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Sample records for bulk vitrification glass

  1. Feed Variability and Bulk Vitrification Glass Performance Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Vienna, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The supplemental treatment (ST) bulk vitrification process will obtain its feed, consisting of low-activity waste (LAW), from more than one source. One purpose of this letter report is to describe the compositional variability of the feed to ST. The other is to support the M-62-08 decision by providing a preliminary assessment of the effectiveness of bulk vitrification (BV), the process that has been selected to perform supplemental treatment, in handling the ST feed envelope. Roughly nine-tenths of the ST LAW feed will come from the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment. This processed waste is expected to combine (1) a portion of the same LAW feed sent to the WTP melters and (2) a dilute stream that is the product of the condensate from the submerged-bed scrubber (SBS) and the drainage from the electrostatic precipitator (WESP), both of which are part of the LAW off-gas system. The manner in which the off-gas-product stream is concentrated to reduce its volume, and the way in which the excess LAW and off-gas product streams are combined, are part of the interface between WTP and ST and have not been determined. This letter report considers only one possible arrangement, in which half of the total LAW is added to the off-gas product stream, giving an estimated ST feed stream from WTP. (Total LAW equals that portion of LAW sent to the WTP LAW vitrification plant (WTP LAW) plus the LAW not currently treatable in the LAW vitrification plant due to capacity limitations (excess))

  2. Glasses and nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojovan, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Glass is an amorphous solid material which behaves like an isotropic crystal. Atomic structure of glass lacks long-range order but possesses short and most probably medium range order. Compared to crystalline materials of the same composition glasses are metastable materials however crystallisation processes are kinetically impeded within times which typically exceed the age of universe. The physical and chemical durability of glasses combined with their high tolerance to compositional changes makes glasses irreplaceable when hazardous waste needs immobilisation for safe long-term storage, transportation and consequent disposal. Immobilisation of radioactive waste in glassy materials using vitrification has been used successfully for several decades. Nuclear waste vitrification is attractive because of its flexibility, the large number of elements which can be incorporated in the glass, its high corrosion durability and the reduced volume of the resulting wasteform. Vitrification involves melting of waste materials with glass-forming additives so that the final vitreous product incorporates the waste contaminants in its macro- and micro-structure. Hazardous waste constituents are immobilised either by direct incorporation into the glass structure or by encapsulation when the final glassy material can be in form of a glass composite material. Both borosilicate and phosphate glasses are currently used to immobilise nuclear wastes. In addition to relatively homogeneous glasses novel glass composite materials are used to immobilise problematic waste streams. (author)

  3. Glass and vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, J.L.; Vacher, R.; Moncouyoux, J.P.; Vernaz, E.

    1997-01-01

    Most glasses used as materials are oxides glasses that are produced by a quick quench of a liquid. Glasses are characterized by the absence of periodicity in the atomic arrangements, they do not have symmetries and do not present order over a long distance. This series of 4 short articles present: 1) the properties of glass and its industrial story, 2) the glass structure, 3) a forty years long story of glass as dies used to confine wastes and 4) the methodology used to study the behaviour of glass over very long periods of time. This methodology is based on 5 steps: 1) define and specify the material to study (the prediction of long term alteration of a material is nonsense unless you know well its initial properties), 2) identify all the alteration processes that are likely to happen, determine their kinetics and the influence of environmental parameters, 3) develop mathematical models in order to simulate long-term behaviour of glasses, 4) determine the release rates of the radionuclides confined in the glass, and 5) validate data and models, it is not possible to expect a complete validation of a model that will be extrapolated over tens of thousands of years, nevertheless some ways of validation can lead to a satisfactory level of confidence taking into account reasonable uncertainties. (A.C.)

  4. Bulk Vitrification Castable Refractory Block Protection Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Beck, Andrew E.; Brouns, Thomas M.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Elliott, Michael L.; Matyas, Josef; Minister, Kevin BC; Schweiger, Michael J.; Strachan, Denis M.; Tinsley, Bronnie P.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-05-01

    Bulk vitrification (BV) was selected for a pilot-scale test and demonstration facility for supplemental treatment to accelerate the cleanup of low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford U.S. DOE Site. During engineering-scale (ES) tests, a small fraction of radioactive Tc (and Re, its nonradioactive surrogate) were transferred out of the LAW glass feed and molten LAW glass, and deposited on the surface and within the pores of the castable refractory block (CRB). Laboratory experiments were undertaken to understand the mechanisms of the transport Tc/Re into the CRB during vitrification and to evaluate various means of CRB protection against the deposition of leachable Tc/Re. The tests used Re as a chemical surrogate for Tc. The tests with the baseline CRB showed that the molten LAW penetrates into CRB pores before it converts to glass, leaving deposits of sulfates and chlorides when the nitrate components decompose. Na2O from the LAW reacts with the CRB to create a durable glass phase that may contain Tc/Re. Limited data from a single CRB sample taken from an ES experiment indicate that, while a fraction of Tc/Re is present in the CRB in a readily leachable form, most of the Tc/Re deposited in the refractory is retained in the form of a durable glass phase. In addition, the molten salts from the LAW, mainly sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates, begin to evaporate from BV feeds at temperatures below 800 C and condense on solid surfaces at temperatures below 530 C. Three approaches aimed at reducing or preventing the deposition of soluble Tc/Re within the CRB were proposed: metal lining, sealing the CRB surface with a glaze, and lining the CRB with ceramic tiles. Metal liners were deemed unsuitable because evaluations showed that they can cause unacceptable distortions of the electric field in the BV system. Sodium silicate and a low-alkali borosilicate glaze were selected for testing. The glazes slowed down molten salt condensate penetration, but did little to reduce the

  5. Progress of the Hanford Bulk Vitrification Project ICVTM Testing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witwer, K.S.; Woolery, D.W.; Dysland, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    In June 2004, the Bulk Vitrification Project was initiated with the intent to engineer, construct and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford tank 241-S-109. The project, managed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., and performed by AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc. (AMEC), will develop and operate a full-scale demonstration facility to exhibit the effectiveness of the bulk vitrification process under actual operating conditions. Since project initiation, testing has been undertaken using crucible-scale, 1/6 linear (engineering) scale, and full-scale vitrification equipment. Crucible-scale testing, coupled with engineering-scale testing, helps establish process limitations of selected glass formulations. Full-scale testing provides critical design verification of the In Container Vitrification (ICV) TM process both prior to and during operation of the demonstration facility. Beginning in late 2004, several full-scale tests have been performed at AMEC's test site, located adjacent to the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in Richland, WA. Early testing involved verification of melt startup methodology, followed by subsequent full-melt testing to validate critical design parameters and demonstrate the 'Bottom-Up, Feed While Melt' process. As testing has progressed, design improvements have been identified and incorporated into each successive test. Full scale testing at AMEC's test site is currently scheduled to complete in 2006, with continued full-scale operational testing at the demonstration facility on the Hanford Site starting in 2007. Additional engineering scale testing will validate recommended glass formulations that have been provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This testing is expected to continue through 2006. This paper discusses the progress of the full-scale and engineering scale testing performed to date. Crucible-scale testing, a critical step in developing

  6. Corrosion of Metal Inclusions In Bulk Vitrification Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Strachan, Denis M.; Josephson, Gary B.

    2006-07-31

    The primary purpose of the work reported here is to analyze the potential effect of the release of technetium (Tc) from metal inclusions in bulk vitrification waste packages once they are placed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). As part of the strategy for immobilizing waste from the underground tanks at Hanford, selected wastes will be immobilized using bulk vitrification. During analyses of the glass produced in engineering-scale tests, metal inclusions were found in the glass product. This report contains the results from experiments designed to quantify the corrosion rates of metal inclusions found in the glass product from AMEC Test ES-32B and simulations designed to compare the rate of Tc release from the metal inclusions to the release of Tc from glass produced with the bulk vitrification process. In the simulations, the Tc in the metal inclusions was assumed to be released congruently during metal corrosion as soluble TcO4-. The experimental results and modeling calculations show that the metal corrosion rate will, under all conceivable conditions at the IDF, be dominated by the presence of the passivating layer and corrosion products on the metal particles. As a result, the release of Tc from the metal particles at the surfaces of fractures in the glass releases at a rate similar to the Tc present as a soluble salt. The release of the remaining Tc in the metal is controlled by the dissolution of the glass matrix. To summarize, the release of 99Tc from the BV glass within precipitated Fe is directly proportional to the diameter of the Fe particles and to the amount of precipitated Fe. However, the main contribution to the Tc release from the iron particles is over the same time period as the release of the soluble Tc salt. For the base case used in this study (0.48 mass% of 0.5 mm diameter metal particles homogeneously distributed in the BV glass), the release of 99Tc from the metal is approximately the same as the release from 0.3 mass% soluble Tc

  7. Superductile bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, K.F.; Ruan, F.; Yang, Y.Q.; Chen, N.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<2%) at room temperature. We report a newly developed Pd-Si binary bulk metallic glass, which exhibits a uniform plastic deformation and a large plastic engineering strain of 82% and a plastic true strain of 170%, together with initial strain hardening, slight strain softening and final strain hardening characteristics. The uniform shear deformation and the ultrahigh plasticity are mainly attributed to strain hardening, which results from the nanoscale inhomogeneity due to liquid phase separation. The formed nanoscale inhomogeneity will hinder, deflect, and bifurcate the propagation of shear bands

  8. A COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    In May 2006, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project. However, a number of technical issues were found that could significantly affect the project's ability to meet its overall mission as stated in the project ''Justification of Mission Need'' document, if not satisfactorily resolved. The ERP recognizes that the project has changed from an accelerated schedule demonstration project to a formally chartered project that must be in full compliance with DOE 413.3 requirements. The perspective of the ERP presented herein, is measured against the formally chartered project as stated in the approved Justification of Mission Need document. A justification of Mission Need document was approved in July 2006 which defined the objectives for the DBVS Project. In this document, DOE concluded that bulk vitrification is a viable technology that requires additional development to determine its potential applicability to treatment of a portion of the Hanford low activity waste. The DBVS mission need statement now includes the following primary objectives: (1) process approximately 190,000 gallons of Tank S-109 waste into fifty 100 metric ton boxes of vitrified product; (2) store and dispose of these boxes at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); (3) evaluate the waste form characteristics; (4) gather pilot plant operability data, and (5) develop the overall life cycle system performance of bulk vitrification and produce a comparison of the bulk vitrification process to building a second LAW Immobilization facility or other

  9. PNL vitrification technology development project glass formulation strategy for LLW vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.; Hrma, P.R.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This Glass Formulation Strategy describes development approaches to optimize glass compositions for Hanford's low-level waste vitrification between now and the projected low-level waste facility start-up in 2005. The objectives of the glass formulation task are to develop optimized glass compositions with satisfactory long-term durability, acceptable processing characteristics, adequate flexibility to handle waste variations, maximize waste loading to practical limits, and to develop methodology to respond to further waste variations

  10. Glass formulation for phase 1 high-level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide potential glass formulations for prospective Phase 1 High-Level Waste (HLW) vitrification at Hanford. The results reported here will be used to aid in developing a Phase 1 HLW vitrification request for proposal (RFP) and facilitate the evaluation of ensuing proposals. The following factors were considered in the glass formulation effort: impact on total glass volume of requiring the vendor to process each of the tank compositions independently versus as a blend; effects of imposing typical values of B 2 O 3 content and waste loading in HLW borosilicate glasses as restrictions on the vendors (according to WAPS 1995, the typical values are 5--10 wt% B 2 O 3 and 20--40 wt% waste oxide loading); impacts of restricting the processing temperature to 1,150 C on eventual glass volume; and effects of caustic washing on any of the selected tank wastes relative to glass volume

  11. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Bulk Vitrification Performance Enhancement: Refractory Lining Protection Against Molten Salt Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Evans, Michael B.; Smith, Benjamin T.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Matyas, Josef; Buchmiller, William C.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Fluegel, Alexander

    2007-08-06

    Bulk vitrification (BV) is a process that heats a feed material that consists of glass-forming solids and dried low-activity waste (LAW) in a disposable refractory-lined metal box using electrical power supplied through carbon electrodes. The feed is heated to the point that the LAW decomposes and combines with the solids to generate a vitreous waste form. This study supports the BV design and operations by exploring various methods aimed at reducing the quantities of soluble Tc in the castable refractory block portion of the refractory lining, which limits the effectiveness of the final waste form.

  13. Zirconium based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.K.; Neogy, S.; Savalia, R.T.; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Banerjee, S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic glasses have come into prominence in recent times because their nanocrystalline atomic arrangement imparts many useful and unusual properties to these metallic solids. In this study, bulk glasses have been obtained in Zr based multicomponent alloy by induction melting these alloys in silica crucibles and casting these in form of rods 3 and 6 mm in diameter in a copper mould

  14. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Workman, P.; Poole, K.; Erich, D.; Harden, J.

    1998-05-01

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper

  15. Glass formulation for phase 1 high-level waste vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.R.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide potential glass formulations for prospective Phase 1 High-Level Waste (HLW) vitrification at Hanford. The results reported here will be used to aid in developing a Phase 1 HLW vitrification request for proposal (RFP) and facilitate the evaluation of ensuing proposals. The following factors were considered in the glass formulation effort: impact on total glass volume of requiring the vendor to process each of the tank compositions independently versus as a blend; effects of imposing typical values of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and waste loading in HLW borosilicate glasses as restrictions on the vendors (according to WAPS 1995, the typical values are 5--10 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 20--40 wt% waste oxide loading); impacts of restricting the processing temperature to 1,150 C on eventual glass volume; and effects of caustic washing on any of the selected tank wastes relative to glass volume.

  16. Chemical durability of soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass for radioactive waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eppler, F.H.; Yim, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification has been identified as one of the most viable waste treatment alternatives for nuclear waste disposal. Currently, the most popular glass compositions being selected for vitrification are the borosilicate family of glasses. Another popular type that has been around in glass industry is the soda-lime-silicate variety, which has often been characterized as the least durable and a poor candidate for radioactive waste vitrification. By replacing the boron constituent with a cheaper substitute, such as silica, the cost of vitrification processing can be reduced. At the same time, addition of network intermediates such as Al 2 O 3 to the glass composition increases the environmental durability of the glass. The objective of this study is to examine the ability of the soda-lime-aluminosilicate glass as an alternative vitrification tool for the disposal of radioactive waste and to investigate the sensitivity of product chemical durability to variations in composition

  17. HLW vitrification in France industrial experience and glass quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desvaux, J.L.; Delahaye, P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the vitrification process, the technology and process improvements at the La Hague plant in R 7 and T 7 facilities. The main achievements relate to the process flexibility, the reliability of the equipment and solid waste management. The quality of the vitrified glass produced and canisters compliance with agreed specifications are demonstrated through characterization studies. Since the active start-up of R 7/T 7 facilities, canisters compliance with specifications relies upon a complete quality assurance/quality control program including process control. 1 tab., 1 fig

  18. The Radiation Effect to Waste Glass that Resulting of Vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlan Martono; Aisyah

    2002-01-01

    The high level liquid waste (HLLW) is generated from the first step extraction of the nuclear fuel reprocessing. This waste was contain of few of actinide and many of fission product. The alpha radiation of actinide that contain on the HLLW cause the change the waste glass characteristic. The experiment was conducted by the doping, irradiation and heating of waste glass resulting from vitrification. The alpha radiation cause the change of composition that could be detected from change of waste glass density and mechanical strength. The increasing of alpha radiation dose cause the increasing change of density and mechanical strength, although the change of mechanical strength is not significant. Degree of change of waste glass density also depend on type of waste-glass and reach for saturated point at over of 5x10 24 alpha decay/m 3 . The gamma radiation of fission product that contain on the HLLW can increasing of waste glass temperature that cause the structure change, so devitrification was occur. The devitrification can the increasing of leaching rate. The cumulative of gamma dose rate was not cause the devitrification. (author)

  19. STATUS and DIRECTION OF THE BULK VITRIFICATION PROGRAM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAYMOND, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is managing a program at the Hanford site that will retrieve and treat more than 200 million liters (53 million gal.) of radioactive waste stored in underground storage tanks. The waste was generated over the past 50 years as part of the nation's defense programs. The project baseline calls for the waste to be retrieved from the tanks and partitioned to separate the highly radioactive constituents from the large volumes of chemical waste. These highly radioactive components will be vitrified into glass logs in the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), temporarily stored on the Hanford Site, and ultimately disposed of as high-level waste in the offsite national repository. The less radioactive chemical waste, referred to as low-activity waste (LAW), is also planned to be vitrified by the WTP, and then disposed of in approved onsite trenches. However, additional treatment capacity is required in order to complete the pretreatment and immobilization of the tank waste by 2028, which represents a Tri-Party Agreement milestone. To help ensure that the treatment milestones will be met, the Supplemental Treatment Program was undertaken. The program, managed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., involves several sub-projects each intended to supplement part of the treatment of waste being designed into the WTP. This includes the testing, evaluation, design, and deployment of supplemental LAW treatment and immobilization technologies, retrieval and treatment of mixed TRU waste stored in the Hanford Tanks, and supplemental pre-treatment. Applying one or more supplemental treatment technologies to the LAW has several advantages, including providing additional processing capacity, reducing the planned loading on the WTP, and reducing the need for double-shell tank space for interim storage of LAW. In fiscal year 2003, three potential supplemental treatment technologies were evaluated including grout, steam reforming and bulk vitrification using AMEC

  20. Vitrification and determination of the crystallization time scales of the bulk-metallic-glass-forming liquid Zr58.5Nb2.8Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, C. C.; Schroers, J.; Johnson, W. L.; Rathz, T. J.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.

    2001-01-01

    The crystallization kinetics of Zr 58.5 Nb 2.8 Cu 15.6 Ni 12.8 Al 10.3 were studied in an electrostatic levitation (ESL) apparatus. The measured critical cooling rate is 1.75 K/s. Zr 58.5 Nb 2.8 Cu 15.6 Ni 12.8 Al 10.3 is the first bulk-metallic-glass-forming liquid that does not contain beryllium to be vitrified by purely radiative cooling in the ESL. Furthermore, the sluggish crystallization kinetics enable the determination of the time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram between the liquidus and the glass transition temperatures. The shortest time to reach crystallization in an isothermal experiment; i.e., the nose of the TTT diagram is 32 s. The nose of the TTT diagram is at 900 K and positioned about 200 K below the liquidus temperature

  1. DESIGN OF THE DEMOSNTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM FOR THE SUPPLEMENTAL TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY TANK WASTE AT HANFORD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN BEEK JE

    2008-01-01

    In June 2004, the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) was initiated with the intent to design, construct, and operate a full-scale bulk vitrification pilot-plant to treat low-activity tank waste from Hanford Tank 241-S-109. The DBVS facility uses In-Container Vitrification(trademark) (ICV(trademark)) at the core of the treatment process. The basic process steps combine liquid low-activity waste (LAW) and glassformers; dry the mixture; and then vitrify the mixture in a batch feed-while-melt process in a refractory lined steel container. Off-gases are processed through a state-of-the-art air pollution control system including sintered-metal filtration, thermal oxidation, acid gas scrubbing, and high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) and high-efficiency gas adsorber (HEGA) filtration. Testing has focused on development and validation of the waste dryer, ICV, and sintered-metal filters (SMFs) equipment, operations enhancements, and glass formulation. With a parallel testing and design process, testing has allowed improvements to the DBVS equipment configuration and operating methodology, since its original inception. Design improvements include optimization of refractory panels in the ICV, simplifying glassformer addition equipment, increasing the number of waste feed chutes to the ICV, and adding capability for remote clean-out of piping, In addition, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has provided an independent review of the entire DBVS process. While the review did not find any fatal flaws, some technical issues were identified that required a re-evaluation of the DBVS design and subsequent changes to the design. A 100 percent design package for the pilot plant will be completed and submitted to DOE for review in early 2008 that incorporates process improvements substantiated through testing and reviews. This paper provides a description of the bulk vitrification process and a discussion of major equipment design changes that have occurred based on full

  2. Glass melter assembly for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.E.; Russell, A.; Shah, K.R.; Kalia, J.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is designed to solidify high level radioactive waste by converting it into stable borosilicate after mixing with glass frit and water. The heart of this conversion process takes place in the glass melter. The life span of the existing melter is limited by the possible premature failure of the heater assembly, which is not remotely replaceable, in the riser and pour spout. A goal of HWVP Project is to design remotely replaceable riser and pour spout heaters so that the useful life of the melter can be prolonged. The riser pour spout area is accessible only by the canyon crane and impact wrench. It is also congested with supporting frame members, service piping, electrode terminals, canister positioning arm and other various melter components. The visibility is low and the accessibility is limited. The problem is further compounded by the extreme high temperature in the riser core and the electrical conductive nature of the molten glass that flows through it

  3. Waste vitrification: prediction of acceptable compositions in a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    A model is presented based upon calculated bridging oxygens which allows the prediction of the region of acceptable glass compositions for a lime-soda-silica glass-forming system containing mixed waste. The model can be used to guide glass formulation studies (e.g., treatability studies) or assess the applicability of vitrification to candidate waste streams

  4. Bulk Vitrification Technology For The Treatment And Immobilization Of Low-Activity Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ard, K.E.

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

  5. BULK VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARD KE

    2011-04-11

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

  6. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF BULK VITRIFICATION PROCESS/ PRODUCT FOR TANK WASTE TREATMENT AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    At the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being constructed to immobilize both high-level waste (IUW) for disposal in a national repository and low-activity waste (LAW) for onsite, near-surface disposal. The schedule-controlling step for the WTP Project is vitrification of the large volume of LAW, current capacity of the WTP (as planned) would require 50 years to treat the Hanford tank waste, if the entire LAW volume were to be processed through the WTP. To reduce the time and cost for treatment of Hanford Tank Waste, and as required by the Tank Waste Remediation System Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision and the Hanford Federal Facility Consent Agreement (Tn-Party Agreement), DOE plans to supplement the LAW treatment capacity of the WTP. Since 2002, DOE, in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and State of Washington Department of Ecology has been evaluating technologies that could provide safe and effective supplemental treatment of LAW. Current efforts at Hanford are intended to provide additional information to aid a joint agency decision on which technology will be used to supplement the WTP. A Research, Development and Demonstration permit has been issued by the State of Washington to build and (for a limited time) operate a Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) facility to provide information for the decision on a supplemental treatment technology for up to 50% of the LAW. In the Bulk Vitrification (BV) process, LAW, soil, and glass-forming chemicals are mixed, dried, and placed in a refractory-lined box, Electric current, supplied through two graphite electrodes in the box, melts the waste feed, producing a durable glass waste-form. Although recent modifications to the process have resulted in significant improvements, there are continuing technical concerns

  7. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF BULK VITRIFICATION PROCESS & PRODUCT FOR TANK WASTE TREATMENT AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2006-07-21

    At the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being constructed to immobilize both high-level waste (IUW) for disposal in a national repository and low-activity waste (LAW) for onsite, near-surface disposal. The schedule-controlling step for the WTP Project is vitrification of the large volume of LAW, current capacity of the WTP (as planned) would require 50 years to treat the Hanford tank waste, if the entire LAW volume were to be processed through the WTP. To reduce the time and cost for treatment of Hanford Tank Waste, and as required by the Tank Waste Remediation System Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision and the Hanford Federal Facility Consent Agreement (Tn-Party Agreement), DOE plans to supplement the LAW treatment capacity of the WTP. Since 2002, DOE, in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and State of Washington Department of Ecology has been evaluating technologies that could provide safe and effective supplemental treatment of LAW. Current efforts at Hanford are intended to provide additional information to aid a joint agency decision on which technology will be used to supplement the WTP. A Research, Development and Demonstration permit has been issued by the State of Washington to build and (for a limited time) operate a Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) facility to provide information for the decision on a supplemental treatment technology for up to 50% of the LAW. In the Bulk Vitrification (BV) process, LAW, soil, and glass-forming chemicals are mixed, dried, and placed in a refractory-lined box, Electric current, supplied through two graphite electrodes in the box, melts the waste feed, producing a durable glass waste-form. Although recent modifications to the process have resulted in significant improvements, there are continuing technical concerns.

  8. Feasibility Study for Preparation and Use of Glass Grains as an Alternative to Glass Nodules for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonavane, M S; Mishra, P.K., E-mail: maheshss@barc.gov.in [Nuclear Recycle Board, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Mandal, S; Barik, S; Roy Chowdhury, A; Sen, R [Central Glass and Ceramic Institute, Kolkata (India)

    2012-10-15

    High level nuclear liquid waste (HLW) is immobilized using borosilicate glass matrix. Presently joule heated ceramic melter is being employed for vitrification of HLW in India. Preformed nodules of base glass are fed to melter along with liquid waste in predetermined ratio. In order to reduce the cost incurred for production of glass nodules of base glass, an alternative option of using glass grains was evaluated for its preparation and its suitability for the melter operation. (author)

  9. Feasibility Study for Preparation and Use of Glass Grains as an Alternative to Glass Nodules for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonavane, M.S.; Mishra, P.K.; Mandal, S.; Barik, S.; Roy Chowdhury, A.; Sen, R.

    2012-01-01

    High level nuclear liquid waste (HLW) is immobilized using borosilicate glass matrix. Presently joule heated ceramic melter is being employed for vitrification of HLW in India. Preformed nodules of base glass are fed to melter along with liquid waste in predetermined ratio. In order to reduce the cost incurred for production of glass nodules of base glass, an alternative option of using glass grains was evaluated for its preparation and its suitability for the melter operation. (author)

  10. Nanopatterned Bulk Metallic Glass Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Emily R; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Yu, Roy; Corona, Sydney L; Li, Jinyang; Vaddiraju, Sagar; Legassey, Allen; Loye, Ayomiposi; Balestrini, Jenna; Solly, Dawson A; Schroers, Jan; Taylor, André D; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Herzog, Raimund I; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2017-12-22

    Nanopatterning as a surface area enhancement method has the potential to increase signal and sensitivity of biosensors. Platinum-based bulk metallic glass (Pt-BMG) is a biocompatible material with electrical properties conducive for biosensor electrode applications, which can be processed in air at comparably low temperatures to produce nonrandom topography at the nanoscale. Work presented here employs nanopatterned Pt-BMG electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase enzyme to explore the impact of nonrandom and highly reproducible nanoscale surface area enhancement on glucose biosensor performance. Electrochemical measurements including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric voltammetry (AV) were completed to compare the performance of 200 nm Pt-BMG electrodes vs Flat Pt-BMG control electrodes. Glucose dosing response was studied in a range of 2 mM to 10 mM. Effective current density dynamic range for the 200 nm Pt-BMG was 10-12 times greater than that of the Flat BMG control. Nanopatterned electrode sensitivity was measured to be 3.28 μA/cm 2 /mM, which was also an order of magnitude greater than the flat electrode. These results suggest that nonrandom nanotopography is a scalable and customizable engineering tool which can be integrated with Pt-BMGs to produce biocompatible biosensors with enhanced signal and sensitivity.

  11. Processing constraints on high-level nuclear waste glasses for Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrma, P.R.

    1993-09-01

    The work presented in this paper is a part of a major technology program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in preparation for the planned operation of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). Because composition of Hanford waste varies greatly, processability is a major concern for successful vitrification. This paper briefly surveys general aspects of waste glass processability and then discusses their ramifications for specific examples of Hanford waste streams

  12. Startup and operation of a plant-scale continuous glass melter for vitrification of Savannah River Plant simulated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    The reference process for disposal of radioactive waste from the Savannah River Plant is vitrification of the waste in borosilicate glass in a continuous glass melter. Design, startup, and operation of a plant-scale developmental melter system are discussed

  13. The feasibility of sampling the glass pour in a high level waste vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, G.V.; Shilton, P.; Morris, J.B.

    1986-06-01

    Vitrified high level waste can be sampled for quality assurance purposes in three general ways: (I) from the glass pour, (II) from the canister, and (III) from the melter. A discussion of the potential advantages and disadvantages of each route is presented. The second philosophy seems to show the best promise; it is recommended that the Contained Pot method and the Token method are best suited for further development. An international survey of policy at vitrification plants shows that with one possible exception no glass sampling is intended and that quality is normally to be assured by control of the vitrification process. (author)

  14. Development of a glass matrix for vitrification of sulphate bearing high level radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Mishra, R.K.; Thorat, Vidya; Ramchandran, M.; Amar Kumar; Ozarde, P.D.; Raj, Kanwar; Das, D.

    2004-07-01

    High level radioactive liquid waste (HLW) is generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the earlier reprocessing flow sheet ferrous sulphamate has been used for valancy adjustment of Pu from IV to III for effective separation. This has resulted in generation of HLW containing significance amount of sulphate. Internationally borosilicate glass matrix has been adopted for vitrification of HLW. The first Indian vitrification facility at Waste Immobilislition Plant (WIP), Tarapur a five component borosilicate matrix (SiO 2 :B 2 O 3 :Na 2 O : MnO : TiO 2 ) has been used for vitrification of waste. However at Trombay HLW contain significant amount of sulphate which is not compatible with standard borosilicate formulation. Extensive R and D efforts were made to develop a glass formulation which can accommodate sulphate and other constituents of HLW e.g., U, Al, Ca, etc. This report deals with development work of a glass formulations for immobilization of sulphate bearing waste. Different glass formulations were studied to evaluate the compatibility with respect to sulphate and other constituents as mentioned above. This includes sodium, lead and barium borosilicate glass matrices. Problems encountered in different glass matrices for containment of sulphate have also been addressed. A glass formulation based on barium borosilicate was found to be effective and compatible for sulphate bearing high level waste. (author)

  15. Thulium-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H. B.; Yu, P.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2008-01-01

    We report the formation and properties of a thulium-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). Compared with other known rare-earth (RE) based BMGs, Tm-based BMGs show features of excellent glass formation ability, considerable higher elastic modulus, smaller Poisson's ratio, high mechanical strength, and intrinsic brittleness. The reasons for the different properties between the Tm-based and other RE-based BMGs are discussed. It is expected that the Tm-based glasses with the unique properties are appropriate candidates for studying some important issues in BMGs

  16. Sodalite as a vehicle to increase Re retention in waste glass simulant during vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luksic, Steven A., E-mail: steven.luksic@pnnl.gov; Riley, Brian J.; Parker, Kent E.; Hrma, Pavel

    2016-10-15

    Technetium (Tc) retention during Hanford waste vitrification can be increased if the volatility can be controlled. Incorporating Tc into a thermally stable mineral phase, such as sodalite, is one way to achieve increased retention. Here, rhenium (Re)-bearing sodalite was tested as a vehicle to transport perrhenate (ReO{sub 4}{sup −}), a nonradioactive surrogate for pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup −}), into high-level (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glass simulants. After melting HLW and LAW simulant feeds, the retention of Re in the glass was measured and compared with the Re retention in glass prepared from a feed containing Re{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Phase analysis of sodalite in both these glasses across a profile of temperatures describes the durability of Re-sodalite during the feed-to-glass transition. The use of Re sodalite improved the Re retention by 21% for HLW glass and 85% for LAW glass, demonstrating the potential improvement in Tc-retention if TcO{sub 4}{sup −} were to be encapsulated in a Tc-sodalite prior to vitrification. - Highlights: • Re retention is improved by incorporation into sodalite structure. • LAW-type glass shows lower retention but larger improvement with Re-sodalite. • Sodalite is stable to higher temperatures in high-alumina glass melts.

  17. Glass melter materials technical options for the French vitrification process and operations experience authors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonniaud, R.; Roznad, L.; Demay, R.

    1986-09-01

    The French vitrification process for solidifying high-level radioactive waste which has been under industrial application since 1978, is mentioned briefly. This technique involves glass melting at 1,150 deg.C, using an induction heated metallic vessel. The molten glass pouring is controlled by a thermal gate, which is also heated by induction. Two types of vessel are in use. Both are remotely removable and disposable to permit replacement at regular intervals. The technical criteria (the materials used have to meet) are described. The behaviour of the materials has been investigated using the industrial experience gained in the AVM facility during 8 years of operation, as well as with operation of a prototype for the new vitrification facilities under construction at La Hague. A short description of the use of these materials is also presented

  18. Elastic properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of this thesis the elastic properties of a superconducting bulk metallic glass between 10 mK and 300 K were first investigated. In order to measure the entire temperature range, in particular the low temperature part, new experimental techniques were developed. Using an inductive readout scheme for a double paddle oscillator it was possible to determine the internal friction and the relative change of sound velocity of bulk metallic glasses with high precision. This allowed for a detailed comparison of the data with different models. The analysis focuses on the low temperature regime where the properties of glassy materials are governed by atomic tunneling systems as described by the tunneling model. The influence of conduction electrons in the normal conducting state and quasiparticles in the superconducting state of the glass were accounted for in the theoretical description, resulting in a good agreement over a large temperature range between measured data and prediction of the tunneling model. This allowed for a direct determination of the coupling constant between electrons and tunneling systems. In the vicinity of the transition temperature Tc the data can only be described if a modified distribution function of the tunneling parameters is applied.

  19. Bulk glass formation and crystallization in zirconium based bulk metallic glass forming alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savalia, R.T.; Neogy, S.; Dey, G.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructures of Zr based metallic glasses produced in bulk form have been described in the as-cast condition and after crystallization. Various microscopic techniques have been used to characterize the microstructures. The microstructure in the as-cast condition was found to contain isolated crystals and crystalline aggregates embedded in the amorphous matrix. Quenched-in nuclei of crystalline phases were found to be present in fully amorphous regions. These glasses after crystallization gave rise to nanocrystalline solids. (author)

  20. Forming of bulk metallic glass microcomponents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wert, John A.; Thomsen, Christian; Jensen, Rune Debel

    2009-01-01

    The present article considers forward extrusion, closed-die forging and backward extrusion processes for fabrication of individual microcomponents from two bulk metallic glass (BMG) compositions: Mg60Cu30Y10 and Zr44Cu40Ag8Al8. Two types of tooling were used in the present work: relatively massive...... die sets characteristic of cold forming operations for crystalline metals and lightweight die sets adapted to the special characteristics of BMGs. In addition to demonstrating that microcomponents of several geometries can be readily fabricated from BMGs, rheological properties are combined...

  1. Glass optimization for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    The radioactive defense wastes stored in 177 underground single-shell tanks (SST) and double-shell tanks (DST) at the Hanford Site will be separated into low-level and high-level fractions. One technology activity underway at PNNL is the development of glass formulations for the immobilization of the low-level tank wastes. A glass formulation strategy has been developed that describes development approaches to optimize glass compositions prior to the projected LLW vitrification facility start-up in 2005. Implementation of this strategy requires testing of glass formulations spanning a number of waste loadings, compositions, and additives over the range of expected waste compositions. The resulting glasses will then be characterized and compared to processing and performance specifications yet to be developed. This report documents the glass formulation work conducted at PNL in fiscal years 1994 and 1995 including glass formulation optimization, minor component impacts evaluation, Phase 1 and Phase 2 melter vendor glass development, liquidus temperature and crystallization kinetics determination. This report also summarizes relevant work at PNNL on high-iron glasses for Hanford tank wastes conducted through the Mixed Waste Integrated Program and work at Savannah River Technology Center to optimize glass formulations using a Plackett-Burnam experimental design

  2. Multiphase, multi-electrode Joule heat computations for glass melter and in situ vitrification simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, P.S.; Lessor, D.L.

    1991-02-01

    Waste glass melter and in situ vitrification (ISV) processes represent the combination of electrical thermal, and fluid flow phenomena to produce a stable waste-from product. Computational modeling of the thermal and fluid flow aspects of these processes provides a useful tool for assessing the potential performance of proposed system designs. These computations can be performed at a fraction of the cost of experiment. Consequently, computational modeling of vitrification systems can also provide and economical means for assessing the suitability of a proposed process application. The computational model described in this paper employs finite difference representations of the basic continuum conservation laws governing the thermal, fluid flow, and electrical aspects of the vitrification process -- i.e., conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and electrical charge. The resulting code is a member of the TEMPEST family of codes developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy). This paper provides an overview of the numerical approach employed in TEMPEST. In addition, results from several TEMPEST simulations of sample waste glass melter and ISV processes are provided to illustrate the insights to be gained from computational modeling of these processes. 3 refs., 13 figs

  3. Research on vitrification technology to immobilize radioactive sludge generated from Fukushima Daiichi power plant. Enhanced glass medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amamoto, Ippei; Kobayashi, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Naoto; Takebe, Hiromichi; Mitamura, Naoki; Tsuzuki, Tatsuya; Fukayama, Daigen; Nagano, Yuichi; Jantzen, Tatjana; Hack, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The search for an enhanced glass medium to immobilize the sludge at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is our main purpose. The iron phosphate glass (IPG) is a potential candidate as we set about assessing it by means of theoretical and experimental investigation. Based on the results of this study, the IPG showed favorable characteristics as a vitrification medium for the sludge. (author)

  4. Natural analogue study of long-term leaching behavior of vitrification glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Takashi; Yusa, Yasuhisa; Kamei; Gento

    1990-01-01

    In the research on the formation disposal of high level radioactive wastes, the evaluation of the leaching behavior of vitrification glass over ultralong term is one of the important themes. Therefore, the research on the phenomena of quality change in natural environment of volcanic glass, of which the chemical composition resembles well, was carried out (natural analogue study). Among the pyroclastic fall deposit in Fuji and Izu Oshima Volcanoes, the examples of the weathering change of quality of basaltic glass over several hundreds-several thousands years were selected, and on the spot survey, the analysis of groundwater, SEM observation, EPMA and so on were carried out. As the results, the following facts were found. According to the review of the literatures on ancient climate, the atmospheric temperature and precipitation in the past 3000 years were regarded as nearly the same as now. The products from the quality change were similar to the case of laboratory leaching experiment on vitrification glass. The measured ion concentration in groundwater agreed with the calculated values. (K.I.)

  5. Stability of bulk metallic glass structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, H.; Williams, D.B.

    2003-06-18

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub (80-x)}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  6. Criticality in Bulk Metallic Glass Constituent Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Rodrigo Miguel Ojeda; Graedel, T. E.; Pekarskaya, Evgenia; Schroers, Jan

    2017-11-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), which readily form amorphous phases during solidification, are increasingly being used in first applications of watch components, electronic casings, and sporting goods. The compositions of BMGs typically include four to six elements. Various political and geological factors have recently led to supply disruptions for several metals, including some present in BMG compositions. In this work, we assess the "criticality" of 22 technologically interesting BMG compositions, compare the results with those for three common engineering alloy groups, and derive recommendations for BMG composition choices from a criticality perspective. The criticality of BMGs is found to be generally much higher compared with those for the established engineering alloys. Therefore, criticality concerns should also be considered in the choice between existing and developing novel BMGs.

  7. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Jaehun; Pierce, David A.; Pokorny, Richard; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-01-01

    Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both sensible heat and experimental instability, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by the nth order kinetics, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model

  8. NUCLEAR WASTE GLASSES: CONTINUOUS MELTING AND BULK VITRIFICAITON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KRUGER, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    This contribution addresses various aspects of nuclear waste vitrification. Nuclear wastes have a variety of components and composition ranges. For each waste composition, the glass must be formulated to possess acceptable processing and product behavior defined in terms of physical and chemical properties that guarantee the glass can be easily made and resist environmental degradation. Glass formulation is facilitated by developing property-composition models, and the strategy of model development and application is reviewed. However, the large variability of waste compositions presents numerous additional challenges: insoluble solids and molten salts may segregate; foam may hinder heat transfer and slow down the process; molten salts may accumulate in container refractory walls; the glass on cooling may precipitate crystalline phases. These problems need targeted exploratory research. Examples of specific problems and their possible solutions are discussed

  9. Cavitation instability in bulk metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments have shown that fracture surfaces of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs usually exhibit an intriguing nanoscale corrugation like fractographic feature mediated by nanoscale void formation. We attribute the onset of this nanoscale corrugation to TTZs (tension transformation zones mediated cavitation. In our recent study, the spall experiments of Zr-based BMG using a single-stage light gas gun were performed. To uncover the mechanisms of the spallation damage nucleation and evolution, the samples were designed to be subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude but with different durations by making use of the multi-stress pulse and the double-flyer techniques. It is clearly revealed that the macroscopic spall fracture in BMGs originates from the nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids. Then, a microvoid nucleation model of BMGs based on free volume theory is proposed, which indicates that the nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in BMGs is resulted from diffusion and coalescence of free volume. Furthermore, a theoretical model of void growth in BMGs undergoing remote dynamic hydrostatic tension is developed. The critical condition of cavitation instability is obtained. It is found that dynamic void growth in BMGs can be well controlled by a dimensionless inertial number characterizing the competition between intrinsic and extrinsic time scales. To unveil the atomic-level mechanism of cavitation, a systematic molecular dynamics (MD simulation of spallation behaviour of a binary metallic glass with different impact velocities was performed. It is found that micro-void nucleation is determined TTZs while the growth is controlled by shear transformation zones (STZs at atomic scale.

  10. Development of an Alternative Glass Formulation for Vitrification of Excess Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARRA, JAMES

    2006-01-01

    compositional region of potential glass-in-glass phase separation toward a region near a low melting eutectic trough. The resulting LaBS Frit X composition was fabricated and tested. The chemical durability of the LaBS Frit X glass was shown to be equivalent to the reference Frit B composition as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The Frit X composition demonstrated improved component solubility in surrogate and plutonium testing. This composition also exhibited improved devitrification behavior that could translate to lower glass processing temperatures and minimize any negative impacts on glass pouring. Testing with the LaBS Frit X composition also indicated the potential to intentionally precipitate a PuO 2 -HfO 2 solid solution phase. This could result in a means to dramatically improve the plutonium leach performance in the repository by the formation of a highly insoluble phase with an inherent neutron absorber. Preliminary testing indicated that glass heat treatment could be used to intentionally form this phase in the glass. This study identified an alternative LaBS glass composition (Frit X) that should be tested further. Specifically, the suite of performance tests currently being conducted on the reference Frit B composition should be conducted on the Frit X composition to provide the necessary data for repository modeling. The potential to form a PuO 2 -HfO 2 phase in the glass should also be further pursued as a potential means to improve waste form performance and criticality control. Additionally, as the feed stream chemistry destined for disposition via vitrification is better defined, a thorough glass formulation variability study should be performed to demonstrate that feed variations can be accommodated in the glass. Finally, this composition should be utilized in melter testing to support project design initiatives

  11. Entrapment of 137Cs vapour generated during vitrification and casting of cesium borosilicate glass by inorganic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, Ramu; Gandhi, Shyamala; Dash, A.; Varma, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    Efficiency of different inorganic materials like zirconium antimonate (ZrA), ammonium molybdophosphate (AMP), synthetic zeolites, activated charcoal, glass wool etc, towards the entrapment of 137 Cs vapour escaping during vitrification and casting of cesium borosilicate glass required for the preparation of 137 Cs sources for medical and industrial applications have been determined. The recovery of entrapped cesium using dilute acids for subsequent recycling has also been explored. (author)

  12. Structural study of conventional and bulk metallic glasses during annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, E.; Hidalgo, I.; Bruna, P.; Pradell, T.; Labrador, A.; Crespo, D.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic glasses with conventional glass-forming ability (Al-Fe-Nd, Fe-Zr-B, Fe-B-Nb compositions) and bulk metallic glasses (Ca-Mg-Cu compositions) were studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during annealing throughout glass transition and crystallization temperatures. The analysis of the first diffraction peak position during the annealing process allowed us to follow the free volume change during relaxation and glass transition. The structure factor and the radial distribution function of the glasses were obtained from the X-ray measurements. The structural changes occurred during annealing are analyzed and discussed.

  13. Double stage crystallization of bulk Ge20Te80 glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthasarathy, G.; Bandyopadhyay, A.K.; Gopal, E.S.R.; Subbanna, G.N.

    1984-01-01

    The growing interest of the semiconducting glasses is partly because of their interesting electrical and optical properties. These properties are usually connected with their crystallization. In many glasses, the glass-supercooled liquid transition precedes crystallization. The glass transition temperature (Tsub(g)) is found to exhibit multistage processes for a few systems. In this communication, we report the observation of a double Tsub(g) effect in bulk Ge 20 Te 80 glass and also explain the structural changes taking place in the two stages. (author)

  14. Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, D. W.; Wang, X. D., E-mail: wangxd@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn; Lou, H. B.; Cao, Q. P.; Jiang, J. Z., E-mail: wangxd@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM), Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Wang, L. W. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, D. X. [State Key Laboratory of Modern Optical Instrumentation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2014-12-14

    Thermal behaviors of liquid La-based bulk metallic glasses have been measured by using the dilatometer with a self-sealed sample cell. It is demonstrated that the strong glass forming liquid not only has the small thermal expansion coefficient but also shows the slow variation rate. Moreover, the strong glass former has relatively dense atomic packing and also small density change in the liquid state. The results suggest that the high glass forming ability of La-based metallic glasses would be closely related to the slow atomic rearrangements in liquid melts.

  15. Leaching behaviour of a glassy slag and derived glass-ceramics from arc-plasma vitrification of hospital wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Maximina; Hernández, M. S.; Rincón López, Jesús María

    2009-01-01

    The arc-plasma vitrification of a hospital wastes containing metals and inorganic oxides yields to a leach-resistant glassy or vitreous slag, which can be environmentally safe for landfill disposal or could be transformed in glass-ceramic tiles with physical and mechanical properties similar to those showed by marketable products for building applications. Standard methods have been used for testing the leachability of elements from this new type of tiles. The water resistance was evaluated b...

  16. Formulation of special glass frit and its use for decontamination of Joule melter employed for vitrification of high level and radioactive liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valsala, T.P.; Mishra, P.K.; Thakur, D.A.; Ghongane, D.E.; Jayan, R.V.; Dani, U.; Sonavane, M.S.; Kulkarni, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced vitrification system at TWMP Tarapur was used for successful vitrification of large volume of HLW stored in waste tank farm. After completion of the operational life of the joule melter, dismantling was planned. Prior to the dismantling, the hold up inventory of active glass product from the melter was flushed out using specially formulated inactive glass frit to reduce the air activity buildup in the cell during dismantling operations. The properties of the special glass frit prepared are comparable with that of the regular product glass. More than 94% of holdup activity was flushed out from the joule melter prior to the dismantling of the melter. (author)

  17. Formation of Ti--Zr--Cu--Ni bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, X.H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    Formation of bulk metallic glass in quaternary Ti--Zr--Cu--Ni alloys by relatively slow cooling from the melt is reported. Thick strips of metallic glass were obtained by the method of metal mold casting. The glass forming ability of the quaternary alloys exceeds that of binary or ternary alloys containing the same elements due to the complexity of the system. The best glass forming alloys such as Ti 34 Zr 11 Cu 47 Ni 8 can be cast to at least 4-mm-thick amorphous strips. The critical cooling rate for glass formation is of the order of 250 K/s or less, at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the best ternary alloys. The glass transition, crystallization, and melting behavior of the alloys were studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The amorphous alloys exhibit a significant undercooled liquid region between the glass transition and first crystallization event. The glass forming ability of these alloys, as determined by the critical cooling rate, exceeds what is expected based on the reduced glass transition temperature. It is also found that the glass forming ability for alloys of similar reduced glass transition temperature can differ by two orders of magnitude as defined by critical cooling rates. The origins of the difference in glass forming ability of the alloys are discussed. It is found that when large composition redistribution accompanies crystallization, glass formation is enhanced. The excellent glass forming ability of alloys such as Ti 34 Zr 11 Cu 47 Ni 8 is a result of simultaneously minimizing the nucleation rate of the competing crystalline phases. The ternary/quaternary Laves phase (MgZn 2 type) shows the greatest ease of nucleation and plays a key role in determining the optimum compositions for glass formation. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  18. Glass formulation development and testing for the vitrification of DWPF HLW sludge coupled with crystalline silicotitanate (CST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, M.K.; Workman, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    An alternative to the In Tank Precipitation and sodium titanate processes at the Savannah River Site is the removal of cesium, strontium, and plutonium from the tank supernate by ion exchange using crystalline silicotitanate (CST). This inorganic material has been shown to effectively and selectively sorb these elements from supernate. The loaded CST could then be immobilized with High-Level Waste (HLW) sludge during vitrification. Initial efforts on the development of a glass formulation for a coupled waste stream indicate that reasonable loadings of both sludge and CST can be achieved in glass

  19. Iron phosphate glasses: Bulk properties and atomic scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Asuvathraman, R.; Dube, Charu L.; Gandy, Amy S.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Jolley, Kenny; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.; Smith, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Bulk properties such as glass transition temperature, density and thermal expansion of iron phosphate glass compositions, with replacement of Cs by Ba, are investigated as a surrogate for the transmutation of 137Cs to 137Ba, relevant to the immobilisation of Cs in glass. These studies are required to establish the appropriate incorporation rate of 137Cs in iron phosphate glass. Density and glass transition temperature increases with the addition of BaO indicating the shrinkage and reticulation of the iron phosphate glass network. The average thermal expansion coefficient reduces from 19.8 × 10-6 K-1 to 13.4 × 10-6 K-1, when 25 wt. % of Cs2O was replaced by 25 wt. % of BaO in caesium loaded iron phosphate glass. In addition to the above bulk properties, the role of Ba as a network modifier in the structure of iron phosphate glass is examined using various spectroscopic techniques. The FeII content and average coordination number of iron in the glass network was estimated using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The FeII content in the un-doped iron phosphate glass and barium doped iron phosphate glasses was 20, 21 and 22 ± 1% respectively and the average Fe coordination varied from 5.3 ± 0.2 to 5.7 ± 0.2 with increasing Ba content. The atomic scale structure was further probed by Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The average coordination number provided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure was in good agreement with that given by the Mössbauer data.

  20. Metastability and thermophysical properties of metallic bulk glass forming alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, R.K.; Fecht, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The absence of crystallization over a wide time/temperature window can be used to produce bulk metallic glass by relatively slow cooling of the melt. For a number of alloys, including several multicomponent Zr-based alloys, the relevant thermodynamic and thermomechanical properties of the metastable glassy and undercooled liquid states have been measured below and above the glass transition temperature. These measurements include specific heat, viscosity, volume, and elastic properties as a function of temperature. As a result, it becomes obvious that the maximum undercooling for these alloys is given by an isentropic condition before an enthalpic or isochoric instability is reached. Alternatively, these glasses can also be produced by mechanical alloying, thus replacing the thermal disorder by static disorder and resulting in the same thermodynamic glass state. During heating through the undercooled liquid, a nanoscale phase separation occurs for most glasses as a precursor of crystallization

  1. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of hign-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higley, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock ampersand Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing

  2. Free standing bulk metallic glass microcomponents: Tooling considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Cormac; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Ohnuma, Masato

    2010-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses have enormous potential for use in small-scale devices such as MEMS and biomedical components. Thermoplastic forging of free standing components poses challenges unlike those seen when forging crystalline materials. Central to these challenges is the simultaneous advantage/disadvantage...

  3. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M

    2003-07-15

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix.

  4. Compressive yielding of tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.-Y.; Uestuendag, E.; Aydiner, C.C.; Conner, R.D.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    In-situ uniaxial compression tests were conducted on four tungsten fiber reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites using neutron diffraction. The results were interpreted with a finite element model. Both phases were seen to approximately obey the von Mises yield criterion. The fibers were observed to yield first and then transfer load to the matrix

  5. Cast bulk metallic glass alloys: prospects as wear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Shiflet, Gary J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA)

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are single phase materials with unusual physical and mechanical properties. One intriguing area of possible use is as a wear material. Usually, pure metals and single phase dilute alloys do not perform well in tribological conditions. When the metal or alloy is lightweight, it is usually soft leading to galling in sliding situations. For the harder metals and alloys, their density is usually high, so there is an energy penalty when using these materials in wear situations. However, bulk metallic glasses at the same density are usually harder than corresponding metals and dilute single phase alloys, and so could offer better wear resistance. This work will discuss preliminary wear results for metallic glasses with densities in the range of 4.5 to 7.9 g/cc. The wear behavior of these materials will be compared to similar metals and alloys.

  6. XAS and XRF investigation of an actual HAWC glass fragment obtained from the Karlsruhe vitrification plant (VEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardenne, K.; González-Robles, E.; Rothe, J.; Müller, N.; Christill, G.; Lemmer, D.; Praetorius, R.; Kienzler, B.; Metz, V.; Roth, G.; Geckeis, H.

    2015-05-01

    Several sections of HAWC glass rods remaining at the end of glass pouring at the Karlsruhe Vitrification Plant (VEK) were retained during vitrification operation in 2009-2010 and transferred to the KIT-INE shielded box line for later glass product characterization. A mm sized fragment with a contact dose rate of ∼590 μSv/h was selected for pilot XAS/XRF investigations at the INE-Beamline for actinide science at the ANKA synchrotron radiation source. The experiment was aimed at elucidating the potential of direct radionuclide speciation with an emphasis on the fission products Se and Tc in highly active nuclear materials and at assessing the possible influence of the γ-radiation field surrounding highly active samples on the beamline instrumentation. While the influence of γ-radiation turned out to be negligible, initial radionuclide speciation studies by XAFS were most promising. In addition to Se and Tc speciation, the focus of these initial investigations was on the possibility for direct actinide speciation by recording corresponding L3-edge XAFS data. The registration of high quality XANES data was possible for the actinide elements U, Np, Pu and Am, as well as for Zr.

  7. Hydrogen-induced high damping of bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, M.

    2009-01-01

    There are two important topics concerned with the recent researches on the damping materials of hydrogenated metallic glasses (HMGs). One is the mechanism of the high hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs. The other is the materials processing of 'bulk' HMGs for engineering. This article describes the summary of our recent studies on these topics. The first one is closely related to the local structure of the metallic glasses. Therefore, our recent results on the intermediate-range local structure of the simple two Zr-based metallic glasses are described, which has been clarified by the Voronoi analysis using the experimental data of the neutron diffraction measurements. The hydrogen-induced internal friction of HMGs is also discussed on the basis of these recent results of the local structure of the metallic glasses. In terms of the second topic, the first successful preparation of heavily hydrogenated Zr-based bulk HMG rods without hydrogen-induced surface embrittlement is described. They are prepared by a powder-compact-melting and liquid-casting process using Zr-Al-Ni-Cu metallic glass and ZrH 2 powders as the starting materials. It has been found that they have high damping properties.

  8. Physical factors controlling the ductility of bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y. [Central South University, China; Liu, Chain T [ORNL; Zhang, Z. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Keppens, V. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify key physical factor controlling the deformation and fracture behavior of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), we compiled and analyzed the elastic moduli and compressive ductility for BMGs. In addition, new modulus data were generated in the critical ranges in order to facilitate the analysis. We have found that the intrinsic ductility of BMGs can be correlated with the bulk-to-shear modulus ratio B/G according to Pugh's [Philos. Mag. 45, 823 (1954) ] rule. In some individual BMG systems, for example, Fe based, the relationship seems to be very clear. The physical meaning of this correlation is discussed in terms of atomic bonding and connectivity.

  9. Correlations between elastic moduli and properties in bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weihua

    2006-01-01

    A survey of the elastic, mechanical, fragility, and thermodynamic properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and glass-forming liquids is presented. It is found that the elastic moduli of BMGs have correlations with the glass transition temperature, melting temperature, mechanical properties, and even liquid fragility. On the other hand, the elastic constants of available BMGs show a rough correlation with a weighted average of the elastic constants for the constituent elements. Although the theoretical and physical reasons for the correlations are to be clarified, these correlations could assist in understanding the long-standing issues of glass formation and the nature of glass and simulate the work of theorists. Based on the correlation, we show that the elastic moduli can assist in selecting alloying components for controlling the elastic properties and glass-forming ability of the BMGs and thus can guide BMG design. As case study, we report the formation of the families of rare-earth-based BMGs with controllable properties

  10. Direct vitrification of plutonium-containing materials (PCM`s) with the glass material oxidation and dissolution system (GMODS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W. Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Haas, P.A.; Malling, G.F.; Elam, K.; Ott, L.

    1995-10-30

    The end of the cold war has resulted in excess PCMs from nuclear weapons and associated production facilities. Consequently, the US government has undertaken studies to determine how best to manage and dispose of this excess material. The issues include (a) ensurance of domestic health, environment, and safety in handling, storage, and disposition, (b) international arms control agreements with Russia and other countries, and (c) economics. One major set of options is to convert the PCMs into glass for storage or disposal. The chemically inert characteristics of glasses make them a desirable chemical form for storage or disposal of radioactive materials. A glass may contain only plutonium, or it may contain plutonium along with other radioactive materials and nonradioactive materials. GMODS is a new process for the direct conversion of PCMs (i.e., plutonium metal, scrap, and residues) to glass. The plutonium content of these materials varies from a fraction of a percent to pure plutonium. GMODS has the capability to also convert other metals, ceramics, and amorphous solids to glass, destroy organics, and convert chloride-containing materials into a low-chloride glass and a secondary clean chloride salt strewn. This report is the initial study of GMODS for vitrification of PCMs as input to ongoing studies of plutonium management options. Several tasks were completed: initial analysis of process thermodynamics, initial flowsheet analysis, identification of equipment options, proof-of-principle experiments, and identification of uncertainties.

  11. Test Summary Report Vitrification Demonstration of an Optimized Hanford C-106/AY-102 Waste-Glass Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goles, Ronald W.; Buchmiller, William C.; Hymas, Charles R.; MacIsaac, Brett D.

