WorldWideScience

Sample records for bulk tumor cells

  1. Wilms’ Tumor Blastemal Stem Cells Dedifferentiate to Propagate the Tumor Bulk

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    Rachel Shukrun

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An open question remains in cancer stem cell (CSC biology whether CSCs are by definition at the top of the differentiation hierarchy of the tumor. Wilms’ tumor (WT, composed of blastema and differentiated renal elements resembling the nephrogenic zone of the developing kidney, is a valuable model for studying this question because early kidney differentiation is well characterized. WT neural cell adhesion molecule 1-positive (NCAM1+ aldehyde dehydrogenase 1-positive (ALDH1+ CSCs have been recently isolated and shown to harbor early renal progenitor traits. Herein, by generating pure blastema WT xenografts, composed solely of cells expressing the renal developmental markers SIX2 and NCAM1, we surprisingly show that sorted ALDH1+ WT CSCs do not correspond to earliest renal stem cells. Rather, gene expression and proteomic comparative analyses disclose a cell type skewed more toward epithelial differentiation than the bulk of the blastema. Thus, WT CSCs are likely to dedifferentiate to propagate WT blastema.

  2. Combination therapy targeting both cancer stem-like cells and bulk tumor cells for improved efficacy of breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Ren, Huilan; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-06-01

    Many types of tumors are organized in a hierarchy of heterogeneous cell populations. The cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) hypothesis suggests that tumor development and metastasis are driven by a minority population of cells, which are responsible for tumor initiation, growth and recurrences. The inability to efficiently eliminate CSCs during chemotherapy, together with CSCs being highly tumorigenic and invasive, may result in treatment failure due to cancer relapse and metastases. CSCs are emerging as a promising target for the development of translational cancer therapies. Ideal panacea for cancer would kill all malignant cells, including CSCs and bulk tumor cells. Since both chemotherapy and CSCs-specific therapy are insufficient to cure cancer, we propose combination therapy with CSCs-targeted agents and chemotherapeutics for improved breast cancer treatment. We generated in vitro mammosphere of 2 breast cancer cell lines, and demonstrated ability of mammospheres to grow and enrich cancer cells with stem-like properties, including self-renewal, multilineage differentiation and enrichment of cells expressing breast cancer stem-like cell biomarkers CD44(+)/CD24(-/low). The formation of mammospheres was significantly inhibited by salinomycin, validating its pharmacological role against the cancer stem-like cells. In contrast, paclitaxel showed a minimal effect on the proliferation and growth of breast cancer stem-like cells. While combination therapies of salinomycin with conventional chemotherapy (paclitaxel or lipodox) showed a potential to improve tumor cell killing, different subtypes of breast cancer cells showed different patterns in response to the combination therapies. While optimization of combination therapy is warranted, the design of combination therapy should consider phenotypic attributes of breast cancer types.

  3. Selective depletion of a minor subpopulation of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is followed by a delayed but progressive loss of bulk tumor cells and disease regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodell Margaret A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer precursor/progenitor cells may initiate and sustain the growth of tumors, but evidence for their existence in human disease is indirect, relying on their in vitro properties and animal models. More directly, specific elimination of these rare cells from cancer patients should produce a delayed but progressive disappearance of differentiated malignant progeny. Here, we describe selective eradication of a putative precursor population in a patient with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, followed 6 months later by a progressive loss of mature tumor cells without further treatment. This outcome supports the presence of a rare population of precursor/progenitor cells in human malignancies, and suggests benefit from their removal.

  4. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

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    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed.

  5. Tumor cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  6. Polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, RAJ; Hummelen, JC; Saricifti, NS

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured phase-separated blends, or bulk heterojunctions, of conjugated Polymers and fullerene derivatives form a very attractive approach to large-area, solid-state organic solar cells.The key feature of these cells is that they combine easy, processing from solution on a variety of substrate

  7. Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

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    Singhaniya Shikha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT is a rare tumorous form of calcifying odontogenic cyst and only a small number of cases have been described. It is a locally invasive neoplasm that is characterized by ameloblastoma-like epithelial islands, ghost cells and dentinoid. The present report describes a case of a 21-year-old male with a tumor in the posterior region of the mandible, showing features of DGCT.

  8. Olfactory ensheathing cell tumor

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    Ippili Kaushal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs are found in the olfactory bulb and olfactory nasal mucosa. They resemble Schwann cells on light and electron microscopy, however, immunohistochemical staining can distinguish between the two. There are less than 30 cases of olfactory groove schwannomas reported in the literature while there is only one reported case of OEC tumor. We report an OEC tumor in a 42-year-old male and discuss the pathology and origin of this rare tumor.

  9. Merkel cell tumor.

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    Kitazawa, M; Watanabe, H; Kobayashi, H; Ohnishi, Y; Shitara, A; Nitto, H

    1987-06-01

    A Merkel cell tumor appeared on the left cheek of an 83-year-old female was reported. The tumor was located mainly in the dermis and infiltrated to the subcutaneous adipose tissue with an involvement of the blood vessels and lymphatics at the periphery. Electron-microscopically, few of the dense-cored granules and the single globular aggregates of intermediate filaments at the nuclear indentations were observed. Electron-microscopic uranaffin reaction proved positive reaction on the dense-cored granules. Half of the cytoplasmic border was smooth, while the rest had short projections. Desmosomes or junctional complexes were not detected among the tumor cells. Immunohistochemically, the cytoplasm of tumor cell showed positive reaction to both neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and keratin. The single globular positive spots of the latter were localized in accordance with the aggregates of intermediate filaments. These findings suggested a neurogenic origin with double differentiation, epithelial and neuroendocrine, of the Merkel cell tumor.

  10. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

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    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  11. Nonislet Cell Tumor Hypoglycemia

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    Johnson Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH is a rare cause of hypoglycemia. It is characterized by increased glucose utilization by tissues mediated by a tumor resulting in hypoglycemia. NICTH is usually seen in large mesenchymal tumors including tumors involving the GI tract. Here we will discuss a case, its pathophysiology, and recent advances in the management of NICTH. Our patient was diagnosed with poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus. He continued to be hypoglycemic even after starting continuous tube feeds and D5W. General workup for hypoglycemia was negative and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II was in the normal range. Hypoglycemia secondary to “big” IGF II was considered, and patient was started on steroids. His hypoglycemia resolved within a day of treatment with steroids. Initially patient had hypoglycemia unawareness, which he regained after maintaining euglycemia for 48 hours.

  12. Ghost Cell Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Jason; Cohen, Molly D; Ramer, Naomi; Payami, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Ghost cell tumors are a family of lesions that range in presentation from cyst to solid neoplasm and in behavior from benign to locally aggressive or metastatic. All are characterized by the presence of ameloblastic epithelium, ghost cells, and calcifications. This report presents the cases of a 14-year-old girl with a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) and a 65-year-old woman with a peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) with dysplastic changes, a rare locally invasive tumor of odontogenic epithelium. The first patient presented with a 1-year history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph displayed a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion. An incisional biopsy yielded a diagnosis of CCOT. Decompression of the mass was completed; after 3 months, it was enucleated and immediately grafted with bone harvested from the anterior iliac crest. The second patient presented with a 3-month history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph depicted a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion with saucerization of the buccal mandibular cortex. An incisional biopsy examination suggested a diagnosis of DGCT because of the presence of ghost cells, dentinoid, and islands of ameloblastic epithelium. Excision of the mass with peripheral ostectomy was completed. At 6 and 12 months of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was noted.

  13. Bulk heterojunction solar cells of three polythienothiophenes

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    Elif Alturk Parlak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting conjugated copolymers poly(3-phenyl-2-(thiophen-2-ylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene (PTTPh, poly(3-(4-methoxyphenyl-2-(thiophen-2-ylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene (PTTPh-OMe and poly(3-(4-N,N-dimethylaminophenyl-2-(thiophen-2-ylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene (PTTPh-N(CH 3 2, which were synthesized previously through Suzuki coupling method, were fabricated for solar cell applications. The devices had a structure of glass/ITO/PEDOT:PSS/polymer:PC61BM/Al. Bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells were prepared as blends of PTTPh, PTTPh-OMe, PTTPh-N(CH 3 2 and PC61BM in a 1:1 ratio, which delivered power conversion efficiencies of 0.43%, 0.039% and 0.027%, respectively, without addition of additives or device optimization.

  14. Benign notochordal cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Gamarra, C; Bernabéu Taboada, D; Pozo Kreilinger, J J; Tapia Viñé, M

    2017-08-01

    Benign notochordal cell tumors (TBCN) are lesions with notochordal differentiation which affect the axial skeleton. They are characterized by asymptomatic or non-specific symptomatology and are radiologically unnoticed because of their small size, or because they are mistaken with other benign bone lesions, such as vertebral hemangiomas. When they are large, or symptomatic, can be differential diagnosis with metastases, primary bone tumors and chordomas. We present a case of a TBCN in a 50-year-old woman, with a sacral lesion seen in MRI. A CT-guided biopsy was scheduled to analyze the lesion, finding that the tumor was not clearly recognizable on CT, so the anatomical references of MRI were used to select the appropriate plane. The planning of the approach and the radio-pathological correlation were determinant to reach the definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Extraovarian granulosa cell tumor

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    Paul Prabir

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Extraovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT is a very uncommon tumor, assumed to arise from the ectopic gonadal tissue along the embryonal route of the genital ridge. One such rare case of extraovarian GCT was encountered in a 58-year-old female who presented with a large intraabdominal lump. Computerized tomography revealed one large retroperitoneal mass measuring 15cm x 16cm and another mesenteric mass of 8cm x 5cm size. The patient had a history of hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy 20 years ago for uterine leiomyoma. Ultrasonography-guided aspiration smears revealed cytological features suggestive of GCT. Histopathological examination of the excised masses showed features of adult-type GCT. Because metastatic epithelial tumors, particularly from the ovaries, may show identical morphology, immunostains for inhibin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA were performed. The tumor showed positivity for inhibin while EMA was negative thus confirming the diagnosis of GCT. As this patient had no previous history of GCT and was oophorectomized 20 years ago, the tumor was considered as extraovarian. A diagnosis of extraovarian GCT should be carried out after excluding any previous history of GCT of the ovary. Immunostains help to differentiate GCTs from other neoplasms.

  16. Studies of bulk heterojunction solar cells

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    Cossel, Raquel; McIntyre, Max; Tzolov, Marian

    We are studying bulk heterojunction solar cells that were fabricated using a mixture of PCPDTBT and PCBM­C60. The impedance data of the cells in dark responded like a simple RC circuit. The value of the dielectric constant derived from these results is consistent with the values reported in the literature for these materials. We are showing that the parallel resistance in the equivalent circuit of linear lump elements can be interpreted using the DC current­voltage measurements. The impedance spectra under light illumination indicated the existence of additional polarization. This extra feature can be described by a model that includes a series RC circuit in parallel with the equivalent circuit for a device in dark. The physical interpretation of the additional polarization is based on photo­generated charges getting trapped in wells, which have a characteristic relaxation time corresponding to the observed break frequency in the impedance spectra. We have studied the influence of the anode and cathode interface on this phenomena, either by using different interface materials, or by depositing the metal electrode while the substate is heated.

  17. Pericytes limit tumor cell metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xian, Xiaojie; Håkansson, Joakim; Ståhlberg, Anders

    2006-01-01

    Previously we observed that neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) deficiency in beta tumor cells facilitates metastasis into distant organs and local lymph nodes. Here, we show that NCAM-deficient beta cell tumors grew leaky blood vessels with perturbed pericyte-endothelial cell-cell interactions...... and deficient perivascular deposition of ECM components. Conversely, tumor cell expression of NCAM in a fibrosarcoma model (T241) improved pericyte recruitment and increased perivascular deposition of ECM molecules. Together, these findings suggest that NCAM may limit tumor cell metastasis by stabilizing...... the microvessel wall. To directly address whether pericyte dysfunction increases the metastatic potential of solid tumors, we studied beta cell tumorigenesis in primary pericyte-deficient Pdgfb(ret/ret) mice. This resulted in beta tumor cell metastases in distant organs and local lymph nodes, demonstrating a role...

  18. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

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    Sertoli-stromal cell tumor; Arrhenoblastoma; Androblastoma; Ovarian cancer - Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor ... The exact cause of this tumor is not known. Changes (mutations) in genes may play a role. SLCT occur most often in young women 20 to 30 ...

  19. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

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    ... ovarian germ cell tumor are swelling of the abdomen or vaginal bleeding after menopause. Ovarian germ cell ... if you have either of the following: Swollen abdomen without weight gain in other parts of the ...

  20. Efficiency of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharber, M C; Sariciftci, N S

    2013-12-01

    During the last years the performance of bulk heterojunction solar cells has been improved significantly. For a large-scale application of this technology further improvements are required. This article reviews the basic working principles and the state of the art device design of bulk heterojunction solar cells. The importance of high power conversion efficiencies for the commercial exploitation is outlined and different efficiency models for bulk heterojunction solar cells are discussed. Assuming state of the art materials and device architectures several models predict power conversion efficiencies in the range of 10-15%. A more general approach assuming device operation close to the Shockley-Queisser-limit leads to even higher efficiencies. Bulk heterojunction devices exhibiting only radiative recombination of charge carriers could be as efficient as ideal inorganic photovoltaic devices.

  1. Efficiency of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharber, M.C.; Sariciftci, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    During the last years the performance of bulk heterojunction solar cells has been improved significantly. For a large-scale application of this technology further improvements are required. This article reviews the basic working principles and the state of the art device design of bulk heterojunction solar cells. The importance of high power conversion efficiencies for the commercial exploitation is outlined and different efficiency models for bulk heterojunction solar cells are discussed. Assuming state of the art materials and device architectures several models predict power conversion efficiencies in the range of 10–15%. A more general approach assuming device operation close to the Shockley–Queisser-limit leads to even higher efficiencies. Bulk heterojunction devices exhibiting only radiative recombination of charge carriers could be as efficient as ideal inorganic photovoltaic devices. PMID:24302787

  2. Infantile pericardial round cell tumor

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    K H Sridevi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac malignancies presenting in infancy are rare. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT is a rare occurrence in this age group. No case of intrapericardial DSRCT has been reported in the literature in infants.

  3. Polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

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    Jenny Nelson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of solar cells made from a conjugated polymer blended with a fullerene derivative has risen from around 1 % to over 9 % in the last ten years, making organic photovoltaic technology a viable contender for commercialization. The efficiency increases have resulted from the development of new materials with lower optical gaps, new polymer:fullerene combinations with higher charge separated state energies, and new approaches to control the blend microstructure, all driven by a qualitative understanding of the principles governing organic solar cell operation. In parallel, a device physics framework has been developed that enables the rational design of device structures and materials for improved organic photovoltaic devices. We review developments in both materials science and device physics for organic photovoltaics.

  4. Brain tumor stem cells: the cancer stem cell hypothesis writ large.

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    Dirks, Peter B

    2010-10-01

    Brain tumors, which are typically very heterogeneous at the cellular level, appear to have a stem cell foundation. Recently, investigations from multiple groups have found that human as well as experimental mouse brain tumors contain subpopulations of cells that functionally behave as tumor stem cells, driving tumor growth and generating tumor cell progeny that form the tumor bulk, but which then lose tumorigenic ability. In human glioblastomas, these tumor stem cells express neural precursor markers and are capable of differentiating into tumor cells that express more mature neural lineage markers. In addition, modeling brain tumors in mice suggests that neural precursor cells more readily give rise to full blown tumors, narrowing potential cells of origin to those rarer brain cells that have a proliferative potential. Applying stem cell concepts and methodologies is giving fresh insight into brain tumor biology, cell of origin and mechanisms of growth, and is offering new opportunities for development of more effective treatments. The field of brain tumor stem cells remains very young and there is much to be learned before these new insights are translated into new patient treatments. Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Zinc uptake by brain cells: `surface' versus `bulk'

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStasio, Gelsomina; Pochon, S.; Lorusso, G. F.; Tonner, B. P.; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, M. Teresa; Oddo, Nino; Galli, Paolo; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.

    1996-08-01

    The uptake of zinc by cerebellar rat cultures upon exposure to 0022-3727/29/8/023/img12 solutions was comparatively investigated using two well known condensed matter physics techniques: synchrotron photoelectron spectromicroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The objective was to apply a strategy - well known in surface physics - to distinguish between `surface' and `bulk' phenomena. The results clearly demonstrate that exposure significantly enhances the bulk (cell cytoplasm) Zn concentration with respect to the physiological level, whereas the effect on the surface (cell membrane) is negligible.

  6. Bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on merocyanine colorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Nils M; Deppisch, Manuela; Würthner, Frank; Lademann, Hans W A; Deing, Kaja; Meerholz, Klaus

    2008-12-28

    Traditional low-molecular weight colorants that are widely applied in textile coloration, for printing purposes and nonlinear optics, now afford bulk heterojunction solar cells in combination with soluble C(60) fullerene derivative PCBM with power conversion efficiencies up to 1.7% under standard solar radiation.

  7. Microenvironments Dictating Tumor Cell Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragado, Paloma; Sosa, Maria Soledad; Keely, Patricia; Condeelis, John

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms driving dormancy of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) remain largely unknown. Here, we discuss experimental evidence and theoretical frameworks that support three potential scenarios contributing to tumor cell dormancy. The first scenario proposes that DTCs from invasive cancers activate stress signals in response to the dissemination process and/or a growth suppressive target organ microenvironment inducing dormancy. The second scenario asks whether therapy and/or micro-environmental stress conditions (e.g. hypoxia) acting on primary tumor cells carrying specific gene signatures prime new DTCs to enter dormancy in a matching target organ microenvironment that can also control the timing of DTC dormancy. The third and final scenario proposes that early dissemination contributes a population of DTCs that are unfit for immediate expansion and survive mostly in an arrested state well after primary tumor surgery, until genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms activate their proliferation. We propose that DTC dormancy is ultimately a survival strategy that when targeted will eradicate dormant DTCs preventing metastasis. For these non-mutually exclusive scenarios we review experimental and clinical evidence in their support. PMID:22527492

  8. Mechanisms of tumor cell necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, Sergey Y; Gabai, Vladimir L

    2010-01-01

    Until recently, necrosis, unlike apoptosis, was considered as passive and unregulated form of cell death. However, during the last decade a number of experimental data demonstrated that, except under extreme conditions, necrosis may be a well-regulated process activated by rather specific physiological and pathological stimuli. In this review, we consider mechanisms and the role of necrosis in tumor cells. It became recently clear that the major player in necrotic cascade is a protein kinase RIP1, which can be activated by number of stumuli including TNF, TRAIL, and LPS, oxidative stress, or DNA damage (via poly-ADP-ribose polymerase). RIP1 kinase directly (or indirectly via another kinase JNK) transduces signal to mitochondria and causes specific damage (mitochondrial permeability transition). Mitochondrial collapse activates various proteases (e.g., calpains, cathepsin) and phospholipases, and eventually leads to plasma membrane destruction, a hallmark of necrotic cell death. Necrosis, in contrast to apoptosis, usually evokes powerful inflammatory response, which may participate in tumor regression during anticancer therapy. On the other hand, excessive spontaneous necrosis during tumor development may lead to more aggressive tumors due to stimulatory role of necrosis-induced inflammation on their growth.

  9. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  10. Palifosfamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-11

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  11. Culture and Isolation of Brain Tumor Initiating Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; McFarlane, Nicole; Singh, Sheila K

    2015-08-03

    Brain tumors are typically composed of heterogeneous cells that exhibit distinct phenotypic characteristics and proliferative potentials. Only a relatively small fraction of cells in the tumor with stem cell properties, termed brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), possess an ability to differentiate along multiple lineages, self-renew, and initiate tumors in vivo. This unit describes protocols for the culture and isolation BTICs. We applied culture conditions and assays originally used for normal neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro to a variety of brain tumors. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting for the neural precursor cell surface marker CD133/CD15, BTICs can be isolated and studied prospectively. Isolation of BTICs from GBM bulk tumor will enable examination of dissimilar morphologies, self-renewal capacities, tumorigenicity, and therapeutic sensitivities. As cancer is also considered a disease of unregulated self-renewal and differentiation, an understanding of BTICs is fundamental to understanding tumor growth. Ultimately, it will lead to novel drug discovery approaches that strategically target the functionally relevant BTIC population. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  14. Dendritic cells are stressed out in tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Tomasz; Zou, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    A recently paper published in Cell reports that dendritic cells (DCs) are dysfunctional in the tumor environment. Tumor impairs DC function through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress response and subsequent disruption of lipid metabolic homeostasis.

  15. Human neutrophils facilitate tumor cell transendothelial migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wu, Q D

    2012-02-03

    Tumor cell extravasation plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms by which tumor cells migrate through normal vascular endothelium remain unclear. In this study, using an in vitro transendothelial migration model, we show that human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) assist the human breast tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 to cross the endothelial barrier. We found that tumor-conditioned medium (TCM) downregulated PMN cytocidal function, delayed PMN apoptosis, and concomitantly upregulated PMN adhesion molecule expression. These PMN treated with TCM attached to tumor cells and facilitated tumor cell migration through different endothelial monolayers. In contrast, MDA-MB-231 cells alone did not transmigrate. FACScan analysis revealed that these tumor cells expressed high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) but did not express CD11a, CD11b, or CD18. Blockage of CD11b and CD18 on PMN and of ICAM-1 on MDA-MB-231 cells significantly attenuated TCM-treated, PMN-mediated tumor cell migration. These tumor cells still possessed the ability to proliferate after PMN-assisted transmigration. These results indicate that TCM-treated PMN may serve as a carrier to assist tumor cell transendothelial migration and suggest that tumor cells can exploit PMN and alter their function to facilitate their extravasation.

  16. Morphology Control in co-evaporated bulk heterojunction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacik, P; Assender, HE; Watt, AAR

    2013-01-01

    Bulk heterojunction solar cells made by vacuum co-evaporation of polythiophene (PTh) and fullerene (C60) are reported and the blend morphology control through donor-acceptor composition and post-situ annealing demonstrated. Co-deposited heterojunctions are shown to generate about 60% higher photocurrents than their thickness-optimized PTh/C60 planar heterojunction counterparts. Furthermore, by annealing the devices post-situ the power conversion efficiency is improved by as much as 80%. UV-vi...

  17. Peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant S Kamat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumors (DGCT are uncommon lesions mainly with rare peripheral types. This report presents a case of peripheral DGCT on the left side of the mandibular alveolar ridge of a heavy smoker, a 68-year-old man, with main presenting feature as a mild pain. Submandibular lymphadenopathy and radiological "saucerization" were evident. Differential diagnosis included fibroma, neurofibroma, peripheral ameloblastoma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, and peripheral giant cell granuloma. Histologically, ameloblastoma-like epithelial elements were seen in association with grouped ghost cells. Proliferating polyhedral cells and stellate reticulum-like cells with various densities were spread over a wide range of the field. The lesion was curetted and after 2 years of follow up, it did not recur.

  18. Study of organic solar cells with stacked bulk heterojunction structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xin-fang; XU Zheng; ZHAO Su-ling; ZHANG Fu-jun; LI Yan; WU Chun-yu; CHEN Yue-ning

    2008-01-01

    Organic solar cells with stacked bulk heterojunction(BHJ) are investigated based on conjugated polymer. By using the solution spin-coating method, Poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy) -1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) and ZnO nanoparticles (50 nm) are mixed as the optical sense layer. Ag is used as inter-layer to connect the upper BILl cell and the lower cell. The structures are ITO/PEDOT:PSS/MEH-PPV/Ag/MEH-PPV:ZnO/Al. The open circuit voltage (Voc) of a stacked cell is about 3.7 times of that of an individual organic solar cell (ITO/PEDOT:PSS/MEH-PPV/A1). The short circuit current (Jsc) of a stacked cell is increased by about 1.6 times of that of individual one.

  19. Spin-cast bulk heterojunction solar cells: A dynamical investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Chou, Kang Wei

    2013-02-22

    Spin-coating is extensively used in the lab-based manufacture of organic solar cells, including most of the record-setting solution-processed cells. We report the first direct observation of photoactive layer formation as it occurs during spin-coating. The study provides new insight into mechanisms and kinetics of bulk heterojunction formation, which may be crucial for its successful transfer to scalable printing processes. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Modulation of junction tension by tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes regulates cell-cell contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Guirao, Boris; Wang, Zhimin; Rivière, Mathieu; Bonnet, Isabelle; Graner, François; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-15

    Tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes play crucial roles in tissue proliferation. Furthermore, de-regulation of their functions is deleterious to tissue architecture and can result in the sorting of somatic rounded clones minimizing their contact with surrounding wild-type (wt) cells. Defects in the shape of somatic clones correlate with defects in proliferation, cell affinity, cell-cell adhesion, oriented cell division and cortical contractility. Combining genetics, live-imaging, laser ablation and computer simulations, we aim to analyze whether distinct or similar mechanisms can account for the common role of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes in cell-cell contact regulation. In Drosophila epithelia, the tumor suppressors Fat (Ft) and Dachsous (Ds) regulate cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, planar cell polarity and junction tension. By analyzing the evolution over time of ft mutant cells and clones, we show that ft clones reduce their cell-cell contacts with the surrounding wt tissue in the absence of concomitant cell divisions and over-proliferation. This contact reduction depends on opposed changes of junction tensions in the clone bulk and its boundary with neighboring wt tissue. More generally, either clone bulk or boundary junction tension is modulated by the activation of Yorkie, Myc and Ras, yielding similar contact reductions with wt cells. Together, our data highlight mechanical roles for proto-oncogene and tumor suppressor pathways in cell-cell interactions.

  1. The rationale for liquid biopsy in colorectal cancer: a focus on circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Carletti, Raffaella; di Gioia, Cira; Gradilone, Angela; Cortesi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Capturing circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and/or circulating tumor DNA from blood, which represents a precious source of biological material derived from both primary and metastatic tumors, has been named a 'liquid biopsy'. While the circulating tumor DNA might be more representative of the bulk of the metastatic tumor, CTCs are thought to reflect more of the metastases-initiating cells. Consequently, a liquid biopsy made of tumor cells and tumor DNA that is able to track cancer evolution, as a fingerprint of the patient's individual tumor, and is easy to perform at every stage of the disease course, sounds attractive. This article mainly focuses on the applications of CTCs to track tumor dynamics in real time using colorectal cancer as a model system. The analysis of viable CTCs at DNA, RNA and protein levels, as well as their expansion in vitro, may allow deep investigation of the features of metastases-initiating cells.

  2. Graphene-Based Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Eric; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2015-09-01

    The current highest power-conversion efficiencies found for different types of solar cell devices range from 20% to 46%, depending on the nature of the photovoltaic materials used and device configuration. Graphene has emerged as an important organic photovoltaic material for photoenergy conversion, where graphene can be used as a transparent electrode, active interfacial layer, electron transport layer, hole transport layer, or electron/hole separation layer in fabricating solar cell devices. This review article briefly discusses some recent advances made in different types of photovoltaic materials, and then summarizes the current status of graphene-based bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, including graphene-containing perovskite and tandem solar cell devices. Power-conversion efficiencies currently exceed 10% for heteroatom-doped multilayer graphene-based BHJ solar cells and 15.6% for graphene-containing perovskite-based solar cells. The role of graphene layer thickness, bending, thermal annealing, passivation, heteroatom doping, perovskite materials, and tandem solar cell structure on the photovoltaic performance of graphene-based solar cells is discussed. Besides aiming for high power-conversion efficiency, factors such as long-term environmental stability and degradation, and the cost-effectiveness of graphene-based solar cells for large-scale commercial production are challenging tasks.

  3. NK cells in the tumor microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine K; Gao, Yanhua; Basse, Per H

    2014-01-01

    The presence of natural killer (NK) cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with outcome in a variety of cancers. However, the role of intratumoral NK cells is unclear. Preclinical studies have shown that, while NK cells efficiently kill circulating tumor cells of almost any origin...

  4. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging th...

  5. Different Device Architectures for Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew Adam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report different solar cell designs which allow a simple electrical connection of subsequent devices deposited on the same substrate. By arranging so-called standard and inverted solar-cell architectures next to each other, a serial connection of the two devices can easily be realized by a single compound electrode. In this work, we tested different interfacial layer materials like polyethylenimine (PEI and PEDOT:PSS, and silver as a non-transparent electrode material. We also built organic light emitting diodes applying the same device designs demonstrating the versatility of applied layer stacks. The proposed design should allow the preparation of organic bulk-heterojunction modules with minimized photovoltaically inactive regions at the interconnection of individual devices.

  6. Efficient organic photovoltaic cells with vertically ordered bulk heterojunctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Wang, Haibo; Yan, Donghang

    2013-12-01

    Nanoscale morphology has been proved to be the key parameter deciding the exciton dissociation and charge transportation in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. In this paper, we report a kind of small molecular organic photovoltaic cell (OPV) with a vertically ordered BHJ prepared by the weak epitaxial growth method. By this method, zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) can easily be formed into a highly ordered and continuous thin film and C60 is inclined to become dispersed crystalline grains in ZnPc film. Furthermore, we can control both the size and distribution density of C60 crystalline grains in ZnPc thin film without destroying the order of the ZnPc thin film. The OPVs with the vertically ordered BHJ show a high fill factor and a power conversion efficiency over 3% has been achieved.

  7. Robo-Enabled Tumor Cell Extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Helena E; Portela, Marta

    2016-12-19

    How aberrant cells are removed from a tissue to prevent tumor formation is a key question in cancer biology. Reporting in this issue of Developmental Cell, Vaughen and Igaki (2016) show that a pathway with an important role in neural guidance also directs extrusion of tumor cells from epithelial tissues.

  8. Evolution of cooperation among tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Robert; Axelrod, David E; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2006-09-01

    The evolution of cooperation has a well established theoretical framework based on game theory. This approach has made valuable contributions to a wide variety of disciplines, including political science, economics, and evolutionary biology. Existing cancer theory suggests that individual clones of cancer cells evolve independently from one another, acquiring all of the genetic traits or hallmarks necessary to form a malignant tumor. It is also now recognized that tumors are heterotypic, with cancer cells interacting with normal stromal cells within the tissue microenvironment, including endothelial, stromal, and nerve cells. This tumor cell-stromal cell interaction in itself is a form of commensalism, because it has been demonstrated that these nonmalignant cells support and even enable tumor growth. Here, we add to this theory by regarding tumor cells as game players whose interactions help to determine their Darwinian fitness. We marshal evidence that tumor cells overcome certain host defenses by means of diffusible products. Our original contribution is to raise the possibility that two nearby cells can protect each other from a set of host defenses that neither could survive alone. Cooperation can evolve as by-product mutualism among genetically diverse tumor cells. Our hypothesis supplements, but does not supplant, the traditional view of carcinogenesis in which one clonal population of cells develops all of the necessary genetic traits independently to form a tumor. Cooperation through the sharing of diffusible products raises new questions about tumorigenesis and has implications for understanding observed phenomena, designing new experiments, and developing new therapeutic approaches.

  9. Effect of tumor cells and tumor microenvironment on NK-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Massimo; Cantoni, Claudia; Pietra, Gabriella; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    The ability of tumors to manage an immune-mediated attack has been recently included in the "next generation" of cancer hallmarks. In solid tumors, the microenvironment that is generated during the first steps of tumor development has a pivotal role in immune regulation. An intricate net of cross-interactions occurring between tumor components, stromal cells, and resident or recruited immune cells skews the possible acute inflammatory response toward an aberrant ineffective chronic inflammatory status that favors the evasion from the host's defenses. Natural killer (NK) cells have powerful cytotoxic activity, but their activity may be eluded by the tumor microenvironment. Immunosubversion, immunoediting or immunoselection of poorly immunogenic tumor cells and interference with tumor infiltration play a major role in evading NK-cell responses to tumors. Tumor cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts and tumor-induced aberrant immune cells (i.e. tolerogenic or suppressive macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells) can interfere with NK-cell activation pathways or the complex receptor array that regulate NK-cell activation and antitumor activity. Thus, the definition of tumor microenvironment-related immunosuppressive factors, along with the identification of new classes of tissue-residing NK-like innate lymphoid cells, represent key issues to design effective NK-cell-based therapies of solid tumors.

  10. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  11. Cancer Stem Cells and Pediatric Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory K. Friedman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a subpopulation of cells, termed tumor-initiating cells or tumor stem cells (TSC, has been identified in many different types of solid tumors. These TSC, which are typically more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation compared to other tumor cells, have properties similar to normal stem cells including multipotency and the ability to self-renew, proliferate, and maintain the neoplastic clone. Much of the research on TSC has focused on adult cancers. With considerable differences in tumor biology between adult and pediatric cancers, there may be significant differences in the presence, function and behavior of TSC in pediatric malignancies. We discuss what is currently known about pediatric solid TSC with specific focus on TSC markers, tumor microenvironment, signaling pathways, therapeutic resistance and potential future therapies to target pediatric TSC.

  12. Bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells based on merocyanine colorants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, Nils M.; Lademann, Hans W.A.; Meerholz, Klaus [Department fuer Chemie, Universitaet zu Koen (Germany); Buerckstuemmer, Hannah; Tulyakova, Elena V.; Deppisch, Manuela; Wuerthner, Frank [Institut fuer Organische Chemie, Universitaet Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    To take advantage of the full potential of organic Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, there is a need to explore new materials. We introduced merocyanines dyes (MCs) as a new class of electron donor materials for the application in solution-processed BHJ solar cells. MCs are traditional low-molecular colorants that are widely applied in textile coloration, for printing purposes, and nonlinear optics. Due to their structure, consisting of an electron-donating and an electron-accepting subunit, they possess high absorption coefficients which is favorable for the use in solar cells. The vast variety of the MC synthesis allows for a variation of the absorption properties in a wide range and a tuning of the solar cell absorption to the emission spectrum of the sun. Another advantage of MCs compared to some long-wavelength absorbing polymers is the relatively low HOMO-energy (down to -6.0 eV), which is beneficial for large open-circuit voltages. We tested various different MC-dyes in the application as donor compound in BHJ solar cells in combination with the soluble C{sub 60} derivative PCBM. Power conversion efficiencies up to 2.1% under standard illumination and 2.7% at reduced intensities were achieved.

  13. Metastasis and circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalum, van G.; Holland, L.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulati

  14. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  15. Morphological Control Agent in Ternary Blend Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Chung Liao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulk heterojunction (BHJ organic photovoltaic (OPV promise low cost solar energy and have caused an explosive increase in investigations during the last decade. Control over the 3D morphology of BHJ blend films in various length scales is one of the pillars accounting for the significant advance of OPV performance recently. In this contribution, we focus on the strategy of incorporating an additive into BHJ blend films as a morphological control agent, i.e., ternary blend system. This strategy has shown to be effective in tailoring the morphology of BHJ through different inter- and intra-molecular interactions. We systematically review the morphological observations and associated mechanisms with respect to various kinds of additives, i.e., polymers, small molecules and inorganic nanoparticles. We organize the effects of morphological control (compatibilization, stabilization, etc. and provide general guidelines for rational molecular design for additives toward high efficiency and high stability organic solar cells.

  16. [Granular cell tumor of the larynx].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrzyński, M; Wróbel, B; Zawisza, E; Drozd, K

    1999-09-01

    Granular cell tumor is an unusual growth of probably neuroectodermal histogenesis, first reported by Abrikossoff in 1926 with the name of myoblastenmyoma. Authors described a case of a 54 year man with laryngeal seat of granular-cell myoblastoma. In this case Abrikossoff tumor was located in the right vocal chord. The tumor was treated successfully surgically by microlaryngoscopy. The etiology, clinical features and diagnostic difficulties are discussed.

  17. Oct-4+/Tenascin C+ neuroblastoma cells serve as progenitors of tumor-derived endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annalisa Pezzolo; Silvia Deaglio; Fabio Malavasi; Vito Pistoia; Federica Parodi; Danilo Marimpietri; Lizzia Raffaghello; Claudia Cocco; Angela Pistorio; Manuela Mosconi; Claudio Gambini; Michele Cillj

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB)-associated endothelial microvessels (EMs) may be lined by tumor-derived endothelial cells (TECs),that are genetically unstable and chemoresistant.Here we have addressed the identification of TEC progenitors in NB by focusing on Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct-4) as a putative marker.Oct-4+ cells were detected in primary NB samples (n = 23),metastatic bone marrow aspirates (n = 10),NB cell lines (n = 4),and orthotopic tumors (n = 10) formed by the HTLA-230 NB cell line in immunodeficient mice.Most Oct-4+ cells showed a perivascular distribution,with 5% of them homing in perinecrotic areas.All Oct-4+ cells were tumor-derived since they shared amplification of MYCN oncogene with malignant cells.Perivascular Oct-4+ cells expressed stem cellrelated,neural progenitor-related and NB-related markers,including surface Tenascin C (TNC),that was absent from perinecrotic Oct-4+ cells and bulk tumor cells.TNC+ but not TNC- HTLA-230 cells differentiated in vitro into endothelial-like cells expressing vascular-endothellal-cadherin,prostate-specific membrane antigen and CD31 upon culture in medium containing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).TNC+ but not TNC- HTLA-230 cells formed neurospheres when cultured in serum-free medium.Both cell fractions were tumorigenic,but only tumors formed by TNC+ cegs contained EMs fined by TECs.In conclusion,we have identified in NB tumors two putative niches containing Oct-4+ tumor cells.Oct-4+/TNC+ perivascular NB cells displayed a high degree of plasticity and served as progenitors of TECs.Therapeutic targeting of Oct4+/TNC+ progenitors may counteract the contribution of NB-derived ECs to tumor relapse and chemoresistance.

  18. Granular cell tumors of the tracheobronchial tree.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maten, van der J; Blaauwgeers, JL; Sutedja, G.; Kwa, HB; Postmus, P.E.; Wagenaar, SS

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the population-based incidence and clinical characteristics of granular cell tumors of the tracheobronchial tree. METHODS: All newly registered tracheobronchial granular cell tumors in the Dutch Network and National Database for Pathology for 10 consecutive years (1990-1999) w

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ovarian germ cell tumor are swelling of the abdomen or vaginal bleeding after menopause. Ovarian germ cell ... if you have either of the following: Swollen abdomen without weight gain in other parts of the ...

  20. General Information about Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ovarian germ cell tumor are swelling of the abdomen or vaginal bleeding after menopause. Ovarian germ cell ... if you have either of the following: Swollen abdomen without weight gain in other parts of the ...

  1. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  2. Tumor Evasion from T Cell Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Töpfer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An intact immune system is essential to prevent the development and progression of neoplastic cells in a process termed immune surveillance. During this process the innate and the adaptive immune systems closely cooperate and especially T cells play an important role to detect and eliminate tumor cells. Due to the mechanism of central tolerance the frequency of T cells displaying appropriate arranged tumor-peptide-specific-T-cell receptors is very low and their activation by professional antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, is frequently hampered by insufficient costimulation resulting in peripheral tolerance. In addition, inhibitory immune circuits can impair an efficient antitumoral response of reactive T cells. It also has been demonstrated that large tumor burden can promote a state of immunosuppression that in turn can facilitate neoplastic progression. Moreover, tumor cells, which mostly are genetically instable, can gain rescue mechanisms which further impair immune surveillance by T cells. Herein, we summarize the data on how tumor cells evade T-cell immune surveillance with the focus on solid tumors and describe approaches to improve anticancer capacity of T cells.

  3. Spin-enhanced organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Basel, Tek P; Gautam, Bhoj R; Yang, Xiaomei; Mascaro, Debra J; Liu, Feng; Vardeny, Z Valy

    2012-01-01

    Recently, much effort has been devoted to improve the efficiency of organic photovoltaic solar cells based on blends of donors and acceptors molecules in bulk heterojunction architecture. One of the major losses in organic photovoltaic devices has been recombination of polaron pairs at the donor-acceptor domain interfaces. Here, we present a novel method to suppress polaron pair recombination at the donor-acceptor domain interfaces and thus improve the organic photovoltaic solar cell efficiency, by doping the device active layer with spin 1/2 radical galvinoxyl. At an optimal doping level of 3 wt%, the efficiency of a standard poly(3-hexylthiophene)/1-(3-(methoxycarbonyl)propyl)-1-1-phenyl)(6,6)C(61) solar cell improves by 18%. A spin-flip mechanism is proposed and supported by magneto-photocurrent measurements, as well as by density functional theory calculations in which polaron pair recombination rate is suppressed by resonant exchange interaction between the spin 1/2 radicals and charged acceptors, which convert the polaron pair spin state from singlet to triplet.

  4. Solution processed organic bulk heterojunction tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Steve; Neher, Dieter [Soft Matter Physics, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    One of the critical issues regarding the preparation of organic tandem solar cells from solution is the central recombination contact. This contact should be highly transparent and conductive to provide high recombination currents. Moreover it should protect the 1st subcell from the solution processing of the 2nd subcell. Here, we present a systematic study of various recombination contacts in organic bulk heterojunction tandem solar cells made from blends of different polymers with PCBM. We compare solution processed recombination contacts fabricated from metal-oxides (TiO{sub 2} and ZnO) and PEDOT:PSS with evaporated recombination contacts made from thin metal layers and molybdenum-oxide. The solar cell characteristics as well as the morphology of the contacts measured by AFM and SEM are illustrated. To compare the electrical properties of the varying contacts we show measurements on single carrier devices for different contact-structures. Alongside we present the results of optical modeling of the subcells and the complete tandem device and relate these results to experimental absorption and reflection spectra of the same structures. Based on these studies, layer thicknesses were adjusted for optimum current matching and device performance.

  5. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs, and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative

  6. Tumor's other immune targets: dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esche, C; Lokshin, A; Shurin, G V; Gastman, B R; Rabinowich, H; Watkins, S C; Lotze, M T; Shurin, M R

    1999-08-01

    The induction of apoptosis in T cells is one of several mechanisms by which tumors escape immune recognition. We have investigated whether tumors induce apoptosis in dendritic cells (DC) by co-culture of murine or human DC with different tumor cell lines for 4-48 h. Analysis of DC morphological features, JAM assay, TUNEL, caspase-3-like and transglutaminase activity, Annexin V binding, and DNA fragmentation assays revealed a time- and dose-dependent induction of apoptosis in DC by tumor-derived factors. This finding is both effector and target specific. The mechanism of tumor-induced DC apoptosis involved regulation of Bcl-2 and Bax expression. Double staining of both murine and human tumor tissues confirmed that tumor-associated DC undergo apoptotic death in vivo. DC isolated from tumor tissue showed significantly higher levels of apoptosis as determined by TUNEL assay when compared with DC isolated from spleen. These findings demonstrate that tumors induce apoptosis in DC and suggest a new mechanism of tumor escape from immune recognition. DC protection from apoptosis will lead to improvement of DC-based immunotherapies for cancer and other immune diseases.

