguishable from non-vitrified fresh MSCs. In addition, the resuscitated cells cultured ininduction medium showed osteogenesis. Mineral production and deposition was detectableby alizarine red S staining. Moreover, by applying an adipogenic differentiation condition,both pre and post cryopreserved cells differentiated into adipocyte and lipid vacuole accumulationthat was stained by oil red O.Conclusion: Vitrification is a reliable and effective method for the cryopreservation of MSCs.

  8. Effects of vitrification on ram spermatozoa using free-egg yolk extenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Rabadán, Pilar; García-Álvarez, Olga; Vidal, Ana; Maroto-Morales, Alejandro; Iniesta-Cuerda, María; Ramón, Manuel; del Olmo, Enrique; Fernández-Santos, Rocío; Garde, J Julián; Soler, Ana Josefa

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to examine the behavior of ram spermatozoa subjected to a vitrification process in free-egg yolk diluents in relation with conventional diluents and cryopreservation protocol used in this species. Previously it was investigated the toxicity of cryoprotectants, sucrose and glycerol, based on different concentrations (sucrose at 0.03 M, 0.05 M, 0.15 M and 0.25 M; and glycerol at 3%, 7%, 14% and 18%) compared to a commercial extender (Biladyl® with 20% egg yolk and 7% glyerol). Cryoprotectants which reported less toxicity were chosen to perform the vitrification and results were compared with the conventional cryopreservation. Semen from three rams was collected by electroejaculation. The sperm evaluation was carried out at 0, 2 and 4h through the incubation time at 37°C for the experiment of toxicity and, at thawing when cryopreservation was performed. The sperm quality throughout the incubation time always resulted lower (P⩽0.05) for the free-egg yolk diluents in relation to Biladyl® (control), obtaining the lowest values of sperm quality with the highest concentrations of sucrose and glycerol. The vitrification was carried out with combinations of sucrose and glycerol (sucrose at 0.03 and 0.05 M with 3% and 7% of glycerol, respectively) and with Biladyl® (at different sperm concentrations). The vitrification decreased drastically (P⩽0.05) the sperm quality when combinations of sucrose and glycerol were used. Nevertheless, the sperm samples vitrified with Biladyl® at the lowest sperm concentration showed acceptable values of viability, acrosome integrity and DFI, although the sperm motility was strongly decreased. In conclusion, the use of vitrification with diluents based on combinations of sucrose and glycerol did not work for semen cryopreservation of ram. Promising results were obtained when diluents with egg yolk were used in the vitrification procedure, although more studies are necessary to improve this technique and the use

  9. Comparison of the Developmental Potential and Clinical Results of In Vivo Matured Oocytes Cryopreserved with Different Vitrification Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oocyte vitrification is widely used throughout the world, but its clinical efficacy is inconsistent and depends on the vitrification media. This study compared the developmental potential and clinical results of in vivo matured oocytes cryopreserved with different vitrification media. Methods: This retrospective study involved vitrified-warmed oocytes at one in vitro fertilization laboratory. Vitrification media kits comprised the MC kit (ethylene glycol [EG] plus 1,2-propanediol [PROH], the KT kit (EG plus dimethyl sulphoxide [DMSO], and the Modified kit (EG plus DMSO and PROH kit. Rates of oocyte survival and subsequent developmental potential were recorded and analyzed. The t-test and the Chi-square test were used to evaluate each method′s efficacy. Results: Oocyte survival rate was significantly higher for the Modified kit (92.0% than for the MC kit (88.2% (P 0.05. The high-quality embryo rate per warmed oocyte was significantly higher (23.4% in the Modified kit group than in the other groups (P 0.05. Conclusions: Modified vitrification media are efficient for oocyte vitrification and, with further verification, may be able to replace commercially available media in future clinical applications.

  10. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description for high-level waste form development and qualification. Revision 3, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project has been established to convert the high-level radioactive waste associated with nuclear defense production at the Hanford Site into a waste form suitable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will mix processed radioactive waste with borosilicate material, then heat the mixture to its melting point (vitrification) to forin a glass-like substance that traps the radionuclides in the glass matrix upon cooling. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program has been established to support the mission of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. This Quality Assurance Program Description has been written to document the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program.

  11. Bulk Nuclear Properties from Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Danielewicz, P.

    2002-01-01

    Extraction of bulk nuclear properties by comparing reaction observables to results from semiclassical transport-model simulations is discussed. Specific properties include the nuclear viscosity, incompressibility and constraints on the nuclear pressure at supranormal densities.

  12. Bulk charges in eleven dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Stephen William

    1998-01-01

    Eleven dimensional supergravity has electric type currents arising from the Chern-Simon and anomaly terms in the action. However the bulk charge integrates to zero for asymptotically flat solutions with topological trivial spatial sections. We show that by relaxing the boundary conditions to generalisations of the ALE and ALF boundary conditions in four dimensions one can obtain static solutions with a bulk charge preserving between 1/16 and 1/4 of the supersymmetries. One can introduce membranes with the same sign of charge into these backgrounds. This raises the possibility that these generalized membranes might decay quantum mechanically to leave just a bulk distribution of charge. Alternatively and more probably, a bulk distribution of charge can decay into a collection of singlely charged membranes. Dimensional reductions of these solutions lead to novel representations of extreme black holes in four dimensions with up to four charges. We discuss how the eleven-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole wrapped a...

  13. Oocyte vitrification in the 21st century and post-warming fertility outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potdar, Neelam; Gelbaya, Tarek A; Nardo, Luciano G

    2014-08-01

    Oocyte cryopreservation is a rapidly developing technology, which is increasingly being used for various medical, legal and social reasons. There are inconsistencies in information regarding survival rate and fertility outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis provides evidence-based information about oocyte survival and fertility outcomes post warming to help women to make informed choices. All randomized and non-randomized, controlled and prospective cohort studies using oocyte vitrification were included. The primary outcome measure was ongoing pregnancy rate/warmed oocyte. Sensitivity analysis for donor and non-donor oocyte studies was performed. Proportional meta-analysis of 17 studies, using a random-effects model, showed pooled ongoing pregnancy and clinical pregnancy rates per warmed oocyte of 7%. Oocyte survival, fertilization, cleavage, clinical pregnancy and ongoing pregnancy rates per warmed oocyte were higher in donor versus non-donor studies. Comparing vitrified with fresh oocytes, no statistically significant difference was observed in fertilization, cleavage and clinical pregnancy rates, but ongoing pregnancy rate was reduced in the vitrified group (odds ratio 0.74), with heterogeneity between studies. Considering the age of women and the reason for cryopreservation, reasonable information can be given to help women to make informed choices. Future studies with outcomes from oocytes cryopreserved for gonadotoxic treatment may provide more insight. PMID:24931362

  14. Application of evolved gas analysis to cold-cap reactions of melter feeds for nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We applied the TGA-GC–MS combination to perform EGA of glass batches. • We confirmed the proportionality between mass loss rate and gas evolution intensities. • Proportionality coefficients can be obtained via single-reaction calibration. • Quantitative EGA allows mass loss rates to be matched with evolution rates for gases. • Industrial and waste glass technology can benefit from quantitative EGA. - Abstract: In the vitrification of nuclear wastes, the melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming and modifying additives) experiences multiple gas-evolving reactions in an electrical glass-melting furnace. We employed the thermogravimetry-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (TGA-GC–MS) combination to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Along with identifying the gases evolved, we performed quantitative analysis relating the weighted sum of intensities of individual gases in linear proportion with the differential thermogravimetry. The proportionality coefficients were obtained by three methods based on the stoichiometry, least squares, and calibration. The linearity was shown to be a good first-order approximation, in spite of the complicated overlapping reactions