    2002-01-01

    In order to further the goal of optimizing Hanford?s HLW borosilicate flowsheet, a glass formulation effort was launched to develop an advanced high-capacity waste form exhibiting acceptable leach and crystal formation characteristics. A simulated C-106/AY-102 waste envelop inclusive of LAW pretreatment products was chosen as the subject of these nonradioactive optimization efforts. To evaluate this optimized borosilicate waste formulation under continuous dynamic vitrification conditions, a research-scale Joule-heated ceramic melter was used to demonstrate the advanced waste form?s flowsheet. The main objectives of this melter test was to evaluate (1) the processing characteristics of the newly formulated C-106/AY-102 surrogate melter-feed stream, (2) the effectiveness of sucrose as a glass-oxidation-state modifier, and (3) the impact of this reductant upon processing rates

  12. Friction welding of bulk metallic glasses to different ones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Takuo; Kawamura, Yoshihito; Ohno, Yasuhide

    2004-01-01

    For application of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) as industrial materials, it is necessary to establish the metallurgical bonding technology. The BMGs exhibit high-strain-rate superplasticity in the supercooled liquid state. It has been reported that bulk metallic glasses were successfully welded together by friction, pulse-current, explosion and electron-beam methods. In this study, friction welding of the BMGs to different ones were tried for Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 , Pd 40 Cu 30 P 20 Ni 10 , Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 and Zr 41 Be 23 Ti 14 Cu 12 Ni 10 BMGs. Successful welding was obtained in the combinations of the Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 and Pd 40 Cu 30 P 20 Ni 10 BMGs, and the Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 and Zr 41 Be 23 Ti 14 Cu 12 Ni 10 ones. No crystallization was observed and no visible defect was recognized in the interface. The joining strength of the welded BMGs was the same as that of the parent BMG or more. BMGs seem to be successfully welded to the different ones with a difference below about 50 K in glass transition temperature

  13. Fe-based bulk metallic glasses used for magnetic shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serban, Va; Codrean, C; UTu, D [Politehnica University of Timisoara, Depart for Materials Science and Welding, 1, M. Viteazu Bvd., 300222, Timisoara (Romania); ErcuTa, A, E-mail: serban@mec.upt.r [West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Physics, 4, Vasile Parvan Bdv., Timisoara 300223 (Romania)

    2009-01-01

    The casting in complex shapes (tubular) and the main magnetic properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) alloys from the ferromagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni-Ga-P-Si-C system, with a small addition of Ni (3%) were studied. Samples as rods and sockets having the thickness up to 1 mm were obtained from master alloys by melt injection by low cooling rates into a Cu mold and annealed in order to ensure adequate magnetic requirements. The structure was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the basic magnetic properties (coercivity, magnetic remanence, initial susceptibility, etc.) were determined by conventional low frequency induction method. The experimental investigations on producing of BMG ferromagnetic alloys with 3% Ni show the possibility to obtain magnetic shields of complex shape with satisfactory magnetic properties. The presence of Ni does not affect the glass forming ability, but reduce the shielding capacity.

  14. High-entropy bulk metallic glasses as promising magnetic refrigerants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Juntao; Huo, Lishan; Li, Jiawei; Men, He; Wang, Xinmin; Chang, Chuntao; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Li, Run-Wei; Inoue, Akihisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the Ho 20 Er 20 Co 20 Al 20 RE 20 (RE = Gd, Dy, and Tm) high-entropy bulk metallic glasses (HE-BMGs) with good magnetocaloric properties are fabricated successfully. The HE-BMGs exhibit a second-order magnetic phase transition. The peak of magnetic entropy change (ΔS M pk ) and refrigerant capacity (RC) reaches 15.0 J kg −1 K −1 and 627 J kg −1 at 5 T, respectively, which is larger than most rare earth based BMGs. The heterogeneous nature of glasses also contributes to the large ΔS M pk and RC. In addition, the magnetic ordering temperature, ΔS M pk and RC can be widely tuned by alloying different rare earth elements. These results suggest that the HE-BMGs are promising magnetic refrigerant at low temperatures

  15. Slurry erosion induced surface nanocrystallization of bulk metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiulin; Wu, Jili; Pi, Jinghong; Cheng, Jiangbo; Shan, Yiping; Zhang, Yingtao

    2018-05-01

    Microstructure evolution and phase transformation of metallic glasses (MGs) could occur under heating condition or mechanical deformation. The cross-section of as-cast Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 MG rod was impacted by the solid particles when subjected to erosion in slurry flow. The surface microstructure was observed by XRD before and after slurry erosion. And the stress-driven de-vitrification increases with the increase of erosion time. A microstructure evolution layer with 1-2 μm thickness was formed on the topmost eroded surface. And a short range atomic ordering prevails in the microstructure evolution layer with crystalline size around 2-3 nm embedded in the amorphous matrix. The XPS analysis reveals that most of the metal elements in the MG surface, except for Cu, were oxidized. And a composite layer with ZrO2 and Al2O3 phases were formed in the topmost surface after slurry erosion. The cooling rate during solidification of MG has a strong influence on the slurry erosion induced nanocrystallization. And a lower cooling rate favors the surface nanocrystallization because of lower activation energy and thermo-stability. Finally, the slurry erosion induced surface nanocrystallization and microstructure evolution result in surface hardening and strengthening. Moreover, the microstructure evolution mechanisms were discussed and it is related to the cooling rate of solidification and the impact-induced temperature rise, as well as the combined effects of the impact-induced plastic flow, inter-diffusion and oxidation of the metal elements.

  16. Qualification and characterization programmes for disposal of a glass product resulting from high level waste vitrification in the PAMELA installation of BELGOPROCESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeyse, A. de; De, A.K.; Demonie, M.; Iseghem, P. van

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of a general quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) programme, the quality of a conditioned waste product is achieved in two phases. The first phase is the design of a process and facility which will ensure the required quality of the product. In the second phase the conformance of the product with the preset requirements is verified. NIRAS/ONDRAF, as the agency responsible for the management of all radioactive waste in Belgium (including treatment, conditioning, storage and disposal), controls compliance with the quality requirements during both phases. The purpose of the paper is to describe the different phases of this general procedure in the case of a vitrified HLW product resulting from a vitrification campaign in the PAMELA facility at the BELGOPROCESS site. The active glass product of type SM527 produced during the vitrification of highly enriched waste concentrate (HEWC) (resulting from the reprocessing of highly enriched uranium fuel) has been selected for illustration. During the process qualification phase, the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Wiederaufarbeitung von Kernbrennstoffen mbH, responsible for the development of the vitrification process of PAMELA, defined and performed and R and D programmed for each glass product originating from the vitrification of the different HEWC solutions stored at the BELGOPROCESS site. At the end of this qualification phase a data catalogue was prepared. In order to ensure that the active glass product corresponds with the selected product from the data catalogue, the QA/QC handbook for the vitrification process describes all measures to be taken by the waste producer, BELGOPROCESS, during the vitrification. Finally, verification analyses are performed by the characterization of inactive and active samples by an independent laboratory. This phase is called the product quality verification phase. The details of the characterization programmes performed during the different phases and their results

  17. Oxidation behaviour of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Bin

    2011-01-01

    The Zr-based bulk metallic glasses, developed since the late 1980's, have very interesting mechanical properties, which can be considered for many applications including working under oxidizing atmosphere conditions at high temperatures. It is therefore interesting to study their oxidation resistance and to characterize the oxide scale formed on alloys surface. The fundamental objective of this thesis is to enhance the understanding of the role of various thermodynamic and chemistry parameters on the oxidation behaviour of the Zr-based bulk metallic glasses at high temperature under dry air, to determine the residual stresses in the oxide layer, in comparison with their crystalline alloys with the same chemical composition after an annealing treatment. The oxidation kinetics of these glasses and the crystalline structure of oxide scale ZrO 2 depend on the temperature and the oxidation duration: for short periods of oxidation or at a temperature below Tg, the kinetics follows a parabolic law, whereas, if the sample is oxidized at T ≥ Tg, the kinetics can be divided into two parts. The crystalline counterparts are oxidized by a parabolic rule whatever the temperature; for long oxidation duration at a temperature close to Tg, the kinetics becomes more complex because of the crystallisation of the glasses during the oxidation tests. Also the crystalline structure of the oxide layers depends on the oxidation temperature: the oxide layer consists only in tetragonal Zirconia at T ≤ Tg, while monoclinic Zirconia was formed at higher temperature. The mechanism of the formation of the oxide scale is due to both the interior diffusion of Oxygen ions and the external diffusion of Zirconium ions. However the diffusion of Zirconium ions slows gradually during the crystallisation process of the glass matrix. When the crystallisation is completed, the formation of Zirconia is controlled by only the internal diffusion of oxygen ions. The corresponding residual stresses

  18. Wastes vitrification by plasma torch: study of a glass formulation compatible with a wide range of B wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poitou, S.; Richaud, D.; Fiquet, O.; Gramondi, P.; Massit, H.

    2001-01-01

    Within the context of radioactive waste management, CEA has equipped itself with a 'PLASMARC' device. The central element of this device is a plasma torch treatment furnace. It has been implemented and validated for the vitrification of low level radioactive wastes. Meanwhile, the plasma torch presents potentially interests for immobilizing under an inert form in vitreous matrices, B wastes which are generally divided and of complex chemical composition. The application of this process to this type of wastes has been studied here. The obtained results show that with the plasma torch it is possible to make glasses with a high amount of silicon and aluminium oxide and which are adapted to the treatment / packaging of the B wastes. (O.M.)

  19. Elaboration and experimental study of the Borosilicate glass GP 98/12 for the vitrification of the radioactive wastes of KfKarlsruhe Centre (R.F.A.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghezal, A.

    1987-09-01

    The transformation into a vitrified block of highly radioactive liquid wastes is actually the best solution for the storage in long run. In West Germany, the research institute in the field of nuclear energy (KfK) has been oriented in this way by developing industrial processes of vitrification and by following studies on the behaviour of the final products. For the fission products, the chosen glasses present good stability characteristics and are used as a first barrier during confinement. Our work, which is part of the research program on radioactive waste vitrification, consists of preparing borosilicate glass GP 98/12 and studying physical and chemical characteristics. We have also contributed to the development and the realization of glass blocks sampling system prepared at pilot scale

  20. Synthesis and devitrification of high glass-forming ability bulk metallic glasses.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hong.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, literature on the production, microstructures and properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) has been reviewed with particular reference to glass forming ability (GFA) and alloys of the Fe-Zr-B and Zr-based BMG systems. The experimental procedures used in the research are presented and the results for the amorphous Fe80Zr12B8 ribbon and the Zr57Ti5Al10Cu20Ni8, Zr57Nb5Al10Cu20Ni8, Zr53Nb2Al8Cu30Ni7 BMGs are given and discussed. Wedge-shaped ingots of the Zr-based BMGs were produ...

  1. Stability of Bulk Metallic Glass Structure. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.

    2003-06-01

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub 80-x}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  2. Glass Formation, Chemical Properties and Surface Analysis of Cu-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihisa Inoue

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the influence of alloying elements Mo, Nb, Ta and Ni on glass formation and corrosion resistance of Cu-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs. In order to obtain basic knowledge for application to the industry, corrosion resistance of the Cu–Hf–Ti–(Mo, Nb, Ta, Ni and Cu–Zr–Ag–Al–(Nb bulk glassy alloy systems in various solutions are reported in this work. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis is performed to clarify the surface-related chemical characteristics of the alloy before and after immersion in the solutions; this has lead to a better understanding of the correlation between the surface composition and the corrosion resistance.

  3. Vitrification of copper flotation waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamanov, Alexander [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Science, G. Bonchev Str. Block 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: karama@ing.univaq.it; Aloisi, Mirko [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of L' Aquila, 67040 Monteluco di Roio, L' Aquila (Italy); Pelino, Mario [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of L' Aquila, 67040 Monteluco di Roio, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-02-09

    The vitrification of an hazardous iron-rich waste (W), arising from slag flotation of copper production, was studied. Two glasses, containing 30 wt% W were melted for 30 min at 1400 deg. C. The first batch, labeled WSZ, was obtained by mixing W, blast furnace slag (S) and zeolite tuff (Z), whereas the second, labeled WG, was prepared by mixing W, glass cullet (G), sand and limestone. The glass frits showed high chemical durability, measured by the TCLP test. The crystallization of the glasses was evaluated by DTA. The crystal phases formed were identified by XRD resulting to be pyroxene and wollastonite solid solutions, magnetite and hematite. The morphology of the glass-ceramics was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. WSZ composition showed a high rate of bulk crystallization and resulted to be suitable for producing glass-ceramics by a short crystallization heat-treatment. WG composition showed a low crystallization rate and good sinterability; glass-ceramics were obtained by sinter-crystallization of the glass frit.

  4. Vitrification of copper flotation waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanov, Alexander; Aloisi, Mirko; Pelino, Mario

    2007-02-09

    The vitrification of an hazardous iron-rich waste (W), arising from slag flotation of copper production, was studied. Two glasses, containing 30wt% W were melted for 30min at 1400 degrees C. The first batch, labeled WSZ, was obtained by mixing W, blast furnace slag (S) and zeolite tuff (Z), whereas the second, labeled WG, was prepared by mixing W, glass cullet (G), sand and limestone. The glass frits showed high chemical durability, measured by the TCLP test. The crystallization of the glasses was evaluated by DTA. The crystal phases formed were identified by XRD resulting to be pyroxene and wollastonite solid solutions, magnetite and hematite. The morphology of the glass-ceramics was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. WSZ composition showed a high rate of bulk crystallization and resulted to be suitable for producing glass-ceramics by a short crystallization heat-treatment. WG composition showed a low crystallization rate and good sinterability; glass-ceramics were obtained by sinter-crystallization of the glass frit.

  5. Vitrification of copper flotation waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karamanov, Alexander; Aloisi, Mirko; Pelino, Mario

    2007-01-01

    The vitrification of an hazardous iron-rich waste (W), arising from slag flotation of copper production, was studied. Two glasses, containing 30 wt% W were melted for 30 min at 1400 deg. C. The first batch, labeled WSZ, was obtained by mixing W, blast furnace slag (S) and zeolite tuff (Z), whereas the second, labeled WG, was prepared by mixing W, glass cullet (G), sand and limestone. The glass frits showed high chemical durability, measured by the TCLP test. The crystallization of the glasses was evaluated by DTA. The crystal phases formed were identified by XRD resulting to be pyroxene and wollastonite solid solutions, magnetite and hematite. The morphology of the glass-ceramics was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. WSZ composition showed a high rate of bulk crystallization and resulted to be suitable for producing glass-ceramics by a short crystallization heat-treatment. WG composition showed a low crystallization rate and good sinterability; glass-ceramics were obtained by sinter-crystallization of the glass frit

  6. Optimization of glass composition for the vitrification of nuclear waste at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soper, P.D.; Roberts, G.J.; Lightner, L.F.; Walker, D.D.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Waste glasses of different compositions were compared in terms of leachability, viscosity, liquidus temperature, and coefficient of expansion. The compositions of the glasses were determined by statistical optimization. Waste glass of the optimized composition is more durable than the current reference composition but can still be processed at low temperature

  7. Compressive behavior of wire reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Yub [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Clausen, Bjorn [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Uestuendag, Ersan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Choi-Yim, Haein [Department of Materials Science, M/C 138-78, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Aydiner, C. Can [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Bourke, Mark A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) possess a unique set of mechanical properties that make them attractive structural materials. However, when loaded without constraint, BMGs fracture catastrophically due to formation of macroscopic shear bands and this behavior reduces their reliability. To address this issue, BMG matrix composites have been developed. In this investigation, neutron diffraction was used during uniaxial compressive loading to measure the internal strains in the second phases of various BMG composites reinforced with Ta, Mo, or stainless steel wires. The diffraction data were then employed to develop a finite element model that deduced the in situ constitutive behavior of each phase. It was found that the reinforcements yielded first and started transferring load to the matrix, which remained elastic during the whole experiment. While the present composites exhibited enhanced ductility, largely due to their ductile reinforcements, they yielded at applied stresses lower than those found in W reinforced composites.

  8. Compressive deformation of in situ formed bulk metallic glass composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, B. [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Ustuendag, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Kim, C.P. [Liquidmetal Technologies, Lake Forest, CA 92630 (United States); Brown, D.W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    A bulk metallic glass matrix composite with dendc second phase precipitates was investigated using neutron diffraction and self-consistent modeling (SCM) to ascertain its deformation mechanisms. The compressive behavior of both the composite and the second phase (in its monolithic form) were investigated. The diffraction data were compared to the predictions of a new SCM resulting in good agreement. For the first time, this model considered both amorphous and crystalline phases and allowed the calculation of single crystal elastic constants from polycrystalline diffraction data. It was shown that the ductile second phase yielded first upon loading, and this was followed by multiple shear band formation in the matrix, a process which enhanced the ductility of the composite.

  9. Compressive deformation of in situ formed bulk metallic glass composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, B.; Lee, S.Y.; Ustuendag, E.; Kim, C.P.; Brown, D.W.; Bourke, M.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    A bulk metallic glass matrix composite with dendritic second phase precipitates was investigated using neutron diffraction and self-consistent modeling (SCM) to ascertain its deformation mechanisms. The compressive behavior of both the composite and the second phase (in its monolithic form) were investigated. The diffraction data were compared to the predictions of a new SCM resulting in good agreement. For the first time, this model considered both amorphous and crystalline phases and allowed the calculation of single crystal elastic constants from polycrystalline diffraction data. It was shown that the ductile second phase yielded first upon loading, and this was followed by multiple shear band formation in the matrix, a process which enhanced the ductility of the composite

  10. Bulk metallic glasses and high entropy alloys for reprocessing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Jayaraj, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in materials engineering have generated complex alloys that retain a glassy state in bulk form (bulk metallic glasses or BMGs) via ingot casting. High corrosion resistance is expected for BMGs (amorphous) as they are free from defects associated with the crystalline state such as grain boundaries, dislocations and stacking faults. Compared with conventional alloys containing one or two principal elements, the recently developed HEAs are usually composed of five or more elements with equimolar or near equimolar elemental fractions, which forms single solid solution phase. These HEAs exhibit excellent microstructural stability with better mechanical, wear and corrosion resistance properties as they are essentially single phase. Reprocessing of spent fuel from the fast breeder reactor involves the use of high concentration of (11.5 M) nitric acid under boiling conditions for the dissolution of the fuel. Conventional AISI type 304LSS and nitric acid grade 304L stainless steel would undergo inter-granular corrosion under these conditions and cannot be used for the fabrication of dissolver vessel. Currently titanium is used and zirconium alloys are proposed for future dissolver applications. Thus searching for newer materials with higher corrosion resistance suggests metallic glasses and HEAs for critical components of the dissolver application. Several Zr-based glassy alloys with different microstructural states and Ni-Nb based glassy alloys and TiZrHfNbTa HEA were cast and characterized for microstructure and corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. From these studies, factors such as the corrosive environment (nitric acid, chloride and fluoride), and the presence of passivating elements in the alloy were emphasized for better corrosion resistance of BMGs and HEA. Attempts were also made to prepare coatings of Zr-and Ni-based glassy alloys on 304LSS by laser based deposition technique and their corrosion properties were evaluated. (author)

  11. Zr-(Cu,Ag)-Al bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Q.K.; Wang, X.D.; Nie, X.P.; Zhang, G.Q.; Ma, H.; Fecht, H.-J.; Bendnarcik, J.; Franz, H.; Liu, Y.G.; Cao, Q.P.; Jiang, J.Z.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report the formation of a series Zr-(Cu,Ag)-Al bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with diameters at least 20 mm and demonstrate the formation of about 25 g amorphous metallic ingots in a wide Zr-(Cu,Ag)-Al composition range using a conventional arc-melting machine. The origin of high glass-forming ability (GFA) of the Zr-(Cu,Ag)-Al alloy system has been investigated from the structural, thermodynamic and kinetic points of view. The high GFA of the Zr-(Cu,Ag)-Al system is attributed to denser local atomic packing and the smaller difference in Gibbs free energy between amorphous and crystalline phases. The thermal, mechanical and corrosion properties, as well as elastic constants for the newly developed Zr-(Cu,Ag)-Al BMGs, are also presented. These newly developed Ni-free Zr-(Cu,Ag)-Al BMGs exhibit excellent combined properties: strong GFA, high strength, high compressive plasticity, cheap and non-toxic raw materials and biocompatible property, as compared with other BMGs, leading to their potential industrial applications

  12. A new parameter to evaluate the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo, Z.Y.; Qiu, K.Q.; Li, Q.F.; You, J.H.; Ren, Y.L.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Develop a new criterion, i.e., Q=((T g +T x )/T l ).(ΔE/ΔH). → The reliability and benefits of the new criterion have been demonstrated in a wide range of BMG alloys. → It corresponds well with the critical diameter of BMGs investigated up to now. - Abstract: Based on the consideration of the liquid phase stability, the resistance to crystallization and the glass transition enthalpy, a new criterion Q, defined as ((T g + T x )/T l ).(ΔE/ΔH), where the T g , T x , T l , ΔE and ΔH are the glass transition temperature, the onset crystallization temperature, the liquidus temperature, the crystalline enthalpy and the fusion enthalpy, respectively, has been proposed for evaluating the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses. The new criterion Q exhibits better correlation with the maximum cross section thickness (D m ) for glass formation compared with γ (=T x /(T l + T g )), T rg (=T g /T l ) and ΔT x (=T x - T g ) respectively. The available data from literatures and experiments have confirmed the effectiveness of the newly developed criterion.

  13. Homogeneous nucleation limit on the bulk formation of metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drehman, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Glassy Pd 82 Si 18 spheres, of up to 1 mm diameter, were formed in a drop tube filled with He gas. The largest spheres were successfully cooled to a glass using a cooling rate of less than 800 K/sec. Even at this low cooling rate, crystallization (complete or partial) was the result of heterogeneous nucleation at a high temperature, relative to the temperature at which copious homogeneous nucleation would commence. Bulk underscoring experiments demonstrated that this alloy could be cooled to 385 K below its eutectic melting temperature (1083 K) without the occurrence of crystallization. If heterogeneous nucleation can be avoided, it is estimated that a cooling rate of at most 100 K/sec would be required to form this alloy in the glassy state. Ingots of glassy Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 were formed from the liquid by cooling at a rate of only 1 K/sec. It was found that glassy samples of this alloy could be heated well above the glass transition temperature without the occurrence of rapid divitrification. This is a result due, in part of the low density of pre-existing nuclei, but, more importantly, due to the low homogeneous nucleation rate and the slow crystal growth kinetics. Based on the observed devitrification kinetics, the steady-state homogeneous nucleation rate is approximately 1 nuclei/cm 3 sec at 590 K (the temperature at which the homogeneous nucleation rate is estimated to be a maximum). Two iron-nickel based glass-forming alloys (Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 40 Ni 40 B 20 , were not successfully formed into glassy spheres, however, microstructural examination indicates that crystallization was not the result of copious homogeneous nucleation. In contrast, glass forming iron based alloys (Fe 80 B 20 and Fe/sub 79.3/B/sub 16.4/Si/sub 4.0/C/sub 0.3/) exhibit copious homogeneous nucleation when cooled at approximately the same rate

  14. Bulk metallic glasses: A new class of engineering materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    been discovered. Glass-forming ability depends on various factors like enthalpy ... The determination of a glass transition temperature in ... Rao (1980) has postulated that an alloy with the smallest possible molar volume is most prone to glass ...

  15. Vitrification chemistry and nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vitrification of nuclear waste offers unique challenges to the glass technologist. The waste contains 50 or 60 elements, and often varies widely in composition. Most of these elements are seldom encountered in processing commercial glasses. The melter to vitrify the waste must be able to tolerate these variations in composition, while producing a durable glass. This glass must be produced without releasing hazardous radionuclides to the environment during any step of the vitrification process. Construction of a facility to convert the nearly 30 million gallons of high-level nuclear waste at the Savannah River Plant into borosilicate glass began in late 1983. In developing the vitrification process, the Savannah River Laboratory has had to overcome all of these challenges to the glass technologist. Advances in understanding in three areas have been crucial to our success: oxidation-reduction phenomena during glass melting; the reaction between glass and natural wastes; and the causes of foaming during glass melting

  16. AN ALTERNATIVE HOST MATRIX BASED ON IRON PHOSPHATE GLASSES FOR THE VITRIFICATION OF SPECIALIZED WASTE FORMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Delbert D.

    2000-01-01

    As mentioned above, the overall goal of this research project was to collect the scientific information essential to develop iron phosphate glass based nuclear wasteforms. The specific objectives of the project were: (1) Investigate the structure of binary iron phosphate glasses and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand atomic arrangements and nature of the bonding. Establish structure-property relationships. Determine the compositions and melting conditions which optimize the critical properties of the base glass. (2) Understand the structure of iron phosphate wasteforms and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Investigate how the waste elements are bonded and coordinated within the glass structure. Establish structure-property relationships for the waste glasses. Determine the compositions and melting atmosphere for which the critical properties of the waste forms would be optimum. (3) Determine the role(s) played by the valence states of iron ions and it's dependence on the composition and melting atmosphere: Understand the different roles of iron(II) and iron(III) ions in determining the critical properties of the base glass and the waste forms. Investigate how the iron valence and its significance depend on the composition and melting atmosphere. (4) Investigate glass forming and crystallization processes of the iron phosphate glasses and their waste forms: Understand the dependence of the glass forming and crystallization characteristics on overall glass composition and valence states of iron ions. Identify the products of devitrification and investigate the critical properties of these crystalline compounds which may adversely affect the chemical and physical properties of the waste forms

  17. Nanopatterned bulk metallic glass-based biomaterials modulate macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayan, Mahdis; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Morris, Aaron H; Cheung, Bettina; Smith, Ryan; Schroers, Jan; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2018-06-01

    Polarization of macrophages by chemical, topographical and mechanical cues presents a robust strategy for designing immunomodulatory biomaterials. Here, we studied the ability of nanopatterned bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a new class of metallic biomaterials, to modulate murine macrophage polarization. Cytokine/chemokine analysis of IL-4 or IFNγ/LPS-stimulated macrophages showed that the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-12, CCL-2 and CXCL1 was significantly reduced after 24-hour culture on BMGs with 55 nm nanorod arrays (BMG-55). Additionally, under these conditions, macrophages increased phagocytic potential and exhibited decreased cell area with multiple actin protrusions. These in vitro findings suggest that nanopatterning can modulate biochemical cues such as IFNγ/LPS. In vivo evaluation of the subcutaneous host response at 2 weeks demonstrated that the ratio of Arg-1 to iNOS increased in macrophages adjacent to BMG-55 implants, suggesting modulation of polarization. In addition, macrophage fusion and fibrous capsule thickness decreased and the number and size of blood vessels increased, which is consistent with changes in macrophage responses. Our study demonstrates that nanopatterning of BMG implants is a promising technique to selectively polarize macrophages to modulate the immune response, and also presents an effective tool to study mechanisms of macrophage polarization and function. Implanted biomaterials elicit a complex series of tissue and cellular responses, termed the foreign body response (FBR), that can be influenced by the polarization state of macrophages. Surface topography can influence polarization, which is broadly characterized as either inflammatory or repair-like. The latter has been linked to improved outcomes of the FBR. However, the impact of topography on macrophage polarization is not fully understood, in part, due to a lack of high moduli biomaterials that can be reproducibly processed at the nanoscale. Here, we studied

  18. Glass forming ability and mechanical properties of Zr50Cu42Al8 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, L; Chan, K C; Wang, G; Liu, L

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we report that Zr 50 Cu 42 Al 8 bulk metallic glass (BMG) exhibits excellent glass forming ability and mechanical properties. Zr 50 Cu 42 Al 8 glassy rods with a diameter of 3 mm were prepared using conventional copper mould suction casting. The glassy rod exhibits a modulus of about 115 GPa and a fracture strength of about 2 GPa, and, as compared with other large-scale BMGs, it has excellent room-temperature plasticity of up to 20% under compression. The fracture mechanism of the rod was investigated by microstructural investigations, and it was found that the large plasticity of the as-cast rod is closely related to the in situ formation of nano-crystalline particles embedded in the amorphous matrix.

  19. Reentrant spin glass ordering in an Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Qiang; Shen, Jun, E-mail: junshen@tongji.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 201804 (China)

    2015-02-07

    We report the results of the complex susceptibility, temperature, and field dependence of DC magnetization and the nonequilibrium dynamics of a bulk metallic glass Fe{sub 40}Co{sub 8}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Er{sub 2}. Solid indication of the coexistence of reentrant spin glass (SG) and ferromagnetic orderings is determined from both DC magnetization and AC susceptibility under different DC fields. Dynamics scaling of AC susceptibility indicates critical slowing down to a reentrant SG state with a static transition temperature T{sub s} = ∼17.8 K and a dynamic exponent zv = ∼7.3. The SG nature is further corroborated from chaos and memory effects, magnetic hysteresis, and aging behavior. We discuss the results in terms of the competition among random magnetic anisotropy and exchange interactions and compare them with simulation predictions.

  20. Small-scale, joule-heated melting of Savannah River Plant waste glass. I. Factors affecting large-scale vitrification tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Chismar, P.H.

    1979-10-01

    A promising method of immobilizing SRP radioactive waste solids is incorporation in borosilicate glass. In the reference vitrification process, called joule-heated melting, a mixture of glass frit and calcined waste is heated by passage of an electric current. Two problems observed in large-scale tests are foaming and formation of an insoluble slag. A small joule-heated melter was designed and built to study problems such as these. This report describes the melter, identifies factors involved in foaming and slag formation, and proposes ways to overcome these problems

  1. Welding of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elahi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, many bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials with high specific strength, hardness and superior corrosion resistance have been developed and the maximum thickness of some Zr-based BMGs have reached several tenths of millimeters. Nevertheless, homogeneous glassy BMGs are not thick enough to be used for structural applications. In order to extend the engineering applications of BMG materials, BMG welding technologies needed to be developed. Specifically, the welding technologies of dissimilar materials such as BMG materials to crystalline alloys are to be developed. The functional use of the specific properties of each material in dissimilar material combination provides flexible design possibilities for products. In this project electron beam welding is employed to join BMG with BMG of different composition as well as with different crystalline materials (i.e. Hastealoy C-276, Inconel-625 and pure Ti metal). Defects free weld joint was achieved in BMG-BMG welding. Some cracks were produced in melt zone of BMG-Ti and BMG-Hastealoy C-276 welding while at joint they fuse properly with BMG. Inconel-625 could not properly weld with BMG. In all cases, hardness of melt zone was found to be higher than the base metals and the heat affected zone (HAZ). (author)

  2. Memory phenomenon in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ye; Huang, Wei Min; Zhao, Yong; Ding, Zhen; Li, Yan; Tor, Shu Beng; Liu, Erjia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate two memory phenomena in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass (BMG). While the temperature memory effect (TME) is not found by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) test, shape recovery is observed in samples indented at both low and high temperatures. In terms of shape memory related characteristics, this BMG shares some features of shape memory alloys (SMAs) due to its metal nature, and some other features of shape memory polymers (SMPs) owing to its glassy–rubbery transition. The formation of protrusion in the polished sample after heating to super-cooled liquid region (SCLR) indicates that surface tension is not a necessarily positive contributor for shape recovery. Release of internal elastic stress is concluded as the major player. Although the amorphous nature of BMGs enables for storing appreciable amount of internal elastic stress upon deformation, without the presence of cross-linker as in typical SMPs, the shape recovery in BMGs is rather limited. - Highlights: • Experimental investigation of shape recovery in BMG. • Surface tension is not the major reason for shape recovery in BMG. • Release of internal stress is the major contributor for shape recovery. • Comparison of shape memory features of BMG with other shape memory materials.

  3. Memory phenomenon in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Wei Min, E-mail: mwmhuang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Zhao, Yong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ding, Zhen [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Li, Yan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Tor, Shu Beng; Liu, Erjia [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-07-05

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate two memory phenomena in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass (BMG). While the temperature memory effect (TME) is not found by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) test, shape recovery is observed in samples indented at both low and high temperatures. In terms of shape memory related characteristics, this BMG shares some features of shape memory alloys (SMAs) due to its metal nature, and some other features of shape memory polymers (SMPs) owing to its glassy–rubbery transition. The formation of protrusion in the polished sample after heating to super-cooled liquid region (SCLR) indicates that surface tension is not a necessarily positive contributor for shape recovery. Release of internal elastic stress is concluded as the major player. Although the amorphous nature of BMGs enables for storing appreciable amount of internal elastic stress upon deformation, without the presence of cross-linker as in typical SMPs, the shape recovery in BMGs is rather limited. - Highlights: • Experimental investigation of shape recovery in BMG. • Surface tension is not the major reason for shape recovery in BMG. • Release of internal stress is the major contributor for shape recovery. • Comparison of shape memory features of BMG with other shape memory materials.

  4. Thermal properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses at ultralow temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothfuss, Daniel Simon

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the first investigation of thermal properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses in the range between 6mK and 300K. Measuring the thermal conductivity provides the possibility to probe the fundamental interactions governing the heat flow in solids. At ultralow temperatures a novel contactless measuring technique was used, which is based on optical heating and paramagnetic temperature sensors that are read out by a SQUID magnetometer. Below the critical temperature T c the results can be described by resonant scattering of phonons by tunneling systems. Above T c the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity can be described successfully within a model considering not only electrons and phonons but also localized modes as scattering centres. To expand the accessible temperature range for experiments an adiabatic nuclear demagnetization refrigerator was set up. For measuring the base temperature a novel noise thermometer was developed which enables continuous measuring of the temperature in this temperature range for the first time. Therefore the magnetic Johnson noise of a massive copper cylinder is simultaneously monitored by two SQUID magnetometers. A subsequent cross-correlation suppresses the amplifier noise by more than one order of magnitude. The thermometer was characterized between 42μK and 0.8K showing no deviation from the expected linear behaviour between the power spectral density of the thermal noise and the temperature.

  5. Analysis of Pressure-Volume Relationship for Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Rai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between compression (V/V0 and pressure have been studied for five bulk metallic glasses (BMGs viz. Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni9Be22.5C1, Zr48Nb8Cu12Fe8Be24, (Zr0.59Ti0.06Cu0.22Ni0.1385.7Al14.3 and SiO2.TiO2 in the compression ranges of V/V0 =1.00 to V/V0 = 0.10. Six forms of equation of state reported in the literature have been used in the present study to calculate pressure corresponding to different values of compressions. The comparison of graph plotted between the logarithms of calculated value of pressure to logarithm of calculated value of compression (V/V0 reveals that the agreement of Brennan-Stacey equation of state (EOS and Poirier-Tarantolla equation of state are not good. It has been found that the assumptions, on which these equations are based, do not satisfy well in case of given BMGs.

  6. Glass transition, crystallization kinetics and pressure effect on crystallization of ZrNbCuNiBe bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, P.F.; Zhuang, Yanxin; Wang, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The glass transition behavior and crystallization kinetics of Zr48Nb8Cu14Ni12Be18 bulk metallic glass have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The activation energies of both glass transition and crystallization events have been obtained using...... the Kissinger method. Results indicate that this glass crystallizes by a three-stage reaction: (1) phase separation and primary crystallization of glass, (2) formation of intermetallic compounds, and (3) decomposition of intermetallic compounds and crystallization of residual amorphous phase. The pressure...

  7. Safeguardability of the vitrification option for disposal of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillay, K.K.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Safeguardability of the vitrification option for plutonium disposition is rather complex and there is no experience base in either domestic or international safeguards for this approach. In the present treaty regime between the US and the states of the former Soviet Union, bilaterial verifications are considered more likely with potential for a third-party verification of safeguards. There are serious technological limitations to applying conventional bulk handling facility safeguards techniques to achieve independent verification of plutonium in borosilicate glass. If vitrification is the final disposition option chosen, maintaining continuity of knowledge of plutonium in glass matrices, especially those containing boron and those spike with high-level wastes or {sup 137}Cs, is beyond the capability of present-day safeguards technologies and nondestructive assay techniques. The alternative to quantitative measurement of fissile content is to maintain continuity of knowledge through a combination of containment and surveillance, which is not the international norm for bulk handling facilities.

  8. Glass formation, magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effect of ternary Ho–Al–Co bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Li, Ran; Ji, Yunfei; Liu, Fanmao; Luo, Qiang; Zhang, Tao

    2012-01-01

    A ternary Ho–Al–Co system with high glass-forming ability (GFA) was developed and fully glassy rods with diameters up to 1 cm can be produced for the best glass former of Ho 55 Al 27.5 Co 17.5 alloy. The thermal stability and low-temperature magnetic properties of the Ho 55 Al 27.5 Co 17.5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) were studied. The magnetic transition temperature of this alloy is ∼14 K as determined by the thermomagnetic measurement. Two indicators, i.e. isothermal magnetic entropy change (ΔS M ) and the relative cooling power (RCP), were adopted to evaluate the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of the alloy under a low magnetic field up to 2 T, which can be generated by permanent magnets. The values of |ΔS M | and RCP are 7.98 J kg −1 K −1 and 191.5 J kg −1 , respectively. The Ho 55 Al 27.5 Co 17.5 BMG with good MCE and high GFA provides an attractive candidate for magnetic refrigeration applications, like hydrogen liquefaction and storage. - Highlights: ► A ternary Ho–Al–Co BMG system with high glass-forming ability was developed. ► Fully glassy rods of Ho 55 Al 27.5 Co 17.5 alloy were produced up to 1 cm in diameter. ► The thermal stability and magnetic properties of the BMG were evaluated. ► The BMG exhibits good magnetocaloric effect under a low magnetic field up to 2 T.

  9. Interphases, gelation, vitrification, porous glasses and the generalized Cauchy relation: epoxy/silica nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, M; Mueller, U; Jimenez Rioboo, R J; Baller, J; Sanctuary, R; Krueger, J K [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, University of Luxembourg, 162A avenue de la Faiencerie, L-1511 Luxembourg (Luxembourg); Possart, W [Fachbereich Werkstoffwissenschaften, Universitaet des Saarlandes, D-66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)], E-mail: martine.philipp@uni.lu

    2009-02-15

    The generalized Cauchy relation (gCR) of epoxy/silica nano-composites does not show either the chemically induced sol-gel transition or the chemically induced glass transition in the course of polymerization. Astonishingly, by varying the silica nanoparticles' concentration between 0 and 25 vol% in the composites, the Cauchy parameter A of the gCR remains universal and can be determined from the pure epoxy's elastic moduli. Air-filled porous silica glasses are considered as models for percolated silica particles. A longitudinal modulus versus density representation evidences the aforementioned transition phenomena during polymerization of the epoxy/silica nanocomposites. The existence of optically and mechanically relevant interphases is discussed.

  10. Interphases, gelation, vitrification, porous glasses and the generalized Cauchy relation: epoxy/silica nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipp, M; Mueller, U; Jimenez Rioboo, R J; Baller, J; Sanctuary, R; Krueger, J K; Possart, W

    2009-01-01

    The generalized Cauchy relation (gCR) of epoxy/silica nano-composites does not show either the chemically induced sol-gel transition or the chemically induced glass transition in the course of polymerization. Astonishingly, by varying the silica nanoparticles' concentration between 0 and 25 vol% in the composites, the Cauchy parameter A of the gCR remains universal and can be determined from the pure epoxy's elastic moduli. Air-filled porous silica glasses are considered as models for percolated silica particles. A longitudinal modulus versus density representation evidences the aforementioned transition phenomena during polymerization of the epoxy/silica nanocomposites. The existence of optically and mechanically relevant interphases is discussed.

  11. Structural behavior of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass below and above the glass transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattern, N.; Hermann, H.; Roth, S.

    2003-01-01

    The thermal behavior of the structure of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass has been investigated in situ through the glass transition by means of high-temperature x-ray synchrotron diffraction. The dependence of the x-ray structure factor S(q) of the Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 glass on temperature follows...... the Debye theory up to the glass transition with a Debye temperature theta=296 K. Above the glass transition temperature T-g, the temperature dependence of S(q) is altered, pointing to a continuous development of structural changes in the liquid with temperature. The atomic pair correlation functions g......(r) indicate changes in short-range-order parameters of the first and the second neighborhood with temperature. The temperature dependence of structural parameters is different in glass and in supercooled liquid, with a continuous behavior through the glass transition. The nearest-neighbor distance decreases...

  12. New insight on glass-forming ability and designing Cu-based bulk metallic glasses: The solidification range perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jili; Pan, Ye; Li, Xingzhou; Wang, Xianfei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The equation, T rg = T g /T l , was rotationally modified to T rg = κ(T m /T l ) + C/T l . • The newly generalized equation suggests a way for describing glass-forming ability. • Several new Cu-based bulk metallic glasses were discovered by solidification range. - Abstract: In this paper, a new equation was rationally generalized from the reduced glass transition temperature. This equation indicates that solidification range can be used for describing glass-forming ability, which can be calculated with the aid of computational thermodynamic approach. Based on this scenario, several new Cu-based bulk metallic glasses in the ternary Cu–Zr–Ti alloy system were discovered. The as-cast samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electronic microscopy. The results indicate that as-cast samples have monolithic amorphous nature. Thermal analysis validates that the smaller solidification range is closely related to the higher glass-forming ability, which is contributed to the effect of solidification time on the formation of bulk metallic glasses. This work also suggests that solidus can influence glass formation

  13. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based bulk metallic glass (BMG) and its in situ BMG matrix composites with diameter of 3 mm were fabricated by conventional Cu-mould casting method and ... The composites showed lower friction coefficient and wear rate than the pure BMG.

  14. Development of Low Density CaMg-A1-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Senkov, O. N; Scott, J. M; Miracle, D. B

    2006-01-01

    Low density Ca-Mg-Al-based bulk metallic glasses containing additionally Cu and Zn, were produced by a copper mold casting method as wedge-shaped samples with thicknesses varying from 0.5 mm to 10 rom...

  15. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    based bulk metallic glasses; in situ composites; ductile phase; wear behaviours. 1. Introduction ... crystalline alloys [2], which led to an abnormal phenomenon that the wear ... of BMGs does not follow the empirical Archard's wear equa- tion which ...

  16. Net Shaping of Multifunctional Bulk Metallic Glass Containers and Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demand for novel manufacturing methods for space systems brings unique properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) into the spotlight. In addition to superior...

  17. Thermoplastic forming of bulk metallic glasses for precision robotics components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demand for novel manufacturing methods for space systems brings unique properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) into the spotlight. In addition to superior...

  18. Ageing, fragility and the reversibility window in bulk alloy glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarty, S; Georgiev, D G; Boolchand, P; Micoulaut, M

    2005-01-01

    Non-reversing relaxation enthalpies (ΔH nr ) at glass transitions T g (x) in the P x Ge x Se 1-2x ternary display wide, sharp and deep global minima (∼0) in the 0.09 g s become thermally reversing. In this reversibility window, glasses are found not to age, in contrast to ageing observed for fragile glass compositions outside the window. Thermal reversibility and lack of ageing seem to be paradigms of self-organization which molecular glasses share with protein structures which repetitively and reversibly change conformation near T g and the folding temperature respectively. (letter to the editor)

  19. Status of the French AVM vitrification facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonniaud, R.A.; Jouan, A.F.; Sombret, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    The Commission of the Marcoule Vitrification Plant (or AVM) has opened the industrial development era for the continuous vitrification process. Radioactive liquid wastes are calcinated in a rotary kiln to give a solid form, mixed with suitable raw materials in an electric furnace to make the glass. The glass is poured in containers and transferred to a disposal facility. The off gas released are processed. Design of La Hague next vitrification plant is given

  20. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman; Gibson, Mark A.; East, Daniel; Simon, George P.

    2011-01-01

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  1. High performance bulk metallic glass/carbon nanotube composite cathodes for electron field emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojati-Talemi, Pejman [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia); Mawson Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095 (Australia); Gibson, Mark A. [Process Science and Engineering, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Clayton, Vic 3168 (Australia); East, Daniel; Simon, George P. [Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia)

    2011-11-07

    We report the preparation of new nanocomposites based on a combination of bulk metallic glass and carbon nanotubes for electron field emission applications. The use of bulk metallic glass as the matrix ensures high electrical and thermal conductivity, high thermal stability, and ease of processing, whilst the well dispersed carbon nanotubes act as highly efficient electron emitters. These advantages, alongside excellent electron emission properties, make these composites one of the best reported options for electron emission applications to date.

  2. Kinetics of Cold-Cap Reactions for Vitrification of Nuclear Waste Glass Based on Simultaneous Differential Scanning Calorimetry - Thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and Evolved Gas Analysis (EGA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.; Chun, Jaehun; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-12-03

    For vitrifying nuclear waste glass, the feed, a mixture of waste with glass-forming and modifying additives, is charged onto the cold cap that covers 90-100% of the melt surface. The cold cap consists of a layer of reacting molten glass floating on the surface of the melt in an all-electric, continuous glass melter. As the feed moves through the cold cap, it undergoes chemical reactions and phase transitions through which it is converted to molten glass that moves from the cold cap into the melt pool. The process involves a series of reactions that generate multiple gases and subsequent mass loss and foaming significantly influence the mass and heat transfers. The rate of glass melting, which is greatly influenced by mass and heat transfers, affects the vitrification process and the efficiency of the immobilization of nuclear waste. We studied the cold-cap reactions of a representative waste glass feed using both the simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry thermogravimetry (DSC-TGA) and the thermogravimetry coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (TGA-GC-MS) as complementary tools to perform evolved gas analysis (EGA). Analyses from DSC-TGA and EGA on the cold-cap reactions provide a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model. It also helps to formulate melter feeds for higher production rate.

  3. Spectral descriptors for bulk metallic glasses based on the thermodynamics of competing crystalline phases

    OpenAIRE

    Perim, Eric; Lee, Dongwoo; Liu, Yanhui; Toher, Cormac; Gong, Pan; Li, Yanglin; Simmons, W. Neal; Levy, Ohad; Vlassak, Joost J.; Schroers, Jan; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses have attracted considerable interest in recent years due to their unique combination of superb properties and processability. Predicting bulk metallic glass formers from known parameters remains a challenge and the search for new systems is still performed by trial and error. It has been speculated that some sort of "confusion" during crystallization of the crystalline phases competing with glass formation could play a key role. Here, we propose a heuristic descriptor quantif...

  4. On the anelasticity and strain induced structural changes in a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, A.; Louzguine-Luzguin, D. V.; Kawashima, A.; Inoue, A.; Fecht, H.-J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the anelastic behavior of a cyclically loaded Zr 62.5 Fe 5 Cu 22.5 Al 10 bulk metallic glass well below its yield strength. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the glass is discussed on the basis of its structural and thermodynamic properties before and after tests. We show how the kinetically frozen anelastic deformation accumulates at room temperature and causes a structural relaxation and densification of the glass and further leads to its partial crystallization.

  5. Flow and Fracture of Bulk Metallic Glass Alloys and their Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, K M; Suh, D; Howell, R; Asoka-Kumar, P; Dauskardt, R H

    2001-01-01

    The fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms of a Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be bulk metallic glass and a composite utilizing a crystalline reinforcement phase are reviewed. The relationship between stress state, free volume and shear band formation are discussed. Positron annihilation techniques were used to confirm the predicted increase in free volume after plastic straining. Strain localization and failure were examined for a wide range of stress states. Finally, methods for toughening metallic glasses are considered. Significant increases in toughness are demonstrated for a composite bulk metallic glass containing a ductile second phase which stabilizes shear band formation and distributes plastic deformation

  6. Vitrification development for mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrill, R.; Whittington, K.; Peters, R.

    1995-02-01

    Vitrification is a promising approach to waste-form immobilization. It destroys hazardous organic compounds and produces a durable and highly stable glass. Vitrification tests were performed on three surrogate wastes during fiscal year 1994; 183-H Solar Evaporation Basin waste from Hanford, bottom ash from the Oak Ridge TSCA incinerator, and saltcrete from Rocky Flats. Preliminary glass development involved melting trials followed by visual homogeneity examination, short-duration leach tests on glass specimens, and long-term leach tests on selected glasses. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements were taken for the most durable glass formulations. Results for the saltcrete are presented in this paper and demonstrate the applicability of vitrification technology to this mixed waste

  7. Bulk metallic glass for low noise fluxgate, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The team of Prime Photonics, Virginia Tech, and Utron Kinetics propose to demonstrate a method for fabrication of a bulk, amorphous, cobalt-rich material that...

  8. Tuning apparent friction coefficient by controlled patterning bulk metallic glasses surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Xu, Erjiang; Liu, Ze; Wang, Xinyun; Liu, Lin

    2016-12-01

    Micro-honeycomb structures with various pitches between adjacent cells were hot-embossed on Zr35Ti30Cu8.25Be26.75 bulk metallic glass surface. The effect of pitch geometry on the frictional behavior of metallic glass surface was systematically investigated. The results revealed that all textured metallic glass surfaces show a reduction in friction coefficient compared to smooth surface. More intriguingly, the friction coefficient first decreased and then increased gradually with increasing pitches. Such unique behavior can be understood fundamentally from the perspective of competing effects between contact area and local stress level with increasing pitches. This finding not only enhance the in-depth understanding of the mechanism of the significant role of surface topography on the frictional behavior of metallic glass surface, but also opens a new route towards other functional applications for bulk metallic glasses.

  9. Crystallization of Pd40CU30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass with and without pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, B.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Zhuang, Yanxin

    2007-01-01

    The glass-transition behavior of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk metallic glass was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The effect of pressure on the crystallization behavior of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk glass was studied by in situ high-pressure and high...

  10. Phosphate-based glass fiber vs. bulk glass: Change in fiber optical response to probe in vitro glass reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massera, J; Ahmed, I; Petit, L; Aallos, V; Hupa, L

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the effect of fiber drawing on the thermal and structural properties as well as on the glass reactivity of a phosphate glass in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane-buffered (TRIS) solution and simulated body fluid (SBF). The changes induced in the thermal properties suggest that the fiber drawing process leads to a weakening and probable re-orientation of the POP bonds. Whereas the fiber drawing did not significantly impact the release of P and Ca, an increase in the release of Na into the solution was noticed. This was probably due to small structural reorientations occurring during the fiber drawing process and to a slight diffusion of Na to the fiber surface. Both the powders from the bulk and the glass fibers formed a Ca-P surface layer when immersed in SBF and TRIS. The layer thickness was higher in the calcium and phosphate supersaturated SBF than in TRIS. This paper for the first time presents the in vitro reactivity and optical response of a phosphate-based bioactive glass (PBG) fiber when immersed in SBF. The light intensity remained constant for the first 48h after which a decrease with three distinct slopes was observed: the first decrease between 48 and 200h of immersion could be correlated to the formation of the Ca-P layer at the fiber surface. After this a faster decrease in light transmission was observed from 200 to ~425h in SBF. SEM analysis suggested that after 200h, the surface of the fiber was fully covered by a thin Ca-P layer which is likely to scatter light. For immersion times longer than ~425h, the thickness of the Ca-P layer increased and thus acted as a barrier to the dissolution process limiting further reduction in light transmission. The tracking of light transmission through the PBG fiber allowed monitoring of the fiber dissolution in vitro. These results are essential in developing new bioactive fiber sensors that can be used to monitor bioresponse in situ. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Glass and nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1982-10-01

    Glass shows interesting technical and economical properties for long term storage of solidified radioactive wastes by vitrification or embedding. Glass composition, vitrification processes, stability under irradiation, thermal stability and aqueous corrosion are studied [fr

  12. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Shuai; Stolpe, Moritz; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf; Evenson, Zach; Bednarcik, Jozef; Kruzic, Jamie J.

    2015-01-01

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T g . The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure

  13. Linking structure to fragility in bulk metallic glass-forming liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shuai, E-mail: shuai.wei@asu.edu, E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Stolpe, Moritz, E-mail: shuai.wei@asu.edu, E-mail: m.stolpe@mx.uni-saarland.de; Gross, Oliver; Gallino, Isabella; Hembree, William; Busch, Ralf [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Evenson, Zach [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Saarland University, Campus C63, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Institut für Materialphysik im Weltraum, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), 51170 Köln (Germany); Bednarcik, Jozef [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Kruzic, Jamie J. [Material Science, School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

    2015-05-04

    Using in-situ synchrotron X-ray scattering, we show that the structural evolution of various bulk metallic glass-forming liquids can be quantitatively connected to their viscosity behavior in the supercooled liquid near T{sub g}. The structural signature of fragility is identified as the temperature dependence of local dilatation on distinct key atomic length scales. A more fragile behavior results from a more pronounced thermally induced dilatation of the structure on a length scale of about 3 to 4 atomic diameters, coupled with shallower temperature dependence of structural changes in the nearest neighbor environment. These findings shed light on the structural origin of viscous slowdown during undercooling of bulk metallic glass-forming liquids and demonstrate the promise of predicting the properties of bulk metallic glasses from the atomic scale structure.

  14. Viscous surface flow induced on Ti-based bulk metallic glass by heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kun [Key Laboratory of Microgravity (National Microgravity Laboratory), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hu, Zheng [Key Laboratory of Microgravity (National Microgravity Laboratory), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Science and Technology on Vehicle Transmission Laboratory, China North Vehicle Research Institute, Beijing 100072 (China); Li, Fengjiang [Key Laboratory of Microgravity (National Microgravity Laboratory), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei, Bingchen, E-mail: weibc@imech.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Microgravity (National Microgravity Laboratory), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Obvious smoothing and roughening phases on the Ti-based MG surface resulted, which correspond respectively to the normal and off-normal incidence angles. • Atomic force microscopy confirms two types of periodic ripples distributed evenly over the rough surface. • The irradiation-induced viscosity of MG is about 4×10{sup 12} Pa·s, which accords with the theoretical prediction for metallic glasses close to glass transition temperature. • Surface-confined viscous flow plays a dominant quantitative role, which is due to radiation-induced softening of the low-viscosity surface layer. - Abstract: Ti-based bulk metallic glass was irradiated by a 20 MeV Cl{sup 4+} ion beam under liquid-nitrogen cooling, which produced remarkable surface smoothing and roughening that respectively correspond to normal and off-normal incidence angles of irradiation. Atomic force microscopy confirms two types of periodic ripples distributed evenly over the rough glass surface. In terms of mechanism, irradiation-induced viscosity agrees with the theoretical prediction for metallic glasses near glass transition temperature. Here, a model is introduced, based on relaxation of confined viscous flow with a thin liquid-like layer, that explains both surface smoothing and ripple formation. This study demonstrates that bulk metallic glass has high morphological instability and low viscosity under ion irradiation, which assets can pave new paths for metallic glass applications.

  15. In situ visualization of Ni-Nb bulk metallic glasses phase transition

    OpenAIRE

    Oreshkin, A. I.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Savinov, S. V.; Oreshkin, S. I.; Panov, V. I.; Yavari, A. R.; Miracle, D. B.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of the Ni-based bulk metallic glass structural evolution and crystallization behavior in situ investigation. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nano-beam diffraction (NBD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), radial distribution function (RDF) and scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) techniques were applied to analyze the structure and electronic properties of Ni63.5Nb36.5 glasses before and after crystallization. It was...

  16. Vitrification of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.; Schumacher, R.

    1995-01-01

    Vitrification offers many attractive waste stabilization options. Versatility of waste compositions, as well as the inherent durability of a glass waste form, have made vitrification the treatment of choice for high-level radioactive wastes. Adapting the technology to other hazardous and radioactive waste streams will provide an environmentally acceptable solution to many of the waste challenges that face the public today. This document reviews various types and technologies involved in vitrification

  17. Glass vitrification furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Katsuyuki.

    1995-01-01

    An air curtain is formed in the inside of an off gas exhaustion pipe, and off gases are ventilated therein in a state being isolated from the inner walls of the exhaustion pipe. In this case, a steam blowing port is disposed to the end portion of a suction side of an inner pipe to which the air curtain is formed, and a steam blowing means is disposed while being connected to the steam blowing port for sending steams. With such a constitution, since steams are condensed to extremely reduce the volume thereof, the amount of off gases to be processed in an off gas processing step at downstream can be reduced. (T.M.)

  18. Composition design and mechanical properties of ternary Cu–Zr–Ti bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Ye; Zeng, Yuqiao; Jing, Lijun; Zhang, Lu; Pi, Jinhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Newly designed monolithic bulk metallic glasses are of good glass-forming ability. • Cu 50 Zr 44 Ti 6 exhibits excellent plastic deformation up to ∼7.4%. • Copious and intersected shear bans are observed in the fractography of Cu 50 Zr 44 Ti 6 . • Cu 50 Zr 44 Ti 6 has the best plasticity in the ternary Cu–Zr–Ti bulk metallic glasses. - Abstract: The new compositions of ternary Cu–Zr–Ti bulk metallic glasses are predicted by integrating calculation of vacancy formation energy, mixing enthalpy and configuration entropy of the alloys based on thermodynamics of glass formers. The monolithic amorphous rods of 3 mm diameter have been successfully fabricated, and characterized by X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy and compression tests. The results show that the designed alloys possess good glass forming ability and excellent mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the samples can be effectively improved by regulating their composition. The monolithic amorphous rod of Cu 50 Zr 44 Ti 6 exhibits a high fracture strength of 1855 MPa and excellent plastic deformation up to ∼7.4%. The formation and propagation of shear bands in samples are also investigated. The enhancement of plastic deformation is mainly contributed to multiplication and intersection of shear bands

  19. Vitrification of reactor wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan, A.

    1993-01-01

    The vitrification of low and intermediate level wastes from the NPP operation has been studied in the frame of a Franco-Czech agreement. The laboratory experiments concentrated on a search for a suitable borosilicate glass matrix which could incorporate relatively high quantities of boron and sodium, main components of liquid wastes from the WWER reactor type NPPs. A relatively wide area of waste compositions has been studied and properties of glasses suitable for the technology and waste disposal were measured. Great attention has been paid to the chemical stability (leachability), other properties like thermal dependence of viscosity and electrical conductivity of melts, and the microstructure of the final solidification product have also been evaluated. The feasibility of the vitrification process has been proved during pilot plant tests which were accomplished at the French establishment in Marcoule. The results of tests were promising. (authors). 4 tabs., 7 figs

  20. Vitrification of reactor wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouan, A [CEA Centre d` Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 - Marcoule (France). Dept. des Procedes de Retraitement; Sussmilch, J [Nuclear Research Institut, Rez (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31

    The vitrification of low and intermediate level wastes from the NPP operation has been studied in the frame of a Franco-Czech agreement. The laboratory experiments concentrated on a search for a suitable borosilicate glass matrix which could incorporate relatively high quantities of boron and sodium, main components of liquid wastes from the WWER reactor type NPPs. A relatively wide area of waste compositions has been studied and properties of glasses suitable for the technology and waste disposal were measured. Great attention has been paid to the chemical stability (leachability), other properties like thermal dependence of viscosity and electrical conductivity of melts, and the microstructure of the final solidification product have also been evaluated. The feasibility of the vitrification process has been proved during pilot plant tests which were accomplished at the French establishment in Marcoule. The results of tests were promising. (authors). 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  1. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R.; Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T.

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs

  2. Bulk forming of industrial micro components in conventional metals and bulk metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin; Eriksen, Rasmus Solmer

    2007-01-01

    For production of micro components in large numbers, forging is an interesting and challenging process. The conventional metals like silver, steel and aluminum often require multi-step processes, but high productivity and increased strength justify the investment. As an alternative, bulk metallic...