  7. Polymer-fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Duren, J.K.J.

    2004-03-08

    In 2000 polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells reached power conversion efficiencies of < 1%. Improving the performance, stability, and lifetime of bulk-heterojunction solar cells requires more insight in the preparation, and operation of these devices. This thesis discusses the preparation and the morphological and electrical characterization of devices made from MDMO-PPV (poly 2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene), PCBM (1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)propyl-1-phenyl-(6,6)-methanofullerene), and their mixtures. The understanding of the influence of morphology on the device performance should aid in obtaining insight in the fundamental issues of the bulk-heterojunction concept. Furthermore, new materials are introduced in an attempt to improve performance. In chapter 2, it is shown that bulk-heterojunction solar cells made from MDMO-PPV and PCBM reach power conversion efficiencies of 2.5% under simulated solar light. It is shown for the first time that replacing the orange MDMO-PPV with a low-bandgap conjugated material results in a more red-shifted spectral response of these solar cells. Additionally, in an attempt to control the nanoscale morphology of the photoactive layer, the first example of a covalently linked donor polymer with pendant fullerenes incorporated in working solar cells is reported. The results indicated that more fundamental questions concerning the operation of the device and the influence of morphology must be addressed, before a rational improvement in device performance can be expected. Chapter 3 discusses the influence of morphology on transport in disordered organic semiconductors. Morphological investigations on films of PCBM and several PPVs are combined with the analysis of charge-carrier-mobility data. The morphological disorder observed in the PCBM films is in agreement with its charge-transport properties. Imaging individual conjugated polymer chains and aggregates on cast films with scanning force

  8. CellTracks cytometer for detection of circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tibbe, A.G.J.; Kooi, van der A.; Groot, de M.R.; Vermes, I.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with carcinomas, tumor cells are shed into the circulation. The number of the circulating tumor cells is low and technology is needed that has sufficient sensitivity and specificity to enumerate and characterize these cells. The CellTracks system was developed to provide an

  9. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanqun Qiao; Qingquan Li; Gang Peng; Jun Ma; Hongwei Fan; Yingbin Li

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are stil unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cel s and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain tumor stem cells. The numbers of cytolysosomes and autophagosomes in brain tumor stem cells and induced neural stem cel s were lower and the proliferative activity was obviously stronger than that in normal neural stem cells. Normal neural stem cells could differentiate into glial fibril ary acidic protein-positive and microtubule associated protein-2-positive cells, which were also negative for nestin. However, glial fibril ary acidic protein/nestin, microtubule associated protein-2/nestin, and glial fibril ary acidic protein/microtubule associated protein-2 double-positive cells were found in induced neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cel s. Results indicate that induced neural stem cells are similar to brain tumor stem cells, and are possibly the source of brain tumor stem cells.

  10. Giant cell tumor in adipose package Hoffa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Escobar, G.; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino₁, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of adipose Hoffa package are very uncommon, with isolated cases reported in the literature. His presentation in pediatric patients knee is exceptional. The most frequently described tumors are benign including vellonodular synovitis. The extra-articular localized variant there of is known as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. It is characterized by locally aggressive nature, and has been described in reports of isolated cases. Objective: A case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in adipose presentation package Hoffa in pediatric patients is presented in this paper. Methods: male patient eleven years with right knee pain after sports practice was evaluated. Physical examination, showed limited extension -30º, joint effusion, stable negative Lachman maneuver without peripheral knee laxity. MRI hyperintense on tumor is observed in T2 and hypointense on T1 homogeneous and defined edges content displayed prior to LCA related to adipose Hoffa package. Results: The tumor specimen was obtained and histopathology is defined as densely cellular tissue accumulation of xantomisados fibrocollagenous with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, compatible with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Conclusion: The presentation of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath in Hoffa fat pad is exceptional. However, his suspicion allows adequate preoperative surgical planning, as a whole resection is the only procedure that has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence of this disease.

  11. Herceptin conjugates linked by EDC boost direct tumor cell death via programmed tumor cell necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiemiao Hu

    Full Text Available Tumor-targeted antibody therapy is one of the safest biological therapeutics for cancer patients, but it is often ineffective at inducing direct tumor cell death and is ineffective against resistant tumor cells. Currently, the antitumor efficacy of antibody therapy is primarily achieved by inducing indirect tumor cell death, such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity. Our study reveals that Herceptin conjugates, if generated via the crosslinker EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, are capable of engendering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2 positive tumor cells death. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system, three peaks with estimated molecular weights of antibody monomer, dimer, and trimer were isolated. Both Herceptin trimer and dimer separated by HPLC induced significant levels of necrotic tumor cell death, although the trimer was more effective than the dimer. Notably, the Herceptin trimer also induced Herceptin-resistant tumor cell death. Surprisingly different from the known cell death mechanism that often results from antibody treatment, the Herceptin trimer elicited effective and direct tumor cell death via a novel mechanism: programmed cell necrosis. In Her2-positive cells, inhibition of necrosis pathways significantly reversed Herceptin trimer-induced cell death. In summary, the Herceptin trimer reported herein harbors great potential for overcoming tumor cell resistance to Herceptin treatment.

  12. Suprasellar/pineal bifocal germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccia, Vicente; Alderete, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    Intracranial germ cell tumors (GCT) arise from embryonal rests of germinal cells. The aim of this report is to analyze a small group of GCT located simultaneously in the suprasellar and pineal regions without seeding either between both tumors or to other places. We named this group as suprasellar/pineal bifocal germ cell tumors (SPBT). A retrospective review of a series of 25 GCT showed a) 16 cases of unifocal non-disseminated pineal or sellar GCT, b) one case of unifocal disseminated pineal GCT, c) three cases with suprasellar and pineal double tumors with dissemination, and d) five cases with SPBT. The analysis is focused on the latter group. The series includes four pure germinomas and one germinal non-germinoma. MRI and endoscopic exploration were necessary to define SPBT. Endocrine, ocular, and increased intracranial pressure syndromes were identified and related to the size of the tumors. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were performed in all SPBT. Radical or partial resection of SPBT offered no benefits over biopsy. Prognosis for bifocal groups was similar to unifocal tumors of the same histological type. Complete remission without recurrence and mortality were achieved in all cases. SPBT seem to be an entity defined by a) one tumor in the suprasellar and another in the pineal region, b) GCT with predominance of PG, but not exclusively, and c) MRI and endoscopy without any dissemination. The presence of two tumors does not indicate dissemination; SPBT were non-disseminated but focal tumors, and spinal radiotherapy was not necessary.

  13. Destruction of solid tumors by immune cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Álvaro G.; Seoane, Jesús M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2017-03-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. In order to investigate the fractional cell kill that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs), we present several in silico simulations and mathematical analyses. When the CTLs eradicate efficiently the tumor cells, the models predict a correlation between the morphology of the tumors and the rate at which they are lysed. However, when the effectiveness of the immune cells is decreased, the mathematical function fails to reproduce the process of lysis. This limit is thoroughly discussed and a new fractional cell kill is proposed.

  14. Harnessing Dendritic Cells for Tumor Antigen Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nierkens, Stefan [Department of Tumor Immunology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Geert Grooteplein 28, Nijmegen 6525 GA (Netherlands); Janssen, Edith M., E-mail: edith.janssen@cchmc.org [Division of Molecular Immunology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)

    2011-04-26

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that are crucial for the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses. As a consequence, research has focused on the harnessing of DCs for therapeutic interventions. Although current strategies employing ex vivo-generated and tumor-antigen loaded DCs have been proven feasible, there are still many obstacles to overcome in order to improve clinical trial successes and offset the cost and complexity of customized cell therapy. This review focuses on one of these obstacles and a pivotal step for the priming of tumor-specific CD8{sup +} and CD4{sup +} T cells; the in vitro loading of DCs with tumor antigens.

  15. Molecular bulk heterojunctions: an emerging approach to organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncali, Jean

    2009-11-17

    The predicted exhaustion of fossil energy resources and the pressure of environmental constraints are stimulating an intensification of research on renewable energy sources, in particular, on the photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. In this context, organic solar cells are attracting increasing interest that is motivated by the possibility of fabricating large-area, lightweight, and flexible devices using simple techniques with low environmental impact. Organic solar cells are based on a heterojunction resulting from the contact of a donor (D) and an acceptor (A) material. Absorption of solar photons creates excitons, Coulombically bound electron-hole pairs, which diffuse to the D/A interface, where they are dissociated into free holes and electrons by the electric field. D/A heterojunctions can be created with two types of architectures, namely, bilayer heterojunction and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. BHJ cells combine the advantages of easier fabrication and higher conversion efficiency due to the considerably extended D/A interface. Until now, the development of BHJ solar cells has been essentially based on the use of soluble pi-conjugated polymers as donor material. Intensive interdisciplinary research carried out in the past 10 years has led to an increase in the conversion efficiency of BHJ cells from 0.10 to more than 5.0%. These investigations have progressively established regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as the standard donor material for BHJ solar cells, owing to a useful combination of optical and charge-transport properties. However, besides the limit imposed to the maximum conversion efficiency by its intrinsic electronic properties, P3HT and more generally polymers pose several problems related to the control of their structure, molecular weight, polydispersity, and purification. In this context, recent years have seen the emergence of an alternative approach based on the replacement of polydisperse polymers by soluble

  16. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frohlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar

    2011-01-01

    Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues, but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In the present study, we found...... that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 appears to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we demonstrate that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence...... tumor progression, but that ADAM12 expression by tumor cells is necessary for tumor progression in these mice. This finding is consistent with our observation that in human breast carcinoma ADAM12 is almost exclusively located in tumor cells and only rarely seen in the tumor-associated stroma. We...

  17. NK Cells Preferentially Target Tumor Cells with a Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Erik; Canter, Robert J; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mac, Stephanie; Chen, Mingyi; Smith, Rachel C; Hagino, Takeshi; Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Sckisel, Gail D; Urayama, Shiro; Monjazeb, Arta M; Fragoso, Ruben C; Sayers, Thomas J; Murphy, William J

    2015-10-15

    Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are resistant to antiproliferative therapies, able to repopulate tumor bulk, and seed metastasis. NK cells are able to target stem cells as shown by their ability to reject allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells but not solid tissue grafts. Using multiple preclinical models, including NK coculture (autologous and allogeneic) with multiple human cancer cell lines and dissociated primary cancer specimens and NK transfer in NSG mice harboring orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenografts, we assessed CSC viability, CSC frequency, expression of death receptor ligands, and tumor burden. We demonstrate that activated NK cells are capable of preferentially killing CSCs identified by multiple CSC markers (CD24(+)/CD44(+), CD133(+), and aldehyde dehydrogenase(bright)) from a wide variety of human cancer cell lines in vitro and dissociated primary cancer specimens ex vivo. We observed comparable effector function of allogeneic and autologous NK cells. We also observed preferential upregulation of NK activation ligands MICA/B, Fas, and DR5 on CSCs. Blocking studies further implicated an NKG2D-dependent mechanism for NK killing of CSCs. Treatment of orthotopic human pancreatic cancer tumor-bearing NSG mice with activated NK cells led to significant reductions in both intratumoral CSCs and tumor burden. Taken together, these data from multiple preclinical models, including a strong reliance on primary human cancer specimens, provide compelling preclinical evidence that activated NK cells preferentially target cancer cells with a CSC phenotype, highlighting the translational potential of NK immunotherapy as part of a combined modality approach for refractory solid malignancies.

  18. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-07-10

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Stages of Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors include the following: Having certain genetic syndromes : Klinefelter syndrome may increase the risk of germ cell ... and procedures may be used: Physical exam and history : An exam of the body to check general ...

  20. Ovarian steroid cell tumors: sonographic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteagudo, A; Heller, D; Husami, N; Levine, R U; McCaffrey, R; Timor-Tritsch, I E

    1997-10-01

    The goal of the gynecologist is to detect ovarian tumors in their earliest stages. Small virilizing tumors, which barely affect the size of the ovaries, are such lesions. Since the introduction of transvaginal sonography it is technically possible to detect small intraovarian neoplasms. Three cases of virilizing steroid cell tumors in postmenopausal women with ovarian volumes just exceeding the normal sizes for age are presented. High-frequency transvaginal ultrasound and color Doppler studies to measure flow parameters were used. These small tumors had different echogenicity from the surrounding ovarian tissue and two had low impedance-to-flow values. Gray-scale transvaginal sonography combined with color Doppler studies can make the diagnosis of small steroid cell tumors easier and, at times, better than other, more costly imaging modalities.

  1. Guidelines for monitoring bulk tank milk somatic cell and bacterial counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarao, B M; Pillai, S R; Sawant, A A; Wolfgang, D R; Hegde, N V

    2004-10-01

    This study was conducted to establish guidelines for monitoring bulk tank milk somatic cell count and bacterial counts, and to understand the relationship between different bacterial groups that occur in bulk tank milk. One hundred twenty-six dairy farms in 14 counties of Pennsylvania participated, each providing one bulk tank milk sample every 15 d for 2 mo. The 4 bulk tank milk samples from each farm were examined for bulk tank somatic cell count and bacterial counts including standard plate count, preliminary incubation count, laboratory pasteurization count, coagulase-negative staphylococcal count, environmental streptococcal count, coliform count, and gram-negative noncoliform count. The milk samples were also examined for presence of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Mycoplasma. The bacterial counts of 4 bulk tank milk samples examined over an 8-wk period were averaged and expressed as mean bacterial count per milliliter. The study revealed that an increase in the frequency of isolation of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae was significantly associated with an increased bulk tank somatic cell count. Paired correlation analysis showed that there was low correlation between different bacterial counts. Bulk tank milk with low (standard plate count also had a significantly low level of mean bulk tank somatic cell count (count (count (counts (count (count was less likely to be associated with somatic cell or other bacterial counts. Herd size and farm management practices had considerable influence on somatic cell and bacterial counts in bulk tank milk. Dairy herds that used automatic milking detachers, sand as bedding material, dip cups for teat dipping instead of spraying, and practiced pre-and postdipping had significantly lower bulk tank somatic cell and/or bacterial counts. In conclusion, categorized bulk tank somatic cell and bacterial counts could serve as indicators and facilitate monitoring of herd udder health and milk

  2. Glioma Stem Cells but Not Bulk Glioma Cells Upregulate IL-6 Secretion in Microglia/Brain Macrophages via Toll-like Receptor 4 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    a Dzaye, Omar Dildar; Hu, Feng; Derkow, Katja; Haage, Verena; Euskirchen, Philipp; Harms, Christoph; Lehnardt, Seija; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral macrophages and resident microglia constitute the dominant glioma-infiltrating cells. The tumor induces an immunosuppressive and tumor-supportive phenotype in these glioma-associated microglia/brain macrophages (GAMs). A subpopulation of glioma cells acts as glioma stem cells (GSCs). We explored the interaction between GSCs and GAMs. Using CD133 as a marker of stemness, we enriched for or deprived the mouse glioma cell line GL261 of GSCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Over the same period of time, 100 CD133(+ )GSCs had the capacity to form a tumor of comparable size to the ones formed by 10,000 CD133(-) GL261 cells. In IL-6(-/-) mice, only tumors formed by CD133(+ )cells were smaller compared with wild type. After stimulation of primary cultured microglia with medium from CD133-enriched GL261 glioma cells, we observed an selective upregulation in microglial IL-6 secretion dependent on Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Our results show that GSCs, but not the bulk glioma cells, initiate microglial IL-6 secretion via TLR4 signaling and that IL-6 regulates glioma growth by supporting GSCs. Using human glioma tissue, we could confirm the finding that GAMs are the major source of IL-6 in the tumor context.

  3. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fernandes de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg’s original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers.

  4. Escape from Tumor Cell Dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Pouliot, K. L. Stanley, J. Chia , J. M. Moseley, D. K. Hards and R. L. Anderson: Tumor-specific expression of alphavbeta3 integrin promotes...deep, measured by confocal imaging of microwells filled with 20-mm-diameter fluores - cent beads (Fig. 1). Evaluation of mechanical properties of PEG...

  5. [Sertoli cell tumor of the testis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hita Rosino, E; López Hidalgo, J; Mellado Mesa, P; Olivar Buera, M

    2001-01-01

    Sertoli cell tumors (TCS) derivated from sex-cord estroma cells, are an uncommon variety of testicles neoplasms. A 66 year-old patient that came to the consultation for an increased scrotum of size present. Ultrasound viewed a hipoecoic nodule capable with testicular tumor, more secondary hidrocele. After undergoing the standard treatment, by means of groin radical orchiectomy, its pathologic analysis identified the lesion as Sertoli cell tumor conventional. The pathologic features that best correlate with a clinically benign course are as follows: a lower size tumor to 5 cm, mild nuclear atypia, a mitotic rate of less than 5 mitosis per 10 high power fields, and absent necrosis. Our case presented with these features. Follow-up of these neoplasms should be prolonged by the unusual of its presentation and a small percentage of cases are clinically malignant.

  6. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  7. Radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Oncogenes and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltenburg, L. T. C. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Clinical Oncology

    2000-12-01

    The success of treatment of cancer patients by radiotherapy largely depends on tumor radiosensitivity. Several molecular factors that determine the sensitivity of tumor cells to ionizing radiation have been identified during the last couple of years. Some of these factors are known as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. This review focuses on the influence of some of these molecular factors on a major determinant of radiosensitivity: i. e. programmed cell death or apoptosis. The crucial molecular step in ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cell's cytosol. The ways the tumor suppressor protein p53, as well as the oncogenes ras and raf, c-myc and Bcl-2 can influence this process at different stages are presented. As will be discussed, the result of activation of an oncoprotein on tumor radiosensitivity depends on its mechanism of action and on the presence of other (oncogenic) factors, since complex interactions among many molecular factors determine the delicate balance between cell proliferation and cell death. The ongoing identification and characterization of factors influencing apoptosis will eventually make it possible to predict tumor radiosensitivity and thereby improve cancer treatment.

  8. CD8+ Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells Are Trapped in the Tumor-Dendritic Cell Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Boissonnas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy enhances the antitumor adaptive immune T cell response, but the immunosuppressive tumor environment often dominates, resulting in cancer relapse. Antigen-presenting cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and tumor dendritic cells (TuDCs are the main protagonists of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL immuno-suppression. TAMs have been widely investigated and are associated with poor prognosis, but the immuno-suppressive activity of TuDCs is less well understood. We performed two-photon imaging of the tumor tissue to examine the spatiotemporal interactions between TILs and TuDCs after chemotherapy. In a strongly immuno-suppressive murine tumor model, cyclophosphamide-mediated chemotherapy transiently enhanced the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cell receptor transgenic T cells (OTI but barely affected TuDC compartment within the tumor. Time lapse imaging of living tumor tissue showed that TuDCs are organized as a mesh with dynamic interconnections. Once infiltrated into the tumor parenchyma, OTI T cells make antigen-specific and long-lasting contacts with TuDCs. Extensive analysis of TIL infiltration on histologic section revealed that after chemotherapy the majority of OTI T cells interact with TuDCs and that infiltration is restricted to TuDC-rich areas. We propose that the TuDC network exerts antigen-dependent unproductive retention that trap T cells and limit their antitumor effectiveness.

  9. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas: an immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dizon, M A; Multhaupt, H A; Paskin, D L

    1996-01-01

    A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor.......A case of an osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas is presented. Immunohistochemical studies were performed, which showed keratin (CAM, AE1) and epithelial membrane antigen positivity in the tumor cells. The findings support an epithelial origin for this tumor....

  10. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benencia Fabian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions.

  11. Molecular biology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Exposito, R; Merino, M; Aguayo, C

    2016-06-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common solid tumors in young adult men. They constitute a unique pathology because of their embryonic and germ origin and their special behavior. Genetic predisposition, environmental factors involved in their development and genetic aberrations have been under study in many works throughout the last years trying to explain the susceptibility and the transformation mechanism of TGCTs. Despite the high rate of cure in this type of tumors because its particular sensitivity to cisplatin, there are tumors resistant to chemotherapy for which it is needed to find new therapies. In the present work, it has been carried out a literature review on the most important molecular aspects involved in the onset and development of such tumors, as well as a review of the major developments regarding prognostic factors, new prognostic biomarkers and the possibility of new targeted therapies.

  12. Myeloid cells contribute to tumor lymphangiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumsteg, Adrian; Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Imaizumi, Natsuko; Schwendener, Reto; Rüegg, Curzio; Christofori, Gerhard

    2009-09-17

    The formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) and lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis) promotes tumor outgrowth and metastasis. Previously, it has been demonstrated that bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) can contribute to tumor angiogenesis. However, the role of BMDC in lymphangiogenesis has largely remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate by bone marrow transplantation/reconstitution and genetic lineage-tracing experiments that BMDC integrate into tumor-associated lymphatic vessels in the Rip1Tag2 mouse model of insulinoma and in the TRAMP-C1 prostate cancer transplantation model, and that the integrated BMDC originate from the myelomonocytic lineage. Conversely, pharmacological depletion of tumor-associated macrophages reduces lymphangiogenesis. No cell fusion events are detected by genetic tracing experiments. Rather, the phenotypical conversion of myeloid cells into lymphatic endothelial cells and their integration into lymphatic structures is recapitulated in two in vitro tube formation assays and is dependent on fibroblast growth factor-mediated signaling. Together, the results reveal that myeloid cells can contribute to tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, thus extending the findings on the previously reported role of hematopoietic cells in lymphatic vessel formation.

  13. Myeloid cells contribute to tumor lymphangiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Zumsteg

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis and lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis promotes tumor outgrowth and metastasis. Previously, it has been demonstrated that bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC can contribute to tumor angiogenesis. However, the role of BMDC in lymphangiogenesis has largely remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate by bone marrow transplantation/reconstitution and genetic lineage-tracing experiments that BMDC integrate into tumor-associated lymphatic vessels in the Rip1Tag2 mouse model of insulinoma and in the TRAMP-C1 prostate cancer transplantation model, and that the integrated BMDC originate from the myelomonocytic lineage. Conversely, pharmacological depletion of tumor-associated macrophages reduces lymphangiogenesis. No cell fusion events are detected by genetic tracing experiments. Rather, the phenotypical conversion of myeloid cells into lymphatic endothelial cells and their integration into lymphatic structures is recapitulated in two in vitro tube formation assays and is dependent on fibroblast growth factor-mediated signaling. Together, the results reveal that myeloid cells can contribute to tumor-associated lymphatic vessels, thus extending the findings on the previously reported role of hematopoietic cells in lymphatic vessel formation.

  14. Cytotoxic effects of bulk fill composite resins on human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şişman, Reyhan; Aksoy, Ayça; Yalçın, Muhammet; Karaöz, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Five bulk fill composite resins, including SDR, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEC), X-trafil (XTF), Sonic Fill (SF), Filtek Bulk Fill (FBF), were used in this study. Human dental pulp stem cells were cultured in 12-well culture dishes (3 × 104 cells per cm(2)) and stored in an incubator at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 1 day. On days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of co-culture, viable cells were measured using a WST-1 assay. Lower cell viability was observed with XTF and SDR bulk fill composite resins compared to the control group during the WST-1 assay. Although bulk fill composite resins provide advantages in practical applications, they are limited by their cytotoxic properties. (J Oral Sci 58, 299-305, 2016).

  15. Cancer stem cell plasticity and tumor hierarchy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marina Carla Cabrera; Robert E Hollingsworth; Elaine M Hurt

    2015-01-01

    The origins of the complex process of intratumoralheterogeneity have been highly debated and differentcellular mechanisms have been hypothesized to accountfor the diversity within a tumor. The clonal evolution andcancer stem cell (CSC) models have been proposed asdrivers of this heterogeneity. However, the concept ofcancer stem cell plasticity and bidirectional conversionbetween stem and non-stem cells has added additionalcomplexity to these highly studied paradigms and may helpexplain the tumor heterogeneity observed in solid tumors.The process of cancer stem cell plasticity in which cancercells harbor the dynamic ability of shifting from a non-CSCstate to a CSC state and vice versa may be modulated byspecific microenvironmental signals and cellular interactionsarising in the tumor niche. In addition to promoting CSCplasticity, these interactions may contribute to the cellulartransformation of tumor cells and affect response tochemotherapeutic and radiation treatments by providingCSCs protection from these agents. Herein, we review theliterature in support of this dynamic CSC state, discussthe effectors of plasticity, and examine their role in thedevelopment and treatment of cancer.

  16. Gangliosides regulate tumor cell adhesion to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarian, Tamara; Jabbar, Adnan A; Wen, Fei-Qui; Patel, Dharmesh A; Valentino, Leonard A

    2003-01-01

    The ability of tumor cells to adhere to extracellular matrix proteins is critical for migration and invasion. The factors that regulate tumor cell adhesion are poorly characterized. Gangliosides promote platelet adhesion and may also play a role in the adhesion of other cell types. We hypothesized that pharmacological depletion of membrane gangliosides from adherent cells would abrogate adhesion to collagen and promote migration and invasion. To test these hypotheses, LA-N1 neuroblastoma cells, which avidly adhere to collagen and are rich with membrane gangliosides (43.69 nmol/10(8) cells), were cultured in the presence of D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol-HCl. Endogenous gangliosides were reduced by 98% (0.76 nmol/10(8) cells) and adhesion to collagen decreased by 67%. There were no changes in cell morphology, viability, proliferation rate or apoptosis. Pre-incubation of ganglioside-depleted cells in conditioned medium from control cells restored adhesion to collagen (0.45 +/- 0.002), comparable to that of control cells (0.49 +/- 0.035). Similarly, pre-incubation of ganglioside-depleted cells with purified GD2 completely restored adhesion in a concentration-dependent manner. When LA-N1 cells were cultured with retinoic acid, a biological response modifier known to increase endogenous gangliosides, adhesion to collagen increased. Next, we questioned whether changes in adhesion would be reflected as changes in migration and invasion. Cells depleted of endogenous cellular gangliosides migrated more than control cells. Finally, control cells replete with their endogenous gangliosides demonstrated less invasive potential than control cells. The data demonstrate that endogenous tumor gangliosides increase neuroblastoma cell adhesion to collagen and reduce migration and invasion in vitro.

  17. Cancer Stem Cells, EMT, and Developmental Pathway Activation in Pancreatic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten F. Bijlsma

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a disease with remarkably poor patient survival rates. The frequent presence of metastases and profound chemoresistance pose a severe problem for the treatment of these tumors. Moreover, cross-talk between the tumor and the local micro-environment contributes to tumorigenicity, metastasis and chemoresistance. Compared to bulk tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSC have reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy. CSC are tumor cells with stem-like features that possess the ability to self-renew, but can also give rise to more differentiated progeny. CSC can be identified based on increased in vitro spheroid- or colony formation, enhanced in vivo tumor initiating potential, or expression of cell surface markers. Since CSC are thought to be required for the maintenance of a tumor cell population, these cells could possibly serve as a therapeutic target. There appears to be a causal relationship between CSC and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT in pancreatic tumors. The occurrence of EMT in pancreatic cancer cells is often accompanied by re-activation of developmental pathways, such as the Hedgehog, WNT, NOTCH, and Nodal/Activin pathways. Therapeutics based on CSC markers, EMT, developmental pathways, or tumor micro-environment could potentially be used to target pancreatic CSC. This may lead to a reduction of tumor growth, metastatic events, and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

  18. Cancer Stem Cells, EMT, and Developmental Pathway Activation in Pancreatic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindriksen, Sanne; Bijlsma, Maarten F., E-mail: m.f.bijlsma@amc.uva.nl [Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-10-12

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease with remarkably poor patient survival rates. The frequent presence of metastases and profound chemoresistance pose a severe problem for the treatment of these tumors. Moreover, cross-talk between the tumor and the local micro-environment contributes to tumorigenicity, metastasis and chemoresistance. Compared to bulk tumor cells, cancer stem cells (CSC) have reduced sensitivity to chemotherapy. CSC are tumor cells with stem-like features that possess the ability to self-renew, but can also give rise to more differentiated progeny. CSC can be identified based on increased in vitro spheroid- or colony formation, enhanced in vivo tumor initiating potential, or expression of cell surface markers. Since CSC are thought to be required for the maintenance of a tumor cell population, these cells could possibly serve as a therapeutic target. There appears to be a causal relationship between CSC and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in pancreatic tumors. The occurrence of EMT in pancreatic cancer cells is often accompanied by re-activation of developmental pathways, such as the Hedgehog, WNT, NOTCH, and Nodal/Activin pathways. Therapeutics based on CSC markers, EMT, developmental pathways, or tumor micro-environment could potentially be used to target pancreatic CSC. This may lead to a reduction of tumor growth, metastatic events, and chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

  19. Cell-to-cell signaling influences the fate of prostate cancer stem cells and their potential to generate more aggressive tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Salvatori

    Full Text Available An increasing number of malignancies has been shown to be initiated and propelled by small subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSC. However, whether tumor aggressiveness is driven by CSC and by what extent this property may be relevant within the tumor mass is still unsettled. To address this issue, we isolated a rare tumor cell population on the basis of its CD44(+CD24(- phenotype from the human androgen-independent prostate carcinoma cell line DU145 and established its CSC properties. The behavior of selected CSC was investigated with respect to the bulk DU145 cells. The injection of CSC in nude mice generated highly vascularized tumors infiltrating the adjacent tissues, showing high density of neuroendocrine cells and expressing low levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin as well as high levels of vimentin. On the contrary, when a comparable number of unsorted DU145 cells were injected the resulting tumors were less aggressive. To investigate the different features of tumors in vivo, the influence of differentiated tumor cells on CSC was examined in vitro by growing CSC in the absence or presence of conditioned medium from DU145 cells. CSC grown in permissive conditions differentiated into cell populations with features similar to those of cells held in aggressive tumors generated from CSC injection. Differently, conditioned medium induced CSC to differentiate into a cell phenotype comparable to cells of scarcely aggressive tumors originated from bulk DU145 cell injection. These findings show for the first time that CSC are able to generate differentiated cells expressing either highly or scarcely aggressive phenotype, thus influencing prostate cancer progression. The fate of CSC was determined by signals released from tumor environment. Moreover, using microarray analysis we selected some molecules which could be involved in this cell-to-cell signaling, hypothesizing their potential value for prognostic or therapeutic applications.

  20. Giant cell tumor of bone: Multimodal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical behavior and treatment of giant cell tumor of bone is still perplexing. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinico-pathological correlation of tumor and its relevance in treatment and prognosis. Materials and Methods: Ninety -three cases of giant cell tumor were treated during 1980-1990 by different methods. The age of the patients varied from 18-58 yrs with male and female ratio as 5:4. The upper end of the tibia was most commonly involved (n=31, followed by the lower end of the femur(n=21, distal end of radius(n=14,upper end of fibula (n=9,proximal end of femur(n=5, upper end of the humerus(n=3, iliac bone(n=2,phalanx (n=2 and spine(n=1. The tumors were also encountered on uncommon sites like metacarpals (n=4 and metatarsal(n=1. Fifty four cases were treated by curettage and bone grafting. Wide excision and reconstruction was performed in twenty two cases . Nine cases were treated by wide excision while primary amputation was performed in four cases. One case required only curettage. Three inaccessible lesions of ilium and spine were treated by radiotherapy. Results: 19 of 54 treated by curettage and bone grafting showed a recurrence. The repeat curettage and bone grafting was performed in 18 cases while amputation was done in one. One each out of the cases treated by wide excision and reconstruction and wide excision alone recurred. In this study we observed that though curettage and bone grafting is still the most commonly adopted treatment, wide excision of tumor with reconstruction has shown lesser recurrence. Conclusion: For radiologically well-contained and histologically typical tumor, curettage and autogenous bone grafting is the treatment of choice . The typical tumors with radiologically deficient cortex, clinically aggressive tumors and tumors with histological Grade III should be treated by wide excision and reconstruction.

  1. Streptavidin Modified ZnO Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator for Detection of Tumor Marker Mucin 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dan; Guo, Peng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-09-01

    A ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator has been fabricated using a magnetron sputtering technology, which was employed as a biosensor for detection of mucin 1. The resonant frequency of the thin-film bulk acoustic resonator was located near at 1503.3 MHz. The average electromechanical coupling factor {K}_{eff}^2 and quality factor Q were 2.39 % and 224, respectively. Using the specific binding system of avidin-biotin, the streptavidin was self-assembled on the top gold electrode as the sensitive layer to indirectly test the MUC1 molecules. The resonant frequency of the biosensor decreases in response to the mass loading in range of 20-500 nM. The sensor modified with the streptavidin exhibits a high sensitivity of 4642.6 Hz/nM and a good selectivity.

  2. Ultrasound features of orbital granular cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Bernadete; Miller, Neil R; Eberhart, Charles G; Dibernardo, Cathy W

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the echographic characteristics of a rare orbital granular cell tumor and correlate these findings with histopathology. A 56-year-old woman presented with proptosis. Complete ophthalmic and ultrasound examinations were performed. Ultrasound revealed an oval, well-outlined orbital mass in the intraconal space with low-medium reflectivity and regular internal structure. An orbitotomy with complete excision of the tumor was performed. Histopathologic evaluation showed sheets and nests of cells with abundant eosinophilic and granular cytoplasm in a uniform distribution throughout the lesion. The echographic characteristics correlated well with the morphologic surgical findings and the histologic architecture. This is the first report describing the echographic characteristics of orbital granular cell tumor.

  3. In vivo photolabeling of tumor-infiltrating cells reveals highly regulated egress of T-cell subsets from tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torcellan, Tommaso; Hampton, Henry R; Bailey, Jacqueline; Tomura, Michio; Brink, Robert; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2017-05-30

    Immune therapy is rapidly gaining prominence in the clinic as a major weapon against cancer. Whereas much attention has been focused on the infiltration of tumors by immune cells, the subsequent fate of these infiltrates remains largely unexplored. We therefore established a photoconversion-based model that allowed us to label tumor-infiltrating immune cells and follow their migration. Using this system, we identified a population of tumor-experienced cells that emigrate from primary tumors to draining lymph nodes via afferent lymphatic vessels. Although the majority of tumor-infiltrating cells were myeloid, T cells made up the largest population of tumor-egressing leukocytes. Strikingly, the subset composition of tumor-egressing T cells was greatly skewed compared with those that had infiltrated the tumor and those resident in the draining lymph node. Some T-cell subsets such as CD8(+) T cells emigrated more readily; others including CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells were preferentially retained, suggesting that specific mechanisms guide immune cell egress from tumors. Furthermore, tumor-egressing T cells were more activated and displayed enhanced effector function in comparison with their lymph node counterparts. Finally, we demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating T cells migrate to distant secondary tumors and draining lymph nodes, highlighting a mechanism whereby tumor-experienced effector T cells may mediate antitumor immunity at metastatic sites. Thus, our results provide insights into migration and function of tumor-infiltrating immune cells and the role of these cells in tumor immunity outside of primary tumor deposits.

  4. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Oriented collagen fibers direct tumor cell intravasation

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Weijing

    2016-09-24

    In this work, we constructed a Collagen I-Matrigel composite extracellular matrix (ECM). The composite ECM was used to determine the influence of the local collagen fiber orientation on the collective intravasation ability of tumor cells. We found that the local fiber alignment enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Specifically, metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells followed the local fiber alignment direction during the intravasation into rigid Matrigel (∼10 mg/mL protein concentration).

  6. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    OpenAIRE

    Koop, G.; Dik, N; Nielen, M; Lipman, L. J. A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms, 3 bulk milk samples were collected at intervals of 2 wk. The samples were cultured for SPC, coliform count, and staphylococcal count and for the presence of Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, SCC ...

  7. Direct visualization of macrophage-assisted tumor cell intravasation in mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Wang, Yarong; Lin, Elaine Y; Li, Jiu-feng; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, E Richard; Segall, Jeffrey E; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2007-03-15

    Although the presence of macrophages in tumors has been correlated with poor prognosis, until now there was no direct observation of how macrophages are involved in hematogenous metastasis. In this study, we use multiphoton microscopy to show, for the first time, that tumor cell intravasation occurs in association with perivascular macrophages in mammary tumors. Furthermore, we show that perivascular macrophages of the mammary tumor are associated with tumor cell intravasation in the absence of local angiogenesis. These results show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells lying in close proximity defines a microenvironment that is directly involved in the intravasation of cancer cells in mammary tumors.

  8. Management of desmoplastic small round cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; LaQuaglia, Michael P; Modak, Shakeel

    2016-10-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a soft tissue sarcoma of mesenchymal cell origin that typically presents with multiple intra-abdominal tumors and exhibits a multi-phenotypic pattern of immunohistochemical staining. The specific organ or tissue type of origin has yet to be identified. DSRCT rarely arises as a singular tumor in the abdomen; in most cases, there are dozens to hundreds of abdominal peritoneal tumors that are detected on diagnosis. One very large dominant mass is usually present in the omentum, with an additional one or two large conglomerates of tumors in the pelvis and right peritoneum, respectively. Despite an often overwhelmingly large number of abdominal tumors, symptoms of bowel obstruction are rare. Ascites may be present. In late stages, pleural effusions, pleural implants, mediastinal adenopathy, supraclavicular adenopathy, or bone metastasis may be present. With this challenging disease, multidisciplinary therapy, including aggressive surgery, is warranted. This review will address DSRCT biology and treatment options and discuss outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Management of nonfunctioning islet cell tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Liang; Pu Wang; Xiao-Na Wang; Jia-Cang Wang; Xi-Shan Hao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To more clearly define the clinical and pathological characteristics and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of nonfunctioning (NFICTs) islet cell tumors, and to review our institutional experience over the last 30 years.METHODS: The records of 43 patients confirmed to have nonfunctioning islet cell tumors of pancreas were retrospectively reviewed. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier methods and potential risk factors for survival were compared with the log-rank tests.RESULTS: The mean age was 31.63 years (range, 8 to 67 years). There were 7 men and 36 women. Twentyeight patients had a confirmed diagnosis of nonfunctioning islet cell carcinoma (NFICC) and benign islet cell tumors were found in 15 patients. The most common symptoms in patients with NFICTs were abdominal pain (55.8%),nausea and/or vomiting (32.6%), fatigue (25.6%) and abdominal mass (23.3%). Preoperative ultrasonic and computed tomography localized the tumors in all patients.Forty-three NFICTs were distributed throughout the pancreas, with 21 located to the right of the superior mesenteric vessels, 10 in the body of the pancreas, 6 in the tail of the pancreas, and multiple tumors were found in one patient. Thirty-nine of 43 patients (91%) underwent surgical resection. Surgical treatment was curative in 30patients (70%) and palliative in 9(21%). The resectability and curative resection rate in patients with NFICC of pancreas were 89% and 61%, respectively. The overall cumulative 5- and 10-year survival rates for patients with NFICC were 58.05% and 29.03%, respectively. Radical operation and diameter of cancer small than :10 cm were positive prognostic factors in females younger than 30years old. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that radical operation was the only independent prognostic factor, P=0.007.CONCLUSION: Nonfunctioning islet cell tumors of pancreas are found mainly in young women. The long-term results for patients undergone surgery, especially curative resection are

  10. Neutrophil-tumor cell cannibalism in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarode, Sachin C; Sarode, Gargi S

    2014-07-01

    Cannibalism was recognized as a phenomenon seen mainly with the tumor cells ingesting other tumor cells. Recent reports have shown tumor cell engulfing other cells (xeno-cannibalism) as well, such as neutrophils, lymphocytes and erythrocytes. But no such finding has been reported in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in the literature till date. Retrospective histopathological analysis of OSCC for identification of neutrophil-tumor cell cannibalism (NTCC) and its correlation with clinico-pathological parameters. The hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections of 500 OSCC cases were thoroughly screened at high power magnification (400X) for NTCC. Cases showing only frank NTCC were selected. Cases were subjected to immunohistochemical analysis using CD68 and lysozyme. Seven (1.4%) cases of OSCC which showed classical features of extreme NTCC on histopathological examination. Seventeen Cases (3.4%) showing occasional isolated NTCC were excluded. All the cases were poorly differentiated and showed cervical lymph node metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis showed mild (+) to moderate (++) positivity in tumor cells for CD68 and lysozyme markers. NTCC in OSCC can predict the biological behavior and could serve as a useful prognostic marker in future. Tumor cell displaying macrophage phenotype and cell digestion could be mediated through lysosomal enzyme activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Brian [Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 7416, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Rochefort, Holly [Department of Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, HCT 4300, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Goldkorn, Amir, E-mail: agoldkor@usc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 3440, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  12. Cyberknife radiosurgery for cranial plasma cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafaci, Cetty; Grasso, Giovanni; Conti, Alfredo; Caffo, Mariella; Salpietro, Francesco Maria; Tomasello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Cranial and intracranial involvement by myelomatous disease is relatively uncommon. Furthermore, systemic manifestations of multiple myeloma are present in the majority of these cases at the time of symptom onset. The authors report the case of a patient with serial appearance of multiple intracranial plasma cell tumor localizations as the first manifestations of a multiple myeloma. The patient was treated with CyberKnife radiosurgery for a lesion localized at the clivus and sella turcica with complete local control. With such a technique, based on high-dose conformality, the tumor was centered with an ablative dose of radiation and, at the same time, with a low dose spreading to the surrounding critical structures. The radiosensitivity of plasma cell tumors renders this treatment modality particularly advantageous for their localized manifestation. A technical description of this case is provided. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful Cyberknife radiosurgery of multifocal intracranial plasmacytoma.

  13. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  14. Syndecans in tumor cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapraeger Alan C

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anchorage of cells to "heparin" – binding domains that are prevalent in extracellular matrix (ECM components is thought to occur primarily through the syndecans, a four-member family of transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans that communicate environmental cues from the ECM to the cytoskeleton and the signaling apparatus of the cell. Known activities of the syndecans trace to their highly conserved cytoplasmic domains and to their heparan sulfate chains, which can serve to regulate the signaling of growth factors and morphogens. However, several emerging studies point to critical roles for the syndecans' extracellular protein domains in tumor cell behavior to include cell adhesion and invasion. Although the mechanisms of these activities remain largely unknown, one possibility involves "co-receptor" interactions with integrins that may regulate integrin function and the cell adhesion-signaling phenotype. Thus, alterations in syndecan expression, leading to either overexpression or loss of expression, both of which take place in tumor cells, may have dramatic effects on tumor cell invasion.

  15. Cohesion and device reliability in organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brand, Vitali

    2012-04-01

    The fracture resistance of P3HT:PC 60BM-based photovoltaic devices are characterized using quantitative adhesion and cohesion metrologies that allow identification of the weakest layer or interface in the device structure. We demonstrate that the phase separated bulk heterojunction layer is the weakest layer and report quantitative cohesion values which ranged from ∼1 to 20 J m -2. The effects of layer thickness, composition, and annealing treatments on layer cohesion are investigated. Using depth profiling and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the resulting fracture surfaces, we examine the gradient of molecular components through the thickness of the bulk heterojunction layer. Finally, using atomic force microscopy we show how the topography of the failure path is related to buckling of the metal electrode and how it develops with annealing. The research provides new insights on how the molecular design, structure and composition affect the cohesive properties of organic photovoltaics. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great

  17. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    -proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting...

  18. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great cons

  19. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great cons

  20. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E.; Geissler, Edward K.; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J.; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy. PMID:28337200

  1. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E; Geissler, Edward K; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy.