  15. The hot bench scale plant Ester for the vitrification of high level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the hot bench-scale plant ESTER for the vitrification of the high-level radioactive wastes is described, and the main results of the first radioactive campaign are reported. The ESTER plant, which is placed in the ADECO-ESSOR hot cells of the C.C.R.-EURATOM-ISPRA, has been built and is operated by the ENEA, Departement of Fuel Cycle. It began operating with real radioactive wastes about 1 year ago, solidifying a total of 12 Ci of fission products into 2,02 Kg of borosilicate glass, corresponding to 757 ml of glass. During the vitrification many samples of liquid and gaseous streams have been taken and analyzed. A radioactivity balance in the plant has been calculated, as well as a mass balance of nitrates and of the 137Cs and 106Ru volatized in the process

  16. Process and device for cleaning furnace exhaust gas in a vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The furnace exhaust gas produced during vitrification is cleaned of carried over dust particles in an exhaust gas cleaning stage using a washing liquid. In order to achieve a simplified process for dosing and exhaust gas cleaning, radioactive fission product solution is taken from the feed container as the washing liquid and is transported to the head of the exhaust gas cleaning stage. The fission product solution noting as washing liquid is returned to the feed container after passing through the exhaust gas cleaning stage. The furnace exhaust gas of the vitrification plant is taken through the exhaust gas cleaning stage in counterflow. The invention also concerns a device to carry out this process. (orig./HP)

  17. Glass melter materials: technical options for the French vitrification process and operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The French vitrification process for solidifying high-level radioactive waste which has been under industrial application since 1978, is briefly mentioned. This technique involves glass melting at 1,150 deg. C, using an induction heated metallic vessel. The molten glass pouring is controlled by a thermal gate, which is also heated by induction. Two types of vessel are in use. Both are remotely removable and disposable to permit replacement at regular intervals. The technical criteria that the materials have to meet are described. The behaviour of the materials has been investigated using the industrial experience gained in the AVM facility during 8 years of operation, as well as with operation of a prototype for the new vitrification facilities under construction at La Hague. A short description of the use of these materials is also presented. (author)

  18. High temperature materials for radioactive waste incineration and vitrification. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incineration or vitrification of radioactive waste subjects equipment to alkaline or acidic fluxing, oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and thermal shock. It is necessary to select appropriate materials of construction and control operating conditions to avoid rapid equipment failure. Nickel- and cobalt-based alloys with high chromium or aluminum content and aluminum oxide/chromium oxide refractories with high chromium oxide content have provided the best service in pilot-scale melter tests. Inconel 690 and Monofrax K-3 are being used for waste vitrification. Haynes 188 and high alumina refractory are undergoing pilot scale tests for incineration equipment. Laboratory tests indicate that alloys and refractories containing still higher concentrations of chromium or chromium oxide, such as Inconel 671 and Monofrax E, may provide superior resistance to attack in glass melter environments

  19. Different routes to the glass transition: A comparison between chemical and physical vitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponi, Silvia; Corezzi, Silvia

    2012-07-01

    Despite the differences in the molecular processes involved in chemical and physical vitrification, surprising similarities are observed in the dynamics and in the thermodynamical properties of the resulting glasses. We report on a systematic study of reactive glass-formers undergoing a process of progressive polymerization of the constituent molecules via the formation of irreversible chemical bonds. The formation of most of the materials used in engineering plastics and the hardening of natural and synthetic resins, including epoxy resins, are based on chemical vitrification. The clear analogies characterizing the dynamic evolution of physical and chemical glass-formers, on the time scale of the structural and the low-frequency vibrational dynamics, are briefly reviewed.

  20. Recycle stream impacts on feed treatment flowsheets and glass formulation for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to vitrify high-level radioactive wastes stored on the Hanford site. The vitrification flowsheet is being developed to assure that low-level effluent streams will be sufficiently low in TRU and gamma activity to allow direct disposal in shallow land burial. To achieve this goal, the process is being designed to separate high activity components from off-gas treatment decontamination waste streams, thereby creating a recycle stream which must be combined with the plant food. The intent of this paper is to consider the impacts of such a recycle stream on glass formulation, melter operability, redox control upsets due to the recycle of nitrates, and the ability of a single composition frit to accommodate shifts in the recycle flowsheet

  1. Radioactive waste combustion / vitrification under arc plasma: thermal and dynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis concerns the thermal and dynamic modelling for a combustion/vitrification process of surrogate radioactive waste under transferred arc plasma. The writer presents the confinement processes for radioactive waste using arc plasma and the different software used to model theses processes. This is followed by a description of our experimental equipment including a plasma arc reactor and an inductive system allowing the homogenization of glass temperature. A combustion/vitrification test is described. Thermal and material balances were discussed. The temperature fields of plasma arc and the glass frit conductivity are measured. Finally, the writer describes and clarifies the equations solved for the simulations of the electrically plasma arc and the glass melting including the thin layer of glass frit coating the crucible cold walls. The modelling results are presented in the form of spatial distribution of temperature, velocity and volume power... (author)

  2. HWVP pilot-scale vitrification system campaign: LFCM-8 summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, J.M.; Whitney, L.D.; Buchmiller, W.C.; Daume, J.T.; Whyatt, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to treat the high-level radiative waste (HLW) stored in underground storage tanks as an alkaline sludge. Tank waste will first be retrieved and pretreated to minimize solids requiring vitrification as HLW. The glass product resulting from HWVP operations will be stored onsite in stainless steel canisters until the HLW repository is available for final disposal. The first waste stream scheduled to be processed by the HWVP is the neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) stored in double-shell storage tanks. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by providing research, development, and engineering expertise in defined areas. As a part of this support, pilot-scale testing is being conducted to support closure of HWVP design and development issues. Testing results will verify equipment design performance, establish acceptable and optimum process parameters, and support product qualification activities.

  3. HWVP pilot-scale vitrification system campaign: LFCM-8 summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to treat the high-level radiative waste (HLW) stored in underground storage tanks as an alkaline sludge. Tank waste will first be retrieved and pretreated to minimize solids requiring vitrification as HLW. The glass product resulting from HWVP operations will be stored onsite in stainless steel canisters until the HLW repository is available for final disposal. The first waste stream scheduled to be processed by the HWVP is the neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) stored in double-shell storage tanks. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supporting Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) by providing research, development, and engineering expertise in defined areas. As a part of this support, pilot-scale testing is being conducted to support closure of HWVP design and development issues. Testing results will verify equipment design performance, establish acceptable and optimum process parameters, and support product qualification activities

  4. Modeling of NOx Destruction Options for INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste Vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard Arthur

    2001-09-01

    Off-gas NOx concentrations in the range of 1-5 mol% are expected as a result of the proposed vitrification of sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. An existing kinetic model for staged combustion (originally developed for NOx abatement from the calcination process) was updated for application to vitrification offgas. In addition, two new kinetic models were developed to assess the feasibility of using selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) or high-temperature alone for NOx abatement. Each of the models was developed using the Chemkin code. Results indicate that SNCR is a viable option, reducing NOx levels to below 1000 ppmv. In addition, SNCR may be capable of simultaneously reducing CO emissions to below 100 ppmv. Results for using high-temperature alone were not as promising, indicating that a minimum NOx concentration of 3950 ppmv is achievable at 3344°F.

  5. Hanford waste vitrification plant process description, process advancements, and Hanford site interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse Hanford Company, a prime operating contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy in Richland, Washington, has the lead responsibility for development, design, construction, and operation of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will be built for the U.S. Department of Energy to vitrify existing and future liquid high level and transuranic wastes produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. Start of construction is scheduled for mid1991. Hot startup currently is scheduled for December 1999, and acceleration of the hot startup schedule is under consideration. Requirements related to interfaces with existing Hanford Site facilities and other site specific requirements are discussed in this paper. Design of the feed transfer and lag storage, radioactive liquid waste treatment and recycle, and process off gas treatment systems is significantly affected by site specific requirements. Recent developments in design of these systems are described. 3 figs

  6. Effects of cryoprotectant concentration and cooling rate on vitrification of aqueous solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Berejnov, V; Alsaied, O A; Thorne, R E; Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Husseini, Naji S.; Alsaied, Osama A.; Thorne, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    Vitrification of aqueous cryoprotectant mixtures is essential in cryopreservation of proteins and other biological samples. We report systematic measurements of critical cryoprotective agent (CPA) concentrations required for vitrification during plunge cooling from T=295 K to T=77 K in liquid nitrogen. Measurements on fourteen common CPAs including alcohols (glycerol, methanol, isopropanol), sugars (sucrose, xylitol, dextrose, trehalose), PEGs (ethylene glycol, PEG 200, PEG 2 000, PEG 20 000), glycols (DMSO, MPD), and salt (NaCl) were performed for volumes ranging over four orders of magnitude from ~nL to 20 mkL, and covering the range of interest in protein crystallography. X-ray diffraction measurements on aqueous glycerol mixtures confirm that the polycrystalline-to-vitreous transition occurs within a span of less than 2% w/v in CPA concentration, and that the form of polycrystalline ice (hexagonal or cubic) depends on CPA concentration and cooling rate. For most of the studied cryoprotectants, the critica...