  3. Enhanced glass forming ability and refrigerant capacity of a Gd55Ni22Mn3Al20 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, L.; Chan, K.C.; Tang, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A new Gd 55 Ni 22 Mn 3 Al 20 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was synthesized by minor Mn addition. → The BMG has enhanced glass forming ability and excellent refrigerant capacity (RC). → The RC of the BMG reaches a high value of 825 J kg -1 under a field of 3979 kA/m. → Its excellent RC is related to its large effective magnetic moment. - Abstract: In this work, a small amount of Mn was added to a Gd 55 Ni 25 Al 20 glass forming alloy, as a replacement for Ni, and a Gd 55 Ni 22 Mn 3 Al 20 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was obtained by suction casting. Its glass forming ability (GFA) was characterized by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and its magnetic properties were measured using a magnetic property measurement system. It is found that the minor Mn addition can significantly improve both the GFA and the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of the alloy. The refrigerant capacity (RC) of the BMG can reach a high value of 825 J kg -1 under a field of 3979 kA/m, which is about 29% larger than that of a Gd 55 Ni 25 Al 20 BMG. The effect of the minor Mn addition on the GFA and MCE of the BMG was investigated in the study.

  4. Composition Range and Glass Forming Ability of Ternary Ca-Mg-Cu Bulk Metallic Glasses (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Senkov, O. N; Scott, J. M; Miracle, D. B

    2006-01-01

    .... The maximum thickness at which an alloy remains fully amorphous, glass transition temperature, crystallization temperature, temperature interval of the super-cooled region, solidus and liquidus...

  5. Deformation-strengthening during rolling Cu60Zr20Ti20 bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Q.P.; Li, J.F.; Hu, Yuyan

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical strength evolutions during rolling the Cu60Zr20Ti20 bulk metallic glass (BMG) at room temperature (RT) and cryogenic temperature (CT) have been investigated by measuring the microhardness. The hardness slightly increases during the initial rolling stage as a result of the gradually...

  6. Preparation, thermal stability, and magnetic properties of Fe-Zr-Mo-W-B bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, D.Y.; Sun, W.S.; Wang, A.M.; Zhang, H.F.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2004-01-01

    A bulk metallic glass (BMG) cylinder of Fe 60 Co 8 Zr 10 Mo 5 W 2 B 15 with a diameter of 1.5 mm was prepared by copper mould casting of industrial raw materials. The amorphous state and the crystallization behavior were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The thermal stability parameters, such as glass transition temperature (T g ), crystallization temperature (T x ), supercooled liquid region (ΔT x ) between T g and T x , and reduced glass transition temperature T rg (T g /T m ) were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to be 891, 950, 59 K, and 0.62, respectively. The crystallization process took place through a single stage, and involved crystallization of the phases α-Fe, ZrFe 2 , Fe 3 B, MoB 2 , Mo 2 FeB 2 , and an unknown phase, as determined by X-ray analysis of the sample annealed for 1.5 ks at 1023 K, 50 K above the DSC peak temperature of crystallization. Moessbauer spectroscopy was studied for this alloy. The spectra exhibit a broadened and asymmetric doublet-like structure that indicated paramagnetic behavior and a fully amorphous structure. α-Fe was found in the amorphous matrix for a cylinder with a diameter of 2.5 mm. The success of synthesis of the Fe-based bulk metallic glass from industrial materials is important for the future progress in research and practical application of new bulk metallic glasses

  7. Unusual glass-forming ability induced by changes in the local atomic structure in Ti-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y C; Chang, H J; Kim, D H; Kim, W T; Cha, P R

    2007-01-01

    The effect of partial replacement of Cu by Be in Ti 50 Cu 32 Ni 15 Sn 3 alloy on the thermal properties, structure, and forming ability of an amorphous phase were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray diffraction (XRD), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti 50 Cu 25 Ni 15 Sn 3 Be 7 alloy shows enhanced glass-forming ability, enabling one to fabricate a fully amorphous bulk metallic glass sample 2 mm in diameter by injection casting. With the replacement, the supercooled liquid region ΔT x (= T x -T g , where T x is the crystallization temperature and T g is the glass transition temperature) decreased from 73 to 45 K and the reduced glass transition temperature T rg (= T g /T 1 , where T 1 is the liquidus temperature) increased from 0.53 to 0.57. The amorphous Ti 50 Cu 25 Ni 15 Sn 3 Be 7 phase showed a formation of short-range-ordered clusters 1-2 nm in size, which is attributed to the strong interaction between Ti and Be. The results show that ΔT x can be used as a thermal parameter reflecting the glass-forming ability of the alloy only when the phase formed during crystallization is the same as the phase competing with the glass transition during solidification

  8. Volatility and entrainment of feed components and product glass characteristics during pilot-scale vitrification of simulated Hanford site low-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Commercially available melter technologies were tested for application to vitrification of Hanford site low-level waste (LLW). Testing was conducted at vendor facilities using a non-radioactive LLW simulant. Technologies tested included four Joule-heated melter types, a carbon electrode melter, a cyclone combustion melter, and a plasma torch-fired melter. A variety of samples were collected during the vendor tests and analyzed to provide data to support evaluation of the technologies. This paper describes the evaluation of melter feed component volatility and entrainment losses and product glass samples produced during the vendor tests. All vendors produced glasses that met minimum leach criteria established for the test glass formulations, although in many cases the waste oxide loading was less than intended. Entrainment was much lower in Joule-heated systems than in the combustion or plasma torch-fired systems. Volatility of alkali metals, halogens, B, Mo, and P were severe for non-Joule-heated systems. While losses of sulfur were significant for all systems, the volatility of other components was greatly reduced for some configurations of Joule-heated melters. Data on approaches to reduce NO x generation, resulting from high nitrate and nitrite content in the double-shell slurry feed, are also presented

  9. NMR signature of evolution of ductile-to-brittle transition in bulk metallic glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C C; Xiang, J F; Xi, X K; Wang, W H

    2011-12-02

    The mechanical properties of monolithic metallic glasses depend on the structures at atomic or subnanometer scales, while a clear correlation between mechanical behavior and structures has not been well established in such amorphous materials. In this work, we find a clear correlation of (27)Al NMR isotropic shifts with a microalloying induced ductile-to-brittle transition at ambient temperature in bulk metallic glasses, which indicates that the (27)Al NMR isotropic shift can be regarded as a structural signature to characterize plasticity for this metallic glass system. The study provides a compelling approach for investigating and understanding the mechanical properties of metallic glasses from the point of view of electronic structure. © 2011 American Physical Society

  10. Roles of Co element in Fe-based bulk metallic glasses utilizing industrial FeB alloy as raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyuan Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A series of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses were fabricated by a conventional copper mold casting method using a kind of Fe-B industrial raw alloy. It is found that Fe-B-Y-Nb bulk metallic glass with 3 at% of Co addition possesses the best glass forming ability, thermal stability, hardness, magnetic property and anti-corrosion property. The hardness test result indicates a synchronically trend with glass-forming ability parameters. The excellent glass-forming ability and a combination of good mechanical and functional properties suggest that the alloys in this work might be good candidates for commercial use.

  11. Pretreatment of americium/curium solutions for vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1996-01-01

    Vitrification will be used to stabilize an americium/curium (Am/Cm) solution presently stored in F-Canyon for eventual transport to the heavy isotope programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Prior to vitrification, an in-tank oxalate precipitation and a series of oxalic/nitric acid washes will be used to separate these elements and lanthanide fission products from the bulk of the uranium and metal impurities present in the solution. Pretreatment development experiments were performed to understand the behavior of the lanthanides and the metal impurities during the oxalate precipitation and properties of the precipitate slurry. The results of these experiments will be used to refine the target glass composition allowing optimization of the primary processing parameters and design of the solution transfer equipment

  12. Atomic structure and formation of CuZrAl bulk metallic glasses and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaban, I.; Jóvári, P.; Escher, B.; Tran, D.T.; Svensson, G.; Webb, M.A.; Regier, T.Z.; Kokotin, V.; Beuneu, B.; Gemming, T.; Eckert, J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Partial radial distribution functions for Cu 47.5 Zr 47.5 Al 5 metallic glass and relevant crystal structures. - Abstract: Cu 47.5 Zr 47.5 Al 5 metallic glass is studied experimentally by high-energy X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution, electron diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The atomic structure of the glass is modeled by reverse Monte-Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. RMC modeling of seven experimental datasets enabled reliable separation of all partial pair distribution functions for Cu 47.5 Zr 47.5 Al 5 metallic glass. A peculiar structural feature of the ternary alloy is formation of the strong Al–Zr bonds, which are supposed to determine its high viscosity and enhanced bulk glass formation. Analysis of the local atomic order in Cu 47.5 Zr 47.5 Al 5 glass and Cu 10 Zr 7 , CuZr 2 and CuZr B2 crystalline structures elucidates their similarities and differences explaining the phase formation sequence by devitrification of the glass.

  13. Recent advances on glass-forming systems driven far from equilibrium. Special issue marking the completion of the Research Unit FOR 1394 `Nonlinear response to probe vitrification'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Matthias

    2017-08-01

    The nature of the glass transition is one of the frontier questions in Statistical Physics and Materials Science. Highly cooperative structural processes develop in glass-forming melts exhibiting relaxational dynamics which is spread out over many decades in time. While considerable progress has been made in recent decades towards understanding dynamical slowing-down in quiescent systems, the interplay of glassy dynamics with external fields reveals a wealth of novel phenomena yet to be explored. This special issue focuses on recent results obtained by the Research Unit FOR 1394 `Nonlinear response to probe vitrification' which was funded by the German Science Foundation (DFG). In the projects of the research unit, strong external fields were used in order to gain insights into the complex structural and transport phenomena at the glass transition under far-from-equilibrium conditions. This aimed inter alia to test theories of the glass transition developed for quiescent systems by pushing them beyond their original regime. Combining experimental, simulational, and theoretical efforts, the eight projects within the FOR 1394 measured and determined aspects of the nonlinear response of supercooled metallic, polymeric, and silica melts, of colloidal dispersions, and of ionic liquids. Applied fields included electric and mechanic fields, and forced active probing (`micro-rheology'), where a single probe is forced through the glass-forming host. Nonlinear stress-strain and force-velocity relations as well as nonlinear dielectric susceptibilities and conductivities were observed. While the physical manipulation of melts and glasses is interesting in its own right, especially technologically, the investigations performed by the FOR 1394 suggest to use the response to strong homogeneous and inhomogeneous fields as technique to explore on the microscopic level the cooperative mechanisms in dense melts of strongly interacting constituents. Questions considered concern the

  14. Development of glass compositions with 9% waste content for the vitrification of high-level waste from LWR nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, T.

    1979-10-01

    Reduction of the contents of waste in glass from 20-25% to 9% causes a decrease of the leaching resistance of the glass. The addition of Zn0 reduces the leaching values by a factor of approximately 10. The crystallized glass ceramics have a lower coefficient of thermal expansion than glassy waste bodies. The separation of the phase which contains Mo occurs during heat treatment. The amount of separated Mo is lower for low alkali sac type (Si0 2 - A1 2 0 3 -Ca0 system) of glasses by a factor of approximately 50. All the glasses were prepared with simulated waste composition. (GBn.)

  15. Non-repeatability of large plasticity for Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Weiming [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, School of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Sun, Baoan [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Zhao, Yucheng, E-mail: zhaoyc1972@163.com [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, School of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Li, Qiang [School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830046 (China); Hou, Long; Luo, Ning [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, School of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Dun, Chaochao [Department of Physics, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, NC 27109 (United States); Zhao, Chengliang [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology & Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Ma, Zhanguo [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, School of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Liu, Haishun, E-mail: liuhaishun@126.com [State Key Laboratory for Geomechanics and Deep Underground Engineering, School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, School of Sciences, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Shen, Baolong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Serrated flow is an essential characteristic of the plastic deformation of metallic glasses. Under restricted loading conditions, the formation and expansion of shear bands act as the serrated flow of stress-strain curves in metallic glasses. In this work, serrated flows in Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}P{sub 13}C{sub 7} glassy samples with different plasticity were studied. The distribution histogram shows a monotonically decreasing trend during the initial deformation stage (i.e., the plastic deformation in the range of 0–8%), whereas in the following deformation stage (i.e., a plastic deformation of 8–14%), the stress drop frequency distribution presents both a monotonically decreasing distribution and a peak shape similar to chaotic dynamics. It is shown that the spatial evolution behavior of shear bands in Fe{sub 50}Ni{sub 30}P{sub 13}C{sub 7} metallic glasses evolved from self-organized critical to chaotic dynamics in the form of serrated flow, which reveals the origin of discrete plasticity of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses. This study has potential applications for understanding the plastic deformation mechanism. - Highlights: • Two-stage deformation mechanism in Fe-based bulk metallic glasses. • Distribution of the stress drop amplitude is significantly different at two stages. • The stages are related to multiple shear bands and discrete plasticity.

  16. Non-repeatability of large plasticity for Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Weiming; Sun, Baoan; Zhao, Yucheng; Li, Qiang; Hou, Long; Luo, Ning; Dun, Chaochao; Zhao, Chengliang; Ma, Zhanguo; Liu, Haishun; Shen, Baolong

    2016-01-01

    Serrated flow is an essential characteristic of the plastic deformation of metallic glasses. Under restricted loading conditions, the formation and expansion of shear bands act as the serrated flow of stress-strain curves in metallic glasses. In this work, serrated flows in Fe_5_0Ni_3_0P_1_3C_7 glassy samples with different plasticity were studied. The distribution histogram shows a monotonically decreasing trend during the initial deformation stage (i.e., the plastic deformation in the range of 0–8%), whereas in the following deformation stage (i.e., a plastic deformation of 8–14%), the stress drop frequency distribution presents both a monotonically decreasing distribution and a peak shape similar to chaotic dynamics. It is shown that the spatial evolution behavior of shear bands in Fe_5_0Ni_3_0P_1_3C_7 metallic glasses evolved from self-organized critical to chaotic dynamics in the form of serrated flow, which reveals the origin of discrete plasticity of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses. This study has potential applications for understanding the plastic deformation mechanism. - Highlights: • Two-stage deformation mechanism in Fe-based bulk metallic glasses. • Distribution of the stress drop amplitude is significantly different at two stages. • The stages are related to multiple shear bands and discrete plasticity.

  17. The local structure nature for a Ti-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yiqiang; Huang, Yongjiang; Fan, Hongbo; Wang, Dongjun; Shen, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The directional bonds in TiZrNiCuBe bulk metallic glass are primarily comprised of Be-Ni and Be-Cu bonds. ► A coefficient η could be extracted from Raman scattering to characterize the glass forming ability. ► The weak directional bonds dependent on Be could increase the localized electrons, facilitating the glass forming ability. - Abstract: In the present work, the local atomic structures of a Be-containing Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) have been characterized using electron spectrum for chemical analysis and Raman scattering, including directional bonds and medium range order. It might suggest that a coefficient could be extracted from Raman scattering to characterize the glass forming ability (GFA), which could be employed to interpret the enhanced GFA by Be addition of Ti-based BMG. Additionally, compared with the crystallized sample, the glassy sample exhibits larger average bond length and larger content of local bond distortion using Raman scattering.

  18. Experimental study on the surface characteristics of Pd-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiang; Sun, Bingli [School of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); National Center for International Joint Research of Micro-nano Molding Technology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Key Laboratory for Micro Molding Technology of Henan Province, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China); Zhao, Na [National Center for International Joint Research of Micro-nano Molding Technology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Key Laboratory for Micro Molding Technology of Henan Province, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Advanced Polymer Processing Technology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Li, Qian, E-mail: qianli@zzu.edu.cn [School of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); National Center for International Joint Research of Micro-nano Molding Technology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Key Laboratory for Micro Molding Technology of Henan Province, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Advanced Polymer Processing Technology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450002 (China); Hou, Jianhua; Feng, Weina [School of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); National Center for International Joint Research of Micro-nano Molding Technology, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Key Laboratory for Micro Molding Technology of Henan Province, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, 450001 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Wetting behavior of four polymer melts on Pd-based bulk metallic glass was investigated. • From results, in general, the contact angle of polymer on Pd-based BMG decreases with temperature increasing. • We find a critical temperature for each polymer, above this temperature, contact angle on Pd-based BMG does not decrease with temperature increasing. • Surface free energy of Pd-based BMG was estimated by Owens–Wendt method. - Abstract: The metallic glass has many unique and desirable physical and chemical characteristics for their long-range disordered atomic structure, among them the interfacial properties of the metallic glasses are crucial for their applications and manufacturing. In this work, the contact wetting angles between the polymer melts and Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass (Pd-BMG) with four kinds of roughness were analyzed. Experiments show the order of four polymers wettability on Pd-BMG was PP > HDPE > COC > PC. The surface free energy of Pd-BMG was estimated by Owens–Wendt method using the contact angles of three testing liquids. Neumann method was also used to further evidence the surface free energy of Pd-BMG comparing with PTFE, mold steels NAK80 and LKM2343ESR. The results provide theoretical and technical supports for the fabrication of metallic glass micro mold and the parameter optimization of polymer micro injection molding.

  19. An interatomic potential for studying CuZr bulk metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paduraru, Anca; Kenoufi, Abdel; Bailey, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    -scale deformation events and may furthermore involve localization through formation of shear bands. In this paper, an Effective Medium Theory (EMT) potential optimized for modeling the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of CuZr bulk metallic glass is studied. The late transition metals crystallizing in close......The mechanical properties of BMGs are remarkably different from the ones of ordinary metallic alloys due to the atomic level disorder in the glassy state. Unlike crystalline materials plastic deformation in metallic glasses cannot be caused by lattice defects but takes place through atomic...

  20. First principles process-product models for vitrification of nuclear waste: Relationship of glass composition to glass viscosity, resistivity, liquidus temperature, and durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe to immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Process and product quality models based on glass composition simplify the fabrication of the borosilicate glass while ensuring glass processability and quality. The process model for glass viscosity is based on a relationship between the glass composition and its structural polymerization. The relationship between glass viscosity and electrical resistivity is also shown to relate to glass polymerization. The process model for glass liquidus temperature calculates the solubility of the liquidus phases based on the free energies of formation of the precipitating species. The durability product quality model is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic hydration free energy from the glass composition

  1. Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction 2 O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils

  2. Feasibility Study of Using High-Temperature Raman Spectroscopy for On-Line Monitoring and Product Control of the Glass Vitrification Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Piepel, G.F.; Li, H.; Elliott, M.L.; Su, Y.

    1999-01-01

    A pulse-gating Raman spectroscopy setup was developed in this project. The setup was capable of performing in-situ high-temperature Raman measurements for glasses at temperatures as high as 1412 C. In the literature, high-temperature Raman measurements have only been performed on thin films of glass to minimize black-body radiation effects. The pulse-gating Raman setup allows making high-temperature measurements for bulk melts while effectively minimizing black-body radiation effects. A good correlation was found between certain Raman characteristic parameters and glass melt temperature for sodium silicate glasses measured in this project. Comparisons were made between the high-temperature Raman data from this study and literature data. The results suggest that an optimization of the pulse-gating Raman setup is necessary to further improve data quality (i.e., to obtain data with a higher signal-to-noise ratio). An W confocal Raman microspectrometer with continuous wave laser excitation using a 325 nm excitation line was evaluated selectively using a transparent silicate glass ad a deep-colored high-level waste glass in a bulk quantity. The data were successfully collected at temperatures as high as approximately 1500 C. The results demonstrated that the UV excitation line can be used for high-temperature Raman measurements of molten glasses without black-body radiation interference from the melt for both transparent and deep-color glasses. Further studies are needed to select the best laser system that can be used to develop high-temperature Raman glass databases

  3. Laboratory-scale vitrification and leaching of Hanford high-level waste for the purpose of simulant and glass property models validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, E.V.; Elliott, M.L.; Tingey, J.M.

    1993-02-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being built to process the high-level and TRU waste into canistered glass logs for disposal in a national repository. Testing programs have been established within the Project to verify process technology using simulated waste. A parallel testing program with actual radioactive waste is being performed to confirm the validity of using simulates and glass property models for waste form qualification and process testing. The first feed type to be processed by and the first to be tested on a laboratory-scale is pretreated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW). The NCAW is a neutralized high-level waste stream generated from the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel in the Plutonium and Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant at Hanford. As part of the fuel reprocessing, the high-level waste generated in PUREX was denitrated with sugar to form current acid waste (CAW). Sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrite were added to the CAW to minimize corrosion in the tanks, thus yielding neutralized CAW. The NCAW contains small amounts of plutonium, fission products from the irradiated fuel, stainless steel corrosion products, and iron and sulfate from the ferrous sulfamate reductant used in the PUREX process. This paper will discuss the results and status of the laboratory-scale radioactive testing

  4. Vitrification pilot plant experiences at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akgunduz, N.; Gimpel, R.F.; Paine, D.; Pierce, V.H.

    1997-01-01

    A one metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates containing high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1,150 to 1,350 C. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and path forward will be presented

  5. Fabricating Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Microcomponent by Suction Casting Using Silicon Micromold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijing Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A suction casting process for fabricating Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 bulk metallic glass microcomponent using silicon micromold has been studied. A complicated BMG microgear with 50 μm in module has been cast successfully. Observed by scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy, we find that the cast microgear duplicates the silicon micromold including the microstructure on the surface. The amorphous state of the microgear is confirmed by transmission election microscopy. The nanoindentation hardness and elasticity modulus of the microgear reach 6.5 GPa and 94.5 GPa. The simulation and experimental results prove that the suction casting process with the silicon micromold is a promising one-step method to fabricate bulk metallic glass microcomponents with high performance for applications in microelectromechanical system.

  6. Influence of minor alloying additions on the glass-forming ability of Mg-Ni-La bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, S.; Figueroa, I.A.; Todd, I.

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses of Mg 60 Ni 23.6 Y x La (16.4-x) and Mg 65 Ni 20 Y x LaMM (15-x) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 at.% have been produced by injection casting. For the La-containing alloy a maximum amorphous diameter of 4 mm for x = 0.5 and 0.75 was obtained. The LaMM-containing alloy showed a maximum amorphous diameter of 2 mm for x = 0 and 0.25 but decreased to 1 mm with further Y additions. The glass-forming ability of the Mg 60 Ni 23.6 La 16.4 alloy decreased when La is partially substituted by small amounts of small atoms (Si or B) or by large atoms (Y and Si).

  7. Effect of Nb on glass forming ability and plasticity of (Ti-Cu)-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo, Z.Y.; Qiu, K.Q.; Li, Q.F.; Ren, Y.L.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2010-01-01

    A Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 bulk metallic glass has been developed by Nb partial substitution for Zr in Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 11 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 alloy. The glass forming ability Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 alloy has been investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry. Partial Nb substitutes for Zr promote the glass forming ability. Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG with diameter of 3 mm can be fabricated by Cu-mold injection casting method. The glass forming ability of Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 alloy is enhanced by stabilizing the undercooled liquid against crystallization. The plastic strain up to 2.5% was obtained for Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG compared to 0.15% for Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 11 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 BMG, which demonstrates that small amount of Nb addition can have a dramatic effect on plasticity enhancement in Ti-Cu-based BMG. The intersection and branching of the shear bands are observed. The plastic strain of the Ti 33 Cu 47 Zr 9 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 Nb 2 BMG can be improved by the generation of nanocrystalline particles, which lead to multiple shear bands.

  8. Glass-Forming Ability and Early Crystallization Kinetics of Novel Cu-Zr-Al-Co Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoliang Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG composites ductilized by a shape memory B2 CuZr phase have attracted great attention owing to their outstanding mechanical properties. However, the B2 CuZr phase for most CuZr-based glass-forming compositions is only stable at very high temperatures, leading to the uncontrollable formation of B2 crystals during quenching. In this work, by introducing Co (i.e., 4, 5, and 6 at. % and 10 at. % Al into CuZr-based alloys, the relatively good glass-forming ability (GFA of CuZr-based alloys still can be achieved. Meanwhile, the B2 phase can be successfully stabilized to lower temperatures than the final temperatures of crystallization upon heating CuZr-based BMGs. Unlike previous reported CuZr-based BMGs, the primary crystallization products upon heating are mainly B2 CuZr crystals but not CuZr2 and Cu10Zr7 crystals. Furthermore, the primary precipitates during solidification are still dominated by B2 crystals, whose percolation threshold is detected to lie between 10 ± 2 vol. % and 31 ± 2 vol. %. The crystallization kinetics underlying the precipitation of B2 crystals was also investigated. Our results show that the present glass-forming composites are promising candidates for the fabrication of ductile CuZr-based BMG composites.

  9. Simultaneous measurements of bulk moduli and particle dynamics in a sheared colloidal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Michael V.; Eisenmann, Christoph; Kim, Chanjoong; Weitz, David A.

    2007-03-01

    We present a novel study of glassy colloidal systems, using a stress-controlled rheometer in conjunction with a confocal microscope. This experimental setup combines the measurement of bulk moduli, using conventional rheology, with the ability to track the motion of individual particles, through confocal microscopy techniques. We explore the response of the system to applied shear, by simultaneously monitoring the macroscopic relaxation and microscopic particle dynamics, under conditions from the quiescent glass to a shear-melted liquid.

  10. Preparation and characterization of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses in form of plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilarczyk, Wirginia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Zr-based BMGs in form of plate was successful produced by die pressure casting method. • Many techniques have been used to characterize the structure of Zr 55 Cu 30 Ni 5 Al 10 alloy. • The calculated GFA parameters show that the alloy exhibits satisfactory GFA. • The studies reveal that tested as-cast Zr-based alloy is in amorphous state. - Abstract: Zr-based bulk metallic glasses present an interesting combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. During the last decade, intensive progress has been made and a number of applications have been suggested for these materials. In order to successfully apply these materials, it is necessary to accurately characterize their structure, thermal stability and other properties accurately. The aim of the presented work is the manufacturing, examination of the structure of selected Zr-based bulk metallic alloys and confirmation of an amorphous structure using X-ray analysis, microscopic observation and thermal analysis. In this work, the Zr-based bulk metallic glasses in form of plate was successful produced by die pressure casting method. Designed scientific station for casting zirconium based amorphous alloys in the form of plates and rods with selected dimensions is in our university a comprehensive method for achieving amorphous materials which enables us to maintain repeatability of as-cast samples with the amorphous structure and the assumed dimensions range. The diffraction pattern and exothermic reaction as well as the fracture surface morphology reveal that studied as-cast Zr-based alloy is in amorphous state. The calculated GFA parameters show that the alloy exhibits satisfactory glass-forming ability in form of studied plate. These obtained values can suggest that studied alloys are suitable materials for further planned practical application at welding process. The success of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses production in form of plate with obtained sizes is important for future

  11. Microstructural characterization of Mg-based bulk metallic glass and nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babilas, Rafał, E-mail: rafal.babilas@polsl.pl [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego 18a St., 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Nowosielski, Ryszard; Pawlyta, Mirosława [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego 18a St., 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Fitch, Andy [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, CS40220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Burian, Andrzej [A. Chelkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4 St., 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2015-04-15

    New magnesium-based bulk metallic glasses Mg{sub 60}Cu{sub 30}Y{sub 10} have been prepared by pressure casting. Glassy alloys were successfully annealed to become nanocomposite containing 200 nm crystallites in an amorphous matrix. The microstructure of bulk glassy alloy and nanocomposite obtained during heat treatment was examined by X-ray diffraction and scanning and high-resolution electron microscopy. Metallic glass has been also studied to explain the structural characteristics by the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling based on the diffraction data. The HRTEM images allow to indicate some medium-range order (MRO) regions about 2–3 nm in size and formation of local atomic clusters. The RMC modeling results confirmed some kinds of short range order (SRO) structures. It was found that the structure of bulk metallic glass formed by the pressure casting is homogeneous. The composite material contained very small particles in the amorphous matrix. Homogeneous glassy alloy had better corrosion resistance than a composite containing nanocrystalline particles in a glassy matrix. - Highlights: • RMC modeling demonstrates some kinds of SRO structures in Mg-based BMGs. • HRTEM indicated MRO regions about 2–3 nm and SRO regions about 0.5 nm in size. • Mg-based glassy alloys were successfully annealed to become nanocomposite material. • Crystalline particles have spherical morphology with an average diameter of 200 nm. • Glassy alloy had higher corrosion resistance than a nanocomposite sample.

  12. Distribution of oxides in a Zr-Cu-Ni-Al-Nb-Si bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, Jochen; Busch, Ralf [Chair of Metallic Materials, Saarland University, PO Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Mueller, Frank; Huefner, Stefan [Chair of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, PO Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The course of oxide presence with distance from the sample surface and bonding partner was studied for the bulk metallic glass with the nominal composition Zr{sub 57.9}Cu{sub 15.4}Ni{sub 12.7}Al{sub 10.2}Nb{sub 2.8}Si{sub 1} (at%) by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Investigated specimens are taken from vacuum quench-cast rods subjected to oxidation at room temperature and atmosphere. Binding energies were determined in various depths using ion beam ablation of up to 100 nanometers. XPS spectra confirm oxidation primarily of the pure zirconium and aluminum constituents, all other peaks correspond to metallic bonds. While the surface area shows a passivating zirconia layer a few nanometers thick, oxygen is bonded predominantly with aluminum inside the bulk. Since the concentration of oxygen is a crucial factor in the crystallization behavior of bulk metallic glass forming liquids on basis of oxygen affine metals, so far only high purity materials were thought to be suitable. The findings in this study, however, are promising for alloys with industrial grade elements with sufficient glass forming ability. Comparisons of the alloy with differing oxygen content support the conclusion that aluminum acts as an appropriate scavenger for both adsorbed and large amounts of intrinsic oxygen in zirconium based amorphous metals.

  13. Free volume model: High-temperature deformation of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bletry, M.; Guyot, P.; Blandin, J.J.; Soubeyroux, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The homogeneous deformation of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass is investigated in the glass transition region. Compression tests at different temperatures and strain rates have been conducted. The mechanical behavior is analyzed in the framework of the free volume model, taking into account the dependence of the flow defect concentration on deformation. The activation volume is evaluated and allows one to gather the viscosity data (for the different strain rates and temperatures) on a unique master curve. It is also shown that, due to the relation between flow defect concentration and free volume, it is not possible to deduce the equilibrium flow defect concentration directly from mechanical measurements. However, if this parameter is arbitrarily chosen, mechanical measurements give access to the other parameters of the model, these parameters for the alloy under investigation being of the same order of magnitude as those for other metallic glasses

  14. Thermal stability and magnetocaloric properties of GdDyAlCo bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, L. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hui, X. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: huixd01@hotmail.com; Chen, G.L. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-01-25

    Gd{sub 56-x}Dy{sub x}Al{sub 24}Co{sub 20} (x = 16, 20 and 22) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) alloys with a diameter of 2, 3 and 3 mm, respectively, were prepared by using copper mold casting. These alloys exhibit higher values of the glass transition temperature, crystallization temperature, and activation energy of the glass transition and crystallization, compared with those of other known rare-earth-based BMGs. A maximum magnetic entropy changes of 15.78 J/(kg K) is obtained in Gd{sub 40}Dy{sub 16}Al{sub 24}Co{sub 20}, which is the maximal among all the bulk metallic glasses, and is much larger than those of the known crystalline magnetic refrigerant compound Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 2}Ge{sub 1.9}Fe{sub 0.1} and pure Gd metal. All the three BMG alloys have a broader temperature range of the entropy change peak, resulting in larger refrigerate capacities (RC) than those of conventional crystalline materials. The excellent magnetocaloric properties combining with high thermal stability make them an attractive candidate for magnetic refrigerants in the temperature range of 20-100 K.

  15. Zr-Cu-Ni-Al bulk metallic glasses with superhigh glass-forming ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.J.; Qu, D.D.; Huang, Y.J.; Liss, K.-D.; Wei, X.S.; Xing, D.W.; Shen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Zr-Cu-Ni-Al quaternary amorphous alloy compositions with varying glass-forming ability are developed by an efficient method of proportional mixing of binary eutectics. The critical diameter of the glassy sample is improved from 6 mm for Zr 53 Cu 18.7 Ni 12 Al 16.3 to 14 mm for Zr 50.7 Cu 28 Ni 9 Al 12.3 by straightforwardly adjusting the eutectic unit's coefficients. The drastic improvement in GFA is attributed to balancing the chemical affinities of the Zr, Cu, Ni and Al components in the melt prior to solidification which makes the precipitation of competing crystalline phases more difficult. As the glass-forming ability increases, the concentration of Cu in the alloys exhibits a same trend. Based on synchrotron radiation high-energy X-ray diffraction analysis and Miracle's structural model, it is envisioned that the substitution of additional Cu atoms for Zr atoms in the investigated alloys stabilizes the efficient cluster packing structure of the amorphous alloys, leading to the pronounced increase in their glass-forming ability

  16. Formation of centimeter Fe-based bulk metallic glasses in low vacuum environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Jie; Chen Qi; Li Ning [State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Mould Technology, Department of Materials Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu Lin [State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Mould Technology, Department of Materials Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)], E-mail: lliu2000@public.wh.hb.cn

    2008-09-08

    The formation of a Fe{sub 43.7}Co{sub 7.3}Cr{sub 14.7}Mo{sub 12.6}C{sub 15.5}B{sub 4.3}Y{sub 1.9} bulk metallic glass (BMG) was attempted in low vacuum environment and in air using commercial raw materials. The glass forming ability of the Fe-based alloys was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). It was found that cylindric rods with diameters ranging from 10 mm to 5 mm could be successfully fabricated by copper-mold casting in the pressures from 1.5 Pa to 10{sup 5} Pa (10{sup 5} Pa = 1 atm). All BMGs exhibit a distinct glass transition and wide supercooled liquid region. The preparation condition seems not significantly affected by the thermodynamic parameters of BMG, such as supercooled liquid region, glass transition temperature and melting process. The oxygen content of the alloys prepared in different vacuum conditions was measured by a LECO oxygen analyzer, which revealed that the oxygen content was less than 100 ppm for all BMGs prepared, even in air. The good glass forming ability and excellent oxidation resistance for the present Fe-based alloy are discussed.

  17. Solidification and vitrification life-cycle economics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450 000 cm 3 of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarizes a detailed study done to: (1) compare the economics of the solidification and vitrification processes, (2) determine if the stigma assigned to vitrification is warranted and, (3) determine if investing millions of dollars into vitrification development, along with solidification development, at Fernald is warranted

  18. Systems and Methods for Implementing Bulk Metallic Glass-Based Strain Wave Gears and Strain Wave Gear Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Wilcox, Brian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass-based strain wave gears and strain wave gear components. In one embodiment, a strain wave gear includes: a wave generator; a flexspline that itself includes a first set of gear teeth; and a circular spline that itself includes a second set of gear teeth; where at least one of the wave generator, the flexspline, and the circular spline, includes a bulk metallic glass-based material.

  19. Pressure effect of glass transition temperature in Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Roseker, W.; Sikorski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Pressure effects on glass transition temperature and supercooled liquid region of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. The glass transition was det...... range of 0-2.2 GPa. This method opens a possibility to study the pressure effect of glass transition process in glassy systems under high pressures (>1 GPa). (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics.......Pressure effects on glass transition temperature and supercooled liquid region of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. The glass transition...... was detected from the change of the slope of peak position as a function of temperature. It is found that the glass transition temperature increases with pressure by 4.4 K/GPa for the Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass, and the supercooled liquid range decreases with pressure by 2.9 K/GPa in a pressure...

  20. Selecting a plutonium vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouan, A. [Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    1996-05-01

    Vitrification of plutonium is one means of mitigating its potential danger. This option is technically feasible, even if it is not the solution advocated in France. Two situations are possible, depending on whether or not the glass matrix also contains fission products; concentrations of up to 15% should be achievable for plutonium alone, whereas the upper limit is 3% in the presence of fission products. The French continuous vitrification process appears to be particularly suitable for plutonium vitrification: its capacity is compatible with the required throughout, and the compact dimensions of the process equipment prevent a criticality hazard. Preprocessing of plutonium metal, to convert it to PuO{sub 2} or to a nitric acid solution, may prove advantageous or even necessary depending on whether a dry or wet process is adopted. The process may involve a single step (vitrification of Pu or PuO{sub 2} mixed with glass frit) or may include a prior calcination step - notably if the plutonium is to be incorporated into a fission product glass. It is important to weigh the advantages and drawbacks of all the possible options in terms of feasibility, safety and cost-effectiveness.

  1. Insight on the glass-forming ability of Al–Y–Ni–Ce bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shih-Fan, E-mail: sfchen@ntut.edu.tw [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chih-Yuan, E-mail: chen6563@gmail.com [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chia-Hung [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Adding 1 at.% cerium to Al{sub 87}Y{sub 8}Ni{sub 5} alloy causes glass transition. • A large ΔT{sub x} indicates that (Al{sub 87}Y{sub 8}Ni{sub 5}){sub 99}Ce{sub 1} is possibly a ductile amorphous alloy. • Ce is effective in improving the thermal stability of the Al–Y–Ni amorphous alloy. • The hardness of the crystallized cerium-bearing alloy was as high as 593 Hv. - Abstract: In the present study, the role of Ce in the thermal stability and glass forming ability (GFA) of (Al{sub 87}Y{sub 8}Ni{sub 5}){sub 99}Ce{sub 1} alloy ribbons produced by a single roller melt-spinning process has been investigated in an attempt to understand the influences of multiple RE elements in an Al–TM–RE (TM: transition metal, RE: rear earth metal) alloy system. Only the (Al{sub 87}Y{sub 8}Ni{sub 5}){sub 99}Ce{sub 1} alloy ribbon showed a glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) at 483.2 K, and its ΔT{sub x} value was 41.3 K. Crystallization occurred in the temperature range of 500–750 K in three exothermic reaction stages. The peak temperature for these reactions shifted toward higher temperatures at higher heating rates. XRD and SEM analysis of annealed samples revealed that nano-sized Al particles precipitated within the amorphous matrix during the first exothermic reaction. The maximum hardness was obtained for both non-cerium and cerium addition alloys after crystallization in the 550–660 K region due to numerous nano-sized precipitates randomly and homogeneously distributed in the amorphous matrix. Moreover, from observation of the fracture surface, it is found that the fracture mode transforms from ductile to brittle when the sample is annealed at a higher crystallization temperature, at which brittle intermetallic compounds appear.

  2. A summary report on feed preparation offgas and glass redox data for Hanford waste vitrification plant: Letter report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, M.D.

    1996-03-01

    Tests to evaluate feed processing options for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) were conducted by a number of investigators, and considerable data were acquired for tests of different scale, including recent full-scale tests. In this report, a comparison was made of the characteristics of feed preparation observed in tests of scale ranging from 57 ml to full-scale of 28,000 liters. These tests included Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) laboratory-scale tests, Kernforschungszentrums Karlsruhe (KfK) melter feed preparation, Research Scale Melter (RSM) feed preparation, Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) feed preparation, Slurry Integrated Performance Testing (SIPT) feed preparation, and formic acid addition to Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) care samples.' The data presented herein were drawn mainly from draft reports and include system characteristics such as slurry volume and depth, sweep gas flow rate, headspace, and heating and stirring characteristics. Operating conditions such as acid feed rate, temperature, starting pH, final pH, quantities and type of frit, nitrite, nitrate, and carbonate concentrations, noble metal content, and waste oxide loading were tabulated. Offgas data for CO 2 , NO x , N 2 O, NO 2 , H 2 and NH 3 were tabulated on a common basis. Observation and non-observation of other species were also noted

  3. Elastic properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses; Elastische Eigenschaften von supraleitenden massiven metallischen Glaesern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempel, Marius

    2015-07-01

    Within the framework of this thesis the elastic properties of a superconducting bulk metallic glass between 10 mK and 300 K were first investigated. In order to measure the entire temperature range, in particular the low temperature part, new experimental techniques were developed. Using an inductive readout scheme for a double paddle oscillator it was possible to determine the internal friction and the relative change of sound velocity of bulk metallic glasses with high precision. This allowed for a detailed comparison of the data with different models. The analysis focuses on the low temperature regime where the properties of glassy materials are governed by atomic tunneling systems as described by the tunneling model. The influence of conduction electrons in the normal conducting state and quasiparticles in the superconducting state of the glass were accounted for in the theoretical description, resulting in a good agreement over a large temperature range between measured data and prediction of the tunneling model. This allowed for a direct determination of the coupling constant between electrons and tunneling systems. In the vicinity of the transition temperature Tc the data can only be described if a modified distribution function of the tunneling parameters is applied.

  4. Modeling size effects on fatigue life of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass under bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Tao; Wang Gongyao; Feng Qingming; Liaw, Peter K.; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Inoue, Akihisa

    2013-01-01

    A size effect on the fatigue-life cycles of a Zr 50 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 10 (at.%) bulk metallic glass has been observed in the four-point-bending fatigue experiment. Under the same bending-stress condition, large-sized samples tend to exhibit longer fatigue lives than small-sized samples. This size effect on the fatigue life cannot be satisfactorily explained by the flaw-based Weibull theories. Based on the experimental results, this study explores possible approaches to modeling the size effects on the bending-fatigue life of bulk metallic glasses, and proposes two fatigue-life models based on the Weibull distribution. The first model assumes, empirically, log-linear effects of the sample thickness on the Weibull parameters. The second model incorporates the mechanistic knowledge of the fatigue behavior of metallic glasses, and assumes that the shear-band density, instead of the flaw density, has significant influence on the bending fatigue-life cycles. Promising predictive results provide evidence of the potential validity of the models and their assumptions.

  5. Demonstration of the Defense Waste Processing Facility vitrification process for Tank 42 radioactive sludge -- Glass preparation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, N.E.; Fellinger, T.L.; Marshall, K.M.; Crawford, C.L.; Cozzi, A.D.; Edwards, T.B.

    1999-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently processing and immobilizing the radioactive high level waste sludge at SRS into a durable borosilicate glass for final geological disposal. The DWPF has recently finished processing the first radioactive sludge batch, and is ready for the second batch of radioactive sludge. The second batch is primarily sludge from Tank 42. Before processing this batch in the DWPF, the DWPF process flowsheet has to be demonstrated with a sample of Tank 42 sludge to ensure that an acceptable melter feed and glass can be made. This demonstration was recently completed in the Shielded Cells Facility at SRS. An earlier paper in these proceedings described the sludge composition and processes necessary for producing an acceptable melter fee. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of the glass from that demonstration. Results substantiate that Tank 42 sludge after mixing with the proper amount of glass forming frit (Frit 200) can be processed to make an acceptable glass

  6. Forty years of the Hrubý glass-forming coefficient via DTA when comparing other criteria in relation to the glass stability and vitrification ability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozmidis-Petrovic, A.; Šesták, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 2 (2012), 997-1004 ISSN 1388-6150 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : glass transition * Hrubý criterion * glass -forming ability * DTA/DSC Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.982, year: 2012

  7. ZrCuAl Bulk Metallic Glass spall induced by laser shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, Benjamin; Loison, Didier; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Lescoute, Emilien; Berthe, Laurent; Sangleboeuf, Jean-Christophe

    2017-06-01

    To face High Velocity Impacts, the aerospace industry is always seeking for innovative materials usable as debris shielding components. Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMG) revealed interesting mechanical properties in case of static and quasi-static loading conditions: high elasticity, high tenacity, low density and high fracture threshold... The department of Mechanics and Glass of the Institut of Physics Rennes conducted on the ELFIE facility, laser shock experiments to study the behavior of a ternary ZrCuAl BMG under high strain rate, up-to fragmentation process. On the one hand, in-situ diagnostics were used to measure ejection velocities with PDV and debris morphologies were observed by Shadowgraphy. On the other hand, spalled areas (dimensions and features) were characterized through post-mortem analysis (optical observations, profilometry and SEM). These results are compared to experimental and numerical data on the crystalline forms of the ZrCuAl basic compounds.

  8. Liquid phase and supercooled liquid phase welding of bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Recent progress on welding in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) has been reviewed. BMGs have been successfully welded to BMGs or crystalline metals by liquid phase welding using explosion, pulse-current and electron-beam methods, and by supercooled liquid phase welding using friction method. Successful welding of the liquid phase methods was due to the high glass-forming ability of the BMGs and the high concentration of welding energy in these methods. In contrast, the supercooled liquid phase welding was successful due to the thermally stable supercooled liquid state of the BMGs and the superplasticity and viscous flow of the supercooled liquid. The successful welding of BMGs to BMGs and crystalline materials is promising for the future development of BMGs as engineering materials

  9. Computational analysis of the atomic size effect in bulk metallic glasses and their liquid precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokotin, V.; Hermann, H.

    2008-01-01

    The atomic size effect and its consequences for the ability of multicomponent liquid alloys to form bulk metallic glasses are analyzed in terms of the generalized Bernal's model for liquids, following the hypothesis that maximum density in the liquid state improves the glass-forming ability. The maximum density that can be achieved in the liquid state is studied in the 2(N-1) dimensional parameter space of N-component systems. Computer simulations reveal that the size ratio of largest to smallest atoms are most relevant for achieving the maximum packing for N = 3-5, whereas the number of components plays a minor role. At small size ratio, the maximum packing density can be achieved by different atomic size distributions, whereas for medium size ratios the maximum density is always correlated to a concave size distribution. The relationship of the results to Miracle's efficient cluster packing model is also discussed

  10. Transient regimes during high-temperature deformation of a bulk metallic glass: A free volume approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bletry, M.; Guyot, P.; Brechet, Y.; Blandin, J.J.; Soubeyroux, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    The homogeneous deformation of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass is investigated in the glass transition range. Compression and stress-relaxation tests have been conducted. The stress-strain curves are modeled in the framework of the free volume theory, including transient phenomena (overshoot and undershoot). This approach allows several physical parameters (activation volume, flow defect creation and relaxation coefficient) to be determined from a mechanical experiment. This model is able to rationalize the dependency of stress overshoot on relaxation time. It is shown that, due to the relationship between flow defect concentration and free volume model, it is impossible to determine the equilibrium flow defect concentration. However, the relative variation of flow defect is always the same, and all the model parameters depend on the equilibrium flow defect concentration. The methodology presented in this paper should, in the future, allow the consistency of the free volume model to be assessed

  11. THE IMPACT OF PARTIAL CRYSTALLIZATION ON THE PERMEATION PROPERTIES BULK AMORPHOUS GLASS HYDROGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K; Paul Korinko, P; Thad Adams, T; Elise Fox, E; Arthur Jurgensen, A

    2008-11-25

    It is recognized that hydrogen separation membranes are a key component of the emerging hydrogen economy. A potentially exciting material for membrane separations are bulk metallic glass materials due to their low cost, high elastic toughness and resistance to hydrogen 'embrittlement' as compared to crystalline Pd-based membrane systems. However, at elevated temperatures and extended operation times structural changes including partial crystallinity may appear in these amorphous metallic systems. A systematic evaluation of the impact of partial crystallinity/devitrification on the diffusion and solubility behavior in multi-component Metallic Glass materials would provide great insight into the potential of these materials for hydrogen applications. This study will report on the development of time and temperature crystallization mapping and their use for interpretation of 'in-situ' hydrogen permeation at elevated temperatures.

  12. Evidence of an Intermediate Phase in bulk alloy oxide glass sysem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, S.; Boolchand, P.

    2011-03-01

    Reversibility windows have been observed in modified oxides (alkali-silicates and -germanates) and identified with Intermediate Phases(IPs). Here we find preliminary evidence of an IP in a ternary oxide glass, (B2 O3)5 (Te O2)95-x (V2O5)x , which is composed of network formers. Bulk glasses are synthesized across the 18% x 35 % composition range, and examined in Raman scattering, modulated DSC and molar volume experiments. Glass transition temperatures Tg (x) steadily decrease with V2O5 content x, and reveal the enthalpy of relaxation at Tg to show a global minimum in the 24% x < 27 range, the reversibility window (IP). Molar volumes reveal a minimum in this window. Raman scattering reveals a Boson mode, and at least six other vibrational bands in the 100cm-1 < ν < 1700cm-1 range. Compositional trends in vibrational mode strengths and frequency are established. These results will be presented in relation to glass structure evolution with vanadia content and the underlying elastic phases. Supported by NSF grant DMR 08-53957.

  13. Formation of bulk metallic glasses in the Fe-M-Y-B (M = transition metal) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, X.M. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chang, C.T. [Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Chang, Z.Y.; Wang, X.D.; Cao, Q.P. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Shen, B.L.; Inoue, A. [Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Jiang, J.Z. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    In this work, quaternary Fe{sub 72-x}M{sub x}Y{sub 6}B{sub 22} (M = Ni, Co and Mo) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have been developed. It is found that a fully amorphous Fe{sub 68}Mo{sub 4}Y{sub 6}B{sub 22} cylindrical rod with 6.5 mm in diameter can be prepared by copper mold injection. These alloys have a high glass transition temperature of about 900 K with high fracture strengths up to about 3 GPa although they are still brittle. Magnetic measurements reveal that they are ferromagnetic at ambient temperature with low coercive force of about 2 A/m, saturation magnetization of about 0.7 T and effective permeability of about 7000 at 100 kHz. The newly developed Fe-based quaternary alloys exhibit excellent combination properties: superior glass forming ability (GFA), high glass transition temperature, and soft magnetic properties, which could have potential applications in electronic industries. Furthermore, the effect of Mo addition on GFA in the Fe-Y-B BMG system has been discussed compared with those of Ni and Co additions.

  14. A new method for evaluating structural stability of bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lei; Jia, Haoling [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xie, Shenghui; Zeng, Xierong [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen University and Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, ShenZhen 518060 (China); Zhang, Tao [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Ma, Chaoli, E-mail: machaoli@buaa.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2010-08-15

    This paper proposed a new method for evaluating the structural stability of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) based on dilatometric measurements. During heating in the dilatometric experiments, the BMGs expanded continuously with increasing temperature. When the temperature reached the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), viscous shrinkage occurred due to the viscosity of material becoming lower. Since the inhomogeneous nature of the metallic glasses at atomic level, the processes of rigid expansion and the viscous shrinkage co-exist in a certain temperature region. The expansion stopped completely at a temperature (named T{sub p} here) beyond T{sub g}. The values of the temperature region, {Delta}T{sub gp} = T{sub p} - T{sub g}, and the corresponding time interval ({Delta}t{sub gp}) and the activation energy (E{sub p}) corresponding to the expansion processes, are the reflection of the structural stability of BMGs. Investigating the co-existing processes kinetically and thermodynamically, we can make an insight into the structural stability of metallic glasses. Based on this idea, the thermal expansion behaviors of Mg-, Pd-, Zr-, Ti- and Fe-based BMG were studied, and their structural stability was evaluated by the parameters of {Delta}T{sub gp}, {Delta}t{sub gp} and E{sub p}.

  15. Vitrification development and experiences at Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.; Paine, D.; Roberts, J.L.; Akgunduz, N.

    1998-01-01

    Vitrification of radioactive wastes products have proven to produce an extremely stable waste form. Vitrification involves the melting of wastes with a mixture of glass-forming additives at high temperatures; when cooled, the wastes are incorporated into a glass that is analogous to obsidian. Obsidian is a volcanic glass-like rock, commonly found in nature. A one-metric ton/day Vitrification Pilot Plant (VITPP) at Fernald, Ohio, simulated the vitrification of radium and radon bearing silo residues using representative non-radioactive surrogates. These non-radioactive surrogates contained high concentrations of lead, sulfates, and phosphates. The vitrification process was carried out at temperatures of 1150 to 1350 C. Laboratory and bench-scale treatability studies were conducted before initiation of the VITPP. Development of the glass formulas, containing up to 90% waste, will be discussed in the paper. The VITPP processed glass for seven months, until a breach of the melter containment vessel suspended operations. More than 70,000 pounds of good surrogate glass were produced by the VITPP. Experiences, lessons learned, and the planned path forward will be presented

  16. Ductile Bulk Aluminum-Based Alloy with Good Glass-Forming Ability and High Strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-Chao, Zhuo; Shu-Jie, Pang; Hui, Wang; Tao, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Based on a new approach for designing glassy alloy compositions, bulk Al-based alloys with good glass-forming ability (GFA) are synthesized. The cast Al 86 Si 0.5 Ni 4.06 Co 2.94 Y 6 Sc 0.5 rod with a diameter of 1 mm shows almost fully amorphous structure besides about 5% fcc-Al nucleated in the center of the rod. The bulk alloy with high Al concentration exhibits an ultrahigh yield strength of 1.18 GPa and maximum strength of 1.27 GPa as well as an obvious plastic strain of about 2.4% during compressive deformation. This light Al-based alloy with good GFA and mechanical properties is promising as a new high specific strength material with good deformability. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  17. Comparison of mechanical behavior between bulk and ribbon Cu-based metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, W.H.; Liu, F.X.; Wang, Y.D.; Zhang, H.F.; Choo, H.; Liaw, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    As-cast bulk and as-spun ribbon Cu 60 Zr 30 Ti 10 metallic glasses were characterized using differential-scanning calorimetry and instrumented nanoindentation. Two alloys show a significant difference in the amount of free volume, which is attributed to the difference in a cooling rate, while exhibiting a similar serrated plastic flow. Atomic-force-microscopy observations demonstrate the pile-ups containing shear bands around the indents in both alloys. The as-cast bulk alloy has higher hardness and elastic modulus than the as-spun ribbon alloy. The difference in the strengths of two alloys may be related to the different amount of free volume. The strength seems to be more sensitive to a cooling rate during solidification than the plastic-flow behavior in the Cu 60 Zr 30 Ti 10

  18. Cu-Zr-Ag bulk metallic glasses based on Cu8Zr5 icosahedron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Junhai; Qiang Jianbing; Wang Yingmin; Wang Qing; Dong Chuang

    2007-01-01

    Based on the cluster line criterion, the Ag addition into the Cu 8 Zr 5 cluster composition is investigated for the search of ternary Cu-Zr-Ag bulk metallic glasses with high glass forming abilities. Two initial binary compositions Cu 0.618 Zr 0.382 and Cu 0.64 Zr 0.36 are selected. The former one corresponds to a deep eutectic point; it is also the composition of the Cu 8 Zr 5 icosahedron, which is derived from the Cu 8 Zr 3 structure. The latter one, which can be regarded as the Cu 8 Zr 5 cluster plus a glue atom Cu, is the best glass-forming composition in the Cu-Zr binary system. Two composition lines (Cu 0.618 Zr 0.382 ) 1-x Ag x and (Cu 0.64 Zr 0.36 ) 1-x Ag x are thus constructed in the Cu-Zr-Ag system by linking these two compositions with the third constitute Ag. A series of Cu-Zr-Ag bulk metallic glasses are found with 2-8 at.% Ag contents in both composition lines. The optimum composition (Cu 0.618 Zr 0.382 ) 0.92 Ag 0.08 within the searched region with the highest T g /T l = 0.633, is located along the cluster line (Cu 0.618 Zr 0.382 ) 1-x Ag x , where the deep eutectic Cu 0.618 Zr 0.382 exactly corresponds to the dense packing cluster Cu 8 Zr 5 . The alloying mechanism is discussed in the light of atomic size and electron concentration factors

  19. Preparation and characterization of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses in form of plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilarczyk, Wirginia, E-mail: wirginia.pilarczyk@polsl.pl

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Zr-based BMGs in form of plate was successful produced by die pressure casting method. • Many techniques have been used to characterize the structure of Zr{sub 55}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 5}Al{sub 10} alloy. • The calculated GFA parameters show that the alloy exhibits satisfactory GFA. • The studies reveal that tested as-cast Zr-based alloy is in amorphous state. - Abstract: Zr-based bulk metallic glasses present an interesting combination of physical, chemical and mechanical properties. During the last decade, intensive progress has been made and a number of applications have been suggested for these materials. In order to successfully apply these materials, it is necessary to accurately characterize their structure, thermal stability and other properties accurately. The aim of the presented work is the manufacturing, examination of the structure of selected Zr-based bulk metallic alloys and confirmation of an amorphous structure using X-ray analysis, microscopic observation and thermal analysis. In this work, the Zr-based bulk metallic glasses in form of plate was successful produced by die pressure casting method. Designed scientific station for casting zirconium based amorphous alloys in the form of plates and rods with selected dimensions is in our university a comprehensive method for achieving amorphous materials which enables us to maintain repeatability of as-cast samples with the amorphous structure and the assumed dimensions range. The diffraction pattern and exothermic reaction as well as the fracture surface morphology reveal that studied as-cast Zr-based alloy is in amorphous state. The calculated GFA parameters show that the alloy exhibits satisfactory glass-forming ability in form of studied plate. These obtained values can suggest that studied alloys are suitable materials for further planned practical application at welding process. The success of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses production in form of plate with obtained sizes is

  20. Bulk and microscale compressive behavior of a Zr-based metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Y.H.; Lee, C.J.; Cheng, Y.T.; Chou, H.S.; Chen, H.M.; Du, X.H.; Chang, C.I.; Huang, J.C.; Jian, S.R.; Jang, J.S.C.; Nieh, T.G.

    2008-01-01

    Micropillars with diameters of 3.8, 1 and 0.7 μm were fabricated from a two-phase Zr-based metallic glass using focus ion beam (FIB), and then tested in compression at strain rates from 1 x 10 -4 to 1 x 10 -2 s -1 . The apparent yield strength of the micropillars ranges from 1992 to 2972 MPa, or 25-86% increase over that of the bulk specimens. This strength increase can be rationalized by the Weibull statistics for brittle materials

  1. Ti-based bulk metallic glass with high cold workability at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.M.; Park, J.S.; Kim, J.H.; Lee, M.H.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, W.T.

    2005-01-01

    The cold workability of Ti-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have been investigated. Ti 45 Zr 16 Be 20 Cu 10 Ni 9 BMG with a large compressive plastic strain of 4.7% shows a high cold workability, i.e. total reduction ratio of 50% by cold rolling at room temperature. The multiple shear bands formed during rolling are effective in enhancing the plasticity. The cold rolled Ti 45 Zr 16 Be 20 Cu 10 Ni 9 BMG (reduction ratio: 30%) exhibits a large plastic strain of ∝14%. (orig.)