  2. Silicon bulk growth for solar cells: Science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Koichi; Gao, Bing; Nakano, Satoshi; Harada, Hirofumi; Miyamura, Yoshiji

    2017-02-01

    The photovoltaic industry is in a phase of rapid expansion, growing by more than 30% per annum over the last few decades. Almost all commercial solar cells presently use single-crystalline or multicrystalline silicon wafers similar to those used in microelectronics; meanwhile, thin-film compounds and alloy solar cells are currently under development. The laboratory performance of these cells, at 26% solar energy conversion efficiency, is now approaching thermodynamic limits, with the challenge being to incorporate these improvements into low-cost commercial products. Improvements in the optical design of cells, particularly in their ability to trap weakly absorbed light, have also led to increasing interest in thin-film cells based on polycrystalline silicon; these cells have advantages over other thin-film photovoltaic candidates. This paper provides an overview of silicon-based solar cell research, especially the development of silicon wafers for solar cells, from the viewpoint of growing both single-crystalline and multicrystalline wafers.

  3. Clear-cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) in the mandible

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Yi Chen; Chung-Wei Wu; Wen-Chen Wang; Li-Min Lin; Yuk-Kwan Chen

    2013-01-01

    We present an uncommon case (female patient aged 59 years) of the clear-cell variant of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT) (also known as Pindborg tumor) in the mandible. The clinical characteristics and probable origins of the clear tumor cells of previously reported cases of clear-cell variant of intraosseous CEOT are also summarized and discussed.

  4. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  5. Lung metastasis of benign giant cell tumor: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosi, Thiago Carneiro da Cunha; Andrade, Fernando Coelho Goulart de; Turtelli, Celso Montenegro; Ribeiro Junior, Helio Antonio [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFMT), Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis]. E-mail: tccbosi@yahoo.com.br; Fatureto, Marcelo Cunha [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFMT), Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Thoracic Surgery; Etchebehere, Renata Margarida [Universidade Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (UFMT), Uberaba, MG (Brazil). Dept. of Pathology

    2008-05-15

    Giant cell tumor is the sixth most frequent primary bone neoplasm, affecting long bone metaphysis, most frequently in young adults. On radiological images, this tumor appears as a lytic, well-defined, eccentric lesion. The authors report a case of benign giant cell tumor in a patient who presented with lung metastases five years after undergoing resection of the primary tumor. (author)

  6. The biology of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantel, K; Speicher, M R

    2016-03-10

    Metastasis is a biologically complex process consisting of numerous stochastic events which may tremendously differ across various cancer types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that are shed from primary tumors and metastatic deposits into the blood stream. CTCs bear a tremendous potential to improve our understanding of steps involved in the metastatic cascade, starting from intravasation of tumor cells into the circulation until the formation of clinically detectable metastasis. These efforts were propelled by novel high-resolution approaches to dissect the genomes and transcriptomes of CTCs. Furthermore, capturing of viable CTCs has paved the way for innovative culturing technologies to study fundamental characteristics of CTCs such as invasiveness, their kinetics and responses to selection barriers, such as given therapies. Hence the study of CTCs is not only instrumental as a basic research tool, but also allows the serial monitoring of tumor genotypes and may therefore provide predictive and prognostic biomarkers for clinicians. Here, we review how CTCs have contributed to significant insights into the metastatic process and how they may be utilized in clinical practice.

  7. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies.

  8. Environmental stability of PTB7:PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, Elhadi A. A.; Taleatu, Bidini; Mola, Genene T.

    2014-12-01

    The short life span of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell in an ambient laboratory condition is one of the challenges hindering the realization of organic-based devices. The presence of moisture and oxygen in conjugated polymer matrix is the major factors responsible for the degradation of organic molecules. The chemical degradation of OPV cell generally depends on the nature of the semiconductor polymer used in the preparation of the devices. However, the lifespan of unprotected OPV cells often ranges in the order of few hours in simple laboratory environment. We are reporting here the lifetime of organic photovoltaic cell in ambient laboratory condition whose active layer is composed of PTB7:PCBM blend.

  9. Degradation of bulk diffusion length in CZ silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiss, J.H.; King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W. [Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Commercially-produced, unencapsulated, CZ silicon solar cells can lose 3 to 4% of their initial efficiency after exposure to light. After this initial, rapid ( < 30 min.) decrease, the cell power output remains stable. The cell performance recovers in a matter of hours in the dark at room temperature, and degrades again under light exposure. The different conditions under which CZ silicon cells degrade, and the reverse process, annealing, are characterized with the methods of spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Iron impurities are a possible cause of this effect.

  10. Treatment of tenosynovial giant cell tumor and pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Vinod; Wang, Wei-Lien; Lewis, Valerae O

    2011-07-01

    To review recent developments in the molecular pathogenesis of tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT) or pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and its therapeutic implications. TGCT or PVNS is a benign clonal neoplastic proliferation arising from the synovium characterized by a minor population of intratumoral cells that harbor a recurrent translocation. These cells overexpress CSF1, resulting in recruitment of CSF1R-bearing macrophages that are polyclonal and make up the bulk of the tumor. Inhibition of CSF1R using small molecule inhibitors such as imatinib, nilotinib or sunitinib can result in clinical, radiological and functional improvement in the affected joint. Currently, surgery remains the treatment of choice for patients with TGCT/PVNS. Localized TGCT/PVNS is managed by marginal excision. Recurrences occur in 8-20% of patients and are easily managed by re-excision. Diffuse TGCT/PVNS tends to recur more often (33-50%) and has a much more aggressive clinical course. Patients are often symptomatic and require multiple surgical procedures during their lifetime. For patients with unresectable disease or multiple recurrences, systemic therapy using CSF1R inhibitors may help delay or avoid surgical procedures and improve functional outcomes.

  11. Granular cell tumors of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayani Naila

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granular cell tumors (GCTs are extremely rare lesions of the urinary bladder with only nine cases being reported in world literature of which one was malignant. Generally believed to be of neural origin based on histochemical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural studies; they mostly follow a clinically benign course but are commonly mistaken for malignant tumors since they are solid looking, ulcerated tumors with ill-defined margins. Materials and methods We herein report two cases of GCTs, one benign and one malignant, presenting with gross hematuria in a 14- and a 47-year-old female, respectively. Results Histopathology revealed characteristic GCTs with positive immunostaining for neural marker (S-100 and negative immunostaining for epithelial (cytokeratin, Cam 5.2, AE/A13, neuroendocrine (neuron specific enolase, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and sarcoma (desmin, vimentin markers. The benign tumor was successfully managed conservatively with transurethral resection alone while for the malignant tumor, radical cystectomy, hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, anterior vaginectomy, plus lymph node dissection was done. Both cases show long-term disease free survival. Conclusion We recommend careful pathologic assessment for establishing the appropriate diagnosis and either a conservative or aggressive surgical treatment for benign or localized malignant GCT of the urinary bladder, respectively.

  12. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  13. Somatic cell counts in bulk milk and their importance for milk processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, N. R.; Mikulec, D. P.; Radovanović, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    Bulk tank milk somatic cell counts are the indicator of the mammary gland health in the dairy herds and may be regarded as an indirect measure of milk quality. Elevated somatic cell counts are correlated with changes in milk composition The aim of this study was to assess the somatic cell counts that significantly affect the quality of milk and dairy products. We examined the somatic cell counts in bulk tank milk samples from 38 farms during the period of 6 months, from December to the May of the next year. The flow cytometry, Fossomatic was used for determination of somatic cell counts. In the same samples content of total proteins and lactose was determined by Milcoscan. Our results showed that average values for bulk tank milk samples were 273,605/ml from morning milking and 292,895/ml from evening milking. The average values for total proteins content from morning and evening milking are 3,31 and 3,34%, respectively. The average values for lactose content from morning and evening milking are 4,56 and 4,63%, respectively. The highest somatic cell count (516,000/ml) was detected in bulk tank milk sample from evening milk in the Winter and the lowest content of lactose was 4,46%. Our results showed that obtained values for bulk tank milk somatic cell counts did not significantly affected the content of total proteins and lactose.

  14. Does Royal jelly affect tumor cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirzad Maryam

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Royal jelly is a substance that appears to be effective on immune system and it appears to be effective on both prevention and growth of cancer cells. In this study, we aimed to carry out a research to investigate the effect of royal jelly on the growth of WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma cell in syngenic Balb/c mice. Methods: In an experimental study, 28 male Balb/c mice were designated into four equal groups. The mice were subcutaneously injected with 5x105 WEHI-164 tumor cells on the day zero in the chest area of the animal. Animals in groups 1 to 4 were orally given 100, 200, 300 mg/kg of royal jelly or vehicle, respectively. In every individual mouse, the tumour size was measured every 2 days from day 5 (days 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15 and 17. Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney-U tests. Result: Our results showed that the mean size of tumor in case group was significantly smaller than the control group in days 11, 13, 15 and 17 (P<0.05. No metastasis was seen in test and control groups. Conclusion: With emphasize on antitumor effect of royal jelly, it seems that royal jelly has important role in control and regression of fibrosarcoma cells. Since royal jelly showed a delayed effect in control of fibrosarcoma, we suggest that royal jelly be used at least 10 days before tumor inoculation.

  15. Circulating Tumor Cells Measurements in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Chiappini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the seventh in women. During the past 20 years, the incidence of HCC has tripled while the 5-year survival rate has remained below 12%. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC reflects the aggressiveness nature of a tumor. Many attempts have been made to develop assays that reliably detect and enumerate the CTC during the development of the HCC. In this case, the challenges are (1 there are few markers specific to the HCC (tumor cells versus nontumor cells and (2 they can be used to quantify the number of CTC in the bloodstream. Another technical challenge consists of finding few CTC mixed with million leukocytes and billion erythrocytes. CTC detection and identification can be used to estimate prognosis and may serve as an early marker to assess antitumor activity of treatment. CTC can also be used to predict progression-free survival and overall survival. CTC are an interesting source of biological information in order to understand dissemination, drug resistance, and treatment-induced cell death. Our aim is to review and analyze the different new methods existing to detect, enumerate, and characterize the CTC in the peripheral circulation of patients with HCC.

  16. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy PRINCIPAL...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... cancer . To eradicate chemoresistant tumor cells, it is important to identify the subset of tumor cells that can survive from chemotherapy and

  17. Stem Cells and the Origin and Propagation of Brain Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been a flood of interest in the relationship between brain tumors and stem cells. Some investigators have focused on the sensitivity of normal stem cells to transformation, others have described phenotypic or functional similarities between tumor cells and stem cells, and still others have suggested that tumors contain a subpopulation of “cancer stem cells” that is crucial for tumor maintenance or propagation. While all these concepts are interesting and provide insi...

  18. Application of PECVD for bulk and surface passivation of high efficiency silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krygowski, T.; Doshi, P.; Cai, L.; Doolittle, A.; Rohatgi, A. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) passivation of bulk and surface defects has been shown to be an important technique to improve the performance of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) and single crystalline silicon solar cells. In this paper, we report the status of our on-going investigation into the bulk and surface passivation properties of PECVD insulators for photovoltaic applications. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the ability of PECVD films to passivate the front (emitter) surface, bulk, and back surface by proper tailoring of deposition and post-PECVD annealing conditions.

  19. Multicentric giant cell tumor around the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgia Anil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of multicentric giant cell tumor with synchronous occurrence in all three bones around the knee is reported here in view of its rarity. A 33-year-old average built male reported with complaints of severe pain, gradually increasing swelling around the right knee. A 3 x 2 cm swelling was present on the lateral aspect of the distal end of the right femur and a 3 x 3 cm swelling on the proximal part of the right tibia. Plain X-ray of right knee showed subarticular eccentrically located expansile lytic lesion in the lateral tibia condyle, lateral condyle of femur and patella. Fine needle aspiration cytology and subsequent histology ascertained the diagnosis of giant cell tumor of the bone. The patient was treated successfully with curettage, bone grafting and methyl methacrylate cementing (Sandwich technique.

  20. Derivation and solution of effective-medium equations for bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Giles; Please, Colin; Styles, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    A drift-diffusion model for charge transport in an organic bulk-heterojunction solar cell, formed by conjoined acceptor and donor materials sandwiched between two electrodes, is formulated. The model accounts for (i) bulk photogeneration of excitons, (ii) exciton drift and recombination, (iii) exciton dissociation (into polarons) on the acceptor-donor interface, (iv) polaron recombination, (v) polaron dissociation into a free electron (in the acceptor) and a hole (in the donor), (vi) electron...

  1. Salivary duct carcinoma with striking neutrophil-tumor cell cannibalism

    OpenAIRE

    Payam Arya; Khalbuss, Walid E.; Monaco, Sara E.; Liron Pantanowitz

    2011-01-01

    Cannibalism of neutrophils by tumor cells has previously been reported in certain carcinomas, lymphoma and melanoma. Tumor cannibalism is believed to serve as a tumor-immune escape mechanism, associated with high-grade aggressive cancers with a significantly increased metastatic potential. This interesting phenomenon has not been previously documented in association with salivary gland tumors. We report, for the first time, striking neutrophil-tumor cell cannibalism associated with a high gra...

  2. Incomplete Exciton Harvesting from Fullerenes in Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Burkhard, George F.

    2009-12-09

    We investigate the internal quantum efficiencies (IQEs) of high efficiency poly-3-hexylthiophene:[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) solar cells and find them to be lower at wavelengths where the PCBM absorbs. Because the exciton diffusion length in PCBM is too small, excitons generated in PCBM decay before reaching the donor-acceptor interface. This result has implications for most state of the art organic solar cells, since all of the most efficient devices use fullerenes as electron acceptors. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  3. Single-cell analyses of circulating tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Xi Chen; Fan Bai

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of tumor cells mediating metastasis, which results in most of the cancer related deaths. hTe number of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients is rare, and many platforms have been launched for detection and enrichment of CTCs. Enumeration of CTCs has already been used as a prognosis marker predicting the survival rate of cancer patients. Yet CTCs should be more potential. Studies on CTCs at single cell level may help revealing the underlying mechanism of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Though far from developed, this area of study holds much promise in providing new clinical application and deep understanding towards metastasis and cancer development.

  4. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...

  5. Regulatory T Cells in Tumor-Associated Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Suppress Anti-tumor T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R; Farago, Anna F; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M; Bronson, Roderick T; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-09-15

    Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma and found that Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLSs). TA-TLSs have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLSs in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLSs upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose that Treg cells in TA-TLSs can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells might provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

  6. Quantifying Bimolecular Recombination Losses in Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, L. Jan Anton; Kemerink, Martijn; Wienk, Martijn M.; Maturova, Klara; Janssen, Rene A. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new experimental technique that affords direct quantification of the fraction of charge carriers lost in poly(3-hexylthiophene): fullerene solar cells by bimolecular recombination. Depending on annealing conditions up to 17% of carriers recombine bimolecularly under solar illumination.

  7. Ultimate performance of polymer: Fullerene bulk heterojunction tandem solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotlarski, J.D.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    We present the model calculations to explore the potential of polymer:fullerene tandem solar cells. As an approach we use a combined optical and electrical device model, where the absorption profiles are used as starting point for the numerical current-voltage calculations. With this model a maximum

  8. Pro-Tumor and Anti-Tumor Functions of IL-17 and of TH17 Cells in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulubova M.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The current review reveals the seven subclasses of CD4+ T helper cells, i.e. Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, regulatory T cells and Tfh, the cytokines produced by them and their role in tumor microenvironment. Main attention was paid to IL-17 and Th17 cells. IL-17-producing cells were described, among which were Treg17 cells and Tc17 cells. The transcription factors, engaged in the activation of Th17 cell differentiation were reviewed. It was shown that Th17 cells might possess regulatory functions in tumor microenvironments that directs toward immunosuppression. The reciprocity between Treg and Th17 cells is realized when the production of a large amount of TGF-β in tumors causes Treg cell differentiation, and the addition of IL-6 shifts the differentiation of naïve T cells to Th17 cells. The main pro-tumor role of IL-17 is the promotion of tumor angiogenesis through stimulation of fibroblasts and endothelial cells. The antitumor functions of IL-17 are associated with enhancement of cytotoxic activity of tumor specific CTL cells and with angiogenesis that provide channels through which immune cells might invade tumor and promote antitumor immunity.

  9. Photobiomodulation on tumor cells in vitro and tumor tissue in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Dong-Liang; Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Jin, Hua

    2006-01-01

    Background and Objective: There are many kinds of photobiomodulation (PBM) on tumor cells whereas PBM induced oncogenic transformation has not been found. These will be discussed in view of the anti-cancer efficacy of PBM. Study Design/Materials and Methods: The biological information model of PBM (BIMP) will be used to study PBM on tumor cells. Results: The PBM on tumor cells includes cell proliferation, cell cycle modulation, cell adhesion, cell differentiation and so on. The PBM on small tumor tissue in vivo may include the inhibition or promotion of tumor growth. The PBM can be designed to play an important role in anti-cancer treatments in terms of BIMP. Conclusions and discussion: PBM on tumor cells may develop into a novel anti-cancer therapeutic approach.

  10. Laparoscopic resection of a residual retroperitoneal tumor mass of nonseminomatous testicular germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozturk, Cigdem; van Ginkel, Robert J.; Krol, Ruby M.; Gietema, Jourik A.; Hofker, Hendrik S.; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    Resection of a residual retroperitoneal tumor mass (RRRTM) is standard procedure after combination chemotherapy for metastatic nonseminomatous testicular germ cell tumors (NSTGCT). At the University Medical Center Groningen, 79 consecutive patients with disseminated NSTGCT were treated with

  11. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion.

  12. Combined optical and electrical modeling of polymer : fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotlarski, Jan D.; Blom, Paul W. M.; Koster, Lambert. J. A.; Lenes, Martijn; Slooff, Lenneke H.

    2008-01-01

    Optical interference effects are important for the total absorption as well as the profile of the exciton generation rate in polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells. For solar cells with an active layer of poly[2-methoxy-5-(3('),7(')-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] as electron don

  13. Charge Carrier Generation, Recombination, and Extraction in Polymer–Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Laquai, Frederic

    2016-12-20

    In this chapter we review the basic principles of photocurrent generation in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, discuss the loss channels limiting their efficiency, and present case studies of several polymer–fullerene blends. Using steady-state and transient, optical, and electrooptical techniques, we create a precise picture of the fundamental processes that ultimately govern solar cell efficiency.

  14. Significance of Micrometastases: Circulating Tumor Cells and Disseminated Tumor Cells in Early Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Oakman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvant systemic therapy targets minimal residual disease. Our current clinical approach in the adjuvant setting is to presume, rather than confirm, the presence of minimal residual disease. Based on assessment of the primary tumor, we estimate an individual’s recurrence risk. Subsequent treatment decisions are based on characteristics of the primary tumor, with the presumption of consistent biology and treatment sensitivity between micrometastases and the primary lesion. An alternative approach is to identify micrometastatic disease. Detection of disseminated tumor cells (DTC in the bone marrow and circulating tumor cells (CTC from peripheral blood collection may offer quantification and biocharacterization of residual disease. This paper will review the prognostic and predictive potential of micrometastatic disease in early breast cancer.

  15. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  16. Nanocomposite-Based Bulk Heterojunction Hybrid Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich Phuong Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic devices based on nanocomposites composed of conjugated polymers and inorganic nanocrystals show promise for the fabrication of low-cost third-generation thin film photovoltaics. In theory, hybrid solar cells can combine the advantages of the two classes of materials to potentially provide high power conversion efficiencies of up to 10%; however, certain limitations on the current within a hybrid solar cell must be overcome. Current limitations arise from incompatibilities among the various intradevice interfaces and the uncontrolled aggregation of nanocrystals during the step in which the nanocrystals are mixed into the polymer matrix. Both effects can lead to charge transfer and transport inefficiencies. This paper highlights potential strategies for resolving these obstacles and presents an outlook on the future directions of this field.

  17. GRANULAR CELL TUMOR OF BREAST (CYTOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS CONFIRMED BY HISTOPATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divvya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumor is a tumor derived from Schwann cells of peripheral nerves and it can occur throughout the body. About 5% of granular cell tumors occur in breast and are mostly benign in nature. We report a case of 30 year old female who presented with a swelling in right breast which on histo pathological examination revealed features consistent with granular cell tumor. This case is highlighted to reveal the importance of histopathology in differentiating granular cell tumor from carcinoma breast which is difficult based on clinical, radiological and cytological examination alone.

  18. Tumor-altered dendritic cell function: implications for anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Michael Hargadon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity, and the array of immunoregulatory functions exhibited by these cells is dictated by their differentiation, maturation, and activation status. Although a major role for these cells in the induction of immunity to pathogens has long been appreciated, data accumulated over the last several years has demonstrated that DC are also critical regulators of anti-tumor immune responses. However, despite the potential for stimulation of robust anti-tumor immunity by DC, tumor-altered DC function has been observed in many cancer patients and tumor-bearing animals and is often associated with tumor immune escape. Such dysfunction has significant implications for both the induction of natural anti-tumor immune responses as well as the efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies that target endogenous DC in situ or that employ exogenous DC as part of anti-cancer immunization maneuvers. In this review, the major types of tumor-altered DC function will be described, with emphasis on recent insights into the mechanistic bases for the inhibition of DC differentiation from hematopoietic precursors, the altered programming of DC precursors to differentiate into myeloid-derived suppressor cells or tumor-associated macrophages, the suppression of DC maturation and activation, and the induction of immunoregulatory DC by tumors, tumor-derived factors, and tumor-associated cells within the milieu of the tumor microenvironment. The impact of these tumor-altered cells on the quality of the overall anti-tumor immune response will also be discussed. Finally, this review will also highlight questions concerning tumor-altered DC function that remain unanswered, and it will address factors that have limited advances in the study of this phenomenon in order to focus future research efforts in the field on identifying strategies for interfering with tumor-associated DC dysfunction and improving DC-mediated anti-tumor

  19. Farm management factors associated with bulk tank somatic cell count in Irish dairy herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly PT

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The relationship between bulk tank somatic cell count (SCC and farm management and infrastructure was examined using data from 398 randomly selected, yet representative, Irish dairy farms where the basal diet is grazed grass. Median bulk tank SCC for the farms was 282,887 cells/ml ranging from 82,209 to 773,028 cells/ml. Two questionnaires were administered through face-to-face contact with each farmer. Herd-level factors associated with bulk tank SCC were determined using linear models with annual somatic cell score (i.e., arithmetic mean of the natural logarithm of bulk tank SCC included as the dependent variable. All herd level factors were analysed individually in separate regression models, which included an adjustment for geographical location of the farm; a multiple regression model was subsequently developed. Management practices associated with low SCC included the use of dry cow therapy, participation in a milk recording scheme and the use of teat disinfection post-milking. There was an association between low SCC and an increased level of hygiene and frequency of cleaning of the holding yard, passageways and cubicles. Herd management factors associated with bulk tank SCC in Irish grazing herds are generally in agreement with most previous studies from confinement systems of milk production.

  20. Farm management factors associated with bulk tank somatic cell count in Irish dairy herds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between bulk tank somatic cell count (SCC) and farm management and infrastructure was examined using data from 398 randomly selected, yet representative, Irish dairy farms where the basal diet is grazed grass. Median bulk tank SCC for the farms was 282,887 cells/ml ranging from 82,209 to 773,028 cells/ml. Two questionnaires were administered through face-to-face contact with each farmer. Herd-level factors associated with bulk tank SCC were determined using linear models with annual somatic cell score (i.e., arithmetic mean of the natural logarithm of bulk tank SCC) included as the dependent variable. All herd level factors were analysed individually in separate regression models, which included an adjustment for geographical location of the farm; a multiple regression model was subsequently developed. Management practices associated with low SCC included the use of dry cow therapy, participation in a milk recording scheme and the use of teat disinfection post-milking. There was an association between low SCC and an increased level of hygiene and frequency of cleaning of the holding yard, passageways and cubicles. Herd management factors associated with bulk tank SCC in Irish grazing herds are generally in agreement with most previous studies from confinement systems of milk production. PMID:22081962

  1. Tetrathiomolybdate inhibits head and neck cancer metastasis by decreasing tumor cell motility, invasiveness and by promoting tumor cell anoikis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merajver Sofia D

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metastatic spread of solid tumors is directly or indirectly responsible for most cancer-related deaths. Tumor metastasis is very complex and this process requires a tumor cell to acquire enhanced motility, invasiveness and anoikis resistance to successfully establish a tumor at a distal site. Metastatic potential of tumor cells is directly correlated with the expression levels of several angiogenic cytokines. Copper is a mandatory cofactor for the function of many of these angiogenic mediators as well as other proteins that play an important role in tumor cell motility and invasiveness. We have previously shown that tetrathiomolybdate (TM is a potent chelator of copper and it mediates its anti-tumor effects by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. However, very little is known about the effect of TM on tumor cell function and tumor metastasis. In this study, we explored the mechanisms underlying TM-mediated inhibition of tumor metastasis. Results We used two in vivo models to examine the effects of TM on tumor metastasis. Animals treated with TM showed a significant decrease in lung metastasis in both in vivo models as compared to the control group. In addition, tumor cells from the lungs of TM treated animals developed significantly smaller colonies and these colonies had significantly fewer tumor cells. TM treatment significantly decreased tumor cell motility and invasiveness by inhibiting lysyl oxidase (LOX activity, FAK activation and MMP2 levels. Furthermore, TM treatment significantly enhanced tumor cell anoikis by activating p38 MAPK cell death pathway and by downregulating XIAP survival protein expression. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that TM is a potent suppressor of head and neck tumor metastasis by modulating key regulators of tumor cell motility, invasiveness and anoikis resistance.

  2. Solution-processed inorganic bulk nano-heterojunctions and their application to solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Arup K.; Bernechea, Maria; Martinez, Luis; de Arquer, F. Pelayo Garcia; Osmond, Johann; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2012-08-01

    In the last decade, solution-processed quantum dot/nanocrystal solar cells have emerged as a very promising technology for third-generation thin-film photovoltaics because of their low cost and high energy-harnessing potential. Quantum dot solar cell architectures developed to date have relied on the use of bulk-like thin films of colloidal quantum dots. Here, we introduce the bulk nano-heterojunction concept for inorganic solution-processed semiconductors. This platform can be readily implemented by mixing different semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and allows for the development of optoelectronic nanocomposite materials with tailored optoelectronic properties. We present bulk nano-heterojunction solar cells based on n-type Bi2S3 nanocrystals and p-type PbS quantum dots, which demonstrate a more than a threefold improvement in device performance compared to their bilayer analogue, as a result of suppressed recombination.

  3. Circulating Tumor Cells, Enumeration and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Mei Hou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The detection and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs has shown significant clinical utility with respect to prognosis in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. Emerging studies show that CTCs can provide pharmacodynamic information to aid therapy decision making. CTCs as a ‘virtual and real-time biopsy’ have clear potential to facilitate exploration of tumor biology, and in particular, the process of metastasis. The challenge of profiling CTC molecular characteristics and generating CTC signatures using current technologies is that they enrich rather than purify CTCs from whole blood; we face the problem of looking for the proverbial ‘needle in the haystack’. This review summarizes the current methods for CTC detection and enumeration, focuses on molecular characterization of CTCs, unveils some aspects of CTC heterogeneity, describes attempts to purify CTCs and scans the horizon for approaches leading to comprehensive dissection of CTC biology.

  4. [Precocious pseudopuberty secondary to granulosa cell tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, F; Jordán, J; Carmona, M; Oliver, A; Gracia, R; González, M; Peralta, A

    1984-12-01

    A case report of pseudoprecocity secondary to a unilateral ovarian tumor of granulosa cells is presented in a 13 month old female. Clinical manifestations appeared at two months of age as unilateral enlargement of the breast, development of pubic hair and vaginal discharge. Plasma estrogen levels were elevated, whereas there was no response of FSH and LH to LH-RH stimulation. The absence of a palpable abdominal mass and a normal ultrasound examination of the abdomen must be pointed out in our case. The suspected clinical and laboratory diagnosis was later confirmed by surgical abdominal examination and ovarian histopathology study. With the exception of a minimal breast enlargement which persists at two years of age, all other signs of pseudoprecocity have disappeared after the surgical removal of the neoplasm. The importance of surgical abdominal examination must be pointed out as a diagnostic method when clinical and laboratory findings suggest an ovarian tumor inspite of normal abdominal palpation, ultrasound and roentgenology.

  5. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C., E-mail: pgascoyn@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Unit 951, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shim, Sangjo [Department of Imaging Physics Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Unit 951, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Present address: Micro & Nanotechnology Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-03-12

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs) from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a) the principles of DEP; (b) the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c) why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d) instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies.

  6. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. C. Gascoyne

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dielectrophoresis (DEP is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a the principles of DEP; (b the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies.

  7. Severe acute tumor lysis syndrome in patients with germ-cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Alvarenga Feres

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ-cell tumors are a high-proliferative type of cancer that may evolve to significant bulky disease. Tumor lysis syndrome is rarely reported in this setting. The reports of three patients with germ-cell tumors who developed severe acute tumor lysis syndrome following the start of their anticancer therapy are presented. All patients developed renal dysfunction and multiorgan failure. Patients with extensive germ-cell tumors should be kept on close clinical and laboratory monitoring. Physicians should be aware of this uncommon but severe complication and consider early admission to the intensive care unit for the institution of measures to prevent acute renal failure.

  8. Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor and Metastasis Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0461 TITLE: Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor - and Metastasis-Initiating Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daotai...29 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Tumor Oct4 to Deplete Prostate Tumor - and Metastasis-Initiating Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...the c-MYC oncogene. POU5F1B is a pseudogene of embryonic Oct4 (POU5F1). A recent study found that tumor Oct4 found in prostate cancer cells is due

  9. Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Germ Cell Tumor; Teratoma; Choriocarcinoma; Germinoma; Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Malignant Germ Cell Neoplasm; Extragonadal Seminoma; Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Seminoma

  10. Study of buffer layer thickness on bulk heterojunction solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seunguk; Suman, C K; Lee, Donggu; Kim, Seohee; Lee, Changhee

    2010-10-01

    We studied the effect of the buffer layer (molybdenum-oxide (MoO3)) thickness on the performance of organic solar cell based on blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester fullerene derivative (PCBM). The thickness of MoO3 was varied from 1 nm to 30 nm for optimization of device performance. The photocurrent-voltage and impedance spectroscopy were measured under dark and AM1.5G solar simulated illumination of 100 mW/cm2 for exploring the role of the buffer layer thickness on carrier collection at an anode. The MoO3 thickness of the optimized device (efficiency approximately 3.7%) was found to be in the range of 5 approximately 10 nm. The short-circuit current and the shunt resistance decrease gradually for thicker MoO3 layer over 5 nm. The device can be modeled as the combination of three RC parallel circuits (each one for the active layer, buffer layer and interface between the buffer layer and the active layer) in series with contact resistance (Rs approximately 60 ohm).

  11. Circulating tumor cells: highlight on practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Naso, Giuseppe; Cortesi, Enrico; Frati, Luigi

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells of presumed epithelial origin, whose prognostic and predictive value in metastatic cancer patients has recently been demonstrated. To date, the count of CTCs through the CellSearch® system represents a valid approach for monitoring disease status in patients with metastatic colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer; in these cancer types, a rise in the CTC count at any time during treatment predicts a poor outcome. Nevertheless, the clinical utility of monitoring CTC counts remains controversial, and what to do when CTC counts rise during therapy still remains an unanswered question. In this report, we suggest how to integrate CTC counts with their molecular characterization to better translate biologic information obtained on CTCs into daily clinical practice.

  12. Mixed germ cell tumors: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan M Pagaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ cell tumors arise in the ovaries and testis and rarely in other tissues. Mixed germ cell tumors are rare. We report two cases of mixed germ cell tumors, one consisting of seminoma and immature teratoma in the testis of a 30-year-old male and second consisting of a yolk sac tumor and immature teratoma in the ovary of a 17-year-old female. Many combinations of mixed germ cell tumors have been reported but very few cases of the above-mentioned combinations have been reported in literature.

  13. Photovoltaic characteristics of diffused P/+N bulk GaAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, J. M.; Keeney, R. P.; Bhat, I. B.; Bhat, K. N.; Sundaram, L. G.; Ghandhi, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The photovoltaic characteristics of P(+)N junction solar cells fabricated on bulk GaAs by an open tube diffusion technique are described in this paper.Spectral response measurements were analyzed in detail and compared to a computer simulation in order to determine important material parameters. It is projected that proper optimization of the cell parameters can increase the efficiency of the cells from 12.2 percent to close to 20 percent.

  14. The effects of telomerase inhibition on prostate tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Calin O; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2010-07-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men, and patients with metastatic disease have poor outcome even with the most advanced therapeutic approaches. Most cancer therapies target the bulk tumor cells, but may leave intact a small population of tumor-initiating cells (TICs), which are believed to be responsible for the subsequent relapse and metastasis. Using specific surface markers (CD44, integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and CD133), Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion, and holoclone formation, we isolated TICs from a panel of prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, C4-2 and LNCaP). We have found that prostate TICs have significant telomerase activity which is inhibited by imetelstat sodium (GRN163L), a new telomerase antagonist that is currently in Phase I/II clinical trials for several hematological and solid tumor malignancies. Prostate TICs telomeres were of similar average length to the telomeres of the main population of cells and significant telomere shortening was detected in prostate TICs as a result of imetelstat treatment. These findings suggest that telomerase inhibition therapy may be able to efficiently target the prostate TICs in addition to the bulk tumor cells, providing new opportunities for combination therapies.

  15. [Circulating tumor cells and prostate cancer prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoun, Otakar; Soukup, Viktor; Mikulová, Veronika; Jančíková, Markéta; Honová, Hana; Kološtová, Katarína; Zima, Tomáš; Hanuš, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common malignant disease in men. Prognosis of patients with metastatic PC is generally unfavourable; however there are significant differences in survival at this stage of the disease. The definition of prognosis is essential for the selection of therapy, respecting an individual risk. In recent years, the association between circulating tumor cells (CTC) detection and response to PC treatment has been widely investigated. Detection of CTC is based on a metastatic process theory and uses well-known tumor-specific antigens on the cell surface. Individual methods assess CTC with different sensitivity and are not yet efficient at the localised PC stage. Only the method of immunomagnetic separation and semi-automatic visualisation (CellSearchTM) has been validated and approved for the use in the PC management. Assessment of the CTC count directly correlates with the prognosis of patients with castration-resistant PC. Change in the CTC count during the therapy also considerably improves risk estimation and represents a marker of overall survival. New methods of CTC cultivation and gene profiling may contribute to individualisation of the treatment similarly to breast cancer. The authors present a review article about theory, methods of detection and clinical use of CTC in castration-resistant PC.

  16. Tumor cell culture on collagen–chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Mahmoudzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen–chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen–chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen–chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies.

  17. Management practices associated with low, medium, and high somatic cell counts in bulk milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkema, H W; Schukken, Y H; Lam, T J; Beiboer, M L; Benedictus, G; Brand, A

    1998-07-01

    Management practices associated with bulk milk somatic cell counts (SCC) were studied for 201 dairy herds grouped into three categories according to bulk milk SCC. The cumulative production of fat-corrected milk over 305 d of lactation and category for bulk milk SCC were highly correlated; herds within the low category had the highest milk production. Differences in bulk milk SCC among the categories were well explained by the management practices studied. This correlation was not only true for the difference between the high (250,000 to 400,000) and low (teat disinfection, and antibiotic treatment of clinical mastitis, were also found to be important in the explanation of the difference between herds in the medium and low categories for bulk milk SCC. More attention was paid to hygiene for herds in the low category than for herds in the medium or high category. Supplementation of the diet with minerals occurred more frequently for cows in the low category for bulk milk SCC than for cows in the medium and high categories.

  18. Cancer stem cells in solid tumors: elusive or illusive?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehrach Hans R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past years in vivo transplantation experiments and in vitro colony-forming assays indicated that tumors arise only from rare cells. These cells were shown to bear self-renewal capacities and the ability to recapitulate all cell types within an individual tumor. Due to their phenotypic resemblance to normal stem cells, the term "cancer stem cells" is used. However, some pieces of the puzzle are missing: (a a stringent definition of cancer stem cells in solid tumors (b specific markers that only target cells that meet the criteria for a cancer stem cell in a certain type of tumor. These missing parts started an ongoing debate about which is the best method to identify and characterize cancer stem cells, or even if their mere existence is just an artifact caused by the experimental procedures. Recent findings query the cancer stem cell hypothesis for solid tumors itself since it was shown in xenograft transplantation experiments that under appropriate conditions tumor-initiating cells are not rare. In this review we critically discuss the challenges and prospects of the currently used major methods to identify cancer stem cells. Further on, we reflect the present discussion about the existence of cancer stem cells in solid tumors as well as the amount and characteristics of tumor-initiating cells and finally provide new perspectives like the correlation of cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells.

  19. Plexin D1 is ubiquitously expressed on tumor vessels and tumor cells in solid malignancies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodink, I.; Verrijp, K.; Raats, J.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plexin D1 is expressed on both tumor-associated endothelium and malignant cells in a number of clinical brain tumors. Recently we demonstrated that Plexin D1 expression is correlated with tumor invasion level and metastasis in a human melanoma progression series. The objective of this st

  20. Establishment of a tumor sphere cell line from a metastatic brain neuroendocrine tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Ryoichi; Maruyama, Masato; Ito, Tomoki; Nakano, Yosuke; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Koike, Taro; Oe, Souichi; Yoshimura, Kunikazu; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nomura, Shosaku; Sugimoto, Tetsuo; Yamada, Hisao; Asai, Akio

    2017-05-17

    Neuroendocrine tumors are rare, and little is known about the existence of cancer stem cells in this disease. Identification of the tumorigenic population will contribute to the development of effective therapies targeting neuroendocrine tumors. Surgically resected brain metastases from a primary neuroendocrine tumor of unknown origin were dissociated and cultured in serum-free neurosphere medium. Stem cell properties, including self-renewal, differentiation potential, and stem cell marker expression, were examined. Tumor formation was evaluated using intracranial xenograft models. The effect of temozolomide was measured in vitro by cell viability assays. We established the neuroendocrine tumor sphere cell line ANI-27S, which displayed stable exponential growth, virtually unlimited expansion in vitro, and expression of stem-cell markers such as CD133, nestin, Sox2, and aldehyde dehydrogenase. FBS-induced differentiation decreased Sox2 and nestin expression. On the basis of real-time PCR, ANI-27S cells expressed the neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin and chromogranin A. Intracranial xenotransplanted brain tumors recapitulated the original patient tumor and temozolomide exhibited cytotoxic effects on tumor sphere cells. For the first time, we demonstrated the presence of a sphere-forming, stem cell-like population in brain metastases from a primary neuroendocrine tumor. We also demonstrated the potential therapeutic effects of temozolomide for this disease.

  1. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology.

  2. A Think Tank of TINK/TANKs: Tumor-Infiltrating/Tumor-Associated Natural Killer Cells in Tumor Progression and Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This “polarization” has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as “TINKs”) and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call “TANKs”) are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology. PMID:25178695

  3. Oxaliplatin-incorporated micelles eliminate both cancer stem-like and bulk cell populations in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ke Wang1,*, Lina Liu2,*, Tao Zhang1, Yong-liang Zhu3, Fuming Qiu4, Xian-guo Wu1, Xiao-lei Wang1, Fu-qiang Hu5, Jian Huang1,41Cancer Institute (Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Intervention, National Ministry of Education; Provincial Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Medical Sciences, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine; 2Department of Pharmacy, Second Affiliated Hospital (Binjiang Branch, Zhejiang University School of Medicine; 3Department of Gastroenterology; 4Department of Oncology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine; 5College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China, , *These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: The failure of cancer treatments is partly due to the enrichment of cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. A novel micelle formulation of oxaliplatin (OXA encapsulated in chitosan vesicle was developed. The authors postulate that micelle encapsulation of OXA would eliminate both CSLCs and bulk cancer cells in colorectal cancer (CRC.Experimental design: In this study, using stearic acid-g-chitosan oligosaccharide (CSO-SA polymeric micelles as a drug-delivery system, OXA-loaded CSO-SA micelles (CSO-SA/OXA were prepared. Intracellular uptake of CSO-SA/OXA micelles was assessed by confocal microscope. The effects of free OXA, the empty carrier, and CSO-SA/OXA micelles were tested using human CRC cell lines in vitro and in vivo.Results: The micelles showed excellent internalization ability that increased OXA accumulation both in CRC cells and tissues. Furthermore, CSO-SA/OXA micelles could either increase the cytotoxicity of OXA against the bulk cancer cells or reverse chemoresistance of CSLC subpopulations in vitro. Intravenous administration of CSO-SA/OXA micelles effectively suppressed the tumor growth and reduced CD133+/CD24+ cell (putative CRC CSLC markers compared with free OXA

  4. Biophysical control of invasive tumor cell behavior by extracellular matrix microarchitecture

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Shawn P.; Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Cynthia A. Reinhart-King

    2012-01-01

    Fibrillar collagen gels, which are used extensively in vitro to study tumor-microenvironment interactions, are composed of a cell-instructive network of interconnected fibers and pores whose organization is sensitive to polymerization conditions such as bulk concentration, pH, and temperature. Using confocal reflectance microscopy and image autocorrelation analysis to quantitatively assess gel microarchitecture, we show that additional polymerization parameters including culture media formula...

  5. Circulating tumor cells in melanoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A Clawson

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are of recognized importance for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer patients. With melanoma, most studies do not show any clear relationship between CTC levels and stage of disease. Here, CTCs were enriched (∼400X from blood of melanoma patients using a simple centrifugation device (OncoQuick, and 4 melanocyte target RNAs (TYR, MLANA, MITF, and MIF were quantified using QPCR. Approximately one-third of melanoma patients had elevated MIF and MLANA transcripts (p<0.0001 and p<0.001, respectively compared with healthy controls. In contrast, healthy controls had uniformly higher levels of TYR and MITF than melanoma patients (p<0.0001. There was a marked shift of leukocytes into the CTC-enriched fractions (a 430% increase in RNA recovery, p<0.001, and no relationship between CTC levels and stage of disease was found. CTCs were captured on microfabricated filters and cultured. Captured melanoma CTCs were large cells, and consisted of 2 subpopulations, based on immunoreactivity. One subpopulation (∼50% stained for both pan-cytokeratin (KRT markers and the common leukocyte marker CD-45, whereas the second subpopulation stained for only KRT. Since similar cells are described in many cancers, we also examined blood from colorectal and pancreatic cancer patients. We observed analogous results, with most captured CTCs staining for both CD-45/KRT markers (and for the monocyte differentiation marker CD-14. Our results suggest that immature melanocyte-related cells (expressing TYR and MITF RNA may circulate in healthy controls, although they are not readily detectable without considerable enrichment. Further, as early-stage melanomas develop, immature melanocyte migration into the blood is somehow curtailed, whereas a significant proportion of patients develop elevated CTC levels (based on MIF and MLANA RNAs. The nature of the captured CTCs is consistent with literature describing leukocyte/macrophage-tumor cell fusion hybrids

  6. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  7. Role of Balanced Charge Carrier Transport in Low Band Gap polymer : fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotlarski, Jan D.; Moet, Date J. D.; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Lowering of the optical band gap of conjugated polymers in bulk heterojunction solar cells not only leads to an increased absorption but also to an increase of the optimal active layer thickness due to interference effects at longer wavelengths. The increased carrier densities due to the enhanced ab

  8. Device model for the operation of polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, LJA; Smits, ECP; Mihailetchi, VD; Blom, PWM

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a numerical device model that consistently describes the current-voltage characteristics of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells. Bimolecular recombination and a temperature- and field-dependent generation mechanism of free charges are incorporated. It is demonstrated

  9. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  10. Delayed menopause due to granulosa cell tumor of the ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Murkey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 52-year-old patient presented with complaints of menorrhagia. Endometrial biopsy revealed simple hyperplasia of the endometrium. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy was carried out. The ovaries looked grossly normal, but histopathology reported granulosa cell tumor of the right ovary. Granulosa cell tumors belong to the sexcord stromal category and account for approximately 2% of all ovarian tumors. We review the features and treatment of granulosa cell tumors and the importance of screening for ovarian tumors in a case of endometrial hyperplasia and delayed menopause.