  7. Ultrastructural and Morphalogical Changes of Mouse Ovarian Tissues Following Direct Cover Vitrification with Different Cryoprotectants

    OpenAIRE

    Ghavami, Maryam; Mohammadnejad, Daryoush; Beheshti, Rahim; Solmani-rad, Jafar; Abedelahi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cryopreservation of mammalian ovaries has been reported with different levels of success. Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue may be a potential alternative for treatment of infertility and many attempts have been done to improve the efficiency of ovarian cryopreservation. The objective of the present study was to compare the direct cover vitrification (DCV) with ethylene glycol (EG), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and EG plus DMSO. Methods: Eighty five mice were sacrificed by cervical ...

  8. Effective Oocyte Vitrification and Survival Techniques for Bovine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Jee; Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Eun Young; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Park, Se Pill

    2015-06-01

    Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using vitrified-thawed (VT) oocytes has been studied; however, the cloning efficiency of these oocytes is not comparable with that of nonvitrified (non-V) fresh oocytes. This study sought to optimize the survival and cryopreservation of VT oocytes for SCNT. Co-culture with feeder cells that had been preincubated for 15 h significantly improved the survival of VT oocytes and their in vitro developmental potential following SCNT in comparison to co-culture with feeder cells that had been preincubated for 2, 5, or 24 h (pEVT) group, 13.7%; VT group, 15.0%; p<0.05] and was comparable with that of the non-V group (25.9%). The reactive oxygen species level was significantly lower in the EAVT group than in the other vitrification groups (p<0.05). mRNA levels of maternal genes (ZAR1, BMP15, and NLRP5) and a stress gene (HSF1) were lower in the vitrification groups than in the non-V group (p<0.05), whereas the level of phospho-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase did not differ among the groups. Among the vitrification groups, blastocysts in the EAVT group had the best developmental potential, as judged by their high mRNA expression of developmental potential-related genes (POU5f1, Interferon-tau, and SLC2A5) and their low expression of proapoptotic (CASP3) and stress (Hsp70) genes. This study demonstrates that SCNT using bovine frozen-thawed oocytes can be successfully achieved using optimized vitrification and co-culture techniques. PMID:25984830

  9. Process for the storage of borate containing radioactive wastes by vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For storage of radioactive waste by vitrification the radioactive waste concentrates from borate-containing liquids are mixed with glass-forming aggregates. The borates make up a major part of the glass product. A glass product with good chemical and physical properties for storage is produced by heating to produce a glass-forming melt. Lead oxides and silicates in particular are considered suitable aggregate materials. (orig.)

  10. Thermal spray vitrification process for the removal of lead oxide contained in organic paints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthikeyan, J.; Chen, J.; Bancke, G.A.; Herman, H.; Berndt, C.C. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Breslin, V.T. [Marine Science Research Center, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) regulations have necessitated the removal and containment of toxic lead from lead oxide containing paints. The Thermal Spray Vitrification Process (TSVP) is a novel technique in which a glass powder of appropriate composition is flame sprayed onto the painted surface to achieve removal and vitrification of the lead. Two different glass systems, i.e., alkali silicate and ferrous silicate, were chosen for detailed study. Appropriate amounts of raw materials were mixed, fused, quenched, ground and sieved to obtain the spray quality powders. Grit blasted mild steel coupons were used as test substrates for the spray parameter optimization studies; while those coupons with lead oxide containing organic paint were used for the lead removal experiments. The powders and deposits were investigated using Microtrac particle size analysis (for powders), optical microscopy, XRD and SEM. The remnant lead in the panel was measured using a specially prepared X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) system. The lead leach rate was recorded as per US-EPA approved Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The results of this study have shown that lead oxide can be successfully removed form the paint by flame spraying a maximum of three layers of glass onto the painted surface. It is possible to obtain much higher lead removal rate with ferrous silicate glass as compared to alkali silicate glass is much higher than the ferrous silicate glass. The in situ vitrification has not been completely optimized; however, the lead containing glass coating can be remelted in situ or on site to enhance the vitrification of the lead which had been absorbed in the glass coating.

  11. The Effects of AFGP Addition and Removing Protocol of CPA on Vitrification Cryopreservation of Osteoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 Introduction Vitrification is an effective method for cryopreservation of cells~([1, 2]). However, cells are usually damaged due to the osmotic injury caused by the higher concentrations of cryoprotective agents (CPA) during CPA removing. The ice recrystallization in thawing solution can also hurt cells seriously. Antifreeze glycoprotein (AFGPs) is extremely efficient at inhibiting ice recrystallization~([3]).The effects of Removing protocols and AFGP on cell viability were investigated. 2 Materials and M...

  12. Successful vitrification of bovine immature oocyte using liquid helium instead of liquid nitrogen as cryogenic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue-Li; Xu, Ya-Kun; Wu, Hua; Guo, Xian-Fei; Li, Xiao-Xia; Han, Wen-Xia; Li, Ying-Hua

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the effectiveness of liquid helium (LHe) and liquid nitrogen (LN2) as cryogenic liquid for vitrification of bovine immature oocytes with open-pulled straw (OPS) system and determine the optimal cryoprotectant concentration of LHe vitrification. Cumulus oocyte complexes were divided into three groups, namely, untreated group (control), LN2 vitrified with OPS group, and LHe vitrified with OPS group. Oocyte survival was assessed by morphology, nuclear maturation, and developmental capability. Results indicated that the rates of normal morphology, maturation, cleavage, and blastocyst (89.3%, 52.8%, 42.7%, and 10.1%, respectively) in the LHe-vitrified group were all higher than those (79.3%, 43.4%, 34.1%, and 4.7%) in the LN2-vitrified group (P  0.05). The maturation rate of the EDS35 group (65.0%) was higher than those of the EDS30 (51.3%), EDS40 (50.1%), EDS45 (52.1%), and EDS50 groups (36.9%; P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the cleavage and blastocyst rates between the EDS35 (49.0% and 12.1%) and EDS40 (41.7% and 10.2%) groups. However, the cleavage and blastocyst rates in the EDS35 group were higher (P < 0.05) than those of the EDS30 (36.2% and 6.8%), EDS45 (35.9% and 5.8%), and EDS50 (16.6% and 2.2%) groups. In conclusion, LHe can be used as a cryogenic liquid for vitrification of bovine immature oocytes, and it is more efficient than LN2-vitrified oocytes in terms of blastocyst production. EDS35 was the optimal cryoprotectant agent combination for LHe vitrification in this study. PMID:26707386

  13. A state of the art review of vitrification of high level waste in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a review of the state-of-the-art of the development and demonstration of vitrification processes for high level radioactive waste solutions on an industrial scale in four European countries (France, United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany and Belgium). Historical development, experiences and operations present status and future plans are presented. Three of the processes which seem to be of major importance are described (AVM-France, HARVEST-United Kingdom, PAMELA Germany/Belgium). (author)

  14. Identification and summary characterization of materials potentially requiring vitrification: Background information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains background information for the Workshop in general and the presentation entitled 'Identification and Summary Characterization of Materials Potentially Requiring Vitrification' that was given during the first morning of the workshop. summary characteristics of 9 categories of US materials having some potential to be vitrified are given. This is followed by a 1-2 page elaborations for each of these 9 categories. References to more detailed information are included