  2. Enhancement of room-temperature plasticity in a bulk metallic glass by finely dispersed porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Takeshi; Inoue, Akihisa; Greer, Alan Lindsay

    2005-01-01

    Melts of Pd 42.5 Cu 30 Ni 7.5 P 20 (at. %) held under pressurized hydrogen are cast into bulk metallic glass (BMG) rods with fine (20-30 μm diameter) pores uniformly dispersed. The low overall porosities ( -3 , compared to 16 MJ m -3 for the pore-free BMG. The pores force the proliferation of shear bands below the overall failure stress, a process of interest for toughening BMGs, materials for which shear localization in deformation restricts structural applications

  3. Electron beam welding of the dissimilar Zr-based bulk metallic glass and Ti metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jonghyun [Department of Material Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: joindoc@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Kawamura, Y. [Department of Material Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    We successfully welded 3 mm thick Zr{sub 41}Be{sub 23}Ti{sub 14}Cu{sub 12}Ni{sub 10} bulk metallic glass plate to Ti metal by electron beam welding with a beam irradiated 0.4 mm on the BMG side of the interface. There was no crystallization or defects in the weld because changes in the chemical composition of the weld metal were prevented. Bending showed that the welded sample had a higher strength than the Ti base metal. The interface had a 10 {mu}m thick interdiffusion layer of Zr and Ti.

  4. Analysis on the phase transition behavior of Cu base bulk metallic glass by electrical resistivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Young Su; Chung, Sung Jae; Ok, Myoung-Ryul; Hong, Kyung Tae; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Byeon, Jai Won; Yoon, Jin-Kook; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyung Sub

    2007-01-01

    The crystallization behavior of Cu 43 Zr 43 Al 7 Ag 7 (numbers indicate at.%) bulk metallic glass was investigated using the isothermal electrical resistivity measurements at 450 deg. C in the supercooled liquid region. The crystallization process is a single step phase transformation. To analyze the electrical resistivity reduction, microstructure evolutions were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. The Avrami parameter of the electrical resistivity reduction step was 1.73, indicating that the crystallization process is a diffusion-controlled growth of intermetallic compounds with decreasing nucleation rate

  5. Thermodynamic modeling of the insoluble phases in the nuclear waste glasses. Application to the vitrification of molybdenum and of platinoid fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    calculations in relation with the industrial vitrification process. The thermodynamic calculations in the ternary oxide System Na_2O-SiO_2-MoO_3 revealed the possible equilibrium of two immiscible liquids. The thermodynamic solubility of the molybdenum in the melt is clearly characterized. These calculations enable to determine the nature and the proportion of the molybdate phases formed when the glass is cooled and allow to calculate the equilibrium vapor pressure of these phases. As an example, some application calculations on the platinoid system at the composition of the industrial fission product flow reveal the formation of metallic and oxide phases. They also evaluate the influence of the introduction of a variable amount of selenium and tellurium on the phases formed. The calculation of the evolution of the proportion and of the composition of the phases at the equilibrium helps to manage the consequences of their formation on the process. (author) [fr

  6. Effect of Si addition on glass-forming ability and mechanical properties of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekan, M.; Shabestari, S.G.; Zhang, W.; Seyedein, S.H.; Gholamipour, R.; Makino, A.; Inoue, A.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: The Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 alloy has a surprising GFA, and the glassy rods with diameter of 10 mm have been produced in this research. It has not been reported that the Cu-based glassy rods (Cu ≥ 50 at.%) to be produced with the critical diameter greater than 10 mm. The novelty of this research is that the glass formation has been improved and the critical diameter increased to 12 mm for the alloy having x = 1 with the addition of Si. Different criteria are used to evaluate the influence of Si content on the GFA, and the possible mechanisms involved in the achievement of this GFA are also discussed. - Abstract: The effect of Si addition on the glass-forming ability (GFA) and mechanical properties of (Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 ) 100-x Si x (x = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 at.%) alloys were investigated. The GFA of Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 alloy is improved by addition of a small amount of Si, and the critical diameter for glass formation increases from 10 mm for the alloy with x = 0-12 mm for the alloy with x = 1 when prepared using copper mold casting. Different criteria are used to evaluate the influence of Si content on the GFA, and the possible mechanisms involved in the achievement of this GFA are also discussed. In the uniaxial compression, the bulk glassy alloys exhibit a limited plastic strain of less than 1%, but the compressive fracture strength and Young's modulus were obtained in high values of 1969-2129 MPa and 101-144 GPa, respectively. Fracture surface and shear bands of samples were studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  7. Tuning glass formation and brittle behaviors by similar solvent element substitution in (Mn,Fe)-based bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tao [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Ran, E-mail: liran@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xiao, Ruijuan [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Gang [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, Jianfeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Zhang, Tao, E-mail: zhangtao@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-02-25

    A family of Mn-rich bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was developed through the similar solvent elements (SSE) substitution of Mn for Fe in (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 80−x})P{sub 10}B{sub 7}C{sub 3} alloys. The effect of the SSE substitution on glass formation, thermal stability, elastic constants, mechanical properties, fracture morphologies, Weibull modulus and indentation fracture toughness was discussed. A thermodynamics analysis provided by Battezzati et al. (L. Battezzati, E. Garrone, Z. Metallkd. 75 (1984) 305–310) was adopted to explain the compositional dependence of the glass-forming ability (GFA). The elastic moduli follow roughly linear correlations with the substitution concentration of Mn in (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 80−x})P{sub 10}B{sub 7}C{sub 3} BMGs. The introduction of Mn to replace Fe significantly decreases the plasticity of the resulting BMGs and the Weibull modulus of the fracture strength. A super-brittle Mn-based BMGs of (Mn{sub 55}Fe{sub 25})P{sub 10}B{sub 7}C{sub 3} BMGs were found with the indentation fracture toughness (K{sub c}) of 1.91±0.04 MPa m{sup 1/2}, the lowest value among all kinds of BMGs so far. The atomic and electronic structure of the selected BMGs were simulated by the first principles molecular dynamics calculations based on density functional theory, which provided a possible understanding of the brittleness caused by the similar chemical element replacement of Mn for Fe.

  8. FeSiBP bulk metallic glasses with high magnetization and excellent magnetic softness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Akihiro [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: amakino@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Kubota, Takeshi; Chang, Chuntao [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Makabe, Masahiro [Makabe R and D Co., Ltd., 3-1-25 Nagatake, Sendai 983-0036 (Japan); Inoue, Akihisa [Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    Fe-based amorphous alloy ribbons are one of the major soft magnetic materials, because of their superior magnetic properties such as the relatively high saturation magnetization (J{sub s}) of 1.5-1.6 T and good magnetic softness. However, the preparation of the ordinary amorphous magnetic alloys requires cooling rates higher than 10{sup 4} K/s due to the low glass-forming ability (GFA) and thus restricts the material outer shape. Recently, Fe-metalloid-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) containing glass-forming elements such as Al, Ga, Nb, Mo, Y and so forth have been developed. These alloys have high GFA, leading to the formation of BMG rod with diameters of mm-order. However, the glass-forming metal elements in BMGs result in a remarkable decrease in magnetization. Basically, J{sub s} depends on Fe content; hence, high J{sub s} requires high Fe content in the Fe-based amorphous alloys or BMGs. On the other hand, high GFA requires a large amount of glass-forming elements in the alloys, which results in lower Fe content. Therefore, in substances, the coexistence of high J{sub s} and high GFA is difficult. Since this matter should be immensely important from academia to industry in the material field, a great deal of effort has been devoted; however, it has remained unsolved for many years. In this paper, we present a novel Fe-rich FeSiBP BMG with high J{sub s} of 1.51 T comparable to the ordinary Fe-Si-B amorphous alloy now in practical use as well as with high GFA leading to a rod-shaped specimen of 2.5 mm in diameter, obtained by Cu-mold casting in air.

  9. Formation of hydroxyapatite on Ti-coated Ti-Zr-Cu-Pd bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, F.X.; Wang, X.M.; Wada, T.; Xie, G.Q.; Asami, K.; Inoue, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this research, Ti coating was conducted on Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 bulk metallic glass (BMG) in order to increase the formation rate of hydroxyapatite layer. The formation behavior of bone-like hydroxyapatite on Ti-coated and uncoated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was studied. The surface morphology of Ti-coated and uncoated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 BMG was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results revealed that the alkali pretreatment in 5 M NaOH solution at 60degC for 24 h had a beneficial effect on the formation of porous sodium titanate on Ti-coated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 BMG. A bone-like hydroxyapatite layer was able to form on the alkali-treated Ti-coated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 BMG after a short-time immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). On the contrary, hydroxyapatite formation was not observed on the uncoated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 BMG after the same chemical treatments. (author)

  10. Hypervelocity impact on Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, W.; Huang, Y.J.; Pang, B.J.; Shen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Hypervelocity impact experiments were performed on a bulk metallic glass. → Morphology of the bullet hole presents three different regions. → The post-impact samples keep glassy structure. → Mechanical properties of the post-impact samples were studied by nanoindentation. → Mechanical properties of the post-impact samples were discussed by free-volume model. - Abstract: In this study, the hypervelocity impact experiments were performed on Zr 51 Ti 5 Ni 10 Cu 25 Al 9 bulk metallic glass using a two-stage light gas gun. The morphologies of the bullet holes exhibit three different regions: melting area, vein-pattern area, and radiating core feature area, suggesting that various regions experience different stress states during the hypervelocity impact. For the post-impact samples, the nano-hardness increases and plastic deformability decreases both with the increase in the distance from the bullet hole and with the decrease in the impact velocity, which is discussed by means of spherical stress wave theory and free-volume model.

  11. Hot Embossing of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Micropart Using Stacked Silicon Dies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijing Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated hot embossing of Zr65Cu17.5Ni10Al7.5 bulk metallic glass micropart using stacked silicon dies. Finite element simulation was carried out, suggesting that it could reduce the stress below 400 MPa in the silicon dies and enhance the durability of the brittle silicon dies when using varying load mode (100 N for 60 s and then 400 N for 60 s compared with using constant load mode (200 N for 120 s. A micropart with good appearance was fabricated under the varying load, and no silicon die failure was observed, in agreement with the simulation. The amorphous state of the micropart was confirmed by differential scanning calorimeter and X-ray diffraction, and the nanohardness and Young’s modulus were validated close to those of the as-cast BMG rods by nanoindentation tests. The results proved that it was feasible to adopt the varying load mode to fabricate three-dimensional Zr-based bulk metallic glass microparts by hot embossing process.

  12. Formation and properties of two-phase bulk metallic glasses by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Guoqiang, E-mail: xiegq@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Louzguine-Luzgin, D.V. [WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Inoue, Akihisa [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: > Two-phase bulk metallic glasses with high strength and good soft magnetic properties as well as satisfying large-size requirements were produced by spark plasma sintering. > Effects of sintering temperature on thermal stability, microstructure, mechanical and magnetic properties were investigated. > Densified samples were obtained by the spark plasma sintering at above 773 K. - Abstract: Using a mixture of the gas-atomized Ni{sub 52.5}Nb{sub 10}Zr{sub 15}Ti{sub 15}Pt{sub 7.5} and Fe{sub 73}Si{sub 7}B{sub 17}Nb{sub 3} glassy alloy powders, we produced the two-phase bulk metallic glass (BMG) with high strength and good soft magnetic properties as well as satisfying large-size requirements by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) process. Two kinds of glassy particulates were homogeneously dispersed each other. With an increase in sintering temperature, density of the produced samples increased, and densified samples were obtained by the SPS process at above 773 K. Good bonding state among the Ni- and Fe-based glassy particulates was achieved.

  13. Enhancement of plasticity of Fe-based bulk metallic glass by Ni substitution for Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, S.F. [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, N.; Zhang, C. [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Liu, L., E-mail: sfguo2005@163.co [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2010-08-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) (Fe{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}){sub 71}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 12}C{sub 10}B{sub 2} (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.2) with a diameter of 3 mm were synthesized by copper mold casting. The effect of Ni substitution for Fe on the structure, thermal and mechanical properties has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and compressive testing. It was found that the substitution of Ni for Fe enhances the glass forming ability, and improves the plasticity of Fe{sub 71}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 12}C{sub 10}B{sub 2} BMG as indicated by the increase in the plastic strain from 3.1% (x = 0) to 5.2% (x = 0.2). The improvement of the plasticity is discussed in term of the reduction of glass transition temperature and the supercooled liquid region due to the substitution of Ni for Fe.

  14. Analysis of atomic mobility in a Cu38Zr46Ag8Al8 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, J.C.; Pelletier, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Atomic mobility in Cu 38 Zr 46 Ag 8 Al 8 bulk metallic glass have been investigated by DMA. ► Loss factor is directly connected to the energy lost during application of the stress. ► Structural relaxation and crystallization induces a decrease of the atomic mobility. ► The concentration of quasi-point defects links to atomic mobility in metallic glasses. - Abstract: Atomic mobility in as-cast and annealed Cu 38 Zr 46 Ag 8 Al 8 bulk metallic glass samples is analyzed by performing dynamic mechanical analysis. The loss factor is directly connected to the energy lost during application of the stress. Structural relaxation process and crystallization lead to a decrease of the atomic mobility in the bulk metallic glass. A physical model, based on the concept of quasi point defects is introduced, to describe the atomic mobility. Movements in amorphous materials are correlated. The correlation factor χ reflects the atomic mobility in bulk metallic glasses: structural relaxation and crystallization lead to a decrease of χ, implying the reduction of atomic mobility. The evolution of elastic, visco-elastic and viscoplastic components after structural relaxation and partial crystallization state during the mechanical response has been obtained. Compared with as-cast state, structural relaxation induced an increase of elastic component and a decrease of visco-elastic component in the metallic glass.

  15. Vitrification of high level wastes in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.

    1984-02-01

    A brief historical background of the research and development work conducted in France over 25 years is first presented. Then, the papers deals with the vitrification at (1) the UP1 reprocessing plant (Marcoule) and (2) the UP2 and UP3 reprocessing plants (La Hague). 1) The properties of glass required for high-level radioactive waste vitrification are recalled. The vitrification process and facility of Marcoule are presented. (2) The average characteristics (chemical composition, activity) of LWR fission product solution are given. The glass formulations developed to solidify LWR waste solution must meet the same requirements as those used in the UP1 facility at Marcoule. Three important aspects must be considered with respect to the glass fabrication process: corrosiveness of the molten glass with regard to metals, viscosity of the molten glass, and, volatization during glass fabrication. The glass properties required in view of interim storage and long-term disposal are then largely developed. Two identical vitrification facilities are planned for the site: T7, to process the UP2 throughput, and T7 for the UP3 plant. A prototype unit was built and operated at Marcoule

  16. Elastic properties of Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk glass in supercooled liquid region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishiyama, N.; Inoue, A.; Jiang, Jianzhong

    2001-01-01

    In situ ultrasonic measurements for the Pd40Cu30Ni10P20 bulk glass in three states: Glassy solid, supercooled liquid, and crystalline, have been performed. It is found that velocities of both longitudinal and transverse waves and elastic moduli (shear modulus, bulk modulus, Young's modulus......, and Lame parameter), together with Debye temperature, gradually decrease with increasing temperature through the glass transition temperature as the Poisson's ratio increases. The behavior of the velocity of transverse wave vs. temperature in the supercooled liquid region could be explained by viscosity...

  17. The structural relaxation effect on the nanomechanical properties of a Ti-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yongjiang, E-mail: yjhuang@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Key Laboratory of Micro-Systems and Micro-Structures Manufacturing, Harbin Institute of Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou, Binjun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chiu, YuLung, E-mail: y.chiu@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Fan, Hongbo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Dongjun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Key Laboratory of Micro-Systems and Micro-Structures Manufacturing, Harbin Institute of Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150001 (China); Sun, Jianfei; Shen, Jun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • The effect of structural relaxation on the nano-mechanical behaviors of BMGs is studied. • The indent load at first pop-in event, the hardness and Young’s modulus are enhanced after annealing. • The differences in nanomechanical properties can be attributed to their different atomic structure. - Abstract: Indentation experiments were performed on the as-cast and the annealed Ti-based bulk metallic glass samples to investigate the effect of structural relaxation on the nanomechanical behaviors of the material. The onset of pop-in event, Young’s modulus, and hardness were found to be sensitive to the structural relaxation of the testing material. The difference in nanomechanical properties between the as-cast and annealed BMG samples is interpreted in terms of free volume theory.

  18. Characterization of mechanically alloyed Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites containing carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, C.F. [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, No. 2, Beining Road, Keelung (China); Lin, H.M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, No.40, Sec. 3, Jhongshan N. Rd. Jhongshan District, Taipei 104 Taiwan (China); Lee, P.Y.

    2008-11-15

    This study explored the feasibility of preparing CNT/Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 28}Ni{sub 15}Sn{sub 7} bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites though powder metallurgy route. The CNT/Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 28}Ni{sub 15}Sn{sub 7} BMG composites were obtained by consolidating the 8h mechanically alloyed composite powders by vacuum hot pressing process. A significant increase in hardness (9.34 GPa) and fracture strength (1937 MPa) was achieved for the Ti{sub 50}Cu{sub 28}Ni{sub 15}Sn{sub 7} BMG composites containing 12 vol. % CNT. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. The structural relaxation effect on the nanomechanical properties of a Ti-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Yongjiang; Zhou, Binjun; Chiu, YuLung; Fan, Hongbo; Wang, Dongjun; Sun, Jianfei; Shen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of structural relaxation on the nano-mechanical behaviors of BMGs is studied. • The indent load at first pop-in event, the hardness and Young’s modulus are enhanced after annealing. • The differences in nanomechanical properties can be attributed to their different atomic structure. - Abstract: Indentation experiments were performed on the as-cast and the annealed Ti-based bulk metallic glass samples to investigate the effect of structural relaxation on the nanomechanical behaviors of the material. The onset of pop-in event, Young’s modulus, and hardness were found to be sensitive to the structural relaxation of the testing material. The difference in nanomechanical properties between the as-cast and annealed BMG samples is interpreted in terms of free volume theory

  20. Development of friction welding process of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyung Seop; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2004-01-01

    Bulk Metallic Glasses(BMG) with good mechanical properties have problems that engineering application fields have been limited because of limitation of the alloy size. In order to solving this problem, the friction welding of BMG has been tried using the superplastic-like deformation behavior under the supercooled liquid region. The apparatus for friction welding test was designed and constructed using pneumatic cylinder and gripper based on a conventional lathe. Friction welding have been tried to combination of same BMG alloy and crystalline alloys. The results of welding test were evaluated by X-ray diffraction, measurement of hardness and mechanical properties test. In order to obtain the optimized welding test conditions the temperature of friction interface was measured using Infrared thermal imager

  1. Influence of air and vacuum environment on fatigue behavior of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G.Y.; Liaw, P.K.; Yokoyama, Y.; Peter, W.H.; Yang, B.; Freels, M.; Buchanan, R.A.; Liu, C.T.; Brooks, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue (HCF) experiments in air and vacuum at room temperature were conducted on zirconium (Zr)-based bulk-metallic glasses (BMGs): Zr 50 Cu 40 Al 10 , Zr 50 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 10 , and Zr 50 Cu 37 Al 10 Pd 3 in atomic percent. The fatigue-endurance limit of Zr 50 Cu 37 Al 10 Pd 3 was found to be significantly greater than those of Zr 50 Cu 40 Al 10 and Zr 50 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 10 , which indicates that the inclusions of Pd and the resulting nano structures improve the fatigue resistances of the Zr-based BMGs. The fatigue lives in vacuum and air were generally found to be comparable

  2. Dynamic strength behavior of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass under shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yu-Ying; Xi Feng; Dai Cheng-Da; Cai Ling-Cang; Tan Ye; Li Xue-Mei; Wu Qiang; Tan Hua

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic strength behavior of Zr 51 Ti 5 Ni 10 Cu 25 Al 9 bulk metallic glass (BMG) up to 66 GPa was investigated in a series of plate impact shock-release and shock-reload experiments. Particle velocity profiles measured at the sample/LiF window interface were used to estimate the shear stress, shear modulus, and yield stress in shocked BMG. Beyond confirming the previously reported strain-softening of shear stress during the shock loading process for BMGs, it is also shown that the softened Zr-BMG still has a high shear modulus and can support large yield stress when released or reloaded from the shocked state, and both the shear modulus and the yield stress appear as strain-hardening behaviors. The work provides a much clearer picture of the strength behavior of BMGs under shock loading, which is useful to comprehensively understand the plastic deformation mechanisms of BMGs. (paper)

  3. Positron annihilation studies on bulk metallic glass and high intensity positron beam developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Stoeffl, W.

    2003-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy is an ideal probe to examine atomic scale open-volume regions in materials. Below, we summarize the recent results on studies of open-volume regions of a multicomponent Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be bulk metallic glass. Our studies establish two types of open-volume regions, one group that is too shallow to trap positrons at room temperature and becomes effective only at low temperatures and the other group that localizes positrons at room temperature and is large enough to accommodate hydrogen. The second half of the paper will concentrate on the high intensity positron program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A new positron production target is under development and we are constructing two experimental end stations to accommodate a pulsed positron microprobe and an experiment on positron diffraction and holography. Important design considerations of these experiments will be described. (author)

  4. Micromechanical modeling of tungsten-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Li Ke [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, TAMU 3123, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)]. E-mail: keli@tamu.edu; Subhash, Ghatu [Department of Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Drive, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); Kecskes, Laszlo J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Dowding, Robert J. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Micromechanics models are developed for tungsten (W)-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) matrix composites employing the Voronoi tessellation technique and the finite element (FE) method. The simulation results indicate that the computed elastic moduli are close to those measured in the experiments. The predicted stress-strain curves agree well with their experimentally obtained counterparts in the early stage of the plastic deformation. An increase in the W volume fraction leads to a decrease in the yield stress and an increase in the Young's modulus of the composite. In addition, contours of equivalent plastic strain for increasing applied strains provide an explanation why shear bands were observed in the glassy phase, along the W/BMG interface, and in the W phase of failed W/BMG composite specimens.

  5. Engineering report of plasma vitrification of Hanford tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides an analysis of vendor-derived testing and technology applicability to full scale glass production from Hanford tank wastes using plasma vitrification. The subject vendor testing and concept was applied in support of the Hanford LLW Vitrification Program, Tank Waste Remediation System

  6. Healing of interfaces of high and ultra-high-molecular- weight polystyrene below the bulk glass transition temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiko, Yuri M.; Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    into contact to themselves below the glass transition temperature T-g of the bulk Tg-bulk, in a lap-shear joint geometry, at a constant healing temperature T-h for a healing time t(h) of 10 min to 24 h. The lap-shear strength sigma of the symmetric HMWPS-HMWPS and UHMWPS-URMWPS interfaces has been measured...

  7. Fatigue and corrosion of a Pd-based bulk metallic glass in various environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, L.Y. [East Los Angeles College, Monterey Park, CA 91754 (United States); Roberts, S.N. [Keck Laboratory of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Baca, N. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Wiest, A. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Norco, CA (United States); Garrett, S.J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Conner, R.D., E-mail: rdconner@csun.edu [Department of Manufacturing Systems Engineering and Management, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff St., Mail Code 8295, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) possess attractive properties for biomedical applications, including high strength, hardness and corrosion resistance, and low elastic modulus. In this study, we conduct rotating beam fatigue tests on Pd{sub 43}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 27}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass in air and Eagle's medium (EM) and measure the corrosive resistance of the alloy by submersion in acidic and basic electrolytes. Fatigue results are compared to those of commonly used biometals in EM. Rotating beam fatigue tests conducted in air and in Eagle's medium show no deterioration in fatigue properties in this potentially corrosive environment out to 10{sup 7} cycles. A specimen size effect is revealed when comparing fatigue results to those of a similar alloy of larger minimum dimensions. Corrosion tests show that the alloy is not affected by highly basic (NaOH) or saline (NaCl) solutions, nor in EM, and is affected by chlorinated acidic solutions (HCl) to a lesser extent than other commonly used biometals. Corrosion in HCl initiates with selective leaching of late transition metals, followed by dissolution of Pd. - Highlights: • Fatigue limit of 600 MPa with no deterioration when exposed to Eagle's medium. • Fatigue shows sample size effect. • Pd-based BMG is unaffected by saline or strong basic solutions. • Pd-based BMG is substantially more resistant to chlorinated acids than CoCrMo, 316 L Stainless, or Ti6Al4V alloys. • Corrosion shows selective leaching of late transition metals, followed by Pd and P.

  8. Biocompatibility study on Ni-free Ti-based and Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T.H. [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wong, P.C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, S.F. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tsai, P.H. [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Jang, J.S.C., E-mail: jscjang@ncu.edu.tw [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Huang, J.C. [Department of Materials and Optoelectronic Science, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2017-06-01

    Safety and reliability are crucial issues for medical instruments and implants. In the past few decays, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have drawn attentions due to their superior mechanical properties, good corrosion resistance, antibacterial and good biocompatibility. However, most Zr-based and Ti-based BMGs contain Ni as an important element which is prone to human allergy problem. In this study, the Ni-free Ti-based and Zr-based BMGs, Ti{sub 40}Zr{sub 10}Cu{sub 36}Pd{sub 14}, and Zr{sub 48}Cu{sub 36}Al{sub 8}Ag{sub 8}, were selected for systematical evaluation of their biocompatibility. Several biocompatibility tests, co-cultural with L929 murine fibroblast cell line, were carried out on these two BMGs, as well as the comparison samples of Ti6Al4V and pure Cu. The results in terms of cellular adhesion, cytotoxicity, and metallic ion release affection reveal that the Ti{sub 40}Zr{sub 10}Cu{sub 36}Pd{sub 14} BMG and Ti6Al4V exhibit the optimum biocompatibility; cells still being attached on the petri dish with good adhesion and exhibiting the spindle shape after direct contact test. Furthermore, the Ti{sub 40}Zr{sub 10}Cu{sub 36}Pd{sub 14} BMG showed very low Cu ion release level, in agreement with the MTT results. Based on the current findings, it is believed that Ni-free Ti-based BMG can act as an ideal candidate for medical implant. - Highlight: • Ni-free bulk metallic glass is promising material for medical implants. • Ni-free Ti-based BMG presents similar cellular adhesion as Ti6Al4V. • Ni-free Ti-based BMG shows less cytotoxicity, and metallic ion release than Ti6Al4V.

  9. Ellipsometry measurements of glass transition breadth in bulk films of random, block, and gradient copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, M M; Kim, J; Marrou, S R; Torkelson, J M

    2010-03-01

    Bulk films of random, block and gradient copolymer systems were studied using ellipsometry to demonstrate the applicability of the numerical differentiation technique pioneered by Kawana and Jones for studying the glass transition temperature (T (g)) behavior and thermal expansivities of copolymers possessing different architectures and different levels of nanoheterogeneity. In a series of styrene/n -butyl methacrylate (S/nBMA) random copolymers, T (g) breadths were observed to increase from approximately 17( degrees ) C in styrene-rich cases to almost 30( degrees ) C in nBMA-rich cases, reflecting previous observations of significant nanoheterogeneity in PnBMA homopolymers. The derivative technique also revealed for the first time a substantial increase in glassy-state expansivity with increasing nBMA content in S/nBMA random copolymers, from 1.4x10(-4) K-1 in PS to 3.5x10(-4) K-1 in PnBMA. The first characterization of block copolymer T (g) 's and T (g) breadths by ellipsometry is given, examining the impact of nanophase-segregated copolymer structure on ellipsometric measurements of glass transition. The results show that, while the technique is effective in detecting the two T (g) 's expected in certain block copolymer systems, the details of the glass transition can become suppressed in ellipsometry measurements of a rubbery minor phase under conditions where the matrix is glassy; meanwhile, both transitions are easily discernible by differential scanning calorimetry. Finally, broad glass transition regions were measured in gradient copolymers, yielding in some cases extraordinary T (g) breadths of 69- 71( degrees ) C , factors of 4-5 larger than the T (g) breadths of related homopolymers and random copolymers. Surprisingly, one gradient copolymer demonstrated a slightly narrower T (g) breadth than the S/nBMA random copolymers with the highest nBMA content. This highlights the fact that nanoheterogeneity relevant to the glass transition response in selected

  10. Silicate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.

    1988-01-01

    Vitrification of liquid high-level radioactive wastes has received the greatest attention, world-wide, compared to any other HLW solidification process. The waste form is a borosilicate-based glass. The production of phosphate-based glass has been abandoned in the western world. Only in the Soviet Union are phosphate-based glasses still being developed. Vitrification techniques, equipment and processes and their remote operation have been developed and studied for almost thirty years and have reached a high degree of technical maturity. Industrial demonstration of the vitrification process has been in progress since 1978. This chapter is a survey of world-wide research and development efforts in nuclear waste glasses and its production technology. The principal glasses considered are silicate glasses which contain boron, i.e., borosilicate glasses

  11. In-situ ductile metal/bulk metallic glass matrix composites formed by chemical partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choong Paul; Hays, Charles C.; Johnson, William L.

    2004-03-23

    A composite metal object comprises ductile crystalline metal particles in an amorphous metal matrix. An alloy is heated above its liquidus temperature. Upon cooling from the high temperature melt, the alloy chemically partitions, forming dendrites in the melt. Upon cooling the remaining liquid below the glass transition temperature it freezes to the amorphous state, producing a two-phase microstructure containing crystalline particles in an amorphous metal matrix. The ductile metal particles have a size in the range of from 0.1 to 15 micrometers and spacing in the range of from 0.1 to 20 micrometers. Preferably, the particle size is in the range of from 0.5 to 8 micrometers and spacing is in the range of from 1 to 10 micrometers. The volume proportion of particles is in the range of from 5 to 50% and preferably 15 to 35%. Differential cooling can produce oriented dendrites of ductile metal phase in an amorphous matrix. Examples are given in the Zr--Ti--Cu--Ni--Be alloy bulk glass forming system with added niobium.

  12. Feasibility of using bulk metallic glass for self-expandable stent applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen Kumar, Gideon; Jafary-Zadeh, Mehdi; Tavakoli, Rouhollah; Cui, Fangsen

    2017-10-01

    Self-expandable stents are widely used to restore blood flow in a diseased artery segment by keeping the artery open after angioplasty. Despite the prevalent use of conventional crystalline metallic alloys, for example, nitinol, to construct self-expandable stents, new biomaterials such as bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are being actively pursued to improve stent performance. Here, we conducted a series of analyses including finite element analysis and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the feasibility of using a prototypical Zr-based BMG for self-expandable stent applications. We model stent crimping of several designs for different percutaneous applications. Our results indicate that BMG-based stents with diamond-shaped crowns suffer from severe localization of plastic deformation and abrupt failure during crimping. As a possible solution, we further illustrate that such abrupt failure could be avoided in BMG-based stents without diamond shape crowns. This work would open a new horizon for a quest toward exploiting superior mechanical and functional properties of metallic glasses to design future stents. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 1874-1882, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cluster-based bulk metallic glass formation in Fe-Si-B-Nb alloy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, C L; Wang, Q; Li, F W; Li, Y H; Wang, Y M; Dong, C [State Key Laboratory of Materials Modification, Dalian University of Technology (DUT), Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, W; Inoue, A, E-mail: dong@dlut.edu.c [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-Ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass formations have been explored in Fe-B-Si-Nb alloy system using the so-called atomic cluster line approach in combination with minor alloying guideline. The atomic cluster line refers to a straight line linking binary cluster to the third element in a ternary system. The basic ternary compositions in Fe-B-Si system are determined by the inetersection points of two cluster lines, namely Fe-B cluster to Si and Fe-Si cluster to B, and then further alloyed with 3-5 at. % Nb for enhancing glass forming abilities. BMG rods with a diameter of 3 mm are formed under the case of minor Nb alloying the basic intersecting compositions of Fe{sub 8}B{sub 3}-Si with Fe{sub 12}Si-B and Fe{sub 8}B{sub 2}-Si with Fe{sub 9}Si-B. The BMGs also exhibit high Vickers hardness (H{sub v}) of 1130-1164 and high Young's modulous (E) of 170-180 GPa

  14. FeNbB bulk metallic glass with high boron content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica, M.; Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 270016, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Hajlaoui, Khalil; Yavari, Alain Reza [LTPCM-CNRS, I.N.P. Grenoble, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP 75, F-38402 University Campus (France)

    2007-07-01

    Fe-based alloys able to form magnetic bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are of the type transition metal - metalloid and often contain 5 or more elements. Usually, the metalloid content is around 20 atomic %. Very recently, the Fe{sub 66}Nb{sub 4}B{sub 30} alloy was found to be able to form BMG by copper mold casting technique, despite its high metalloid content. Several composition with boron contents around 30 at. % or even higher were calculated since 1993 as possible compositions of the remaining amorphous matrix after the first stage of nanocrystallization of Finemet-type Fe{sub 77}Si{sub 14}B{sub 9} glassy ribbons with 0.5 to 1 atomic % Cu and a few percent Nb addition. Melt-spun ribbons of all calculated compositions were found to be glassy. The composition of the ternary Fe-based BMG investigated in the present study resulted as an optimization of all possibilities. The alloy is ferromagnetic with glass transition temperature T{sub g}=845 K, crystallisation temperature T{sub x}=876 K, liquidus temperature T{sub liq}=1451 K and mechanical strength of 4 GPa. The coercivity of as-cast samples is very low, around 1.5 A/m. The present contribution aims at discussing the thermal stability, mechanical and magnetic properties of the Fe{sub 66}Nb{sub 4}B{sub 30} BMG.

  15. Environmental Management vitrification activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumrine, P.H. [Waste Policy Institute, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Both the Mixed Waste and Landfill Stabilization Focus Areas as part of the Office of Technology Development efforts within the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Division have been developing various vitrification technologies as a treatment approach for the large quantities of transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed and Mixed Low Level Wastes that are stored in either landfills or above ground storage facilities. The technologies being developed include joule heated, plasma torch, plasma arc, induction, microwave, combustion, molten metal, and in situ methods. There are related efforts going into development glass, ceramic, and slag waste form windows of opportunity for the diverse quantities of heterogeneous wastes needing treatment. These studies look at both processing parameters, and long term performance parameters as a function of composition to assure that developed technologies have the right chemistry for success.

  16. Environmental Management vitrification activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumrine, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    Both the Mixed Waste and Landfill Stabilization Focus Areas as part of the Office of Technology Development efforts within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Division have been developing various vitrification technologies as a treatment approach for the large quantities of transuranic (TRU), TRU mixed and Mixed Low Level Wastes that are stored in either landfills or above ground storage facilities. The technologies being developed include joule heated, plasma torch, plasma arc, induction, microwave, combustion, molten metal, and in situ methods. There are related efforts going into development glass, ceramic, and slag waste form windows of opportunity for the diverse quantities of heterogeneous wastes needing treatment. These studies look at both processing parameters, and long term performance parameters as a function of composition to assure that developed technologies have the right chemistry for success

  17. Improvement of corrosion resistance in NaOH solution and glass forming ability of as-cast Mg-based bulk metallic glasses by microalloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The influences of the addition of Ag on the glass forming ability (GFA and corrosion behavior were investigated in the Mg-Ni-based alloy system by X-ray diffraction (XRD and electrochemical polarization in 0.1 mol/L NaOH solution. Results shows that the GFA of the Mg-Ni-based BMGs can be improved dramatically by the addition of an appropriate amount of Ag; and the addition element Ag can improve the corrosion resistance of Mg-Ni-based bulk metallic glass. The large difference in atomic size and large negative mixing enthalpy in alloy system can contribute to the high GFA. The addition element Ag improves the forming speed and the stability of the passive film, which is helpful to decrease the passivation current density and to improve the corrosion resistance of Mg-Ni-based bulk metallic glass.

  18. Second amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation in Cu60Ti20Zr20 bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Q.P.; Li, J.F.; Zhang, P.N.

    2007-01-01

    The second amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation in Cu60Ti20Zr20 bulk metallic glass was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffractometry. The difference of the Gibbs free energies between the amorphous phase and the crystalline products during the transformation...

  19. Liquid -to-glass transition in bulk glass-forming Cu55-xZr45Agx alloys using molecular dynamic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celtek M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results from molecular dynamics (MD studies concerning the microscopic structure of the ternary, bulk metallic glass-forming Cu55-x Zr45Agx (x=0,10,20 alloys using tight-binding potentials. Understanding of the nature of Glass Forming Ability (GFA of studied alloys, GFA parameters, glass transition temperature (T-g, melting temperature (T-m, reduced glass transition temperature (T-g/T-m, the supercooled liquid region and other parameters were simulated and compared with experiments. The computed pair distribution functions reproduce well experimental x-ray data of Inoue and co-workers. Structure analysis of the Cu-Zr-Ag alloy based on MD simulation will be also presented

  20. Effects of Cu substitution for Fe on the glass-forming ability and soft magnetic properties for Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dou, Lintao; Liu, Haishun; Hou, Long; Xue, Lin; Yang, Weiming; Zhao, Yucheng; Chang, Chuntao

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Cu substitution for Fe on the glass-forming ability (GFA) and soft magnetic properties for Fe 72−x Cu x B 20 Si 4 Nb 4 (x=0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are investigated. It is found that the investigated BMGs exhibit large GFA as well as excellent soft magnetic properties, and proper substitution of Fe by Cu improves the saturation magnetization, coercive force, and effective permeability without obvious deterioration of the GFA. - Highlights: • Fully glassy rods of Fe 72−x Cu x B 20 Si 4 Nb 4 BMGs were produced above 1 mm in diameter. • Investigated BMGs exhibit large glass-forming ability and excellent soft magnetic properties. • Proper Cu substitution improves magnetic properties without obvious deterioration of glass-forming ability

  1. Effect of Ge addition on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekan, M.; Shabestari, S.G.; Gholamipour, R.; Seyedein, S.H.

    2009-01-01

    Effect of the addition of a small amount of Ge on mechanical properties and fracture behavior of Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 (at.%) bulk metallic glass were studied. The Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 alloy has a surprising glass-forming ability (GFA), and the glassy rods up to 4 mm in diameter can be formed. Partial addition of Ge causes the crystalline phases precipitate in the glassy matrix of (Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 ) 100-x Ge x (x = 0, 1, 2) rods with a diameter of 4 mm. In uniaxial compression, Cu 50 Zr 43 Al 7 bulk metallic glass exhibit high strength of 1692 MPa and very limited plasticity of 0.05%. When Ge increases from 0 to 2 at.%, the strength decreases, but plastic strain increases about 2.5%. Fracture surface and shear bands of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  2. Mechanically driven phase separation and corresponding microhardness change in Cu60Zr20Ti20 bulk metallic glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Q.P.; Li, J.F.; Zhou, Y.H.

    2005-01-01

    Rolling deformation of bulk Cu60Zr20Ti20 metallic glass has been performed at cryogenic temperature. The specimens exhibit excellent ductility, and are rolled up to 97% reduction in thickness without fracture. Crystallization is suppressed during the deformation, however, phase separation is obse...... is observed in the glassy matrix when the thickness reduction exceeds 89%. Once the phase separation occurs, the microhardness of the specimen increases drastically, indicating the existence of work hardening by severe plastic deformation of the metallic glass.......Rolling deformation of bulk Cu60Zr20Ti20 metallic glass has been performed at cryogenic temperature. The specimens exhibit excellent ductility, and are rolled up to 97% reduction in thickness without fracture. Crystallization is suppressed during the deformation, however, phase separation...

  3. Treatment of NPP wastes using vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobolev, I.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Kobelev, A.P.; Savkin, A.E.; Kornev, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    Glass-based materials to immobilize various liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated at nuclear power plants (NPP) were designed. Glassy waste forms can be produced using electric melting including a cold crucible melting. Leach rate of cesium was found to be 10 -5 -10 -6 g/(cm 2 day) (IAEA technique). Volume reduction factor after vitrification reached 4-5. Various technologies for NPP waste vitrification were developed. Direct vitrification means feeding of source waste into the melter with formation of glassy waste form to be disposed. Joule heated ceramic melter, and cold crucible were tested. Process variables at treatment of Kursk, Chernobyl (RBMK), Kalinin, Novovoronezh (VVER) NPP wastes were determined. The most promising melter was found to be the cold crucible. Pilot plant based on the cold crucibles has been designed and constructed. Solid burnable NPP wastes are incinerated and slags are incorporated in glass. (author)

  4. Vacancies and atomic processes in intermetallics - From crystals to quasicrystals and bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Hans-Eckhardt [Institute of Theoretical and Applied Physics, Stuttgart University, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Baier, Falko [Voith Turbo Comp., Alexanderstr. 2, 89552 Heidenheim (Germany); Mueller, Markus A. [GFT Technologies A. G., Filderhauptstr. 142, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Reichle, Klaus J. [Philipp-Matthaeus-Hahn School, Jakob-Beutter-Str. 15, 72336 Balingen (Germany); Reimann, Klaus [NXP Semiconductors, Central Research and Development, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rempel, Andrey A. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ul. Pervomaiskaya 91, 620041 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sato, Kiminori [Tokyo Gakugei University, Nukuikita 4-1-1, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Ye, Feng [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Xiangyi [Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Sprengel, Wolfgang [Institute of Materials Physics, Graz University of Technology, Petersgasse 16, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-10-15

    A review is given on atomic vacancies in intermetallic compounds. The intermetallic compounds cover crystalline, quasicrystalline, and bulk metallic glass (BMG) structures. Vacancies can be specifically characterized by their positron lifetimes, by the coincident measurement of the Doppler broadening of the two quanta emitted by positron-electron annihilation, or by time-differential dilatometry. By these techniques, high concentrations and low mobilities of thermal vacancies were found in open-structured B2 intermetallics such as FeAl or NiAl, whereas the concentrations of vacancies are low and their mobilities high in close-packed structure as, e.g., L1{sub 2}-Ni{sub 3}Al. The activation volumes of vacancy formation and migration are determined by high-pressure experiments. The favorable sublattice for vacancy formation is found to be the majority sublattice in Fe{sub 61}Al{sub 39} and in MoSi{sub 2}. In the icosahedral quasicrystal Al{sub 70}Pd{sub 21}Mn{sub 9} the thermal vacancy concentration is low, whereas in the BMG Zr{sub 57}Cu{sub 15.4}Ni{sub 12.6}Nb{sub 3}Al{sub 10} thermal vacancies are found in high concentrations with low mobilities. This may determine the basic mechanisms of the glass transition. Making use of the experimentally determined vacancy data, the main features of atomic diffusion studies in crystalline intermetallics, in quasicrystals, and in BMGs can be understood. Manfred Faehnle and his group have substantially contributed to the theoretical understanding of vacancies and diffusion mechanisms in intermetallics. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Deformation behavior, corrosion resistance, and cytotoxicity of Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Qiu, C L; Chen, Q; Chan, K C; Zhang, S M

    2008-07-01

    Two Ni-free bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) of Zr(60)Nb(5)Cu(22.5)Pd(5)Al(7.5) and Zr(60)Nb(5)Cu(20)Fe(5)Al(10) were successfully prepared by arc-melting and copper mold casting. The thermal stability and crystallization were studied using differential scanning calorimetry. It demonstrates that the two BMGs exhibit very good glass forming ability with a wide supercooled liquid region. A multi-step process of crystallization with a preferential formation of quasicrystals occurred in both BMGs under continuous heating. The deformation behavior of the two BMGs was investigated using quasi-static compression testing. It reveals that the BMGs exhibit not only superior strength but also an extended plasticity. Corrosion behaviors of the BMGs were investigated in phosphate buffered solution by electrochemical polarization. The result shows that the two BMGs exhibit excellent corrosion resistance characterized by low corrosion current densities and wide passive regions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the passive film formed after anodic polarization was highly enriched in zirconium, niobium, and aluminum oxides. This is attributed to the excellent corrosion resistance. Additionally, the potential cytotoxicity of the two Ni-free BMGs was evaluated through cell culture for 1 week followed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and SEM observation. The results indicate that the two Ni-free BMGs exhibit as good biocompatibility as Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and thus show a promising potential for biomedical applications. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Vitrification facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DesCamp, V.A.; McMahon, C.L.

    1996-07-01

    This report is a description of the West Valley Demonstration Project's vitrification facilities from the establishment of the West Valley, NY site as a federal and state cooperative project to the completion of all activities necessary to begin solidification of radioactive waste into glass by vitrification. Topics discussed in this report include the Project's background, high-level radioactive waste consolidation, vitrification process and component testing, facilities design and construction, waste/glass recipe development, integrated facility testing, and readiness activities for radioactive waste processing

  7. Bulk glass formation and crystallization in Zr54.5Cu20Al10Ni8Ti7.5 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neogy, S.; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.; Kumar, V.; Ranganathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    The present work was aimed at fabrication, characterization and crystallization of Zr 54.5 Cu 20 Al 10 Ni 8 Ti 7.5 bulk metallic glass. The glass forming alloy was made by arc melting and then subjected to copper mold casting into 3 mm diameter bulk glass rods. The as-cast microstructure was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  8. Vitrification of spent mordenite molecular sieves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathi Sasidharan, N.; Deshingkar, D.S.; Jain, Savita; Singh, I.J.; Wattal, P.K.

    2002-11-01

    Vitrification of cesium loaded inorganic ion exchangers (mordenite type molecular sieves/zeolite AR-1) was studied empolying borosilicate glass systems. Direct vitrification of aluminosilicates is rather difficult mainly on account of volatility of cesium at processing temperatures of 1100 degC-1300 degC. In the borosilicate glass system, oxides of lead, sodium and zinc along with boric oxide were employed as major glass formers. Homogeneous glass matrix was obtained incorporating simulated composition of mordenite along with oxides of sodium, lead and boron at the processing temperature of 950 degC. The waste oxide loading up to 50% on dry weight basis was incorporated in this glass formulation. Partial replacement of PbO by TeO 2 , Bi 2 O 3 and CaF 2 resulted in lowering of the processing temperature and also increasing homogeneity of matrix. Based on these results, a glass matrix was prepared with actual cesium AR-1 molecular sieves with processing temperature limited to 925 degC. Powdered samples of glass matrix were subjected to leaching as per ASTM-1285 Product Consistency Test in high purity water at 90 degC for 28 days. The normalised cesium leach rate of this glass was found to be 3.92 x 10 -6 g/cm 2 /day, which is comparable to sodium borosilicate glass matrices currently in use for immobilisation of high level waste. The molecular sieves are also amenable to immobilization in cement matrix. As expected, there is substantial volume reduction by factor 3 in vitrification compared to their immobilization in cementious matrices. Also the quantity of cesium leached from vitrified product was nearly 10,000 times lower compared to cement based matrix. Vitrification of mordenite molecular sieves would lead to high capacity utilisation of zeolite AR-1 for the treatment of low and intennediate levelliquid effluents. (author)

  9. Characteristic of improved fatigue performance for Zr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, J.W.; Huang, E.W.; Wang, G.Y.; Yang, H.J.; Liang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Liaw, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Zr 58.5 Ti 14.3 Nb 5.2 Cu 6.1 Ni 4.9 Be 11.0 bulk metallic glass matrix composites exhibit improved four-point-bending fatigue endurance with a fatigue limit of 567 MPa, compared to that under the tension–tension fatigue, due to the high-volume-fractioned dendrites, which can effectively blunt the fatigue-induced cracks. Illuminated by high-energy synchrotron X-ray at 200 and 100 K, the corresponding diffraction peaks, such as (110), (200), and (211) shift rightward to small lattice spacings, compared to those at 298 K. However, the peak widths at 100 K and 200 K are almost identical to that of room temperature. Since an identical fatigue specimen was measured under room temperature, 200 K, and 100 K, the invariant of the peak widths reveal the fact of the irreversible microstructure developments induced by fatigue. Even if the fatigue fracture stress is distinguishingly lower than the yielding strength, the deformation of dendrites locally prevails, evidenced by the occurrence of dislocations

  10. Homogeneous viscous flow behavior of a Cu–Zr based bulk metallic glass composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.Y.; Yuan, Z.Z.; Feng, X.L.; Cui, L.Z.; Li, D.X.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Cu 40 Zr 44 Ag 8 Al 8 bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) consisting of various volume fraction of nanocrystals embedded in the amorphous matrix was synthesized by controlled annealing treatment of an as-cast BMGCs. The high temperature compression behaviors of the BMGCs were characterized in the supercooled liquid region. Results show that the flow stresses keep increasing after an initial decrease with extension of the annealing time. With annealing the values of activation volume V act is determined to be increasing from 283.6216 Ǻ 3 to 305.553 Ǻ 3 , suggesting that the jump of atoms is a cooperative process during the high-temperature deformation. Flow behavior of the BMGCs annealed for less than 8 min transform from Newtonian to non-Newtonian dependant on the stain rate and can be successively fitted by the visco-plasticity model. Fitting results indicate that deformation behaviors of these samples are governed by homogeneous flow of the amorphous matrix and indeed determined by the viscosities in the Newtonian flow stage. However, the BMGCs annealed for 8 min exhibit a non-Newtonian flow over the entire compression process and fail to be fitted by the visco-plasticity model. Micrographs of the sample reflect an impinged structure, indicating that high temperature deformation behavior of the BMGCs with high volume fractions of particles is indeed controlled by that of a backbone of particles

  11. Magnetic properties and microstructural homogeneity in NdFeAl bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega-Zempoalteca, R.; Valenzuela, R.; Betancourt, I.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses of nominal composition Nd 60 Fe 30 Al 10 were prepared by copper mold casting in the form of rods of 3 mm in diameter and 50 mm in length. Preparation conditions were varied to assess the effects of the injection distance and the injection pressure of the melt. In order to determine their microstructure, disk-shaped samples were obtained from different cut zones along the axis rod. A non-homogeneous phase distribution was observed, which resulted from the heat transfer regime during the cooling of the melt in the copper mold. As expected, the nature, distribution and volumetric fraction of the various phases produced play an important role on the resulting magnetic properties. Among the main observed phases are Fe-rich rod-like crystals, Nd-rich dendritic crystals and a ''like-amorphous'' matrix. The hard magnetic properties of these materials can be associated with this matrix. In these cooling regimes, the coercive field increases as the cooling rate of the amorphous matrix increases. Hysteresis loops showed a high degree of coupling between phases with different magnetic order. Both the coercive field and the magnetization showed a significant variation along the rod axis; a maximum appeared as a function of the axis length. In order to gather more information about the coupling between the observed phases, δM (or Henkel) plots were obtained, showing an exchange character for interactions (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Nanoindentation studies on Cu-Ti-Zr-Ni-Si-Sn bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, N.K.; Belger, A.; Paufler, P.; Kim, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    In the present investigation, Cu 47 Ti 33 Ni 6 Sn 2 Si 1 (numbers indicate at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG), fabricated by injection casting has been used for indentation experiments. Microindentation and nanoindentation tests were conducted to study the indentation responses of this material. The nanohardness and the Young's modulus were calculated following the standard procedure in literature. Around the indent, shear bands can be clearly observed under scanning electron microscopy examination. Atomic-force microscopy shows the pile of the material in a step-wise manner. The thinned sample near the indent shows the evolution of nanocrystals (∼20-30 nm) by transmission electron microscopy. During nanoindentation (in single- and multi-indent mode) experiments, the load-displacement P-h curves show displacement bursts, which are also known as pop-ins or serrations. The total displacement during indentation can be accounted for by sum total effect of the individual displacement of all the displacement-bursts observed in the P-h curve. Thus the plastic deformation of this glassy material appears to proceed in a discrete manner unlike ductile metallic alloys

  13. Residual stresses in a bulk metallic glass-stainless steel composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydiner, C.C. [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Uestuendag, E. [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)]. E-mail: ustundag@iastate.edu; Clausen, B. [Lujan Neutron Science Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hanan, J.C. [Division of Engineering and Applied Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Winholtz, R.A. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Bourke, M.A.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Peker, A. [Liquidmetal Technologies, Lake Forest, CA 92630 (United States)

    2005-06-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are new structural materials with impressive mechanical properties. They can now be cast into large dimensions, which can lead to significant residual stress generation due to thermal tempering. In this process, a surface compression develops balanced with tension in the interior. To evaluate this phenomenon non-destructively, a model cylindrical stainless steel (SS)-BMG composite was prepared and studied using neutron diffraction and finite element (FE) modeling. The residual strain data from the SS obtained by diffraction were used in modeling calculations to show that significant tempering could be achieved in the composite (about -200 MPa surface compression in the SS). The strong bond between the SS and BMG allowed efficient load transfer and facilitated stress generation. The final values of the residual stresses were seen to be relatively insensitive to the high temperature constitutive behavior of the SS due to the physics of the thermal tempering in BMGs. The approach presented here constitutes an effective means to study non-destructively thermal tempering in BMGs.

  14. Residual stresses in a bulk metallic glass-stainless steel composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aydiner, C.C.; Uestuendag, E.; Clausen, B.; Hanan, J.C.; Winholtz, R.A.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Peker, A.

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are new structural materials with impressive mechanical properties. They can now be cast into large dimensions, which can lead to significant residual stress generation due to thermal tempering. In this process, a surface compression develops balanced with tension in the interior. To evaluate this phenomenon non-destructively, a model cylindrical stainless steel (SS)-BMG composite was prepared and studied using neutron diffraction and finite element (FE) modeling. The residual strain data from the SS obtained by diffraction were used in modeling calculations to show that significant tempering could be achieved in the composite (about -200 MPa surface compression in the SS). The strong bond between the SS and BMG allowed efficient load transfer and facilitated stress generation. The final values of the residual stresses were seen to be relatively insensitive to the high temperature constitutive behavior of the SS due to the physics of the thermal tempering in BMGs. The approach presented here constitutes an effective means to study non-destructively thermal tempering in BMGs

  15. Plastic deformation behavior of Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb–Cr bulk metallic glasses under nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.T.; Hong, S.H.; Lee, C.H.; Park, J.M.; Kim, T.W.; Lee, W.H.; Yim, H.I.; Kim, K.B.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Additional Cr modulation of atomic structure of Fe-Co-B-Si-Nb BMGs. • An amount of free volume characterized by a combination of nanoindentation and AFM. • Free volume determined by height measurement of AFM after nanoindentation. -- Abstract: In this work, we investigate the effect of Cr addition on thermal properties and indentation behavior of Fe 52 Co 20−x B 20 Si 4 Nb 4 Cr x alloys with x = 0, 1, 3 and 5 at.%, respectively. Among all studied alloys, the Fe 52 Co 17 B 20 Si 4 Nb 4 Cr 3 bulk metallic glass (BMG) exhibits the highest thermal stability with large supercooled liquid region of 40 K and the pronounced plastic deformation features which is serrated flow (pop-in event) and significant pile-up of materials around indents. This demonstrates that the appropriate addition of Cr in Fe-based BMG can induce the internal atomic structure modulation and promote the mechanical softening, which are discussed in terms of free volume concept

  16. AC Calorimetry and Thermophysical Properties of Bulk Glass-Forming Metallic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.

    2000-01-01

    Thermo-physical properties of two bulk metallic glass forming alloys, Ti34Zr11Cu47Ni8 (VIT 101) and Zr57Nb5Ni12.6Al10CU15.4 (VIT 106), were investigated in the stable and undercooled melt. Our investigation focused on measurements of the specific heat in the stable and undercooled liquid using the method of AC modulation calorimetry. The VIT 106 exhibited a maximum undercooling of 140 K in free radiative cooling. Specific heat measurements could be performed in stable melt down to an undercooling of 80 K. Analysis of the specific heat data indicate an anomaly near the equilibrium liquidus temperature. This anomaly is also observed in y the temperature dependencies of the external relaxation time, the specific volume, and the surface tension; it is tentatively attributed to a phase separation in the liquid state. The VIT 101 specimen exhibited a small undercooling of about 50 K. Specific heat measurements were performed in the stable and undercooled melt. These various results will be combined with ground based work such as the measurement of T-T-T curves in the electrostatic levitator and low temperature viscosity and specific heat measurements for modeling the nucleation kinetics of these alloys.

  17. Plastic deformation behavior of Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb–Cr bulk metallic glasses under nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.T.; Hong, S.H.; Lee, C.H. [HMC, Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.M., E-mail: jinman_park@hotmail.com [Materials Research Center, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), San 14-1, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T.W.; Lee, W.H. [HMC, Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, H.I. [Department of Physics, Sookmyung Women’s University, Hyochangwongil 52, Yongsan-ku, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, K.B., E-mail: kbkim@sejong.ac.kr [HMC, Faculty of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • Additional Cr modulation of atomic structure of Fe-Co-B-Si-Nb BMGs. • An amount of free volume characterized by a combination of nanoindentation and AFM. • Free volume determined by height measurement of AFM after nanoindentation. -- Abstract: In this work, we investigate the effect of Cr addition on thermal properties and indentation behavior of Fe{sub 52}Co{sub 20−x}B{sub 20}Si{sub 4}Nb{sub 4}Cr{sub x} alloys with x = 0, 1, 3 and 5 at.%, respectively. Among all studied alloys, the Fe{sub 52}Co{sub 17}B{sub 20}Si{sub 4}Nb{sub 4}Cr{sub 3} bulk metallic glass (BMG) exhibits the highest thermal stability with large supercooled liquid region of 40 K and the pronounced plastic deformation features which is serrated flow (pop-in event) and significant pile-up of materials around indents. This demonstrates that the appropriate addition of Cr in Fe-based BMG can induce the internal atomic structure modulation and promote the mechanical softening, which are discussed in terms of free volume concept.

  18. Thermoplastic deformation of ferromagnetic CoFe-based bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chenguang; Hu, Renchao; Man, Qikui; Chang, Chuntao; Wang, Xinmin

    2017-12-01

    The superplastic deformation behavior of the ferromagnetic Co31Fe31Nb8B30 bulk metallic glass (BMG) in the supercooled liquid region was investigated. At a given temperature, the BMG exhibits a Newtonian behavior at low strain rates but a non-Newtonian behavior at high strain rates. The high thermal stability of this glassy alloy system offers an enough processing window to thermoplastic forming (TPF), and the strong processing ability was examined by simple micro-replication experiments. It is demonstrated that the TPF formability on length scales ranging down to nanometers can be achieved in the selected experimental condition. Based on the analysis of deformation behavior, the nearly full density sample (i.e. nearly 100%), was produced from water-atomized glassy powders and consolidated by the hot-pressing technique. The sample exhibits good soft-magnetic and mechanical properties, i.e., low coercive force of 0.43 Oe, high initial permeability of 4100 and high Vickers hardness 1398. These results suggest that the hot-pressing process opens up possibilities for the commercial exploitation of BMGs in engineering applications.

  19. A multi-component Zr alloy with comparable strength and Higher plasticity than Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, S.X.; Yin, L.X.; Ma, M.Z.; Jing, R.; Yu, P.F.; Zhang, Y.F.; Wang, B.A.; Liu, R.P.