  11. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  12. Pharmacogenomics of Scopoletin in Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ean-Jeong Seo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance and the severe side effects of chemotherapy necessitate the development of novel anticancer drugs. Natural products are a valuable source for drug development. Scopoletin is a coumarin compound, which can be found in several Artemisia species and other plant genera. Microarray-based RNA expression profiling of the NCI cell line panel showed that cellular response of scopoletin did not correlate to the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters as classical drug resistance mechanisms (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCC1, ABCG2. This was also true for the expression of the oncogene EGFR and the mutational status of the tumor suppressor gene, TP53. However, mutations in the RAS oncogenes and the slow proliferative activity in terms of cell doubling times significantly correlated with scopoletin resistance. COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of transcriptome-wide mRNA expression resulted in a set of 40 genes, which all harbored binding motifs in their promoter sequences for the transcription factor, NF-κB, which is known to be associated with drug resistance. RAS mutations, slow proliferative activity, and NF-κB may hamper its effectiveness. By in silico molecular docking studies, we found that scopoletin bound to NF-κB and its regulator IκB. Scopoletin activated NF-κB in a SEAP-driven NF-κB reporter cell line, indicating that NF-κB might be a resistance factor for scopoletin. In conclusion, scopoletin might serve as lead compound for drug development because of its favorable activity against tumor cells with ABC-transporter expression, although NF-κB activation may be considered as resistance factor for this compound. Further investigations are warranted to explore the full therapeutic potential of this natural product.

  13. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control.

  14. Analytical Model for Voltage-Dependent Photo and Dark Currents in Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A physics-based explicit mathematical model for the external voltage-dependent forward dark current in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells is developed by considering Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination and solving the continuity equations for both electrons and holes. An analytical model for the external voltage-dependent photocurrent in BHJ organic solar cells is also proposed by incorporating exponential photon absorption, dissociation efficiency of bound electron-hole pairs (...

  15. Charge generation in polymer-fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Feng; Inganäs, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Charge generation in organic solar cells is a fundamental yet heavily debated issue. This article gives a balanced review of different mechanisms proposed to explain efficient charge generation in polymer-fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells. We discuss the effect of charge-transfer states, excess energy, external electric field, temperature, disorder of the materials, and delocalisation of the charge carriers on charge generation. Although a general consensus has not been reached yet, r...

  16. Circulating tumor cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Prakruthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are those cells present in the blood and have antigenic and/or genetic characteristics of a specific tumor type. CTCs can be detected in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Various techniques are available for detection of CTCs, which provide evidence for future metastasis. CTCs may provide new insight into the biology of cancer and process of metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. The detection of CTCs may represent a new diagnostic tool for predicting the occurrence of metastatic disease in OSCC and endow with the treatment strategies to efficiently treat and prevent cancer metastasis. This review gives an insight into the significance of CTCs and different techniques for detection of CTCs.

  17. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1 single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase, and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems. Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients.

  18. Tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes as an efficient source of highly specific immunoglobulins recognizing tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelliccia Angela

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is much evidence that tumor cells elicit a humoral immune response in patients. In most cases, the presence of antibodies in peripheral blood is detected only in small proportion of patients with tumors overexpressing the corresponding antigen. In the present study, we analyzed the significance of local humoral response provided by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer patients. Methods The ability of a patient's immune system to produce specific antibodies inside tumor tissue, capable of recognizing tumor cells, was explored through analysis of the oligoclonality of antibodies derived from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and construction of a series of recombinant antibody libraries in scFv format, derived from breast tumor-infiltrating B lymphocytes. These libraries and one from peripheral blood lymphocytes of a single breast cancer patient were panned against three purified surface tumor antigens, such as CEA, MUC1 and ED-B domain, and against intact MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. Results Application of novel display vector, pKM19, allowed isolation of a large panel of breast cancer-specific antibodies against known tumor antigens, as well as against breast carcinoma cells. Reactivity of novel scFvs was confirmed by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence staining and flow cytometry. We demonstrated that seven of ten primary breast tumor specimens, obtained using discarded surgical material, could be exploited as an appropriate source for generation of phage display libraries, giving highly specific antitumor antibodies which recognize heterologous tumor cells. Conclusion Local humoral immune response within tumor tissue in breast cancer patients frequently has an oligoclonal character. Efficient selection of specific antitumor antibodies from recombinant antibody libraries, derived from such oligoclonal tumor-infiltrated B lymphocytes, indicates the presence of natural immune response against tumor antigens

  19. Prognostic value of CD66b positive tumor-infiltrating neutrophils in testicular germ cell tumor

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Prognostic value of immune cells is not clear in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). We aimed to investigate the prognostic value of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils in TGCTs. Methods A total of 102 patients who underwent orchiectomy for TGCT were investigated for CD66b positive tumor-infiltrating neutrophils (CD66b + TINs). Immmunostaining for CD66b was performed in 102 sections as described. Clinicopathological parameters as well as cancer specific survival and overall survival we...

  20. Genotype by environment interaction for somatic cell score across bulk milk somatic cell count and days in milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Janss, L.L.G.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate the importance of a genotype x environment interaction (G x E) for somatic cell score (SCS) across levels of bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC), number of days in milk (DIM), and their interaction. Variance components were estimated with a model inclu

  1. Gold nanoparticles enhanced photocurrent in nanostructure-based bulk heterojunction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Gen; Ching, Levine; Saqodi, Mostafa; Xu, Huizhong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we report a first hand study of enhanced photocurrent observed in nanostructure-based bulk heterojunction solar cell due to introduction of Au nanoparticles. The bulk heterojunction solar cell was fabricated using chemically synthesized narrow gap, IV-VI group semiconductor nanoparticles (PbS, ~3 nm), wide gap semiconductor ZnO nanowires (~1 μm length, ~50 nm diameter), and gold nanoparticles (~20 nm), by spin-coating method in N2-filled glove box. We have demonstrated that such a bulk heterojunction solar cell can be incorporated with metal nanoparticles (Au) to enhance solar device performance. Three types of solar cell devices were studied. An enhancement in the photocurrent due to introduction of Au nanoparticles was observed, compared to solar cell device without Au nanoparticles. The power conversion efficiency was also increased, possibly due to the plasmonic effects from Au nanoparticles. The fabrication procedures can be readily extended to other nanomaterial systems. Further optimization in the fabrication would be needed to realize high-efficient, stable solar cell devices.

  2. Molecular helices as electron acceptors in high-performance bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yu; Trinh, M Tuan; Chen, Rongsheng; Purdum, Geoffrey E; Khlyabich, Petr P; Sezen, Melda; Oh, Seokjoon; Zhu, Haiming; Fowler, Brandon; Zhang, Boyuan; Wang, Wei; Nam, Chang-Yong; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Black, Charles T; Steigerwald, Michael L; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Ng, Fay; Zhu, X-Y; Nuckolls, Colin

    2015-09-18

    Despite numerous organic semiconducting materials synthesized for organic photovoltaics in the past decade, fullerenes are widely used as electron acceptors in highly efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells. None of the non-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells have achieved efficiencies as high as fullerene-based solar cells. Design principles for fullerene-free acceptors remain unclear in the field. Here we report examples of helical molecular semiconductors as electron acceptors that are on par with fullerene derivatives in efficient solar cells. We achieved an 8.3% power conversion efficiency in a solar cell, which is a record high for non-fullerene bulk heterojunctions. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy revealed both electron and hole transfer processes at the donor-acceptor interfaces. Atomic force microscopy reveals a mesh-like network of acceptors with pores that are tens of nanometres in diameter for efficient exciton separation and charge transport. This study describes a new motif for designing highly efficient acceptors for organic solar cells.

  3. Hybrid morphology dependence of CdTe:CdSe bulk-heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Furui; Qu, Shengchun; Zhang, Weifeng; Wang, Zhanguo

    2014-01-01

    A nanocrystal thin-film solar cell operating on an exciton splitting pattern requires a highly efficient separation of electron-hole pairs and transportation of separated charges. A hybrid bulk-heterojunction (HBH) nanostructure providing a large contact area and interpenetrated charge channels is favorable to an inorganic nanocrystal solar cell with high performance. For this freshly appeared structure, here in this work, we have firstly explored the influence of hybrid morphology on the photovoltaic performance of CdTe:CdSe bulk-heterojunction solar cells with variation in CdSe nanoparticle morphology. Quantum dot (QD) or nanotetrapod (NT)-shaped CdSe nanocrystals have been employed together with CdTe NTs to construct different hybrid structures. The solar cells with the two different hybrid active layers show obvious difference in photovoltaic performance. The hybrid structure with densely packed and continuously interpenetrated two phases generates superior morphological and electrical properties for more efficient inorganic bulk-heterojunction solar cells, which could be readily realized in the NTs:QDs hybrid. This proved strategy is applicable and promising in designing other highly efficient inorganic hybrid solar cells.

  4. In vivo tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature is exclusively mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mees Soeren T

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis formation is the leading cause of death among colon cancer patients. We established a new in-situ model of in vivo microscopy of the lung to analyse initiating events of metastatic tumor cell adhesion within this typical metastatic target of colon cancer. Methods Anaesthetized CD rats were mechanically ventilated and 106 human HT-29LMM and T84 colon cancer cells were injected intracardially as single cell suspensions. Quantitative in vivo microscopy of the lung was performed in 10 minute intervals for a total of 40 minutes beginning with the time of injection. Results After vehicle treatment of HT-29LMM controls 15.2 ± 5.3; 14.2 ± 7.5; 11.4 ± 5.5; and 15.4 ± 6.5 cells/20 microscopic fields were found adherent within the pulmonary microvasculature in each 10 minute interval. Similar numbers were found after injection of the lung metastasis derived T84 cell line and after treatment of HT-29LMM with unspecific mouse control-IgG. Subsequently, HT-29LMM cells were treated with function blocking antibodies against β1-, β4-, and αv-integrins wich also did not impair tumor cell adhesion in the lung. In contrast, after hydrolization of sialylated glycoproteins on the cells' surface by neuraminidase, we observed impairment of tumor cell adhesion by more than 50% (p Conclusions These results demonstrate that the initial colon cancer cell adhesion in the capillaries of the lung is predominantly mediated by tumor cell - endothelial cell interactions, possibly supported by platelets. In contrast to reports of earlier studies that metastatic tumor cell adhesion occurs through integrin mediated binding of extracellular matrix proteins in liver, in the lung, the continuously lined endothelium appears to be specifically targeted by circulating tumor cells.

  5. Bulk conductivity measurement of paper by a new in situ pressure cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefowicz, Jack Y.; Anczurowski, Edward; Jones, Arthur Y.; Deslandes, Yves

    1981-06-01

    In this report a new bulk conductivity cell design is described which can be used to characterize both conductivized and nonconductive paper. By the use of optically flat stainless steel electrodes under a pressure of 115 bars during the conductivity measurement, it is shown that the contact resistance between the paper sample and the electrodes is reduced to negligible proportions. The effect of paper surface morphology on the contact resistance during the measurement of bulk conductivity was studied by a comparison between the polished stainless steel electrodes and electrodes composed of liquid Galium Indium, which make intimate contact with the paper surface. Bulk conductivity measurements were determined for paper samples having different basis weights and different degrees of calendering. The results obtained with the pressurized stainless steel electrodes for these paper samples indicate that the contact resistance is essentially eliminated for all the papers studied by using an applied pressure of 115 bars.

  6. The metabolic advantage of tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwartz Laurent

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract 1- Oncogenes express proteins of "Tyrosine kinase receptor pathways", a receptor family including insulin or IGF-Growth Hormone receptors. Other oncogenes alter the PP2A phosphatase brake over these kinases. 2- Experiments on pancreatectomized animals; treated with pure insulin or total pancreatic extracts, showed that choline in the extract, preserved them from hepatomas. Since choline is a methyle donor, and since methylation regulates PP2A, the choline protection may result from PP2A methylation, which then attenuates kinases. 3- Moreover, kinases activated by the boosted signaling pathway inactivate pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, demethylated PP2A would no longer dephosphorylate these enzymes. A "bottleneck" between glycolysis and the oxidative-citrate cycle interrupts the glycolytic pyruvate supply now provided via proteolysis and alanine transamination. This pyruvate forms lactate (Warburg effect and NAD+ for glycolysis. Lipolysis and fatty acids provide acetyl CoA; the citrate condensation increases, unusual oxaloacetate sources are available. ATP citrate lyase follows, supporting aberrant transaminations with glutaminolysis and tumor lipogenesis. Truncated urea cycles, increased polyamine synthesis, consume the methyl donor SAM favoring carcinogenesis. 4- The decrease of butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, elicits epigenic changes (PETEN, P53, IGFBP decrease; hexokinase, fetal-genes-M2, increase 5- IGFBP stops binding the IGF - IGFR complex, it is perhaps no longer inherited by a single mitotic daughter cell; leading to two daughter cells with a mitotic capability. 6- An excess of IGF induces a decrease of the major histocompatibility complex MHC1, Natural killer lymphocytes should eliminate such cells that start the tumor, unless the fever prostaglandin PGE2 or inflammation, inhibit them...

  7. UTERINE PERIVASCULAR EPITHELIOID CELL TUMOR:A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Iravanlo Z. Nozarian

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa is composed of HMB45+ epithelioid cells with clear to granular cytoplasm and perivascular distribution. We describe a uterine PEComa in a 33 years old woman where tumor cells were positive for HMB45 but negative for epithelial markers and negative or positive for smooth muscles markers.

  8. The use of bispecific antibodies in tumor cell and tumor vasculature directed immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molema, G; Kroesen, BJ; Helfrich, W; Meijer, DKF; de Leij, LFMH

    2000-01-01

    To overcome dose limiting toxicities and to increase efficacy of immunotherapy of cancer, a number of strategies are under development for selectively redirecting effector cells/molecules towards tumor cells. Many of these strategies exploit the specificity of tumor associated antigen recognition by

  9. Flow cytometric DNA ploidy analysis of ovarian granulosa cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; C.J. Cornelisse; A. Schabert (A.)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The nuclear DNA content of 50 ovarian tumors initially diagnosed as granulosa cell tumors was measured by flow cytometry using paraffin-embedded archival material. The follow-up period of the patients ranged from 4 months to 19 years. Thirty-eight tumors were diploid or near-dip

  10. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  11. Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Paul Briët

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background:  Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS is often thought of as a volar finger mass. We hypothesized that GCTTS are equally common on the dorsal and volar aspects of the hand. In addition, we hypothesized that there are no factors associated with the location (volar versus dorsal and largest measured dimension of a GCTTS.  Methods:  A total of 126 patients with a pathological diagnosis of a GCTTS of the hand or finger were reviewed. Basic emographic and GCTTS specific information was obtained. Bivariable analyses were used to assess predicting factors for location (volar or dorsal side and largest measured diameter of a GCTTS.  Results:  Seventy-two tumors (57% were on the volar side of the hand, 47 (37% were dorsal, 6 (4.8% were both dorsal and volar, and one was midaxial (0.79%. The most common site of a GCTTS was the index finger (30%. There were no factors significantly associated with the location (volar or dorsal, n=119 of the GCTTS. There were also no factors significantly associated with a larger diameter of a GCTTS.  Conclusions:  A GCTTS was more frequently seen on the volar aspect of the hand. No significant factors associated with the location or an increased size of a GCTTS were found in this study.

  12. T cell avidity and tumor recognition: implications and therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowski Jeffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last two decades, great advances have been made studying the immune response to human tumors. The identification of protein antigens from cancer cells and better techniques for eliciting antigen specific T cell responses in vitro and in vivo have led to improved understanding of tumor recognition by T cells. Yet, much remains to be learned about the intricate details of T celltumor cell interactions. Though the strength of interaction between T cell and target is thought to be a key factor influencing the T cell response, investigations of T cell avidity, T cell receptor (TCR affinity for peptide-MHC complex, and the recognition of peptide on antigen presenting targets or tumor cells reveal complex relationships. Coincident with these investigations, therapeutic strategies have been developed to enhance tumor recognition using antigens with altered peptide structures and T cells modified by the introduction of new antigen binding receptor molecules. The profound effects of these strategies on T celltumor interactions and the clinical implications of these effects are of interest to both scientists and clinicians. In recent years, the focus of much of our work has been the avidity and effector characteristics of tumor reactive T cells. Here we review concepts and current results in the field, and the implications of therapeutic strategies using altered antigens and altered effector T cells.

  13. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  14. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  15. Schwann cells: a new player in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunimovich, Yuri L; Keskinov, Anton A; Shurin, Galina V; Shurin, Michael R

    2017-08-01

    Cancerous cells must cooperate with the surrounding stroma and non-malignant cells within the microenvironment to support the growth and invasion of the tumor. The nervous system is a component of every organ system of the body, and therefore, is invariably at the front line of the tumor invasion. Due to the complexity of the nervous system physiology, this review separately discusses the contributions of the central and peripheral nervous systems to the tumorigenesis and tumor progression. We further focus the discussion on the evidence that Schwann cells aid in tumor growth and invasion. Schwann cells, a largely unexplored element of the tumor microenvironment, may participate in the creation of tumor-favorable conditions through both bi-directional interaction with cancer cells and the facilitation of the immune-suppressive microenvironment through the mechanism of neural repair and immunomodulation.

  16. The Impact of the Tumor Microenvironment on the Properties of Glioma Stem-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audia, Alessandra; Conroy, Siobhan; Glass, Rainer; Bhat, Krishna P L

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and highly malignant primary brain tumor, and patients affected with this disease exhibit a uniformly dismal prognosis. Glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) are a subset of cells within the bulk tumor that possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation properties similar to somatic stem cells. These cells also are at the apex of the cellular hierarchy and cause tumor initiation and expansion after chemo-radiation. These traits make them an attractive target for therapeutic development. Because GSCs are dependent on the brain microenvironment for their growth, and because non-tumorigenic cell types in the microenvironment can influence GSC phenotypes and treatment response, a better understanding of these cell types is needed. In this review, we provide a focused overview of the contributions from the microenvironment to GSC homing, maintenance, phenotypic plasticity, and tumor initiation. The interaction of GSCs with the vascular compartment, mesenchymal stem cells, immune system, and normal brain cell types are discussed. Studies that provide mechanistic insight into each of these GSC-microenvironment interactions are warranted in the future.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER Chaperones and Oxidoreductases: Critical Regulators of Tumor Cell Survival and Immunorecognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSimmen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones and oxidoreductases are abundant enzymes that mediate the production of fully folded secretory and transmembrane proteins. Resisting the Golgi and plasma membrane-directed bulk flow, ER chaperones and oxidoreductases enter retrograde trafficking whenever they are pulled outside of the ER. However, solid tumors are characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, combined with reduced blood flow that leads to low oxygen supply and ER stress. Under these conditions, hypoxia and the unfolded protein response (UPR upregulate ER chaperones and oxidoreductases. When this occurs, ER oxidoreductases and chaperones become important regulators of tumor growth. However, under these conditions, these proteins not only promote the production of proteins, but also alter the properties of the plasma membrane and hence modulate tumor immune recognition. For instance, high levels of calreticulin serve as an eat-me signal on the surface of tumor cells. Conversely, both intracellular and surface BiP/GRP78 promotes tumor growth. Other ER folding assistants able to modulate the properties of tumor tissue include protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, Ero1α and GRP94. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of ER chaperones in regulating tumor cell functions and immunorecognition will lead to important insight for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  18. Immunohistochemical characterization of feline mast cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, C L; Northrup, N C; Saba, C F; Rodriguez, C O; Rassnick, K M; Gieger, T L; Childress, M O; Howerth, E W

    2013-01-01

    Expression of histamine, serotonin, and KIT was evaluated in 61 archived feline mast cell tumors (MCTs) from the skin (n = 29), spleen (n = 17), and gastrointestinal (GI) tract (n = 15) using immunohistochemistry. Twenty-eight percent of cutaneous MCTs, 18% of splenic MCTs, and 53% of GI MCTs displayed histamine immunoreactivity. Serotonin immunoreactivity was detected in 3 GI and 1 cutaneous MCT. Sixty-nine percent of cutaneous MCTs, 35% of splenic MCTs, and 33% of GI MCTs were positive for KIT. Expression of these biogenic amines and KIT was less common than expected. Results of this study suggest heterogeneity in feline MCTs based on anatomic location. Further studies are needed to explain the significance of these differences.

  19. Tumor endothelial cells express high pentraxin 3 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Kyoko; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Kenji; Hojo, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Masumi; Torii, Chisaho; Shinohara, Nobuo; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2016-12-01

    It has been described that tumor progression has many similarities to inflammation and wound healing in terms of the signaling processes involved. Among biological responses, angiogenesis, which is necessary for tumor progression and metastasis, is a common hallmark; therefore, tumor blood vessels have been considered as important therapeutic targets in anticancer therapy. We focused on pentraxin 3 (PTX3), which is a marker of cancer-related inflammation, but we found no reports on its expression and function in tumor blood vessels. Here we showed that PTX3 is expressed in mouse and human tumor blood vessels based on immunohistochemical analysis. We found that PTX3 is upregulated in primary mouse and human tumor endothelial cells compared to normal endothelial cells. We also showed that PTX3 plays an important role in the proliferation of the tumor endothelial cells. These results suggest that PTX3 is an important target for antiangiogenic therapy.

  20. Dielectrophoretic capture and genetic analysis of single neuroblastoma tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Carpenter

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells. Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control white blood cells. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples from patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients.

  1. [The problems of yolk sac tumor morphogenesis in a light of the tumor stem cell theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karseladze, A I

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of possible morphogenesis of the different structures in human yolk sac tumor has been considered. The author has supposed that features of blood vessel microarchitecture formation and perpetual differentiation of tumor cells or theirs functional modification play a crucial role in the morphogenesis of YST. The immunohistochemical investigation of some stem cells markers has showed the necessity of accounting of their distribution pattern in various cellular structures for the differential diagnosis of morphogenetical steps of YST. The growth of tumor cells differentiation rate correlates with increasing of stem cells markers expression as well c-kit > OCT4 > CD30 > PLAP.

  2. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  3. Tumor-derived IL-35 promotes tumor growth by enhancing myeloid cell accumulation and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihui; Liu, Jin-Qing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Shen, Rulong; Zhang, Guoqiang; Xu, Jianping; Basu, Sujit; Feng, Youmei; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2013-03-01

    IL-35 is a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines that is comprised of an IL-12 p35 subunit and an IL-12 p40-related protein subunit, EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3). IL-35 functions through IL-35R and has a potent immune-suppressive activity. Although IL-35 was demonstrated to be produced by regulatory T cells, gene-expression analysis revealed that it is likely to have a wider distribution, including expression in cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that IL-35 is produced in human cancer tissues, such as large B cell lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and melanoma. To determine the roles of tumor-derived IL-35 in tumorigenesis and tumor immunity, we generated IL-35-producing plasmacytoma J558 and B16 melanoma cells and observed that the expression of IL-35 in cancer cells does not affect their growth and survival in vitro, but it stimulates tumorigenesis in both immune-competent and Rag1/2-deficient mice. Tumor-derived IL-35 increases CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cell accumulation in the tumor microenvironment and, thereby, promotes tumor angiogenesis. In immune-competent mice, spontaneous CTL responses to tumors are diminished. IL-35 does not directly inhibit tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell activation, differentiation, and effector functions. However, IL-35-treated cancer cells had increased expression of gp130 and reduced sensitivity to CTL destruction. Thus, our study indicates novel functions for IL-35 in promoting tumor growth via the enhancement of myeloid cell accumulation, tumor angiogenesis, and suppression of tumor immunity.

  4. Fabrication of pixilated architecture large panel organic flexible solar cell by reducing bulk electrical resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panag, Jasmeet Singh

    This study investigates experimentally the photovoltaic behavior and performance of a new pixilated architecture of large organic photovoltaic panels made of a large array of high-aspect ratio three-dimensional pillars surrounded by a matrix of polymer photoactive material. A least addressed problem in organic and thin-film solar cells is the high bulk resistance of cathodic and anodic layers that result in drastic reduction of currents and power conversion efficiency (PCE). For such panels to be practical and commercially competitive, this huge bulk-resistance has to be minimized as much as possible. In this study, therefore, we introduce a new novel architecture that essentially compartmentalizes large panels into smaller modules that are connected to each other in a parallel fashion. In this architecture, the metal cathode layer is applied on the top as a series of lines whereas the anodic layer is independently connected to the pixilated cells at the bottom. As a result, these modules act like independent pixel cells wherein the damage from process and operation is limited individual pixel cells. The factors considered in validating the pixilated architecture presented here consisted of effect of number of pixels on efficiency and bulk electrical resistance. In addition, the study shows that pixilated architecture offers more uniform photoactive layers, and hence better photovoltaic performance because of the compartmentalization.

  5. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-02-16

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis.

  6. Targeting Notch, a key pathway for ovarian cancer stem cells, sensitizes tumors to platinum therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Shannon M; Morgan, Stefanie L; Wyant, Gregory A; Tran, Lieu T; Muto, Katherine W; Chen, Yu Sarah; Chin, Kenneth T; Partridge, Justin C; Poole, Barish B; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Daggett, John; Cullen, Kristen; Kantoff, Emily; Hasselbatt, Kathleen; Berkowitz, Julia; Muto, Michael G; Berkowitz, Ross S; Aster, Jon C; Matulonis, Ursula A; Dinulescu, Daniela M

    2012-10-23

    Chemoresistance to platinum therapy is a major obstacle that needs to be overcome in the treatment of ovarian cancer patients. The high rates and patterns of therapeutic failure seen in patients are consistent with a steady accumulation of drug-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). This study demonstrates that the Notch signaling pathway and Notch3 in particular are critical for the regulation of CSCs and tumor resistance to platinum. We show that Notch3 overexpression in tumor cells results in expansion of CSCs and increased platinum chemoresistance. In contrast, γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI), a Notch pathway inhibitor, depletes CSCs and increases tumor sensitivity to platinum. Similarly, a Notch3 siRNA knockdown increases the response to platinum therapy, further demonstrating that modulation of tumor chemosensitivity by GSI is Notch specific. Most importantly, the cisplatin/GSI combination is the only treatment that effectively eliminates both CSCs and the bulk of tumor cells, indicating that a dual combination targeting both populations is needed for tumor eradication. In addition, we found that the cisplatin/GSI combination therapy has a synergistic cytotoxic effect in Notch-dependent tumor cells by enhancing the DNA-damage response, G(2)/M cell-cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Based on these results, we conclude that targeting the Notch pathway could significantly increase tumor sensitivity to platinum therapy. Our study suggests important clinical applications for targeting Notch as part of novel treatment strategies upon diagnosis of ovarian cancer and at recurrence. Both platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive relapses may benefit from such an approach as clinical data suggest that all relapses after platinum therapy are increasingly platinum resistant.

  7. Morphology versus Vertical Phase Segregation in Solvent Annealed Small Molecule Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kovalenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The deep study of solvent annealed small molecules bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on DPP(TBFu2 : PC60BM blend is carried out. To reveal the reason of the solvent annealing advantage over the thermal one, capacitance-voltage measurements were applied. It was found that controlling the vertical phase segregation in the solar cells a high fullerene population in the vicinity of the cathode could be achieved. This results in increase of the shunt resistance of the cell, thus improving the light harvesting efficiency.

  8. Targeted delivery of let-7b to reprogramme tumor-associated macrophages and tumor infiltrating dendritic cells for tumor rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen; Gan, Jingjing; Long, Ziyan; Guo, Guangxing; Shi, Xiafei; Wang, Chunming; Zang, Yuhui; Ding, Zhi; Chen, Jiangning; Zhang, Junfeng; Dong, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Both tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) and tumor infiltrating dendritic cells (TIDCs) are important components in the tumor microenvironment that mediate tumor immunosuppression and promote cancer progression. Targeting these cells and altering their phenotypes may become a new strategy to recover their anti-tumor activities and thereby restore the local immune surveillance against tumor. In this study, we constructed a nucleic acid delivery system for the delivery of let-7b, a synthetic microRNA mimic. Our carrier has an affinity for the mannose receptors on TAMs/TIDCs and is responsive to the low-pH tumor microenvironment. The delivery of let-7b could reactivate TAMs/TIDCs by acting as a TLR-7 agonist and suppressing IL-10 production in vitro. In a breast cancer mouse model, let-7b delivered by this system efficiently reprogrammed the functions of TAMs/TIDCs, reversed the suppressive tumor microenvironment, and inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, this strategy, designed based upon TAMs/TIDCs-targeting delivery and the dual biological functions of let-7b (TLR-7 ligand and IL-10 inhibitor), may provide a new approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Bone marrow-derived cells and tumor growth : Contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to tumor micro-environments with special focus on mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, Berber D.; ter Elst, Arja; Kamps, Willem A.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    Research has provided evidence that tumor growth depends on the interaction of tumor cells with stromal cells, as already suggested in 1889 by Paget. Experimental and clinical studies have revealed that tumor stromal cells can be derived from bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells, such as

  10. An unusual mixed germ cell tumor of the testis consisting of rhabdomyosarcoma, mature teratoma and yolk sac tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Lovri(c); Dubravka Bobonj Hi(z)ak; Melita Peri(c) Balja; Tanja Leni(c)ek; Bo(z)o Kru(s)lin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, We recently encountered a rare case of testicular mixed germ cell tumor (MGCT) in a 32-year-old man. The tumor was composed of a combination of a yolk sac tumor, teratoma and rhabdomyosarcomatous somatic type malignancy.

  11. Cell Mediated Photothermal Therapy of Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschberg, Henry; Madsen, Steen J

    2017-03-01

    Gold based nanoparticles with strong near infra-red (NIR) absorption are ideally suited for photothermal therapy (PTT) of brain tumors. The goal of PTT is to induce rapid heating in tumor tissues while minimizing thermal diffusion to normal brain. PTT efficacy is sensitively dependent on both nanoparticle concentration and distribution in tumor tissues. Nanoparticle delivery via passive approaches such as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect is unlikely to achieve sufficient nanoparticle concentrations throughout tumor volumes required for effective PTT. A simple approach for improving tumor biodsitribution of nanoparticles is the use of cellular delivery vehicles. Specifically, this review focuses on the use of monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) as gold nanoparticle delivery vectors for PTT of brain tumors. Although the efficacy of this delivery approach has been demonstrated in both in vitro and animal PTT studies, its clinical potential for the treatment of brain tumors remains uncertain.

  12. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations.

  13. Bulk processing of radionuclide generator parents at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fassbender, M.; Nortier, F.M.; Phillips, D.R. [Los Almos National Laboratory, NM (US). Chemistry Div.] (and others)

    2004-07-01

    Bulk radionuclide processing at Los Alamos includes isotopes (''generator parents'') with short-lived radioactive daughter nuclides for medical applications: Germanium-68, {sup 82}Sr, {sup 88}Zr and {sup 109}Cd are regularly prepared at the Los Alamos Hot Cell Facility. Nuclear chemical aspects related to the production and processing of these generator parents are briefly outlined below. (orig.)

  14. To clone or not to clone? Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated in bulk culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte A Willmann

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are usually clonally derived. The selection of fully reprogrammed cells generally involves picking of individual colonies with morphology similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs. Given that fully reprogrammed cells are highly proliferative and escape from cellular senescence, it is conceivable that they outgrow non-pluripotent and partially reprogrammed cells during culture expansion without the need of clonal selection. In this study, we have reprogrammed human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs with episomal plasmid vectors. Colony frequency was higher and size was larger when using murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs as stromal support instead of HDFs or human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. We have then compared iPSCs which were either clonally derived by manual selection of a single colony, or derived from bulk-cultures of all initial colonies. After few passages their morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, and gene expression profiles did not reveal any significant differences. Furthermore, clonally-derived and bulk-cultured iPSCs revealed similar in vitro differentiation potential towards the three germ layers. Therefore, manual selection of individual colonies does not appear to be necessary for the generation of iPSCs - this is of relevance for standardization and automation of cell culture procedures.

  15. To clone or not to clone? Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated in bulk culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Charlotte A; Hemeda, Hatim; Pieper, Lisa A; Lenz, Michael; Qin, Jie; Joussen, Sylvia; Sontag, Stephanie; Wanek, Paul; Denecke, Bernd; Schüler, Herdit M; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are usually clonally derived. The selection of fully reprogrammed cells generally involves picking of individual colonies with morphology similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Given that fully reprogrammed cells are highly proliferative and escape from cellular senescence, it is conceivable that they outgrow non-pluripotent and partially reprogrammed cells during culture expansion without the need of clonal selection. In this study, we have reprogrammed human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) with episomal plasmid vectors. Colony frequency was higher and size was larger when using murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as stromal support instead of HDFs or human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We have then compared iPSCs which were either clonally derived by manual selection of a single colony, or derived from bulk-cultures of all initial colonies. After few passages their morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, and gene expression profiles did not reveal any significant differences. Furthermore, clonally-derived and bulk-cultured iPSCs revealed similar in vitro differentiation potential towards the three germ layers. Therefore, manual selection of individual colonies does not appear to be necessary for the generation of iPSCs - this is of relevance for standardization and automation of cell culture procedures.

  16. Multiple skin tumors of indeterminate cells in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolde, G; Bröcker, E B

    1986-10-01

    An adult patient with multiple unusual histiocytic tumors of the skin is described. As shown by immunohistologic study, electron microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy, the tumors represent circumscribed proliferations of the Langerhans cell-related indeterminate dendritic cells of the skin. This distinct cutaneous histiocytosis may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome.

  17. [Clinical diagnosis and treatment of extragonadal germ cell tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Kenichi

    2012-12-01

    Extragonadal germ cell tumors (EGGCT) are very rare and account for only 2% to 5% of all malignant germ cell neoplasms. Although multimodality treatment, including cisplatin-based chemotherapy and postchemotherapy surgery, has improved the prognosis of patients with EGGCT, few findings are available for these tumors. This article presents the clinical outcome and management of EGGCT patients.

  18. "Flagellated" cancer cells propel anti-tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaude, Johan; Blander, J Magarian

    2012-09-01

    The use of innate immune receptor agonists in cancer therapies has suffered from many drawbacks. Our recent observations suggest that some of these hurdles can be overcome by introducing flagellin into tumor cells to promote tumor antigen presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) and simultaneously trigger two types of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs).

  19. Large mid-esophageal granular cell tumor: benign versus malignant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prarthana Roselil Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Granular cell tumors are rare soft tissue neoplasms, among which only 2% are malignant, arising from nervous tissue. Here we present a case of a large esophageal granular cell tumor with benign histopathological features which metastasized to the liver, but showing on positron emission tomography-computerized tomography standardized uptake value suggestive of a benign lesion.

  20. Cancer stem cells: a new approach to tumor development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Cristina Ciufa Kobayashi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Many theories have been proposed to explain the origins of cancer. Currently, evidences show that not every tumor cell is capable of initiating a tumor. Only a small part of the cancer cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs, can generate a tumor identical to the original one, when removed from human tumors and transplanted into immunosuppressed mice. The name given to these cells comes from the resemblance to normal stem cells, except for the fact that their ability to divide is infinite. These cells are also affected by their microenvironment. Many of the signaling pathways, such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog, are altered in this tumoral subpopulation, which also contributes to abnormal proliferation. Researchers have found several markers for CSCs; however, much remains to be studied, or perhaps a universal marker does not even exist, since they vary among tumor types and even from patient to patient. It was also found that cancer stem cells are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This may explain the re-emergence of the disease, since they are not completely eliminated and minimal amounts of CSCs can repopulate a tumor. Once the diagnosis in the early stages greatly increases the chances of curing cancer, identifying CSCs in tumors is a goal for the development of more effective treatments. The objective of this article is to discuss the origin of cancer according to the theory of stem cell cancer, as well as its markers and therapies used for treatment.

  1. Intracellular particle tracking as a tool for tumor cell characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Yixuan; Duits, Michel H.G.; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of two types of intracellular probe particles, ballistically injected latex spheres and endogenous granules, in tumor cell lines of differerent metastatic potential: breast tumor cells (MCF-7 malignant, MCF-10A benign) and pancreas adenocarcinoma (PaTu8988T malignant, PaTu898

  2. Treatment Options By Stage (Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ovarian germ cell tumor are swelling of the abdomen or vaginal bleeding after menopause. Ovarian germ cell ... if you have either of the following: Swollen abdomen without weight gain in other parts of the ...

  3. Targeting stromal glutamine synthetase in tumors disrupts tumor microenvironment-regulated cancer cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive stromal cells are an integral part of tumor microenvironment (TME) and interact with cancer cells to regulate their growth. Although targeting stromal cells could be a viable therapy to regulate the communication between TME and cancer cells, identification of stromal targets that make canc...

  4. Cryo-ablation improves anti-tumor immunity through recovering tumor educated dendritic cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He XZ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiao-Zheng He,1,2 Qi-Fu Wang,1,2 Shuai Han,3 Hui-Qing Wang,1,2 Yong-Yi Ye,1,2 Zhi-Yuan Zhu,1,2 Shi-Zhong Zhang1,2 1Department of Neurosurgery, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2The National Key Clinic Specialty, The Neurosurgery Institute of Guangdong Province, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory on Brain Function Repair and Regeneration, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of General Surgery, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Background: In addition to minimally invasive destruction of tumors, cryo-ablation of tumors to some extent modulated anti-tumor immunity. Cryo-ablated tumors in glioma mice models induced anti-tumor cellular immunologic response which increases the percentage of CD3+ and CD4+T cells in blood as well as natural killer cells. As a crucial role in triggering anti-tumor immunity, dendritic cells (DCs were educated by tumors to adopt a tolerance phenotype which helps the tumor escape from immune monitoring. This study aims to study whether cryo-ablation could influence the tolerogenic DCs, and influence anti-tumor immunity in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs. Methods: Using the GL261 subcutaneous glioma mouse model, we created a tumor bearing group, cryo-ablation group, and surgery group. We analyzed alteration in phenotype and function of tolerogenic DCs, and evaluated the factors of anti-tumor immunity inhibition. Results: DCs in TDLNs in GL261 subcutaneous glioma mouse model expressed tolerogenic phenotype. In contrast to surgery, cryo-ablation improved the quantity and quality of these tolerogenic DCs. Moreover, the DCs decreased the expression of intracellular interleukin-10 (IL-10 and extra-cellular IL-10. In vitro, DCs from the cryo-ablation group recovered their specific function and induced potent anti-tumor immunity through triggering T cells. In vivo, cryo

  5. Near infrared organic semiconducting materials for bulk heterojunction and dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surya Prakash; Sharma, G D

    2014-06-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells have been the subject of intensive academic interest over the past two decades, and significant commercial effort has been directed towards this area with the vison of developing the next generation of low cost solar cells. Materials development has played a vital role in the dramatic improvement of both DSSC and BHJ solar cell performance in the recent years. Organic conjugated polymers and small molecules that absorb solar light in the visible and near infrared (NIR) regions represent a class of emering materials and show a great potential for the use of different optoelectronic devices such as DSSCs and BHJ solar cells. This account describes the emering class of near infrared (NIR) organic polymers and small molecules having donor and acceptors units, and explores their potential applications in the DSSCs and BHJ solar cells.

  6. A Study of CD45RA+ Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-18

    Ewing Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma

  7. Internalization of NK cells into tumor cells requires ezrin and leads to programmed cell-in-cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Zhen Guo; Peng Xia; Tingting Liu; Jufang Wang; Shan Li; Lihua Sun; Jianxin Lu; Qian Wen; Mingqian Zhou; Li Ma; Xia Ding; Xiaoning Wang; Xuebiao Yao

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes are key players in the orchestration of immune response and elimination of defective cells. We have previously reported that natural killer (NK) cells enter target tumor cells, leading to either target cell death or self-destruction within tumor cells. However, it has remained elusive as to the fate of NK cells after internaliza-tion and whether the heterotypic cell-in-cell process is different from that of the homotypic cell-in-cell event recently named entosis. Here, we show that NK cells undergo a cell-in-cell process with the ultimate fate of apoptosis within tumor cells and reveal that the internalization process requires the actin cytoskeletal regulator, ezrin. To visualize how NK cells enter into tumor cells, we carried out real-time dual color imaging analyses of NK cell internalization into tumor cells. Surprisingly, most NK cells commit to programmed cell death after their entry into tumor cells, which is distinctively different from entosis observed in the homotypic cell-in-cell process. The apoptotic cell death of the internalized NK cells was evident by activation of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, NK cell death after internalization is attenuated by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, confirming apoptosis as the mode of NK cell death within tumor cells. To determine protein factors essential for the entry of NK cells into tumor cells, we car-ried out siRNA-based knockdown analysis and discovered a critical role of ezrin in NK cell internalization. Impor-tantly, PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin promotes the NK cell internalization process. Our findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which ezrin governs NK cell internalization into tumor cells.

  8. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  9. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-12

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors.

  10. Interleukin-2 inhibits proliferation of HPV-associated tumor cells and halts tumor growth in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, Patricia H; Hernandez, Hector; Arana, Manuel J

    2002-12-20

    Previous studies have shown inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth by treatment with high concentrations of IL-2. In the present study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of recombinant human IL-2 on HPV-associated tumor cells (3T3-16). Treatment of 3T3-16 cells with rhIL-2 for 72 h inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner and this effect was evidenced at nanomolar concentrations. These tumor cells expressed mRNA for beta and gamma subunits of the IL-2 receptor, which are required for signal transduction. In experiments to explore the effect of IL-2 on the growth of the HPV-associated tumor, mice received rhIL-2 through different routes: (i) intraperitoneal; (ii) subcutaneous, at the tumor inoculation site; or (iii) subcutaneous, distant from the tumor inoculation site. An effective antitumor response was observed only in those animals that received IL-2 at the tumor site (P<0.01). These results indicate the potential adequacy of therapeutic strategies based on local administration of rhIL-2 for cervical carcinoma, not only based on the ability of this cytokine to stimulate cellular-mediated immunity but also because of its direct effects on tumor cells.

  11. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  12. Identification of a population of epidermal squamous cell carcinoma cells with enhanced potential for tumor formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Adhikary

    Full Text Available Epidermal squamous cell carcinoma is among the most common cancers in humans. These tumors are comprised of phenotypically diverse populations of cells that display varying potential for proliferation and differentiation. An important goal is identifying cells from this population that drive tumor formation. To enrich for tumor-forming cells, cancer cells were grown as spheroids in non-attached conditions. We show that spheroid-selected cells form faster growing and larger tumors in immune-compromised mice as compared to non-selected cells. Moreover, spheroid-selected cells gave rise to tumors following injection of as few as one hundred cells, suggesting these cells have enhanced tumor-forming potential. Cells isolated from spheroid-selected tumors retain an enhanced ability to grow as spheroids when grown in non-attached culture conditions. Thus, these tumor-forming cells retain their phenotype following in vivo passage as tumors. Detailed analysis reveals that spheroid-selected cultures are highly enriched for expression of epidermal stem cell and embryonic stem cell markers, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, keratin 15, CD200, keratin 19, Oct4, Bmi-1, Ezh2 and trimethylated histone H3. These studies indicate that a subpopulation of cells that possess stem cell-like properties and express stem cell markers can be derived from human epidermal cancer cells and that these cells display enhanced ability to drive tumor formation.