  15. Cryopreservation of kunming mouse oocytes using slow cooling, ultrarapid cooling and vitrification protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, H S; Chen, J C; Ji, W Z; Shang, E Y; Yang, S C; Zou, R J

    1997-05-01

    The cryopreservation of oocytes has been only marginally successful with any of the current protocols, including slow cooling, rapid cooling and vitrification. We wished to test the hypothesis that oocytes from a single mouse strain would freeze successfully by 1 of the 3 mentioned protocols. Unfertilized Kunming mouse oocytes obtained 14 h after PMSG/hCG administration were randomly assigned to be cryopreserved after slow cooling, ultra rapid cooling and vitrification. Oocytes were thawed by straws being placed into 37 degrees C water, and their morphological appearance and in vitro fertilization capability were compared with that of oocytes that had not undergone cryopreservation. Survival of oocytes was indicated by the absence of darkened ooplasm or by broken membranes or zona pellucida. Functional integrity was evaluated by the formation of a 2-cell embryo after IVF. Survival rate of slow cooled oocytes did not differ from that seen in vitrified oocytes (55.1 vs 65.9%) but was significantly lower in the rapidly cooled oocytes (24.2%; P 0.05). It appears that Kunming mouse oocytes can be successfully cryopreserved using the slow cooling method with 1,2-propanediol and vitrification, which contains both permeating and nonpermeating cryoprotectants. PMID:16728088

  16. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150 degrees C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150 degrees C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150 degrees C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs

  17. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-07-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150{degrees}C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150{degrees}C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs.

  18. The outcomes of human blastocyst cryopreservation: vitrification using cryoloop versus slow-freezing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Zheng-yi; He Fang-fang; Yu Qi; Deng Cheng-yan; Liu Mei-zhi

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes of vitrification using cryoloop with slow-freezing method for human blastocyst cryopreservation.Methods: In IVF-ET cycles, supernumerary embryos were cultured to Day 5 or Day 6, blastocysts were cryopreserved by vitrification using cryoloops or slow-freezing method, then blastocyst survival rate and pregnant rate were compared.Results: 115 vitrified blastocysts from 39 cycles were warmed, 104(90.4%) blastocysts survived. After the transfer of 74 blastocysts in 38 cycles, 28(73.7%) women got clinically pregnant, 2(7.1%) of them suffered from miscarriage, 2 healthy babies were born in 2 deliveries, and the other 24 pregnancies are ongoing. As to slow-freezing method, 87 blastocysts from 21 cycles were thawed, 37(42.5%)of them survived, 28 blastocysts were transferred in 15 cycles, 6(40%) women got clinically pregnant, 1 of them miscarried, 3 healthy babies were born in 2 deliveries, and the other 3 pregnancies are ongoing.Conclusion: The survival rate and pregnant rate of vitrification using cryoloop are superior to traditional slow-freezing method, and the transfer cancel rate is lower than that of slow-freezing method. The miscarriage rate is similar in two methods.

  19. Development of a glass matrix for vitrification of sulphate bearing high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the earlier reprocessing flow sheet ferrous sulphamate has been used for valancy adjustment of Pu from IV to III for effective separation. This has resulted in generation of HLW containing significance amount of sulphate. Internationally borosilicate glass matrix has been adopted for vitrification of HLW. The first Indian vitrification facility at Waste Immobilislition Plant (WIP), Tarapur a five component borosilicate matrix (SiO2 :B2O3 :Na2O : MnO : TiO2) has been used for vitrification of waste. However at Trombay HLW contain significant amount of sulphate which is not compatible with standard borosilicate formulation. Extensive R and D efforts were made to develop a glass formulation which can accommodate sulphate and other constituents of HLW e.g., U, Al, Ca, etc. This report deals with development work of a glass formulations for immobilization of sulphate bearing waste. Different glass formulations were studied to evaluate the compatibility with respect to sulphate and other constituents as mentioned above. This includes sodium, lead and barium borosilicate glass matrices. Problems encountered in different glass matrices for containment of sulphate have also been addressed. A glass formulation based on barium borosilicate was found to be effective and compatible for sulphate bearing high level waste. (author)

  20. Remotely-Controlled Shear for Dismantling Highly Radioactive Tools In Rokkasho Vitrification Facility - 12204

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-level liquid waste vitrification facility in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) is right in the middle of hot commissioning tests toward starting operation in fall of 2012. In these tests, various tools were applied to address issues occurring in the vitrification cell. Because of these tools' unplanned placement in the cell it has been necessary to dismantle and dispose of them promptly. One of the tools requiring removal is a rod used in the glass melter to improve glass pouring. It is composed of a long rod made of Inconel 601 or 625 and has been highly contaminated. In order to dismantle these tools and to remotely put them in a designated waste basket, a custom electric shear machine was developed. It was installed in a dismantling area of the vitrification cell by remote cranes and manipulators and has been successfully operated. It can be remotely dismantled and placed in a waste basket for interim storage. This is a very good example of a successful deployment of a specialty remote tool in a hot cell environment. This paper also highlights how commissioning and operations are done in the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. (authors)

  1. Lessons Learned In Technology Development for Supplemental Treatment of Low-Activity Waste at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanford needs supplemental technology treatment of low-activity waste (LAW) in addition to the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The Washington State Department of Ecology requires that supplemental technology provide the same protection to human health and the environment as WTP LAW glass. In 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) evaluated supplemental treatment technologies for LAW treatment and looked more closely at three: bulk vitrification (BV), steam reforming, and tailored cementitious stabilization. US DOE with Ecology's support chose to design and test BV because it believed BV would offer rapid deployment, low cost, and waste stream versatility. This paper will describe the path taken in choosing and developing technologies for additional LAW treatment capacity and, more importantly, the lessons learned along the way. In conclusion: Contractors' off-the-shelf vitrification technology that worked elsewhere may not apply easily to Hanford's waste challenges. The BV development process could have been improved by first identifying and then focusing on primary areas of concern. Continuing integrated tests at the Horn Rapids facility offers a convenient option to test both the dryer and the SMF. But the plan for development of the SMF must be short term with well defined success criteria. US DOE has the responsibility to carefully evaluate each proposal and make critical decisions that will make optimum use of limited funds. The ERP provided valuable technical guidance on improving BV's design. This must be complemented by a similar study of cost effectiveness of a process. We must have a better understanding of life cycle costs before a path for supplemental treatment is chosen. US DOE has now gained five years of experience in developing BV. It is time for US DOE to make defensible economic evaluations before further funding towards developing supplemental treatment. It must reevaluate if the projected advantages of rapid deployment, low cost, and waste

  2. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  3. A Batch Feeder for Inhomogeneous Bulk Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vislov, I. S.; Kladiev, S. N.; Slobodyan, S. M.; Bogdan, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    The work includes the mechanical analysis of mechanical feeders and batchers that find application in various technological processes and industrial fields. Feeders are usually classified according to their design features into two groups: conveyor-type feeders and non-conveyor feeders. Batchers are used to batch solid bulk materials. Less frequently, they are used for liquids. In terms of a batching method, they are divided into volumetric and weighting batchers. Weighting batchers do not provide for sufficient batching accuracy. Automatic weighting batchers include a mass controlling sensor and systems for automatic material feed and automatic mass discharge control. In terms of operating principle, batchers are divided into gravitational batchers and batchers with forced feed of material using conveyors and pumps. Improved consumption of raw materials, decreased loss of materials, ease of use in automatic control systems of industrial facilities allows increasing the quality of technological processes and improve labor conditions. The batch feeder suggested by the authors is a volumetric batcher that has no comparable counterparts among conveyor-type feeders and allows solving the problem of targeted feeding of bulk material batches increasing reliability and hermeticity of the device.