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium (Zr)-based bulk metallic glass possesses the highest potential as a structural material among metallic glasses. Although Zr-based bulk metallic glass exhibits extremely high strength, its potential application has been restricted by a number of issues, such as fragility, small size, difficult fabrication into different shapes and poisonous beryllium content, among others. In this paper, a Zr-based crystal alloy with comparable strength and higher plasticity than Zr-based bulk metallic glass is presented. The proposed Zr-based alloy has a tensile strength greater than 1600 MPa. That value is comparable to the 1500 MPa to 2000 MPa strength of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). The ductility in terms of elongation reached 6.2%; at the same time, the 1400 MPa tensile strength was retained. This phenomenon is not possible for Zr-based BMGs. XRD results show that the proposed ultrahigh-strength Zr-based crystal alloy has two-phase structures: an hcp-structured α phase and a bcc-structured β phase. The forged specimen exhibits a typical basket-weave microstructure, which is characterised by the interlaced plate α phase separated from the β phase matrix. Fine, short bar-shaped α phases precipitated along the original β grain boundary together with ultrafine dot-shaped α phases that presented inside the original β grain when the ageing temperature was between 500 °C and 525 °C. As the ageing temperature increased, the dot-shaped α phase grew into plate shapes, decreasing the material's strength and increasing its plasticity. The ultrafine dot-shaped and short bar-shaped α phases in the original β phase matrix are the main strengthening mechanisms of the ultrahigh-strength Zr-based crystal alloy.

  20. Vitrification Facility integrated system performance testing report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, D.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides a summary of component and system performance testing associated with the Vitrification Facility (VF) following construction turnover. The VF at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass form for eventual disposal in a federal repository. Following an initial Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) Program and subsequent conversion of test stand equipment into the final VF, a testing program was executed to demonstrate successful performance of the components, subsystems, and systems that make up the vitrification process. Systems were started up and brought on line as construction was completed, until integrated system operation could be demonstrated to produce borosilicate glass using nonradioactive waste simulant. Integrated system testing and operation culminated with a successful Operational Readiness Review (ORR) and Department of Energy (DOE) approval to initiate vitrification of high-level waste (HLW) on June 19, 1996. Performance and integrated operational test runs conducted during the test program provided a means for critical examination, observation, and evaluation of the vitrification system. Test data taken for each Test Instruction Procedure (TIP) was used to evaluate component performance against system design and acceptance criteria, while test observations were used to correct, modify, or improve system operation. This process was critical in establishing operating conditions for the entire vitrification process

  1. Wastes vitrification by plasma torch: study of a glass formulation compatible with a wide range of B wastes; Vitrification des dechets par torche a plasma: recherche d'une formulation de verre compatible avec un large eventail de dechets B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poitou, S.; Richaud, D.; Fiquet, O.; Gramondi, P.; Massit, H. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. d' Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    Within the context of radioactive waste management, CEA has equipped itself with a 'PLASMARC' device. The central element of this device is a plasma torch treatment furnace. It has been implemented and validated for the vitrification of low level radioactive wastes. Meanwhile, the plasma torch presents potentially interests for immobilizing under an inert form in vitreous matrices, B wastes which are generally divided and of complex chemical composition. The application of this process to this type of wastes has been studied here. The obtained results show that with the plasma torch it is possible to make glasses with a high amount of silicon and aluminium oxide and which are adapted to the treatment / packaging of the B wastes. (O.M.)

  2. Effect of rolling deformation on the microstructure of bulk Cu60Zr20Ti20 metallic glass and its crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Q.P.; Li, J.F.; Zhou, Y.H.

    2006-01-01

    Bulk Cu60Zr20Ti20 metallic glass has been rolled at room temperature (RT) and cryogenic temperature (CIF) up to 97% in thickness reduction, and the dependences of microstructure on the strain and temperature have been investigated. It is revealed that as the deformation proceeds below a critical...... thickness reduction, which is 87% at RT and 89% at CT, only the shear band density and the free-volume content increase, whereas the thermal stability of the deformed glass remains unchanged. Deformation above the critical thickness reduction results in phase separation plus nanocrystallization at RT...

  3. Effect of Yttrium Addition on Glass-Forming Ability and Magnetic Properties of Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb Bulk Metallic Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Bitoh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The glass-forming ability (GFA and the magnetic properties of the [(Fe0.5Co0.50.75B0.20Si0.05]96Nb4−xYx bulk metallic glasses (BMGs have been studied. The partial replacement of Nb by Y improves the thermal stability of the glass against crystallization. The saturation mass magnetization (σs exhibits a maximum around 2 at. % Y, and the value of σs of the alloy with 2 at. % Y is 6.5% larger than that of the Y-free alloy. The coercivity shows a tendency to decrease with increasing Y content. These results indicate that the partial replacement of Nb by Y in the Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb BMGs is useful to simultaneous achievement of high GFA, high σs, and good soft magnetic properties.

  4. India gets set at Tarapur [vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruickshank, Andrew.

    1987-01-01

    A vitrification plant has been built and commissioned at Tarapur to immobilise high level radioactive waste arising from the reprocessing plant. The plant employs a semi-continuous pot-glass process, involving calcination followed by melting in the processing vessel and subsequent casting of the glass in a storage container. Prior to disposal the waste is stored in an air-cooled vault with a convective air-circulation system. (author)

  5. Vitrification process testing for reference HWVP waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.M. Jr.; Goles, R.W.; Nakaoka, R.K.; Kruger, O.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to vitrify high-level radioactive wastes stored on the Hanford site. The vitrification flow-sheet is being developed to assure the plant will achieve plant production requirements and the glass product will meet all waste form requirements for final geologic disposal. The first Hanford waste to be processed by the HWVP will be a neutralized waste resulting from PUREX fuel reprocessing operations. Testing is being conducted using representative nonradioactive simulants to obtain process and product data required to support design, environmental, and qualification activities. Plant/process criteria, testing requirements and approach, and results to date will be presented

  6. Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with a larger supercooled liquid region and high ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, K.Q. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110178 (China)], E-mail: kqqiu@yahoo.com.cn; Pang, J.; Ren, Y.L.; Zhang, H.B. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenyang University of Technology, Shenyang 110178 (China); Ma, C.L.; Zhang, T. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-12-20

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with compositions of Fe{sub 61.5-x}Co{sub 3}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Er{sub 0.5}M{sub x} (x = 2, 3; M = Ni, Nb) were fabricated by copper mold casting using raw industrial materials. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mechanical tester and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were employed to check the phase constituent, the thermal stability, the mechanical properties and the fracture surfaces of as-cast samples. The results indicate that the BMGs with diameters of 1.5-3 mm were fabricated for the alloys investigated. The largest supercooled liquid region (SLR) up to 76 K was found for Fe{sub 58.5}Co{sub 3}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Er{sub 0.5}Ni{sub 3} BMG. The BMGs with Ni addition exhibit not only high fracture strengths reaching 3770 MPa for x = 2 and 3980 MPa for x = 3 alloys, respectively, but also apparently plastic strains up to 0.67% and 0.93%, respectively. The fracture surfaces of the Fe{sub 61.5-x}Co{sub 3}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Er{sub 0.5}Ni{sub x} (x = 2, 3) alloys with plasticity show narrow ridges characteristic of venous patterns combining with tearing flow between the ridges. While the Nb containing alloys show not only a lower SLR below 60 K but also a lower stress below 2400 MPa, as well as almost no plastic strain before fracture.

  7. Homogeneous-inhomogeneous models of Ag x (Ge0.25Se0.75)100-x bulk glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcondo, B.; Urena, M.A.; Piarristeguy, A.; Pradel, A.; Fontana, M.

    2007-01-01

    Ge-Se system presents an extensive glass forming composition range even when different metals (Ag, Sb, Bi) are added. In spite that the addition of Ag (up to 30 at%) to Ge-Se does not affect substantially the glass forming tendency, it impacts significantly on the transport properties. (Ge 0.25 Se 0.75 ) 100- x Ag x is a fast ionic conductor with x≥8 at% whereas it is a semiconductor for x 0.25 Se 0.75 ) 100- x Ag x bulk samples. These results appear to sustain this model. However previous structural and thermal studies oppose it. Moessbauer spectrometry on samples (0≤x≤25) containing 0.5 at% of 57 Fe is performed at T≤300 K. The main contribution to the glasses spectra correspond to low spin Fe 2+ in octahedral coordination and high spin Fe 2+ in distorted octahedral environments. The relative population of both sites changes continuously as Ag concentration varies denoting that the change in the transport behavior obeys to a percolation phenomenon. The low temperature results are discussed with the aim to throw light on the controversy about the homogeneity-inhomogeneity of the studied bulk glasses

  8. Impact of the structural state on the mechanical properties in a Zr–Co–Al bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, J.C.; Pelletier, J.M.; Esnouf, C.; Liu, Y.; Kato, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Atomic mobility in metallic glass was studied by DMA, HRTEM and nanoindentation. • Physical ageing and crystallization reduce the atomic mobility. • Plastic deformation, i.e. cold-rolling enhances the atomic mobility. • Atomic mobility in glassy materials can be described by quasi-point defects model. - Abstract: This paper reports on the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and nanoindentation technique to investigate atomic mobility in Zr 56 Co 28 Al 16 bulk metallic glass in the as-cast state, after thermal annealing and after cold rolling. From the DMA results together with nanoindentation data point of view, the atomic mobility is significantly modified by the thermo-mechanical history. On the one hand, atomic mobility in bulk metallic glass is reduced after physical aging or crystallization. On the other hand, the atomic mobility in metallic glass is enhanced by cold rolling. To analyze the atomic mobility in amorphous materials, a physical theory is introduced. This model invoked the concept of quasi-point defects, which correspond to the density fluctuations in the glassy materials. Correlated movements of atoms are assisted by these quasi-point defects and the correlation factor χ is connected to the concentration of these “defects” in metallic glasses: (i) physical aging and crystallization decreases the parameter χ and (ii) the concentration of defects augments via plastic deformation (i.e. cold-rolling), suggesting that the correlation factor χ reflects the atomic mobility for glassy materials in a quantitative manner. This correlation bridges the gap between the mechanical properties on macroscopic scale and atomic mobility in microstructural regions in metallic glasses

  9. Decrease in electrical resistivity on depletion of islands of mobility during aging of a bulk metal glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Daisman P. B.; Johari, G. P.

    2018-04-01

    The effect of structural relaxation on electrical resistivity, ρglass, of strain-free Zr46.75Ti8.25Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk metallic glass was studied during isothermal aging at several temperatures, Tas. Since cooling of a liquid metal increases its resistivity ρliq, one expects ρglass to increase on aging toward ρliq at T = Ta. Instead, ρglass decreased non-exponentially with the aging time. The activation energy of aging kinetics is 189 kJ mol-1, which is higher than the activation energy of the Johari-Goldstein (JG) relaxation. After considering the sample's contraction, phase separation, and crystallization as possible causes of the decrease in ρglass, we attribute the decrease to depletion of islands of atomic mobility, soft spots, or static heterogeneity. Vibrations of the atoms in these local (loosely packed) regions and in the region's interfacial area contribute to electron scattering. As these deplete on aging, the contribution decreases and ρglass decreases, with a concomitant decrease in macroscopic volume, enthalpy, and entropy (V, H, and S). Local regions of faster mobility also decrease on cooling as V, H, and S of a liquid decrease, but structure fluctuations dominate electron scattering of a liquid metal and ρliq increases effectively according to the Ziman-Nagel theory for a homogenously disordered structure. Whether depletion of such local regions initiates the structural relaxation of a glass, or vice versa, may be resolved by finding a glass that physically ages but shows no JG relaxation.

  10. Vitrification of HLW in cold crucible melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, G.

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the vitrification process currently used in the La Hague commercial reprocessing plants has been continuously improved during more than ten years of operation. In parallel the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission), COGEMA (Industrial Operator), and SGN (COGEMA's Engineering) have developed the cold crucible melter vitrification technology to obtain greater operating flexibility, increased plant availability and further reduction of secondary waste generated during operations. The cold crucible is a compact water-cooled melter in which the radioactive waste and the glass additives are melted by direct high frequency induction. The cooling of the melter produces a solidified glass layer that protects the melter's inner wall from corrosion. Because the heat is transferred directly to the melt, high operating temperatures can be achieved with no impact on the melter itself. COGEMA plans to implement the cold crucible technology to vitrify high level liquid waste from reprocessed spent U-Mo-Sn-Al fuel (used in gas cooled reactor). The cold crucible was selected for the vitrification of this particularly hard-to-process waste stream because it could not be reasonably processed in the standard hot induction melters currently used at the La Hague vitrification facilities: the waste has a high molybdenum content which makes it very corrosive and also requires a special high temperature glass formulation to obtain sufficiently high waste loading factors (12 % in molybdenum). A special glass formulation has been developed by the CEA and has been qualified through lab and pilot testing to meet standard waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the U-Mo waste. The process and the associated technologies have been also qualified on a full-scale prototype at the CEA pilot facility in Marcoule. Engineering study has been integrated in parallel in order to take into account that the Cold Crucible should be installed remotely in one of the R7 vitrification

  11. In situ vitrification: Application to buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callow, R.A.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two in situ vitrification field tests were conducted in June and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification is a technology for in-place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form and is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate buried waste structures found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests were designed as part of a treatability study to provide essential information on field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes, and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology provided valuable operational control for successfully processing the high metal content waste. The results indicate that in situ vitrification is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Vitrification in the presence of salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, J.C.; Andrews, M.K.; Schumacher, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    Glass is an advantageous material for the immobilization of nuclear wastes because of the simplicity of processing and its unique ability to accept a wide variety of waste elements into its network structure. Unfortunately, some anionic species which are present in the nuclear waste streams have only limited solubility in oxide glasses. This can result in either vitrification concerns or it can affect the integrity, of the final vitrified waste form. The presence of immiscible salts can also corrode metals and refractories in the vitrification unit as well as degrade components in the off-gas system. The presence of a molten salt layer on the melt may alter the batch melting rate and increase operational safety concerns. These safety concerns relate to the interaction of the molten salt and the melter cooling fluids. Some preliminary data from ongoing experimental efforts examining the solubility of molten salts in glasses and the interaction of salts with melter component materials is included

  13. New Ti-based Ti–Cu–Zr–Fe–Sn–Si–Ag bulk metallic glass for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, Shujie; Liu, Ying; Li, Haifei; Sun, Lulu; Li, Yan; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel Ti 47 Cu 38 Zr 7.5 Fe 2.5 Sn 2 Si 1 Ag 2 (at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG) with a critical diameter of 7 mm was discovered. • The present BMG is the largest Ni- and Be-free Ti-based BMG containing low content of noble metal reported to date. • The glassy alloy possesses high specific strength, low Young’s modulus, and good corrosion resistance and bio-compatibility. • Combination of high glass-forming ability and good mechano- and bio-compatibility for the Ti-based BMG demonstrates the potential for use in biomedical applications. - Abstract: A novel Ni-free Ti 47 Cu 38 Zr 7.5 Fe 2.5 Sn 2 Si 1 Ag 2 (at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG) with superior glass-forming ability, good mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility was discovered. The Ti-based BMG with a diameter of 7 mm can be prepared by copper mold casting and the supercooled liquid region was 52 K. Compressive strength, specific strength, Young’s modulus and microhardness of the Ti-based BMG were about 2.08 GPa, 3.2 × 10 5 N m/kg, 100 GPa and 588 Hv, respectively. Electrochemical measurements indicated that the Ti-based glassy alloy possesses higher corrosion resistance than Ti–6Al–4V alloy in a simulated body fluid environment. Attachment, spreading out and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on the Ti-based BMG surface demonstrated the excellent biocompatibility. Mechanisms of the formation and properties for the Ti-based glassy alloy are also discussed. The combination of high glass-forming ability, excellent mechanical properties, high corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility demonstrates the potential of the Ni-free Ti-based BMG for use in biomedical applications

  14. Development of Fe-B Based Bulk Metallic Glasses: Morphology of Residual Phases in Fe50Ni16Mo6B18Zr10 Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiburce A. Aboki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron-boron based bulk metallic glasses (BMG development has been initiated using Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 as precursor. Addition of zirconium up to 10 atomic % along with the reduction of Ni proportion improves the glass forming ability (GFA, which is optimum when Ni is suppressed in the alloy. However melting instability occurred during the materials fabrication resulting in the formation of residual crystalline phases closely related to the amorphous phase. Microstructure study shows an evolution from amorphous structure to peculiar acicular structure, particularly for Fe50Ni16Mo6B18Zr10, suggesting the amorphous structure as interconnected atomic sheets like “atomic mille feuilles” whose growth affects the alloys’ GFA.

  15. Radioactive waste vitrification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, L.L.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-08-01

    The research and development of an immobilization process for the containment of nuclear high-level liquid waste has been underway for well-over the past four decades. The method that has become the state-of-the-art is the liquid-fed ceramic melter process which converts a mixture of high-level liquid waste and glass forming frit to a borosilicate glass product. This report gives a chronological review of the various vitrification processes starting with the very first reported process in 1960. Information on the early methods of frit selection as well as information on the currently computerized method are presented. The importance of all these parameters is discussed with regard to product durability. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. An interatomic potential for studying CuZr bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paduraru, A.; Kenoufi, A.; Bailey, N.P.; Schioetz, J.

    2007-01-01

    Glass forming ability has been found in only a small number of binary alloys, one being CuZr. In order to simulate this glass, we fitted an interatomic potential within Effective Medium Theory (EMT). For this purpose we use basic properties of the B2 crystal structure as calculated from Density Functional Theory (DFT) or obtained from experiments. We then performed Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of the cooling process and studied the thermodynamics and structure of CuZr glass. We find that the potential gives a good description of the CuZr glass, with a glass transition temperature and elastic constants close to the experimental values. The local atomic order, as witnessed by the radial distribution function, is also consistent with similar experimental data. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Predicting Nanoscale Dynamics of a Glass-Forming Liquid from Its Macroscopic Bulk Behavior and Vice Versa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrjanowicz, Karolina; Kaminski, Kamil; Tarnacka, Magdalena; Szklarz, Grzegorz; Paluch, Marian

    2017-02-02

    The properties of a molecular liquid confined at the nanometer length scale can be very distinct from the bulk. For that reason, the macro- and the nanoscopic behaviors of glass-forming liquids are regarded as two nonconnected realms, governed by their own rules. Here, we show that the glassy dynamics in molecular liquids confined to nanometer pores might obey the density scaling relation, ρ γ /T, just like in bulk fluids. Even more surprisingly, the same value of the scaling exponent γ superposes the α-relaxation time measured at different state points in nanoscale confinement and upon increased pressure. We report this remarkable finding for van der Waals liquids tetramethyl-tetraphenyl-trisiloxane (DC704) and polyphenyl ether (5PPE), considered as simple, single-parameter liquids. Demonstrating that the density scaling idea can be fulfilled in both environments opens an exciting possibility to predict the dynamic features of the nanoconfined system close to its glass-transition temperature from the high-pressure studies of the bulk liquid. Likewise, we can describe the viscous liquid dynamics at any given combination of temperature and pressure based on analysis of its behavior in nanopores.

  18. High-level waste processing and conditioning: vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonniaud, R.

    1981-02-01

    The vitrification process used to treat fission product solutions at the Marcoule Vitrification Plant is described. The type of waste processed is characterized by its very high activity and the long lifetimes of some of the emitters that it contains. The performance obtained with this process is given together with the future developments envisaged. The storage of glasses is described as well as their behavior with time [fr

  19. Effects of configurational changes on electrical resistivity during glass-liquid transition of two bulk metal-alloy glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aji, D. P. B.; Johari, G. P., E-mail: joharig@mcmaster.ca [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-12-14

    Consequences of increase in structural fluctuations on heating Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 10}Cu{sub 30}P{sub 20} and Zr{sub 46.75}Ti{sub 8.25}Cu{sub 7.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 27.5} through their glass to liquid transition range were investigated by measuring the electrical resistivity, ρ, an electron scattering property. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR = (1/ρ) dρ/dT) of the liquid and glassy states is negative. The plots of their ρ against T in the T{sub g} (glass to liquid transition) range show a gradual change in the slope similar to the change observed generally for the plots of the density, elastic modulus, and refractive index. As fluctuations in the melt structure involve fewer configurations on cooling, ρ increases. In the energy landscape description, the melt's structure explores fewer minima with decrease in T, vibrational frequencies increase, and electron scattering and ρ increase. Plots of (−dρ/dT) against T resemble the plot of the specific heat of other glasses and show a sub-T{sub g} feature and a rapid rise at T near T{sub g}. Analysis shows that the magnitude of negative TCR is dominated by change in the phonon characteristics, and configurational fluctuations make it more negative. The TCR of the liquid and glassy states seems qualitatively consistent with the variation in the structure factor in Ziman's model for pure liquid metals as extended by Nagel to metal alloys and used to explain the negative TCR of a two-component metal glass.

  20. 3D printed glass: surface finish and bulk properties as a function of the printing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susanne; Avery, Michael P.; Richardson, Robert; Bartlett, Paul; Frei, Regina; Simske, Steven

    2015-03-01

    It is impossible to print glass directly from a melt, layer by layer. Glass is not only very sensitive to temperature gradients between different layers but also to the cooling process. To achieve a glass state the melt, has to be cooled rapidly to avoid crystallization of the material and then annealed to remove cooling induced stress. In 3D-printing of glass the objects are shaped at room temperature and then fired. The material properties of the final objects are crucially dependent on the frit size of the glass powder used during shaping, the chemical formula of the binder and the firing procedure. For frit sizes below 250 μm, we seem to find a constant volume of pores of less than 5%. Decreasing frit size leads to an increase in the number of pores which then leads to an increase of opacity. The two different binders, 2- hydroxyethyl cellulose and carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt, generate very different porosities. The porosity of samples with 2-hydroxyethyl cellulose is similar to frit-only samples, whereas carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt creates a glass foam. The surface finish is determined by the material the glass comes into contact with during firing.

  1. Waste vitrification: a historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, J.L.; Bjorklund, W.J.; Bonner, W.F.

    1982-02-01

    The possibility of converting high-level wastes (HLW) to glass was first pursued in Canada and England at a time when other countries were evaluating many other alternatives. By 1966, the British had completed radioactive demonstrations of the FINGAL pot process, converting HLW to borosilicate glass. By this time other countries, including France and the United States, had begun using the glass waste form. Beginning in 1966, several processes, including phosphate and borosilicate glass, were demonstrated by the US in the Waste Solidification Engineering Prototypes (WSEP) program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Most of the current vitrification processes are adaptations of the FINGAL pot process or the continuous metallic melter used in the WSEP program. One notable exception is the joule-heated ceramic melter, which was adapted from commercial glass technology for HLW by PNL in the mid-1970's. Both batch and continuous processes have been developed to an advanced stage of readiness. These processes are described and compared in this paper

  2. The effect of nanocrystallization and free volume on the room temperature plasticity of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, K.; Ohkubo, T.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Hono, K.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of the room temperature plasticity of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), microstructure observations, density measurements and positron annihilation studies were carried out for Zr-based BMGs cast at various temperatures and post-annealed under different conditions. We found that higher casting temperatures cause partial crystallization, which enhance the plasticity as long as the volume fraction of the crystalline phase is low. However, a similar nanocrystalline microstructure produced by post-annealing often leads to a large loss of plasticity, while certain conditions enhance the plasticity. Based on density measurements and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, we conclude that the relative contribution of free volume and nanocrystallization is important for acquiring plasticity in metallic glasses

  3. Enhanced Mechanical Properties of MgZnCa Bulk Metallic Glass Composites with Ti-Particle Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Chun Wong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rod samples of Mg60Zn35Ca5 bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs dispersed with Ti particles have been successfully fabricated via injection casting. The glass forming ability (GFA and the mechanical properties of these Mg-based BMGCs have been systematically investigated as a function of the volume fraction (Vf of Ti particles. The results showed that the compressive ductility increased with Vf. The mechanical performance of these BMGCs, with up to 5.4% compressive failure strain and 1187 MPa fracture strength at room temperature, can be obtained for the Mg-based BMGCs with 50 vol % Ti particles, suggesting that these dispersed Ti particles can absorb the energy of the crack propagations and can induce branches of the primary shear band into multiple secondary shear bands. It follows that further propagation of the shear band is blocked, enhancing the overall plasticity.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of the ternary Cu50Ti25Zr25 bulk glass forming alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celtek M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure and thermodynamic properties of a ternary Cu50Ti25Zr25 metallic glass forming alloy in solid-liquid to glass phases were studied using molecular dynamics (MD method based on tight-binding (TB potentials. An atomic description of the melting, glass formation and crystallization process has been analyzed using different heating and cooling rates. The computed Glass Forming Ability (GFA parameters are in good agreement with experimental data. The structure analysis of the Cu50Ti25Zr25 based on molecular dynamics simulation will be also presented and compared with available MD results. We have also discussed the crystallization transition with two different interatomic potentials used in this work

  5. The structural properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses subjected to high pressure torsion at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltynjuk, E. V., E-mail: boltynjuk@gmail.com; Ubyivovk, E. V.; Kshumanev, A. M. [Saint Petersburg State University, 28 Universitetskiy pr., Saint Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Gunderov, D. V.; Lukianov, A. V. [Ufa State Aviation Technical University, K. Marks 12, Ufa, 450000 (Russian Federation); Bednarz, A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics, Department of Aircraft and Aircraft Engines, Rzeszow University of Technology, Al. Powstancow Warszawy 8, 35-959 Rzeszow (Poland); Valiev, R. Z. [Saint Petersburg State University, 28 Universitetskiy pr., Saint Petersburg, 198504 (Russian Federation); Ufa State Aviation Technical University, K. Marks 12, Ufa, 450000 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The structural properties of a Zr{sub 62}Cu{sub 22}Al{sub 10}Fe{sub 5}Dy{sub 1} bulk metallic glasses were investigated. Cylindrical rods of the Zr{sub 62}Cu{sub 22}Al{sub 10}Fe{sub 5}Dy{sub 1} BMG were subjected to high pressure torsion at temperatures of 20°C and 150°C. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy were used to determine peculiarities of the modified structure. Analysis of fracture surfaces, nanohardness measurements were conducted to investigate the influence of structural changes on mechanical behavior of processed samples.

  6. The structural properties of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses subjected to high pressure torsion at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boltynjuk, E. V.; Ubyivovk, E. V.; Kshumanev, A. M.; Gunderov, D. V.; Lukianov, A. V.; Bednarz, A.; Valiev, R. Z.

    2016-01-01

    The structural properties of a Zr_6_2Cu_2_2Al_1_0Fe_5Dy_1 bulk metallic glasses were investigated. Cylindrical rods of the Zr_6_2Cu_2_2Al_1_0Fe_5Dy_1 BMG were subjected to high pressure torsion at temperatures of 20°C and 150°C. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy were used to determine peculiarities of the modified structure. Analysis of fracture surfaces, nanohardness measurements were conducted to investigate the influence of structural changes on mechanical behavior of processed samples.

  7. Electronic-structure origin of the glass-forming ability and magnetic properties in Fe–RE–B–Nb bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.W.; Estévez, D.; Jiang, K.M.; Yang, W.M.; Man, Q.K.; Chang, C.T.; Wang, X.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Relation between GFA and electronic structure of RE doped BMGs is investigated. • Tm enhances RE–B bonds and decreases the density of states near the Fermi level. • Magnetic properties of the alloys are related to the electronic structure of RE. - Abstract: (Fe 0.71 RE 0.05 B 0.24 ) 96 Nb 4 (RE = Gd, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were found exhibiting excellent glass-forming ability (GFA) with critical diameters ranging from 3.5 to 6.5 mm, and high compressive fracture strength larger than 4300 MPa. Moreover, they displayed good soft-magnetic properties with saturation magnetic flux density of 0.71–0.87 T, coercive force of 1.23–39.76 A/m and effective permeability of 1500–12,740 at 1 kHz. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to clarify the origin of the excellent GFA from the viewpoint of electronic structure. It was found that the Tm doped alloy displayed unique electronic structure including the deepest core-level binding energy, the most numerous RE–B bonds and the minimum density of states near the Fermi level, making this alloy the best glass former. The various trends noticed in the magnetic properties were ascribed mainly to the differences in the magnetic anisotropy and magnetic moment of RE elements

  8. Vibration-accelerated activation of flow units in a Pd-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ning, E-mail: hslining@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Liu, Ze [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang, Xinyun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Meng [Institute of Advanced Wear & Corrosion Resistant and Functional Materials, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2017-04-24

    Controlled activation of flow units and in-situ characterization of mechanical properties in metallic glasses are facing challenges thus far. Here, vibrational loading is introduced through nanoscale dynamic mechanical analysis technique to probe vibration-accelerated atomic level flow that plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of metallic glasses. The intriguing finding is that high vibrational frequency induces deep indentation depth, prominent pop-in events on load–depth curves and low storage modulus, exhibiting a vibration-facilitated activation of flow units in Pd{sub 40}Cu{sub 30}Ni{sub 10}P{sub 20} metallic glass. Theoretical analysis revealed that vibration-moderated activation time-scale accelerate the activation of flow units and responsible for the above scenario.

  9. Vitrification of NORM wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, C.

    1994-05-01

    Vitrification of wastes is a relatively new application of none of man's oldest manufacturing processes. During the past 25 years it has been developed and accepted internationally for immobilizing the most highly radioactive wastes from spent nuclear fuel. By the year 2005, there will be nine operating high-level radioactive vitrification plants. Many of the technical ''lessons learned'' from this international program can be applied to much less hazardous materials such as naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). With the deployment of low capital and operating cost systems, vitrification should become a broadly applied process for treating a large variety of wastes. In many situations, the wastes can be transformed into marketable products. This paper will present a general description of waste vitrification, summarize some of its key advantages, provide some test data for a small sample of one NORM, and suggest how this process may be applied to NORM

  10. Investigation of crystallization kinetics and deformation behavior in supercooled liquid region of CuZr-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ke; Fan, Xinhui; Li, Bing; Li, Yanhong; Wang, Xin; Xu, Xuanxuan [Xi' an Technological Univ. (China). School of Material and Chemical Engineering

    2017-08-15

    In this paper, a systematic study of crystallization kinetics and deformation behavior is presented for (Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}){sub 94}Al{sub 6} bulk metallic glass in the supercooled liquid region. Crystallization results showed that the activation energy for (Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}){sub 94}Al{sub 6} was calculated using the Arrhenius equation in isothermal mode and the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose method in non-isothermal mode. The activation energy was quite high compared with other bulk metallic glasses. Based on isothermal transformation kinetics described by the Johson-Mehl-Avrami model, the average Avrami exponent of about 3.05 implies a mainly diffusion controlled three-dimensional growth with an increasing nucleation rate during the crystallization. For warm deformation, the results showed that deformation behavior, composed of homogeneous and inhomogeneous deformation, is strongly dependent on strain rate and temperature. The homogeneous deformation transformed from non-Newtonian flow to Newtonian flow with a decrease in strain rate and an increase in temperature. It was found that the crystallization during high temperature deformation is induced by heating. The appropriate working temperature/strain rate combination for the alloy forming, without in-situ crystallization, was deduced by constructing an empirical deformation map. The optimum process condition for (Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50}){sub 94}Al{sub 6} can be expressed as T∝733 K and ∝ ε 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}.

  11. Vitrification melter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.A.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a study performed to identify the most promising vitrification melter technologies that the Department of Energy (EM-50) might pursue with available funding. The primary focus was on plasma arc systems and graphite arc melters. The study was also intended to assist EM-50 in evaluating competing technologies, formulating effective technology strategy, developing focused technology development projects, and directing the work of contractors involved in vitrification melter development

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant applied technology plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, O.L.

    1990-09-01

    This Applied Technology Plan describes the process development, verification testing, equipment adaptation, and waste form qualification technical issues and plans for resolution to support the design, permitting, and operation of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. The scope of this Plan includes work to be performed by the research and development contractor, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, other organizations within Westinghouse Hanford Company, universities and companies with glass technology expertise, and other US Department of Energy sites. All work described in this Plan is funded by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project and the relationship of this Plan to other waste management documents and issues is provided for background information. Work to performed under this Plan is divided into major areas that establish a reference process, develop an acceptable glass composition envelope, and demonstrate feed processing and glass production for the range of Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant feeds. Included in this work is the evaluation and verification testing of equipment and technology obtained from the Defense Waste Processing Facility, the West Valley Demonstration Project, foreign countries, and the Hanford Site. Development and verification of product and process models and other data needed for waste form qualification documentation are also included in this Plan. 21 refs., 4 figs., 33 tabs

  13. Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program nonradioactive-process operations summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, G.H.; Knox, C.A.; Goles, R.G.; Ethridge, L.J.; Siemens, D.H.

    1982-09-01

    The Submerged Demineralizer System is a process developed to decontaminate high-activity level water at Three Mile Island by sorbing the activity (primarily Cs and Sr) onto beds of zeolite. Pacific Northwest Laboratory's Zeolite Vitrification Demonstration Program has the responsibility of demonstrating the full-scale vitrification of this zeolite material. The first phase of this program has been to develop a glass formulation and demonstrate the vitrification process with the use of nonradioactive materials. During this phase, four full-scale nonradioactive demonstration runs were completed. The same zeolite mixture being used in the SDS system was loaded with nonradioactive isotopes of Cs and Sr, dried, blended with glass-forming chemicals and fed to a canister in an in-can melter furnace. During each run, the gaseous effluents were sampled. After each run, glass samples were removed and analyzed

  14. Final Report for Crucible -Scale Radioactive Vitrification and Product Test of Waste Envelope B (AZ-102) Low-Activity Waste Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CRAWFORD, CHARLES

    2004-01-01

    A proof-of-technology demonstration for the Hanford River Protection Project (RPP) Waste treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) was performed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). As part of this demonstration, treated AZ-102 Low-Activity Waste supernate was vitrified using a crucible-scale furnace. Initial glass samples were quench-cooled and characterized for metals and radionuclides. The glass was also durability tested using the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Product Consistency Test (PCT) protocol. These tests used the AZ-102 glass formulation Low Activity Waste (LAW) B88 that targeted AZ-102 waste loading at 5 wt% Na2O. After these initial results were obtained with the quench-cooled LAWB88 glass, a prototypical container centerline cooling (CCC) program was supplied to SRTC by WTP. A portion of the quench-cooled LAWB88 glass was remelted and centerline cooled. Samples from the CCC low-activity AZ-102 glass waste form were durability tested using the PCT and characterized for crystalline phase identification.This final report documents the characterization and durability of this AZ-102 glass

  15. Solidification and vitrification life-cycle economics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method, whereas vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ex situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450,000 m 3 of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper s a detailed study done to: compare the economics of the solidification and vitrification processes; determine if the stigma assigned to vitrification is warranted; determine if investing millions of dollars into vitrification development, along with solidification development, at Fernald is warranted. Common parameters were determined and detailed life-cycle cost estimates were made. Incorporating the unit costs into a computer spreadsheet allowed 'what if' scenarios to be performed. Some scenarios investigated included variation of: remediation times, amount of wastes treated, treatment efficiencies, electrical and material costs and escalation

  16. Microstructure Effects on Spall Strength of Titanium-based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Rene; Hofmann, Douglas; Thadhani, Naresh; Georgia Tech Team; GT-JPL Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    The spall strength of Ti-based metallic glass composites is investigated as a function of varying volume fractions (0-80%) of in-situ formed crystalline dendrites. With increasing dendrite content, the topology changes such that neither the harder glass nor the softer dendrites dominate the microstructure. Plate-impact experiments were performed using the 80-mm single-stage gas gun over impact stresses up to 18 GPa. VISAR interferometry was used to obtain rear free-surface velocity profiles revealing the velocity pullback spall failure signals. The spall strengths were higher than for Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and remained high up to impact stress. The influence of microstructure on the spall strength is indicated by the constants of the power law fit with the decompression strain rate. Differences in fracture behavior reveal void nucleation as a dominant mechanism affecting the spall strength. The microstructure with neither 100% glass nor with very high crystalline content, provides the most tortuous path for fracture and therefore highest spall strength. The results allow projection of spall strength predictions for design of in-situ formed metallic glass composites. ARO Grant # W911NF-09 ``1-0403 NASA JPL Contract # 1492033 ``Prime # NNN12AA01C; NSF GRFP Grant #DGE-1148903; and NDSE & G.

  17. New Ti-based Ti–Cu–Zr–Fe–Sn–Si–Ag bulk metallic glass for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Shujie; Liu, Ying; Li, Haifei; Sun, Lulu [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Li, Yan [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory for Advanced Functional Materials and Thin Film Technology, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhang, Tao, E-mail: zhangtao@buaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Novel Ti{sub 47}Cu{sub 38}Zr{sub 7.5}Fe{sub 2.5}Sn{sub 2}Si{sub 1}Ag{sub 2} (at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG) with a critical diameter of 7 mm was discovered. • The present BMG is the largest Ni- and Be-free Ti-based BMG containing low content of noble metal reported to date. • The glassy alloy possesses high specific strength, low Young’s modulus, and good corrosion resistance and bio-compatibility. • Combination of high glass-forming ability and good mechano- and bio-compatibility for the Ti-based BMG demonstrates the potential for use in biomedical applications. - Abstract: A novel Ni-free Ti{sub 47}Cu{sub 38}Zr{sub 7.5}Fe{sub 2.5}Sn{sub 2}Si{sub 1}Ag{sub 2} (at.%) bulk metallic glass (BMG) with superior glass-forming ability, good mechanical properties and excellent biocompatibility was discovered. The Ti-based BMG with a diameter of 7 mm can be prepared by copper mold casting and the supercooled liquid region was 52 K. Compressive strength, specific strength, Young’s modulus and microhardness of the Ti-based BMG were about 2.08 GPa, 3.2 × 10{sup 5} N m/kg, 100 GPa and 588 Hv, respectively. Electrochemical measurements indicated that the Ti-based glassy alloy possesses higher corrosion resistance than Ti–6Al–4V alloy in a simulated body fluid environment. Attachment, spreading out and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on the Ti-based BMG surface demonstrated the excellent biocompatibility. Mechanisms of the formation and properties for the Ti-based glassy alloy are also discussed. The combination of high glass-forming ability, excellent mechanical properties, high corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility demonstrates the potential of the Ni-free Ti-based BMG for use in biomedical applications.

  18. The vitrification of high level wastes using microwave power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardwick, W.H.; Gayler, R.; Murphy, V.

    1981-01-01

    A process for radioactive waste vitrification which exploits advantages peculiar to microwave heating is under development. The advantages claimed are the removal of the heat source from the radioactive environment, the elimination of heat transfer barriers by direct coupling of the energy with the process materials, and the ability to evaporate liquors absorbed in a glass fibre matrix which constitutes the glass forming additive. This glass fibre matrix which constitutes the glass forming additive. This glass fibre is also used to filter off-gases and give a condensate free of solids. The fibre loaded with dried waste is converted to a homogeneous glass by melting using microwave power. (orig./DG)

  19. Atomistic materials modeling of complex systems: Carbynes, carbon nanotube devices and bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiqi

    The key to understanding and predicting the behavior of materials is the knowledge of their structures. Many properties of materials samples are not solely determined by their average chemical compositions which one may easily control. Instead, they are profoundly influenced by structural features of different characteristic length scales. Starting in the last century, metallurgical engineering has mostly been microstructure engineering. With the further evolution of materials science, structural features of smaller length scales down to the atomic structure, have become of interest for the purpose of properties engineering and functionalizing materials and are, therefore, subjected to study. As computer modeling is becoming more powerful due to the dramatic increase of computational resources and software over the recent decades, there is an increasing demand for atomistic simulations with the goal of better understanding materials behavior on the atomic scale. Density functional theory (DFT) is a quantum mechanics based approach to calculate electron distribution, total energy and interatomic forces with high accuracy. From these, atomic structures and thermal effects can be predicted. However, DFT is mostly applied to relatively simple systems because it is computationally very demanding. In this thesis, the current limits of DFT applications are explored by studying relatively complex systems, namely, carbynes, carbon nanotube (CNT) devices and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). Special care is taken to overcome the limitations set by small system sizes and time scales that often prohibit DFT from being applied to realistic systems under realistic external conditions. In the first study, we examine the possible existence of a third solid phase of carbon with linear bonding called carbyne, which has been suggested in the literature and whose formation has been suggested to be detrimental to high-temperature carbon materials. We have suggested potential structures for

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory simulated sludge vitrification demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero, C.A.; Bickford, D.F.; Bennert, D.M.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    Technologies are being developed to convert hazardous and mixed wastes to a form suitable for permanent disposal. Vitrification, which has been declared the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for high-level radioactive waste disposal by the EPA, is capable of producing a highly durable wasteform that minimizes disposal volumes through organic destruction, moisture evaporation, and porosity reduction. However, this technology must be demonstrated over a range of waste characteristics, including compositions, chemistries, moistures, and physical characteristics to ensure that it is suitable for hazardous and mixed waste treatment. This project plans to demonstrate vitrification of simulated wastes that are considered representatives of wastes found throughout the DOE complex. For the most part, the primary constituent of the wastes is flocculation aids, such as Fe(OH) 3 , and natural filter aids, such as diatomaceous earth and perlite. The filter aids consist mostly of silica, which serves as an excellent glass former; hence, the reason why vitrification is such a viable option. LANL is currently operating a liquid waste processing plant which produces an inorganic sludge similar to other waste water treatment streams. Since this waste has characteristics that make it suitable for vitrification and the likelihood of success is high, it shall be tested at CU. The objective of this task is to characterize the process behavior and glass product formed upon vitrification of simulated LANL sludge. The off-gases generated from the production runs will also be characterized to help further develop vitrification processes for mixed and low level wastes

  1. An alternative host matrix based on iron phosphate glasses for the vitrification of specialized nuclear waste forms. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, D.E.; Marasinghe, K.; Ray, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    'Objectives of this project are to: (1) investigate the glass composition and processing conditions that yield optimum properties for iron phosphate glasses for vitrifying radioactive waste, (2) determine the atomic structure of iron phosphate glasses and the structure-property relationships, (3) determine how the physical and structural properties of iron phosphate glasses are affected by the addition of simulated high level nuclear waste components, and (4) investigate the process and products of devitrification of iron phosphate waste forms. The glass forming ability of about 125 iron phosphate melts has been investigated in different oxidizing to reducing atmospheres using various iron oxide raw materials such as Fe 2 O 3 , FeO, Fe 3 O 4 , and FeC 2 O 4 2H 2 O. The chemical durability, redox equilibria between Fe(II) and Fe(III), crystallization behavior and structural features for these glasses and their crystalline forms have been investigated using a variety of techniques including Mossbauer spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis (DTA/TGA), and X-ray and neutron diffraction.'

  2. In situ vitrification program treatability investigation progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrenholz, D.A.

    1991-02-01

    This document presents a summary of the efforts conducted under the in situ vitrification treatability study during the period from its initiation in FY-88 until FY-90. In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that uses electrical power to convert contaminated soils into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. Contaminants present in the soil are either incorporated into the product or are pyrolyzed during treatment. The treatability study being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by EG ampersand G Idaho is directed at examining the specific applicability of the in situ vitrification process to buried wastes contaminated with transuranic radionuclides and other contaminants found at the Subsurface Disposal Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This treatability study consists of a variety of tasks, including engineering tests, field tests, vitrified product evaluation, and analytical models of the in situ vitrification process. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  3. Vitrification of organics-containing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    A process is described for stabilizing organics-containing waste materials and recovering metals therefrom, and a waste glass product made according to the process is also disclosed. Vitrification of wastes such as organic ion exchange resins, electronic components and the like can be accomplished by mixing at least one transition metal oxide with the wastes, and, if needed, glass formers to compensate for a shortage of silicates or other glass formers in the wastes. The transition metal oxide increases the rate of oxidation of organic materials in the wastes to improve the composition of the glass-forming mixture: at low temperatures, the oxide catalyzes oxidation of a portion of the organics in the waste; at higher temperatures, the oxide dissolves and the resulting oxygen ions oxidize more of the organics; and at vitrification temperatures, the metal ions conduct oxygen into the melt to oxidize the remaining organics. In addition, the transition metal oxide buffers the redox potential of the glass melt so that metals such as Au, Pt, Ag, and Cu separate from the melt in the metallic state and can be recovered. After the metals are recovered, the remainder of the melt is allowed to cool and may subsequently be disposed of. The product has good leaching resistance and can be disposed of in an ordinary landfill, or, alternatively, used as a filler in materials such as concrete, asphalt, brick and tile. 1 fig

  4. Choosing solidification or vitrification for low-level radioactive and mixed waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method. Whereas, vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ironically, economic studies, as presented in this paper, show that vitrification may be more competitive in some high volume applications. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450 000m 3 of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarizes how Fernald is choosing between solidification and vitrification as the primary waste treatment method

  5. Choosing solidification or vitrification for low-level radioactive and mixed waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimpel, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Solidification (making concrete) and vitrification (making glass) are frequently the treatment methods recommended for treating inorganic or radioactive wastes. Solidification is generally perceived as the most economical treatment method. Whereas, vitrification is considered (by many) as the most effective of all treatment methods. Unfortunately, vitrification has acquired the stigma that it is too expensive to receive further consideration as an alternative to solidification in high volume treatment applications. Ironically, economic studies, as presented in this paper, show that vitrification may be more competitive in some high volume applications. Ex-situ solidification and vitrification are the competing methods for treating in excess of 450,000 m 3 of low-level radioactive and mixed waste at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP or simply, Fernald) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. This paper summarized how Fernald is choosing between solidification and vitrification as the primary waste treatment method

  6. Investigation on Explosive Welding of Zr53Cu35Al12 Bulk Metallic Glass with Crystalline Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianrui; Chen, Pengwan; Zhou, Qiang

    2018-05-01

    A Zr53Cu35Al12 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was welded to a crystalline Cu using explosive welding technique. The morphology and the composition of the composite were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The investigation indicated that the BMG and Cu were tightly joined together without visible defects, and a thin diffusion layer appeared at the interface. The captured jet at the end of the welding region mostly comes from the Cu side. Amorphous and partially crystallized structures have been observed within the diffusion layer, but the BMG in close proximity to the interface still retains its amorphous state. Nanoindentation tests reveal that the interface exhibits an increment in hardness compared with the matrix on both sides.

  7. Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of Spark Plasma Sintered Fe-Based Bulk Metallic Glass/Graphite Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulin Ji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bulk metallic glass (BMG and BMG-graphite composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering at the sintering temperature of 575 °C and holding time of 15 min. The sintered composites exhibited partial crystallization and the presence of distributed porosity and graphite particles. The effect of graphite reinforcement on the tribological properties of the BMG/graphite composites was investigated using dry ball-on-disc sliding wear tests. The reinforcement of graphite resulted in a reduction in both the wear rate and the coefficient of friction as compared to monolithic BMG samples. The wear surfaces of BMG/graphite composites showed regions of localized wear loss due to microcracking and fracture, as was also the case with the regions covered with graphite-rich protective film due to smearing of pulled off graphite particles.

  8. Effect of annealing on the magnetic properties of Nd70Fe20Al10 bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivetti, Elena; Baricco, Marcello; Ferrara, Enzo; Tiberto, Paola; Martino, Luca

    2005-01-01

    In this work, the influence of thermal treatments on the hysteresis behaviour of Nd 70 Fe 20 Al 10 bulk metallic glasses is studied. Two samples obtained applying different quenching rates have been characterized: (a) master alloy ingots, prepared through arc melting, and (b) cone-shaped ingots obtained by copper mould casting. DSC measurements have been performed on both alloys. Selected samples have been submitted to subsequent annealing. Hard magnetic properties have been observed at room temperature either in the as-cast master alloy or in the cone-shaped ingots. High values of coercivity are still observed after treatment at temperatures close to the crystallisation temperature (up to 500 deg. C). The different magnetic behaviour of the samples is discussed in terms of differences in the residual amorphous phase composition

  9. Second amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation in Cu(60)Ti(20)Zr(20) bulk metallic glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Q P; Li, J F; Zhang, P N; Horsewell, A; Jiang, J Z; Zhou, Y H

    2007-06-20

    The second amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation in Cu(60)Ti(20)Zr(20) bulk metallic glass was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffractometry. The difference of the Gibbs free energies between the amorphous phase and the crystalline products during the transformation is estimated to be about 2.46 kJ mol(-1) at 753 K, much smaller than the 61 kJ mol(-1) obtained assuming that it is a polymorphic transformation. It was revealed that the phase transformation occurs through a eutectic crystallization of Cu(51)Zr(14) and Cu(2)TiZr, having an effective activation energy of the order of 400 kJ mol(-1). The average Avrami exponent n is about 2.0, indicating that the crystallization is diffusion controlled.

  10. Nanoindentation study on the characteristic of shear transformation zone in a Pd-based bulk metallic glass during serrated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, G. K.; Long, Z. L.; Zhao, M. S. Z.; Peng, L.; Chai, W.; Ping, Z. H.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the research on the evolution of shear transformation zone (STZ) in a Pd-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) during serrated flow under nanoindentation. A novel method of estimating the STZ volume through statistical analysis of the serrated flow behavior was proposed for the first time. Based on the proposed method, the STZ volume of the studied BMG at various peak loads have been systematically investigated. The results indicate that the measured STZ volumes are in good agreement with that documented in literature, and the STZ size exhibits an increasing trend during indentation. Moreover, the correlation between the serrated flow dynamics and the STZ activation has also been evaluated. It is found that the STZ activation can promote the formation of self-organized critical (SOC) state during serrated flow.

  11. Relation between calculated Lennard-Jones potential and thermal stability of Cu-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T.; Bian, X.F.; Jiang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Two metallic bulk glasses, Cu 60 Zr 30 Ti 10 and Cu 47 Ti 33 Zr 11 Ni 8 Si 1 , with a diameter of 3 mm were prepared by copper mold casting method. Dilatometric measurement was carried out on the two glassy alloys to obtain information about the average nearest-neighbour distance r 0 and the effective depth of pair potential V 0 . By assuming a Lennard-Jones potential, r 0 and V 0 were calculated to be 0.28 nm and 0.16 eV for Cu 60 Zr 30 Ti 10 and 0.27 nm and 0.13 eV for Cu 47 Ti 33 Zr 11 Ni 8 Si 1 , respectively. It was found that the glassy alloy Cu 60 Zr 30 Ti 10 was more stable than Cu 47 Ti 33 Zr 11 Ni 8 Si 1 against heating from both experiment and calculation

  12. Alloying effect on the room temperature creep characteristics of a Ti-Zr-Be bulk metallic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pan; Wang, Sibo; Li, Fangwei; Wang, Xinyun

    2018-02-01

    The effect of alloying elements (e.g. Fe, Al, and Ni) on the room temperature creep behavior of a lightweight Ti41Zr25Be34 bulk metallic glass (BMG) was investigated via nanoindentation tests. The generalized Kelvin model was adopted to describe the creep curves. The strain rate sensitivity m has been derived as a measure of the creep resistance. The compliance spectrum and retardation spectrum were also derived. The results show that the creep resistance of Ti41Zr25Be34 alloy can be obviously improved with the addition of alloying elements, and the most effective element is found to be Al. The mechanism for enhancing the creep resistance was discussed in terms of the scale variation of the shear transformation zone induced by alloying.

  13. Indentation size effects in the nano- and micro-hardness of a Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, F., E-mail: xufu@xtu.edu.cn; Ding, Y.H.; Deng, X.H.; Zhang, P.; Long, Z.L.

    2014-10-01

    Hardness of a Fe-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) was evaluated by both atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation (nano-hardness) and instrumented indentation with a traditional indenter setup (micro-hardness) under different maximum loads at room temperature. The nano-hardness and the micro-hardness were found to be comparable. For both of the indentation methods, indentation size effect (ISE) is detected as increase in hardness with decrease in indentation peak load. It is proposed that strain rate dependent softening, loading history and the lag between free volume creation and mechanical softening should be responsible for the ISE in this BMG. Furthermore, ISE is found to be more significant in AFM nanoindentation than in instrumented indentation. This can be explained by taking into account the effect of exerted peak load and the face angle of the indenter in a qualitative manner.

  14. Fracture toughness study of new Zr-based Be-bearing bulk metallic glasses

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, C. Paul; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Wiest, Aaron; Lind, Mary Laura; Conner, R. Dale; Johnson, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Three new compositional variants of the Zr–Ti–Be–LTM (late transition metal) family of metallic glasses are discussed. Thermal stability, ΔT = T_x−T_g, was increased from 82 °C for Zr_(41.2)Ti_(13.8)Cu_(12.5)Ni_(10)Be_(22.5) (Viterloy 1) to 141 °C for Zr_(44)Ti_(11)Cu_(20)Be_(25). It is found that fracture toughness is the most distinguishing parameter characterizing the alloys in contrast to other mechanical properties. Quaternary alloys consistently had fracture toughness values exceeding 8...

  15. The role of troublesome components in plutonium vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong; Vienna, J.D.; Peeler, D.K.; Hrma, P.; Schweiger, M.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    One option for immobilizing surplus plutonium is vitrification in a borosilicate glass. Two advantages of the glass form are (1) high tolerance to feed variability and, (2) high solubility of some impurity components. The types of plutonium-containing materials in the United States inventory include: pits, metals, oxides, residues, scrap, compounds, and fuel. Many of them also contain high concentrations of carbon, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide. To vitrify plutonium-containing scrap and residues, it is critical to understand the impact of each component on glass processing and chemical durability of the final product. This paper addresses glass processing issues associated with these troublesome components. It covers solubility limits of chlorine, fluorine, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide in several borosilicate based glasses, and the effect of each component on vitrification (volatility, phase segregation, crystallization, and melt viscosity). Techniques (formulation, pretreatment, removal, and/or dilution) to mitigate the effect of these troublesome components are suggested.

  16. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Technology Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton, R.A.

    1988-06-01

    The reference Hanford plan for disposal of defense high-level waste is based on waste immobilization in glass by the vitrification process and temporary vitrified waste storage at the Hanford Site until final disposal in a geologic repository. A companion document to the Hanford Waste Management Plan (HWMP) is the Draft, Interim Hanford Waste Management Technology Plan (HWMTP), which provides a description of the technology that must be developed to meet the reference waste management plan. One of the issues in the HWMTP is DST-6, Immobilization (Glass). The HWMTP includes all expense funding needed to complete the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project. A preliminary HWVP Technology Plan was prepared in 1985 as a supporting document to the HWMTP to provide a more detailed description of the technology needed to construct and operate a vitrification facility. The plan was updated and issued in 1986, and revised in 1987. This document is an annual update of the plan. The HWVP Technology Plan is limited in scope to technology that requires development or confirmation testing. Other expense-funded activities are not included. The relationship between the HWVP Technology Plan and other waste management issues addressed in the HWMTP is described in section 1.6 of this plan. 6 refs., 4 figs., 34 tabs

  17. Off-Gas Analysis During the Vitrification of Hanford Radioactive Waste Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Crawford, C.L.; Choi, A.S.; Bibler, N.E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the off-gas analysis of samples collected during the radioactive vitrification experiments. Production and characterization of the Hanford waste-containing LAW and HAW glasses are presented in related reports from this conference

  18. Vitrification testing of simulated high-level radioactive waste at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.M. Jr.; Nakaoka, R.R.

    1986-03-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant may apply vitrification technology, being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to solidify selected Hanford waste streams prior to disposal in a federal repository. Based on the first stage of flowsheet development and laboratory testing, a reference working glass and two candidate simulated feed slurries were recommended for vitrification testing. Over 500 hours of melter testing were performed in 1985 during prototype vitrification experiments. Testing demonstrated that the slurry compositions had acceptable processing characteristics in a ceramic melter. A pre-made glass-former frit was determined to be preferred as the method of glass-former addition. Due to a high chromium content in the waste, spinal crystal formation and settling occurred in the glass tank. The nature and extent of off-gas effluents were consistent with past experiments processing slurries containing formic acid

  19. Vitrification and some physical and chemical properties of glass in the BaO-B2O3-GeO2 system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhavadyan, V.G.; Kostanyan, K.A.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of the determination of the areas of glass-transition in RO-B 2 O-GeO 2 systems (where R=Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) and of the study of the density, the refraction index and the coefficient of linear thermal expansion of glasses of the BaO-B 2 O 3 -GeO 2 system as a function of the composition. It is shown that the substitution of the glass forming agent in the borogermanate component by BaO leads to a non-linear growth of the density. A negative deviation is observed of the experimental variation of the molar volume from the ideal and the positive deviation of the refraction indices from the ideal values. A content of 30 % and over of BaO brings about a sharp increase in the value of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion. Changes of the m lar volume, refraction index and coefficient of linear thermal expansion of glasses as a function of their compositions is due to the variation of the coordination number of boron on charge of the BaO/B 2 O 3 ratio

  20. Three-Dimensional Printing of Vitrification Loop Prototypes for Aquatic Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiersch, Nolan J; Childress, William M; Tiersch, Terrence R

    2018-05-16

    Vitrification is a method of cryopreservation that freezes samples rapidly, while forming an amorphous solid ("glass"), typically in small (μL) volumes. The goal of this project was to create, by three-dimensional (3D) printing, open vitrification devices based on an elliptical loop that could be efficiently used and stored. Vitrification efforts can benefit from the application of 3D printing, and to begin integration of this technology, we addressed four main variables: thermoplastic filament type, loop length, loop height, and method of loading. Our objectives were to: (1) design vitrification loops with varied dimensions; (2) print prototype loops for testing; (3) evaluate loading methods for the devices; and (4) classify vitrification responses to multiple device configurations. The various configurations were designed digitally using 3D CAD (Computer Aided Design) software, and prototype devices were produced with MakerBot ® 3D printers. The thermoplastic filaments used to produce devices were acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA). Vitrification devices were characterized by the film volumes formed with different methods of loading (pipetting or submersion). Frozen films were classified to determine vitrification quality: zero (opaque, or abundant crystalline ice formation); one (translucent, or partial vitrification), or two (transparent, or substantial vitrification, glass). A published vitrification solution was used to conduct experiments. Loading by pipetting formed frozen films more reliably than by submersion, but submersion yielded fewer filling problems and was more rapid. The loop designs that yielded the highest levels of vitrification enabled rapid transfer of heat, and most often were characterized as being longer and consisting of fewer layers (height). 3D printing can assist standardization of vitrification methods and research, yet can also provide the ability to quickly design and fabricate custom devices when

  1. Effect of MoSi2 Content on Dry Sliding Tribological Properties of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Yang, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 bulk metallic glass and its composites were prepared by suction casting into a copper mold. The effect of MoSi2 content on the tribological behavior of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 BMG was studied by using a high-speed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The results indicate that the friction coefficient and wear resistance of the BMGs can be improved by a certain amount of crystalline phase induced by MoSi2 content from 1 to 3% and deteriorated with MoSi2 content of 4%. The wear mechanism of both the metallic glass and its composite is abrasive wear. The mechanism of crystalline phase-dependent tribological properties of the composite was discussed based on the wear track and mechanical properties in the present work. The wear behavior of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 BMG and its composite indicates that a good combination of the toughness and the hardness can make the composite be well wear resistant.