  13. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy with cor pulmonale due to desmoplastic small round cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadimin, Evita T; Collier, Adrienne G; Gaffney, Joseph W; Fyfe, Billie

    2012-04-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented acutely after an episode of syncope with perioral cyanosis. He died 19 hours after admission due to cor pulmonale as a complication of metastatic desmoplastic small round cell tumor in the lungs with associated tumor thrombotic microangiopathy.

  14. Aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumor) is derived from mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Colleen; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Nik-Amini, Saied; Nadesan, Puviindran; Stanford, William L; Alman, Benjamin A

    2010-10-01

    The cellular origins from which most tumors arise are poorly defined, especially in mesenchymal neoplasms. Aggressive fibromatosis, also known as desmoid tumor, is a locally invasive soft tissue tumor that has mesenchymal characteristics. We found that aggressive fibromatosis tumors express genes and cell surface markers characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). In mice that are genetically predisposed to develop aggressive fibromatosis tumors (Apc(wt/1638N)), we found that the number of tumors formed was proportional to the number of MSCs present. Sca-1(-/-) mice, which develop fewer MSCs, were crossed with Apc(wt/1638N) mice. Doubly mutant mice deficient in Sca-1 developed substantially fewer aggressive fibromatosis tumors than wild-type (WT) littermates, but Sca-1 deficiency had no effect on the formation of epithelial-derived intestinal polyps. MSCs isolated from Apc(wt/1638N) mice (or mice expressing a stabilized form of β-catenin) induced aberrant cellular growth reminiscent of aggressive fibromatosis tumors after engraftment to immunocompromised mice, but WT cells and mature fibroblasts from the same animals did not. Taken together, our findings indicate that aggressive fibromatosis is derived from MSCs, and that β-catenin supports tumorigenesis by maintaining mesenchymal progenitor cells in a less differentiated state. Protecting this progenitor cell population might prevent tumor formation in patients harboring a germline APC mutation, where fibromatosis is currently the leading cause of mortality. © 2010 AACR.

  15. SCA-1 Identifies the Tumor-Initiating Cells in Mammary Tumors of BALB-neuT Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Grange

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells, initiating and sustaining the tumor process, have been isolated in human and murine breast cancer using different cell markers. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the presence and characteristics of stem/tumor-initiating cells in the model of the mouse mammary neoplasia driven by the activated form of rat Her-2/neu oncogene (BALB-neuT mice. For this purpose, we generated tumor spheres from primary spontaneous BALB-neuT tumors. Tumor sphere cultures were characterized for clonogenicity, self-renewal, and ability to differentiate in epithelial/myoepithelial cells of the mammary gland expressing basal and luminal cytokeratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin. In addition, tumor spheres were more resistant to doxorubicin compared with parental tumor cells. In the attempt to identify a selected marker for the sphere-generating cells, we found that Sca-1+ cells, present in tumors or enriched in mammospheres, and not CD24+ or CD29+ cells, were responsible for the sphere generation in vitro. Moreover, cells from the tumor spheres showed an increased tumor-generating ability in respect to the epithelial tumor cells. Sca-1+ sorted cells or clonal mammospheres derived from a Sca-1+ cell showed a superimposable tumor-initiating ability. The data of the present study indicate that a Sca-1+ population derived from mammary BALB-neuT tumors is responsible for sphere generation in culture and for initiating tumors in vivo.

  16. Nanoparticle-mediated binning and profiling of heterogeneous circulating tumor cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadi, Reza M; Besant, Justin D; Mepham, Adam; Green, Brenda; Mahmoudian, Laili; Gibbs, Thaddeus; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Malvea, Anahita; Stojcic, Jessica; Allan, Alison L; Lowes, Lori E; Sargent, Edward H; Nam, Robert K; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-01-02

    The analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is an important capability that may lead to new approaches for cancer management. CTC capture devices developed to date isolate a bulk population of CTCs and do not differentiate subpopulations that may have varying phenotypes with different levels of clinical relevance. Here, we present a new device for CTC spatial sorting and profiling that sequesters blood-borne tumor cells with different phenotypes into discrete spatial bins. Validation data are presented showing that cancer cell lines with varying surface expression generate different binning profiles within the device. Working with patient blood samples, we obtain profiles that elucidate the heterogeneity of CTC populations present in cancer patients and also report on the status of CTCs within the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT).

  17. From Tumor Immunosuppression to Eradication: Targeting Homing and Activity of Immune Effector Cells to Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Draghiciu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the mechanisms used by the immune system to fight cancer development is one of the most ambitious undertakings in immunology. Detailed knowledge regarding the mechanisms of induction of tolerance and immunosuppression within the tumor microenvironment will contribute to the development of highly effective tumor eradication strategies. Research within the last few decades has shed more light on the matter. This paper aims to give an overview on the current knowledge of the main tolerance and immunosuppression mechanisms elicited within the tumor microenvironment, with the focus on development of effective immunotherapeutic strategies to improve homing and activity of immune effector cells to tumors.

  18. Bulk and interface recombination in planar lead halide perovskite solar cells: A Drift-Diffusion study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olyaeefar, Babak; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab; Asgari, Asghar

    2017-10-01

    A theoretical approach based on Drift-Diffusion equations is presented to study planar mixed lead halide perovskite solar cells. Updated physical parameters such as permittivity, mobility, effective density of states and doping density is employed in simulations. Current-voltage curve data for two experimental sample is imported and through fitting with the model, density of bulk and interface defects is calculated. We obtain the bulk defect density around 1016 cm-3 and surface recombination velocities in the range of 10 cm/s. These values which are in good agreement with experimental measurements and considerably deviated from previous theoretical studies, verify the model and adopted constants. Shockley-Queisser limit is also presented as the ideal device and the effect of bulk and interface defects are presented as loss factors that cause departure from this limit. Our simulations conclude that the overall efficiency of perovskite solar cells is mainly governed by the open-circuit voltage and also identify the interface defects as the major loss factor in these devices.

  19. [Frequent allelic losses in tumor-associated stromal cells and tumor epitelium of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Zavalishina, L E; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2008-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Accumulation of genetic alterations is typical not only for cancer epithelial cells but tumor-associated fibroblasts as well. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma from prostatectomy specimens of patients with prostate cancer and cells from prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adjacent stroma from males with PIN were isolated by using laser capture microdissection. Microsatellite allelotyping was evaluated using 4 highly polymorphic markers for chromosomal regions 8p22, 16q23-24 and 13q14. Incidences of alterations (loss of heterozygosity or allelic imbalance) were 48% for region 8p22, 72% for 16q23 and 37% for 13q14. The LOH frequencies in tumor-associated stroma cells were very similar. Alterations at chromosome 13q were significantly associated with advanced tumor stage, whereas AI at 16q was also associated with high Gleason score and lymph node metastasis. We find some incidences of allelic imbalance in premalignant lesions in epithelial (16-27%) and stromal (7-22%) components. Our results show that the frequencies of genetic aberrations are as high in stromal cells as in tumor cells.

  20. PC3 prostate tumor-initiating cells with molecular profile FAM65Bhigh/MFI2low/LEF1low increase tumor angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waxman David J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer stem-like cells are proposed to sustain solid tumors by virtue of their capacity for self-renewal and differentiation to cells that comprise the bulk of the tumor, and have been identified for a variety of cancers based on characteristic clonal morphologies and patterns of marker gene expression. Methods Single cell cloning and spheroid culture studies were used to identify a population of cancer stem-like cells in the androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line PC3. Results We demonstrate that, under standard culture conditions, ~10% of PC3 cells form holoclones with cancer stem cell characteristics. These holoclones display high self-renewal capability in spheroid formation assays under low attachment and serum-free culture conditions, retain their holoclone morphology when passaged at high cell density, exhibit moderate drug resistance, and show high tumorigenicity in scid immunodeficient mice. PC3 holoclones readily form spheres, and PC3-derived spheres yield a high percentage of holoclones, further supporting their cancer stem cell-like nature. We identified one gene, FAM65B, whose expression is consistently up regulated in PC3 holoclones compared to paraclones, the major cell morphology in the parental PC3 cell population, and two genes, MFI2 and LEF1, that are consistently down regulated. This molecular profile, FAM65Bhigh/MFI2low/LEF1low, also characterizes spheres generated from parental PC3 cells. The PC3 holoclones did not show significant enriched expression of the putative prostate cancer stem cell markers CD44 and integrin α2β1. PC3 tumors seeded with holoclones showed dramatic down regulation of FAM65B and dramatic up regulation of MFI2 and LEF1, and unexpectedly, a marked increase in tumor vascularity compared to parental PC3 tumors, suggesting a role of cancer stem cells in tumor angiogenesis. Conclusions These findings support the proposal that PC3 tumors are sustained by a small number of

  1. Endothelial cell tumor growth is Ape/ref-1 dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K; Gordillo, Gayle M

    2015-09-01

    Tumor-forming endothelial cells have highly elevated levels of Nox-4 that release H2O2 into the nucleus, which is generally not compatible with cell survival. We sought to identify compensatory mechanisms that enable tumor-forming endothelial cells to survive and proliferate under these conditions. Ape-1/ref-1 (Apex-1) is a multifunctional protein that promotes DNA binding of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as AP-1, and repairs oxidative DNA damage. A validated mouse endothelial cell (EOMA) tumor model was used to demonstrate that Nox-4-derived H2O2 causes DNA oxidation that induces Apex-1 expression. Apex-1 functions as a chaperone to keep transcription factors in a reduced state. In EOMA cells Apex-1 enables AP-1 binding to the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (mcp-1) promoter and expression of that protein is required for endothelial cell tumor formation. Intraperitoneal injection of the small molecule inhibitor E3330, which specifically targets Apex-1 redox-sensitive functions, resulted in a 50% decrease in tumor volume compared with mice injected with vehicle control (n = 6 per group), indicating that endothelial cell tumor proliferation is dependent on Apex-1 expression. These are the first reported results to establish Nox-4 induction of Apex-1 as a mechanism promoting endothelial cell tumor formation.

  2. Tumor Irradiation Increases the Recruitment of Circulating Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Ann H.; Spaeth, Erika L.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Munshi, Anupama; Meyn, Raymond E.; Cox, James D.; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) migrate to and proliferate within sites of inflammation and tumors as part of the tissue remodeling process. Radiation increases the expression of inflammatory mediators that could enhance the recruitment of MSC into the tumor microenvironment. To investigate this, bilateral murine 4T1 breast carcinomas (expressing renilla luciferase) were irradiated unilaterally (1 or 2 Gy). Twenty-four hours later, 2 × 105 MSC-expressing firefly luciferase were injected i.v. Mice were then monitored with bioluminescent imaging for expression of both renilla (tumor) and firefly (MSC) luciferase. Forty-eight hours postirradiation, levels of MSC engraftment were 34% higher in tumors receiving 2 Gy (P = 0.004) than in the contralateral unirradiated limb. Immunohistochemical staining of tumor sections from mice treated unilaterally with 2 Gy revealed higher levels of MSC in the parenchyma of radiated tumors, whereas a higher proportion of MSC remained vasculature-associated in unirradiated tumors. To discern the potential mediators involved in MSC attraction, in vitro migration assays showed a 50% to 80% increase in MSC migration towards conditioned media from 1 to 5 Gy-irradiated 4T1 cells compared with unirradiated 4T1 cells. Irradiated 4T1 cells had increased expression of the cytokines, transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and this up-regulation was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in tumors irradiated in vivo. Interestingly, the chemokine receptor CCR2 was found to be up-regulated in MSC exposed to irradiated tumor cells and inhibition of CCR2 led to a marked decrease of MSC migration in vitro. In conclusion, clinically relevant low doses of irradiation increase the tropism for and engraftment of MSC in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:18089798

  3. Structural relaxation of acridine orange dimer in bulk water and inside a single live lung cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Nandi, Somen; Halder, Ritaban; Jana, Biman; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2016-02-01

    Structural relaxation of the acridine orange (AO) dimer in bulk water and inside a single live lung cell is studied using time resolved confocal microscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The emission maxima ( λem max ˜ 630 nm) of AO in a lung cancer cell (A549) and a non-cancer lung fibroblast cell (WI38) suggest that AO exists as a dimer inside the cell. Time-dependent red shift in emission maximum indicates dynamic relaxation of the AO dimer (in the excited state) with a time constant of 500-600 ps, both in bulk water and inside the cell. We have calculated the equilibrium relaxation dynamics of the AO dimer in the ground state using MD simulations and found a slow component of time scale ˜350 ps. The intra- and inter-molecular components of the total relaxation dynamics of the AO dimer reveal the presence of a slow component of the order of a few hundred picoseconds. Upon restricting intra-molecular dye dynamics by harmonic constraint between AO monomers, the slow component vanishes. Combining the experimental observations and MD simulation results, we ascribe the slow component of the dynamic relaxation of the AO dimer to the structural relaxation, namely, fluctuations in the distance between the two monomers and associated fluctuation in the number of water molecules.

  4. Bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on nanocrystal-polymer hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yunfei; Krueger, Michael [Freiburg Materials Research Centre (FMF), University of Freiburg (Germany); Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg (Germany); Urban, Gerald [Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Organic solar cells have the promising advantages of low-cost and large-area fabrication on flexible substrates. State-of-the-art organic solar cells based on blends of conjugated polymers and fullerene derivatives achieve efficiencies up to 5-6%. Inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) e.g. out of CdSe, with tunable bandgaps and high intrinsic carrier mobilities, can be incorporated into conjugated polymers e.g. poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) to form bulk-heterojunction hybrid solar cells. In our group, a highly reproducible synthesis method for CdSe NCs has been developed, leading to monodisperse NCs with excellent photophysical properties. Current research is performed to control the shape and the lattice structure of the NCs within the same synthesis approach. Various solar cells based on bulk-heterojunction nanocomposite materials have been fabricated and characterized. We systematically checked how the solar cell device performance is affected by different NC ligands and by different thermal annealing treatments. Devices using spherical NCs capped with aromatic ligands and appropriate thermal annealing treatment exhibit so far power conversion efficiencies over 0.5% under standard measurement condition. Further investigations to improve the materials and device performance are currently in progress.

  5. Galectin-3 determines tumor cell adaptive strategies in stressed tumor microenvironments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Ferreira Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 is a member of the b-galactoside binding lectin family, whose expression is often dysregulated in cancers. While galectin-3 is usually an intracellular protein, found in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm; under certain conditions, galectin-3 can be secreted by an yet unknown mechanism. Under stressing conditions (hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, e.g. galectin-3 is upregulated, through the activity of transcription factors such as HIF-1a and NF-kB. Here we review evidence that indicates a positive role for galectin-3 in MAPK family signal transduction, leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. Galectin-3 serves as a scaffold protein, which favors the spatial organization of signaling proteins as K-RAS. Upon secretion, extracellular galectin-3 interacts with a variety of cell surface glycoproteins, such as growth factor receptors, integrins, cadherins and members of the Notch family, among other glycoproteins, besides different extracellular matrix molecules. Through its ability to oligomerize, galectin-3 forms lectin lattices that act as scaffolds that sustain the spatial organization of signaling receptors on the cell surface, dictating its maintenance on the plasma membrane or their endocytosis. Galectin-3 induces tumor cell, endothelial cell and leukocyte migration, favoring either the exit of tumor cells from a stressed microenvironment or the entry of endothelial cells and leukocytes, such as monocyte/macrophages into the tumor organoid. Therefore, galectin-3 plays homeostatic roles in tumors, besides its effects in different elements of the immune system, as (i it favors tumor cell adaptation for survival in stressed conditions; (ii upon secretion, galectin-3 induces tumor cell detachment and migration; (iii it attracts endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages to the tumor mass, inducing both directly and indirectly the process of angiogenesis. These activities are potentially targetable and specific interventions may

  6. Galectin-3 Determines Tumor Cell Adaptive Strategies in Stressed Tumor Microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Andrade, Luciana Nogueira de Sousa; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Chammas, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a member of the β-galactoside-binding lectin family, whose expression is often dysregulated in cancers. While galectin-3 is usually an intracellular protein found in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, under certain conditions, galectin-3 can be secreted by an yet unknown mechanism. Under stressing conditions (e.g., hypoxia and nutrient deprivation) galectin-3 is upregulated, through the activity of transcription factors, such as HIF-1α and NF-κB. Here, we review evidence that indicates a positive role for galectin-3 in MAPK family signal transduction, leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. Galectin-3 serves as a scaffold protein, which favors the spatial organization of signaling proteins as K-RAS. Upon secretion, extracellular galectin-3 interacts with a variety of cell surface glycoproteins, such as growth factor receptors, integrins, cadherins, and members of the Notch family, among other glycoproteins, besides different extracellular matrix molecules. Through its ability to oligomerize, galectin-3 forms lectin lattices that act as scaffolds that sustain the spatial organization of signaling receptors on the cell surface, dictating its maintenance on the plasma membrane or their endocytosis. Galectin-3 induces tumor cell, endothelial cell, and leukocyte migration, favoring either the exit of tumor cells from a stressed microenvironment or the entry of endothelial cells and leukocytes, such as monocytes/macrophages into the tumor organoid. Therefore, galectin-3 plays homeostatic roles in tumors, as (i) it favors tumor cell adaptation for survival in stressed conditions; (ii) upon secretion, galectin-3 induces tumor cell detachment and migration; and (iii) it attracts monocyte/macrophage and endothelial cells to the tumor mass, inducing both directly and indirectly the process of angiogenesis. The two latter activities are potentially targetable, and specific interventions may be designed to counteract the protumoral role of extracellular

  7. Collagen-rich stroma in aggressive colon tumors induces mesenchymal gene expression and tumor cell invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, T T; den Uil, S; Rinkes, IHB; Marvin, D; Ponsioen, B; Alvarez-Varela, A; Fatrai, S; Scheele, C; Zwijnenburg, D A; Snippert, H; Vermeulen, L; Medema, J P; Stockmann, H B; Koster, J; Fijneman, R J A; de Rooij, J; Kranenburg, O

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression-based classification systems have identified an aggressive colon cancer subtype with mesenchymal features, possibly reflecting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. However, stromal fibroblasts contribute extensively to the mesenchymal phenotype of aggressive col

  8. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  9. Augmentation of anti-tumor activity by immunization with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Tbc and tuberculin-coupled tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yada,Yoshihiko

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available The anti-tumor effect of immunization with heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Tbc and Tuberculin (PPD-coupled syngeneic tumor cells was examined in vivo. Three tumor cell lines were employed. Immunization of Tbc-primed BALB/c mice with PPD-coupled syngeneic Meth-A tumor cells displayed a potent anti-tumor effect on viable Meth-A cells inoculated subcutaneously. Neither PPD-coupled LLC (Lewis Lung Carcinoma cells nor sonicated PPD-coupled Meth-A cells were capable of immunizing these mice. PPD-coupled syngeneic whole tumor cells were indispensable for induction of this tumor-specific resistance. Immunization of Tbc-primed C3H/He mice with PPD-coupled syngeneic MH134 tumor cells did not elicit anti-tumor activity against MH134, but additional pretreatment of mice with cyclophosphamide brought on an anti-tumor effect. Antimetastatic reactivity was investigated in C57BL/6 mice bearing LLC, with a reduction in metastases noted. This antimetastatic effect was observed even when the mice were immunized with PPD-coupled LLC cells three days after removal of the initial tumor. Immunization with Tbc and PPD-coupled Meth-A cells together with intraperitoneal administration of murine or rat interleukin 2 (IL 2 further augmented anti-Meth-A resistance. Murine IL 2 further inhibited tumor growth during the early stage, while rat IL 2 showed an anti-tumor effect throughout the course of tumor growth.

  10. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting.

  11. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AD_________________ (Leave blank) Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0350 TITLE: Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After...30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTILE Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Innovative reporter gene systems are designed to mark quiescent or proliferating lung cancer cells (Aim 1) and then used to track and trace the dynamics of

  12. S-100 Negative Granular Cell Tumor of the Oral Cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Lynn W; Velez, Ines

    2016-09-01

    Classic granular cell tumor is a mesenchymal neoplasm that commonly occurs on the skin, but is not infrequently found in the oral cavity, primarily on the dorsal tongue. Diagnosis is usually straightforward with hematoxylin and eosin stained slides. Immunohistochemical studies on classic granular cell tumor shows positive immunostaining for S-100 and vimentin, while CD68 is variably positive. We report a case of otherwise unremarkable oral granular cell tumor that was immunohistochemically negative for S-100, and positive for vimentin and CD68, and discuss the differential diagnosis. The results of the immunohistochemical studies in our case are compared with those of classic S-100 positive oral granular cell tumors, as well as cutaneous and oral S-100 negative granular cell tumors. Classic S-100 positive granular cell tumors and S-100 negative granular cell tumors of the oral cavity can only be distinguished by immunohistochemical studies; however, the necessity of this distinction is unclear, as both are benign lesions in which recurrence is unlikely.

  13. Hybrid tandem solar cells with depleted-heterojunction quantum dot and polymer bulk heterojunction subcells

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Taesoo

    2015-10-01

    We investigate hybrid tandem solar cells that rely on the combination of solution-processed depleted-heterojunction colloidal quantum dot (CQD) and bulk heterojunction polymer:fullerene subcells. The hybrid tandem solar cell is monolithically integrated and electrically connected in series with a suitable p-n recombination layer that includes metal oxides and a conjugated polyelectrolyte. We discuss the monolithic integration of the subcells, taking into account solvent interactions with underlayers and associated constraints on the tandem architecture, and show that an adequate device configuration consists of a low bandgap CQD bottom cell and a high bandgap polymer:fullerene top cell. Once we optimize the recombination layer and individual subcells, the hybrid tandem device reaches a VOC of 1.3V, approaching the sum of the individual subcell voltages. An impressive fill factor of 70% is achieved, further confirming that the subcells are efficiently connected via an appropriate recombination layer. © 2015.

  14.  An Uncommon Presentation of Giant Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Malhotra

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available  Giant Cell Tumors commonly occur at the ends of long bones. However in rare cases, they can occur in the bones of the hands and feet. Tumors in these locations occur in younger patients; in addition, these tumors are more commonly multifocal and are associated with a higher risk for local recurrence than tumors at the ends of long bones. Since lesions in the small bones may be multifocal, a patient with a giant cell tumor of the small bones should undergo a skeletal survey to exclude similar lesions elsewhere. Primary surgical treatment ranges from curettage or excision with or without bone grafting to amputation. The success of surgical treatment depends on the completeness with which the tumor was removed. We are presenting a case report of a 34 year old female, who presented with a swelling in the right hand, following trauma. X-ray of the hand showed an osteolytic expansile lesion at the base of the 1st metacarpal bone. The lesion was initially curetted and then treated by local resection with bone grafting. Histological examination revealed a typical benign giant cell tumor composed of closely packed stromal cells with a variable admixture of giant cells. Follow up at the end of one year did not reveal any recurrence of the tumor.

  15. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  16. Recruited brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells contribute to brain tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnan, Jinan; Isakson, Pauline; Joel, Mrinal; Cilio, Corrado; Langmoen, Iver A; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Badn, Wiaam

    2014-05-01

    The identity of the cells that contribute to brain tumor structure and progression remains unclear. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently been isolated from normal mouse brain. Here, we report the infiltration of MSC-like cells into the GL261 murine glioma model. These brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BT-MSCs) are defined with the phenotype (Lin-Sca-1+CD9+CD44+CD166+/-) and have multipotent differentiation capacity. We show that the infiltration of BT-MSCs correlates to tumor progression; furthermore, BT-MSCs increased the proliferation rate of GL261 cells in vitro. For the first time, we report that the majority of GL261 cells expressed mesenchymal phenotype under both adherent and sphere culture conditions in vitro and that the non-MSC population is nontumorigenic in vivo. Although the GL261 cell line expressed mesenchymal phenotype markers in vitro, most BT-MSCs are recruited cells from host origin in both wild-type GL261 inoculated into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice and GL261-GFP cells inoculated into wild-type mice. We show the expression of chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR6 on different recruited cell populations. In vivo, the GL261 cells change marker profile and acquire a phenotype that is more similar to cells growing in sphere culture conditions. Finally, we identify a BT-MSC population in human glioblastoma that is CD44+CD9+CD166+ both in freshly isolated and culture-expanded cells. Our data indicate that cells with MSC-like phenotype infiltrate into the tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we suggest that targeting BT-MSCs could be a possible strategy for treating glioblastoma patients.

  17. The expression and regulation of glucose transporters in tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transporter proteins are involved in many physiological and biochemical processes. In particular, the high expressions of sodium-glucose cotransporter and glucose transporter proteins in tumor cells show that these two transporters play a key role in tumor cell metabolism. Studying the crystal structure and conformation of human glucose transporter proteins has enabled the development of drugs based on specific binding sites, opening up a new path towards more effective cancer treatments. This mini review serves to summarize our existing understanding of the metabolic pathways of tumor cells, focusing on the roles of glucose transporter proteins.

  18. Natural killer cells: role in local tumor growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langers, Inge; Renoux, Virginie M; Thiry, Marc; Delvenne, Philippe; Jacobs, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the name of natural killer (NK) cells came from their natural ability to kill tumor cells in vitro. From the 1970s to date, accumulating data highlighted the importance of NK cells in host immune response against cancer and in therapy-induced antitumor response. The recognition and the lysis of tumor cells by NK cells are regulated by a complex balance of inhibitory and activating signals. This review summarizes NK cell mechanisms to kill cancer cells, their role in host immune responses against tumor growth or metastasis, and their implications in antitumor immunotherapies via cytokines, antibodies, or in combination with other therapies. The regulatory role of NK cells in autoimmunity is also discussed. PMID:22532775

  19. Bone marrow-derived cells are recruited by the melanoma tumor with endothelial cells contributing to tumor vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfim-Silva, R; Souza, L E B; Melo, F U F; Oliveira, V C; Magalhães, D A R; Oliveira, H F; Covas, D T; Fontes, A M

    2017-01-01

    Tumor expansion is dependent on neovascularization, a process that requires sustained new vessel formation. Although the critical role of angiogenesis by endothelial sprouting in this process, controversy still prevails on whether angiogenesis involving bone marrow-derived endothelial cells, does contribute to this process. This study aims to evaluate the recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells by the melanoma tumor, including endothelial cells, and if they contribute to angiogenesis. A chimeric mouse model of GFP bone marrow was used to induce melanoma tumors derived from murine B16-F10 cell line. These tumors were evaluated for the presence of myeloid cells (CD11b), T lymphocytes (CD3, CD4 and CD8) and endothelial cells (VEGFR2 and CD31) derived from bone marrow. Mice transplanted with GFP+ cells showed significant bone marrow chimerism (90.9 ± 0.87 %) when compared to the GFP transgenic mice (90.66 ± 2.1 %, p = 0.83) demonstrating successful engraftment of donor bone marrow stem/progenitor cells. Analysis of the murine melanoma tumor showed the presence of donor cells in the tumors (3.5 ± 1.7 %) and interestingly, these cells represent endothelial cells (CD31+ cells; 11.5 ± 6.85 %) and myeloid cells (CD11b+ cells; 80 ± 21 %), but also tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (CD8+ T cells, 13.31 ± 0.2 %; CD4+ T-cells, 2.1 ± 1.2 %). Examination of the tumor endothelium by confocal microscopy suggests the presence of donor CD31+/GFP+ cells in the wall of some blood vessels. This study demonstrates that bone marrow-derived cells are recruited by the murine melanoma tumor, with myeloid cells and CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes migrating as antitumor immune response, and endothelial cells participating of the tumor blood vessels formation.

  20. Giant cell tumor of the distal ulna: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanni Daniele

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Several cases of long bone giant cell tumor have been reported in the literature. We report the case of a patient with a giant cell tumor in the distal ulna. This is very unusual, with a reported incidence of 0.45 to 6%. Case presentation A 17-year-old Colombian man presented with a painful swelling of the left wrist. After performing an instrumental examination, a diagnosis of distal ulna giant cell tumor was made. The tumor was treated with an intralesional curettage, phenol application and bone grafting. Conclusions This tumor may have a good prognosis if it is diagnosed early and radically treated. It is important to be aware of atypical cancer localizations in order to perform a proper diagnosis.

  1. Metachronous bilateral testicular germ cell tumors: Report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Francis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Metachronous bilateral testicular germ cell tumors is a rare known problem. However, no report of metachronus bilateralism was identified in the PubMed database published from India so far, where testicular cancer is relatively rare. We report the cases of two gentlemen. One had stage 1 nonseminomatous germ cell tumor (NSGCT at the age of 32 in 1990 and developed marker relapse on surveillance and had chemotherapy using cisplatin and etoposide for four cycles. He developed contralateral seminoma in the testis 13 years later. Another patient had left orchidectomy in 2003 for NSGCT, had adjuvant BEP for two cycles, and developed a contralateral testicular tumor 5 years later, which was also seminoma. As more patients with germ cell tumors are cured with chemotherapy, long-term problems become important. Contralateral testicular tumor is one of them. As it can be very late, many years of continued follow-up examination and patients′ awareness are necessary.

  2. Induction of tumor necrosis factor expression and resistance in a human breast tumor cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Spriggs, D; Imamura, K; Rodriguez, C; Horiguchi, J; Kufe, D W

    1987-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a polypeptide cytokine that is cytotoxic to some but not all tumor cells. The basis for resistance to the cytotoxic effects of this agent remains unclear. We have studied the development of TNF resistance in human ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma cells. ZR-75-1 cells have undetectable levels of TNF RNA and protein. However, TNF transcripts are transiently induced in these cells by exposure to recombinant human TNF. This induction of TNF RNA is associated with production...

  3. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1 Promotes Cell Migration, Tumor Growth of Colorectal Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Kollmar

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In a mouse model of established extrahepatic colorectal metastasis, we analyzed whether stromal cellderived factor (SDF 1 stimulates tumor cell migration in vitro, angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo. METHODS: Using chemotaxis chambers, CT26.WT colorectal tumor cell migration was studied under stimulation with different concentrations of SDF-1. To evaluate angiogenesis, tumor growth in vivo, green fluorescent protein-transfected CT26.WT cells were implanted in dorsal skinfold chambers of syngeneic BALB/c mice. After 5 days, tumors were locally exposed to SDF-1. Cell proliferation, tumor microvascularization, growth were studied during a further 9-day period using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology, immunohistochemistry. Tumors exposed to PBS only served as controls. RESULTS:In vitro, > 30% of unstimulated CT26.WT cells showed expression of the SDF-1 receptor CXCR4. On chemotaxis assay, SDF-1 provoked a dose-dependent increase in cell migration. In vivo, SDF-1 accelerated neovascularization, induced a significant increase in tumor growth. Capillaries of SDF-1-treated tumors showed significant dilation. Of interest, SDF-1 treatment was associated with a significantly increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a downregulation of cleaved caspase-3. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that the CXC chemokine SDF-1 promotes tumor cell migration in vitro, tumor growth of established extrahepatic metastasis in vivo due to angiogenesis-dependent induction of tumor cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic cell death.

  4. Expressional patterns of chaperones in ten human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavc Irene

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chaperones (CH play an important role in tumor biology but no systematic work on expressional patterns has been reported so far. The aim of the study was therefore to present an analytical method for the concomitant determination of several CH in human tumor cell lines, to generate expressional patterns in the individual cell lines and to search for tumor and non-tumor cell line specific CH expression. Human tumor cell lines of neuroblastoma, colorectal and adenocarcinoma of the ovary, osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant melanoma, lung, cervical and breast cancer, promyelocytic leukaemia were homogenised, proteins were separated on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with in-gel digestion of proteins and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis was carried out for the identification of CH. Results A series of CH was identified including the main CH groups as HSP90/HATPas_C, HSP70, Cpn60_TCP1, DnaJ, Thioredoxin, TPR, Pro_isomerase, HSP20, ERP29_C, KE2, Prefoldin, DUF704, BAG, GrpE and DcpS. Conclusions The ten individual tumor cell lines showed different expression patterns, which are important for the design of CH studies in tumor cell lines. The results can serve as a reference map and form the basis of a concomitant determination of CH by a protein chemical rather than an immunochemical method, independent of antibody availability or specificity.

  5. Giant cell tumor of bone and tenosynovial tissue : surgical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, Lizz van der

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an intermediate, locally aggressive but rarely metastasizing tumor. Radiologically, GCTB shows typical lytic lesions. MR imaging is required to evaluate extent of GCTB for surgical planning. Preferred treatment for GCTB is extended curettage with local adjuvants, w

  6. Tumor Seeding With Renal Cell Carcinoma After Renal Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    M.F.B. Andersen; Norus, T.P.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor seeding following biopsy of renal cell carcinoma is extremely rare with an incidence of 1:10.000. In this paper two cases with multiple recurrent RRC metastasis in the biopsy tract following biopsy of renal tumor is presented and the current literature is shortly discussed.

  7. Arrested puberty associated with a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A C; Feinman, M A; Husami, N

    1985-06-01

    Androgen-producing ovarian tumors are rarely recognized as a cause of delayed or arrested puberty, despite their frequent association with secondary amenorrhea in the older patient. A case is discussed of a Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor in an 18-year-old girl resulting in arrest of breast development and primary amenorrhea.

  8. Infantile and adult testicular germ cell tumors : a different pathogenesis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Echten, J; Timmer, A; van der Veen, AY; Molenaar, WM; de Jong, B

    2002-01-01

    Most adult testicular germ cell tumors have a characteristic chromosomal abnormality that is an isochromosome 12p [i(12p)]. Furthermore. these tumors are characterized by a chromosome number in the triploid range and gains and losses of (parts of) specific chromosomes. Cytogenetic investigation of t

  9. Migrating glioma cells express stem cell markers and give rise to new tumors upon xenografting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munthe, Sune; Sørensen, Mia D; Thomassen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    -related genes and the HOX-gene list in migrating cells compared to spheroids. Determination of GBM molecular subtypes revealed that subtypes of spheroids and migrating cells were identical. In conclusion, migrating tumor cells preserve expression of stem cell markers and functional CSC characteristics. Since......Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor with an overall survival of only 14.6 months. Although these tumors are treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, recurrence is inevitable. A critical population of tumor cells in terms of therapy, the so-called cancer stem...... cells (CSCs), has been identified in gliomas and many other cancers. These tumor cells have a stem cell-like phenotype and are suggested to be responsible for tumor growth, chemo- and radio-resistance as well as recurrence. However, functional evidence for migrating glioma cells having a stem cell...

  10. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  11. Rational molecular engineering towards efficient non-fullerene small molecule acceptors for inverted bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu-Qing; Dai, Ya-Zhong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jie-Yu; Pei, Jian

    2014-02-14

    Two non-fullerene small molecules based on fluoranthene-fused imide were developed as acceptors for solution-processed inverted organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells, which showed good power conversion efficiency and high open-circuit voltage.

  12. Investigation of bulk hybrid heterojunction solar cells based on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yu-Ting; Lin, Yi-Kai; Chang, Shu-Hao; Hong, Hwen-Fen; Tuan, Hsing-Yu; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2013-07-19

    This work presents the systematic studies of bulk hybrid heterojunction solar cells based on Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in poly(3-hexylthiophene) matrix. The CIGS NCs of approximately 17 nm in diameter were homogeneously blended with P3HT layer to form an active layer of a photovoltaic device. The blend ratios of CIGS NCs to P3HT, solvent effects on thin film morphologies, interface between P3HT/CIGS NCs and post-production annealing of devices were investigated, and the best performance of photovoltaic devices was measured under AM 1.5 simulated solar illumination (100 mW/cm2).

  13. Solvent additive effects on small molecule crystallization in bulk heterojunction solar cells probed during spin casting

    KAUST Repository

    Pérez, Louis A.

    2013-09-04

    Solvent additive processing can lead to drastic improvements in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) in solution processable small molecule (SPSM) bulk heterojunction solar cells. In situ grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering is used to investigate the kinetics of crystallite formation during and shortly after spin casting. The additive is shown to have a complex effect on structural evolution invoking polymorphism and enhanced crystalline quality of the donor SPSM. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Self-assembled, nanowire network electrodes for depleted bulk heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Xinzheng

    2013-01-06

    Herein, a solution-processed, bottom-up-fabricated, nanowire network electrode is developed. This electrode features a ZnO template which is converted into locally connected, infiltratable, TiO2 nanowires. This new electrode is used to build a depleted bulk heterojunction solar cell employing hybrid-passivated colloidal quantum dots. The new electrode allows the application of a thicker, and thus more light-absorbing, colloidal quantum dot active layer, from which charge extraction of an efficiency comparable to that obtained from a thinner, planar device could be obtained. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Formulation strategies for optimizing the morphology of polymeric bulk heterojunction organic solar cells: a brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongsaysy, Uyxing; Bassani, Dario M.; Servant, Laurent; Pavageau, Bertrand; Wantz, Guillaume; Aziz, Hany

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells represent one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy with a low fabrication cost. Control over BHJ morphology is one of the key factors in obtaining high-efficiency devices. This review focuses on formulation strategies for optimizing the BHJ morphology. We address how solvent choice and the introduction of processing additives affect the morphology. We also review a number of recent studies concerning prediction methods that utilize the Hansen solubility parameters to develop efficient solvent systems.

  16. Recombination lifetime of free polarons in polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kejia; Li, Lijun; Campbell, Joe C.

    2012-02-01

    The recombination lifetime of free polarons was measured using three different methods: electrical field-dependent photoresponse, transient photoconductivity, and forward-to-zero bias transient-current response. The average free polaron recombination lifetime is estimated to be a few microseconds for poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) solar cells. The competition between sweep-out by the internal field and the loss of photogenerated carriers by recombination is analyzed. The short-circuit free polaron collection efficiency for P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction material was determined to be in the range of 80% to 90%.

  17. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  18. Visualization of Hierarchical Nanodomains in Polymer/Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Jianguo; Miller, Dean J.; Chen, Wei; Xu, Tao; Yu, L; Darling, Seth B.; Zaluzec, Nestor J.

    2014-10-01

    raditional electron microscopy techniques such as bright-field imaging provide poor contrast for organic films and identification of structures in amorphous material can be problematic, particularly in high- performance organic solar cells. By combining energy-filtered corrected transmission electron microscopy, together with electron energy loss and X-ray energy-dispersive hyperspectral imaging, we have imaged PTB7/ PC61BM blended polymer optical photovoltaic films, and were able to identify domains ranging in size from several hundred nanometers to several nanometers in extent. This work verifies that microstructural domains exist in bulk heterojunctions in PTB7/PC61BM polymeric solar cells at multiple length scales and expands our understanding of optimal device performance providing insight for the design of even higher performance cells.

  19. Development of Efficient and Stable Inverted Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ Solar Cells Using Different Metal Oxide Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Litzov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed inverted bulk heterojunction (BHJ solar cells have gained much more attention during the last decade, because of their significantly better environmental stability compared to the normal architecture BHJ solar cells. Transparent metal oxides (MeOx play an important role as the dominant class for solution-processed interface materials in this development, due to their excellent optical transparency, their relatively high electrical conductivity and their tunable work function. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of the most common synthesis methods used for the wet chemical preparation of the most relevant n-type- and p-type-like MeOx interface materials consisting of binary compounds AxBy. Their performance for applications as electron transport/extraction layers (ETL/EEL and as hole transport/extraction layers (HTL/HEL in inverted BHJ solar cells will be reviewed and discussed.

  20. Development of Efficient and Stable Inverted Bulk Heterojunction (BHJ) Solar Cells Using Different Metal Oxide Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litzov, Ivan; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2013-01-01

    Solution-processed inverted bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells have gained much more attention during the last decade, because of their significantly better environmental stability compared to the normal architecture BHJ solar cells. Transparent metal oxides (MeOx) play an important role as the dominant class for solution-processed interface materials in this development, due to their excellent optical transparency, their relatively high electrical conductivity and their tunable work function. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of the most common synthesis methods used for the wet chemical preparation of the most relevant n-type- and p-type-like MeOx interface materials consisting of binary compounds AxBy. Their performance for applications as electron transport/extraction layers (ETL/EEL) and as hole transport/extraction layers (HTL/HEL) in inverted BHJ solar cells will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:28788423

  1. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrhardt, H.; Wachter, F; Grunert, M.; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 o...

  2. Androgen - secreting steroid cell tumor of the ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paras Ratilal Udhreja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Steroid cell tumors (SCTs, not otherwise specified of the ovary are rare subgroup of sex cord tumors, which account for less than 0.1% of all ovarian tumors and also that will present at any age. The majority of these tumors produce steroids with testosterone being the most common. A case of a 28-year-old woman who presented with symptoms of virilization is reported. Although SCTs are generally benign, there is a risk for malignant transformation. Surgery is the most important and hallmark treatment.

  3. The roles of bulk and interfacial molecular orientations in determining the performance of organic bilayer solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy O.

    2014-09-09

    Molecular orientation plays a significant role in determining the performance of small molecule solar cells. Key photovoltaic processes in these cells are strongly dependent on how the molecules are oriented in the active layer. We isolate contributions arising from the bulk molecular orientations vs. those from interfacial orientations in ZnPc/C60 bilayer systems and we probe these contributions by comparing device pairs in which only the bulk or the interface differ. By controlling the orientation in the bulk the current can be strongly modulated, whereas controlling the interfacial molecular orientation and degree of intermixing mediate the voltage.

  4. Forcing Tumor Cells to Present Their Own Tumor Antigens to the Immune System: a Necessary Design for an Efficient Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RobertE.Humphreys; GildaG.Hillman; EricyonHofe; MinzhenXu

    2004-01-01

    The general principle for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance is to prevent tumor antigens from being recognized by the immune system. Many methods have been developed to increase the immunogenecity of the tumor cells. The most efficient methods are able to force tumor cells to present their own tumor antigens to the immune system. Stimulating Th cells by converting tumor cells into MHC class II+/Ii- antigen presenting cells is one of the most efficient technologies. Using antisense methods, we suppress the expression of the Ii protein that normally co-expresses with MHC class II molecules and blocks the antigenic peptide binding site of MHC class II molecules during synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In such tumor cells, the"unprotected" MHC class II molecules pick up endogenous tumor antigenic peptides, which have been transported into the ER for binding to MHC class I molecules. Simultaneous presentation of tumor antigens by both MHC class I and II molecules generates a robust and long-lasting anti-tumor immune response. MHC class II+/Ii- tumor cells are potent tumor cell vaccines and also cure a significant number of animals with renal and prostate tumors. We have developed analogous human gene vectors that are suitable for most patients and cancers.