  4. Looking for a bulk point

    CERN Document Server

    Maldacena, Juan; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We consider Lorentzian correlators of local operators. In perturbation theory, singularities occur when we can draw a position-space Landau diagram with null lines. In theories with gravity duals, we can also draw Landau diagrams in the bulk. We argue that certain singularities can arise only from bulk diagrams, not from boundary diagrams. As has been previously observed, these singularities are a clear diagnostic of bulk locality. We analyze some properties of these perturbative singularities and discuss their relation to the OPE and the dimensions of double-trace operators. In the exact nonperturbative theory, we expect no singularity at these locations. We prove this statement in 1+1 dimensions by CFT methods.

  5. Gamma probe dry bulk densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma density probe is a useful instrument for measuring water content in small volumes of soil. Essentially, the gamma probe measures the density of the soil and water between a source and a detector. To transpose the gamma densities into water content, the dry bulk density of the soil is needed. A nondestructive method for estimating dry bulk densities for use with the gamma probe is proposed. The procedure is based on the assumption that water content values in a field dry condition were more stable than the dry bulk density values and could be transferred from one point to another. The procedure was successfully used on three areas in Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwest Idaho. (U.S.)

  6. Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Melter - 12167

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the vitrification melter used in the West Valley Demonstration Project can be disposed of as low-level waste (LLW) after completion of a waste-incidental-to-reprocessing evaluation performed in accordance with the evaluation process of DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. The vitrification melter - which consists of a ceramic lined, electrically heated box structure - was operated for more than 5 years melting and fusing high-level waste (HLW) slurry and glass formers and pouring the molten glass into 275 stainless steel canisters. Prior to shutdown, the melter was decontaminated by processing low-activity decontamination flush solutions and by extracting molten glass from the melter cavity. Because it could not be completely emptied, residual radioactivity conservatively estimated at approximately 170 TBq (4,600 Ci) remained in the vitrification melter. To establish whether the melter was incidental to reprocessing, DOE prepared an evaluation to demonstrate that the vitrification melter: (1) had been processed to remove key radionuclides to the maximum extent technically and economically practical; (2) would be managed to meet safety requirements comparable to the performance objectives for LLW established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and (3) would be managed by DOE in accordance with DOE's requirements for LLW after it had been incorporated in a solid physical form with radionuclide concentrations that do not exceed the NRC concentration limits for Class C LLW. DOE consulted with the NRC on the draft evaluation and gave other stakeholders an opportunity to submit comments before the determination was made. The NRC submitted a request for additional information in connection with staff review of the draft evaluation; DOE provided the additional information and made improvements to the evaluation, which was issued in January 2012. DOE considered the NRC Technical Evaluation Report

  7. Bulk Viscosity of Interacting Hadrons

    OpenAIRE

    Wiranata, A.; M. Prakash

    2009-01-01

    We show that first approximations to the bulk viscosity $\\eta_v$ are expressible in terms of factors that depend on the sound speed $v_s$, the enthalpy, and the interaction (elastic and inelastic) cross section. The explicit dependence of $\\eta_v$ on the factor $(\\frac 13 - v_s^2)$ is demonstrated in the Chapman-Enskog approximation as well as the variational and relaxation time approaches. The interesting feature of bulk viscosity is that the dominant contributions at a given temperature ari...

  8. Bulk Viscosity of Interacting Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Wiranata, A

    2009-01-01

    We show that first approximations to the bulk viscosity $\\eta_v$ are expressible in terms of factors that depend on the sound speed $v_s$, the enthalpy, and the interaction (elastic and inelastic) cross section. The explicit dependence of $\\eta_v$ on the factor $(\\frac 13 - v_s^2)$ is demonstrated in the Chapman-Enskog approximation as well as the variational and relaxation time approaches. The interesting feature of bulk viscosity is that the dominant contributions at a given temperature arise from particles which are neither extremely nonrelativistic nor extremely relativistic. Numerical results for a model binary mixture are reported.

  9. Two new research melters at the Savannah River Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) complex leader in the development of vitrification technology. To maintain and expand this SRTC core technology, two new melter systems are currently under construction in SRTC. This paper discusses the development of these two new systems, which will be used to support current as well as future vitrification programs in the DOE complex. The first of these is the new minimelter, which is a joule-heated glass melter intended for experimental melting studies with nonradioactive glass waste forms. Testing will include surrogates of Defense Waste processing Facility (DWPF) high-level wastes. To support the DWPF testing, the new minimelter was scaled to the DWPF melter based on melt surface area. This new minimelter will replace an existing system and provide a platform for the research and development necessary to support the SRTC vitrification core technology mission. The second new melter is the British Nuclear Fuels, Inc., research melter system (BNFL melter), which is a scaled version of the BNFL low-activity-waste (LAW) melter proposed for vitrification of LAW at Hanford. It is designed to process a relatively large amount of actual radiative Hanford tank waste and to gather data on the composition of off-gases that will be generated by the LAW melter. Both the minimelter and BNFL melter systems consist of five primary subsystems: melter vessel, off-gas treatment, feed, power supply, and instrumentation and controls. The configuration and design of these subsystems are tailored to match the current system requirements and provide the flexibility to support future DOE vitrification programs. This paper presents a detailed discussion of the unique design challenges represented by these two new melter systems

  10. Historical hydronuclear testing: Characterization and remediation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the most current literature and information available on characterization and remediation technologies that could be used on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) historical hydronuclear test areas. Historical hydronuclear tests use high explosives and a small amount of plutonium. The explosion scatters plutonium within a contained subsurface environment. There is currently a need to characterize these test areas to determine the spatial extent of plutonium in the subsurface and whether geohydrologic processes are transporting the plutonium away from the event site. Three technologies were identified to assist in the characterization of the sites. These technologies are the Pipe Explorer trademark, cone penetrometer, and drilling. If the characterization results indicate that remediation is needed, three remediation technologies were identified that should be appropriate, namely: capping or sealing the surface, in situ grouting, and in situ vitrification. Capping the surface would prevent vertical infiltration of water into the soil column, but would not restrict lateral movement of vadose zone water. Both the in situ grouting and vitrification techniques would attempt to immobilize the radioactive contaminants to restrict or prevent leaching of the radioactive contaminants into the groundwater. In situ grouting uses penetrometers or boreholes to inject the soil below the contaminant zone with low permeability grout. In situ vitrification melts the soil containing contaminants into a solid block. This technique would provide a significantly longer contaminant immobilization, but some research and development would be required to re-engineer existing systems for use at deep soil depths. Currently, equipment can only handle shallow depth vitrification. After existing documentation on the historical hydronuclear tests have been reviewed and the sites have been visited, more specific recommendations will be made

  11. Historical hydronuclear testing: Characterization and remediation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaulis, L.; Wilson, G.; Jacobson, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report examines the most current literature and information available on characterization and remediation technologies that could be used on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) historical hydronuclear test areas. Historical hydronuclear tests use high explosives and a small amount of plutonium. The explosion scatters plutonium within a contained subsurface environment. There is currently a need to characterize these test areas to determine the spatial extent of plutonium in the subsurface and whether geohydrologic processes are transporting the plutonium away from the event site. Three technologies were identified to assist in the characterization of the sites. These technologies are the Pipe Explorer{trademark}, cone penetrometer, and drilling. If the characterization results indicate that remediation is needed, three remediation technologies were identified that should be appropriate, namely: capping or sealing the surface, in situ grouting, and in situ vitrification. Capping the surface would prevent vertical infiltration of water into the soil column, but would not restrict lateral movement of vadose zone water. Both the in situ grouting and vitrification techniques would attempt to immobilize the radioactive contaminants to restrict or prevent leaching of the radioactive contaminants into the groundwater. In situ grouting uses penetrometers or boreholes to inject the soil below the contaminant zone with low permeability grout. In situ vitrification melts the soil containing contaminants into a solid block. This technique would provide a significantly longer contaminant immobilization, but some research and development would be required to re-engineer existing systems for use at deep soil depths. Currently, equipment can only handle shallow depth vitrification. After existing documentation on the historical hydronuclear tests have been reviewed and the sites have been visited, more specific recommendations will be made.