  2. The impact of elastic and plastic strain on relaxation and crystallization of Pd–Ni–P-based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitrofanov, Yu.P.; Peterlechner, M.; Binkowski, I.; Zadorozhnyy, M.Yu.; Golovin, I.S.; Divinski, S.V.; Wilde, G.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of deformation and subsequent heat treatment on the low-temperature heat capacity, enthalpy relaxation rate and mechanical losses of two Pd–Ni–P-based bulk metallic glasses of slightly different compositions and different thermal stabilities have been investigated. It was found that the crystallization temperatures decreased significantly with imposed strain and the effect was more pronounced for the alloy with a higher thermal stability. The boson heat capacity peak increases with increasing strain in both alloys. However, after annealing treatments above room temperature, it relaxes to a lower enthalpy state as compared to that of the as-quenched state for the alloy with a lower thermal stability. The existence of two counteracting processes that might be related to different shear band structures within one homogeneously deformed sample is suggested. These results agree with the internal friction data, which indicate different regimes of mechanical damping as a function of the strain amplitude, while the critical amplitude of a transition between the regimes depends on the imposed strain. The results are interpreted within the energy landscape approach and advocate that the composition-dependent local atomic configurations affect significantly the response of the glass to an applied strain

  3. Two-phase quasi-equilibrium in β-type Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Pauly, S.; Tang, M. Q.; Eckert, J.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of cast Ti/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) containing β-Ti still remains ambiguous. This is why to date the strategies and alloys suitable for producing such BMGCs with precisely controllable volume fractions and crystallite sizes are still rather limited. In this work, a Ti-based BMGC containing β-Ti was developed in the Ti-Zr-Cu-Co-Be system. The glassy matrix of this BMGC possesses an exceptional glass-forming ability and as a consequence, the volume fractions as well as the composition of the β-Ti dendrites remain constant over a wide range of cooling rates. This finding can be explained in terms of a two-phase quasi-equilibrium between the supercooled liquid and β-Ti, which the system attains on cooling. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium allows predicting the crystalline and glassy volume fractions by means of the lever rule and we succeeded in reproducing these values by slight variations in the alloy composition at a fixed cooling rate. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium could be of critical importance for understanding and designing the microstructures of BMGCs containing the β-phase. Its implications on the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase are elaborated. PMID:26754315

  4. Laser Shock Peening on Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glass and Its Effect on Plasticity: Experiment and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yunfeng; Xie, Xie; Antonaglia, James; Winiarski, Bartlomiej; Wang, Gongyao; Shin, Yung C.; Withers, Philip J.; Dahmen, Karin A.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-05-01

    The Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are a new family of attractive materials with good glass-forming ability and excellent mechanical properties, such as high strength and good wear resistance, which make them candidates for structural and biomedical materials. Although the mechanical behavior of BMGs has been widely investigated, their deformation mechanisms are still poorly understood. In particular, their poor ductility significantly impedes their industrial application. In the present work, we show that the ductility of Zr-based BMGs with nearly zero plasticity is improved by a laser shock peening technique. Moreover, we map the distribution of laser-induced residual stresses via the micro-slot cutting method, and then predict them using a three-dimensional finite-element method coupled with a confined plasma model. Reasonable agreement is achieved between the experimental and modeling results. The analyses of serrated flows reveal plentiful and useful information of the underlying deformation process. Our work provides an easy and effective way to extend the ductility of intrinsically-brittle BMGs, opening up wider applications of these materials.

  5. Hanford low-level vitrification melter testing -- Master list of data submittals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is conducting a two-phased effort to evaluate melter system technologies for vitrification of liquid low-level radioactive waste (LLW) streams. The evaluation effort includes demonstration testing of selected glass melter technologies and technical reports regarding the applicability of the glass melter technologies to the vitrification of Hanford LLW tank waste. The scope of this document is to identify and list vendor document submittals in technology demonstration support of the Hanford Low-Level Waste Vitrification melter testing program. The scope of this document is limited to those documents responsive to the Statement of Work, accepted and issued by the LLW Vitrification Program. The purpose of such a list is to maintain configuration control of vendor supplied data and to enable ready access to, and application of, vendor supplied data in the evaluation of melter technologies for the vitrification of Hanford low-level tank wastes

  6. The Effect of Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement Base and Bulk-fill Resin Composite on Cuspal Deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, K V; Wong, R H; Palamara, J; Burrow, M F

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated cuspal deformation in teeth restored with different types of adhesive materials with and without a base. Mesio-occluso-distal slot cavities of moderately large dimension were prepared on extracted maxillary premolars (n=24). Teeth were assigned to one of four groups and restored with either a sonic-activated bulk-fill resin composite (RC) (SonicFill), or a conventional nanohybrid RC (Herculite Ultra). The base materials used were a flowable nanofilled RC (Premise Flowable) and a high-viscosity resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Riva Light-Cure HV). Cuspal deflection was measured with two direct current differential transformers, each contacting a buccal and palatal cusp. Cuspal movements were recorded during and after restoration placement. Data for the buccal and palatal cusp deflections were combined to give the net cuspal deflection. Data varied widely. All teeth experienced net inward cuspal movement. No statistically significant differences in cuspal deflection were found among the four test groups. The use of a flowable RC or an RMGIC in closed-laminate restorations produced the same degree of cuspal movement as restorations filled with only a conventional nanohybrid or bulk-fill RC.

  7. Hanford Waste Vitrification Project overview and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, L.D.; Smets, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP) is being constructed at the US DOE's Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Engineering and design are being accomplished by Fluor Daniel Inc. in Irvine, CA. Technical input is furnished by Westinghouse Hanford Co. and construction management services by UE ampersand C-Catalytic Inc. The HWVP will immobilize high level nuclear waste in a glass matrix for eventual disposal in the federal repository. The HWVP consists of several structures, the major ones being the Vitrification Building, the Canister Storage Building, fan house, sand filter, waste hold tank, pump house, and administration and construction facilities. Construction started in April 1992 with the clearing and grubbing activities that prepared the site for fencing and construction preparation. Several design packages have been released for procurement activities. The most significant package release is for the Canister Storage Building, which will be the first major structure to be constructed

  8. Actual point about fission products vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonniaud, R.

    1982-05-01

    The main characteristics concerning the continuous vitrification process for the confinement of fission product solutions operated at AVM are summarized. The general principle of a vitrification plant is described. The AVM plant efficiency as also its conception of consumable parts interchangeability are satisfying. The evolution of the process and its application developped in two ways: a more spaced installation conception and the improvement of the weak points remarked at AVM, as also the capacity of output. Two industrial units are designed at La Hague. The future evolution of the process aims at manufacturing glass at higher temperatures about 1400 degrees Celsius. Some problems remain to be resolved for the using of ceramic melters associated with a calcination unit. The studies provide for a satisfying behaviour for the material to long-term. The risks of damage by crystallisation, leaching and effects of alpha emission are analysed [fr

  9. Investigation of the microcrack evolution in a Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and evolution behavior of the shear-bands and microcracks in a Ti-based metallic-glass–matrix composite (MGMC were investigated by using an in-situ tensile test under transmission electron microscopy (TEM. It was found that the plastic deformation of the Ti-based MGMC related with the generation of the plastic deformation zone in crystalline and shear deformation zone in glass phase near the crack tip. The dendrites can suppress the propagation of the shear band effectively. Before the rapid propagation of cracks, the extending of plastic deformation zone and shear deformation zone ahead of crack tip is the main pattern in the composite.

  10. Preparation and characterization of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses in plate form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavorato, G.C.; Fiore, G.; Castellero, A.; Baricco, M.; Moya, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous alloys with composition (at%) Fe 48 Cr 15 Mo 14 C 15 B 6 Gd 2 (alloy A) and Fe 48 Cr 15 Mo 14 C 15 B 6 Y 2 (alloy B) were prepared either using pure elements (A and B1) and a commercial AISI430 steel as a base material (B2). When prepared from pure elements both alloys (A and B1) could be cast in plate form with a fixed thickness of 2 mm and variable lengths between 10 and 20 mm by means of copper-mold injection in air atmosphere. In the case of alloy B2, prepared using commercial grade raw materials, rods of 2 mm diameter were obtained. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy observations confirmed that an amorphous structure was obtained in all the as-cast samples. A minor fraction of crystalline phases (oxides and carbides) was detected on the as-cast surface. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed a glass transition temperature at 856 K for alloy A and 841 K for alloy B1, and an onset crystallization temperature of 887 K for alloy A and 885 K for alloy B1. In the case of alloy B2 a slightly different crystallization sequence was observed. Values of hardness (∼13 GPa) and the Young modulus (∼180 GPa) were measured by nanoindentation for both the alloys. The effects of adverse casting conditions (such as air atmosphere, non-conventional injection copper mold casting and partial replacement of pure elements with commercial grade raw materials) on the glass formation and properties of the alloy are discussed.

  11. Preparation and characterization of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses in plate form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavorato, G.C. [INTECIN (FIUBA-CONICET), Paseo Colon 850, Capital Federal (Argentina); Dipartimento di Chimica IFM and NIS, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy); Fiore, G.; Castellero, A.; Baricco, M. [Dipartimento di Chimica IFM and NIS, Universita di Torino, Torino (Italy); Moya, J.A., E-mail: jmoya.fi.uba@gmail.com [IESIING, Facultad de Ingenieria e Informatica, UCASAL, Salta (Argentina); CONICET (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    Amorphous alloys with composition (at%) Fe{sub 48}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Gd{sub 2} (alloy A) and Fe{sub 48}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Y{sub 2} (alloy B) were prepared either using pure elements (A and B1) and a commercial AISI430 steel as a base material (B2). When prepared from pure elements both alloys (A and B1) could be cast in plate form with a fixed thickness of 2 mm and variable lengths between 10 and 20 mm by means of copper-mold injection in air atmosphere. In the case of alloy B2, prepared using commercial grade raw materials, rods of 2 mm diameter were obtained. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy observations confirmed that an amorphous structure was obtained in all the as-cast samples. A minor fraction of crystalline phases (oxides and carbides) was detected on the as-cast surface. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed a glass transition temperature at 856 K for alloy A and 841 K for alloy B1, and an onset crystallization temperature of 887 K for alloy A and 885 K for alloy B1. In the case of alloy B2 a slightly different crystallization sequence was observed. Values of hardness ({approx}13 GPa) and the Young modulus ({approx}180 GPa) were measured by nanoindentation for both the alloys. The effects of adverse casting conditions (such as air atmosphere, non-conventional injection copper mold casting and partial replacement of pure elements with commercial grade raw materials) on the glass formation and properties of the alloy are discussed.

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description for high-level waste form development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project has been established to convert the high-level radioactive waste associated with nuclear defense production at the Hanford Site into a waste form suitable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will mix processed radioactive waste with borosilicate material, then heat the mixture to its melting point (vitrification) to forin a glass-like substance that traps the radionuclides in the glass matrix upon cooling. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program has been established to support the mission of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. This Quality Assurance Program Description has been written to document the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program

  13. Vitrification of low level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes: Lessons learned from high level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Simultaneously, tehnologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facility sites to immobilize low-level and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes (LLMW) in durable glass formulations for permanent disposal or long-term storage. Vitrification of LLMW achieves large volume reductions (86--97 %) which minimize the associated long-term storage costs. Vitrification of LLMW also ensures that mixed wastes are stabilized to the highest level reasonably possible, e.g. equivalent to HLLW, in order to meet both current and future regulatory waste disposal specifications The tehnologies being developed for vitrification of LLMW rely heavily on the technologies developed for HLLW and the lessons learned about process and product control

  14. Process technology for vitrification of defense high-level waste at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boersma, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Vitrification in borosilicate glass is now the leading worldwide process for immobilizing high-level radioactive waste. Each vitrification project, however, has its unique mission and technical challenges. The Defense Waste Vitrification Facility (DWPF) now under construction at the Savannah River Plant will concentrate and vitrify a large amount of relatively low-power alkaline waste. Process research and development for the DWPF have produced significant advances in remote chemical operations, glass melting, off-gas treatment, slurry handling, decontamination, and welding. 6 references, 1 figure, 5 tables

  15. Am/Cm Vitrification Process: Vitrification Material Balance Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.G.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents material balance calculations for the Americium/Curium vitrification process and describes the basis used to make the calculations. The material balance calculations reported here start with the solution produced by the Am/Cm pretreatment process as described in ``Material Balance Calculations for Am/Cm Pretreatment Process (U)'', SRT-AMC-99-0178 [1]. Following pretreatment, small batches of the product will be further treated with an additional oxalic acid precipitation and washing. The precipitate from each batch will then be charged to the Am/Cm melter with glass cullet and vitrified to produce the final product. The material balance calculations in this report are designed to provide projected compositions of the melter glass and off-gas streams. Except for decanted supernate collected from precipitation and precipitate washing, the flowsheet neglects side streams such as acid washes of empty tanks that would go directly to waste. Complete listings of the results of the material balance calculations are provided in the Appendices to this report

  16. Crystallization in Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Zhou, T.J.; Rasmussen, Helge Kildahl

    2000-01-01

    The effect of pressure on the crystallization behavior of the bulk metallic glass-forming Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 alloy with a wide supercooled liquid region has been investigated by in situ high-pressure and high-temperature x-ray powder diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation......)], reporting a decrease of the crystallization temperature under pressure in a pressure range of 0-6 GPa for the bulk glass Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni9Be22.5C1 alloy. Compressibility with a volume reduction of approximately 22% at room temperature does not induce crystallization in the Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk...... glass alloy. This indicates that the densification effect induced by pressure in the pressure range investigated plays a minor role in the crystallization behavior of this bulk glass alloy. The different crystallization behavior of the carbon-free and the carbon-containing glassy alloys has been...

  17. Mechanical spectra of glass-forming liquids. I. Low-frequency bulk and shear moduli of DC704 and 5-PPE measured by piezoceramic transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecksher, Tina; Olsen, Niels Boye; Nelson, Keith Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present dynamic shear and bulk modulus measurements of supercooled tetraphenyl-tetramethyl-trisiloxane (DC704) and 5-phenyl-4-ether over a range of temperatures close to their glass transition. The data are analyzed and compared in terms of time-temperature superposition (TTS), the relaxation ...

  18. Self induced gratings in ternary SiO2:SnO2:Na2O bulk glasses by UV light seeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancry, M; Douay, M; Niay, P; Beclin, F; Menke, Y; Milanese, D; Ferraris, M; Poumellec, B

    2005-09-05

    The diffraction efficiency of gratings written in ternary SnO2:SiO2:Na2O bulk glasses rises dramatically with time after the occultation of the cw 244nm light used to write the thick hologram. This self-induced behavior lasts for several hours and ultimately leads to refractive index changes as high as 3 10-3.

  19. Corrosion study of resorbable Ca60Mg15Zn25 bulk metallic glasses in physiological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Babilas

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion activity of amorphous plates of Ca60Mg15Zn25 alloy was investigated. The biocompatible elements were selected for the alloy composition. The electrochemical corrosion and immersion tests were carried out in a multi-electrolyte fluid and Ringer's solution. Better corrosion behavior was observed for the samples tested in a multi-electrolyte fluid despite the active dissolution of Ca and Mg in Ringer's solution. The experimental results indicated that reducing concentration of NaCl from 8.6 g/dm3 for Ringer's solution to 5.75 g/dm3 caused the decrease of the corrosion rate. The volume of the hydrogen evolved after 480 min in Ringer's solution (40.1 ml/cm2 was higher in comparison with that obtained in a multi-electrolyte fluid (24.4 ml/cm2. The values of open-circuit potential (EOCP for the Ca60Mg15Zn25 glass after 1 h incubation in Ringer's solution and a multi-electrolyte fluid were determined to be −1553 and −1536 mV vs. a saturated calomel electrode (SCE. The electrochemical measurements indicated a shift of the corrosion current density (jcorr from 1062 μA/cm2 for the sample tested in Ringer's solution to 788 μA/cm2 for the specimen immersed in a multi-electrolyte fluid. The corrosion products analysis was conducted by using the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The corrosion products were identified to be CaCO3, Mg(OH2, CaO, MgO and ZnO. The mechanism of corrosion process was proposed and described based on the microscopic observations. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR also indicated that Ca(OH2, CaCO3, Zn(OH2 and Ca(Zn(OH32·2H2O mainly formed on the surface of the studied alloy. Keywords: Ca-based metallic glasses, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Corrosion resistance, Hydrogen evaluation

  20. Development of Cu-Hf-Al ternary systems and tungsten wire/particle reinforced Cu48Hf43Al9 bulk metallic glass composites for strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Joyoung; An, Jihye; Choi-Yim, Haein

    2010-01-01

    Stable bulk glass forming alloys can be developed over a wide range of compositions in Cu-Hf-Al ternary systems starting from the Cu 49 Hf 42 Al 9 bulk metallic glass. Ternary Cu-Hf-Al alloys can be cast directly from the melt into copper molds to form fully amorphous strips with thicknesses of 1 to 6 mm. The maximum critical diameter of the new Cu-Hf-Al ternary alloy was 6 mm. X-ray diffraction patterns were used to confirm the amorphous nature of the ternary Cu-Hf-Al alloys. To increase the toughness of these metallic glasses, we reinforced the Cu 48 Hf 43 Al 9 bulk metallic glass-forming liquid with a 50% volume fraction of tungsten particles and an 80% volume fraction of tungsten wires with diameters of 242.4 μm. Composites with a critical diameter of 7 mm and length 70 mm were synthesized. The structure of the composites was confirmed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties of the composites were studied in compression tests. The thermal stability and the crystallization processes of the Cu-Hf-Al alloys and composites were investigated by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Values of the glass transition temperature (T g ), the crystallization temperature (T x ), and the supercooled liquid region (ΔT = T x - T g ) are given in this paper.

  1. FeNbB bulk metallic glass: the influence of fluxing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica, Mihai; Eckert, Juergen [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Kumar, Santosh [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Roth, Stefan [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Ram, Shanker [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Yavari, Alain Reza [LTPCM-CNRS, Institut National Politechnique de Grenoble, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP 75, Saint Martin d' Heres Campus 38402 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Recently, a new Fe-based BMG containing only 3 elements and a very high boron (Fe{sub 66}Nb{sub 4}B{sub 30}) content was synthesized. The preparation of this BMG was done by employing the copper mould casting method and using the fluxing technique. This new BMG is ferromagnetic, with a Curie temperature around 550 K and a saturation magnetization of 105 emu/g. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) investigations revealed a reduced glass transition temperature of 0.58 and an extension of the supercooled liquid region of about 31 K, values which indicate a relatively good thermal stability. Fluxed and not-fluxed master alloys were used to cast samples. The present work aims to discuss, for both kinds of samples, the kinetics of the phase formation using the Kissinger analysis and Johnson-Mehl-Avrami plots, correlated with the results obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD) of samples with different metastable structures. Additionally, the magnetic behaviour of different phase(s) is discussed.

  2. The In Situ Vitrification Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1988-10-01

    The Columbia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) is pleased to submit the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Project to the Pacific Northwest Council for consideration as the Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement. The ISV process, developed by Battelle-Northwest researchers beginning in 1980, converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. In this way it stabilizes hazardous chemical and radioactive wastes and makes them chemically inert. This report describes the process. A square array of four molybdenum electrodes is inserted into the ground to the desired treatment depth. Because soil is not electrically conductive when the moisture has been driven off, a conductive mixture of flaked graphite and glass frit is placed among the electrodes as a starter path. An electrical potential is applied to the electrodes to establish an electric current in the starter path. The resultant power heats the starter path and surrounding soil to 2000/degree/C, well above the initial soil-melting temperature of 1100/degree/C to 1400/degree/C. The graphite starter path is eventually consumed by oxidation, and the current is transferred to the molten soil, which is electrically conductive. As the molten or vitrified zone grows, it incorporates radionuclides and nonvolatile hazardous elements, such as heavy metals, and destroys organic components by pyrolysis. 2 figs

  3. Method of vitrificating fine-containing liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Minoru; Matsunaka, Kazuhisa.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a vitrificating method of liquid wastes containing fines (metal powder discharged upon cutting fuel cans) used in a process for treating high level radioactive liquid wastes or a process for treating liquid wastes from nuclear power plants. Liquid wastes containing fines, slurries, etc. are filtered by a filter vessel comprising glass fibers. The fines are supplied as they are to a glass melting furnace placed in the vessel. Filterates formed upon filteration are mixed with other high level radioactive wastes and supplied together with starting glass material to the glass melting furnace. Since the fine-containing liquid wastes are processed separately from high radioactive liquid wastes, clogging of pipeways, etc. can be avoided, supply to the melting furnace is facilitated and the operation efficiency of the vitrification process can be improved. (I.N.)

  4. Vitrification of transuranic and beta-gamma contaminated solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukes, M.D.

    1980-06-01

    Vitrification of solid transuranic contaminated (TRU) wastes alone and with high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) was studied. Homogeneous glasses containing 20 to 30 wt % ash were made by using glass frits previously developed at the Savannah River Plant and Pacific Northwest Laboratories. If the ash is vitrified along with the HLLW, 1.0 wt % as can be added to the waste forms without affecting their quality. This loading of ash is well above the loading required by the relative amounts of HLLW and TRU ash that will be processed at the Savannah River Plant. Vitrification of TRU-contaminated electropolishing sludges and high efficiency particular air filter materials along with HLLW would require an increase in the quantity of glass to be produced. However, if these TRU-contaminated solids were vitrified with the HLLW, the addition of low-level beta-gamma contaminated ash would require no further increase in glass production

  5. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS trademark) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB's as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology

  6. On the induction of homogeneous bulk crystallization in Eu-doped calcium aluminosilicate glass by applying simultaneous high pressure and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz, R. F., E-mail: robsonfmuniz@yahoo.com.br [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS-Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, 87020900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Ligny, D. de [Department of Materials Science, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen Nürnberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Le Floch, S.; Martinet, C.; Guyot, Y. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 CNRS-Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Rohling, J. H.; Medina, A. N.; Sandrini, M.; Baesso, M. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, 87020900, Maringá, PR (Brazil); Andrade, L. H. C.; Lima, S. M. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Óptica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, C.P. 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil)

    2016-06-28

    From initial calcium aluminosilicate glass, transparent glass-ceramics have been successfully synthesized under simultaneous high pressure and temperature (SHPT). Possible homogeneous volumetric crystallization of this glassy system, which was not achieved previously by means of conventional heat treatment, has been put in evidence with a SHPT procedure. Structural, mechanical, and optical properties of glass and glass-ceramic obtained were investigated. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction allowed to identify two main crystalline phases: merwinite [Ca{sub 3}Mg(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}] and diopside [CaMgSi{sub 2}O{sub 6}]. A Raman scanning profile showed that the formation of merwinite is quite homogeneous over the bulk sample. However, the sample surface also contains significant diopside crystals. Instrumented Berkovich nanoindentation was applied to determine the effect of SHPT on hardness from glass to glass-ceramic. For Eu-doped samples, the broadband emission due to 4f{sup 6}5d{sup 1} → 4f{sup 7} transition of Eu{sup 2+} was studied in both host systems. Additionally, the {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub J} transition of Eu{sup 3+} was used as an environment probe in the pristine glass and the glass-ceramic.

  7. Behavior of mercury and iodine during vitrification of simulated alkaline Purex waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holton, L.K.

    1981-09-01

    Current plans indicate that the high-level wastes stored at the Savannah River Plant will be solidified by vitrification. The behavior of mercury and iodine during the vitrification process is of concern because: mercury is present in the waste in high concentrations (0.1 to 2.8 wt%); mercury will react with iodine and the other halogens present in the waste during vitrification and; the mercury compounds formed will be volatilized from the vitrification process placing a high particulate load in the vitrification system off-gas. Twelve experiments were completed to study the behavior of mercury during vitrification of simulated SRP Purex waste. The mercury was completely volatized from the vitrification system in all experiments. The mercury reacted with iodine, chlorine and oxygen to form a fine particulate solid. Quantitative recovery of mercury compounds formed in the vitrification system off-gas was not possible due to high (37 to 90%) deposition of solids in the off-gas piping. The behavior of mercury and iodine was most strongly influenced by the vitrification system atmosphere. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was low (< 1 vol%); iodine retention in the glass product was 27 to 55%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 75 to 85 wt%, and a small quantity of metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution. During experiments performed in which the oxygen content of the vitrification system atmosphere was high (20 vol%), iodide retention in the glass product was 3 to 15%, the mercury composition of the solids recovered from the off-gas scrub solutions was 60 to 80 wt%, and very little metallic mercury was recovered from the off-gas scrub solution

  8. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10 -5 parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables

  9. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  10. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  11. Vitrification operational experiences and lessons learned at the WVDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamel, W.F. Jr.; Sheridan, M.J.; Valenti, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) commenced full, high-level radioactive waste (HLW) processing activities in July 1996. The HLW consists of a blend of washed plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) sludge, neutralized thorium extraction (THOREX) waste, and cesium-loaded zeolite. The waste product is borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters, sealed for eventual disposal in a federal repository. This paper discusses the WVDP vitrification process, focusing on operational experience and lessons learned during the first year of continuous, remote operation

  12. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technology progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, B.A.; Scott, J.L.; Allen, C.R.

    1989-10-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is currently being designed to safely process and temporarily store immobilized defense liquid high-level wastes from the Hanford Site. These wastes will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass waste form in the HWVP and stored onsite until a qualified geologic waste repository is ready for permanent disposal. Because of the diversity of wastes to be disposed of, specific technical issues are being addressed so that the plant can be designed and operated to produce a waste form that meets the requirements for permanent disposal in a geologic repository. This paper reports the progress to date in addressing these issues. 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Influence of compositions on thermal stability and thermodynamic parameter in Ca-Mg-Cu bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, A. A.; Khond, A. A.; Palikundwar, U. A.

    2018-05-01

    In the present manuscript, influence of compositions on thermal stability (ΔTx) and thermodynamic parameter PHSS of Ca-Mg-Cu bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is evaluated. The statistical approach of regression analysis is adopted to investigate the compositional variation with ΔTx and PHSS. It is found that calcium (Ca) and copper (Cu) content has goodlinear relationship with ΔTx and PHSS. It is observed that with increase in Ca content, ΔTx and PHSS decreases. On the other hand, increase in Cu content, both ΔTx and PHSS increases. Correlation fit of magnesium (Mg) content with both ΔTx and PHSS is very poor. A graph is also plotted to understand the relationship between ΔTx and PHSS. Result of the relationship between ΔTx and PHSS reveals that the alloy composition having more negative value of PHSS will have more stability. Therefore, compositions with more negative value of PHSS will lead to ease of BMGs formation in Ca-Mg-Cu alloy system and hence more stable it will be. It is expected that these results will be supportive in identifying the compositions having these elements for making BMGs.

  14. Improved Plasticity of Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass at Room Temperature by Electroless Thin Nickel Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available By restricting the dilated deformation, surface modification can stimulate multiple shear banding and improve the plasticity of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs. Aimed at modifying the surface of BMGs by thin layers, a crystalline Ni coating with ultrafine grains was coated on the surface of a Ti-based BMG by electroless plating. With a thickness of about 10 μm, the prepared thin coating could effectively limit the fast propagation of primary shear bands and stimulate the nucleation of multiple shear bands. As a result, the compression plasticity of the coated Ti-based BMG was improved to about 3.7% from near 0% of the non-coated BMG. Except for a small amount of Ni coating was adhered to the BMG substrate after fracture, most of the coatings were peeled off from the surface. It can be attributed to the abnormal growth of some coarse grains/particles in local region of the coating, which induces a large tensile stress at the interface between the coating and the BMG substrate. It is suggested that, for electroless nickel plating, improving the adhesive bonding strength between the coating and the substrate has a better geometric restriction effect than simply increasing the thickness of the coating.

  15. The influence of Zr substitution for Nb on the corrosion behaviors of the Ni-Nb-Zr bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, DengKe; Zhu, ZhengWang; Zhang, HaiFeng; Wang, AiMin; Hu, ZhuangQi

    2012-12-01

    The influence of Zr content on corrosion behaviors of the Ni61.5Nb38.5- x Zr x ( x=1, 3, 5, 7, 9 at.%) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) in 1 M HCl aqueous solution was investigated by potentiodynamic polarization measurements and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). It was found that these BMG alloys possess superior corrosion resistance, that is, with large passive region of about 1.5 V and low passive current density (as low as 0.05 Am-2 for Ni61.5Nb31.5Zr7). XPS analysis indicates that the high corrosion resistance is attributed to the formation of Nb- and Zr-enriched surface films formed in the aggressive acid solution. The Zr substitution for Nb effectively reduces the Ni content, particularly the metallic state Ni content in the surface films, which depresses the electrical conduction of the surface films and reduces the passive current density, thus leading to the enhancement of the corrosion resistance of these Ni-Nb-Zr BMGs. These alloys may potentially be useful for engineering applications.

  16. Theoretical prediction of Grüneisen parameter for SiO_2.TiO_2 bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Chandra K.; Pandey, Brijesh K.; Pandey, Anjani K.

    2016-01-01

    The Grüneisen parameter (γ) is very important to decide the limitations for the prediction of thermoelastic properties of bulk metallic glasses. It can be defined in terms of microscopic and macroscopic parameters of the material in which former is based on vibrational frequencies of atoms in the material while later is closely related to its thermodynamic properties. Different formulation and equation of states are used by the pioneer researchers of this field to predict the true sense of Gruneisen parameter for BMG but for SiO_2.TiO_2 very few and insufficient information is available till now. In the present work we have tested the validity of two different isothermal EOS viz. Poirrior-Tarantola EOS and Usual-Tait EOS to predict the true value of Gruneisen parameter for SiO_2.TiO_2 as a function of compression. Using different thermodynamic limitations related to the material constraints and analyzing obtained result it is concluded that the Poirrior-Tarantola EOS gives better numeric values of Grüneisen parameter (γ) for SiO_2.TiO_2 BMG.

  17. Microstructural evolution and homogeneous viscous flow behavior of a Cu–Zr based bulk metallic glass composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.Y.; Yuan, Z.Z.; Li, D.X.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Stress–strain behaviors of the BMGCs are strain rate and temperature dependent. • Micro-crystals are compressed to concave polygon in shape and align in line. • Nano-crystals nuclear and aggregate during high temperature deformation. • Deformation behavior is governed by homogeneous flow of the amorphous matrix. - Abstract: The high temperature compression behavior of Cu 40 Zr 44 Ag 8 Al 8 rods with 6 mm in diameter was investigated and compared with the literature data. Microstructure of the as-cast rods were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscope in the composites state with microscale Al 3 Zr particles embedded in the amorphous matrix. Deformation results show that the stress–strain behaviors of the bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) are strain rate and temperature dependent. In addition, SEM observations reveal that the initially spherical and randomly distributed microscale particles in the amorphous matrix deform to concave polygon in shape and align perpendicular to the load direction during the compression. Meanwhile nano-crystals precipitate continuously from the matrix and aggregate during deformation. Rheological analysis show that the BMGCs exhibit a transition from Newtonian to non-Newtonian in flow behavior dependent on the stain rate. Particles in the amorphous matrix have reinforcement effect on the BMGCs, but the deformation behavior is still dominated by the homogeneous flow of the amorphous matrix phase

  18. Studies of Shear Band Velocity Using Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Strain During Quasistatic Compression of Bulk Metallic Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, W J; Samale, M; Hufnagel, T; LeBlanc, M; Florando, J

    2009-06-15

    We have made measurements of the temporal and spatial features of the evolution of strain during the serrated flow of Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glass tested under quasistatic, room temperature, uniaxial compression. Strain and load data were acquired at rates of up to 400 kHz using strain gages affixed to all four sides of the specimen and a piezoelectric load cell located near the specimen. Calculation of the displacement rate requires an assumption about the nature of the shear displacement. If one assumes that the entire shear plane displaces simultaneously, the displacement rate is approximately 0.002 m/s. If instead one assumes that the displacement occurs as a localized propagating front, the velocity of the front is approximately 2.8 m/s. In either case, the velocity is orders of magnitude less than the shear wave speed ({approx}2000 m/s). The significance of these measurements for estimates of heating in shear bands is discussed.

  19. On the use of atomistic simulations to aid bulk metallic glasses structural elucidation with solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ary R; Rino, José P

    2017-08-24

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) experimental 27 Al metallic shifts reported in the literature for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were revisited in the light of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. In a consistent way, the Gauge-Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method was applied in conjunction with classical molecular dynamics (CMD). A series of Zr-Cu-Al alloys with low Al concentrations were selected as case study systems, for which realistic CMD derived structural models were used for a short- and medium-range order mining. That initial procedure allowed the detection of trends describing changes on the microstructure of the material upon Al alloying, which in turn were used to guide GIPAW calculations with a set of abstract systems in the context of ssNMR. With essential precision and accuracy, the ab initio simulations also yielded valuable trends from the electronic structure point of view, which enabled an overview of the bonding nature of Al-centered clusters as well as its influence on the experimental ssNMR outcomes. The approach described in this work might promote the use of ssNMR spectroscopy in research on glassy metals. Moreover, the results presented demonstrate the possibility to expand the applications of this technique, with deeper insight into nuclear interactions and less speculative assignments.

  20. Effect of pre-existing shear bands on the tensile mechanical properties of a bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Q.P.; Liu, J.W.; Yang, K.J.; Xu, F.; Yao, Z.Q.; Minkow, A.; Fecht, H.J.; Ivanisenko, J.; Chen, L.Y.; Wang, X.D.; Qu, S.X.; Jiang, J.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Bulk Zr 64.13 Cu 15.75 Ni 10.12 Al 10 metallic glass has been rolled at room temperature in two different directions, and the dependences of microstructure and tensile mechanical property on the degree of deformation and rolling directions have been investigated. No deformation-induced crystallization occurs except for shear bands. Shear band formation in conjugated directions is achieved in the specimen rolled in two directions, while rolling in one direction induces shear band formation only in a single direction. Pre-existing properly spaced soft inhomogeneities can stabilize shear bands and lead to tensile plastic strain, and the efficient intersection of shear bands in conjugated directions results in work-hardening behavior, which is further confirmed by in situ tensile scanning electron microscopic observation. Based on the experimental results obtained in two different specimen geometries and finite element analysis, it is deduced that a normal-stress-modified maximum shear stress criterion rather than a shear plane criterion can describe the conditions for the formation of shear bands in uniaxial tension.

  1. Electrical and magnetic properties of Fe-based bulk metallic glass with minor Co and Ni addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H.Y. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, D–01069 Dresden (Germany); Stoica, M. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, D–01069 Dresden (Germany); POLITEHNICA University of Timisoara, P-ta Victoriei 2, Timisoara (Romania); Yi, S. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, 702–701 Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, D.H. [Center for Non-crystalline Materials, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Yonsei University, 120–749 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eckert, J. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, D–01069 Dresden (Germany); University of Technology Dresden, Institute of Materials Science, D–01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    The effect of minor Co and Ni alloying on soft magnetic properties and electrical resistivity of Fe{sub 75.5}C{sub 7.0}Si{sub 3.3}B{sub 5.5}P{sub 8.7} (at%) bulk metallic glass has been investigated. Within examined compositional range (Co and Ni up to 4 at%, respectively), the saturation magnetization and electrical resistivity of the alloys continuously decrease with increasing Co or Ni content, while the Curie temperature and initial permeability increase. Comparing the effect of Co and Ni additions, the alloys with Co addition have much higher Curie temperature and saturation magnetization than the alloy with Ni addition. Also, the Co-added alloys show smaller coercivity and larger permeability than the Ni-added alloys. The present results suggest that minor addition of Co can provide better effectiveness to enhance the magnetic softness of Fe-based BMGs than minor Ni addition. - Highlights: • Soft magnetic characteristics of CI-based BMGs can be enhanced with minor Co and Ni alloying. • Minor Co addition can provide better effectiveness to enhance the magnetic softness of CI-based BMG than Ni addition. • Optimum Co addition enlarges atomic packing density and randomness of amorphous structure.

  2. Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics and fragility of (Cu46Zr47Al7)97Ti3 bulk metallic glass investigated by differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Man; Li, Junjie; Yao, Lijuan; Jian, Zengyun; Chang, Fang’e; Yang, Gencang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of (Cu 46 Zr 47 Al 7 ) 97 Ti 3 BMGs was studied. • Two-stage of crystallization process is confirmed by DSC. • The nucleation process is difficult than growth process during crystallization. • The second crystallization process is the most sensitive to heating rate. • Kinetic fragility index is evaluated suggesting it is an intermediate glass. - Abstract: In this paper, bulk metallic glasses with the composition of (Cu 46 Zr 47 Al 7 ) 97 Ti 3 were prepared by copper mold casting technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to investigate its structure and non-isothermal crystallization kinetics. DSC traces revealed that it undergoes two-stage crystallization. The activation energies corresponding to the characteristic temperatures have been calculated, and the results reveal that the as-cast alloys have a good thermal stability in thermodynamics. Based on Kissinger equation, the activation energies for glass transition, the first and second crystallization processes were obtained as 485 ± 16 kJ/mol, 331 ± 7 kJ/mol and 210 ± 3 kJ/mol, respectively, suggesting that the nucleation process is more difficult than the grain growth process. The fitting curves using Lasocka's empirical relation show that the influence of the heating rate for crystallization is larger than glass transition. Furthermore, the kinetic fragility for (Cu 46 Zr 47 Al 7 ) 97 Ti 3 bulk metallic glasses is evaluated. Depending on the fragility index, (Cu 46 Zr 47 Al 7 ) 97 Ti 3 bulk metallic glasses should be considered as “intermediate glasses”

  3. Short-to-Medium-Range Order and Atomic Packing in Zr48Cu36Ag8Al8 Bulk Metallic Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to its excellent glass-forming ability (GFA, the Zr48Cu36Al8Ag8 bulk metallic glass (BMG is of great importance in glass transition investigations and new materials development. However, due to the lack of detailed structural information, the local structure and atomic packing of this alloy is still unknown. In this work, synchrotron measurement and reverse Monte Carlo simulation are performed on the atomic configuration of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass. The local structure is characterized in terms of bond pairs and Voronoi tessellation. It is found that there are mainly two types of bond pairs in the configuration, as the body-centered cubic (bcc-type and icosahedral (ico-type bond pairs. On the other hand, the main polyhedra in the configuration are icosahedra and the bcc structure. That is, the bcc-type bond pairs, together with the ico-type bond pairs, form the bcc polyhedra, introducing the distortion in bcc clusters in short range. However, in the medium range, the atoms formed linear or planar structures, other than the tridimensional clusters. That is, the medium-range order in glass is of 1D or 2D structure, suggesting the imperfect ordered packing feature.

  4. Pressure effect on crystallization kinetics in Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Jianzhong; Gerward, Leif; Xu, Y.S.

    2002-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics of a Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass in the supercooled liquid region have been investigated by performing in situ high-temperature and high-pressure x-ray diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation. A pressure-time-temperature-transformation diagram......, describing the onset of crystallization as a function of time during isothermal annealing under pressure, is presented. Different pressure dependences of crystallization kinetics in the temperature range for the glass have been observed and further be explained by a model of competing processes...

  5. The kinetic glass transition of the Zr46.75Ti8.25Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk metallic glass former-supercooled liquids on a long time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, R.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-01-01

    Viscosity and enthalpy relaxation from the amorphous state into the supercooled liquid state was investigated in the bulk metallic glass forming Zr 46.75 Ti 8.25 Cu 7.5 Ni 10 Be 27.5 alloy below the calorimetric glass transition. At different temperatures, the viscosities relax into states that obey the same Vogel endash Fulcher endash Tammann relation as the data obtained at higher temperatures in the supercooled liquid. Enthalpy recovery experiments after relaxation in the same temperature range show that the enthalpy of the material reaches values that also corresponds to the supercooled liquid state. The glass relaxes into a metastable supercooled liquid state, if it is observed on a long time scale. Equilibration is possible far below the calorimetric glass transition and very likely even below the isentropic temperature. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  6. Vitrification of noble metals containing NCAW simulant with an engineering scale melter (ESM): Campaign report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunewald, W.; Roth, G.; Tobie, W.; Weisenburger, S.; Weiss, K.; Elliott, M.; Eyler, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    ESM has been designed as a 10th-scale model of the DWPF-type melter, currently the reference melter for nitrification of Hanford double shell tankwaste. ESM and related equipment have been integrated to the existing mockup vitrification plant VA-WAK at KfK. On June 2-July 10, 1992, a shakedown test using 2.61 m{sup 3} of NCAW (neutralized current acid waste) simulant without noble metals was performed. On July 11-Aug. 30, 1992, 14.23 m{sup 3} of the same simulant with nominal concentrations of Ru, Rh, and Pd were vitrified. Objective was to investigate the behavior of such a melter with respect to discharge of noble metals with routine glass pouring via glass overflow. Results indicate an accumulation of noble metals in the bottom area of the flat-bottomed ESM. About 65 wt% of the noble metals fed to the melter could be drained out, whereas 35 wt% accumulated in the melter, based on analysis of glass samples from glass pouring stream in to the canisters. After the melter was drained at the end of the campaign through a bottom drain valve, glass samples were taken from the residual bottom layer. The samples had significantly increased noble metals content (factor of 20-45 to target loading). They showed also a significant decrease of the specific electric resistance compared to bulk glass (factor of 10). A decrease of 10- 15% of the resistance between he power electrodes could be seen at the run end, but the total amount of noble metals accumulated was not yet sufficient enough to disturb the Joule heating of the glass tank severely.

  7. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Dangerous Waste Permit Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Facility currently stores mixed waste, resulting from various processing operations, in underground storage tanks. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will be constructed and operated to process the high-activity fraction of mixed waste stored in these underground tanks. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will solidify pretreated tank waste into a glass product that will be packaged for disposal in a national repository. This Vitrification Plant Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Revision 2, consists of both a Part A and a Part B permit application. An explanation of the Part A revisions, including Revision 4 submitted with this application, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. The Part B consists of 15 chapters addressing the organization and content of the Part B Checklist prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987)

  8. Functional description of the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisch, R.R.; McMahon, C.L.

    1990-07-01

    The primary objective of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is the solidification of approximately 2.1 million liters (560,000 gallons) of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) which resulted from the operation of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. Since the original plant was not built to accommodate the processing of waste beyond storage in underground tanks, HLW solidification by vitrification presented numerous engineering challenges. Existing facilities required redesign and conversion to meet their new purpose. Vitrification technology and systems needed to be created and then tested. Equipment modifications, identified from cold test results, were incorporated into the final equipment configuration to be used for radioactive (hot) operations. Cold operations have defined the correct sequence and optimal functioning of the equipment to be used for vitrification and have verified the process by which waste will be solidified into borosilicate glass

  9. Design, operation, and evaluation of the transportable vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamecnik, J.R.; Young, S.R.; Hansen, E.K.; Whitehouse, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a transportable melter system designed to demonstrate the treatment of low-level and mixed hazardous and radioactive wastes such as wastewater treatment sludges, contaminated soils and incinerator ash. The TVS is a large-scale, fully integrated vitrification system consisting of melter feed preparation, melter, offgas, service, and control modules. The TVS was tested with surrogate waste at the Clemson University Environmental Systems Engineering Department's (ESED) DOE/Industry Center for Vitrification Research prior to being shipped to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) K-25 site for treatment of mixed waste. This testing, along with additional testing at ORR, proved that the TVS would be able to successfully treat mixed waste. These surrogate tests consistently produced glass that met the EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). Performance of the system resulted in acceptable emissions of regulated metals from the offgas system. The TVS is scheduled to begin mixed waste operations at ORR in June 1997

  10. Turning nuclear waste into glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegg, Ian L.

    2015-02-15

    Vitrification has emerged as the treatment option of choice for the most dangerous radioactive waste. But dealing with the nuclear waste legacy of the Cold War will require state-of-the-art facilities and advanced glass formulations.

  11. New developments for medium and low level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, A.J.-R.; Pujadas, S.M.-V.

    1997-01-01

    Converting ultimate waste material into a stable, inert product is beneficial, notably in the case of potentially very toxic wastes. Vitrification, in which a glass or glass-ceramic material is fabricated from a particular waste form, is now a proven solution. This high-temperature process uses additives-notably silica-if necessary to form a glass network. Vitrification confines the waste by forming a stable, inert, nontoxic material suitable for safe disposal; it usually also results in a significant volume reduction having a major effect on the disposal cost. France is actively engaged in an ongoing research effort in this area, not only to enhance the production capacity and the containment quality, but also to extend the process to low and medium level wastes such as those produced in nuclear power stations

  12. Formation of quasicrystals in Zr46.8Ti8.2Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanderka, N.; Macht, M. P.; Siedel, M.

    2000-01-01

    The formation of the quasicrystalline phase is observed as a first step of crystallization during isothermal annealing of the Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass. The structure of the quasicrystals and the sequence of phase formation have been investigated by x-ray powder diffraction and transm......The formation of the quasicrystalline phase is observed as a first step of crystallization during isothermal annealing of the Zr46.7Ti8.3Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 bulk glass. The structure of the quasicrystals and the sequence of phase formation have been investigated by x-ray powder diffraction...... min) at high temperatures above 683 K. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  13. Electronic structure of Pd42.5Ni7.5Cu30P20, an excellent bulk metallic glass former: Comparison to the Pd40Ni40P20 reference glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, S.; Sato, H.; Happo, N.; Mimura, K.; Tezuka, Y.; Ichitsubo, T.; Matsubara, E.; Nishiyama, N.

    2007-01-01

    In-house photoemission and inverse-photoemission spectra (PES and IPES) were measured on Pd 42.5 Ni 7.5 Cu 30 P 20 and Pd 40 Ni 40 P 20 bulk metallic glasses in order to clarify the origin of excellent glass-forming ability from the viewpoint of electronic structure. Minima are observed for both the metallic glasses at a slightly higher energy than the Fermi level. Incident photon-energy dependent PES spectra were obtained using synchrotron radiation and the Pd 4d partial density of states (DOS) was estimated from the PES data. Soft X-ray emission spectra were also measured near the Ni and Cu 2p 3/2 absorption edges to evaluate, respectively, the Ni and Cu 3d partial DOS in the valence band. The Pd 4d and the Ni and Cu 3d partials in the conduction band were obtained from X-ray absorption spectra around the Pd 3p 3/2 and Ni and Cu 2p 3/2 absorption edges, respectively. It was found that the Pd 4d partial DOS near the Fermi energy largely decreases and becomes localized by replacing the Ni atoms with the Cu atoms, which may be closely related to the excellent glass-forming ability of the Pd 42.5 Ni 7.5 Cu 30 P 20 bulk metallic glass due to a selective formation of Pd-P covalent bonds

  14. In situ vitrification: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, L.L.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    The in situ vitrification process (ISV) converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. The process appears to be ideally suited for on site treatment of both wet and dry wastes. Basically, the system requires four molybdenum electrodes, an electrical power system for vitrifying the soil, a hood to trap gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system, an off-gas cooling system, and a process control station. Mounted in three transportable trailers, the ISV process can be moved from site to site. The process has the potential for treating contaminated soils at most 13 m deep. The ISV project has won a number of outstanding achievement awards. The process has also been patented with exclusive worldwide rights being granted to Battelle Memorial Institute for nonradioactive applications. While federal applications still belong to the Department of Energy, Battelle transferred the rights of ISV for non-federal government, chemical hazardous wastes to a separate corporation in 1989 called Geosafe. This report gives a review of the process including current operational behavior and applications

  15. Frequency-dependent complex modulus at the glass transition in Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 bulk amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.L.; Li, Y.; Feng, Y.P.; Carter, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    We report frequency-dependent measurements of the dynamic elastic modulus of a Pd 40 Cu 30 Ni 10 P 20 bulk amorphous phase near its glass transition temperature. The storage and loss moduli exhibit a structural relaxation similar to those observed by other characterization techniques. Parameters obtained by fitting to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation and the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts model exhibit similar behaviors to those other methods

  16. Vitrification of high-level liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varani, J.L.; Petraitis, E.J.; Vazquez, Antonio.

    1987-01-01

    High-level radioactive liquid wastes produced in the fuel elements reprocessing require, for their disposal, a preliminary treatment by which, through a series of engineering barriers, the dispersion into the biosphere is delayed by 10 000 years. Four groups of compounds are distinguished among a great variety of final products and methods of elaboration. From these, the borosilicate glasses were chosen. Vitrification experiences were made at a laboratory scale with simulated radioactive wastes, employing different compositions of borosilicate glass. The installations are described. A series of tests were carried out on four basic formulae using always the same methodology, consisting of a dry mixture of the vitreous matrix's products and a dry simulated mixture. Several quality tests of the glasses were made 1: Behaviour in leaching following the DIN 12 111 standard; 2: Mechanical resistance; parameters related with the facility of the different glasses for increasing their surface were studied; 3: Degree of devitrification: it is shown that devitrification turns the glasses containing radioactive wastes easily leachable. From all the glasses tested, the composition SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , B 2 O 3 , Na 2 O, CaO shows the best retention characteristics. (M.E.L.) [es

  17. Vitrification development plan for US Department of Energy mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.; Lucerna, J.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    This document is a general plan for conducting vitrification development for application to mixed wastes owned by the US Department of Energy. The emphasis is a description and discussion of the data needs to proceed through various stages of development. These stages are (1) screening at a waste site to determine which streams should be vitrified, (2) waste characterization and analysis, (3) waste form development and treatability studies, (4) process engineering development, (5) flowsheet and technical specifications for treatment processes, and (6) integrated pilot-scale demonstration. Appendices provide sample test plans for various stages of the vitrification development process. This plan is directed at thermal treatments which produce waste glass. However, the study is still applicable to the broader realm of thermal treatment since it deals with issues such as off-gas characterization and waste characterization that are not necessarily specific to vitrification. The purpose is to provide those exploring or considering vitrification with information concerning the kinds of data that are needed, the way the data are obtained, and the way the data are used. This will provide guidance to those who need to prioritize data needs to fit schedules and budgets. Knowledge of data needs also permits managers and planners to estimate resource requirements for vitrification development

  18. Evaluation of Ni-free Zr–Cu–Fe–Al bulk metallic glass for biomedical implant applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ying-Sui [Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Wei [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China); Kai, Wu [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung, Taiwan (China); Liaw, Peter K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Dentistry, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: ► A Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} bulk metallic glass (BMG) with 50 GPa elastic modulus was used. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG had lower metal ion release rate than the commercial Ti. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG had better proteins adsorption than the commercial Ti. ► This Ni-free Zr-based BMG has a high potential for biomedical implant applications. -- Abstract: This study was conducted to investigate the surface characteristics, including the chemical composition, metal ion release, protein adsorption, and cell adhesion, of a Ni-free Zr-based (Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10}) bulk metallic glass (BMG) with low elastic modulus for biomedical implant applications. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to identify the surface chemical composition and the protein (albumin and fibronectin) adsorption of the specimen. The metal ions released from the specimen in simulated blood plasma and artificial saliva solutions were measured using an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. The cell adhesion, in terms of the morphology, focal adhesion complex, and skeletal arrangement, of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated using scanning electron microscope observations and immunofluorescent staining. For comparison purposes, the above-mentioned tests were also carried out on the widely used biomedical metal, Ti. The results showed that the main component on the outermost surface of the amorphous Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG was ZrO{sub 2} with small amounts of Cu, Al, and Fe oxides. The released metal ions from Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG were well below the critical concentrations that cause negative biological effects. The Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG had a greater adsorption capacity for albumin and fibronectin than that of commercial biomedical Ti. The Zr{sub 62.5}Cu{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 5}Al{sub 10} BMG surface showed an attached cell number similar

  19. Pressure-controlled nucleation and growth in Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass close to and beyond glass transition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Mingxiang; Yao Yushu; Zhao Deqian; Zhuang Yanxin; Wang Weihua

    2002-01-01

    By high-pressure annealing close to and beyond glass transition temperature, the behavior of nucleation and growth of crystals in Zr 41 Ti 14 Cu 12.5 Ni 10 Be 22.5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) is investigated. The experimental results indicate that exerting a high pressure during annealing can markedly decrease the nucleation temperature of the BMG. The growth rate of crystals first increases and then decreases with increase of annealing pressure. The effect of pressure on nucleation and growth of crystals is phenomenologically explained

  20. Deformation behaviors of Cu29Zr32Ti15Al5Ni19 high entropy bulk metallic glass during nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qihong; Yi, Ming; Li, Jia; Liu, Bin; Huang, Zaiwang

    2018-06-01

    The deformation behaviors of Cu29Zr32Ti15Al5Ni19 high entropy bulk metallic glass (HE-BMG) during the nanoindentation are presented via the large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The indentation tests are carried out using spherical rigid indenter to investigate the microstructural evolution on the mechanical properties of HE-BMGs in terms of shear strain, indentation force, and surface morphology as well as radial distribution function (RDF). Based on the Hertzian fitting the load-displacement curve, HE-BMG Cu29Zr32Ti15Al5Ni19 has the Young's modulus of 93.1 GPa and hardness of 8.8 GPa. The indentation force requiring for the continual increasing contacted area between the indenter and the substrate goes up with the increasing of indentation depth. In addition, the symmetrical distribution of atomic displacement reveals the isotropic of HE-BMG after the indentation treatment. In the deformation region, the Al element would lead to the serious fluctuation in the first peak of RDF, which is much stronger than the other elements. The severe distortion from the atomic size difference maybe reduce the activation energy to the occurrence of shear deformation in HE-BMG, leading to the transition from brittle to ductile observed by the whole sliding of the local atom group. Through the indentation load-displacement curves at various temperatures, the softening of HE-BMG at high temperatures is in qualitative agreement with the experimental findings. Moreover, this effective strategy is used to accelerate the discovery of excellent mechanical properties of HE-BMGs by means of MD simulation, as well as understand the fundamental nanoindentation response of HE-BMGs.

  1. Degradation of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses used in load-bearing implants: A tribocorrosion appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guo-Hua; Aune, Ragnhild E; Mao, Huahai; Espallargas, Nuria

    2016-07-01

    Owing to the amorphous structure, Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) have been demonstrating attractive properties for potential biomedical applications. In the present work, the degradation mechanisms of Zr-based BMGs with nominal compositions Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 and Zr65Cu18Ni7Al10 as potential load-bearing implant material were investigated in a tribocorrosion environment. The composition-dependent micro-mechanical and tribological properties of the two BMGs were evaluated prior to the tribocorrosion tests. The sample Zr65-BMG with a higher Zr content exhibited increased plasticity but relatively reduced wear resistance during the ball-on-disc tests. Both BMGs experienced abrasive wear after the dry wear test under the load of 2N. The cross-sectional subsurface structure of the wear track was examined by Focused Ion Beam (FIB). The electrochemical properties of the BMGs in simulated body fluid were evaluated by means of potentiodynamic polarization and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The spontaneous passivation of Zr-based BMGs in Phosphate Buffer Saline solution was mainly attributed to the highly concentrated zirconium cation (Zr(4+)) in the passive film. The tribocorrosion performance of the BMGs was investigated using a reciprocating tribometer equipped with an electrochemical cell. The more passive nature of the Zr65-BMG had consequently a negative influence on its tribocorrosion resistance, which induced the wear-accelerated corrosion and eventually speeded-up the degradation process. It has been revealed the galvanic coupling was established between the depassivated wear track and the surrounding passive area, which is the main degradation mechanism for the passive Zr65-BMG subjected to the tribocorrosion environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamic behaviors of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass under ramp wave and shock wave loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binqiang Luo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic behaviors of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 bulk metallic glass were investigated using electric gun and magnetically driven isentropic compression device which provide shock and ramp wave loading respectively. Double-wave structure was observed under shock compression while three-wave structure was observed under ramp compression in 0 ∼ 18GPa. The HEL of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 is 8.97 ± 0.61GPa and IEL is 8.8 ± 0.3GPa, respectively. Strength of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 estimated from HEL is 5.0 ± 0.3GPa while the strength estimated from IEL is 3.6 ± 0.1GPa. Shock wave velocity versus particle velocity curve of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 under shock compression appears to be bilinear and a kink appears at about 18GPa. The Lagrangian sound speed versus particle velocity curve of Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 under ramp wave compression exhibits two discontinuances and are divided to three regions: elastic, plastic-I and plastic-II. The first jump-down occurs at elastic-plastic transition and the second appears at about 17GPa. In elastic and plastic-I regions, Lagrangian sound speed increases linearly with particle velocity, respectively. Characteristic response of sound speed in plastic-I region disagree with shock result in the same pressure region(7GPa ∼ 18GPa, but is consistent with shock result at higher pressure(18-110GPa.

  3. Spark plasma sintering of bulk SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 eutectic glass with wide-band optical window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaxi; Lu, Nan; He, Gang; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Jianqiang; Li, Jiangtao

    2018-06-01

    SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 eutectic glass was prepared by using an aerodynamic levitator equipped with a CO2 laser device. A bulk transparent amorphous sample was obtained by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) of the prepared eutectic glass. XRD, a UV–vis-NIR spectrophotometer and FT-IR were employed to characterize the phase evolution and optical properties. The results show that the bulk SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 samples fabricated by the containerless process and SPS between 852 °C–857 °C were fully amorphous. The amorphous sample has a wide transparent window between 270 nm and 6.2 μm. The average refractive index in the visible light region is 1.680 and the Abbe number is 27.4. The prepared bulk SrAl2O4-Sr3Al2O6 eutectic glass with the wide-band optical window may be a promising candidate for optical applications.