  5. Forcing Tumor Cells to Present Their Own Tumor Antigens to the Immune System: a Necessary Design for an Efficient Tumor Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert E.Humphreys; Gilda G.Hillman; Eric von Hofe; Minzhen Xu

    2004-01-01

    The general principle for tumor cells to escape from immune surveillance is to prevent tumor antigens from being recognized by the immune system. Many methods have been developed to increase the immunogenecity of the tumor cells. The most efficient methods are able to force tumor cells to present their own tumor antigens to the immune system. Stimulating Th cells by converting tumor cells into MHC class Ⅱ+/Ii- antigen presenting cells is one of the most efficient technologies. Using antisense methods, we suppress the expression of the Ii protein that normally co-expresses with MHC class Ⅱ molecules and blocks the antigenic peptide binding site of MHC class Ⅱ molecules during synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In such tumor cells, the "unprotected" MHC class Ⅱ molecules pick up endogenous tumor antigenic peptides, which have been transported into the ER for binding to MHC class Ⅰ molecules. Simultaneous presentation of tumor antigens by both MHC class Ⅰ and Ⅱ molecules generates a robust and long-lasting anti-tumor immune response. MHC class Ⅱ+/Ii- tumor cells are potent tumor cell vaccines and also cure a significant number of animals with renal and prostate tumors. We have developed analogous human gene vectors that are suitable for most patients and cancers.

  6. Phenotypic characterization of drug resistance and tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human bone tumor osteosarcoma cell line OS-77

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell theory suggest that presence of small subpopulation of cancer stem cells are the major implication in the cancer treatment and also responsible for tumor recurrence. Based on Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique, we have identified about 3.3% of cancer stem like side population (SP cells from human osteosarcoma OS-77 cell line whose prevalence is significantly reduced to 0.3% after treatment with verapamil. The sphere formation assay revealed that osteosarcoma SP cells are highly capable to form tumor spheres (sarcospheres. Further by immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR, we show that OS-77 SP cells have enhanced expression of stem cell surface markers such as CD44, Nanog and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporter gene (ABCG2 which contributes to self-renewal and drug resistance, respectively. Our findings help to designing a novel therapeutic drug which could effectively target the cancer stem cells and prevent the tumor relapse.

  7. Functional significance of erythropoietin receptor on tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kodetthoor B Udupa

    2006-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) is the regulator of red blood cell formation. Its receptor (EpoR) is now found in many cells and tissues of the body. EpoR is also shown to occur in tumor cells and Epo enhances the proliferation of these cells through cell signaling. EpoR antagonist can reduce the growth of the tumor in vivo. In view of our current knowledge of Epo, its recombinant forms and receptor,use of Epo in cancer patients to enhance the recovery of hematocrit after chemotherapy treatment has to be carefully evaluated.

  8. Dentinogenic Ghost Cell Tumor of the Peripheral Variant Mimicking Epulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddipan Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT is an uncommon locally invasive odontogenic tumor regarded by many as a variant of calcifying odontogenic cyst. The peripheral variant of this clinical rarity appears as a well-circumscribed mass mimicking a nonspecific gingival enlargement. Microscopic appearance of odontogenic epithelium admixed with focal areas of dentinoid formation and sheets of ghost cells giving the definitive diagnosis of dentinogenic ghost cell tumor imply that microscopic examination is compulsory for any gingival mass. Van Gieson histochemical stain further confirmed the nature of dentinoid-like material. A complete workup of a case of peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor is presented in this paper and the current concept as well as the appraisal of literature is presented.

  9. Transcriptional Amplification in Tumor Cells with Elevated c-Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Charles Y.; Lovén, Jakob; Rahl, Peter B.; Paranal, Ronald M.; Burge, Christopher B.; Bradner, James E.; Lee, Tong Ihn; Young, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Elevated expression of the c-Myc transcription factor occurs frequently in human cancers and is associated with tumor aggression and poor clinical outcome. The effect of high levels of c-Myc on global gene regulation is poorly understood, but is widely thought to involve newly activated or repressed “Myc target genes”. We report here that in tumor cells expressing high levels of c-Myc, the transcription factor accumulates in the promoter regions of active genes and causes transcriptional amplification, producing increased levels of transcripts within the cell's gene expression program. Thus, rather than binding and regulating a new set of genes, c-Myc amplifies the output of the existing gene expression program. These results provide an explanation for the diverse effects of oncogenic c-Myc on gene expression in different tumor cells and suggest that transcriptional amplification reduces rate-limiting constraints for tumor cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23021215

  10. General Information about Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors include the following: Having certain genetic syndromes : Klinefelter syndrome may increase the risk of germ cell ... and procedures may be used: Physical exam and history : An exam of the body to check general ...

  11. Treatment Options for Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors include the following: Having certain genetic syndromes : Klinefelter syndrome may increase the risk of germ cell ... and procedures may be used: Physical exam and history : An exam of the body to check general ...

  12. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of the liver coexisting with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Moraes Neto, Francisco Alves; Agaimy, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) develop other neoplasms, either synchronously or metachronously. In this report we describe coexistence of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor and a hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) in a 51-year-old woman...... with no evidence of tuberous sclerosis. A subcapsular hepatic nodule (0.8 cm in diameter) was found during surgery for symptomatic gastric neoplasm (15 cm in diameter) arising from the lesser curvature. Both tumors revealed histomorphological and immunohistochemical features confirming a diagnosis of a small...... incidental hepatic PEComa and a high risky extramural gastric GIST, respectively. The patient remained disease-free 25 mo after surgery with no evidence of tumor recurrence or new neoplasms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PEComa in a patient with GIST. Hepatic lesions detected synchronously...

  13. Sphere-forming tumor cells possess stem-like properties in human fibrosarcoma primary tumors and cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, WEI-DONG; ZHANG, TAO; WANG, CHUN-LEI; MENG, HONG-MEI; SONG, YU-WEN; ZHAO, ZHE; LI, ZHENG-MIN; LIU, JIANG-KUN; PAN, SHANG-HA; WANG, WEN-BO

    2012-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma is a malignant soft tissue tumor of mesenchymal origin. Despite advances in medical and surgical treatment, patient survival rates have remained poor. According to the cancer stem cell hypothesis, tumors are comprised of heterogeneous cell populations that have different roles in tumor formation and growth. Cancer stem cells are a small cell subpopulation that exhibits stem-like properties to gain aggressiveness and recurrence. These cells have been identified in a variety of cancerous tumors, but not in human fibrosarcoma. In this study, we observed that HT1080 cells and primary fibrosarcoma cells formed spheres and showed higher self-renewal capacity, invasiveness and drug resistance compared with their adherent counterparts. Moreover, we demonstrated that the cells showed higher expression of the embryonic stem cell-related genes Nanog, Oct3/4, Sox2, Sox10 and their encoding proteins, as well as greater tumorigenic capacity in nude mice. In conclusion, our data suggest the presence of a stem-like cell population in human fibrosarcoma tumors, which provides more evidence for the cancer stem cell hypothesis and assistance in designing new therapeutic strategies against human fibrosarcoma. PMID:23205129

  14. The Role of Tumor Cell-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Pancreatic Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewith, Kevin L.; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M.; Graves, Edward E.; Erler, Janine T.; Kambham, Neeraja; Feazell, Jonathan; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2 derived from either tumor cells or stromal cells as it affects the growth of pancreatic tumors is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of CCN2, we have discovered that CCN2 derived from tumor cells is a critical regulator of pancreatic tumor growth. Pancreatic tumor cells derived from CCN2 shRNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted subcutaneously. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by PET imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, providing an in vivo selection for tumor cells that express high levels of CCN2. We found that CCN2 expression and secretion was increased in hypoxic pancreatic tumor cells in vitro, and we observed co-localization of CCN2 and hypoxia in pancreatic tumor xenografts and clinical pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic tumor growth and progression, and also indicate that CCN2 produced by tumor cells represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19179545

  15. Tumor-Residing Batf3 Dendritic Cells Are Required for Effector T Cell Trafficking and Adoptive T Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranger, Stefani; Dai, Daisy; Horton, Brendan; Gajewski, Thomas F

    2017-05-08

    Effector T cells have the capability of recognizing and killing cancer cells. However, whether tumors can become immune resistant through exclusion of effector T cells from the tumor microenvironment is not known. By using a tumor model resembling non-T cell-inflamed human tumors, we assessed whether adoptive T cell transfer might overcome failed spontaneous priming. Flow cytometric assays combined with intra-vital imaging indicated failed trafficking of effector T cells into tumors. Mechanistically, this was due to the absence of CXCL9/10, which we found to be produced by CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in T cell-inflamed tumors. Our data indicate that lack of CD103(+) DCs within the tumor microenvironment dominantly resists the effector phase of an anti-tumorcell response, contributing to immune escape. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengwen; Calvin; Li; Mustafa; H; Kabeer; Long; T; Vu; Vic; Keschrumrus; Hong; Zhen; Yin; Brent; A; Dethlefs; Jiang; F; Zhong; John; H; Weiss; William; G; Loudon

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for pa-tients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution(i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system.

  17. Localized tenosynovial giant cell tumor in both knee joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Su [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Kwon, Jong Won [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Ahn, Jin Hwan; Chang, Moon Jong [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea); Cho, Eun Yoon [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-09-15

    Tenosynovial giant cell tumor, previously called pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), is a rare benign neoplastic process that may involve the synovium of the joint. The disorder is usually monoarticular and only a few cases have been reported on polyarticular involvement. Herein, we present a case of localized intra-articular tenosynovial giant cell tumor in a 29-year-old man involving both knee joints with a description of the MR imaging and histological findings. (orig.)

  18. Caffeine activates tumor suppressor PTEN in sarcoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miwa, Shinji; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Shirai, Toshiharu; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Nishida, Hideji; Ohnari, Issei; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Yachie, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a negative regulator of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Akt activation exerts a strong anti-apoptotic effect and inhibits key pro-apoptotic proteins. We investigated the effect of caffeine in the prevention of tumor cell proliferation and induction of cell death. We found that caffeine induced increased intracellular cAMP levels, PTEN activation and Akt inactivation, which to...

  19. Mediastinal germ cell tumors: a radiologic-pathologic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevelegas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Aristoteles Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Palladas, P. [Dept. of Radiology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece); Scordalaki, A. [Dept. of Pathology, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2001-10-01

    Germ cell tumors of the mediastinum are histologically identical to those found in the testes and ovaries. Early diagnosis and treatment improve the survival rate. Imaging studies of teratoma demonstrate a rounded, often lobulated heterogeneous mass containing soft tissue elements with fluid and fat attenuation. Calcification is present in 20-43% of cases. Seminomas are large masses of homogeneous soft tissue attenuation. Malignant nonseminomatous germ cell tumors are heterogeneous tumors with irregular borders due to invasion of adjacent structures. CT shows the location and extent of the tumors as well as intrinsic elements including soft tissue, fat, fluid, and calcification. CT is the modality of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of these tumors. MRI reveals masses of heterogeneous signal intensity, is more sensitive in depicting infiltration of the adjacent structures by fat plane obliteration, and is performed as an ancillary study. (orig.)

  20. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Lao

    Full Text Available Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF spheroids in only 2-3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids. Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids.

  1. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines.

  2. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor in a mixed germ cell tumor - A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Dewan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of testicular tumor in a 20-year-old male with Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET was reported. Imaging studies showed a large heterogenous mass in the right scrotal sac and a large retroperitoneal mass with metastasis in the lung and liver. Serum alpha fetoprotein (AFP was markedly elevated with moderate increase in serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG levels. After orchidectomy, a histological diagnosis of mixed germ cell tumor-teratoma with primitive neuroectodermal, embryonal, and yolk sac components was made. Some scattered embryoid bodies representative of primitive germ cell tumor were also present. Morphological diversity including PNET prompted the authors to report this case as PNET points toward a poor prognosis.

  3. Klinefelter Syndrome with Poor Risk Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy A. Konheim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ cell tumors are the most common malignancy in men aged 15-35 years old, with a small percentage presenting in an extragonadal location. These tumors are seldom identified in the gastrointestinal tract. There is increased risk of extragonadal germ cell tumors (EGCT in men with Klinefelter syndrome (KS. We report a rare case of a 37-year-old male with KS and EGCT discovered in the duodenum and pelvis. After treatment with Bleomycin-Etoposide-Cisplatin (BEP, he developed growing teratoma syndrome (GTS and myelodysplasia. Despite surgical excision of the pelvic growing teratoma, he unfortunately died secondary to complications of severe bone marrow suppression.

  4. Klinefelter Syndrome with Poor Risk Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konheim, Jeremy A; Israel, Jonathan A; Delacroix, Scott E

    2017-01-01

    Germ cell tumors are the most common malignancy in men aged 15-35 years old, with a small percentage presenting in an extragonadal location. These tumors are seldom identified in the gastrointestinal tract. There is increased risk of extragonadal germ cell tumors (EGCT) in men with Klinefelter syndrome (KS). We report a rare case of a 37-year-old male with KS and EGCT discovered in the duodenum and pelvis. After treatment with Bleomycin-Etoposide-Cisplatin (BEP), he developed growing teratoma syndrome (GTS) and myelodysplasia. Despite surgical excision of the pelvic growing teratoma, he unfortunately died secondary to complications of severe bone marrow suppression.

  5. Atomically Thin-Layered Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2) for Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Eric; Kim, Ki Seok; Yeom, Geun Young; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2017-02-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are becoming significant because of their interesting semiconducting and photonic properties. In particular, TMDs such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), tungsten disulfide (WS2), tungsten diselenide (WSe2), titanium disulfide (TiS2), tantalum sulfide (TaS2), and niobium selenide (NbSe2) are increasingly attracting attention for their applications in solar cell devices. In this review, we give a brief introduction to TMDs with a focus on MoS2; and thereafter, emphasize the role of atomically thin MoS2 layers in fabricating solar cell devices, including bulk-heterojunction, organic, and perovskites-based solar cells. Layered MoS2 has been used as the hole-transport layer (HTL), electron-transport layer (ETL), interfacial layer, and protective layer in fabricating heterojunction solar cells. The trilayer graphene/MoS2/n-Si solar cell devices exhibit a power-conversion efficiency of 11.1%. The effects of plasma and chemical doping on the photovoltaic performance of MoS2 solar cells have been analyzed. After doping and electrical gating, a power-conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.03% has been observed for the MoS2/h-BN/GaAs heterostructure solar cells. The MoS2-containing perovskites-based solar cells show a PCE as high as 13.3%. The PCE of MoS2-based organic solar cells exceeds 8.40%. The stability of MoS2 solar cells measured under ambient conditions and light illumination has been discussed. The MoS2-based materials show a great potential for solar cell devices along with high PCE; however, in this connection, their long-term environmental stability is also of equal importance for commercial applications.

  6. DNA Analysis in Samples From Younger Patients With Germ Cell Tumors and Their Parents or Siblings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Seminoma; Testicular Teratoma; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  7. Cell wall elasticity: I. A critique of the bulk elastic modulus approach and an analysis using polymer elastic principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. I.; Spence, R. D.; Sharpe, P. J.; Goeschl, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The traditional bulk elastic modulus approach to plant cell pressure-volume relations is inconsistent with its definition. The relationship between the bulk modulus and Young's modulus that forms the basis of their usual application to cell pressure-volume properties is demonstrated to be physically meaningless. The bulk modulus describes stress/strain relations of solid, homogeneous bodies undergoing small deformations, whereas the plant cell is best described as a thin-shelled, fluid-filled structure with a polymer base. Because cell walls possess a polymer structure, an alternative method of mechanical analysis is presented using polymer elasticity principles. This initial study presents the groundwork of polymer mechanics as would be applied to cell walls and discusses how the matrix and microfibrillar network induce nonlinear stress/strain relationships in the cell wall in response to turgor pressure. In subsequent studies, these concepts will be expanded to include anisotropic expansion as regulated by the microfibrillar network.

  8. Review of juxtaglomerular cell tumor with focus on pathobiological aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Chin-Chen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JGCT generally affects adolescents and young adults. The patients experience symptoms related to hypertension and hypokalemia due to renin-secretion by the tumor. Grossly, the tumor is well circumscribed with fibrous capsule and the cut surface shows yellow or gray-tan color with frequent hemorrhage. Histologically, the tumor is composed of monotonous polygonal cells with entrapped normal tubules. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells exhibit a positive reactivity for renin, vimentin and CD34. Ultrastructurally, neoplastic cells contain rhomboid-shaped renin protogranules. Genetically, losses of chromosomes 9 and 11 were frequently observed. Clinically, the majority of tumors showed a benign course, but rare tumors with vascular invasion or metastasis were reported. JGCT is a curable cause of hypertensive disease if it is discovered early and surgically removed, but may cause a fatal outcome usually by a cerebrovascular attack or may cause fetal demise in pregnancy. Additionally, pathologists and urologists need to recognize that this neoplasm in most cases pursues a benign course, but aggressive forms may develop in some cases.

  9. Efficient bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells using small-molecular-weight organic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Peter; Uchida, Soichi; Forrest, Stephen R

    2003-09-11

    The power conversion efficiency of small-molecular-weight and polymer organic photovoltaic cells has increased steadily over the past decade. This progress is chiefly attributable to the introduction of the donor-acceptor heterojunction that functions as a dissociation site for the strongly bound photogenerated excitons. Further progress was realized in polymer devices through use of blends of the donor and acceptor materials: phase separation during spin-coating leads to a bulk heterojunction that removes the exciton diffusion bottleneck by creating an interpenetrating network of the donor and acceptor materials. The realization of bulk heterojunctions using mixtures of vacuum-deposited small-molecular-weight materials has, on the other hand, posed elusive: phase separation induced by elevating the substrate temperature inevitably leads to a significant roughening of the film surface and to short-circuited devices. Here, we demonstrate that the use of a metal cap to confine the organic materials during annealing prevents the formation of a rough surface morphology while allowing for the formation of an interpenetrating donor-acceptor network. This method results in a power conversion efficiency 50 per cent higher than the best values reported for comparable bilayer devices, suggesting that this strained annealing process could allow for the formation of low-cost and high-efficiency thin film organic solar cells based on vacuum-deposited small-molecular-weight organic materials.

  10. Efficient bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells using small-molecular-weight organic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peumans, Peter; Uchida, Soichi; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2003-09-01

    The power conversion efficiency of small-molecular-weight and polymer organic photovoltaic cells has increased steadily over the past decade. This progress is chiefly attributable to the introduction of the donor-acceptor heterojunction that functions as a dissociation site for the strongly bound photogenerated excitons. Further progress was realized in polymer devices through use of blends of the donor and acceptor materials: phase separation during spin-coating leads to a bulk heterojunction that removes the exciton diffusion bottleneck by creating an interpenetrating network of the donor and acceptor materials. The realization of bulk heterojunctions using mixtures of vacuum-deposited small-molecular-weight materials has, on the other hand, posed elusive: phase separation induced by elevating the substrate temperature inevitably leads to a significant roughening of the film surface and to short-circuited devices. Here, we demonstrate that the use of a metal cap to confine the organic materials during annealing prevents the formation of a rough surface morphology while allowing for the formation of an interpenetrating donor-acceptor network. This method results in a power conversion efficiency 50 per cent higher than the best values reported for comparable bilayer devices, suggesting that this strained annealing process could allow for the formation of low-cost and high-efficiency thin film organic solar cells based on vacuum-deposited small-molecular-weight organic materials.

  11. Efficient bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells using small-molecular-weight organic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peumans, Peter; Uchida, Soichi; Forrest, Stephen R. [Princeton Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., Princeton Materials Inst., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2003-09-11

    The power conversion efficiency of small-molecular-weight and polymer organic photovoltaic cells has increased steadily over the past decade. This progress is chiefly attributable to the introduction of the donor-acceptor heterojunction that functions as a dissociation site for the strongly bound photogenerated excitons. Further progress was realized in polymer devices through use of blends of the donor and acceptor materials: phase separation during spin-coating leads to a bulk heterojunction that removes the exciton diffusion bottleneck by creating an interpenetrating network of the donor and acceptor materials. The realization of bulk heterojunctions using mixtures of vacuum-deposited small-molecular-weight materials has, on the other hand, posed elusive: phase separation induced by elevating the substrate temperature inevitably leads to a significant roughening of the film surface and to short-circuited devices. Here, we demonstrate that the use of a metal cap to confine the organic materials during annealing prevents the formation of a rough surface morphology while allowing for the formation of an interpenetrating donor-acceptor network. This method results in a power conversion efficiency 50 per cent higher than the best values reported for comparable bilayer devices, suggesting that this strained annealing process could allow for the formation of low-cost and high-efficiency thin film organic solar cells based on vacuum-deposited small-molecular-weight organic materials. (Author)

  12. Spectroscopic imaging of photopotentials and photoinduced potential fluctuations in a bulk heterojunction solar cell film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Justin L; Hoepker, Nikolas; Bruce, Robert; Jacobs, Andrew R; Groves, Chris; Marohn, John A

    2012-11-27

    We present spatially resolved photovoltage spectra of a bulk heterojunction solar cell film composed of phase-separated poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) and poly(9,9'-dioctylfluorene-co-bis-N,N'-(4-butylphenyl)-bis-N,N'-phenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine) (PFB) polymers prepared on ITO/PEDOT:PSS and aluminum substrates. Over both PFB- and F8BT-rich domains, the photopotential spectra were found to be proportional to a linear combination of the polymers' absorption spectra. Charge trapping in the film was studied using photopotential fluctuation spectroscopy, in which low-frequency photoinduced electrostatic potential fluctuations were measured by observing noise in the oscillation frequency of a nearby charged atomic force microscope cantilever. Over both F8BT- and PFB-rich regions, the magnitude, distance dependence, frequency dependence, and illumination wavelength dependence of the observed cantilever frequency noise are consistent with photopotential fluctuations arising from stochastic light-driven trapping and detrapping of charges in F8BT. Taken together, our findings suggest a microscopic mechanism by which intermixing of phases leads to charge trapping and thereby to suppressed open-circuit voltage and decreased efficiency in this prototypical bulk heterojunction solar cell film.

  13. Exciton delocalization incorporated drift-diffusion model for bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi Shuai; Sha, Wei E. I.; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2016-12-01

    Modeling the charge-generation process is highly important to understand device physics and optimize power conversion efficiency of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells (OSCs). Free carriers are generated by both ultrafast exciton delocalization and slow exciton diffusion and dissociation at the heterojunction interface. In this work, we developed a systematic numerical simulation to describe the charge-generation process by a modified drift-diffusion model. The transport, recombination, and collection of free carriers are incorporated to fully capture the device response. The theoretical results match well with the state-of-the-art high-performance organic solar cells. It is demonstrated that the increase of exciton delocalization ratio reduces the energy loss in the exciton diffusion-dissociation process, and thus, significantly improves the device efficiency, especially for the short-circuit current. By changing the exciton delocalization ratio, OSC performances are comprehensively investigated under the conditions of short-circuit and open-circuit. Particularly, bulk recombination dependent fill factor saturation is unveiled and understood. As a fundamental electrical analysis of the delocalization mechanism, our work is important to understand and optimize the high-performance OSCs.

  14. Charge transport and recombination dynamics in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Andreas

    2011-08-02

    The charge transport in disordered organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is a crucial process affecting the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the solar cell. With the need of synthesizing new materials for improving the power conversion efficiency of those cells it is important to study not only the photophysical but also the electrical properties of the new material classes. Thereby, the experimental techniques need to be applicable to operating solar cells. In this work, the conventional methods of transient photoconductivity (also known as ''Time-of-Flight'' (TOF)), as well as the transient charge extraction technique of ''Charge Carrier Extraction by Linearly Increasing Voltage'' (CELIV) are performed on different organic blend compositions. Especially with the latter it is feasible to study the dynamics - i.e. charge transport and charge carrier recombination - in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells with active layer thicknesses of 100-200 nm. For a well performing organic BHJ solar cells the morphology is the most crucial parameter finding a trade-off between an efficient photogeneration of charge carriers and the transport of the latter to the electrodes. Besides the morphology, the nature of energetic disorder of the active material blend and its influence on the dynamics are discussed extensively in this work. Thereby, the material system of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 61}BM) serves mainly as a reference material system. New promising donor or acceptor materials and their potential for application in organic photovoltaics are studied in view of charge dynamics and compared with the reference system. With the need for commercialization of organic solar cells the question of the impact of environmental conditions on the PCE of the solar cells raises. In this work, organic BHJ solar cells exposed to synthetic air for finite duration are

  15. Cell jamming: Collective invasion of mesenchymal tumor cells imposed by tissue confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeger, A.; Krause, M.; Wolf, K. van der; Friedl, P.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cancer invasion is a multi-step process which coordinates interactions between tumor cells with mechanotransduction towards the surrounding matrix, resulting in distinct cancer invasion strategies. Defined by context, mesenchymal tumors, including melanoma and fibrosarcoma, develop eithe

  16. Starved and asphyxiated: how can CD8+T cells within a tumor microenvironment prevent tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eZhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although cancer immunotherapy has achieved significant breakthroughs in recent years, its overall efficacy remains limited in the majority of patients. One major barrier is exhaustion of tumor antigen (TA-specific CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs, which conventionally has been attributed to persistent stimulation with antigen within the tumor microenvironment (TME. A series of recent studies have highlighted that the TME poses significant metabolic challenges to TILs, which may contribute to their functional exhaustion. Hypoxia increases the expression of co-inhibitors on activated CD8+T cells, which in general reduces the T cells’ effector functions. It also impairs the cells’ ability to gain energy through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Glucose limitation increases expression of programmed cell death protein (PD-1 and reduces functions of activated CD8+T cells. A combination of hypoxia and hypoglycemia, as is common in solid tumors, places CD8+TILs at dual metabolic jeopardy by affecting both major pathways of energy production. Recently, a number of studies addressed the effects of metabolic stress on modulating CD8+T cell metabolism, differentiation and functions. Here we discuss recent findings on how different types of metabolic stress within the TME shape the tumor-killing capacity of CD8+T cells. We propose that manipulating the metabolism of TILs to more efficiently utilize nutrients especially during intermittent periods of hypoxia could maximize their performance, prolong their survival and improve the efficacy of active cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Tumor senescence and radioresistant tumor-initiating cells (TICs): let sleeping dogs lie!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarana, Gaetano; Bristow, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data from cell lines and experimental tumors support the concept that breast cancer-derived tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are relatively resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. This could be a major determinant of tumor recurrence following treatment. Increased clonogenic survival is observed in CD24-/low/CD44+ TICs derived from mammosphere cultures and is associated with (a) reduced production of reactive oxygen species, (b) attenuated activation of γH2AX and CHK2-p53 DNA damage signaling pathways, (c) reduced propensity for ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and (d) altered DNA double-strand or DNA single-strand break repair. However, recent data have shed further light on TIC radioresistance as irradiated TICs are resistant to tumor cell senescence following DNA damage. Taken together, the cumulative data support a model in which DNA damage signaling and repair pathways are altered in TICs and lead to an altered mode of cell death with unique consequences for long-term clonogen survival. The study of TIC senescence lays the foundation for future experiments in isogenic models designed to directly test the capacity for senescence and local control (that is, not solely local regression) and spontaneous metastases following treatment in vivo. The study also supports the targeting of tumor cell senescence pathways to increase TIC clonogen kill if the targeting also maintains the therapeutic ratio.

  18. Acute effect of lactic acid on tumor-endothelial cell metabolic coupling in the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guanqun; Wang, Degui; Li, Shenqian; Yang, Xuecheng; Cao, Yanwei; Wang, Yonghua; Niu, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to systematically analyze alterations in the expression of mitochondrial-associated proteins in human bladder cancer T24 cells co-cultured with tumor-associated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and to investigate the characteristics of bladder cancer cell energy metabolism. The present study used the following techniques: A co-culture system of T24 cells and HUVECs was constructed using a microfluidic chip as a 3D co-culture system; the concentration of lactic acid in the medium of the cells was determined using an automatic microplate reader; a qualitative analysis of mitochondria-associated protein expression was performed by immunofluorescent staining; and a quantitative analysis of mitochondrial-associated protein expression was conducted using western blotting. The present results revealed that between the control groups (monoculture of T24 cells or HUVECs), the mitochondrial-associated protein fluorescence intensity was increased in the HUVECs compared with the T24 cells. The fluorescence intensity of mitochondrial-associated proteins in the HUVEC control group was increased compared with the HUVECs in the experimental co-culture group. In the T24 cells, the protein fluorescence intensity was increased in the experimental co-culture group compared with the control group. In addition, the expression of mitochondria-associated proteins was increased in HUVECs compared with T24 cells in the control groups, while T24 cells in the experimental co-culture group had an increased expression compared with HUVECs in the experimental group (P<0.05). For T24 cells, the expression of mitochondrial-associated proteins was increased in the experimental group compared with the control group, and contrasting results were observed for the HUVECs (P<0.05). Determination of lactic acid concentration demonstrated that lactic acid concentration was highest in the experimental co-culture group, followed by the T24 control group and the HUVEC

  19. Distribution and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in tumor tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hai-feng; CHEN Jun; XU Zhi-shun; ZHANG Ke-qin

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor has an ability to become enriched in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and of guiding MSCs to migrate to tumor tissue. But there are lack of relevant reports on the distribution and differentiation of MSCs in tumor tissue and the effect on tumor growth after MSCs engrafted in tumor tissue. In this study, we observed the distribution of bone marrow MSCs in tumor tissue and the possibility of MSCs differentiating into myofibroblast under the induction of local tumor microenvironment.Methods Twenty-four New Zealand rabbits were randomly classified into the control group and the test group. MSCs were isolated and cultured for each animal, vx-2 tumor tissue was transplanted under the bladder mucosa of each animal. One week after the transplantation, the self F2 passage MSCs marked by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole were transplanted into tumor tissue in the test group while only Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-low glucose was infused into the control group. Ultrasonography was performed for each animal 1,2, 3 and 4 week(s) after the vx-2 tumor mass was transplanted. The maximum bladder tumor diameter of each animal was recorded and the mean value of each group was calculated. One animal from each group was sacrificed in the third week and the remaining animals in the fourth week to observe the tumor development. Another animal treated the same as the test group was sacrificed to observe the distribution of MSCs in tumor tissue one week after self MSCs transplantation. Immunofluorescence was used to trace MSCs in tumor tissue. The double labeling immunofluorescence for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin was performed to identify whether the MSCs can differentiate into myofibroblast.Results The ultrasonography showed no tumor mass one week after the vx-2 tumor mass transplantation. The mean maximum tumor diameter of the control group and test group was (0.70±0.14) cm and (0.78±0.14) cm, respectively, and there was no significant difference (t=1

  20. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland El Ghazal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1 in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4–deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  1. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  2. Tumor-derived death receptor 6 modulates dendritic cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, David C; Ryan, Paul J; Okragly, Angela; Witcher, Derrick R; Benschop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Studies in murine models of cancer as well as in cancer patients have demonstrated that the immune response to cancer is often compromised. This paradigm is viewed as one of the major mechanisms of tumor escape. Many therapies focus on employing the professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DC) as a strategy to overcome immune inhibition in cancer patients. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is an orphan member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF21). It is overexpressed on many tumor cells and DR6(-/-) mice display altered immunity. We investigated whether DR6 plays a role in tumorigenesis by negatively affecting the generation of anti-tumor activity. We show that DR6 is uniquely cleaved from the cell surface of tumor cell lines by the membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14, which is often overexpressed on tumor cells and is associated with malignancy. We also demonstrate that >50% of monocytes differentiating into DC die when the extracellular domain of DR6 is present. In addition, DR6 affects the cell surface phenotype of the resulting immature DC and changes their cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma. The effects of DR6 are mostly amended when these immature DC are matured with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha, as measured by cell surface phenotype and their ability to present antigen. These results implicate MMP-14 and DR6 as a mechanism tumor cells can employ to actively escape detection by the immune system by affecting the generation of antigen presenting cells.

  3. Inverted bulk-heterojunction solar cell with cross-linked hole-blocking layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udum, Yasemin; Denk, Patrick; Adam, Getachew; Apaydin, Dogukan H.; Nevosad, Andreas; Teichert, Christian; S. White, Matthew.; S. Sariciftci, Niyazi.; Scharber, Markus C.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a hole-blocking layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells based on cross-linked polyethylenimine (PEI). We tested five different ether-based cross-linkers and found that all of them give comparable solar cell efficiencies. The initial idea that a cross-linked layer is more solvent resistant compared to a pristine PEI layer could not be confirmed. With and without cross-linking, the PEI layer sticks very well to the surface of the indium–tin–oxide electrode and cannot be removed by solvents used to process PEI or common organic semiconductors. The cross-linked PEI hole-blocking layer functions for multiple donor–acceptor blends. We found that using cross-linkers improves the reproducibility of the device fabrication process. PMID:24817837

  4. Ultrathin organic bulk heterojunction solar cells: Plasmon enhanced performance using Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Shiva; Gangopadhyay, Palash; Norwood, Robert A.

    2012-07-01

    The plasmonic effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) enhances light absorption and, thus, the efficiency of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells with poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as active layer. We report optimization of this enhancement by varying the attachment density of the self-assembled AuNPs on silanized ITO using N1-(3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine. Using finite difference time domain simulations, the thicknesses of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT): poly (styrenesulfonate) (PSS) and P3HT:PCBM layers were suitably varied to ensure broadband optical absorption enhancement and minimal exciton quenching within the active layer. Our experimental results demonstrate that for solar cell structures with 20% surface coverage, absorption is increased by 65% as predicted by simulations. Further, we show that AuNPs increase the efficiency by 30% and that silanization of ITO positively impacts device performance.

  5. Direct determination of defect density of states in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Upkar K.; Tripathi, Durgesh C.; Mohapatra, Y. N.

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of the occupied trap density of states (DOS) is important for optimization of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. We demonstrate a direct method for obtaining it from the trap related peak in capacitance-voltage characteristics under different levels of illumination, and its correlation with the dark current density-voltage characteristics. We use the method to measure the parameters of DOS, occupied trap distribution, and its temperature dependence for poly(3-hexathiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) based solar cells. The total occupied trap concentration is approximately 7 × 1015 cm-3 with a standard deviation for a truncated Gaussian distribution varying between 32 and 44 meV in the temperature range of 310-270 K within a total Gaussian DOS with a standard deviation of 92 meV.

  6. Recent Approaches to Controlling the Nanoscale Morphology of Polymer-Based Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulra'uf Lukman Bola

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for clean, inexpensive and renewable energy has increasingly turned research attention towards polymer photovoltaic cells. However, the performance efficiency of these devices is still low in comparison with silicon-based devices. The recent introduction of new materials and processing techniques has resulted in a remarkable increase in power-conversion efficiency, with a value above 10%. Controlling the interpenetrating network morphology is a key factor in obtaining devices with improved performance. This review focuses on the influence of controlled nanoscale morphology on the overall performance of bulk-heterojunction (BHJ photovoltaic cells. Strategies such as the use of solvents, solvent annealing, polymer nanowires (NWs, and donor–acceptor (D–A blend ratios employed to control the active-layer morphologies are all discussed.

  7. Functional EpoR pathway utilization is not detected in primary tumor cells isolated from human breast, non-small cell lung, colorectal, and ovarian tumor tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D Patterson

    Full Text Available Several clinical trials in oncology have reported increased mortality or disease progression associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. One hypothesis proposes that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents directly stimulate tumor proliferation and/or survival through cell-surface receptors. To test this hypothesis and examine if human tumors utilize the erythropoietin receptor pathway, the response of tumor cells to human recombinant erythropoietin was investigated in disaggregated tumor cells obtained from 186 patients with colorectal, breast, lung, ovarian, head and neck, and other tumors. A cocktail of well characterized tumor growth factors (EGF, HGF, and IGF-1 were analyzed in parallel as a positive control to determine whether freshly-isolated tumor cells were able to respond to growth factor activation ex vivo. Exposing tumor cells to the growth factor cocktail resulted in stimulation of survival and proliferation pathways as measured by an increase in phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins AKT and ERK. In contrast, no activation by human recombinant erythropoietin was observed in isolated tumor cells. Though tumor samples exhibited a broad range of cell-surface expression of EGFR, c-Met, and IGF-1R, no cell-surface erythropoietin receptor was detected in tumor cells from the 186 tumors examined (by flow cytometry or Western blot. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents did not act directly upon isolated tumor cells to stimulate pathways known to promote proliferation or survival of human tumor cells isolated from primary and metastatic tumor tissues.

  8. Microfluidic cell isolation technology for drug testing of single tumor cells and their clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bithi, Swastika S.; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2017-01-01

    Drug assays with patient-derived cells such as circulating tumor cells requires manipulating small sample volumes without loss of rare disease-causing cells. Here, we report an effective technology for isolating and analyzing individual tumor cells and their clusters from minute sample volumes using an optimized microfluidic device integrated with pipettes. The method involves using hand pipetting to create an array of cell-laden nanoliter-sized droplets immobilized in a microfluidic device without loss of tumor cells during the pipetting process. Using this technology, we demonstrate single-cell analysis of tumor cell response to the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin. We find that even though individual tumor cells display diverse uptake profiles of the drug, the onset of apoptosis is determined by accumulation of a critical intracellular concentration of doxorubicin. Experiments with clusters of tumor cells compartmentalized in microfluidic drops reveal that cells within a cluster have higher viability than their single-cell counterparts when exposed to doxorubicin. This result suggests that circulating tumor cell clusters might be able to better survive chemotherapy drug treatment. Our technology is a promising tool for understanding tumor cell-drug interactions in patient-derived samples including rare cells. PMID:28150812

  9. Translational research in ovarian carcinoma : cell biological aspects of drug resistance and tumor aggressiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, Ate Gerard Jan van der

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis diverse cell biological features that in cultured (ovarian) tumor cells have been linked to drug resistance and/or tumor aggressiveness are studied in tumor specimens of epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

  10. T and NK cells: two sides of tumor immunoevasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruci, Doriana; Lo Monaco, Elisa; Cifaldi, Loredana; Locatelli, Franco; Tremante, Elisa; Benevolo, Maria; Giacomini, Patrizio

    2013-02-04

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are known to reject several experimental murine tumors, but their antineoplastic activity in humans is not generally agreed upon, as exemplified by an interesting correspondence recently appeared in Cancer Research. In the present commentary, we join the discussion and bring to the attention of the readers of the Journal of Translational Medicine a set of recent, related reports. These studies demonstrate that effectors of the adaptive and innate immunity need to actively cooperate in order to reject tumors and, conversely, tumors protect themselves by dampening both T and NK cell responses. The recently reported ability of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expressed by melanoma cells to down-regulate activating NK receptors is yet another piece of evidence supporting combined and highly effective T/NK cell disabling. Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, including Human Leukocyte Antigen E (HLA-E), represent another class of shared activating/inhibitory ligands. Ongoing clinical trials with small molecules interfering with IDO and PGE2 may be exploiting an immune bonus to control cancer. Conversely, failure to simultaneously engage effectors of both the innate and the adaptive immunity may contribute to explain the limited clinical efficacy of T cell-only vaccination trials. Shared (T/NK cells) natural immunosuppressants and activating/inhibitory ligands expressed by tumor cells may provide mechanistic insight into impaired gathering and function of immune effectors at the tumor site.

  11. HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Gustafsson, Lotta; Kimura, Hiroshi; Svanborg, Catharina

    2003-10-24

    HAMLET is a folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin in an active complex with oleic acid. HAMLET selectively enters tumor cells, accumulates in their nuclei and induces apoptosis-like cell death. This study examined the interactions of HAMLET with nuclear constituents and identified histones as targets. HAMLET was found to bind histone H3 strongly and to lesser extent histones H4 and H2B. The specificity of these interactions was confirmed using BIAcore technology and chromatin assembly assays. In vivo in tumor cells, HAMLET co-localized with histones and perturbed the chromatin structure; HAMLET was found associated with chromatin in an insoluble nuclear fraction resistant to salt extraction. In vitro, HAMLET bound strongly to histones and impaired their deposition on DNA. We conclude that HAMLET interacts with histones and chromatin in tumor cell nuclei and propose that this interaction locks the cells into the death pathway by irreversibly disrupting chromatin organization.

  12. Local hyperthermia treatment of tumors induces CD8+ T cell-mediated resistance against distal and secondary tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peisheng; Chen, Lei; Baird, Jason R.; Demidenko, Eugene; Turk, Mary Jo; Hoopes, P. Jack; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and an alternating magnetic filed (AMF) can induce local hyperthermia in tumors in a controlled and uniform manner. Heating B16 primary tumors at 43°C for 30 minutes activated dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequently CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node (dLN) and conferred resistance against rechallenge with B16 (but not unrelated Lewis Lung carcinoma) given 7 days post hyperthermia on both the primary tumor side and the contralateral side in a CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. Mice with heated primary tumors also resisted rechallenge given 30 days post hyperthermia. Mice with larger heated primary tumors had greater resistance to secondary tumors. No rechallenge resistance occurred when tumors were heated at 45°C. Our results demonstrate the promising potential of local hyperthermia treatment applied to identified tumors in inducing anti-tumor immune responses that reduce the risk of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24566274

  13. Analytical Model for Voltage-Dependent Photo and Dark Currents in Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesbahus Saleheen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A physics-based explicit mathematical model for the external voltage-dependent forward dark current in bulk heterojunction (BHJ organic solar cells is developed by considering Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH recombination and solving the continuity equations for both electrons and holes. An analytical model for the external voltage-dependent photocurrent in BHJ organic solar cells is also proposed by incorporating exponential photon absorption, dissociation efficiency of bound electron-hole pairs (EHPs, carrier trapping, and carrier drift and diffusion in the photon absorption layer. Modified Braun’s model is used to compute the electric field-dependent dissociation efficiency of the bound EHPs. The overall net current is calculated considering the actual solar spectrum. The mathematical models are verified by comparing the model calculations with various published experimental results. We analyze the effects of the contact properties, blend compositions, charge carrier transport properties (carrier mobility and lifetime, and cell design on the current-voltage characteristics. The power conversion efficiency of BHJ organic solar cells mostly depends on electron transport properties of the acceptor layer. The results of this paper indicate that improvement of charge carrier transport (both mobility and lifetime and dissociation of bound EHPs in organic blend are critically important to increase the power conversion efficiency of the BHJ solar cells.

  14. Neat C₇₀-based bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells with excellent acceptor dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Nicola; Righi, Sara; Tinti, Francesca; Savoini, Alberto; Cominetti, Alessandra; Po, Riccardo; Camaioni, Nadia

    2014-12-10

    The replacement of common fullerene derivatives with neat-C70 could be an effective approach to restrain the costs of organic photovoltaics and increase their sustainability. In this study, bulk-heterojunction solar cells made of neat-C70 and low energy-gap conjugated polymers, PTB7 and PCDTBT, are thoroughly investigated and compared. Upon replacing PC70BM with C70, the mobility of positive carriers in the donor phase is roughly reduced by 1 order of magnitude, while that of electrons is only slightly modified. It is shown that the main loss mechanism of the investigated neat-C70 solar cells is a low mobility-lifetime product. Nevertheless, PCDTBT:C70 devices undergo a limited loss of 7.5%, compared to the reference PCDTBT:PC70BM cells, reaching a record efficiency (4.44%) for polymer solar cells with unfunctionalized fullerenes. The moderate efficiency loss of PCDTBT:C70 devices, due to an unexpected excellent miscibility of PCDTBT:C70 blends, demonstrates that efficient solar cells made of neat-fullerene are possible. The efficient dispersion of C70 in the PCDTBT matrix is attributed to an interaction between fullerene and the carbazole unit of the polymer.