  12. Bulk charges in eleven dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawking, S. W.; Taylor-Robinson, M. M.

    1998-07-01

    Eleven dimensional supergravity has electric type currents arising from the Chern-Simon and anomaly terms in the action. However the bulk charge integrates to zero for asymptotically flat solutions with topological trivial spatial sections. We show that by relaxing the boundary conditions to generalisations of the ALE and ALF boundary conditions in four dimensions one can obtain static solutions with a bulk charge. Solutions involving anomaly terms preserve between 1/16 and 1/4 of the supersymmetries but Chern-Simons fluxes generally break all of the remaining supersymmetry. One can introduce membranes with the same sign of charge into these backgrounds. This raises the possibility that these generalized membranes might decay quantum mechanically to leave just a bulk distribution of charge. Alternatively and more probably, a bulk distribution of charge can decay into a collection of singly charged membranes. Dimensional reductions of these solutions lead to novel representations of extreme black holes in four dimensions with up to four charges. We discuss how the eleven-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole wrapped around a space with non-zero first Pontryagin class picks up an electric charge proportional to the Pontryagin number.

  13. Bulk viscosity and deflationary universes

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, J A S; Waga, I

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the conditions that make possible the description of entropy generation in the new inflationary model by means of a nearequilibrium process. We show that there are situations in which the bulk viscosity cannot describe particle production during the coherent field oscillations phase.

  14. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja;

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise i...

  15. DNA methylation pattern in mouse oocytes and their in vitro fertilized early embryos: effect of oocyte vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Fu, Xiang-Wei; Li, Jun-Jie; Yuan, Dian-Shuai; Zhu, Shi-En

    2014-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the pattern of DNA methylation in vitrified-thawed mouse oocytes and their in vitro fertilized early embryos. Firstly, mouse oocytes at metaphase II (MII) stage of meiosis were allocated randomly into three groups: (1) untreated (control); (2) exposed to vitrification solution without being plunged into liquid nitrogen (toxicity); or (3) vitrified by open-pulled straw (OPS) method (vitrification). Oocytes from all three groups were fertilized subsequently in vitro. The level of DNA methylation in the MII oocytes and their early embryos was then examined by immunofluorescence using an anti-5-methylcytosine (anti-5-MeC) monoclonal antibody and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG. Developmental rates to 2-cell embryos (62.28%) and blastocysts (43.68%) of the vitrified-thawed oocytes were lower (P < 0.01) than those of fresh oocytes (81.47%, 61.99%) and vitrification solution treated (79.20%, 60.04%) oocytes. DNA methylation (as reflected by 5-MeC fluorescence intensity) in the vitrification group was less (P < 0.01) for MII oocyte and 2- to 8-cell stages compared with that in the control and toxicity groups. Accordingly, a reduction in global genomic methylation due to vitrification of MII oocytes may result in compromised in vitro developmental potential in early mouse embryos. PMID:23174120

  16. Polymerisationseigenschaften von Bulk-Fill Kompositen

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund und Ziele: Untersuchung der Polymerisationseigenschaften von Bulk-Fill Kompositen bzgl. Konversionsrate (degree of conversion = DC), Vickers-Härte (HV), Polymerisationsschrumpfungsstress (PSS) und Polymerisationsvolumenschrumpfung (PVS) im Vergleich zu konventionellen Kompositen. Material und Methode: Untersucht wurden die Bulk-Fill Komposite Filtek Bulk Fill Flowable (FBF, 3M ESPE, Seefeld), Surefil Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR, Dentsply, Konstanz), Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill...

  17. Development of vitrification technology in India for immobilization of high-level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work on development of vitreous matrices started in early sixties in the country after proper understanding of demands on product and process. The development studies in collaboration with Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), Kolkata were initiated in 1965 and continued till 1975. Leaching of developed glass system in distilled water was studied along with the influence of heat treatment on chemical durability of waste products. The results obtained during this historical work were very useful in selection of a glass composition as per the need of melting temperature and % waste incorporation. Work in BARC laboratories at Trombay and Tarapur were continued for characterization of VWP samples after leaching, heat treatment, sputtering and as such specimen using SEM, XRD etc.

  18. Modeling requirements for in situ vitrification. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Mecham, D.C.; Hagrman, D.L.; Johnson, R.W.; Murray, P.E.; Slater, C.E.; Marwil, E.S.; Weaver, R.A.; Argyle, M.D.

    1991-11-01

    This document outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to (1) help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclide and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, (2) help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and (3) help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results therefrom.

  19. Coulombic Fluids Bulk and Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Freyland, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In this book the bulk and interfacial physico-chemical characteristics of various fluid systems dominated by Coulomb interactions are treated which includes molten salts, ionic liquids as well as metal-molten salt mixtures and expanded fluid metals. Of particular interest is the comparison of the different systems. Topics in the bulk phase concern the microscopic structure, the phase behaviour and critical phenomena, and the metal-nonmetal transition. Interfacial phenomena include wetting transitions, electrowetting, surface freezing, and the electrified ionic liquid/ electrode interface. With regard to the latter 2D and 3D electrochemical phase formation of metals and semi-conductors on the nanometer scale is described for a number of selected examples. The basic concepts and various experimental methods are introduced making the book suitable for both graduate students and researchers interested in Coulombic fluids.

  20. Waveform control pulse magnetization for HTS bulk magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Tetsuya; Shigeuchi, Koji; Okuda, Sayo; Watasaki, Masahiro; Izumi, Mitsuru

    2016-03-01

    For the past 10 years, we have studied high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnets for use in electromagnetic rotating machines. If the magnetic field effectively magnetizes the HTS bulk, then the size of the motor and generator can be reduced without a reduction in output. We showed that the melt-textured Gd-Ba-Cu-O HTS bulk effectively traps a high magnetic field using waveform control pulse magnetization (WCPM). WCPM makes it possible to generate any pulsed magnetic field waveform by appropriately changing the duty ratio of the pulse width modulation. By chopping so that the pulsed magnetic field has a period of about 1ms, the WCPM technology enables active control of the rise time and suppresses magnetic flux motion that decreases magnetization efficiency. This method is also useful for any HTS bulk magnet, and the high magnetic flux density is trapped in the HTS bulk by a single pulse magnetic field. We developed a magnetizer that has a feedback system from the penetrated magnetic flux density to realize WCPM. In this research, using only a single pulse magnetic field of WCPM method at 77K, an HTS bulk with a 45mm diameter and 19mm thickness trapped a maximum magnetic field of 1.63T, which is more than 90% of the trapped magnetic flux density by FC magnetization. This result suggests that the pulse magnetizing method can replace the conventional field-cooled method and promote the practical use of HTS magnets for electromagnetic power applications.

  1. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  2. Cryoprotectant delivery and removal from murine insulinomas at vitrification-relevant concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Indra Neil; Song, Ying C; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2007-08-01

    Development of optimal cryopreservation protocols requires delivery and removal of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) in such a way that negative osmotic and cytotoxic effects on cells are minimized. This is especially true for vitrification, where high CPA concentrations are employed. In this study, we report on the determination of cell membrane permeability parameters for water (L(p)) and solute (P(s)), and on the design and experimental verification of CPA addition and removal protocols at vitrification-relevant concentrations for a murine insulinoma cell line, betaTC-tet cells. Using membrane permeability values and osmotic tolerance limits, mathematical modeling and computer simulations were used to design CPA addition and removal protocols at high concentrations. The cytotoxic effects of CPAs were also evaluated. Cells were able to tolerate the addition and removal of 2.5M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 2.5M 1,2 propanediol (PD) in single steps, but required multi-step addition and removal with 3.0M DMSO, 3.0M PD, and a vitrification-relevant concentration of 3.0M DMSO+3.0M PD. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that betaTC-tet cells were able to tolerate the presence of single component 6.0M DMSO and 6.0M PD and to a lesser extent 3.0M DMSO+3.0M PD. These results determine the time and concentration domain of CPA exposure that cells can tolerate and are essential for designing cryopreservation protocols for free cells as well as cells in engineered tissues. PMID:17533114