  4. Underground tank remediation by use of in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.E.

    1991-02-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing a remedial action technology for underground storage tanks through the adaptation of the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. The ISV process is a thermal treatment processes that was originally developed for the stabilization of contaminated soil contaminated with transuranic waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington for the Department of Energy (DOE). The application of ISV to underground storage tanks represents an entirely new application of the ISV technology and is being performed in support of the DOE primarily for the Hanford site and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A field scale test was conducted in September 1990 at Hanford on a small cement and stainless steel tank (1-m dia.) that contained a simulated refractory sludge representing a worst-case sludge composition. The tank design and sludge composition was based on conditions present at the ORNL. The sludge contained high concentrations of heavy metals including lead, mercury, and cadmium, and also contained high levels of stable cesium and strontium to represent the predominant radionuclide species present in the tank wastes. The test was highly successful in that the entire tank and surrounding soil was transformed into a highly leach resistant glass and crystalline block with a mass of approximately 30 tons. During the process, the metal shell of the tank forms a metal pool at the base of the molten soil. Upon cooling, the glass and metal phases were subjected to TCLP (toxic characteristic leach procedure) testing and passed the TCLP criteria. Additional sampling and analyses are ongoing to determine the bulk composition of the waste forms, the fraction of volatile or semi-volatile species released to the off-gas treatment system, and to determine whether any soil surrounding the monolith was contaminated as a result of the ISV process. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Transportable vitrification system demonstration on mixed waste. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamecnik, J.R.; Whitehouse, J.C.; Wilson, C.N.; Van Ryn, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a large scale, fully integrated, vitrification system for the treatment of low-level and mixed wastes in the form of sludges, soils, incinerator ash, and many other waste streams. It was demonstrated on surrogate waste at Clemson University and at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) prior to treating actual mixed waste. Treatment of a combination of dried B and C Pond sludge and CNF sludge was successfully demonstrated at ORR in 1997. The demonstration produced 7,616 kg of glass from 7,328 kg of mixed wastes with a 60% reduction in volume. Glass formulations for the wastes treated were developed using a combination of laboratory crucible studies with the actual wastes and small melter studies at Clemson with both surrogate and actual wastes. Initial characterization of the B and C Pond sludge had not shown the presence of carbon or fluoride, which required a modified glass formulation be developed to maintain proper glass redox and viscosity. The CNF sludge challenges the glass formulations due to high levels of phosphate and iron. The demonstration was delayed several times by permitting problems, a glass leak, and electrical problems. The demonstration showed that the two wastes could be successfully vitrified, although the design glass production rate was not achieved. The glass produced met the Universal Treatment Standards and the emissions from the TVS were well within the allowable permit limits

  6. Transportable vitrification system demonstration on mixed waste. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamecnik, J.R.; Whitehouse, J.C. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Wilson, C.N. [Lockheed Martin Hanford Corp., Richland, WA (United States); Van Ryn, F.R. [Bechtel Jacobs Co., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-04-22

    The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) is a large scale, fully integrated, vitrification system for the treatment of low-level and mixed wastes in the form of sludges, soils, incinerator ash, and many other waste streams. It was demonstrated on surrogate waste at Clemson University and at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) prior to treating actual mixed waste. Treatment of a combination of dried B and C Pond sludge and CNF sludge was successfully demonstrated at ORR in 1997. The demonstration produced 7,616 kg of glass from 7,328 kg of mixed wastes with a 60% reduction in volume. Glass formulations for the wastes treated were developed using a combination of laboratory crucible studies with the actual wastes and small melter studies at Clemson with both surrogate and actual wastes. Initial characterization of the B and C Pond sludge had not shown the presence of carbon or fluoride, which required a modified glass formulation be developed to maintain proper glass redox and viscosity. The CNF sludge challenges the glass formulations due to high levels of phosphate and iron. The demonstration was delayed several times by permitting problems, a glass leak, and electrical problems. The demonstration showed that the two wastes could be successfully vitrified, although the design glass production rate was not achieved. The glass produced met the Universal Treatment Standards and the emissions from the TVS were well within the allowable permit limits.

  7. Project summary, 116-B-6-1 crib ISV [in situ vitrification] demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koegler, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    The 116-B Crib Demonstration Project is intended to demonstrate the emerging in situ vitrification (ISV) technology to immobilize or destroy hazardous and radioactive chemicals at an actual site. In situ vitrification is the conversion of contaminated soil into a durable glass and crystalline product through joule heating. The 116-B crib site was chosen for the demonstration because it contains both radioactive and hazardous chemicals (e.g., chromium) and presents a potential threat to environment. The project will involve sampling and analysis of the soil beneath the crib, a small-scale ISV test to verify operating parameters, vitrification of the crib, and analysis of the vitrified soil. 5 figs

  8. Mercury reduction and removal during high-level radioactive waste processing and vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibling, R.E.; Fowler, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A reference process for immobilizing the high-level radioactive waste in borosilicate glass has been developed at the Savannah River Plant. This waste contains a substantial amount of mercury from separations processing. Because mercury will not remain in borosilicate glass at the processing temperature, mercury must be removed before vitrification or must be handled in the off-gas system. A process has been developed to remove mercury by reduction with formic acid prior to vitrification. Additional benefits of formic acid treatment include improved sludge handling and glass melter redox control

  9. Vitrification publication bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieman, E.; Johns, W.E.

    1996-02-01

    This document was compiled by a group of about 12 graduate students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science at Washington State University and was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The literature search resulting in the compilation of this bibliography was designed to be an exhaustive search for research and development work involving the vitrification of mixed wastes, published by domestic and foreign researchers, primarily during 1989-1994. The search techniques were dominated by electronic methods and this bibliography is also available in electronic format, Windows Reference Manager.

  10. Vitrification publication bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmieman, E.; Johns, W.E.

    1996-02-01

    This document was compiled by a group of about 12 graduate students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Material Science at Washington State University and was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. The literature search resulting in the compilation of this bibliography was designed to be an exhaustive search for research and development work involving the vitrification of mixed wastes, published by domestic and foreign researchers, primarily during 1989-1994. The search techniques were dominated by electronic methods and this bibliography is also available in electronic format, Windows Reference Manager

  11. Feasibility testing of in situ vitrification of uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuse, H.; Tsuchino, S.; Tasaka, H.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    Process feasibility studies using in situ vitrification (ISV) were successfully performed on two different uranium-contaminated wastes. In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that converts contaminated soils into durable glass and crystalline form. Of the two different wastes, one waste was uranium mill tailings, while the other was uranium-contaminated soils which had high water contents. Analyses of the data from the two tests are presented

  12. LFCM [liquid-fed ceramic melter] vitrification technology: Quarterly progress report, January--March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouns, R. A.; Allen, C. R.; Powell, J. A.

    1988-05-01

    This report is compiled by the Nuclear Waste Treatment Program and the Hanford Waste Vitrification Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to describe the progress in developing, testing, applying and documenting liquid-fed ceramic melter vitrification technology. Progress in the following technical subject areas during the second quarter of FY 1987 is discussed: melting process chemistry and glass development, feed preparation and transfer systems, melter systems, canister filling and handling systems, and process/product modeling. 23 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs

  13. In-situ vitrification: a large-scale prototype for immobilizing radioactively contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.G.; Buelt, J.L.

    1986-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing the technology of in situ vitrification, a thermal treatment process for immobilizing radioactively contaminated soil. A permanent remedial action, the process incorporates radionuclides into a glass and crystalline form. The transportable procss consists of an electrical power system to vitrify the soil, a hood to contain gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system and cooling system, and a process control station. Large-scale testing of the in situ vitrification process is currently underway

  14. Method for ultimate disposition of borate containing radioactive wastes by vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bege, D.; Faust, H.J.; Puthawala, A.; Stunkel, H.

    1984-01-01

    Method for the ultimate disposition of radioactive wastes by vitrification, in which weak to medium radioactive waste concentrates from borate-containing radioactive liquids are mixed with added glass-forming materials, maximally in a ratio of 1:3, and the mixture heated to obtain a glass-forming melt

  15. Vitrification Studies with DOE Low-Level Mixed Waste Wastewater Treatment Sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero, C.A.; Andrews, M.K.; Bickford, D.F.; Hewlett, K.J.; Bennert, D.M.; Overcamp, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    Vitrification studies with simulated Low Level Mixed Waste (LLMW) sludges were performed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). These studies focused on finding the optimum glass compositions for four simulated LLMW wastewater treatment sludges and were based on both crucible-scale and pilot-scale studies. Optimum compositions were determined based on the maximum waste loading achievable without sacrificing glass integrity

  16. Glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe

    2004-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the viscosity of most glassforming liquids is known to depart significantly from the classical Arrhenius behaviour of simple fluids. The discovery of an unexpected correlation between the extent of this departure and the Poisson ratio of the resulting glass could lead...... to new understanding of glass ageing and viscous liquid dynamics....

  17. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program description for high-level waste form development and qualification. Revision 3, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Project has been established to convert the high-level radioactive waste associated with nuclear defense production at the Hanford Site into a waste form suitable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant will mix processed radioactive waste with borosilicate material, then heat the mixture to its melting point (vitrification) to forin a glass-like substance that traps the radionuclides in the glass matrix upon cooling. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program has been established to support the mission of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant. This Quality Assurance Program Description has been written to document the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Quality Assurance Program.

  18. Laboratory scale vitrification of low-level radioactive nitrate salts and soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.; Anderson, B.

    1993-07-01

    INEL has radiologically contaminated nitrate salt and soil waste stored above and below ground in Pad A and the Acid Pit at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. Pad A contain uranium and transuranic contaminated potassium and sodium nitrate salts generated from dewatered waste solutions at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Acid Pit was used to dispose of liquids containing waste mineral acids, uranium, nitrate, chlorinated solvents, and some mercury. Ex situ vitrification is a high temperature destruction of nitrates and organics and immobilizes hazardous and radioactive metals. Laboratory scale melting of actual radionuclides containing INEL Pad A nitrate salts and Acid Pit soils was performed. The salt/soil/additive ratios were varied to determine the range of glass compositions (resulted from melting different wastes); maximize mass and volume reduction, durability, and immobilization of hazardous and radioactive metals; and minimize viscosity and offgas generation for wastes prevalent at INEL and other DOE sites. Some mixtures were spiked with additional hazardous and radioactive metals. Representative glasses were leach tested and showed none. Samples spiked with transuranic showed low nuclide leaching. Wasteforms were two to three times bulk densities of the salt and soil. Thermally co-processing soils and salts is an effective remediation method for destroying nitrate salts while stabilizing the radiological and hazardous metals they contain. The measured durability of these low-level waste glasses approached those of high-level waste glasses. Lab scale vitrification of actual INEL contaminated salts and soils was performed at General Atomics Laboratory as part of the INEL Waste Technology Development and Environmental Restoration within the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

  19. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celary, Piotr; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The possibility of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge was investigated. • Glass cullet was substituted with different wastes of mineral character. • Component ratio in the processed mixtures was optimized. • Environmental safety of the acquired vitrificates was verified. • An alternative management approach of usually landfilled waste was presented. - Abstract: Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with

  20. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celary, Piotr, E-mail: pcelary@is.pcz.czest.pl; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta, E-mail: jszoltysek@is.pcz.czest.pl

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The possibility of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge was investigated. • Glass cullet was substituted with different wastes of mineral character. • Component ratio in the processed mixtures was optimized. • Environmental safety of the acquired vitrificates was verified. • An alternative management approach of usually landfilled waste was presented. - Abstract: Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with

  1. Radioactive waste vitrification offgas analysis proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, C.W.; Morrey, E.V.

    1993-11-01

    Further validation of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) feed simulants will be performed by analyzing offgases during crucible melting of actual waste glasses and simulants. The existing method of vitrifying radioactive laboratory-scale samples will be modified to allow offgas analysis during preparation of glass for product testing. The analysis equipment will include two gas chromatographs (GC) with thermal conductivity detectors (TCD) and one NO/NO x analyzer. This equipment is part of the radioactive formating offgas system. The system will provide real-time analysis of H 2 , O 2 , N 2 , NO, N 2 O, NO 2 , CO, CO 2 , H 2 O, and SO 2 . As with the prior melting method, the product glass will be compatible with durability testing, i.e., Product Consistency Test (PCT) and Material Characterization Center (MCC-1), and crystallinity analysis. Procedures have been included to ensure glass homogeneity and quenching. The radioactive glass will be adaptable to Fe +2 /ΣFe measurement procedures because the atmosphere above the melt can be controlled. The 325 A-hot cell facility is being established as the permanent location for radioactive offgas analysis during formating, and can be easily adapted to crucible melt tests. The total costs necessary to set up and perform offgas measurements on the first radioactive core sample is estimated at $115K. Costs for repeating the test on each additional core sample are estimated to be $60K. The schedule allows for performing the test on the next available core sample

  2. Conceptual design for vitrification of HLW at West Valley using a rotary calciner/metallic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Conord, J.P.; Saverot, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The CEA has had an extensive research program in the field of vitrification technology for over 24 years, and several testing facilities were used throughout all phases of development and engineering: The Vulcain facility comprises a vitrification hot cell and four auxiliary hot cells. Vulcain allows the production of 2-kg samples of active glass. The off-gas treatment system allows testing the DF of each equipment. The auxiliary cells are equipped with leach-rate tests, diffusion tests, and irradiation tests on the glass samples. The Atlas facility is a reproduction of AVM calcination and vitrification furnaces at 1/2 scale enclosed in a glove box. This facility is used for testing ruthenium volatility and containment in the vitrification process. The full-scale AVM inactive pilot facility is used for testing calcination and vitrification of new compositions of high-level waste and for developing new types of vitrification furnaces. The inactive test loop is for testing air cooling of glass containers. The full-scale AVH inactive pilot facility is used for testing AVH technology and has been in operation since late 1981

  3. Internal friction behaviours in Zr57Al10Ni12.4Cu15.6Nb5 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bo; Zu Fangqiu; Zhen Kang; Shui Jiapeng; Wen Ping

    2002-01-01

    The internal friction patterns of Zr 57 Al 10 Ni 12.4 Cu 15.6 Nb 5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) were investigated with different frequencies and heating rates. An internal friction peak with extremely large magnitude is observed in the internal friction curves as a function of temperature (Q -1 -T curves). The internal friction peak was fitted by an equation Q -1 =AX(T)/η, where A is a constant, X(T) is the fraction of the glass/supercooled liquid and the viscosity η obeys the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann relation. We confirm that the internal friction peak originates from both of the glass transition and crystallization. The anomalous behaviours of the peak suggest that Zr 57 Al 10 Ni 12.4 Cu 15.6 Nb 5 BMG has a wide supercooled liquid region and the magnitude of the peak can be used to judge the glass forming ability (GFA) of the glass forming alloys. In addition, the internal friction technique proved to be a new powerful tool for studying structural relaxation and phase transition as well as the GFA of BMG. (author)

  4. Crack initiation and fracture features of Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb bulk metallic glass during compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lesz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was investigation crack initiation and fracture features developed during compression of Fe-based bulk metallic glass (BMG. These Fe-based BMG has received great attention as a new class of structural material due to an excellent properties (e.g. high strength and high elasticity and low costs. However, the poor ductility and brittle fracture exhibited in BMGs limit their structural application. At room temperature, BMGs fails catastrophically without appreciable plastic deformation under tension and only very limited plastic deformation is observed under compression or bending. Hence a well understanding of the crack initiation and fracture morphology of Fe-based BMGs after compression is of much importance for designing high performance BMGs. The raw materials used in this experiment for the production of BMGs were pure Fe, Co, Nb metals and nonmetallic elements: Si, B. The Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb alloy was cast as rods with three different diameters. The structure of the investigated BMGs rod is amorphous. The measurement of mechanical properties (Young modulus - E, compressive stress - σc, elastic strain - ε, unitary elastic strain energy – Uu were made in compression test. Compression test indicates the rods of Fe-based alloy to exhibit high mechanical strength. The development of crack initiation and fracture morphology after compression of Fe-based BMG were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM. Fracture morphology of rods has been different on the cross section. Two characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphologies of BMGs were observed. One is the smooth region. Another typical feature of the compressive fracture morphology of BMGs is the vein pattern. The veins on the compressive fracture surface have an obvious direction as result of initial displace of sample along shear bands. This direction follows the direction of the displacement of a material. The formation of veins on the

  5. Improvement of the thermoplastic formability of Zr65Cu17.5Ni10Al7.5 bulk metallic glass by minor addition of Erbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q.; Zeng, X.R.; Fu, M.W.; Chen, S.S.; Jiang, J.

    2016-01-01

    The softness of Zr 65 Cu 17.5 Ni 10 Al 7.5 bulk metallic glass (BMG) in the super-cooled liquid range (SCLR) is obviously improved by minor addition of 2% Er, which makes (Zr 65 Cu 17.5 Ni 10 Al 7.5 ) 98 Er 2 (Zr65Er2) to be a very formable Be-free Zr-based BMG. It is found the lower glass transition temperature of Zr65Er2 has an important contribution to the improvement of formability, which is contrary to the general understanding that the larger fragility and wider super-cooled liquid region (SCLR) are the major reasons for better thermoplastic formability. This finding is well explained by using the linear simplification of the SCLR in Angell plot. Zr65Er2 also has lower crystallization temperature and melting temperature, which is believed to be related to the formation of short-range ordering with lower transition energy rather than the composition shift to near eutectic. The above results help understand the effect of minor addition of rare-earth to the formability of Zr-based bulk metallic glasses.

  6. Structural and microstructural aspects of asbestos-cement waste vitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaszko, Józef; Zawada, Anna; Przerada, Iwona; Lubas, Małgorzata

    2018-04-01

    The main goal of the work was to evaluate the vitrification process of asbestos-cement waste (ACW). A mixture of 50 wt% ACW and 50 wt% glass cullet was melted in an electric furnace at 1400 °C for 90 min and then cast into a steel mold. The vitrified product was subjected to annealing. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to evaluate the effects of the vitrification. The chemical constitution of the material before and after the vitrification process was also analyzed. It was found that the vitrified product has an amorphous structure in which the components of asbestos-cement waste are incorporated. MIR spectroscopy showed that the absorption bands of chrysotile completely disappeared after the vitrification process. The results of the spectroscopic studies were confirmed by X-ray studies - no diffraction reflections from the chrysotile crystallographic planes were observed. As a result of the treatment, the fibrous asbestos construction, the main cause of its pathogenic properties, completely disappeared. The vitrified material was characterized by higher resistance to ion leaching in an aquatic environment than ACW and a smaller volume of nearly 72% in relation to the apparent volume of the substrates. The research has confirmed the high effectiveness of vitrification in neutralizing hazardous waste containing asbestos and the FT-IR spectroscopy was found to be useful to identify asbestos varieties and visualizing changes caused by the vitrification process. The work also presents the current situation regarding the utilization of asbestos-containing products.

  7. Vitrification as an alternative to landfilling of tannery sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celary, Piotr; Sobik-Szołtysek, Jolanta

    2014-12-01

    Due to high content of heavy metals such as chromium, tannery sewage sludge is a material which is difficult to be biologically treated as it is in the case of organic waste. Consequently, a common practice in managing tannery sewage sludge is landfilling. This poses a potential threat to both soil and water environments and it additionally generates costs of construction of landfills that meet specific environment protection requirements. Vitrification of this kind of sewage sludge with the addition of mineral wastes can represent an alternative to landfilling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of obtaining an environmentally safe product by means of vitrification of tannery sewage sludge from a flotation wastewater treatment process and chemical precipitation in order to address the upcoming issue of dealing with sewage sludge from the tannery industry which will be prohibited to be landfilled in Poland after 2016. The focus was set on determining mixtures of tannery sewage sludge with additives which would result in the lowest possible heavy metal leaching levels and highest hardness rating of the products obtained from their vitrification. The plasma vitrification process was carried out for mixtures with various amounts of additives depending on the type of sewage sludge used. Only the materials of waste character were used as additives. One finding of the study was an optimum content of mineral additives in vitrified mixture of 30% v/v waste molding sands with 20% v/v carbonate flotation waste from the zinc and lead industry for the formulations with flotation sewage sludge, and 45% v/v and 5% v/v, respectively, for precipitation sewage sludge. These combinations allowed for obtaining products with negligible heavy metal leaching levels and hardness similar to commercial glass, which suggests they could be potentially used as construction aggregate substitutes. Incineration of sewage sludge before the vitrification process lead to

  8. SITE - DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - MINERGY GLASS FURNACE TECHNOLOGY - MINERGY CORPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Glass Furnace Technology (GFT) was developed by Minergy Corporation (Minergy), of Waukesha, Wisconsin. Minergy originally developed vitrification technologies to process wastewater sludge into glass aggregate that could be sold as a commercial product. Minergy modified a st...

  9. Characterization and vitrification of Hanford radioactive high level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, J.M.; Elliott, M.L.; Larson, D.E.; Morrey, E.V.

    1991-01-01

    Radioactive Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) samples from the Hanford waste tanks have been chemically, radiochemically and physically characterized. The wastes were processed according to the Hanford Waste vitrification Plant (HWVP) flowsheet, and characterized after each process step. The waste glasses were sectioned and leach tested. Chemical, radiochemical and physical properties of the waste will be presented and compared to nonradioactive simulant data and the HWVP reference composition and properties

  10. Vitrification of radioactive waste. Application to other kinds of waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan, A.

    1993-01-01

    The containment by vitrification of radioactive waste is applied to concentrate solutions of fission products coming from the spent fuel reprocessing. By the way of liquid state to solid state, it is possible to reduce the volume of waste, to get a material with safety guarantees necessary to long storage and the glass by its chemical resistance, its thermal stability and its well resistance to irradiation answers particularly well to these necessities

  11. Vitrification of high-level alumina nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotzman, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Borophosphate glass compositions have been developed for the vitrification of a high-alumina calcined defense waste. The effect of substituting SiO 2 , P 2 O 5 and CuO for B 2 O 3 on the viscosity and leach resistance was measured. The effect of the alkali to borate ratio and the Li 2 O:Na 2 O ratio on the melt viscosity and leach resistance was also measured

  12. Glass to contain wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncouyoux, M.; Jacquet-Francillon, M.

    1994-01-01

    Here are the tables and figures presented during the conference on the glass to confine high level radioactive wastes: definition, fabrication, storage and disposal. The composition of glasses are detailed, their properties and the vitrification proceeding. The behaviour of these glasses in front of water, irradiation and heat are shown. The characteristics of parcels are given according to the radiation protection rule, ALARA principle, the concept of multi-barriers and the geological stability

  13. Crystalization and redox effects in waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.W.; Buechele, A.C.; Muller, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    This is the continuation of a systematic study to determine the effects of redox state and the concentration of certain transition metals on selected properties of a simplified lime-aluminosilicate glass system, similar to one proposed for high temperature (1350 degrees C-1450 degrees C) vitrification of soil and wastes from DOE sites. The solubilities of Cr 2 O 3 , ZnO, NiO, and Fe 2 O 3 in the base glass, and of the first three oxides in higher-iron variants of the base glass are determined at 1350 degrees C, 1400 degrees C, and 1450 degrees C. Enthalpies of solution are calculated from the solubility data for these four transition metal oxides. Different redox ratios, Fe 2+ /Fe total , are induced at 1450 degrees C in a glass containing NiO at about 75% of its solubility limit at this temperature and related to changes in microstructure. A ZnO-SiO 2 -Fe 2 O 3 pseudoternary 1450 degrees C isotherm is determined and plotted over a wide range of compositions for glasses melted in air. Phases appearing are zincite-, hematite- and spinel-type phases. A Time-Temperature-Transformation (TTT) curve is plotted for a ZnO (12 wt%) containing glass using data from heat treatment studies, and the crystal layer growth rate of a melilite-type phase appearing in this glass is measured at several temperatures over the time range in which the rate is found to be linear. Some kinetic parameters of crystal growth are calculated

  14. In situ vitrification: Process and products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindle, C.; Koegler, S.

    1991-06-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is an electrically powered thermal treatment process that converts soil into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. It is similar in concept to bringing a simplified glass manufacturing process to a site and operating it in the ground, using the soil as a glass feed stock. Gaseous emissions are contained, scrubbed, and filtered. When the process is completed, the molten volume cools producing a block of glass and crystalline material that resembles natural obsidian commingled with crystalline phases. The product passes US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) leach resistance tests, and it can be classified as nonhazardous from a chemical hazard perspective. ISV was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for application to contaminated soils. It is also being adapted for applications to buried waste, underground tanks, and liquid seepage sites. ISV's then-year development period has included tests on many different site conditions. As of January 1991 there have been 74 tests using PNL's ISV equipment; these tests have ranged from technology development tests using nonhazardous conditions to hazardous and radioactive tests. 2 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Clarification on shear transformation zone size and its correlation with plasticity for Zr-based bulk metallic glass in different structural states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.Q.; Huang, L. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Huang, P., E-mail: huangping@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Xu, K.W. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Material, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Wang, F., E-mail: wangfei@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Lu, T.J. [State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); MOE Key Laboratory for Multifunctional Materials and Structures Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-11-20

    To clarify the real size of shear transformation zone (STZ) and its correlation with the plasticity of metallic glass, STZ sizes of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) in three different structural states (as-cast, annealed and confining annealed) were examined using both rate-change and statistical methods upon nanoindentation. STZ sizes (less than 24 atoms) obtained by the statistical method approached the real STZ size of very few atoms, and showed no correlation with BMG plasticity. In sharp contrast, STZ sizes (hundreds of atoms) obtained by the rate-change method not only were much larger than the real STZ size but also exhibited a positive correlation with BMG plasticity. These discrepancies were discussed in terms of the structural evolution of BMGs upon nanoindentation.

  16. The effect of Al substitution on thermal and mechanical properties of Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, R.D.; Zhang, H.F.; Yu, H.S.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a systematic investigation about the effect of Al substitution on properties of Fe-Cr-Mo-Er-C-B amorphous material, including glass-forming ability (GFA), thermal properties, and mechanical properties was presented. It was found out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) that the glass-forming ability decreased with the increase of Al, when Al reached 7 at%, fully amorphous specimen was not obtained. With regard to thermal parameters, such as glass transition temperature T g , crystallization temperature T x , supercooled liquid region ΔT x , and reduced glass temperature T rg were checked by differential scanning calorimeter. A rather wide supercooled liquid region more than 40 K was found. During compression test, results showed Al substitution slightly improved the fracture strength from 3.4 to 3.7 GPa. The fracture morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Micrographs showed the same cleavage-like fracture in spite of different Al substitution

  17. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Bhattacharyya, N.K.

    1996-02-01

    The most promising method for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear wastes is a vitrification process in which the wastes are incorporated into borosilicate glass logs, the logs are sealed into welded stainless steel canisters, and the canisters are buried in suitably protected burial sites for disposal. The purpose of the research supported by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project of the Department of Energy through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and summarized in this report was to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen generation process and to predict the rate and amount of hydrogen generation during the treatment of HWVP feed simulants with formic acid. The objectives of the study were to determine the key feed components and process variables which enhance or inhibit the.production of hydrogen. Information on the kinetics and stoichiometry of relevant formic acid reactions were sought to provide a basis for viable mechanistic proposals. The chemical reactions were characterized through the production and consumption of the key gaseous products such as H 2 . CO 2 , N 2 0, NO, and NH 3 . For this mason this research program relied heavily on analyses of the gases produced and consumed during reactions of the HWVP feed simulants with formic acid under various conditions. Such analyses, used gas chromatographic equipment and expertise at the University of Georgia for the separation and determination of H 2 , CO, CO 2 , N 2 , N 2 O and NO

  18. A combined arc-melting and tilt-casting furnace for the manufacture of high-purity bulk metallic glass materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soinila, E; Pihlajamäki, T; Bossuyt, S; Hänninen, H

    2011-07-01

    An arc-melting furnace which includes a tilt-casting facility was designed and built, for the purpose of producing bulk metallic glass specimens. Tilt-casting was chosen because reportedly, in combination with high-purity processing, it produces the best fatigue endurance in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses. Incorporating the alloying and casting facilities in a single piece of equipment reduces the amount of laboratory space and capital investment needed. Eliminating the sample transfer step from the production process also saves time and reduces sample contamination. This is important because the glass forming ability in many alloy systems, such as Zr-based glass-forming alloys, deteriorates rapidly with increasing oxygen content of the specimen. The challenge was to create a versatile instrument, in which high purity conditions can be maintained throughout the process, even when melting alloys with high affinity for oxygen. Therefore, the design provides a high-vacuum chamber to be filled with a low-oxygen inert atmosphere, and takes special care to keep the system hermetically sealed throughout the process. In particular, movements of the arc-melting electrode and sample manipulator arm are accommodated by deformable metal bellows, rather than sliding O-ring seals, and the whole furnace is tilted for tilt-casting. This performance of the furnace is demonstrated by alloying and casting Zr(55)Cu(30)Al(10)Ni(5) directly into rods up to ø 10 mm which are verified to be amorphous by x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, and to exhibit locally ductile fracture at liquid nitrogen temperature.

  19. Mechanical properties of Zr41.2Ti13.8Ni10Cu12.5Be22.5 bulk metallic glass with different geometric confinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changqin; Zhang, Haifeng; Sun, Qilei; Liu, Kegao

    2018-03-01

    Zr41.2Ti13.8Ni10Cu12.5Be22.5 (Vit 1) bulk metallic glass with Cu sleeves at different positions was prepared by the Cu mold casting method, and the effects of different geometric confinements offered by Cu sleeves on the mechanical properties of Vit 1 were investigated. It was found that the mechanical properties were prominently influenced by different geometric confinements and the plasticity could be modified by optimizing the positions of Cu sleeves. The results revealed that shear band initiation and propagation could be efficiently intervened by changing the radial boundary restraints, which led to quite different mechanical behaviors.

  20. Vitrification of TRU wastes at Rocky Flats Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.M.; Johnson, A.J.; Ledford, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    Immobilization of incinerator ash and various noncombustible TRU wastes was investigated. In three different research projects borosilicate glass proved to be the best candidate for TRU waste fixation. This glass has excellent chemical durability, long-term stability in the presence of radiation, and will withstand continuous temperatures up to 400 0 C without devitrification. In addition, wastes prepared in the form of glass will attain densities of approximately 2500 kg/m 3 (2.5 g/cc). The free forming method of producing glass buttons provides a very simple, consistent, low maintenance way of producing a final waste form for transporting and either retrievable or permanent storage for TRU waste. The vitrification process produces a durable glass from the low density ash generated by the fluidized bed incinerator process and provides volume and weight reductions that are superior to other fixation processes. This results in decreased transportation and storage costs

  1. The present state of research on the vitrification of concentrated solutions of fission products (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonniaud, R.; Sombret, C.

    1961-01-01

    The present report gives the actual point of studies on vitrification of concentrated solutions of fission products. An active cell, giving glasses in crucibles, permitted to study various glass compositions. The leaching rate from the glass raises 1 to 2 10 -7 g of glass/cm 2 /day. Activity loss by volatility during vitrification remains weak and often below 0.1 per cent of total activity. Off gas cleaning is made easier by presence of filter which is compound of granules including iron oxide. After saturation the content of this filter can be melt. Moreover different processes are in experimentation for a more important production. Daily 72 liters of solution containing tracer activity are treated in a continuous calcination and vitrification plant. The loss in 106 Ru is still important and a modification of installation has been necessary. A pot vitrification plant is in study. In order to reduce cost of processing the possibility to pour glass after melting is actuality in study. A production set of very active glass is also in project. (authors) [fr

  2. Using physical properties of molten glass to estimate glass composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwan Sik; Yang, Kyoung Hwa; Park, Jong Kil

    1997-01-01

    A vitrification process is under development in KEPRI for the treatment of low-and medium-level radioactive waste. Although the project is for developing and building Vitrification Pilot Plant in Korea, one of KEPRI's concerns is the quality control of the vitrified glass. This paper discusses a methodology for the estimation of glass composition by on-line measurement of molten glass properties, which could be applied to the plant for real-time quality control of the glass product. By remotely measuring viscosity and density of the molten glass, the glass characteristics such as composition can be estimated and eventually controlled. For this purpose, using the database of glass composition vs. physical properties in isothermal three-component system of SiO 2 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 , a software TERNARY has been developed which determines the glass composition by using two known physical properties (e.g. density and viscosity)

  3. High-level waste vitrification: the state of the art in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sombret, C.; Maillet, J.

    1988-02-01

    This paper describes the main features of the French high-level waste vitrification program. These features include: - extensive R and D for more than 20 years; - successful operation of the AVM facility at Marcoule for about 10 years; - startup of six vitrification lines at La Hague, in the near future. The CEA is pursuing R and D for mid-term vitrification enhancement. New R and D facilities are being built at Marcoule to increase the capacity of vitrification equipment, study glass preparation at even higher temperatures to increase SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 concentration, and perform extensive testing of samples with very high activity (more than 5,000Ci/l). 8 refs

  4. Third-order optical nonlinearities in bulk and fs-laser inscribed waveguides in strengthened alkali aluminosilcate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gustavo F. B.; Almeida, Juliana M. P.; Martins, Renato J.; De Boni, Leonardo; Arnold, Craig B.; Mendonca, Cleber R.

    2018-01-01

    The development of advanced photonics devices requires materials with large optical nonlinearities, fast response times and high optical transparency, while at the same time allowing for the micro/nano-processing needed for integrated photonics. In this context, glasses have been receiving considerable attention given their relevant optical properties which can be specifically tailored by compositional control. Corning Gorilla® Glass (strengthened alkali aluminosilicate glass) is well-known for its use as a protective screen in mobile devices, and has attracted interest as a potential candidate for optical devices. Therefore, it is crucial not only to expand the knowledge on the fabrication of waveguides in Gorilla Glass under different regimes, but also to determine its nonlinear optical response, both using fs-laser pulses. Thus, this paper reports, for the first time, characterization of the third-order optical nonlinearities of Gorilla Glass, as well as linear and nonlinear characterization of waveguide written with femtosecond pulses under the low repetition rate regime (1 kHz).

  5. Molecular Dynamics-based Simulations of Bulk/Interfacial Structures and Diffusion Behaviors in Nuclear Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jincheng

    2018-03-16

    This NEUP Project aimed to generate accurate atomic structural models of nuclear waste glasses by using large-scale molecular dynamics-based computer simulations and to use these models to investigate self-diffusion behaviors, interfacial structures, and hydrated gel structures formed during dissolution of these glasses. The goal was to obtain realistic and accurate short and medium range structures of these complex oxide glasses, to provide a mechanistic understanding of the dissolution behaviors, and to generate reliable information with predictive power in designing nuclear waste glasses for long-term geological storage. Looking back of the research accomplishments of this project, most of the scientific goals initially proposed have been achieved through intensive research in the three and a half year period of the project. This project has also generated a wealth of scientific data and vibrant discussions with various groups through collaborations within and outside of this project. Throughout the project one book chapter and 14 peer reviewed journal publications have been generated (including one under review) and 16 presentations (including 8 invited talks) have been made to disseminate the results of this project in national and international conference. Furthermore, this project has trained several outstanding graduate students and young researchers for future workforce in nuclear related field, especially on nuclear waste immobilization. One postdoc and four PhD students have been fully or partially supported through the project with intensive training in the field material science and engineering with expertise on glass science and nuclear waste disposal

  6. Nuclear Waste Vitrification Efficiency: Cold Cap Reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Hrma, P.R.; Pokorny, R.

    2011-01-01

    conditions. The model demonstrates that batch foaming has a decisive influence on the rate of melting. Understanding the dynamics of the foam layer at the bottom of the cold cap and the heat transfer through it appears crucial for a reliable prediction of the rate of melting as a function of the melter-feed makeup and melter operation parameters. Although the study is focused on a batch for waste vitrification, the authors expect that the outcome will also be relevant for commercial glass melting.

  7. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Cu54Ni6Zr22Ti18 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Changhee; Lee, D.M.; Sun, J.H.; Shin, S.Y.; Bae, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed Nd:YAG laser was used to weld Cu 54 Ni 6 Zr 22 Ti 18 (numbers indicate at.%) metallic glass with glass forming ability of 6 mm. Through a single pulse irradiation on the glassy plate, the pulse condition for welding without crystallization was investigated. Under the selected pulse condition, the Cu 54 Ni 6 Zr 22 Ti 18 plate was periodically welded with different welding speeds. For the welding speed of 60 mm/min, no crystallization was observed in both weldment and heat-affected zone. For the 20 mm/min, the crystallized areas with a band shape were observed along the welding direction

  8. Ash from a pulp mill boiler--characterisation and vitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana S M; Monteiro, Regina C C; Davim, Erika J R; Fernandes, M Helena V

    2010-07-15

    The physical, chemical and mineralogical characterisation of the ash resulting from a pulp mill boiler was performed in order to investigate the valorisation of this waste material through the production of added-value glassy materials. The ash had a particle size distribution in the range 0.06-53 microm, and a high amount of SiO(2) (approximately 82 wt%), which was present as quartz. To favour the vitrification of the ash and to obtain a melt with an adequate viscosity to cast into a mould, different amounts of Na(2)O were added to act as fluxing agent. A batch with 80 wt% waste load melted at 1350 degrees C resulting in a homogeneous transparent green-coloured glass with good workability. The characterisation of the produced glass by differential thermal analysis and dilatometry showed that this glass presents a stable thermal behaviour. Standard leaching tests revealed that the concentration of heavy metals in the leaching solution was lower than those allowed by the Normative. As a conclusion, by vitrification of batch compositions with adequate waste load and additive content it is possible to produce an ash-based glass that may be used in similar applications as a conventional silicate glass inclusively as a building ecomaterial. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the surface film on Zr-based bulk metallic glass using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Ming; Liu Qiao; Zhang Nian; Hu Huiqin; Li Biao; Kang Xianjie

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In this study, we have made four interesting observations. → First, the composition of Al metal ions in the film of the as-cast metallic glass (41%) is much higher than the nominal Al composition of the alloy (9.5%). → We suggest that this should be attributed to the preferential oxidation of Al atoms. → Second, the composition of Al ions in the film of the immersed metallic glass decreases significantly, indicating that the toxic Al oxide and Al ions in the film are dissolved into the solutions during immersion. → Third, the concentration of Cl - ions has no significant effect on the compositions of metal ions in the film. → Fourth, the composition of Zr ions dominates in the film of the immersed metallic glass, indicating that the ZrO 2 oxide in the film is very hard to get corroded in the corrosive solutions. - Abstract: Using XPS, we have for the first time studied the release of metal ions in the film of the Zr-based bulk metallic glass to the corrosive solutions during immersing. The composition of Al ions in the film of the as-cast metallic glass (41%) is substantially higher than the nominal Al composition of the alloy (9.5%). We proposed that the enriched Al ions can be attributed to the preferential oxidation of Al atoms. After immersing in the NaCl- and HCl-solution, the composition of Al ions in the films decreases from 41% to 28.09% and 21.76%, respectively. This indicates that some of the Al ions in the film are dissolved into the solution during immersion. The composition changes of metal ions in the film of the immersed alloys relative to those of the as-cast metallic glass were discussed using the point defect model. SEM was also used to examine the surface morphology of the samples. No pit corrosion was observed in the SEM images of the immersed metal glass.

  10. Noble metal (NM) behavior during simulated HLLW vitrification in induction melter with cold crucible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demin, A.V.; Matyunin, Y.I.; Fedorova, M.I.

    1995-01-01

    The investigation of noble metal (Ru, Rh, Pd) properties in, glass melts are connected with their specific behaviors during HLLW vitrification. Ruthenium, rhodium and palladium volatilities and heterogeneous platinoid phases forming on melts are investigated in reasonable details conformably to Joule's heating ceramic melters. The vitrification conditions in melters with induction heating of melts are differ from the vitrification ones in ceramic melters on some numbers of parameters (the availability of significant temperature gradients and convection flows in melts, short time of molten mass updating in melter and probability of definite interaction between high-frequency field and melt inhomogeneities). The results of simulated HLLW solidification modelling of the vitrification process in induction melter with cold crucible to produce phosphate and boron-silicate materials are presented. The properties of received glasses and behavior of platinoids are shown to have analogies and distinctions in comparison with compounds, synthesized in ceramic melter. The structures of dispersed particles of NM heterogeneous phases forming in glass melts prepared in induction melter with cold crucible are identified. The results of investigations show, that the marked distinctions between two processes can influence (in definite degree) as on property of synthesized materials, as on behavior of platinoid during vitrifications

  11. Modeling in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecham, D.C.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Murray, P.E.; Johnson, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) process is being assessed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine its applicability to transuranic and mixed wastes buried at INEL'S Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). This process uses electrical resistance heating to melt waste and contaminated soil in place to produce a durable glasslike material that encapsulates and immobilizes buried wastes. This paper outlines the requirements for the model being developed at the INEL which will provide analytical support for the ISV technology assessment program. The model includes representations of the electric potential field, thermal transport with melting, gas and particulate release, vapor migration, off-gas combustion and process chemistry. The modeling objectives are to help determine the safety of the process by assessing the air and surrounding soil radionuclides and chemical pollution hazards, the nuclear criticality hazard, and the explosion and fire hazards, help determine the suitability of the ISV process for stabilizing the buried wastes involved, and help design laboratory and field tests and interpret results. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. Effect of Mo-Fe substitution on glass forming ability, thermal stability, and hardness of Fe-C-B-Mo-Cr-W bulk amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, Hesham E.; Cheney, Justin L. [University of California, San Diego Materials Science and Engineering Program, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States); Vecchio, Kenneth S. [University of California, San Diego Department of NanoEngineering, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)], E-mail: kvecchio@ucsd.edu

    2008-08-25

    Amorphous Fe{sub 67-x}C{sub 10}B{sub 9}Mo{sub 7+x}Cr{sub 4}W{sub 3} (x = 1-7 at.%) plates with 640 {mu}m thickness were prepared by copper mold casting. The thermal properties and microstructural development during heat treatments were investigated by a combination of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). The glass forming ability (GFA) and activation energy for crystallization have a distinct dependence on Mo content. Fe{sub 62}C{sub 10}B{sub 9}Mo{sub 12}Cr{sub 4}W{sub 3} is the best glass former in this study, demonstrating a supercooled liquid region, {delta}T{sub x} = 51 K, and an activation energy for crystallization, Q = 453 kJ/mol. The GFA of alloys in this system was governed by elastic strain optimization resulting directly from the variation in Mo content. Heat treatments were performed to demonstrate resistance to crystallization under typical processing conditions. Alloys in this system exhibited a three-phase evolution during crystallization. A second set of heat treatments was performed to identify each phase. Hardness data was collected at each of the heat treatment conditions, and a bulk metallic glasses (BMG)-derived composite containing a Mo-rich phase exhibited Vickers Hardness in excess of 2000. The fully amorphous alloys had an average hardness approaching 1500.

  13. The Effect of Ag Addition on the Enhancement of the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of CuZrAl Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Man Chung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the thermal and mechanical properties of Cu50−xZr43Al7Agx (x = 0, 3, 4, 5, 6 bulk metallic glasses (BMGs are investigated by using an X-ray diffractometer (XRD, a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, differential thermal analysis (DTA, a Vickers hardness tester, a material test system (MTS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Cu50−xZr43Al7Agx (x = 0, 3, 4, 5, 6 BMGs were made by arc-melting and an injection casting process. The results revealed that the glass transition temperature (Tg and the crystallization temperature (Tx of CuZrAl alloy decreased with the Ag addition. Hence, the supercooled liquid region and γ of Cu45Zr43Al7Ag5 alloy increased to 76 K and 0.42, respectively. The thermal stability and glass forming ability of CuZrAlAg BMG alloys were enhanced by the microalloyed Ag content. The room temperature compressive fracture strength and strain measured of Cu47Zr43Al7Ag3 were about 2200 MPa and 2.1%, respectively. The distribution of vein patterns and the formation of nanocrystalline phases on the fracture surface of Cu47Zr43Al7Ag3 alloy can be observed by SEM and TEM to be significant, indicating a typical ductile fracture behavior and an improved plasticity of alloys with the addition of microalloyed Ag from 0 to 6 atom %.

  14. The effect of liquid phase separation on the Vickers microindentation shear bands evolution in a Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari-Paykani, M. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nili Ahmadabadi, M., E-mail: nili@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seiffodini, A. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, North Kargar Street, Tehran 11356-4563 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazd University, Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yazd 84196 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The Vickers microindentation experiments and associated plastic deformation in as-cast and annealed (Fe{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1}){sub 77}Mo{sub 5}P{sub 9}C{sub 7.5}B{sub 1.5} bulk metallic glass was conducted. In addition to the bulk indentation behavior, the shear band morphology underneath the Vickers microindenter was examined by employing the bonded interface technique. Microstructural characterization revealed that a liquid phase separation occurred during melting process. Atomic force microscopy of the glassy matrix of the as-cast specimen reveals the composition inhomogeneity induced by the liquid phase separation. This effect generates shear band branching or deflection during the shear band propagation. For the bulk indentation, the trends in the hardness vs. indentation load were found related to the pressure sensitive index and the phase separation process simultaneously. The results show that the as-cast as well as the annealed specimens are deformed through semi-circular and radial shear bands. In addition, in the partially crystalized specimen, the change in the properties and microstructure of the BMG induced by the partial crystallization treatment and phase separation process resulted in tertiary shear bands formation.

  15. Independent engineering review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was initiated in June 1987. The HWVP is an essential element of the plan to end present interim storage practices for defense wastes and to provide for permanent disposal. The project start was justified, in part, on efficient technology and design information transfer from the prototype Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Development of other serial Hanford Waste Vitrification System (HWVS) elements, such as the waste retrieval system for the double-shell tanks (DSTs), and the pretreatment system to reduce the waste volume converted into glass, also was required to accomplish permanent waste disposal. In July 1991, at the time of this review, the HWVP was in the Title 2 design phase. The objective of this technical assessment is to determine whether the status of the technology development and engineering practice is sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the HWVP and the balance of the HWVS system will operate in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The criteria used to facilitate a judgment of potential successful operation are: vitrification of high-level radioactive waste from specified DSTs on a reasonably continuous basis; and glass produced with physical and chemical properties formally acknowledge as being acceptable for disposal in a repository for high-level radioactive waste. The criteria were proposed specifically for the Independent Engineering Review to focus that assessment effort. They are not represented as the criteria by which the Department will judge the prudence of the Project. 78 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs

  16. In-situ vitrification: pilot-scale development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.; Brouns, R.A.; Buelt, J.L.; Oma, K.H.

    1983-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing in-situ vitrification (ISV) as an in-place stabilization technique for buried radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes. The process melts the wastes and surrounding soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form. These in situ vitrification process development testing and product evaluation studies are being conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy. This report discusses the results of four ISV pilot-scale field tests simulating radioactive and hazardous waste site conditions. The primary objectives of the field tests were to: demonstrate process scale-up from engineering-scale laboratory tests; verify equipment performance of the power system, electrodes and off-gas system; characterize the behavior of simulated wastes in the vitrified soil; identify waste losses to the off-gas system; and evaluate waste form durability. Test results have been encouraging. Process scaleup has been successfully demonstrated, with equipment and electrode performance equally as successful. The off-gas system effectively contained any volatile or entrained hazardous species. Vitrified soil analysis also indicated effective containment and a homogeneous distribution of nonradioactive radionuclide and hazardous waste simulants due to convective mixing during vitrification. Waste form leaching studies revealed that the ISV product has a durability similar to Pyrex glass

  17. Chemical engineering problems of radioactive waste fixation by vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Basic features are reviewed of the chemical engineering problems faced in the vitrification of the high-level radioactive liquid wastes resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear fuel. After an outline of glass solution properties and formation kinetics the constituent elements of the vitrification route are examined in turn: waste feed evaporation and denitration, calcination, offgas treatment, and finally melting and product quality. Plant and experimental data for each stage are discussed with comparison between process routes and with reference to the underlying principles. Attention is drawn to the future need for higher trapping efficiencies and for dealing with a wider range of species in offgas treatments as higher burnup fuels are processed after shorter cooling times from reactor. Two areas of present study where deeper insight into underlying process mechanics is needed are, firstly, the association of waste material with glass formers in the wet or sinter stages and secondly their incorporation and mixing reaction in the melt. Fuller understanding here would bring direct benefit to process performance and handling. The problems discussed are not of a nature to jeopardize the vitrification routes but if product quality does come to rely heavily on process control then demonstrable confidence in the behaviour of the central physico-chemical interactions is indispensable. (author)

  18. Independent engineering review of the Hanford Waste Vitrification System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was initiated in June 1987. The HWVP is an essential element of the plan to end present interim storage practices for defense wastes and to provide for permanent disposal. The project start was justified, in part, on efficient technology and design information transfer from the prototype Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Development of other serial Hanford Waste Vitrification System (HWVS) elements, such as the waste retrieval system for the double-shell tanks (DSTs), and the pretreatment system to reduce the waste volume converted into glass, also was required to accomplish permanent waste disposal. In July 1991, at the time of this review, the HWVP was in the Title 2 design phase. The objective of this technical assessment is to determine whether the status of the technology development and engineering practice is sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the HWVP and the balance of the HWVS system will operate in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The criteria used to facilitate a judgment of potential successful operation are: vitrification of high-level radioactive waste from specified DSTs on a reasonably continuous basis; and glass produced with physical and chemical properties formally acknowledge as being acceptable for disposal in a repository for high-level radioactive waste. The criteria were proposed specifically for the Independent Engineering Review to focus that assessment effort. They are not represented as the criteria by which the Department will judge the prudence of the Project. 78 refs., 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. An experimental feasibility study on vitrification of Low - and medium-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jongkil; Song, Myungjae; Choe, Youngson; Cho, Myungyul

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory and pilot tests(all cold tests) were carried out to examine the possibility of vitrification of low-level radioactive waste such as combustible DAW(protection clothes and vinyl seat), ion exchange resins, and evaporator bottoms with three types of vitrification equipment. Pyrolyzed or dried waste material and glass formers were fed into the melting cavity, converted to molten glassy mixture, and poured into a canister. For examination of the optimal ash contents in borosilicate glass waste forms with respect to waste types, compressive strength tests were conducted for several samples of ash contents. In the case of protection clothes, vinyl seat, and spent resin was rapidly reduced up to 5 or 6 times lower than that of neat glass, but hardly changed for dried evaporator bottoms. In order to investigate the possibility of direct vitrification, combustible DAW and spent resin were directly fed into the in-can melter and Pt crucible. Pilot scale joule-heated melter in which plate type electrodes were employed to generate heat and whose melting cavity maintained a near constant molten glass level throughout the vitrification process, was designed and constructed. The total amount of molten glass in the melter was about 125 Kg and the average processing rate was 10 ∼ 15 Kg/h. At least 10 hr of retention time was considered for the best quality of the glassy waste form throughout the long-term tests

  20. On the Potential of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Dental Implantology: Case Study on Ti40Zr10Cu36Pd14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liens, Alethea; Etiemble, Aurélien; Rivory, Pascaline; Balvay, Sandra; Pelletier, Jean-Marc; Cardinal, Sandrine; Fabrègue, Damien; Kato, Hidemi; Steyer, Philippe; Munhoz, Tais; Adrien, Jerome; Courtois, Nicolas; Hartmann, Daniel J; Chevalier, Jérôme

    2018-02-06

    Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) appears very attractive for future biomedical applications thanks to its high glass forming ability, the absence of toxic elements such as Ni, Al or Be and its good mechanical properties. For the first time, a complete and exhaustive characterization of a unique batch of this glassy alloy was performed, together with ISO standard mechanical tests on machined implant-abutment assemblies. The results were compared to the benchmark Ti-6Al-4V ELI (Extra-Low-Interstitial) to assess its potential in dental implantology. The thermal stability, corrosion and sterilization resistance, cytocompatibility and mechanical properties were measured on samples with a simple geometry, but also on implant-abutment assemblies' prototypes. Results show that the glassy alloy exhibits a quite high thermal stability, with a temperature range of 38 °C between the glass transition and crystallization, a compressive strength of 2 GPa, a certain plastic deformation (0.7%), a hardness of 5.5 GPa and a toughness of 56 MPa.√m. Moreover, the alloy shows a relatively lower Young's modulus (96 GPa) than the Ti-6Al-4V alloy (110-115 GPa), which is beneficial to limit bone stress shielding. The BMG shows a satisfactory cytocompatibility, a high resistance to sterilization and a good corrosion resistance (corrosion potential of -0.07 V/SCE and corrosion current density of 6.0 nA/cm²), which may ensure its use as a biomaterial. Tests on dental implants reveal a load to failure 1.5-times higher than that of Ti-6Al-4V and a comparable fatigue limit. Moreover, implants could be machined and sandblasted by methods usually conducted for titanium implants, without significant degradation of their amorphous nature. All these properties place this metallic glass among a promising class of materials for mechanically-challenging applications such as dental implants.

  1. On the Potential of Bulk Metallic Glasses for Dental Implantology: Case Study on Ti40Zr10Cu36Pd14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alethea Liens

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ti40Zr10Cu36Pd14 Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG appears very attractive for future biomedical applications thanks to its high glass forming ability, the absence of toxic elements such as Ni, Al or Be and its good mechanical properties. For the first time, a complete and exhaustive characterization of a unique batch of this glassy alloy was performed, together with ISO standard mechanical tests on machined implant-abutment assemblies. The results were compared to the benchmark Ti-6Al-4V ELI (Extra-Low-Interstitial to assess its potential in dental implantology. The thermal stability, corrosion and sterilization resistance, cytocompatibility and mechanical properties were measured on samples with a simple geometry, but also on implant-abutment assemblies’ prototypes. Results show that the glassy alloy exhibits a quite high thermal stability, with a temperature range of 38 °C between the glass transition and crystallization, a compressive strength of 2 GPa, a certain plastic deformation (0.7%, a hardness of 5.5 GPa and a toughness of 56 MPa.√m. Moreover, the alloy shows a relatively lower Young’s modulus (96 GPa than the Ti-6Al-4V alloy (110–115 GPa, which is beneficial to limit bone stress shielding. The BMG shows a satisfactory cytocompatibility, a high resistance to sterilization and a good corrosion resistance (corrosion potential of −0.07 V/SCE and corrosion current density of 6.0 nA/cm2, which may ensure its use as a biomaterial. Tests on dental implants reveal a load to failure 1.5-times higher than that of Ti-6Al-4V and a comparable fatigue limit. Moreover, implants could be machined and sandblasted by methods usually conducted for titanium implants, without significant degradation of their amorphous nature. All these properties place this metallic glass among a promising class of materials for mechanically-challenging applications such as dental implants.

  2. Evaluation of vitrification factors from DWPF's macro-batch 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is evaluating new sampling and analytical methods that may be used to support future Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) batch acceptability decisions. This report uses data acquired during DWPF's processing of macro-batch 1 to determine a set of vitrification factors covering several SME and Melter Feed Tank (MFT) batches. Such values are needed for converting the cation measurements derived from the new methods to a ''glass'' basis. The available data from macro-batch 1 were used to examine the stability of these vitrification factors, to estimate their uncertainty over the course of a macro-batch, and to provide a recommendation on the use of a single factor for an entire macro-batch. The report is in response to Technical Task Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-980015

  3. Commercialization project of Ulchin vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Cheon-Woo; Hwang, Tae-Won

    2011-01-01

    The Ulchin Vitrification Facility (UVF), to be used for the vitirification of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) generated by nuclear power plants (NPPs), is the world's first commercial facility using Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology. The construction of the facility was begun in 2005 and was completed in 2007. From December 2007 to September 2009, all key performance tests, such as the system functional test, the cold test, the hot test, and the real waste test, were successfully carried out. The UVF commenced commercial operation in October 2009 for the vitrification of radioactive waste. (author)

  4. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaathaug, E.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations.

  5. Chloride removal from vitrification offgas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1995-01-01

    This study identified and investigated techniques of selectively purging chlorides from the low-level waste (LLW) vitrification process with the purge stream acceptable for burial on the Hanford Site. Chlorides will be present in high concentration in several individual feeds to the LLW Vitrification Plant. The chlorides are highly volatile in combustion type melters and are readily absorbed by wet scrubbing of the melter offgas. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flow sheets show that the resulting chloride rich scrub solution is recycled back to the melter. The chlorides must be purged from the recycle loop to prevent the buildup of excessively high chloride concentrations

  6. A new Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni-Si-Sn bulk amorphous alloy with high glass-forming ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.J.; Shen, J.; Sun, J.F.; Yu, X.B.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of Sn substitution for Cu on the glass-forming ability was investigated in Ti 41.5 Zr 2.5 Hf 5 Cu 42.5-x Ni 7.5 Si 1 Sn x (x = 0, 1, 3, 5, 7) alloys by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry. The alloy containing 5% Sn shows the highest glass-forming ability (GFA) among the Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni-Si-Sn system. Fully amorphous rod sample with diameters up to 6 mm could be successfully fabricated by the copper mold casting Ti 41.5 Zr 2.5 Hf 5 Cu 37.5 Ni 7.5 Si 1 Sn 5 alloy. The activation energies for glass transition and crystallization for Ti 41.5 Zr 2.5 Hf 5 Cu 37.5 Ni 7.5 Si 1 Sn 5 amorphous alloy are both larger than those values for the Sn-free alloy. The enhancement in GFA and thermal stability after the partial replacement of Cu by Sn may be contributed to the strong atomic bonding nature between Ti and Sn and the increasing of atomic packing density. The amorphous Ti 41.5 Zr 2.5 Hf 5 Cu 37.5 Ni 7.5 Si 1 Sn 5 alloy also possesses superior mechanical properties

  7. Molecular structure of virgin and Tg cycled (Ag2Se)x (AsSe)1-x bulk glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachtman, Jacob; Chen, Ping; Boochand, P.

    2009-03-01

    AsSe, the base glass (x = 0) in the titled ternary, is an interesting example of a chalcogenide that is partially de-mixed into As4Se4 molecules segregated from a connected AsSe network, with the latter determining glass network properties. Raman scattering reveals sharp modes of the Realgar molecules that are superimposed on broad modes coming from of the backbone. Upon Tg cycling virgin samples (as quenched melts), the concentration of de-mixed As4Se4 molecules decreases, suggesting that thermally induced polymerization occurs; molecules break up to form part of the connective tissue. Modulated DSC experiments reveal a broad exotherm near 140 ^oC in virgin samples, which becomes nearly extinct in Tg cycled samples. The exotherm may represent Realgar molecules nano-crystallizing as the temperature approaches Tg. Compositional trends in thermal parameters such as Tg(x), δCp(x), and the δHnr(x) as a function of Ag2Se content `x' of the glasses will be reported.