  15. Barium: An Efficient Cathode Layer for Bulk-heterojunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay; Kyaw, Aung Ko Ko; Wang, Dong Hwan; Chand, Suresh; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Heeger, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    We report Barium (Ba) cathode layer for bulk-heterojunction solar cells which enhanced the fill factor (FF) of p-DTS(FBTTh2)2/PC71BM BHJ solar cell up to 75.1%, one of the highest value reported for an organic solar cell. The external quantum efficiency exceeds 80%. Analysis of recombination mechanisms using the current-voltage (J–V) characteristics at various light intensities in the BHJ solar cell layer reveals that Ba prevents trap assisted Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination at the interface and with different thicknesses of the Ba, the recombination shifts towards bimolecular from monomolecular. Moreover, Ba increases shunt resistance and decreases the series resistance significantly. This results in an increase in the charge collection probability leading to high FF. This work identifies a new cathode interlayer which outclasses the all the reported interlayers in increasing FF leading to high power conversion efficiency and have significant implications in improving the performance of BHJ solar cells. PMID:23752562

  16. The bulk elastic modulus and the reversible properties of cell walls in developing Quercus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takami; Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Terashima, Ichiro

    2006-06-01

    We examined the relationship between the bulk elastic modulus (epsilon) of an individual leaf obtained by the pressure-volume (P-V) technique and the mechanical properties of cell walls in the leaf. The plants used were Quercus glauca and Q. serrata, an evergreen and a deciduous broad-leaved tree species, respectively. We compared epsilon and Young's modulus of leaf specimens determined by the stretch technique at various stages of their leaf development. The results showed that epsilon increased from approximately 5 to 20 MPa during leaf development, although other potential determinants of epsilon such as the apoplastic water content in the leaf and the diameter of a palisade tissue cells remained almost constant. epsilon in these two species was similar at every developmental stages, although the apparent mechanical strength of the leaf lamina and thickness of mesophyll cell walls were greater in Q. glauca. There were significant linear relationships between Young's modulus and epsilon (P < 0.01; R (2) = 0.78 and 0.84 in Q. glauca and Q. serrata, respectively) with small y-intercepts. From these results, we conclude that epsilon is closely related to the reversible properties of the cell walls. From the estimation of epsilon based on a physical model, we suggest that the effective thickness of cell walls responsible for epsilon is smaller than the observed wall thickness.

  17. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting.

  18. Alvocidib and Oxaliplatin With or Without Fluorouracil and Leucovorin Calcium in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Recurrent Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Testicular Cancer; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  19. Myoepithelial cells: Current perspectives in salivary gland tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Pramod Redder

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoepithelial cells are normal constituent of the salivary acini and smaller ducts, and are found between the epithelial cells and the basement membrane. Microscopic examination shows that myoepithelial cells are thin and spindle-shaped and situated between the basement membrane and epithelial cells. Ultrastructurally they possess a number of cytoplasmic processes that extend between and over the acinar and ductal-lining cells. They display features of both smooth muscle and epithelium, such as numerous microfilaments with focal densities in the cytoplasmic processes, and desmosomes which attach the myoepithelial to the epithelial cells. Neoplastic myoepithelial cells in both benign and malignant tumors can take several forms, including epithelioid, spindle, plasmacytoid, and clear, and this variability largely accounts for difficulties in histopathological diagnosis. This review article highlights the role of myoepithelial cells in salivary gland tumors.

  20. Markers of tumor-initiating cells predict chemoresistance in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Gong

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evidence is lacking whether the number of breast tumor-initiating cells (BT-ICs directly correlates with the sensitivity of breast tumors to chemotherapy. Here, we evaluated the association between proportion of BT-ICs and chemoresistance of the tumors. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining(IHC was used to examine the expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and TUNEL was used to detect the apoptosis index. The significance of various variables in patient survival was analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model. The percentage of BT-ICs in breast cancer cell lines and primary breast tumors was determined by ALDH1 enzymatic assay, CD44(+/CD24(- phenotype and mammosphere formation assay. RESULTS: ALDH1 expression determined by IHC in primary breast cancers was associated with poor clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and reduced survival in breast cancer patients. Breast tumors that contained higher proportion of BT-ICs with CD44(+/CD24(- phenotype, ALDH1 enzymatic activity and sphere forming capacity were more resistant to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Chemoresistant cell lines AdrR/MCF-7 and SK-3rd, had increased number of cells with sphere forming capacity, CD44(+/CD24(- phenotype and side-population. Regardless the proportion of T-ICs, FACS-sorted CD44(+/CD24(- cells that derived from primary tumors or breast cancer lines were about 10-60 fold more resistant to chemotherapy relative to the non- CD44(+/CD24(- cells and their parental cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that MDR1 (multidrug resistance 1 and ABCG2 (ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 were upregulated in CD44(+/CD24(- cells. Treatment with lapatinib or salinomycin reduced the proportion of BT-ICs by nearly 50 fold, and thus enhanced the sensitivity of breast cancer cells to chemotherapy by around 30 fold. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that the proportion of BT-ICs is associated with chemotherapeutic

  1. Utilizing Energy Transfer in Binary and Ternary Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, Krishna; Cave, James M; Thameel, Mahir N; O'Sullivan, Connor; Kroon, Renee; Andersson, Mats R; Zhou, Xiaojing; Fell, Christopher J; Belcher, Warwick J; Walker, Alison B; Dastoor, Paul C

    2016-08-17

    Energy transfer has been identified as an important process in ternary organic solar cells. Here, we develop kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models to assess the impact of energy transfer in ternary and binary bulk heterojunction systems. We used fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy to determine the energy disorder and Förster radii for poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl), [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, 4-bis[4-(N,N-diisobutylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl]squaraine (DIBSq), and poly(2,5-thiophene-alt-4,9-bis(2-hexyldecyl)-4,9-dihydrodithieno[3,2-c:3',2'-h][1,5]naphthyridine-5,10-dione). Heterogeneous energy transfer is found to be crucial in the exciton dissociation process of both binary and ternary organic semiconductor systems. Circumstances favoring energy transfer across interfaces allow relaxation of the electronic energy level requirements, meaning that a cascade structure is not required for efficient ternary organic solar cells. We explain how energy transfer can be exploited to eliminate additional energy losses in ternary bulk heterojunction solar cells, thus increasing their open-circuit voltage without loss in short-circuit current. In particular, we show that it is important that the DIBSq is located at the electron donor-acceptor interface; otherwise charge carriers will be trapped in the DIBSq domain or excitons in the DIBSq domains will not be able to dissociate efficiently at an interface. KMC modeling shows that only small amounts of DIBSq (energy transfer.

  2. Hsp60 is actively secreted by human tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Merendino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hsp60, a Group I mitochondrial chaperonin, is classically considered an intracellular chaperone with residence in the mitochondria; nonetheless, in the last few years it has been found extracellularly as well as in the cell membrane. Important questions remain pertaining to extracellular Hsp60 such as how generalized is its occurrence outside cells, what are its extracellular functions and the translocation mechanisms that transport the chaperone outside of the cell. These questions are particularly relevant for cancer biology since it is believed that extracellular chaperones, like Hsp70, may play an active role in tumor growth and dissemination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Since cancer cells may undergo necrosis and apoptosis, it could be possible that extracellular Hsps are chiefly the result of cell destruction but not the product of an active, physiological process. In this work, we studied three tumor cells lines and found that they all release Hsp60 into the culture media by an active mechanism independently of cell death. Biochemical analyses of one of the cell lines revealed that Hsp60 secretion was significantly reduced, by inhibitors of exosomes and lipid rafts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that Hsp60 release is the result of an active secretion mechanism and, since extracellular release of the chaperone was demonstrated in all tumor cell lines investigated, our observations most likely reflect a general physiological phenomenon, occurring in many tumors.

  3. Acidosis Promotes Metastasis Formation by Enhancing Tumor Cell Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemann, A; Schneider, B; Gündel, D; Stock, C; Gekle, M; Thews, O

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by hypoxia, acidosis as well as other metabolic and biochemical alterations. Its role in cancer progression is increasingly appreciated especially on invasive capacity and the formation of metastasis. The effect of acidosis on metastasis formation of two rat carcinoma cell lines was studied in the animal model. In order to analyze the pH dependency of different steps of metastasis formation, invasiveness, cell adhesion and migration of AT-1 prostate cancer cells as well as possible underlying cell signaling pathways were studied in vitro. Acidosis significantly increased the formation of lung metastases of both tumor cell lines in vivo. In vitro, extracellular acidosis neither enhanced invasiveness nor affected cell adhesion to a plastic or to an endothelial layer. However, cellular motility was markedly elevated at pH 6.6 and this effect was sustained even when extracellular pH was switched back to pH 7.4. When analyzing the underlying mechanism, a prominent role of ROS in the induction of migration was observed. Signaling through the MAP kinases ERK1/2 and p38 as well as Src family kinases was not involved. Thus, cancer cells in an acidic microenvironment can acquire enhanced motility, which is sustained even if the tumor cells leave their acidic microenvironment e.g. by entering the blood stream. This increase depended on elevated ROS production and may contribute to the augmented formation of metastases of acidosis-primed tumor cells in vivo.

  4. Molecular order in high-efficiency polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Matthew R; Kline, R Joseph; Herzing, Andrew A; Richter, Lee J; Germack, David S; Ro, Hyun-Wook; Soles, Christopher L; Fischer, Daniel A; Xu, Tao; Yu, Luping; Toney, Michael F; Delongchamp, Dean M

    2011-10-25

    We report quantitative measurements of ordering, molecular orientation, and nanoscale morphology in the active layer of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells based on a thieno[3,4-b]thiophene-alt-benzodithiophene copolymer (PTB7), which has been shown to yield very high power conversion efficiency when blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC(71)BM). A surprisingly low degree of order was found in the polymer-far lower in the bulk heterojunction than in pure PTB7. X-ray diffraction data yielded a nearly full orientation distribution for the polymer π-stacking direction within well-ordered regions, revealing a moderate preference for π-stacking in the vertical direction ("face-on"). By combining molecular orientation information from polarizing absorption spectroscopies with the orientation distribution of ordered material from diffraction, we propose a model describing the PTB7 molecular orientation distribution (ordered and disordered), with the fraction of ordered polymer as a model parameter. This model shows that only a small fraction (≈20%) of the polymer in the PTB7/PC(71)BM blend is ordered. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy shows that the morphology of PTB7/PC(71)BM is composed of nanoscale fullerene-rich aggregates separated by polymer-rich regions. The addition of diiodooctane (DIO) to the casting solvent, as a processing additive, results in smaller domains and a more finely interpenetrating BHJ morphology, relative to blend films cast without DIO.

  5. Primary cerebellar extramedullary myeloid cell tumor mimicking oligodendroglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, D M; Wong, T T; Guo, W Y; Chang, K P; Yen, S H

    1997-10-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) are tumors consisting of immature cells of the myeloid series that occur outside the bone marrow. Most of them are associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders, and a small number occur as primary lesions, i.e., are not associated with hematological disorders. Occurrence inside the cranium is rare, and there has been only one case of primary EMCT involving the cerebellum reported in the literature. The case we report here is a blastic EMCT occurring in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who had no signs of leukemia or any hematological disorder throughout the entire course. The cerebellar tumor was at first misdiagnosed as an "oligodendroglioma" because of the uniformity and "fried egg" artifact of the tumor cells. The tumor disappeared during chemotherapy consisting of 12 treatments. However, it recurred and metastasized to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shortly after the therapy was completed. A diagnosis of EMCT was suspected because of the presence of immature myeloid cells in the CSF, and was confirmed by anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-lysozyme immunoreactivity of the cerebellar tumor. The patient succumbed 1 year and 3 months after the first presentation of the disease.

  6. Advances in Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjian SONG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic and recurrent tumors have been identified as the leading attribute to the lung cancer deaths. Cancer research has demonstrated the critical role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the metastatic spread of carcinomas and the recurrence of lung cancer. The rapid advancement of technology in targeted therapy resolves the embarrassing situation for those late-stage patients whose tumor tissues cannot be obtained. CTCs, as a substitute for the tumor tissues, represent a decisive tool to the cancer treatment strategy. Thus, CTCs exert a fundamental role in the early detection of micro-metastasis, assisting in diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of the recurrent tumors, and subsequently choosing an individualized approach for the therapeutic treatment. This article will review the advances, which have been made in the research area of CTCs with the aid of its applications in cancer therapy.

  7. VEGFR-1 Expressed by Malignant Melanoma-Initiating Cells Is Required for Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Natasha Y.; Schatton, Tobias; Kim, Soo; Zhan, Qian; Wilson, Brian J.; Ma, Jie; Saab, Karim R.; Osherov, Veronika; Widlund, Hans R.; Gasser, Martin; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Kupper, Thomas S.; Murphy, George F.; Frank, Markus H.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma growth is driven by malignant melanoma-initiating cells (MMIC) identified by expression of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) member ABCB5. ABCB5+ melanoma subpopulations have been shown to overexpress the vasculogenic differentiation markers CD144 (VE-cadherin) and TIE1 and are associated with CD31− vasculogenic mimicry (VM), an established biomarker associated with increased patient mortality. Here we identify a critical role for VEGFR-1 signaling in ABCB5+ MMIC-dependent VM and tumor growth. Global gene expression analyses, validated by mRNA and protein determinations, revealed preferential expression of VEGFR-1 on ABCB5+ tumor cells purified from clinical melanomas and established melanoma lines. In vitro, VEGF induced the expression of CD144 in ABCB5+ subpopulations that constitutively expressed VEGFR-1 but not in ABCB5− bulk populations that were predominantly VEGFR-1−. In vivo, melanoma-specific shRNA-mediated knockdown of VEGFR-1 blocked the development of ABCB5+ VM morphology and inhibited ABCB5+ VM-associated production of the secreted melanoma mitogen laminin. Moreover, melanoma-specific VEGFR-1 knockdown markedly inhibited tumor growth (by >90%). Our results show that VEGFR-1 function in MMIC regulates VM and associated laminin production and show that this function represents one mechanism through which MMICs promote tumor growth. PMID:21212411

  8. Ability of cell-sized beads bearing tumor cell membrane proteins to stimulate LAK cells to secrete interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, A S; Pinkard, J K; Lam, K S; Scuderi, P; Hersh, E M; Grimes, W J

    1991-04-15

    We recently reported that lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells were stimulated to release both interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) when stimulated by a variety of tumor cells. We proposed then that the released cytokines may play a role in mediating tumor cell regression in vivo. In this paper, we provide further information on the nature of the signals, provided by the tumor cells (K562 erythroleukemia), that stimulate LAK cells to secrete IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Using a previously published protocol for coating tumor-membrane molecules onto cell-sized hydrophobic beads (also called pseudocytes), we demonstrate that the signal provided by the tumor cell is membrane associated. Beads coated with K562 membranes stimulated LAK cells to release IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. The pretreatment of these beads with trypsin and sodium periodate eliminated the ability of these pseudocytes to stimulate cytokine release in LAK cells. The glycoproteins that stimulate LAK cells to secrete IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were further enriched by their ability to bind concanavalin A (Con A, Jack Bean). To determine if the tumor-associated molecules that stimulate LAK cells to release IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha are also the molecules involved in mediating tumor cell lysis, we tested the ability of the Con A binding and nonbinding proteins to inhibit the LAK cell-mediated lysis of K562 cells. Our results demonstrate that molecules that inhibited LAK cell-mediated cytotoxicity were not enriched by Con A. These results are therefore consistent with the conclusion that different sets of tumor-associated molecules are involved in the stimulation of LAK cells to secrete cytokine and in the induction of LAK cells to mediate tumor cell cytolysis.

  9. Induction of abscopal anti-tumor immunity and immunogenic tumor cell death by ionizing irradiation - implications for cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, B; Rubner, Y; Wunderlich, R; Weiss, E-M; Pockley, A G; Fietkau, R; Gaipl, U S

    2012-01-01

    Although cancer progression is primarily driven by the expansion of tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment and anti-tumor immunity also play important roles. Herein, we consider how tumors can become established by escaping immune surveillance and also how cancer cells can be rendered visible to the immune system by standard therapies such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, either alone or in combination with additional immune stimulators. Although local radiotherapy results in DNA damage (targeted effects), it is also capable of inducing immunogenic forms of tumor cell death which are associated with a release of immune activating danger signals (non-targeted effects), such as necrosis. Necrotic tumor cells may result from continued exposure to death stimuli and/or an impaired phosphatidylserine (PS) dependent clearance of the dying tumor cells. In such circumstances, mature dendritic cells take up tumor antigen and mediate the induction of adaptive and innate anti-tumor immunity. Locally-triggered, systemic immune activation can also lead to a spontaneous regression of tumors or metastases that are outside the radiation field - an effect which is termed abscopal. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that combining radiotherapy with immune stimulation can induce anti-tumor immunity. Given that it takes time for immunity to develop following exposure to immunogenic tumor cells, we propose practical combination therapies that should be considered as a basis for future research and clinical practice. It is essential that radiation oncologists become more aware of the importance of the immune system to the success of cancer therapy.

  10. Effects of charged particles on human tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn D Held

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of charged particle therapy in cancer treatment is growing rapidly, in large part because the exquisite dose localization of charged particles allows for higher radiation doses to be given to tumor tissue while normal tissues are exposed to lower doses and decreased volumes of normal tissues are irradiated. In addition, charged particles heavier than protons have substantial potential clinical advantages because of their additional biological effects including greater cell killing effectiveness, decreased radiation resistance of hypoxic cells in tumors and reduced cell cycle dependence of radiation response. These biological advantages depend on many factors such as endpoint, cell or tissue type, dose, dose rate or fractionation, charged particle type and energy, and oxygen concentration. This review summarizes the unique biological advantages of charged particle therapy and highlights recent research and areas of particular research needs, such as quantification of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE for various tumor types and radiation qualities, role of genetic background of tumor cells in determining response to charged particles, sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, role of charged particles in tumors with hypoxic fractions and importance of fractionation, including use of hypofractionation, with charged particles.

  11. HAMLET binding to α-actinin facilitates tumor cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trulsson, Maria; Yu, Hao; Gisselsson, Lennart; Chao, Yinxia; Urbano, Alexander; Aits, Sonja; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Svanborg, Catharina

    2011-03-08

    Cell adhesion is tightly regulated by specific molecular interactions and detachment from the extracellular matrix modifies proliferation and survival. HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a protein-lipid complex with tumoricidal activity that also triggers tumor cell detachment in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that molecular interactions defining detachment are perturbed in cancer cells. To identify such interactions, cell membrane extracts were used in Far-western blots and HAMLET was shown to bind α-actinins; major F-actin cross-linking proteins and focal adhesion constituents. Synthetic peptide mapping revealed that HAMLET binds to the N-terminal actin-binding domain as well as the integrin-binding domain of α-actinin-4. By co-immunoprecipitation of extracts from HAMLET-treated cancer cells, an interaction with α-actinin-1 and -4 was observed. Inhibition of α-actinin-1 and α-actinin-4 expression by siRNA transfection increased detachment, while α-actinin-4-GFP over-expression significantly delayed rounding up and detachment of tumor cells in response to HAMLET. In response to HAMLET, adherent tumor cells rounded up and detached, suggesting a loss of the actin cytoskeletal organization. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in β1 integrin staining and a decrease in FAK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, consistent with a disruption of integrin-dependent cell adhesion signaling. Detachment per se did not increase cell death during the 22 hour experimental period, regardless of α-actinin-4 and α-actinin-1 expression levels but adherent cells with low α-actinin levels showed increased death in response to HAMLET. The results suggest that the interaction between HAMLET and α-actinins promotes tumor cell detachment. As α-actinins also associate with signaling molecules, cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane receptors and ion channels, additional α-actinin-dependent mechanisms are discussed.

  12. Antitumor Cell-Complex Vaccines Employing Genetically Modified Tumor Cells and Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Miguel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluates the immune response mediated by vaccination with cell complexes composed of irradiated B16 tumor cells and mouse fibroblasts genetically modified to produce GM-CSF. The animals were vaccinated with free B16 cells or cell complexes. We employed two gene plasmid constructions: one high producer (pMok and a low producer (p2F. Tumor transplant was performed by injection of B16 tumor cells. Plasma levels of total IgG and its subtypes were measured by ELISA. Tumor volumes were measured and survival curves were obtained. The study resulted in a cell complex vaccine able to stimulate the immune system to produce specific anti-tumor membrane proteins (TMP IgG. In the groups vaccinated with cells transfected with the low producer plasmid, IgG production was higher when we used free B16 cell rather than cell complexes. Nonspecific autoimmune response caused by cell complex was not greater than that induced by the tumor cells alone. Groups vaccinated with B16 transfected with low producer plasmid reached a tumor growth delay of 92% (p ≤ 0.01. When vaccinated with cell complex, the best group was that transfected with high producer plasmid, reaching a tumor growth inhibition of 56% (p ≤ 0.05. Significant survival (40% was only observed in the groups vaccinated with free transfected B16 cells.

  13. Genomic Analysis of Immune Cell Infiltrates Across 11 Tumor Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesia, Michael D; Parker, Joel S; Hoadley, Katherine A; Serody, Jonathan S; Perou, Charles M; Vincent, Benjamin G

    2016-11-01

    Immune infiltration of the tumor microenvironment has been associated with improved survival for some patients with solid tumors. The precise makeup and prognostic relevance of immune infiltrates across a broad spectrum of tumors remain unclear. Using mRNA sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) from 11 tumor types representing 3485 tumors, we evaluated lymphocyte and macrophage gene expression by tissue type and by genomic subtypes defined within and across tumor tissue of origin (Cox proportional hazards, Pearson correlation). We investigated clonal diversity of B-cell infiltrates through calculating B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire sequence diversity. All statistical tests were two-sided. High expression of T-cell and B-cell signatures predicted improved overall survival across many tumor types including breast, lung, and melanoma (breast CD8_T_Cells hazard ratio [HR] = 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.16 to 0.81, P = .01; lung adenocarcinoma B_Cell_60gene HR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.58 to 0.87, P = 7.80E-04; melanoma LCK HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.79 to 0.94, P = 6.75E-04). Macrophage signatures predicted worse survival in GBM, as did B-cell signatures in renal tumors (Glioblastoma Multiforme [GBM]: macrophages HR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.17 to 2.26, P = .004; renal: B_Cell_60gene HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.32, P = .009). BCR diversity was associated with survival beyond gene segment expression in melanoma (HR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.32 to 5.40, P = .02) and renal cell carcinoma (HR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.15 to 0.87, P = .006). These data support existing studies suggesting that in diverse tissue types, heterogeneous immune infiltrates are present and typically portend an improved prognosis. In some tumor types, BCR diversity was also associated with survival. Quantitative genomic signatures of immune cells warrant further testing as prognostic markers and potential biomarkers of response to cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath Phetsouphanh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  15. Molecular aspects of tumor cell migration and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Bozzuto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are crucial steps in many physiological events. However, they are also implicated in the physiopathology of many diseases, such as cancer. To spread through the tissues, tumor cells use mechanisms that involve several molecular actors: adhesion receptor families, receptor tyrosine kinases, cytoskeleton proteins, adapter and signalling proteins interplay in a complex scenario. The balance of cellular signals for proliferation and survival responses also regulates migratory behaviours of tumor cells. To complicate the scene of crime drug resistance players can interfere thus worsening this delicate situation. The complete understanding of this molecular jungle is an impossible mission: some molecular aspects are reviewed in this paper.

  16. Tumor metabolism: cancer cells give and take lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Gregg L

    2008-12-01

    Tumors contain well-oxygenated (aerobic) and poorly oxygenated (hypoxic) regions, which were thought to utilize glucose for oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, respectively. In this issue of the JCI, Sonveaux et al. show that human cancer cells cultured under hypoxic conditions convert glucose to lactate and extrude it, whereas aerobic cancer cells take up lactate via monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and utilize it for oxidative phosphorylation (see the related article beginning on page 3930). When MCT1 is inhibited, aerobic cancer cells take up glucose rather than lactate, and hypoxic cancer cells die due to glucose deprivation. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with an inhibitor of MCT1 retarded tumor growth. MCT1 expression was detected exclusively in nonhypoxic regions of human cancer biopsy samples, and in combination, these data suggest that MCT1 inhibition holds potential as a novel cancer therapy.

  17. Cytomorphology of Circulating Colorectal Tumor Cells: A Small Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dena Marrinucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Several methodologies exist to enumerate circulating tumor cells (CTCs from the blood of cancer patients; however, most methodologies lack high-resolution imaging, and thus, little is known about the cytomorphologic features of these cells. In this study of metastatic colorectal cancer patients, we used immunofluorescent staining with fiber-optic array scanning technology to identify CTCs, with subsequent Wright-Giemsa and Papanicolau staining. The CTCs were compared to the corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The colorectal CTCs showed marked intrapatient pleomorphism. In comparison to the corresponding tissue biopsies, cells from all sites showed similar pleomorphism, demonstrating that colorectal CTCs retain the pleomorphism present in regions of solid growth. They also often retain particular cytomorphologic features present in the patient's primary and/or metastatic tumor tissue. This study provides an initial analysis of the cytomorphologic features of circulating colon cancer cells, providing a foundation for further investigation into the significance and metastatic potential of CTCs.

  18. Apoptosis induced by norcantharidin in human tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Xiao Sun; Qing Wen Ma; Tian De Zhao; Yu Lin Wei; Guang Sheng Wang; Jia Shi Li

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION The antitumor activity of norcantharidin (NCTD),the demethylated analogue of cantharidin, was studied in the early 1980s in China. NCTD has no side effects on urinary organs which cantharidin has shown and is easier to synthesize, and it can inhibit the proliferation of several tumor cell lines as well as transplanted tumors. Clinical trials with NCTD as a monotherapeutic agent indicated that NCTD had beneficial effects in patients with different kinds of digestive tract cancers, such as primary hepatoma,carcinomas of esophagus and gastric cancer, but no depressive effect on bone marrow cells. NCTD can increase the white blood cell count by stimulating the bone marrow and has some antagonistic effect against leukopenia caused by other agents. The exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of NCTD on tumor cells have not yet been elucidated to date[1-3].

  19. Testicular germ cell tumors: Molecular genetic and clinicomorphological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nemtsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular tumors are the most common form of solid cancer in young men. According to the 2004 WHO classification, testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT may present with different histological types. Embryonic cells of varying grade may be a source of TGCT and the occurrence of this type of tumors is directly related to the formation of a pool of male sex cells and gametogenesis. The paper gives information on mo- lecular stages for the process of formation of male sex cells in health, as well as ways of their impairments leading to TGCT. An investigation of the profiles of gene expression and the spectrum of molecular damages revealed genes responsible for a predisposition to the sporadic and hereditary forms of TGCT. The paper presents the current molecular genetic and clinicomorphological characteristics of TGCT. 

  20. Testicular germ cell tumors: Molecular genetic and clinicomorphological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Nemtsova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Testicular tumors are the most common form of solid cancer in young men. According to the 2004 WHO classification, testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT may present with different histological types. Embryonic cells of varying grade may be a source of TGCT and the occurrence of this type of tumors is directly related to the formation of a pool of male sex cells and gametogenesis. The paper gives information on mo- lecular stages for the process of formation of male sex cells in health, as well as ways of their impairments leading to TGCT. An investigation of the profiles of gene expression and the spectrum of molecular damages revealed genes responsible for a predisposition to the sporadic and hereditary forms of TGCT. The paper presents the current molecular genetic and clinicomorphological characteristics of TGCT. 

  1. Central granular cell odontogenic tumor: Report of an unusual case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Madan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central granular cell odontogenic tumor (CGCOT is an unusual benign odontogenic neoplasm characterized by the presence of granular cells associated with apparently inactive odontogenic epithelium. These tumors tend to occur in the posterior mandible and usually present as well-defined unilocular or multilocular radiolucent lesions. So far, only <40 cases of CGCOT have been described in the literature under various terminologies. Though these tumors were not considered as distinct entity in the recent WHO classification of odontogenic tumors, long-term follow-up is recommended as malignant counterpart of CGCOT has already been reported. The main aim of this article is to report an additional case of CGCOT to the literature, occurring in a 73-year-old male.

  2. Effect of annealing copper phthalocyanine on the performance of interdigitated bulk-heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N. N.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, Z. L.; Jiang, Y. D.

    2012-05-01

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with improved efficiency using thermal annealing-induced nanostructured copper phthalocyanine as a donor layer were fabricated. A power conversion efficiency of 1.47% in the OPV cell with interdigitated CuPc/C60 bulk heterojunction has been obtained under AM 1.5 solar illumination at an intensity of 100 mW/cm2, which is higher than 0.63% of CuPc/C60 planar cell. Through varying the annealing temperature of CuPc films, the influence of interface morphology and crystallinity of CuPc films on the performance of OPV cells was systematically studied. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectrophotometry were used to characterize the CuPc films. The results showed that at an optimal annealing temperature, the crystalline nature and vertical orientation of nanostructured CuPc have been modified, which can facilitate the separation of interfacial electron-hole pairs and charge carrier transport to electrodes.

  3. Bulk heterojunction perovskite solar cells based on room temperature deposited hole-blocking layer: Suppressed hysteresis and flexible photovoltaic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiliang; Yang, Guang; Zheng, Xiaolu; Lei, Hongwei; Chen, Cong; Ma, Junjie; Wang, Hao; Fang, Guojia

    2017-05-01

    Perovskite solar cells have developed rapidly in recent years as the third generation solar cells. In spite of the great improvement achieved, there still exist some issues such as undesired hysteresis and indispensable high temperature process. In this work, bulk heterojunction perovskite-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester solar cells have been prepared to diminish hysteresis using a facile two step spin-coating method. Furthermore, high quality tin oxide films are fabricated using pulse laser deposition technique at room temperature without any annealing procedure. The as fabricated tin oxide film is successfully applied in bulk heterojunction perovskite solar cells as a hole blocking layer. Bulk heterojunction devices based on room temperature tin oxide exhibit almost hysteresis-free characteristics with power conversion efficiency of 17.29% and 14.0% on rigid and flexible substrates, respectively.

  4. Tumour cell death induced by the bulk photovoltaic effect of LiNbO3:Fe under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez-Castro, Alfonso; Stockert, Juan C; López-Arias, Begoña; Juarranz, Angeles; Agulló-López, Fernando; García-Cabañes, Angel; Carrascosa, Mercedes

    2011-06-01

    This work reports a pioneer application of the bulk photovoltaic effect in the biomedical field. Massive necrotic cell death was induced in human tumour cell cultures grown on a bulk photovoltaic material (iron-doped lithium niobate, LiNbO(3):Fe) after irradiation with visible light. Lethal doses (≈100% cell death) were obtained with low-intensity visible light sources (10-100 mW cm(-2) irradiances) and short exposure times of the order of minutes. The wavelength dependence to induce the lethal effect observed is consistent with that corresponding to the bulk photovoltaic effect generation in LiNbO(3):Fe. Necrosis also occurred when cultured tumour cells were exposed to LiNbO(3):Fe microparticles and visible light.

  5. Dendritic cells and their role in tumor immunosurveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strioga, M.M.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Powell, D.J.; Pasukoniene, V.; Dobrovolskiene, N.T.; Michalek, J.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of cells that play a key role in initiating, directing and regulating adaptive immune responses, including those critically involved in tumor immunosurveillance. As a riposte to the central role of DCs in the generation of antitumor immune re

  6. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen A. Juratli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs’ diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0–54 CTCs per 5 min. These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients.

  7. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Melerzanov, Alexander V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Zharov, Vladimir P. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Nanomedicine Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Galanzha, Ekaterina I., E-mail: egalanzha@uams.edu [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs’ diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0–54 CTCs per 5 min). These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients.

  8. Dysfunction of Murine Dendritic Cells Induced by Incubation with Tumor Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengguang Gao; Xin Hui; Xianghuo He; Dafang Wan; Jianren Gu

    2008-01-01

    In vivo studies showed that dendritic cell (DC) dysfunction occurred in tumor microcnvironment. As tumors were composed of many kinds of cells, the direct effects of tumor cells on immature DCs (imDCs) are needed for further studies in vitro. In the present study, bone marrow-derived imDCs were incubated with lymphoma, hepatoma and menaloma cells in vitro and surface molecules in imDCs were determined by flow cytometry. Then, imDCs incubated with tumor cells or control imDCs were further pulsed with tumor lysates and then incubated with splenocytes to perform mixed lymphocyte reaction. The DC-dependent tumor antigen-specific T cell proliferation,and IL-12 secretion were determined by flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay respectively.Finally, the DC-dependent tumor-associated antigen-specific CTL was determined by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. The results showed that tumor cell-DC incubation down-regulated the surface molecules in imDCs, such as CD80, CD54, CDllb, CD11a and MHC class Ⅱ molecules. The abilities of DC-dependent antigen-specific T cell proliferation and IL-12 secretion were also decreased by tumor cell incubation in vitro. Most importantly, the ability for antigenic-specific CTL priming of DCs was also decreased by incubation with tumor cells. In the present in vitro study demonstrated that the defective abilities of DCs induced by tumor cell co-incubation and the co-incubation system might be useful for future study of tumor-immune cells direct interaction and for drug screen of immune-modulation.

  9. Congenital granular cell tumor with uncommon clinical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Sebastian; Dejaco, Martin; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia; Rasp, Gerd

    2013-10-01

    Congenital granular cell tumor (CGCT), also known as congenital epulis, is a rare benign mesenchymal tumor of the oral cavity. We report of a 3 years and 7 months old female patient undergoing surgical excision of an oral tumor. Subsequent histological and immunohistological investigations within the clinical course led to the diagnosis of CGCT. However, clinical findings in this case, such as primary onset and an untypical location within the oral cavity, clearly stand in contrast to those usually found in CGCT, resulting in an exceptional case not previously described in the literature. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Renal cell carcinoma with areas mimicking renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor/clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Fredrik; Grossmann, Petr; Hora, Milan; Sperga, Maris; Montiel, Delia Perez; Martinek, Petr; Gutierrez, Maria Evelyn Cortes; Bulimbasic, Stela; Michal, Michal; Branzovsky, Jindrich; Hes, Ondrej

    2013-07-01

    We present a cohort of 8 renal carcinomas that displayed a variable (5%-95% extent) light microscopic appearance of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumor/clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (RAT/CCPRCC) without fulfilling the criteria for these tumors. All but 1 case predominantly (75%-95% extent) showed histopathologic features of conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma. In 5 of 7 cases with mostly conventional clear renal cell carcinoma (CRCC) morphology, a diagnosis of CRCC was supported by the molecular genetic findings (presence of von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor [VHL] mutation and/or VHL promoter methylation and/or loss of heterozygosity [LOH] for 3p). Of the other 2 cases with predominantly characteristic CRCC morphology, 1 tumor did not reveal any VHL mutation, VHL promoter methylation, or LOH for 3p, and both chromosomes 7 and 17 were disomic, whereas the other tumor displayed polysomy for chromosomes 7 and 17 and no VHL mutation, VHL promoter methylation, or LOH for 3p. One tumor was composed primarily (95%) of distinctly RAT/CCPRCC-like morphology, and this tumor harbored a VHL mutation and displayed polysomy for chromosomes 7 and 17. Of the 5 cases with both histomorphologic features and molecular genetic findings of CRCC, we detected significant immunoreactivity for α-methylacyl-CoA racemase in 2 cases and strong diffuse immunopositivity for cytokeratin 7 in 3 cases. Despite the combination of positivity for α-methylacyl-CoA racemase and cytokeratin 7 in 2 cases, there was nothing to suggest of the possibility of a conventional papillary renal cell carcinoma with a predominance of clear cells.

  11. Differentiated human colorectal cancer cells protect tumor-initiating cells from irinotecan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmink, B.L.; Houdt, W.J.; Vries, R.G.J.; Hoogwater, F.J.; Govaert, K.M.; Verheem, A.; Nijkamp, M.W.; Steller, E.J.; Jimenez, C.R.; Clevers, H.; Rinkes, I.H.; Kranenburg, O.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Stem cells of normal tissues have resistance mechanisms that allow them to survive genotoxic insults. The stem cell-like cells of tumors are defined by their tumor-initiating capacity and may have retained these resistance mechanisms, making them resistant to chemotherapy. We stud

  12. Effect of annealing on bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on copper phthalocyanine and perylene derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Inho

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the effects of annealing on device performances of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells based on copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and N,N′-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI-C6). Blended films of CuPc and PTCDI-C6 with annealing at elevated temperature were characterized by measuring optical absorption, photoluminescence, and X-ray diffraction. Enhanced molecular ordering and increments in domain sizes of donor and acceptor for the blended films were observed, and their influences on device performances were discussed. Annealing led to substantial improvements in photocurrent owing to enhanced molecular ordering and formation of percolation pathways. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Magnetic Nanoparticles and External Magnetostatic Field on the Bulk Heterojunction Polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yi, Chao; Liu, Chang; Hu, Xiaowen; Chuang, Steven; Gong, Xiong

    2015-03-01

    The price of energy to separate tightly bound electron-hole pair (or charge-transfer state) and extract freely movable charges from low-mobility materials represents fundamental losses for many low-cost photovoltaic devices. In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs), approximately 50% of the total efficiency lost among all energy loss pathways is due to the photogenerated charge carrier recombination within PSCs and low charge carrier mobility of disordered organic materials. To address these issues, we introduce magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and orientate these MNPS within BHJ composite by an external magnetostatic field. Over 50% enhanced efficiency was observed from BHJ PSCs incorporated with MNPs and an external magnetostatic field alignment when compared to the control BHJ PSCs. The optimization of BHJ thin film morphology, suppression of charge carrier recombination, and enhancement in charge carrier collection result in a greatly increased short-circuit current density and fill factor, as a result, enhanced power conversion efficiency.

  14. Effects of magnetic nanoparticles and external magnetostatic field on the bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yi, Chao; Liu, Chang; Hu, Xiaowen; Chuang, Steven; Gong, Xiong

    2015-03-18

    The price of energy to separate tightly bound electron-hole pair (or charge-transfer state) and extract freely movable charges from low-mobility materials represents fundamental losses for many low-cost photovoltaic devices. In bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells (PSCs), approximately 50% of the total efficiency lost among all energy loss pathways is due to the photogenerated charge carrier recombination within PSCs and low charge carrier mobility of disordered organic materials. To address these issues, we introduce magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and orientate these MNPS within BHJ composite by an external magnetostatic field. Over 50% enhanced efficiency was observed from BHJ PSCs incorporated with MNPs and an external magnetostatic field alignment when compared to the control BHJ PSCs. The optimization of BHJ thin film morphology, suppression of charge carrier recombination, and enhancement in charge carrier collection result in a greatly increased short-circuit current density and fill factor, as a result, enhanced power conversion efficiency.

  15. Thermal annealing effects on non-peripheral octahexylphthalocyanine doped polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Romeo Banoukepa, Gilles; Masuda, Tetsuya; Fujii, Akihiko; Shimizu, Yo; Ozaki, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the thermal annealing temperature dependence of the photovoltaic properties of organic thin film solar cells based on a bulk heterojunction of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and 1-(3-methoxy-carbonyl)-propyl-1-1-phenyl-(6,6)C61 (PCBM) doped with the soluble phthalocyanine derivative 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octahexylphthalocyanine (C6PcH2). The photocurrent density was increased by 45% and the power conversion efficiency was improved to 3.9% by annealing at 130 °C. The annealing temperature dependence of the photovoltaic properties is discussed by considering the result of X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements.

  16. Highly efficient elimination of colorectal tumor-initiating cells by an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody engaging human T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Herrmann

    Full Text Available With their resistance to genotoxic and anti-proliferative drugs and potential to grow tumors and metastases from very few cells, cancer stem or tumor-initiating cells (TICs are a severe limitation for the treatment of cancer by conventional therapies. Here, we explored whether human T cells that are redirected via an EpCAM/CD3-bispecific antibody called MT110 can lyse colorectal TICs and prevent tumor growth from TICs. MT110 recognizes EpCAM, a cell adhesion molecule expressed on TICs from diverse human carcinoma, which was recently shown to promote tumor growth through engagement of elements of the wnt pathway. MT110 was highly potent in mediating complete redirected lysis of KRAS-, PI3 kinase- and BRAF-mutated colorectal TICs, as demonstrated in a soft agar assay. In immunodeficient mice, MT110 prevented growth of tumors from a 5,000-fold excess of a minimally tumorigenic TIC dose. T cells engaged by MT110 may provide a potent therapeutic means to eradicate TICs and bulk tumor cells derived thereof.

  17. Giant cell tumor of the frontal sinus: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matushita, Joao Paulo, E-mail: jpauloejulieta@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Matushita, Julieta S.; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka [Centro de Diagnostico por Imagem Dr. Matsushita, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Matushita, Cristina S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho; Simoes, Luiz Antonio Monteiro; Carvalho Neto, Lizando Franco de

    2013-06-15

    The authors report the case of a giant cell tumor of the frontal sinus in a 54-year-old male patient. This tumor location is rare, and this is the third case reported in the literature with radiographic documentation and histopathological confirmation. The patient underwent surgery, with curettage of frontal sinus and placement of a prosthesis. He died because a voluntary abrupt discontinuation of corticosteroids. (author)

  18. Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath: Spectrum of radiologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasick, D.; Karasick, S. (Jefferson Medical Coll., Philadelphia, PA (United States) Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath is the second most common tumor of the hand. It can also occur in larger joints. Radiologic features include a soft-tissue mass with or without osseous erosion. Less commonly, it can cause periostitis or permeative osseous invasion; it may rarely calcify. The entire imaging spectrum of this lesion is presented, with emphasis on atypical appearances which can mimic other lesions. (orig.).

  19. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis due to renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Haghighatkhah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC had a tendency to extend into the renal vein and inferior vena cava, while extension into the gonadal vein has been rarely reported. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis appears as an enhancing filling defect within the dilated gonadal vein anterior to the psoas muscle and shows an enhancement pattern identical to that of the original tumor. The possibility of gonadal vein thrombosis should be kept in mind when looking at an imaging study of patients with RCC

  20. Polychlorinated biphenyls and risk of testicular germ cell tumors

    OpenAIRE

    McGlynn, Katherine A.; Quraishi, Sabah M.; Graubard, Barry I.; Weber, Jean-Philippe; Rubertone, Mark V; Erickson, Ralph L.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), may alter hormonal balance and thereby, increase risk of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT). To study the relationship of PCBs to TGCT, pre-diagnostic serum samples from 736 cases and 913 controls in the Servicemen’s Testicular Tumor Environmental and Endocrine Determinants study were analyzed. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. PCB levels...

  1. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis due to renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatkhah, Hamidreza; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Taheri, Morteza Sanei

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) had a tendency to extend into the renal vein and inferior vena cava, while extension into the gonadal vein has been rarely reported. Gonadal vein tumor thrombosis appears as an enhancing filling defect within the dilated gonadal vein anterior to the psoas muscle and shows an enhancement pattern identical to that of the original tumor. The possibility of gonadal vein thrombosis should be kept in mind when looking at an imaging study of patients with RCC.