  3. Treatment of Asbestos Wastes Using the GeoMelt Vitrification Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disposal of waste asbestos from decommissioning activities is becoming problematic in countries which have limited disposal space. A particular challenge is the disposal of asbestos wastes from the decommissioning of nuclear sites because some of it is radioactively contaminated or activated and disposal space for such wastes is limited. GeoMeltR vitrification is being developed as a treatment method for volume and toxicity minimization and radionuclide immobilization for UK radioactive asbestos mixed waste. The common practice to date for asbestos wastes is disposal in licensed landfills. In some cases, compaction techniques are used to minimize the disposal space requirements. However, such practices are becoming less practical. Social pressures have resulted in changes to disposal regulations which, in turn, have resulted in the closure of some landfills and increased disposal costs. In the UK, tens of thousands of tonnes of asbestos waste will result from the decommissioning of nuclear sites over the next 20 years. In Japan, it is estimated that over 40 million tonnes of asbestos materials used in construction will require disposal. Methods for the safe and cost effective volume reduction of asbestos wastes are being evaluated for many sites. The GeoMeltR vitrification process is being demonstrated at full-scale in Japan for the Japan Ministry of Environment and plans are being developed for the GeoMelt treatment of UK nuclear site decommissioning-related asbestos wastes. The full-scale treatment operations in Japan have also included contaminated soils and debris. The GeoMeltR vitrification process result in the maximum possible volume reduction, destroys the asbestos fibers, treats problematic debris associated with asbestos wastes, and immobilizes radiological contaminants within the resulting glass matrix. Results from recent full-scale treatment operations in Japan are discussed and plans for GeoMelt treatment of UK nuclear site decommissioning

  4. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H2) and ammonia (NH3) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H2 and NH3 could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H2 and NH3 (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed

  5. Development of analytical cell support for vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical and Process Chemistry (A ampersand PC) support is essential to the high-level waste vitrification campaign at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). A ampersand PC characterizes the waste, providing information necessary to formulate the recipe for the target radioactive glass product. High-level waste (HLW) samples are prepared and analyzed in the analytical cells (ACs) and Sample Storage Cell (SSC) on the third floor of the main plant. The high levels of radioactivity in the samples require handling them in the shielded cells with remote manipulators. The analytical hot cells and third floor laboratories were refurbished to ensure optimal uninterrupted operation during the vitrification campaign. New and modified instrumentation, tools, sample preparation and analysis techniques, and equipment and training were required for A ampersand PC to support vitrification. Analytical Cell Mockup Units (ACMUs) were designed to facilitate method development, scientist and technician training, and planning for analytical process flow. The ACMUs were fabricated and installed to simulate the analytical cell environment and dimensions. New techniques, equipment, and tools could be evaluated m in the ACMUs without the consequences of generating or handling radioactive waste. Tools were fabricated, handling and disposal of wastes was addressed, and spatial arrangements for equipment were refined. As a result of the work at the ACMUs the remote preparation and analysis methods and the equipment and tools were ready for installation into the ACs and SSC m in July 1995. Before use m in the hot cells, all remote methods had been validated and four to eight technicians were trained on each. Fine tuning of the procedures has been ongoing at the ACs based on input from A ampersand PC technicians. Working at the ACs presents greater challenges than had development at the ACMUs. The ACMU work and further refinements m in the ACs have resulted m in a reduction m in

  6. Analysis of the phospholipid profile of metaphase II mouse oocytes undergoing vitrification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehun Jung

    Full Text Available Oocyte freezing confers thermal and chemical stress upon the oolemma and various other intracellular structures due to the formation of ice crystals. The lipid profiles of oocytes and embryos are closely associated with both, the degrees of their membrane fluidity, as well as the degree of chilling and freezing injuries that may occur during cryopreservation. In spite of the importance of lipids in the process of cryopreservation, the phospholipid status in oocytes and embryos before and after freezing has not been investigated. In this study, we employed mass spectrometric analysis to examine if vitrification has an effect on the phospholipid profiles of mouse oocytes. Freshly prepared metaphase II mouse oocytes were vitrified using copper grids and stored in liquid nitrogen for 2 weeks. Fresh and vitrified-warmed oocytes were subjected to phospholipid extraction procedure. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that multiple species of phospholipids are reduced in vitrified-warmed oocytes. LIFT analyses identified 31 underexpressed and 5 overexpressed phospholipids in vitrified mouse oocytes. The intensities of phosphatidylinositol (PI {18∶2/16∶0} [M-H]- and phosphatidylglycerol (PG {14∶0/18∶2} [M-H]- were decreased the most with fold changes of 30.5 and 19.1 in negative ion mode, respectively. Several sphingomyelins (SM including SM {d38∶3} [M+H]+ and SM {d34∶0} [M+K]+ were decreased significantly in positive ion mode. Overall, the declining trend of multiple phospholipids demonstrates that vitrification has a marked effect on phospholipid profiles of oocytes. These results show that the identified phospholipids can be used as potential biomarkers of oocyte undergoing vitrification and will allow for the development of strategies to preserve phospholipids during oocyte cryopreservation.

  7. Development of analytical cell support for vitrification at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, F.H.; Borek, T.T.; Christopher, J.Z. [and others

    1997-12-01

    Analytical and Process Chemistry (A&PC) support is essential to the high-level waste vitrification campaign at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). A&PC characterizes the waste, providing information necessary to formulate the recipe for the target radioactive glass product. High-level waste (HLW) samples are prepared and analyzed in the analytical cells (ACs) and Sample Storage Cell (SSC) on the third floor of the main plant. The high levels of radioactivity in the samples require handling them in the shielded cells with remote manipulators. The analytical hot cells and third floor laboratories were refurbished to ensure optimal uninterrupted operation during the vitrification campaign. New and modified instrumentation, tools, sample preparation and analysis techniques, and equipment and training were required for A&PC to support vitrification. Analytical Cell Mockup Units (ACMUs) were designed to facilitate method development, scientist and technician training, and planning for analytical process flow. The ACMUs were fabricated and installed to simulate the analytical cell environment and dimensions. New techniques, equipment, and tools could be evaluated m in the ACMUs without the consequences of generating or handling radioactive waste. Tools were fabricated, handling and disposal of wastes was addressed, and spatial arrangements for equipment were refined. As a result of the work at the ACMUs the remote preparation and analysis methods and the equipment and tools were ready for installation into the ACs and SSC m in July 1995. Before use m in the hot cells, all remote methods had been validated and four to eight technicians were trained on each. Fine tuning of the procedures has been ongoing at the ACs based on input from A&PC technicians. Working at the ACs presents greater challenges than had development at the ACMUs. The ACMU work and further refinements m in the ACs have resulted m in a reduction m in analysis turnaround time (TAT).

  8. In vivo survival of domestic cat oocytes after vitrification, intracytoplasmic sperm injection and embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, C E; Gómez, M C; Kagawa, N; Kuwayama, M; Leibo, S P; Dresser, B L

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated: (1) cleavage rate after IVF or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes after vitrification (experiment 1); and (2) fetal development after transfer of resultant ICSI-derived embryos into recipients (experiment 2). In vivo-matured cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were recovered from gonadotropin-treated donors at 24 h after LH treatment. In vitro-matured oocytes were obtained by mincing ovaries (from local veterinary clinics) and placing COCs into maturation medium for 24 h. Mature oocytes were denuded and cryopreserved in a vitrification solution of 15% DMSO, 15% ethylene glycol, and 18% sucrose. In experiment 1, for both in vivo- and in vitro-matured oocytes, cleavage frequencies after IVF of control and vitrified oocytes and after ICSI of vitrified oocytes were not different (P > 0.05). After vitrification, blastocyst development occurred only in IVF-derived, in vitro-matured oocytes. In experiment 2, 18 presumptive zygotes and four two-cell embryos derived by ICSI of vitrified in vitro-matured oocytes and 19 presumptive zygotes produced from seven in vivo- and 12 in vitro-matured oocytes were transferred by laparoscopy into the oviducts of two recipients, respectively. On Day 21, there were three fetuses in one recipient and one fetus in the other. On Days 63 and 66 of gestation, four live kittens were born. In vivo viability of zygotes and/or embryos produced via ICSI of vitrified oocytes was established by birth of live kittens after transfer to recipients. PMID:22015162