  8. Stabilization of contaminated soils by in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.

    1984-01-01

    In Situ Vitrification is an emerging technology developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for potential in-place immobilization of radioactive wastes. The contaminated soil is stabilized and converted to an inert glass form. This conversion is accomplished by inserting electrodes in the soil and establishing an electric current between the electrodes. The electrical energy causes a joule heating effect that melts the soil during processing. Any contaminants released from the melt are collected and routed to an off-gas treatment system. A stable and durable glass block is produced which chemically and physically encapsulates any residual waste components. In situ vitrification has been developed for the potential application to radioactive wastes, specifically, contaminated soil sites; however, it could possibly be applied to hazardous chemical and buried munitions waste sites. The technology has been developed and demonstrated to date through a series of 21 engineering-scale tests [producing 50 to 1000 kg (100 to 2000 lb) blocks] and seven pilot-scale tests [producing 9000 kg (20,000 lb) blocks], the most recent of which illustrated treatment of actual radioactively contaminated soil. Testing with some organic materials has shown relatively complete thermal destruction and incineration. Further experiments have documented the insensitivity of in situ vitrification to soil characteristics such as fusion temperature, specific heat, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, and moisture content. Soil inclusions such as metals, cements, ceramics, and combustibles normally present only minor process limitations. Costs for hazardous waste applications are estimated to be less than $175/m 3 ($5.00/ft 3 ) of material vitrified. For many applications, in situ vitrification can provide a cost-effective alternative to other disposal options. 13 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  9. The role of frit in nuclear waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Smith, P.A.; Dorn, D.A.; Hrma, P.

    1994-04-01

    Vitrification of nuclear waste requires additives which are often vitrified independently to form a frit. Frit composition is formulated to meet the needs of glass composition and processing. The effects of frit on melter feed and melt processing, glass acceptance, and waste loading is of practical interest in understanding the trade-offs associated with the competing demands placed on frit composition. Melter feed yield stress, viscosity and durability of frits and corresponding waste glasses as well as the kinetics of elementary melting processes have been measured. The results illustrate the competing requirements on frit. Four frits (FY91, FY93, HW39-4, and SR202) and simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) were used in this study. The experimental evidence shows that optimization of frit for one processing related property often results in poorer performance for the remaining properties. The difficulties associated with maximum waste loading and durability are elucidated for glasses which could be processed using technology available for the previously proposed Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant

  10. Material chemistry challenges in vitrification of high level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear technology with an affective environmental management plan and focused attention on safety measures is a much cleaner source of electricity generation as compared to other sources. With this perspective, India has undertaken nuclear energy program to share substantial part of future need of power. Safe containment and isolation of nuclear waste from human environment is an indispensable part of this programme. Majority of radioactivity in the entire nuclear fuel cycle is high level radioactive liquid waste (HLW), which is getting generated during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels. A three stage strategy for management of HLW has been adopted in India. This involves (i) immobilization of waste oxides in stable and inert solid matrices, (ii) interim retrievable storage of the conditioned waste product under continuous cooling and (iii) disposal in deep geological formation. Borosilicate glass matrix has been adopted in India for immobilization of HLW. Material issue are very important during the entire process of waste immobilization. Performance of the materials used in nuclear waste management determines its safety/hazards. Material chemistry therefore has a significant bearing on immobilization science and its technological development for management of HLW. The choice of suitable waste form to deploy for nuclear waste immobilization is difficult decision and the durability of the conditioned product is not the sole criterion. In any immobilization process, where radioactive materials are involved, the process and operational conditions play an important role in final selection of a suitable glass formulation. In remotely operated vitrification process, study of chemistry of materials like glass, melter, materials of construction of other equipment under high temperature and hostile corrosive condition assume significance for safe and un-interrupted vitrification of radioactive to ensure its isolation waste from human environment. The present

  11. A new Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni-Si-Sn bulk amorphous alloy with high glass-forming ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Shen, J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)]. E-mail: junshen@hit.edu.cn; Sun, J.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yu, X.B. [Lab of Energy Science and Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)]. E-mail: yuxuebin@hotmail.com

    2007-01-16

    The effect of Sn substitution for Cu on the glass-forming ability was investigated in Ti{sub 41.5}Zr{sub 2.5}Hf{sub 5}Cu{sub 42.5-x}Ni{sub 7.5}Si{sub 1}Sn {sub x} (x = 0, 1, 3, 5, 7) alloys by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffractometry. The alloy containing 5% Sn shows the highest glass-forming ability (GFA) among the Ti-Zr-Hf-Cu-Ni-Si-Sn system. Fully amorphous rod sample with diameters up to 6 mm could be successfully fabricated by the copper mold casting Ti{sub 41.5}Zr{sub 2.5}Hf{sub 5}Cu{sub 37.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Si{sub 1}Sn{sub 5} alloy. The activation energies for glass transition and crystallization for Ti{sub 41.5}Zr{sub 2.5}Hf{sub 5}Cu{sub 37.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Si{sub 1}Sn{sub 5} amorphous alloy are both larger than those values for the Sn-free alloy. The enhancement in GFA and thermal stability after the partial replacement of Cu by Sn may be contributed to the strong atomic bonding nature between Ti and Sn and the increasing of atomic packing density. The amorphous Ti{sub 41.5}Zr{sub 2.5}Hf{sub 5}Cu{sub 37.5}Ni{sub 7.5}Si{sub 1}Sn{sub 5} alloy also possesses superior mechanical properties.

  12. Influence of friction on the residual morphology, the penetration load and the residual stress distribution of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, friction between the Cube-Corner indenter and the sample surface of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG was analyzed and discussed by the experimental method, the theoretical method and the finite element simulation. Linear residua are observed on the surface of the indenter for the first time, which gives the direct evidence that strong interaction processes exist between the indenter surface and the sample surface because of strong friction and local high contact press. A simplified model was developed to correct the penetration load with the consideration of friction. Effects of friction on the penetration load-depth curves, plastic flow, surface deformation and residual stress distribution of the sample with different friction coefficients were investigated by the finite element simulation.

  13. Chemical ordering around open-volume regions in bulk metallic glass Zr52.5Ti5Al10Cu17.9Ni14.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Hartley, J.; Howell, R.; Sterne, P. A.; Nieh, T. G.

    2000-01-01

    We provide direct experimental evidence for a nonrandom distribution of atomic constituents in Zr 52.5 Ti 5 Al 10 Cu 17.9 Ni 14.6 bulk metallic glass using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The Ti content around the open-volume regions is significantly enhanced at the expense of Ni and Cu. Our results indicate that Ni and Cu atoms closely occupy the volume bounded by their neighboring atoms while Al, Ti, and Zr are less closely packed, and more likely to be associated with the open-volume regions. The overall distribution of elements seen by the positron is not significantly altered by annealing or by crystallization. Theoretical calculations indicate that the observed elemental distribution is not consistent with the known crystalline phases Zr 2 Cu and NiZr 2 , while Al 3 Zr 4 shows some of the characteristics seen in the experiment. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  14. Magneto-thermo-gravimetric technique to investigate the structural and magnetic properties of Fe-B-Nb-Y Bulk Metallic Glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangmin; Makino, Akihiro; Inoue, Akihisa [Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Masood, Ansar; Tamaki, Takahiko; Valter, Strom; Rao, K V, E-mail: smlee@imr.tohoku.ac.j [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockhom (Sweden)

    2009-01-01

    Magneto-thermo-gravimetric (MTG) technique is highly informative about the changes in the magnetic state, as well as structural changes in a system, which cannot be often noticed in calorimetric measurements. We demonstrate the versatility of this technique in determining the magnetic transition temperature, and the subsequent crystallization process in a (Fe{sub 0.72}B{sub 0.24}Nb{sub 0.04}){sub 95.5}Y{sub 4.5} Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG). MTG and DSC analyses were carried out at the heating rate of 0.67 K/s from RT {approx}1170 K. As a result of the repeated MTG measurements, a magnetic 2nd amorphous phase was observed in the BMG sample, which could be the first measurement for the Magnetic Short Range Ordering (MSRO). Consequently, the MTG measurement is proved as the most convenient method for determining the various structural and magnetic transitions in a glassy material.

  15. Characterization of glass and glass ceramic nuclear waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutze, W.; Borchardt, J.; De, A.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of solidified nuclear waste forms, glass and glass ceramic compositions and the properties (composition, thermal stability, crystallization, phase behavior, chemical stability, mechanical stability, and radiation effects) of glasses and glass ceramics are discussed. The preparation of glass ceramics may be an optional step for proposed vitrification plants if tailored glasses are used. Glass ceramics exhibit some improved properties with respect to glasses. The overall leach resistance is similar to that of glasses. An increased leach resistance may become effective for single radionuclides being hosted in highly insoluble crystal phases mainly when higher melting temperatures are applicable in order to get more leach resistant residual glass phases. The development of glass ceramic is going on. The technological feasibility is still to be demonstrated. The potential gain of stability when using glass ceramics qualifies the material as an alternative nuclear waste form

  16. Mechanical and dynamical behaviors of ZrSi and ZrSi{sub 2} bulk metallic glasses: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Shin-Pon, E-mail: jushin-pon@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tsang-Yu; Liu, Shih-Hao [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-14

    The mechanical and dynamical properties of ZrSi and ZrSi{sub 2} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) index analysis indicates that the major indexes in ZrSi and ZrSi{sub 2} bulk metallic glasses are 1551, 1541, and 1431, which refers to the liquid structure. For uniaxial tension, the results show that the ZrSi and ZrSi{sub 2} BMGs are more ductile than their crystal counterparts. The evolution of the distribution of atomic local shear strain clearly shows the initialization of shear transformation zones (STZs), the extension of STZs, and the formation of shear bands along a direction 45° from the tensile direction when the tensile strain gradually increases. The self-diffusion coefficients of ZrSi and ZrSi{sub 2} BMGs at temperatures near their melting points were calculated by the Einstein equation according to the slopes of the MSD profiles at the long-time limit. Because the HA fraction summation of icosahedral-like structures of ZrSi BMG is higher than that of ZrSi{sub 2} BMG, and these local structures are more dense, the self-diffusion coefficients of the total, Zr, and Si atoms of ZrSi{sub 2} BMG are larger than those of ZrSi BMG. This can be attributed to the cage effect, where a denser local structure has a higher possibility of atoms jumping back to form a backflow and then suppress atomic diffusivity. For ZrSi{sub 2} BMG, the self-diffusion coefficient of Si increases with temperature more significantly than does that of Zr, because more open packing rhombohedra structures are formed by the Si-Si pair.

  17. Beyond packing of hard spheres: The effects of core softness, non-additivity, intermediate-range repulsion, and many-body interactions on the glass-forming ability of bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kai; Fan, Meng; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Shattuck, Mark D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Physics and Benjamin Levich Institute, The City College of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); O’Hern, Corey S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Center for Research on Interface Structures and Phenomena, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2015-11-14

    When a liquid is cooled well below its melting temperature at a rate that exceeds the critical cooling rate R{sub c}, the crystalline state is bypassed and a metastable, amorphous glassy state forms instead. R{sub c} (or the corresponding critical casting thickness d{sub c}) characterizes the glass-forming ability (GFA) of each material. While silica is an excellent glass-former with small R{sub c} < 10{sup −2} K/s, pure metals and most alloys are typically poor glass-formers with large R{sub c} > 10{sup 10} K/s. Only in the past thirty years have bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) been identified with R{sub c} approaching that for silica. Recent simulations have shown that simple, hard-sphere models are able to identify the atomic size ratio and number fraction regime where BMGs exist with critical cooling rates more than 13 orders of magnitude smaller than those for pure metals. However, there are a number of other features of interatomic potentials beyond hard-core interactions. How do these other features affect the glass-forming ability of BMGs? In this manuscript, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to determine how variations in the softness and non-additivity of the repulsive core and form of the interatomic pair potential at intermediate distances affect the GFA of binary alloys. These variations in the interatomic pair potential allow us to introduce geometric frustration and change the crystal phases that compete with glass formation. We also investigate the effect of tuning the strength of the many-body interactions from zero to the full embedded atom model on the GFA for pure metals. We then employ the full embedded atom model for binary BMGs and show that hard-core interactions play the dominant role in setting the GFA of alloys, while other features of the interatomic potential only change the GFA by one to two orders of magnitude. Despite their perturbative effect, understanding the detailed form of the intermetallic potential is important for

  18. Nitrate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirilenko, I.A.; Vinogradov, E.E.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental evidence on behaviour of nitrate glasses is reviewed in terms of relationships between the presence of water in vitrescent nitrate systems and the properties of the systems. The glasses considered belong to systems of Mg(NO 3 ) 2 - Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; Hg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; NaNO 3 -Mg(NO 3 ) 2 -Nd(NO 3 ) 3 ; M-Zn(NO 3 ) 3 , where M is a mixture of 20% mass NaNO 3 and 80% mass Mg(NO 3 ) 2 , and Zn is a rare earth ion. Nitrate glass is shown to be a product of dehydration. Vitrification may be regarded as a resusl of formation of molecular complexes in the chain due to hydrogen bonds of two types, i.e. water-water, or water-nicrate group. Chain formation, along with low melting points of the nitrates, hinder crystallization of nitrate melts. Provided there is enough water, this results in vitrification

  19. Effects of annealing on the compositional heterogeneity and structure in zirconium-based bulk metallic glass thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, L.; Chu, J.P.; Li, C.-L.; Lee, C.-M.; Chen, Y.-C.; Liaw, P.K.; Voyles, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    In-situ heating fluctuation electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy have been utilized to study compositional and structural heterogeneities in Zr 51 Cu 32 Al 9 Ni 8 thin films upon annealing. Composition fluctuations are present in the as-deposited thin films. Well below the glass transition temperature, the composition fluctuations increase with annealing time. Short- and medium-range order also change with annealing temperature. The observed heterogeneities in the glass structure persist until annealing causes crystallization. The 20 nm thick Zr 51 Cu 32 Al 9 Ni 8 films contain oxide layers both at the surface and the film/substrate interface with the total thickness of 7–8 nm. In-situ annealing increased the oxygen content of the whole films to about 24 wt.% after 2 h at 400 °C. - Highlights: • Zr 51 Cu 32 Al 9 Ni 8 thin films were studied with in-situ heating electron microscopy. • Annealing at 400 °C increases the Zr and Cu compositional fluctuations. • Short-range order in Zr 51 Cu 32 Al 9 Ni 8 becomes less homogeneous above 350 °C. • Medium-range order changes in degree and types at 400 °C, well below T g . • Annealing increases composition and structure heterogeneities until crystallization

  20. Americium-curium vitrification process development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fellinger, A.P.; Baich, M.A.; Hardy, B.J

    1999-01-01

    The successful demonstration of sequentially drying, calcining and vitrifying an oxalate slurry in the Drain Tube Test Stand (DTTS) vessel provided the process basis for testing on a larger scale in a cylindrical induction heated melter. A single processing issue, that of batch volume expansion, was encountered during the initial stage of testing. The increase in batch volume centered on a sintered frit cap and high temperature bubble formation. The formation of a sintered frit cap expansion was eliminated with the use of cullet. Volume expansions due to high temperature bubble formation (oxygen liberation from cerium reduction) were mitigated in the DTTS melter vessel through a vessel temperature profile that effectively separated the softening point of the glass cullet and the evolving oxygen from cerium reduction. An increased processing temperature of 1,470 C and a two hour hold time to find any remaining bubbles successfully reduced bubbles in the poured glass to an acceptable level. The success of the preliminary process demonstrations provided a workable process basis that was directly applicable to the newly installed Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) system, making the batch flowsheet the preferred option for vitrification of the americium-curium surrogate feed stream

  1. Heating and structural disordering effects of the nonlinear viscous flow in a Zr55Al10Ni5Cu30 bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hidemi; Inoue, Akihisa; Chen, H.S.

    2003-01-01

    The heat evolution of stress-induced structural disorder, ΔH s (ε), of a Zr 55 Al 10 Ni 5 Cu 30 bulk metallic glass (BMG) during compressive constant ram-velocity deformation at the glass transition region (T g =680 K) was deduced from in situ measurements of temperature change of the deforming sample. At the transition from the linear to nonlinear viscoelasticity, the behavior of viscosity change with strain, η(ε), is qualitatively consistent with the enthalpy evolution of the structural disordering, ΔH s (ε), but not with the temperature change, ΔT(ε). It is concluded that the initial softening deformation is due to the stress-induced structural disordering. The change in the nonlinearity, -log η-tilde ≡-log η /η N , is found to be proportional to the ΔH s and the slope of ΔH s (-log η-tilde) can be estimated to 400 J/mol, where η N is the Newtonian viscosity. On the other hand, the temperature raise, ΔT(ε), is pronouncedly delayed as compared with the η (ε) and ΔH s (ε) at the transition, but is determined by a product of stress and plastic strain-rate, σ·ε p , and is nearly proportional to it at the steady state. The slope of ΔT(σ·ε p ) can be estimated to 5.2x10 -2 K mol/W

  2. Radioactive waste combustion-vitrification under arc plasma: thermal and dynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, B.

    2003-06-01

    This thesis concerns the thermal and dynamic modelling for a combustion/vitrification process of surrogate radioactive waste under transferred arc plasma. The writer presents the confinement processes for radioactive waste using arc plasma and the different software used to model theses processes. This is followed by a description of our experimental equipment including a plasma arc reactor and an inductive system allowing the homogenization of glass temperature. A combustion/vitrification test is described. Thermal and material balances were discussed. The temperature fields of plasma arc and the glass frit conductivity are measured. Finally, the writer describes and clarifies the equations solved for the simulations of the electrically plasma arc and the glass melting including the thin layer of glass frit coating the crucible cold walls. The modelling results are presented in the form of spatial distribution of temperature, velocity and voluminal power... (author)

  3. Radioactive waste combustion / vitrification under arc plasma: thermal and dynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelemy, B.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis concerns the thermal and dynamic modelling for a combustion/vitrification process of surrogate radioactive waste under transferred arc plasma. The writer presents the confinement processes for radioactive waste using arc plasma and the different software used to model theses processes. This is followed by a description of our experimental equipment including a plasma arc reactor and an inductive system allowing the homogenization of glass temperature. A combustion/vitrification test is described. Thermal and material balances were discussed. The temperature fields of plasma arc and the glass frit conductivity are measured. Finally, the writer describes and clarifies the equations solved for the simulations of the electrically plasma arc and the glass melting including the thin layer of glass frit coating the crucible cold walls. The modelling results are presented in the form of spatial distribution of temperature, velocity and volume power... (author)

  4. Vitrification of F006 plating waste sludge by Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.L.; Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Solidification into glass of nickel-on-uranium plating wastewater treatment plant sludge (F006 Mixed Waste) has been demonstrated at the Savannah River She (SRS). Vitrification using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), greatly enhanced the solubility and retention of heavy metals In glass. The bench-scale tests using RASP achieved 76 wt% waste loading In both soda-lime-silica and borosilicate glasses. The RASP has been Independently verified by a commercial waste management company, and a contract awarded to vitrify the approximately 500,000 gallons of stored waste sludge. The waste volume reduction of 89% will greatly reduce the disposal costs, and delisting of the glass waste is anticipated. This will be the world's first commercial-scale vitrification system used for environmental cleanup of Mixed Waste. Its stabilization and volume reduction abilities are expected to set standards for the future of the waste management Industry

  5. First use of in situ vitrification on radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowlds, L.

    1992-01-01

    A high-temperature method for containing hazardous wastes, which was first developed in the 1980s, is being adapted for the in situ treatment of buried radioactive wastes by the US DOE's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), following its recent report on successful preliminary tests. The method, called in situ vitrification (ISV), is an electrically induced thermal process that melts and fuses soil and wastes into a glass-like material at least as strong as natural obsidian or granite. Gases released during the process are captured and treated by an off-gas treatment system. After the wastes are vitrified, they could be left in place, or the mass could be broken up and transported to a disposal site. The glass-like substance would be chemically and physically similar to obsidian and from 4 to 10 times more durable than typical borosilicate glasses used to immobolize high-level nuclear wastes

  6. Multipurpose optimization models for high level waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoza, M.

    1994-08-01

    Optimal Waste Loading (OWL) models have been developed as multipurpose tools for high-level waste studies for the Tank Waste Remediation Program at Hanford. Using nonlinear programming techniques, these models maximize the waste loading of the vitrified waste and optimize the glass formers composition such that the glass produced has the appropriate properties within the melter, and the resultant vitrified waste form meets the requirements for disposal. The OWL model can be used for a single waste stream or for blended streams. The models can determine optimal continuous blends or optimal discrete blends of a number of different wastes. The OWL models have been used to identify the most restrictive constraints, to evaluate prospective waste pretreatment methods, to formulate and evaluate blending strategies, and to determine the impacts of variability in the wastes. The OWL models will be used to aid in the design of frits and the maximize the waste in the glass for High-Level Waste (HLW) vitrification

  7. Savannah River Site waste vitrification projects initiated throughout the United States: Disposal and recycle options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2000-01-01

    A vitrification process was developed and successfully implemented by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) to convert high-level liquid nuclear wastes (HLLW) to a solid borosilicate glass for safe long term geologic disposal. Over the last decade, SRS has successfully completed two additional vitrification projects to safely dispose of mixed low level wastes (MLLW) (radioactive and hazardous) at the SRS and at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The SRS, in conjunction with other laboratories, has also demonstrated that vitrification can be used to dispose of a wide variety of MLLW and low-level wastes (LLW) at the SRS, at ORR, at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), at Rocky Flats (RF), at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP). The SRS, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA), have demonstrated that vitrification can also be used to safely dispose of ion-exchange (IEX) resins and sludges from commercial nuclear reactors. In addition, the SRS has successfully demonstrated that numerous wastes declared hazardous by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can be vitrified, e.g. mining industry wastes, contaminated harbor sludges, asbestos containing material (ACM), Pb-paint on army tanks and bridges. Once these EPA hazardous wastes are vitrified, the waste glass is rendered non-hazardous allowing these materials to be recycled as glassphalt (glass impregnated asphalt for roads and runways), roofing shingles, glasscrete (glass used as aggregate in concrete), or other uses. Glass is also being used as a medium to transport SRS americium (Am) and curium (Cm) to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for recycle in the ORR medical source program and use in smoke detectors at an estimated value of $1.5 billion to the general public

  8. In situ vitrification program treatability investigation progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrenholz, D.A.

    1990-12-01

    This document presents a summary of the efforts conducted under the in situ vitrification treatability study during the period from its initiation in FY-88 until FY-90. In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that uses electrical power to convert contaminated soils into a chemically inert and stable glass and crystalline product. Contaminants present in the soil are either incorporated into the product or are pyrolyzed during treatment. The treatability study being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory by EG ampersand G Idaho is directed at examining the specific applicability of the in situ vitrification process to buried wastes contaminated with transuranic radionuclides and other contaminants found at the Subsurface Disposal Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex. This treatability study consists of a variety of tasks, including engineering tests, field tests, vitrified product evaluation, and analytical models of the ISV process. The data collected in the course of these efforts will address the nine criteria set forth in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, which will be used to identify and select specific technologies to be used in the remediation of the buried wastes at the Subsurface Disposal Area. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Development of vitrification line technology and the manufacture of equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexa, J.

    1989-01-01

    The development is described of technology and the production of equipment for the vitrification of liquid radioactive wastes. For vitrification, frit Frita F270 is used containing up to 20% titanium and featuring a corrosion effect lower by one order than that of lead glass. The liquid waste is discharged in a measuring tank where it is mixed with formic acid. It is then pumped into an evaporator. Breed vapor is carried via a condenser to a condensate tank. The evaporator concentrate is transported to a homogenizer where it is gradually mixed with Frita. The viscous mush thus produced is carried into a furnace where the remaining water is evaporated. The furnace decontamination factor is 10 2 to 10 3 . At a temperature of up to 1,050 degC the frit melts and is discharged into a case. Currently, technology has been developed of mush preparation and the design has been completed of a vitrification furnace featuring remote lid opening and closing, and of equipment for processing furnace emissions. (J.B.). 3 figs., 1 tab., 1 ref

  10. Manipulating femtosecond laser interactions in bulk glass and thin-film with spatial light modulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadian, Ehsan; Ho, Stephen; Ertorer, Erden; Gherghe, Sebastian; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial Light Modulators (SLM) are emerging as a power tool for laser beam shaping whereby digitally addressed phase shifts can impose computer-generated hologram patterns on incoming laser light. SLM provide several additional advantages with ultrashort-pulsed lasers in controlling the shape of both surface and internal interactions with materials. Inside transparent materials, nonlinear optical effects can confine strong absorption only to the focal volume, extend dissipation over long filament tracks, or reach below diffraction-limited spot sizes. Hence, SLM beam shaping has been widely adopted for laser material processing applications that include parallel structuring, filamentation, fiber Bragg grating formation and optical aberration correction. This paper reports on a range of SLM applications we have studied in femtosecond processing of transparent glasses and thin films. Laser phase-fronts were tailored by the SLM to compensate for spherical surface aberration, and to further address the nonlinear interactions that interplay between Kerr-lens self-focusing and plasma defocusing effects over shallow and deep focusing inside the glass. Limits of strong and weak focusing were examined around the respective formation of low-loss optical waveguides and long uniform filament tracks. Further, we have employed the SLM for beam patterning inside thin film, exploring the limits of phase noise, resolution and fringe contrast during interferometric intra-film structuring. Femtosecond laser pulses of 200 fs pulse duration and 515 nm wavelength were shaped by a phase-only LCOS-SLM (Hamamatsu X10468-04). By imposing radial phase profiles, axicon, grating and beam splitting gratings, volume shape control of filament diameter, length, and uniformity as well as simultaneous formation of multiple filaments has been demonstrated. Similarly, competing effects of spherical surface aberration, self-focusing, and plasma de-focusing were studied and delineated to enable formation

  11. Melter system technology testing for Hanford Site low-level tank waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1996-01-01

    Following revisions to the Tri-Party Agreement for Hanford Site cleanup, which specified vitrification for Complete melter feasibility and system operability immobilization of the low-level waste (LLW) tests, select reference melter(s), and establish reference derived from retrieval and pretreatment of the radioactive LLW glass formulation that meets complete systems defense wastes stored in 177 underground tanks, commercial requirements (June 1996). Available melter technologies were tested during 1994 to 1995 as part of a multiphase program to select reference Submit conceptual design and initiate definitive design technologies for the new LLW vitrification mission

  12. A pilot plant demonstration of the vitrification of radioactive solutions using microwave power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, M.S.; Hardwick, W.H.; Murphy, V.; Wace, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    A process has been developed that exploits the characteristics of microwave heating for the vitrification of high-level radioactive liquid waste. This process, microwave vitrification, has been successfully operated at pilot plant scale in an active cell using simulated liquid waste containing several curies of radioactivity. Excellent decontamination factors have been achieved for both volatiles and nonvolatiles with an average ruthenium decontamination factor of 490 and a gross alpha emitter decontamination factor of 100,000. Almost all the radioactivity is incorporated in a glass block

  13. Strongly enhanced irreversibility fields and Bose-glass behaviour in bulk YBCO with discontinuous columnar irradiation defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, G; Nenkov, K; Krabbes, G; Weinstein, R; Gandini, A; Sawh, R; Mayes, B; Parks, D

    2007-01-01

    Flux pinning properties and irreversibility fields B irr (T) of melt-textured YBCO with discontinuous or multiple-in-line-damage (MILD) columnar defects produced by irradiation with high-energy U 238 ions were studied at a constant matching field of B φ = 10 T and for several energy losses between S e = 1.67 and 2.4 keV A -1 . With increasing S e and increasing length of the MILD pins, the critical current density j c (H,T) strongly increases and B irr (T) for fields along the c axis progressively shifts upwards reaching 9 T at 77 K. For S e = 2.4 keV A -1 , a pronounced kink is observed in B irr (T) at 8 T which is a strong indication of Bose-glass behaviour. The j c (H) dependence of this sample shows a peak at a low applied field B p . This peak effect is explained by the entanglement of vortices. It is argued that for MILD pins single vortices interact simultaneously with many short columnar defects in neighbouring ion trails resulting in an automatic splay in the vortex orientation. The observed decrease of B p with increasing temperature is estimated taking the increasing thermal fluctuations into account

  14. In situ vitrification and the effects of soil additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepel, G.F.; Shade, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a case study involving in situ vitrification (ISV), a process for immobilizing chemical or nuclear wastes in soil by melting-dissolving the contaminated soil into a glass block. One goal of the study was to investigate how viscosity and electrical conductivity were affected by mixing CaO and Na 2 O with soil. A three-component constrained-region mixture experiment design was generated and the viscosity and electrical conductivity data collected. Several second-order mixture models were considered, and the Box-Cox transformation technique was applied to select property transformations. The fitted models were used to produce contour and component effects plots

  15. Vitrification of actinide solutions in SRS separations facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minichan, R.L.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1995-01-01

    The actinide vitrification system being developed at SRS provides the capability to convert specialized or unique forms of nuclear material into a stable solid glass product that can be safely shipped, stored or reprocessed according to the DOE complex mission. This project is an application of technology developed through funds from the Office of Technology Development (OTD). This technology is ideally suited for vitrifying relatively small quantities of fissile or special nuclear material since it is designed to be critically safe. Successful demonstration of this system to safely vitrify radioactive material could open up numerous opportunities for transferring this technology to applications throughout the DOE complex

  16. Temperature dependent charge transport studies across thermodynamic glass transition in P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction: insight from J-V and impedance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Atri; Rahaman, Abdulla Bin; Banerjee, Debamalya

    2018-03-01

    Temperature dependent charge transport properties of P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction are analysed by dc and ac measurements under dark conditions across a wide temperature range of 110-473 K, which includes the thermodynamic glass transition temperature (Tg ˜320 K) of the system. A change from Ohmic conduction to space charge limited current conduction at higher (⩾1.2 V) applied bias voltages above  ⩾200 K is observed from J-V characteristics. From capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement at room temperature, the occurrence of a peak near the built-in voltage is observed below the dielectric relaxation frequency, originating from the competition between drift and diffusion driven motions of charges. Carrier concentration (N) is calculated from C-V measurements taken at different temperatures. Room temperature mobility values at various applied bias voltages are in accordance with that obtained from transient charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage measurement. Sample impedance is measured over five decades of frequency across temperature range by using lock-in detection. This data is used to extract temperature dependence of carrier mobility (μ), and dc conductivity (σ_dc ) which is low frequency extrapolation of ac conductivity. An activation energy of  ˜126 meV for the carrier hopping process at the metal-semiconductor interface is estimated from temperature dependence of σ_dc . Above T g, μ levels off to a constant value, whereas σ_dc starts to decrease after a transition knee at T g that can be seen as a combined effect of changes in μ and N. All these observed changes across T g can be correlated to enhanced polymer motion above the glass transition.

  17. Crystallization kinetics and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 66}Nb{sub 4}B{sub 30} bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica, M., E-mail: m.stoica@ifw-dresden.d [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Kumar, S. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Roth, S. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Metallic Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Ram, S. [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Eckert, J. [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Vaughan, G. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities ESRF, 38402 Grenoble (France); Yavari, A.R. [LTPCM-CNRS, Institut National Politechnique de Grenoble, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP 75, Saint Martin d' Heres Campus 38402 (France)

    2009-08-26

    Fe-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have a high application potential because of their unique soft magnetic properties, mechanical behaviour and high corrosion resistance. Also, they can be obtained directly in the final shape suitable for use as magnetic sensors, magnetic valves, magnetic clutches etc. in different devices. Fe-based alloys able to form magnetic BMGs are of the type transition metal-metalloid and often contain 5 or more elements. Usually, the metalloid content is around 20 at.%. Recently, a new Fe-based BMG containing only 3 elements and a very high boron content was synthesized. The preparation of this BMG was done by employing the copper mold casting method and using the fluxing technique. This new BMG is ferromagnetic, with a Curie temperature around 550 K and a saturation magnetization of 105 Am{sup 2}/kg. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) investigations revealed a reduced glass transition temperature of 0.55 and an extension of the supercooled liquid region of about 31 K, values which indicate a relatively good thermal stability. Despite of numerous studies about Fe-based BMGs, there is still a lack of data about the crystallization kinetics. Also, the intermediate metastable phases, which form upon crystallization from the amorphous state, as well as the mechanism of their formation, are not fully understood. The present work discusses the kinetics of the phase formation using the Kissinger analysis and Johnson-Mehl-Avrami plots, correlated with the results obtained upon X-ray diffraction (XRD) of samples with different metastable structures. Additionally, the magnetic behaviour of different phase(s) is presented.

  18. A Zr-based bulk metallic glass for future stent applications: Materials properties, finite element modeling, and in vitro human vascular cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Pu, Chao; Fisher, Richard K; Mountain, Deidra J H; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K; Zhang, Wei; He, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Despite the prevalent use of crystalline alloys in current vascular stent technology, new biomaterials are being actively sought after to improve stent performance. In this study, we demonstrated the potential of a Zr-Al-Fe-Cu bulk metallic glass (BMG) to serve as a candidate stent material. The mechanical properties of the Zr-based BMG, determined under both static and cyclic loadings, were characterized by high strength, which would allow for the design of thinner stent struts to improve stent biocompatibility. Finite element analysis further complemented the experimental results and revealed that a stent made of the Zr-based BMG was more compliant with the beats of a blood vessel, compared with medical 316L stainless steel. The Zr-based BMG was found to be corrosion resistant in a simulated body environment, owing to the presence of a highly stable ZrO2-rich surface passive film. Application-specific biocompatibility studies were conducted using human aortic endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. The Zr-Al-Fe-Cu BMG was found to support stronger adhesion and faster coverage of endothelial cells and slower growth of smooth muscle cells than 316L stainless steel. These results suggest that the Zr-based BMG could promote re-endothelialization and potentially lower the risk of restenosis, which are critical to improve vascular stent implantation integration. In general, findings in this study raised the curtain for the potential application of BMGs as future candidates for stent applications. Vascular stents are medical devices typically used to restore the lumen of narrowed or clogged blood vessel. Despite the clinical success of metallic materials in stent-assisted angioplasty, post-surgery complications persist due to the mechanical failures, corrosion, and in-stent restenosis of current stents. To overcome these hurdles, strategies including new designs and surface functionalization have been exercised. In addition, the development of new materials with

  19. An update on the quality assurance for the waste vitrification plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caplinger, W.H.; Shugars, D.L.; Carlson, M.K.

    1990-01-01

    Immobilization of high-level defense production wastes is an important step in environmental restoration. The best available technology for immobilization of this waste currently is by incorporation into borosilicate glass, i.e., vitrification. Three US sites are active in the design, construction, or operation of vitrification facilities. The status, facility description and Quality Assurance (QA) development for each facility was presented at the 1989 Energy Division Conference. This paper presents the developments since that time. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) in northwestern New York State has demonstrated the technology. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has completed design, construction is essentially complete, and preparation for operation is underway. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) in Washington State is in initial Detailed Design. 4 refs.

  20. An update on the quality assurance for the waste vitrification plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caplinger, W.H.; Shugars, D.L.; Carlson, M.K.

    1990-01-01

    Immobilization of high-level defense production wastes is an important step in environmental restoration. The best available technology for immobilization of this waste currently is by incorporation into borosilicate glass, i.e., vitrification. Three US sites are active in the design, construction, or operation of vitrification facilities. The status, facility description and Quality Assurance (QA) development for each facility was presented at the 1989 Energy Division Conference. This paper presents the developments since that time. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) in northwestern New York State has demonstrated the technology. At the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has completed design, construction is essentially complete, and preparation for operation is underway. The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) in Washington State is in initial Detailed Design. 4 refs

  1. High-temperature vitrification of Hanford residual-liquid waste in a continuous melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.M.

    1980-04-01

    Over 270 kg of high-temperature borosilicate glass have been produced in a series of three short-term tests in the High-Temperature Ceramic Melter vitrification system at PNL. The glass produced was formulated to vitrify simulated Hanford residual-liquid waste. The tests were designed to (1) demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing high-temperature, continuous-vitrification technology for the immobilization of the residual-liquid waste, (2) test the airlift draining technique utilized by the high-temperature melter, (3) compare glass produced in this process to residual-liquid glass produced under laboratory conditions, (4) investigate cesium volatility from the melter during waste processing, and (5) determine the maximum residual-liquid glass production rate in the high-temperature melter. The three tests with the residual-liquid composition confirmed the viability of the continuous-melting vitrification technique for the immobilization of this waste. The airlift draining technique was demonstrated in these tests and the glass produced from the melter was shown to be less porous than the laboratory-produced glass. The final glass produced from the second test was compared to a glass of the same composition produced under laboratory conditions. The comparative tests found the glasses to be indistinguishable, as the small differences in the test results fell within the precision range of the characterization testing equipment. The cesium volatility was examined in the final test. This examination showed that 0.44 wt % of the cesium (assumed to be cesium oxide) was volatilized, which translates to a volatilization rate of 115 mg/cm 2 -h

  2. Vitrification of ion-exchange (IEX) resins: Advantages and technical challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Peeler, D.K.; Cicero, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Technologies are being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the commercial sector to convert low-level radioactive ion exchange (IEX) resin wastes from the nuclear utilities to solid stabilized waste forms for permanent disposal. One of the alternative waste stabilization technologies is vitrification of the resin into glass. Wastes can be vitrified at elevated temperatures by thermal treatment. One alternative thermal treatment is conventional Joule heated melting. Vitrification of wastes into glass is an attractive option because it atomistically bonds both hazardous and radioactive species in the glass structure, and volume reduces the wastes by 70-80%. The large volume reductions allow for large associated savings in disposal and/or long term storage costs

  3. Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP) for hazardous and mixed waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Ramsey, W.G.

    1993-01-01

    Solidification of hazardous/mixed wastes into glass is being examined at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for (1) nickel plating line (F006) sludges and (2) incinerator wastes. Vitrification of these wastes using high surface area additives, the Reactive Additive Stabilization Process (RASP), has been determined to greatly enhance the dissolution and retention of hazardous, mixed, and heavy metal species in glass. RASP lowers melt temperatures (typically 1050-- 1150 degrees C), thereby minimizing volatility concerns during vitrification. RASP maximizes waste loading (typically 50--75 wt% on a dry oxide basis) by taking advantage of the glass forming potential of the waste. RASP vitrification thereby minimizes waste disposal volume (typically 86--97 vol. %), and maximizes cost savings. Solidification of the F006 plating line sludges containing depleted uranium has been achieved in both soda-lime-silica (SLS) and borosilicate glasses at 1150 degrees C up to waste loadings of 75 wt%. Solidification of incinerator blowdown and mixtures of incinerator blowdown and bottom kiln ash have been achieved in SLS glass at 1150 degrees C up to waste loadings of 50% using RASP. These waste loadings correspond to volume reductions of 86 and 94 volume %, respectively, with large associated savings in storage costs

  4. Preparation and properties of Fe{sub 80−x}Ni{sub x}P{sub 14}B{sub 6} bulk metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ling; Ma, XiuHua [School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830046 (China); Li, Qiang, E-mail: qli@xju.edu.cn [School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830046 (China); Zhang, Jijun [School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi, Xinjiang 830046 (China); Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China); Dong, Yaqiang; Chang, Chuntao [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Fe{sub 80−x}Ni{sub x}P{sub 14}B{sub 6} (x = 20–50 at.%) BMGs were prepared by fluxing and J-quenching techniques. • The highest GFA is reached at x = 40 and the corresponding critical diameter is up to 2.5 mm. • The present FeNi-based BMGs exhibit very large ε{sub p} and the ε{sub p} of Fe{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 14}B{sub 6} BMG is 11.7%. • The present FeNi-based BMGs have much higher corrosion resistance than stainless steel. - Abstract: Bulk Fe{sub 80−x}Ni{sub x}P{sub 14}B{sub 6} (x = 20, 30, 40, 50 at.%) glassy alloy rods with the diameters of 1.0–2.5 mm were synthesized by combining fluxing technique and J-quenching technique. The glassy alloy rods were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It is found that the range of supercooled liquid region (ΔT{sub x}) is 27–32 K. The saturation magnetization of Fe{sub 80−x}Ni{sub x}P{sub 14}B{sub 6} (x = 20, 30, 40, 50 at.%) bulk glassy alloys gradually decreases from 1.13 T to 0.58 T with increasing Ni content from x = 20 to x = 50. More importantly, the present quaternary FeNiPB bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) shows a significant plastic strain, in particular, the plastic strain of Fe{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 14}B{sub 6} BMG reaches as high as 11.7%. The corrosion resistance of the present FeNiPB BMGs was studied by weight-loss method, potentiodynamic polarization curves and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It is shown that the corrosion resistance of the present FeNiPB BMGs in 0.5 M NaCl and 1 M HCl solution increases with Ni content, and further the present FeNiPB BMGs exhibit larger E{sub corr} values and lower I{sub corr} values, i.e. higher corrosion resistances, than that of stainless steel.

  5. Bulk glass ceramics containing Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}: β-NaGdF{sub 4} nanocrystals: Phase-separation-controlled crystallization, optical spectroscopy and upconverted temperature sensing behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daqin, E-mail: dqchen@fjirsm.ac.cn [College of Materials & Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Wan, Zhongyi; Zhou, Yan [College of Materials & Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Huang, Ping, E-mail: phuang@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Design and Assembly of Functional Nanostructures, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhong, Jiasong; Ding, Mingye [College of Materials & Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Xiang, Weidong; Liang, Xiaojuan [College of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Ji, Zhenguo, E-mail: jizg@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials & Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou 310018 (China)

    2015-07-25

    Highlights: • Hexagonal NaGdF{sub 4} nanocrystals embedded bulk glass ceramics were fabricated. • The incorporation of Ln{sup 3+} dopants into the β-NaGdF{sub 4} lattice was demonstrated. • Upconversion luminescence was highly intensified after glass crystallization. • Such glass ceramics had possible application in the optical temperature sensors. - Abstract: Lanthanide doped hexagonal β-NaGdF{sub 4} nanocrystals embedded transparent bulk glass ceramics were successfully fabricated via a phase-separation-controlled crystallization route. Elemental mapping in the scanning transmission electron microscope and optical spectroscopy analysis demonstrated the partition of the active centers into the β-NaGdF{sub 4} crystalline lattice. As a result, upconversion luminescence of the glass ceramic co-doped with Yb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} is about 60 times as high as that of the precursor glass, attributing to the modification of Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} surrounding from phase-separated amorphous nanoparticle to β-NaGdF{sub 4} crystalline lattice with low phonon energy and high crystallinity after crystallization. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent green upconversion emissions assigned to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} (520 nm) and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} (540 nm) transitions were investigated, and the corresponding fluorescence intensity ratio of these two thermally coupled emitting-states greatly enhanced with increase of temperature. Using such fabricated glass ceramic as an optical thermometric medium, the maximum sensitivity reached as high as 0.0037 K{sup −1} at 580 K. It is expected that the investigated Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped glass ceramic might be a very promising candidate for accurate optical temperature sensors.

  6. Measurement of the refractive index dispersion of As2Se3 bulk glass and thin films prior to and after laser irradiation and annealing using prism coupling in the near- and mid-infrared spectral range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlie, N.; Petit, L.; Musgraves, J. D.; Richardson, K.; Anheier, N. C. Jr.; Qiao, H. A.; Bernacki, B.; Phillips, M. C.

    2011-01-01

    The prism coupling technique has been utilized to measure the refractive index in the near- and mid-IR spectral region of chalcogenide glasses in bulk and thin film form. A commercial system (Metricon model 2010) has been modified with additional laser sources, detectors, and a new GaP prism to allow the measurement of refractive index dispersion over the 1.5-10.6 μm range. The instrumental error was found to be ±0.001 refractive index units across the entire wavelength region examined. Measurements on thermally evaporated AMTIR2 thin films confirmed that (i) the film deposition process provides thin films with reduced index compared to that of the bulk glass used as a target, (ii) annealing of the films increases the refractive index of the film to the level of the bulk glass used as a target to create it, and (iii) it is possible to locally increase the refractive index of the chalcogenide glass using laser exposure at 632.8 nm.

  7. Vitrification of liquid waste from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Jiawei; Choi, Kwansik; Song, Myung-Jae

    2001-01-01

    Glass is an acceptable waste form to solidify the low-level waste from nuclear power plants (NPPs) because of the simplicity of processing and its unique ability to accept a wide variety of waste streams. Vitrification is being considered to solidify the high-boron-containing liquid waste generated from Korean NPPs. This study dealt with the development of a glass formulation to solidify the liquid waste. Studies were conducted in a borosilicate glass system. Crucible studies have been performed with surrogate waste. Several developed glass frits were evaluated to determine their suitability for vitrifying the liquid waste. The results indicated that the 20 wt% waste oxides loading required could not be obtained using these glass frits. Flyash produced from coal-burning electric power stations, whose major components are SiO 2 and Al 2 O 3 , is a desirable glass network former. Detailed product evaluations including waste loading, homogeneity, chemical durability and viscosity, etc., were carried out on selected formulations using flyash. Up to 30 wt% of the waste oxides was successfully solidified into the flyash after the addition of 5-10 wt% Na 2 O at 1200 deg. C

  8. ''Cold crucible'' vitrification projects for low and high active waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, P.; Jouan, A.

    1998-01-01

    In continuity of the CEA HLW vitrification process experienced for more than 20 years in industrial operations in Cogema reprocessing plants (Marcoule and La Hague), CEA has developed an advanced extended performance cold crucible glass melter to address a wider range of waste like LLW, ILW and in particular waste with very corrosive species or requiring glass with higher elaboration temperature. In the cold crucible melter the bath of molten glass is directly heated by induction while the walls are cooled in order to freeze a protective glass layer. This technology subsequently allows high glass throughput while keeping the flexibility, the maintainability and low secondary waste generation related to a small metallic melter. Its recent use in the glass industry and the thousands of hours of pilot tests performed on inactive surrogates have demonstrated the maturity of this technology and its flexibility of use for processing most of the waste generated at nuclear facilities. SGN has therefore proposed this technology in Italy and Korea and in USA in the frame of the Hanford Privatization phase 1 A feasibility study. Main features of this study but also tests results with Hanford surrogates and active samples are discussed. (author)

  9. Hierarchical surface patterning of Ni- and Be-free Ti- and Zr-based bulk metallic glasses by thermoplastic net-shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarac, Baran, E-mail: b.sarac@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW), Jahnstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Bera, Supriya [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Balakin, Sascha [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); ETH Zurich, Department of Materials, Metal physics und Technology, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 4, HCI J 492, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Stoica, Mihai [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Politehnica University of Timisoara, P-ta Victoriei 2, RO-300006 Timisoara (Romania); Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems IKTS, Winterbergstrasse 28, 01277, Dresden (Germany); Calin, Mariana, E-mail: m.calin@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstrasse 20, D-01069 Dresden (Germany); Eckert, Jürgen [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences (ÖAW), Jahnstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Department Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, Jahnstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2017-04-01

    In order to establish a strong cell-material interaction, the surface topography of the implant material plays an important role. This contribution aims to analyze the formation kinetics of nickel and beryllium-free Ti- and Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) with potential biomedical applications. The surface patterning of the BMGs is achieved by thermoplastic net-shaping (TPN) into anisotropically etched cavities of silicon chips. The forming kinetics of the BMG alloys is assessed by thermal and mechanical measurements to determine the most suitable processing temperature and time, and load applied. Array of pyramidal micropatterns with a tip resolution down to 50 nm is achievable for the Zr-BMG, where the generated hierarchical features are crucial for surface functionalization, acting as topographic cues for cell attachment. The unique processability and intrinsic properties of this new class of amorphous alloys make them competitive with the conventional biomaterials. - Highlights: • Micro to nano-scale hierarchical surface patterns achieved by TPN of BMGs • Ni- and Be-free Zr-/Ti-BMGs with different GFA compared in terms of flow kinetics • Correlation between filling depths of Zr- and Ti-BMGs best described by formability • Multi-scale hierarchical patterning envisaged to facilitate BMG-cell interaction.

  10. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass studied by in situ scratch testing inside the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on material removal mechanism is meaningful for precision and ultra-precision manufacturing. In this paper, a novel scratch device was proposed by integrating the parasitic motion principle linear actuator. The device has a compact structure and it can be installed on the stage of the scanning electron microscope (SEM to carry out in situ scratch testing. Effect of residual chips on the material removal process of the bulk metallic glass (BMG was studied by in situ scratch testing inside the SEM. The whole removal process of the BMG during the scratch was captured in real time. Formation and growth of lamellar chips on the rake face of the Cube-Corner indenter were observed dynamically. Experimental results indicate that when lots of chips are accumulated on the rake face of the indenter and obstruct forward flow of materials, materials will flow laterally and downward to find new location and direction for formation of new chips. Due to similar material removal processes, in situ scratch testing is potential to be a powerful research tool for studying material removal mechanism of single point diamond turning, single grit grinding, mechanical polishing and grating fabrication.

  11. Biocompatible Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with high-Zr-content: compositional optimization for potential biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Nengbin; Huang, Lu; Chen, Wenzhe; He, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The present study designs and prepares Ni-free Zr60+xTi2.5Al10Fe12.5-xCu10Ag5 (at.%, x=0, 2.5, 5) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by copper mold casting for potential biomedical application. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility of the Zr-based BMGs are evaluated by investigating mechanical properties, bio-corrosion behavior, and cellular responses. It is found that increasing the content of Zr is favorable for the mechanical compatibility with a combination of low Young's modulus, large plasticity, and high notch toughness. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the Zr-based BMGs are corrosion resistant in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The bio-corrosion resistance of BMGs is improved with the increase in Zr content, which is attributed to the enrichment in Zr and decrease in Al concentration in the surface passive film of alloys. Regular cell responses of mouse MC3T3-E1 cells, including cell adhesion and proliferation, are observed on the Zr-Ti-Al-Fe-Cu-Ag BMGs, which reveals their general biosafety. The high-Zr-based BMGs exhibit a higher cell proliferation activity in comparison with that of pure Zr and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility can be used to guide the future design of biocompatible Zr-based BMGs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of Nb addition on mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and metal-ion release of ZrAlCuNi bulk metallic glasses in artificial body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, C L; Liu, L; Sun, M; Zhang, S M

    2005-12-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) of Zr(65 - x)Nb(x)- Cu(17.5)Ni(10)Al(7.5) with Nb = 0, 2, and 5 at % were prepared by copper mold casting. Compression tests reveal that the two BMGs containing Nb exhibited superior strength and plasticity to the base alloy. The corrosion behavior of the alloys obtained was investigated in artificial body fluid by electrochemical measurements. It was found that the addition of Nb significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the Zr-based BMG, as indicated by a remarkable increase in corrosion potential and pitting potential. XPS analysis revealed that the passive film formed after anodic polarization was enriched in aluminum oxide and depleted in phosphate ions for the BMGs containing Nb, which accounts for the improvement of corrosion resistance. On the other hand, metal-ion release of different BMGs were determined in PPb (ng/mL) level with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after being immersed in artificial body fluid at 37 degrees C for 20 days. It was found that the addition of Nb considerably reduced the ion release of all kinds of metals of the base system. This is probably attributed to the promoting effect of Nb on a rapid formation of highly protective film.

  13. The Effect of Thermal Cycling Treatments on the Thermal Stability and Mechanical Properties of a Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal cycling treatments on the thermal stability and mechanical properties of a Ti48Zr20Nb12Cu5Be15 bulk metallic glass composite (BMGC has been investigated. Results show that moderate thermal cycles in a temperature range of −196 °C (cryogenic temperature, CT to 25 °C (room temperature, RT or annealing time at CT has not induced obvious changes of thermal stability and then it decreases slightly over critical thermal parameters. In addition, the dendritic second phases with a bcc structure are homogeneously embedded in the amorphous matrix; no visible changes are detected, which shows structural stability. Excellent mechanical properties as high as 1599 MPa yield strength and 34% plastic strain are obtained, and the yield strength and elastic modulus also increase gradually. The effect on the stability is analyzed quantitatively by crystallization kinetics and plastic-flow models, and indicates that the reduction of structural relaxation enthalpy, which is related to the degradation of spatial heterogeneity, reduces thermal stability but does not imperatively deteriorate the plasticity.

  14. Localized atomic segregation in the spalled area of a Zr50Cu40Al10 bulk metallic glasses induced by laser-shock experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodar, B.; Loison, D.; Yokoyama, Y.; Lescoute, E.; Nivard, M.; Berthe, L.; Sangleboeuf, J.-C.

    2018-02-01

    Laser-shock experiments were performed on a ternary {Zr50{Cu}40{Al}10} bulk metallic glass. A spalling process was studied through post-mortem analyses conducted on a recovered sample and spall. Scanning electron microscopy magnification of fracture surfaces revealed the presence of a peculiar feature known as cup-cone. Cups are found on sample fracture surface while cones are observed on spall. Two distinct regions can be observed on cups and cones: a smooth viscous-like region in the center and a flat one with large vein-pattern in the periphery. Energy dispersive spectroscopy measurements conducted on these features emphasized atomic distribution discrepancies both on the sample and spall. We propose a mechanism for the initiation and the growth of these features but also a process for atomic segregation during spallation. Cup and cones would originate from cracks arising from shear bands formation (softened paths). These shear bands result from a quadrupolar-shaped atomic disorder engendered around an initiation site by shock wave propagation. This disorder turns into a shear band when tensile front reaches spallation plane. During the separation process, temperature gain induced by shock waves and shear bands generation decreases material viscosity leading to higher atomic mobility. Once in a liquid-like form, atomic clusters migrate and segregate due to inertial effects originating from particle velocity variation (interaction of release waves). As a result, a high rate of copper is found in sample cups and high zirconium concentration is found on spall cones.

  15. Ni-free Zr-Cu-Al-Nb-Pd bulk metallic glasses with different Zr/Cu ratios for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K; Pang, Shujie; Inoue, Akihisa; Zhang, Tao; He, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) possess attractive properties for prospective biomedical applications. The present study designs Ni-free Zr-Cu-Al-Nb-Pd BMGs and investigates their in vitro biocompatibility by studying mechanical properties, bio-corrosion resistance, and cellular responses. The Ti-6Al-4V alloy is used as a reference material. It is found that the Zr-based BMGs exhibit good mechanical properties, including high strengths above 1600 MPa, high hardness over 4700 MPa, and low elastic moduli of 85-90 GPa. The Zr-based BMGs are corrosion resistant in a simulated body environment, as revealed by wide passive regions, low passive current densities, and high pitting overpotentials. The formation of ZrO(2)-rich surface passive films of the Zr-based BMGs contributes to their high corrosion resistance, whereas their pitting corrosion in the phosphate buffered saline solution can be attributed to the sensitivity of the ZrO(2) films to the chloride ion. The general biosafety of the Zr-based BMGs is revealed by normal cell adhesions and cell morphologies. Moreover, the Zr/Cu content ratio in the alloy composition affects the biocompatibility of the Zr-based BMGs, by increasing their corrosion resistance and surface wettability with the increase of the Zr/Cu ratio. Effects of Zr/Cu ratios can be used to guide the future design of biocompatible Zr-based BMGs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Vitrification for stability of scrap and residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-05-01

    A conference breakout discussion was held on the subject of vitrification for stabilization of plutonium scrap and residue. This was one of four such sessions held within the vitrification workshop for participants to discuss specific subjects in further detail. The questions and issues were defined by the participants.

  17. Drastic influence of minor Fe or Co additions on the glass forming ability, martensitic transformations and mechanical properties of shape memory Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Sergio; Pérez, Pablo; Rossinyol, Emma; Suriñach, Santiago; Dolors Baró, Maria; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Zr 48 Cu 48 -  x Al 4 M x (M ≡ Fe or Co, x  = 0, 0.5, 1 at.%) metallic glass (MG) composites are highly dependent on the amount of Fe or Co added as microalloying elements in the parent Zr 48 Cu 48 Al 4 material. Addition of Fe and Co promotes the transformation from austenite to martensite during the course of nanoindentation or compression experiments, resulting in an enhancement of plasticity. However, the presence of Fe or Co also reduces the glass forming ability, ultimately causing a worsening of the mechanical properties. Owing to the interplay between these two effects, the compressive plasticity for alloys with x  = 0.5 (5.5% in Zr 48 Cu 47.5 Al 4 Co 0.5 and 6.2% in Zr 48 Cu 47.5 Al 4 Fe 0.5 ) is considerably larger than for Zr 48 Cu 48 Al 4 or the alloys with x  = 1. Slight variations in the Young's modulus (around 5-10%) and significant changes in the yield stress (up to 25%) are also observed depending on the composition. The different microstructural factors that have an influence on the mechanical behavior of these composites are investigated in detail: (i) co-existence of amorphous and crystalline phases in the as-cast state, (ii) nature of the crystalline phases (austenite versus martensite content), and (iii) propensity for the austenite to undergo a mechanically-driven martensitic transformation during plastic deformation. Evidence for intragranular nanotwins likely generated in the course of the austenite-martensite transformation is provided by transmission electron microscopy. Our results reveal that fine-tuning of the composition of the Zr-Cu-Al-(Fe,Co) system is crucial in order to optimize the mechanical performance of these bulk MG composites, to make them suitable materials for structural applications.

  18. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, D.E. [ed.; Watrous, R.A.; Kruger, O.L. [and others

    1996-03-01

    A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version.

  19. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.E.; Watrous, R.A.; Kruger, O.L.

    1996-03-01

    A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version

  20. Cost performance assessment of in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showalter, W.E.; Letellier, B.C.; Booth, S.R.; Barnes-Smith, P.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a thermal treatment technology with promise for the destruction or immobilization of hazardous materials in contaminated soils. It has developed over the past decade to a level of maturity where meaningful cost effectiveness studies may be performed. The ISV process melts 4 to 25 m 2 of undisturbed soil to a maximum depth of 6 m into an obsidian-like glass waste form by applying electric current (3750 kill) between symmetrically spaced electrodes. Temperatures of approximately 2000 degree C drive off and destroy complex organics which are captured in an off-gas treatment system, while radio-nuclides are incorporated into the homogeneous glass monolith. A comparative life-cycle cost evaluation between mobile rotary kiln incineration and ISV was performed to quantitatively identify appropriate performance regimes and components of cost which are sensitive to the implementation of each technology. Predictions of melt times and power consumption were obtained from an ISV performance model over ranges of several parameters including electrode spacing, soil moisture, melt depth, electrical resistivity, and soil density. These data were coupled with manpower requirements, capitalization costs, and a melt placement optimization routine to allow interpolation over a wide variety of site characteristics. For the purpose of this study, a single site scenario representative of a mixed waste evaporation pond was constructed. Preliminary comparisons between ISV and incineration show that while operating costs are comparable, ISV avoids secondary treatment and monitored storage of radioactive waste that would be required following conventional incineration. It is the long term storage of incinerated material that is the most expensive component