  9. Literature review of arc/plasma, combustion, and joule-heated melter vitrification systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides reviews of papers and reports for three basic categories of melters: arc/plasma-heated melters, combustion-heated melters, and joule-heated melters. The literature reviewed here represents those publications which may lend insight to phase I testing of low-level waste vitrification being performed at the Hanford Site in FY 1995. For each melter category, information from those papers and reports containing enough information to determine steady-state mass balance data is tabulated at the end of each section. The tables show the composition of the feed processed, the off-gas measured via decontamination factors, gross energy consumptions, and processing rates, among other data

  10. Critique of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant off-gas sampling requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Off-gas sampling and monitoring activities needed to support operations safety, process control, waste form qualification, and environmental protection requirements of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) have been evaluated. The locations of necessary sampling sites have been identified on the basis of plant requirements, and the applicability of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) reference sampling equipment to these HWVP requirements has been assessed for all sampling sites. Equipment deficiencies, if present, have been described and the bases for modifications and/or alternative approaches have been developed

  11. Behaviour of selected contaminants in spray calciner/in-can melter waste vitrification off-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Product loss from spray calciner/in-can melter vitrification of high-level wastes was evaluated with respect to volatile, gaseous and particulate materials. Investigations of the off-gases in a non-radioactive system are discussed, including gaseous constituents, particulate size distributions and loadings. Monitoring of gases leaving the off-gas system during spray calcination/in-can melting of radioactive waste gave material concentrations and material forms in the gases. The most significant conclusion drawn from these studies was that particulate loss accounts for a significant portion of the fission products in the off-gas system. (author)

  12. Decontamination and dismantling of the Piver prototype vitrification facility at Marcoule (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1984 decision to decommission the PIVER pilot vitrification facility was followed by over three years of preparation during which the necessary administrative and operational structures were set up, safety permits and waste conditioning arrangements were secured, and additional technical means were designed and installed. The operational phase began in 1988 with dismantling of the process equipment, followed by preliminary cell decontamination. System pipes were then cut up, first using telemanipulators and subsequently by human operators when the ambient dose rate dropped sufficiently to allow workers to enter the cell. PIVER has now been fully decommissioned, and the main process cell is available for installation of a new research and development facility

  13. Purification of the off-gases of the process of radioactive waste vitrification in induction melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscow SIA RADON has developed the method of vitrifying both radioactive ashes, arising from radioactive waste incineration, and liquid radioactive waste in induction melter. In the experimental plant the characteristics of off-gases were determined and various constructions of filters and filtering materials for dust trapping were tested. On the base of test results the plant for liquid radioactive waste vitrification has been constructed on the base of induction melter cold crucible, equipped with modern effective dust and gas purification system, consisting of filtration unit, absorption unit and unit for nitrogen oxide catalytic reduction. (author). 3 refs., 9 tabs., 3 figs

  14. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs

  15. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant full-scale feed preparation testing with water and process simulant slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaskill, J.R.; Larson, D.E.; Abrigo, G.P. [and others

    1996-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant was intended to convert selected, pretreated defense high-level waste and transuranic waste from the Hanford Site into a borosilicate glass. A full-scale testing program was conducted with nonradioactive waste simulants to develop information for process and equipment design of the feed-preparation system. The equipment systems tested included the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank, Slurry Mix Evaporator, and Melter-Feed Tank. The areas of data generation included heat transfer (boiling, heating, and cooling), slurry mixing, slurry pumping and transport, slurry sampling, and process chemistry. 13 refs., 129 figs., 68 tabs.

  16. Literature review of arc/plasma, combustion, and joule-heated melter vitrification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, C.J.; Abrigo, G.P.; Shafer, P.J.; Merrill, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides reviews of papers and reports for three basic categories of melters: arc/plasma-heated melters, combustion-heated melters, and joule-heated melters. The literature reviewed here represents those publications which may lend insight to phase I testing of low-level waste vitrification being performed at the Hanford Site in FY 1995. For each melter category, information from those papers and reports containing enough information to determine steady-state mass balance data is tabulated at the end of each section. The tables show the composition of the feed processed, the off-gas measured via decontamination factors, gross energy consumptions, and processing rates, among other data.

  17. Tuneable film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Gevorgian, Spartak Sh; Vorobiev, Andrei K

    2013-01-01

    To handle many standards and ever increasing bandwidth requirements, large number of filters and switches are used in transceivers of modern wireless communications systems. It makes the cost, performance, form factor, and power consumption of these systems, including cellular phones, critical issues. At present, the fixed frequency filter banks based on Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators (FBAR) are regarded as one of the most promising technologies to address performance -form factor-cost issues. Even though the FBARs improve the overall performances the complexity of these systems remains high.  Attempts are being made to exclude some of the filters by bringing the digital signal processing (including channel selection) as close to the antennas as possible. However handling the increased interference levels is unrealistic for low-cost battery operated radios. Replacing fixed frequency filter banks by one tuneable filter is the most desired and widely considered scenario. As an example, development of the softwa...

  18. An electrodeless melter for vitrification of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new concept for a high-temperature, electrodeless melter for vitrifying radioactive wastes. Based on the principles of induction heating, it circumvents a number of difficulties associated with existing technology. The melter can operate at higher temperatures (1,500--2,000 C vs 1,150 C), allowing for a higher quality, more durable glass which reduces the long-term leaching rate. Higher processing temperatures also enable conversion from borosilicate to high-silica glass which can accommodate 2 to 3 times as much radioactive waste, potentially halving the ultimate required long-term disposal space. Finally, with high temperatures, conversion of nuclear waste into ceramics can also be considered. This too leads to higher waste loading and the reduction of repository space. The melter is toroidal, linked by an iron core transformer that allows efficient electrical operation even at 60 Hz. One-dimensional electrical and thermal analyses are presented

  19. Heavy metals behavior during thermal plasma vitrification of incineration residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the developed world, incineration of wastes is widely and increasingly practiced. Worldwide, a total of approximately 100 millions of tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) material is incinerated annually. Incineration of one ton of MSW leads to the formation of 30 to 50 kg of fly ash, depending on the type of incinerator. The waste disposal of these dusts already causes great problems today; they are of low bulk density, they contain high concentrations of hazardous water-soluble heavy metal compounds, organohalogen compounds (dioxines, furanes), sulfur, and chlorinated compounds. Thermal processes, based mainly on electrical arc processes, show great promise: the residues are melted at high temperature and converted in a relatively inert glass. A few tens of plants, essentially in Japan and Taiwan, have been in industrial operation for a few years. To be authorized to be dumped in a common landfill, the glassy product has to satisfy the leaching test procedure to ensure long-term durability. But to satisfy the regulation to be reused, for example as a nonhazardous standard material in road building, the glassy product would probably include contents in some heavy metals lower than critical limits. So today, there are two alternatives: the first one is to improve the heavy toxic metals evaporation to get a 'light' glassy product and to recycle separately the said separated metals; the second is on the contrary to improve the incorporation of a maximum of heavy metals into the vitreous silicate matrix. Whatever, it is highly required to control, in situ and in real time, volatility of these metals during ash melting under electrical arc. The objective of this work was to reach basic data about metals volatility under the plasma column of an electrical arc transferred on the melt: an experiment has been designed to examine the effects of processing conditions, such as melt temperature, melt composition, and furnace atmosphere, upon volatilization and glassy slag

  20. Compound semiconductor bulk materials and characterizations, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    This book is concerned with compound semiconductor bulk materials, and has been written for students, researchers and engineers in material science and device fabrication. It provides the elementary and intermediate knowledge of compound semiconductor bulk materials necessary for entry into this field. The first volume described the physical properties, crystal growth technologies, principles of crystal growth, various defects in crystals, characterization techniques and applications, and reviewed various III-V and II-V compound semiconductor materials. In this second volume, other materials a