  2. Temporal trends in bulk tank somatic cell count and total bacterial count in Irish dairy herds during the past decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, D P; O'Brien, B; O'Callaghan, E J; Sullivan, K O; Meaney, W J

    2006-10-01

    The objective of this study was to document temporal trends in bulk tank somatic cell count (SCC) and total bacterial counts (TBC) in Irish dairy herds during the years 1994 to 2004. Three milk processors participated in the study, providing data on 2,754,270 individual bulk tank SCC and 2,056,992 individual bulk tank TBC records from 9,113 herds. Somatic cell counts decreased during the years 1994 to 2000, followed by an annual increase thereafter of more than 2,000 cells/mL. A tendency existed for TBC to decrease over time. Across all years, bulk tank SCC were the lowest in April and highest in November; TBC were the lowest in May and highest in December. The significant seasonal pattern observed in herd SCC and TBC was an artifact of seasonal calving in Ireland. In general, herds selling more milk had lower bulk tank SCC and TBC. Herds having the highest SCC (i.e., > 450,000 cells/mL) and the lowest SCC (i.e., < or = 150,000 cells/mL) both contributed substantially to the mean SCC of the milk pool collected by the milk processors. Derived transition matrices showed that between adjacent years, herds had the greatest probability of remaining in the same annual mean SCC or TBC category.

  3. Scaling and automation of a high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Heng; Chen, Yu-Chih; Brien, Riley; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-10-07

    Recent research suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are the key subpopulation for tumor relapse and metastasis. Due to cancer plasticity in surface antigen and enzymatic activity markers, functional tumorsphere assays are promising alternatives for CSC identification. To reliably quantify rare CSCs (1-5%), thousands of single-cell suspension cultures are required. While microfluidics is a powerful tool in handling single cells, previous works provide limited throughput and lack automatic data analysis capability required for high-throughput studies. In this study, we present the scaling and automation of high-throughput single-cell-derived tumor sphere assay chips, facilitating the tracking of up to ∼10 000 cells on a chip with ∼76.5% capture rate. The presented cell capture scheme guarantees sampling a representative population from the bulk cells. To analyze thousands of single-cells with a variety of fluorescent intensities, a highly adaptable analysis program was developed for cell/sphere counting and size measurement. Using a Pluronic® F108 (poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)) coating on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a suspension culture environment was created to test a controversial hypothesis: whether larger or smaller cells are more stem-like defined by the capability to form single-cell-derived spheres. Different cell lines showed different correlations between sphere formation rate and initial cell size, suggesting heterogeneity in pathway regulation among breast cancer cell lines. More interestingly, by monitoring hundreds of spheres, we identified heterogeneity in sphere growth dynamics, indicating the cellular heterogeneity even within CSCs. These preliminary results highlight the power of unprecedented high-throughput and automation in CSC studies.

  4. Blood vessel endothelium-directed tumor cell streaming in breast tumors requires the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, E; Xue, A; Wang, Y; Rougerie, P; Sharma, V P; Eddy, R; Cox, D; Condeelis, J

    2016-11-28

    During metastasis to distant sites, tumor cells migrate to blood vessels. In vivo, breast tumor cells utilize a specialized mode of migration known as streaming, where a linear assembly of tumor cells migrate directionally towards blood vessels on fibronectin-collagen I-containing extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers in response to chemotactic signals. We have successfully reconstructed tumor cell streaming in vitro by co-plating tumors cells, macrophages and endothelial cells on 2.5 μm thick ECM-coated micro-patterned substrates. We found that tumor cells and macrophages, when plated together on the micro-patterned substrates, do not demonstrate sustained directional migration in only one direction (sustained directionality) but show random bi-directional walking. Sustained directionality of tumor cells as seen in vivo was established in vitro when beads coated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells were placed at one end of the micro-patterned 'ECM fibers' within the assay. We demonstrated that these endothelial cells supply the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) required for the chemotactic gradient responsible for sustained directionality. Using this in vitro reconstituted streaming system, we found that directional streaming is dependent on, and most effectively blocked, by inhibiting the HGF/C-Met signaling pathway between endothelial cells and tumor cells. Key observations made with the in vitro reconstituted system implicating C-Met signaling were confirmed in vivo in mammary tumors using the in vivo invasion assay and intravital multiphoton imaging of tumor cell streaming. These results establish HGF/C-Met as a central organizing signal in blood vessel-directed tumor cell migration in vivo and highlight a promising role for C-Met inhibitors in blocking tumor cell streaming and metastasis in vivo, and for use in human trials.Oncogene advance online publication, 28 November 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.421.

  5. Curcumin targets fibroblast–tumor cell interactions in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudás, József, E-mail: jozsef.dudas@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Fullár, Alexandra, E-mail: fullarsz@gmail.com [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); 1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Romani, Angela, E-mail: angela.romani@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Pritz, Christian, E-mail: christian.pritz@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kovalszky, Ilona, E-mail: koval@korb1.sote.hu [1st Department of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis University, Üllői út 26, 1085 Budapest (Hungary); Hans Schartinger, Volker, E-mail: volker.schartinger@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mathias Sprinzl, Georg, E-mail: georg.sprinzl@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Riechelmann, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.riechelmann@i-med.ac.at [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-04-01

    Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of OSCC tumor cells. We hypothesized that Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells. Normal and 2 μM Curcumin-treated co-culture were performed for 4 days, followed by analysis of tumor cell invasivity, mRNA/protein expression of EMT-markers and mediators, activity measure of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), and western blot analysis of signal transduction in tumor cells and fibroblasts. In Curcumin-treated co-culture, in tumor cells, the levels of nuclear factor κB (NFκBα) and early response kinase (ERK)—decreased, in fibroblasts, integrin αv protein synthesis decreased compared to corresponding cells in normal co-culture. The signal modulatory changes induced by Curcumin caused decreased release of EMT-mediators in CAFs and reversal of EMT in tumor cells, which was associated with decreased invasion. These data confirm the palliative potential of Curcumin in clinical application. - Graphical abstract: Co-culture of periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLs) and SCC-25 oral squamous carcinoma cells (OSCC) results in conversion of PDLs into carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and induces epithelial-to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells. Curcumin targets this dynamic mutual interaction between CAFs and tumor cells by inhibiting the production of EMT mediators in CAFs and by modification of intracellular signaling in tumor cells. This causes less invasivity and reversal of EMT in tumor cells. Highlights: ► Curcumin targets tumor–fibroblast interaction in head and neck cancer. ► Curcumin suppresses mediators of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. ► Curcumin decreases the invasivity of tumor cells.

  6. Extraordinarily Prolonged Disease Recurrence in a Granulosa Cell Tumor Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa N. Abaid

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Granulosa cell tumors are rare sex cord stromal lesions that comprise approximately 3% of all ovarian neoplasms. The vast majority of granulosa cell tumors are considered indolent but in spite of aggressive management, delayed recurrence is of significant concern. Case Report: We describe a case involving a 67-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain, bloody stools, and mild nausea. Following a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis, a 19-cm pelvic mass was identified. Her prior medical history included a hysterectomy for uterine fibroids 40 years ago and a bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for a presumed granulosa cell tumor 20 years ago. Final pathology revealed granulosa cell tumor with small bowel mesentery involvement. The patient underwent surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy; she is currently doing well. Conclusion: Granulosa cell tumors are considered to be of low malignant potential but they have the capacity to recur, even several years following initial patient management. This case exemplifies the disease’s capacity for prolonged recurrence and further accentuates the significance of long-term follow-up in these patients.

  7. Minority carrier bulk lifetimes through a large multicrystalline silicon ingot and related solar cell properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinuzzi, S.; Gauthier, M.; Barakel, D.; Périchaud, I.; Le Quang, N.; Palais, O.; Goaer, G.

    2007-10-01

    The bulk lifetime τ n and diffusion length Ln of minority carriers vary through the height of a cast multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) block. This variation is due to the segregation of metallic impurities during the directional solidification and the native impurity concentrations increase from the bottom to the top of the ingot, which is solidified last, while the ingot bottom, which is solidified first, is contaminated by the contact with the crucible floor. It is of interest to verify if a correlation exists between the bulk lifetime τ of as cut wafers and the conversion efficiency η of solar cells. In a very large ingot (>310 kg), it was found that τ0, in raw wafers, τdif in phosphorus diffused ones and Ln in diffused wafers are smaller in the top and in the bottom of the ingot. The same evolution is observed in solar cells, however the diffusion length values Lcel in the central part of the ingot are markedly higher than those found in diffused wafers, due to the in-diffusion of hydrogen from the SiN-H antireflection coating layer. The variations of η and those of τ 0, along the ingot height, are well correlated, suggesting that the evaluation of τ 0 can predict the properties of the devices. In addition, segregation phenomena around the grain boundaries are observed at the bottom of the ingots, due to a marked contamination by the crucible floor, and at its top where impurities are accumulated. These phenomena are linked to the long duration of the solidification process and the large amount of imperfect silicon used to cast the ingot.

  8. Application of autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine in treatment of tumors of digestive tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Liang; Hui Wang; Tie-Mie Sun; Wen-Qing Yao; Li-Li Chen; Yu Jin; Chun-Ling Li; Fan-Juan Meng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To treat patients with stage Ⅰ-Ⅳ malignant tumors of digestive tract using autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV (Newcastle disease virus) vaccine, and observe the survival period and curative effect.METHODS: 335 patients with malignant tumors of digestive tract were treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine and NDV vaccine. The autologous tumor cell vaccine were assigned for long-term survival observation. While these failed to obtain the autologous tumor tissue were given with NDV vaccine for a short-term observation on curative effect.RESULTS: The colorectal cancer patients treated with autologous tumor cell vaccine were divided into two groups:the controlled group (subjected to resection alone) (n=257),the vaccine group (subjected to both resection and immunotherapy) (n=310). 25 patients treated with NDV immunotherapy were all at stage Ⅳ without having resection.In postoperation adjuvant therapy patients, the 5, 6 and 7-year survival rates were 66.51%, 60.52 %, 56.50 %respectively; whereas in patients with resection alone, only 45.57 %, 44.76 % and 43.42 % respectively. The average survival period was 5.13 years (resection alone group 4.15years), the median survival period was over 7 years (resection alone group 4.46 years). There were significant differences between the two groups. The patients treated with resection plus vaccine were measured delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions after vaccination, (indurative scope >5 mm).The magnitude of DTH was related to the prognosis. The 5-year survival rate was 80 % for those with indurations greater than 5 mm, compared with 30 % for those with indurations less than 5 mm. The 1-year survival rate was 96 % for 25patients treated with NDV immunotherapy. The total effective rate (CR+PR) was 24.00 % in NDV immunotherapy; complete remission (CR) in 1 case (4.00 %), partial remission (PR) in 5 cases (20.00 %), stabilizedin in 16 cases (64.00 %),progression (PD) in 1 case (4.00 %). After NDV vaccine

  9. T Cells as Antigen Carriers for Anti-tumor Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traversari, Catia; Russo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The exploitation of the physiologic processing and presenting machinery of dendritic cells (DCs) by in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens may improve the immunogenic potential and clinical efficacy of DC-based cancer vaccines. The approach developed by our group was based on the clinical observation that some patients treated with the infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced to express the HSV-TK suicide gene for relapse of hematologic malignancies, after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a T cell-mediated immune response specifically directed against the HSV-TK gene product.We demonstrated that lymphocytes genetically modified to express HSV-TK as well as self/tumor antigens, acting as antigen carriers, efficiently target DCs in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. The infusion of TRP-2-transduced lymphocytes induced the establishment of protective immunity and long-term memory in tumor-bearing mice by cross-presentation of the antigen mediated by the CD11c(+)CD8a(+) DCs subset. A similar approach was applied in a clinical setting. Ten patients affected by MAGE-3(+) metastatic melanoma were treated with autologous lymphocytes retrovirally transduced to express the MAGE-3 tumor antigen. In three patients, the treatment led to the increase of MAGE-3 specific CD8+ and CD4+ effectors and the development of long-term memory, which ultimately correlated with a favorable clinical outcome. Transduced lymphocytes represent an efficient way for in vivo loading of tumor-associated antigens of DCs.

  10. The role of tumor cell-derived connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) in pancreatic tumor growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennewith, Kevin L; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2...... adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms...

  11. Cell cycle-arrested tumor cells exhibit increased sensitivity towards TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, H; Wachter, F; Grunert, M; Jeremias, I

    2013-01-01

    Resting tumor cells represent a huge challenge during anticancer therapy due to their increased treatment resistance. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a putative future anticancer drug, currently in phases I and II clinical studies. We recently showed that TRAIL is able to target leukemia stem cell surrogates. Here, we tested the ability of TRAIL to target cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Cell cycle arrest was induced in tumor cell lines and xenografted tumor cells in G0, G1 or G2 using cytotoxic drugs, phase-specific inhibitors or RNA interference against cyclinB and E. Biochemical or molecular arrest at any point of the cell cycle increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Accordingly, when cell cycle arrest was disabled by addition of caffeine, the antitumor activity of TRAIL was reduced. Most important for clinical translation, tumor cells from three children with B precursor or T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia showed increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis upon knockdown of either cyclinB or cyclinE, arresting the cell cycle in G2 or G1, respectively. Taken together and in contrast to most conventional cytotoxic drugs, TRAIL exerts enhanced antitumor activity against cell cycle-arrested tumor cells. Therefore, TRAIL might represent an interesting drug to treat static-tumor disease, for example, during minimal residual disease. PMID:23744361

  12. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Laila C. Roudsari; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted...

  13. Salinomycin inhibits osteosarcoma by targeting its tumor stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing-Lian; Zhao, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Jin-Chun; Liang, Yi; Yin, Jun-Qiang; Zou, Chang-Ye; Xie, Xian-Biao; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Shen, Jing-Nan; Kang, Tiebang; Wang, Jin

    2011-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in children and adolescents and is typically associated with a poor prognosis. Tumor stem cells (TSCs) are presumed to drive tumor initiation and tumor relapse or metastasis. Hence, the poor prognosis of osteosarcoma likely results from a failure to target the osteosarcoma stem cells. Here, we have utilized three different methods to enrich TSCs in osteosarcoma and further evaluated whether salinomycin could selectively target TSCs in osteosarcoma. Our results indicated that sarcosphere selection, chemotherapy selection and stem cell marker OCT4 or SOX2 over-expression are all effective in the enrichment of TSCs from osteosarcoma cell lines. Further investigation found that salinomycin inhibited osteosarcoma by selectively targeting its stem cells both in vitro and in vivo without severe side effects, and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be involved in this inhibition of salinomycin. Taken together, we have identified that salinomycin is an effective inhibitor of osteosarcoma stem cells, supporting the use of salinomycin for elimination of osteosarcoma stem cells and implying a need for further clinical evaluation.

  14. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  15. Cell cycle regulatory factors in juxta-tumoral renal parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruşcă, Daniela Nicoleta; Petrescu, Amelia; Vrabie, Camelia; Niculescu, L; Jinga, V; Diaconu, Carmen; Braşoveanu, Lorelei

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate regulatory cell cycle factors in juxta-tumoral renal parenchyma in order to obtain information regarding early primary changes occurred in normal renal cells. Specimens of juxta-tumoral renal parenchyma were harvested from the tumoral kidney in 10 patients with no history of treatment before surgery. The expression of p53, Bcl-2, Rb and PCNA was studied by immunohistochemical methods in paraffin-embedded tissues. The apoptotic status was evaluated by flow-cytometry analysis following propidium iodide incorporation. The p53 protein expression was recognized in most of the cases (80%) with different intensities. High intensity apoptotic process detected in juxta-tumoral parenchyma seemed to be p53 dependent and well correlated with the low Bcl-2 expression. 70% of cases were Rb positive. In this type of tissue Rb has only an anti-proliferative and anti-tumoral role. PCNA was present in half of the cases being low expressed due to the tissue regenerating mechanism. Our data suggest that the high intensity of programmed cell death in this type of tissue is supported by the status of cell regulatory factors that control this process. Previous studies have demonstrated that healthy renal tissue has neither apoptosis nor mitotic activity. Juxta-tumoral renal tissue is also displaying normal morphology and DNA content (diploidy) but the microenvironmental status induced by the tumor presence prompts cells to choose death rather than malignant transformation. Further studies are necessary to emphasize if these results have a clinical relevance for the outcome of therapeutical approaches in renal carcinomas.

  16. NKT cell networks in the regulation of tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith C Robertson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT cells lie at the interface between the innate and adaptive immune systems and are important mediators of immune responses and tumor immunosurveillance. These NKT cells uniquely recognize lipid antigens, and their rapid yet specific reactions influence both innate and adaptive immunity. In tumor immunity, two NKT subsets (type I and type II have contrasting roles in which they not only cross-regulate one another, but also impact innate immune cell populations, including natural killer, dendritic and myeloid lineage cells, as well as adaptive populations, especially CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. The extent to which NKT cells promote or suppress surrounding cells affects the host’s ability to prevent neoplasia and is consequently of great interest for therapeutic development. Data have shown the potential for therapeutic use of NKT cell agonists and synergy with immune response modifiers in both pre-clinical studies and preliminary clinical studies. However, there is room to improve treatment efficacy by further elucidating the biological mechanisms underlying NKT cell networks. Here, we discuss the progress made in understanding NKT cell networks, their consequent role in the regulation of tumor immunity, and the potential to exploit that knowledge in a clinical setting.

  17. Filtration parameters influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A W Coumans

    Full Text Available Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·10(4∶10(2∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm(2 track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC.

  18. Study of a ternary blend system for bulk heterojunction thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zubair; Touati, Farid; Shakoor, R. A.; Al-Thani, N. J.

    2016-08-01

    In this research, we report a bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell consisting of a ternary blend system. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT is used as a donor and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methylester (PCBM) plays the role of acceptor whereas vanadyl 2,9,16,23-tetraphenoxy-29H, 31H-phthalocyanine (VOPcPhO) is selected as an ambipolar transport material. The materials are selected and assembled in such a fashion that the generated charge carriers could efficiently be transported rightwards within the blend. The organic BHJ solar cells consist of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/ternary BHJ blend/Al structure. The power conversion efficiencies of the ITO/ PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/ P3HT:PCBM:VOPcPhO/Al solar cells are found to be 2.3% and 3.4%, respectively. This publication was made possible by PDRA (Grant No. PDRA1-0117-14109) from the Qatar National Research Fund (a member of Qatar Foundation). The findings achieved herein are solely the responsibility of the authors.

  19. Localized photovoltaic investigations on organic semiconductors and bulk heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollender, Jan Philipp; Gasiorowski, Jacek; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar; Mardare, Andrei Ionut; Hassel, Achim Walter

    2014-10-01

    Newly synthesized organic electronics materials are often available in submicrogram amounts only. Photoelectrochemical scanning droplet cell microscopy is a powerful method that allows a comprehensive characterisation of such small amounts including oxidation, reduction potentials, doping, determination of charge carriers, band gap, charge capacity, over-oxidation sensitivity and many more. Localized photoelectrochemical characterization of the poly[4,8-bis-substituted-benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b0]dithiophene-2,6-diyl-alt-4-substituted-thieno [3,4-b] thiophene-2,6-diyl] (PBDTTT-c) and PBDTTT-c:PCBM bulk heterojunction was performed using photoelectrochemical scanning droplet cell microscopy (PE-SDCM). The optical properties and the real and imaginary part of the dielectric function, of the polymer were determined using spectroscopic ellipsometry. The photoelectrochemical characterizations were performed in a three and two electrode configuration of PE-SDCM under laser and white light illumination. The effect of illumination was characterized using dark/illumination sequences. The stability of the photocurrent was studied using longer term (600 s) illumination. Finally the effect of cell configuration and illumination conditions on the photovoltage was studied.

  20. Sodium chloride methanol solution spin-coating process for bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-Fang; Hu, Yu-Feng; Deng, Zhen-Bo; Li, Xiong; Zhu, Li-Jie; Wang, Yue; Lv, Long-Feng; Wang, Tie-Ning; Lou, Zhi-Dong; Hou, Yan-Bing; Teng, Feng

    2016-08-01

    The sodium chloride methanol solution process is conducted on the conventional poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) polymer bulk heterojunction solar cells. The device exhibits a power conversion efficiency of up to 3.36%, 18% higher than that of the device without the solution process. The measurements of the active layer by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) indicate a slight phase separation in the vertical direction and a sodium chloride distributed island-like interface between the active layer and the cathode. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) and impedance spectroscopy measurements prove that the sodium chloride methanol process can reduce the electron injection barrier and improve the interfacial contact of polymer solar cells. Therefore, this one-step solution process not only optimizes the phase separation in the active layers but also forms a cathode buffer layer, which can enhance the generation, transport, and collection of photogenerated charge carriers in the device simultaneously. This work indicates that the inexpensive and non-toxic sodium chloride methanol solution process is an efficient one-step method for the low cost manufacturing of polymer solar cells. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2014JBZ009) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61274063, 61377028, 61475014, and 61475017).

  1. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  2. "Plastic" solar cells: self-assembly of bulk heterojunction nanomaterials by spontaneous phase separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Jeffrey; Heeger, Alan J; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2009-11-17

    As the global demand for low-cost renewable energy sources intensifies, interest in new routes for converting solar energy to electricity is rapidly increasing. Although photovoltaic cells have been commercially available for more than 50 years, only 0.1% of the total electricity generated in the United States comes directly from sunlight. The earliest commercial solar technology remains the basis for the most prevalent devices in current use, namely, highly-ordered crystalline, inorganic solar cells, commonly referred to as silicon cells. Another class of solar cells that has recently inspired significant academic and industrial excitement is the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) "plastic" solar cell. Research by a rapidly growing community of scientists across the globe is generating a steady stream of new insights into the fundamental physics, the materials design and synthesis, the film processing and morphology, and the device science and architecture of BHJ technology. Future progress in the fabrication of high-performance BHJ cells will depend on our ability to combine aspects of synthetic and physical chemistry, condensed matter physics, and materials science. In this Account, we use a combination of characterization tools to tie together recent advances in BHJ morphology characterization, device photophysics, and thin-film solution processing, illustrating how to identify the limiting factors in solar cell performance. We also highlight how new processing methods, which control both the BHJ phase separation and the internal order of the components, can be implemented to increase the power conversion efficiency (PCE). The failure of many innovative materials to achieve high performance in BHJ solar cell devices has been blamed on "poor morphology" without significant characterization of either the structure of the phase-separated morphology or the nature of the charge carrier recombination. We demonstrate how properly controlling the "nanomorphology", which is

  3. Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Synchronous and Metachronous Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Wirbel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man treated 2.5 years ago for synchronous multicentric giant cell tumor of bone located at the right proximal humerus and the right 5th finger presented now with complaints of pain in his right hip and wrist of two-month duration. Radiology and magnetic resonance revealed multicentric giant cell tumor lesions of the right proximal femur, the left ileum, the right distal radius, and the left distal tibia. The patient has an eighteen-year history of a healed osteosarcoma of the right tibia that was treated with chemotherapy, resection, and allograft reconstruction. A literature review establishes this as the first reported case of a patient with synchronous and metachronous multicentric giant cell tumor who also has a history of osteosarcoma.

  4. Epigenetics, Nervous System Tumors, and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark F. Mehler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances have begun to elucidate how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are responsible for establishing and maintaining cell identity during development and adult life and how the disruption of these processes is, not surprisingly, one of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we describe the major epigenetic mechanisms (i.e., DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modification, non-coding RNA deployment, RNA editing, and nuclear reorganization and discuss the broad spectrum of epigenetic alterations that have been uncovered in pediatric and adult nervous system tumors. We also highlight emerging evidence that suggests epigenetic deregulation is a characteristic feature of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs, which are thought to be present in a range of nervous system tumors and responsible for tumor maintenance, progression, treatment resistance, and recurrence. We believe that better understanding how epigenetic mechanisms operate in neural cells and identifying the etiologies and consequences of epigenetic deregulation in tumor cells and CSCs, in particular, are likely to promote the development of enhanced molecular diagnostics and more targeted and effective therapeutic agents for treating recalcitrant nervous system tumors.

  5. Inhibition of tumor cell proliferation by Coleon C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xiu; Wu, Hezhen; Wang, Xiaoming; Huang, Yongping; Li, Qing; Li, Changlong; Yang, Yanfang; Liu, Yanwen; Liu, Jianwen

    2008-04-01

    Coleon C (6,11,12,14,16-pentahydroxyabieta-5,8,11,13-tetraen-7-one), extracted from Coleus forskohlii Briq., was investigated for its anti-tumor activity on eight human tumor cell lines (95-D, A375, HeLa, A431, MKN45, BEL7402, LoVo and HL60) and two normal ones (293, L02) by MTT and colony-forming assay in vitro. The results indicated that A375 was the most sensitive of all the cell lines. Hoechst 33258 staining showed fragmentation and condensation of chromatin. DNA ladder assay indicated the fragments of DNA because of apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated hypodiploid cells existed in A375 after Coleon C treatment. In the acute toxicity studies of C57BL/6 mice, LD(50 )of Coleon C was 1496+/-150 mg/kg. In the model of Lewis lung carcinoma, the average tumor weight in groups injected with 80 mg/kg Coleon C decreased by 48.9+/-14.3% compared with that of the control. These results indicate that Coleon C could effectively inhibit tumor cell proliferation and growth by inducing apoptosis with low toxicity. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the anti-tumor activity of Coleon C both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Epigenetics, Nervous System Tumors, and Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Irfan A. [Rosyln and Leslie Goldstein Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Institute for Brain Disorders and Neural Regeneration, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Rose F. Kennedy Center for Research on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Mehler, Mark F., E-mail: mark.mehler@einstein.yu.edu [Rosyln and Leslie Goldstein Laboratory for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Institute for Brain Disorders and Neural Regeneration, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States); Rose F. Kennedy Center for Research on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, NY 10461 (United States)

    2011-09-13

    Recent advances have begun to elucidate how epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are responsible for establishing and maintaining cell identity during development and adult life and how the disruption of these processes is, not surprisingly, one of the hallmarks of cancer. In this review, we describe the major epigenetic mechanisms (i.e., DNA methylation, histone and chromatin modification, non-coding RNA deployment, RNA editing, and nuclear reorganization) and discuss the broad spectrum of epigenetic alterations that have been uncovered in pediatric and adult nervous system tumors. We also highlight emerging evidence that suggests epigenetic deregulation is a characteristic feature of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are thought to be present in a range of nervous system tumors and responsible for tumor maintenance, progression, treatment resistance, and recurrence. We believe that better understanding how epigenetic mechanisms operate in neural cells and identifying the etiologies and consequences of epigenetic deregulation in tumor cells and CSCs, in particular, are likely to promote the development of enhanced molecular diagnostics and more targeted and effective therapeutic agents for treating recalcitrant nervous system tumors.

  7. Brain CT of non-pineal intracranial germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hang Young; Chung, Eun Cheul; Lee, Dong Ho; Choo, In Wook; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    19 cases of non-pineal intracranial germ cell tumors were reviewed retrospectively with both radiologic and clinical features. The results were as follows: 1. The age distribution was 8 to 32 year old (16 year old of mean age) and the sex distribution shows male predominance (15:4). 2. The histopathologic diagnosis includes 11 cases of germinoma, 2 case of mixed germ cell tumor, 1 case of embryonal cell carcinoma and 5 cases of unknown. 3. The location of tumors was the sarsaparilla region in 8 cases, the left basal ganglia and thalamus in 5 cases, and the right frontal lobe in 1 case. Among 11 cases of germinoma, 6 cases involve the sarsaparilla region and 3 cases the left basal ganglia and thalamus. 4. In clinical features, there were visual disturbance, diabetes indispose, increased ICP signs, motor weakness, hormonal disorders, and personal changes in order. 5. In tumor marker study of 6 cases of germinoma, 5 cases show increase in HCG titer, but all 6 cases were normal in AFP titer. 6. In brain CT, most of all revealed well-defined homogeneous high density with or without small central low density and homogeneous enhancement at solid portion, and there was calcification in only case with mixed germ cell tumor.

  8. Cell Competition Drives the Formation of Metastatic Tumors in a Drosophila Model of Epithelial Tumor Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichenlaub, Teresa; Cohen, Stephen M; Herranz, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging. The mechan......Cell competition is a homeostatic process in which proliferating cells compete for survival. Elimination of otherwise normal healthy cells through competition is important during development and has recently been shown to contribute to maintaining tissue health during organismal aging....... The mechanisms that allow for ongoing cell competition during adult life could, in principle, contribute to tumorigenesis. However, direct evidence supporting this hypothesis has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence that cell competition drives tumor formation in a Drosophila model of epithelial cancer. Cells...... of the Septin family protein Peanut. Cytokinesis failure due to downregulation of Peanut is required for tumorigenesis. This study provides evidence that the cellular mechanisms that drive cell competition during normal tissue growth can be co-opted to drive tumor formation and metastasis. Analogous mechanisms...

  9. Epigenetics: a way to understand the origin and biology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Keisei

    2012-06-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors are neoplasms carrying two unique features. First, testicular germ cell tumors have a pluripotential nature and show protean histology ranging from that of germ cells to embryonal and differentiated somatic cells. Therefore, testicular germ cell tumors are interesting resources positioned at a crossroad in developmental and neoplastic processes. The second unique feature of testicular germ cell tumors is their exquisite sensitivity to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This review summarizes recent research progress in the epigenetics of testicular germ cell tumors in an attempt to explain the abovementioned biological and clinical characteristics of testicular germ cell tumors.

  10. Malignant transformation and treatment of cystic mixed germ cell tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yapeng Zhao; Hongyu Duan; Qinghui Zhang; Bingxin Shi; Hui Liang; Yuqi Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The authors report an extremely unusual presentation and management of a children pineal mixed germ cell tumor mainly composed of immature teratoma, aiming to summarize main theraptic points by literature review. Methods: A cystic lesion located in the rear of third ventricle in a child was detected 3 years ago with no other therapy performed except for a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt. During the following 3 years, intermitted regular brain MRI demonstrated no evidence of lesion aggrandizement. However from 20 days before admission to our institute the patient began to present acutely with exacerbating clinical symptoms meanwhile brain MRI showed signs of abrupt revulsions of initial lesion without any incentive cause. Neurological examination revealed a significant rising of serum tumor marker level. Then surgical resection was performed immediately after admission which was followed by correlative two-course chemotherapy. Results: Postoperative brain MRI demonstrated totally removing of the lesion in rear of third ventricle. Serum tumor marker level decreased remarkably after surgery and declined to normal level after two-course chemotherapy. No obvious neurological deficit occurred except for short-term memory difficulty which gradually recovered within two weeks. Soon after the second course chemotherapy the patient was currently asymptomatic and returned to school. Conclusions: (1) To ensure definitive diagnosis and proper therapecutic protocols benefit from grasping clinical features of mixed germ cell tumor. (2) Overall preoperative investigation including serum tumor marker level is as critical as neurological imaging examination. (3) Surgical excision is confirmed to be the key modality of treatment. With the regarding of mixed germ cell tumor, never highlight total resection too much. (4) Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy is recommended as further intensive treatment to improve the prognosis of mix germ cell tumor.

  11. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  12. Human T cell crosstalk is induced by tumor membrane transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Uzana

    Full Text Available Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC. Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+ T-APCs. We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+ T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1 Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2 Fratricide (killing of CD8+ T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response.

  13. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Qin; Vladimir A Ljubimov; Cuiqi Zhou; Yunguang Tong; Jimin Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason under-lying difculties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive“liquid biopsy”from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneity. This review focuses on cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream as a versatile biomarker. ctDNA analysis is an evolving field with many new methods being developed and optimized to be able to successfully extract and analyze ctDNA, which has vast clinical applications. ctDNA has the potential to accurately genotype the tumor and identify personalized genetic and epigenetic alterations of the entire tumor. In addition, ctDNA has the potential to accurately monitor tumor burden and treatment response, while also being able to monitor minimal residual disease, reducing the need for harmful adjuvant chemotherapy and allowing more rapid detection of relapse. There are still many challenges that need to be overcome prior to this biomarker getting wide adoption in the clinical world, including optimization, standardization, and large multicenter trials.

  14. Tumor suppressors status in cancer cell line Encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonkin, Dmitriy; Hassan, Mehedi; Murphy, Denis J; Tatarinova, Tatiana V

    2013-08-01

    Tumor suppressors play a major role in the etiology of human cancer, and typically achieve a tumor-promoting effect upon complete functional inactivation. Bi-allelic inactivation of tumor suppressors may occur through genetic mechanisms (such as loss of function mutation, copy number (CN) loss, or loss of heterozygosity (LOH)), epigenetic mechanisms (such as promoter methylation or histone modification), or a combination of the two. We report systematically derived status of 69 known or putative tumor suppressors, across 799 samples of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia. In order to generate such resource we constructed a novel comprehensive computational framework for the assessment of tumor suppressor functional "status". This approach utilizes several orthogonal genomic data types, including mutation data, copy number, LOH and expression. Through correlation with additional data types (compound sensitivity and gene set activity) we show that this integrative method provides a more accurate assessment of tumor suppressor status than can be inferred by expression, copy number, or mutation alone. This approach has the potential for a more realistic assessment of tumor suppressor genes for both basic and translational oncology research.

  15. Granulosa cell tumor of scrotal tunics: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kyoung Sik [Pochon CHA University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of adult granulosa cell tumor arising in the scrotal tunics. The patient was a 34-year-old man who presented with right scrotal swelling, first noticed four months previously. Under the initial clinical impression of epididymoorchitis, antibiotic treatment was instituted but there was no response. The paratesticular nodules revealed by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging mimicked intratesticular lesion, and radical orchiectomy was performed. Although several cases of adult testicular granulosa cell tumor, have been reported, the occurrence of this entity in the paratesticular area has not, as far as we are aware, been previously described.

  16. Intercellular Communication of Tumor Cells and Immune Cells after Exposure to Different Ionizing Radiation Qualities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Diegeler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation can affect the immune system in many ways. Depending on the situation, the whole body or parts of the body can be acutely or chronically exposed to different radiation qualities. In tumor radiotherapy, a fractionated exposure of the tumor (and surrounding tissues is applied to kill the tumor cells. Currently, mostly photons, and also electrons, neutrons, protons, and heavier particles such as carbon ions, are used in radiotherapy. Tumor elimination can be supported by an effective immune response. In recent years, much progress has been achieved in the understanding of basic interactions between the irradiated tumor and the immune system. Here, direct and indirect effects of radiation on immune cells have to be considered. Lymphocytes for example are known to be highly radiosensitive. One important factor in indirect interactions is the radiation-induced bystander effect which can be initiated in unexposed cells by expression of cytokines of the irradiated cells and by direct exchange of molecules via gap junctions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the indirect effects observed after exposure to different radiation qualities. The different immune cell populations important for the tumor immune response are natural killer cells, dendritic cells, and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. In vitro and in vivo studies have revealed the modulation of their functions due to ionizing radiation exposure of tumor cells. After radiation exposure, cytokines are produced by exposed tumor and immune cells and a modulated expression profile has also been observed in bystander immune cells. Release of damage-associated molecular patterns by irradiated tumor cells is another factor in immune activation. In conclusion, both immune-activating and -suppressing effects can occur. Enhancing or inhibiting these effects, respectively, could contribute to modified tumor cell killing after radiotherapy.

  17. General Information about Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Being male. Being age 20 or older. Having Klinefelter syndrome . Signs and symptoms of extragonadal germ cell ... and procedures may be used: Physical exam and history : An exam of the body to check general ...

  18. Recent advances in molecular and cell biology of testicular germ-cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieffi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Testicular germ-cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most frequent solid malignant tumors in men 20-40 years of age and the most frequent cause of death from solid tumors in this age group. TGCTs comprise two major histologic groups: seminomas and nonseminomas germ-cell tumors (NSGCTs). NSGCTs can be further divided into embryonal, carcinoma, Teratoma, yolk sac tumor, and choriocarcinoma. Seminomas and NSGCTs present significant differences in clinical features, therapy, and prognosis, and both show characteristics of the primordial germ cells. Many discovered biomarkers including OCT3/4, SOX2, SOX17, HMGA1, Nek2, GPR30, Aurora-B, estrogen receptor β, and others have given further advantages to discriminate between histological subgroups and could represent useful novel molecular targets for antineoplastic strategies. More insight into the pathogenesis of TGCTs is likely to improve disease management not only to better treatment of these tumors but also to a better understanding of stem cells and oncogenesis.

  19. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) of the cheek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Naseem; Cascarini, Luke; Norris, Paul; Barrett, A W; Lavery, Kenneth M

    2010-07-01

    We present the unusual case of a perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) occurring within the cheek of a 32-year-old woman. PEComa is a rare, recently described, family of tumors with diverse clinicopathologic expression and which express melanocytic and muscle markers. It mainly affects the abdominopelvic region and rarely occurs in somatic soft tissue or skin. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of PEComa occurring in the facial cutaneous tissues. Other possible diagnoses considered included benign mesenchymal tumors of smooth muscle or neural origin. However, the cytomorphologic and immunohistochemical profile were most suggestive of PEComa. The tumor was completely excised, but in view of uncertainty as to how this entity would behave in an unusual location, lifelong follow up is recommended. After complete excision, there was no recurrence in 4 years. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings of intraorbital granular cell tumor (Abrikossoff's tumor): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Wei-Hsin; Lin, Tai-Chi; Lirng, Jiing-Feng; Guo, Wan-You; Chang, Fu-Pang; Ho, Donald Ming-Tak

    2016-05-13

    Granular cell tumors are rare neoplasms which can occur in any part of the body. Granular cell tumors of the orbit account for only 3 % of all granular cell tumor cases. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the orbit have proven useful for diagnosing orbital tumors. However, the rarity of intraorbital granular cell tumors poses a significant diagnostic challenge for both clinicians and radiologists. We report a case of a 37-year-old Chinese woman with a rare intraocular granular cell tumor of her right eye presenting with diplopia, proptosis, and restriction of ocular movement. Preoperative orbital computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement revealed an enhancing solid, ovoid, well-demarcated, retrobulbar nodule. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging features included an intraorbital tumor which was isointense relative to gray matter on T1-weighted imaging and hypointense on T2-weighted imaging. No diffusion restriction of water was noted on either axial diffusion-weighted images or apparent diffusion coefficient maps. Both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features suggested an intraorbital hemangioma. However, postoperative pathology (together with immunohistochemistry) identified an intraorbital granular cell tumor. When intraorbital T2 hypointensity and free diffusion of water are observed on magnetic resonance imaging, a granular cell tumor should be included in the differential diagnosis of an intraocular tumor.

  1. Tandem solar cells made from amorphous silicon and polymer bulk heterojunction sub-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Heum; Shin, Insoo; Kim, Kwang Ho; Street, Robert; Roy, Anshuman; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-14

    A tandem solar cell based on a combination of an amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polymer solar cell (PSC) is demonstrated. As these tandem devices can be readily fabricated by low-cost methods, they require only a minor increase in the total manufacturing cost. Therefore, a combination of a-Si and PSC provides a compelling solution to reduce the cost of electricity produced by photovoltaics.

  2. Circulating Tumor Cells: From Theory to Nanotechnology-Based Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yue; Li, Yuanyuan; Xing, Haiyan; Luo, Minghe; Li, Ziwei; Chen, Jianhong; Mo, Jingxin; Shi, Sanjun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells with stem-cell properties are regarded as tumor initiating cells. Sharing stem-cell properties, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for the development of metastasis, which significant affects CTC analysis in clinical practice. Due to their extremely low occurrence in blood, however, it is challenging to enumerate and analyze CTCs. Nanotechnology is able to address the problems of insufficient capture efficiency and low purity of CTCs owing to the unique structural and functional properties of nanomaterials, showing strong promise for CTC isolation and detection. In this review, we discuss the role of stem-like CTCs in metastases, provide insight into recent progress in CTC isolation and detection approaches using various nanoplatforms, and highlight the role of nanotechnology in the advancement of CTC research.

  3. Circulating Tumor Cells: From Theory to Nanotechnology-Based Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yue; Li, Yuanyuan; Xing, Haiyan; Luo, Minghe; Li, Ziwei; Chen, Jianhong; Mo, Jingxin; Shi, Sanjun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells with stem-cell properties are regarded as tumor initiating cells. Sharing stem-cell properties, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for the development of metastasis, which significant affects CTC analysis in clinical practice. Due to their extremely low occurrence in blood, however, it is challenging to enumerate and analyze CTCs. Nanotechnology is able to address the problems of insufficient capture efficiency and low purity of CTCs owing to the unique structural and functional properties of nanomaterials, showing strong promise for CTC isolation and detection. In this review, we discuss the role of stem-like CTCs in metastases, provide insight into recent progress in CTC isolation and detection approaches using various nanoplatforms, and highlight the role of nanotechnology in the advancement of CTC research. PMID:28203204

  4. The cytology of a thyroid granular cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Mei; Wei, Chang-Kuo; Tseng, Chih-En

    2009-01-01

    Granular cell tumor (GCT) of the thyroid is rare. Before this report, only four cases of thyroid GCT have been reported, none of which presented a cytopathological examination. In this paper, we report the fine needle aspiration cytology and pathological analysis of a thyroid GCT from a 12-year-old girl who presented with a painless neck mass. The tumor cells were single, in syncytial clusters, or pseudofollicles, contained small round, oval, or spindle nuclei, indistinct nucleoli, and a large amount of grayish, granular fragile cytoplasm. The background contained granular debris and naked nuclei. A differential diagnosis of thyroid GCT with more frequent thyroid lesions containing cytoplasmic granules, including Hurthle cells, macrophages, follicular cells, and cells of black thyroid syndrome, was also performed.

  5. Dclk1, a tumor stem cell marker, regulates pro-survival signaling and self-renewal of intestinal tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Yao, Jiannan; Qu, Dongfeng; May, Randal; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ge, Yang; Ali, Naushad; Sureban, Sripathi M; Gude, Modhi; Vega, Kenneth; Bannerman-Menson, Eddie; Xia, Lijun; Bronze, Michael; An, Guangyu; Houchen, Courtney W

    2017-02-01

    More than 80% of intestinal neoplasia is associated with the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutation. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (Dclk1), a kinase protein, is overexpressed in colorectal cancer and specifically marks tumor stem cells (TSCs) that self-renew and increased the tumor progeny in Apc (Min/+) mice. However, the role of Dclk1 expression and its contribution to regulating pro-survival signaling for tumor progression in Apc mutant cancer is poorly understood. We analyzed DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling gene expression datasets of 329 specimens from TCGA Colon Adenocarcinoma Cancer Data. The network of DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling was analyzed utilizing the GeneMANIA database. We examined the expression levels of Dclk1 and other stem cell-associated markers, pro-survival signaling pathways, cell self-renewal in the isolated intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice with high-grade dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. To determine the functional role of Dclk1 for tumor progression, we knocked down Dclk1 and determined the pro-survival signaling pathways and stemness. We used siRNA technology to gene silence pro-survival signaling in colon cancer cells in vitro. We utilized FACS, IHC, western blot, RT-PCR, and clonogenic (self-renewal) assays. We found a correlation between DCLK1 and pro-survival signaling expression. The expression of Dclk1 and stem cell-associated markers Lgr5, Bmi1, and Musashi1 were significantly higher in the intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice than in wild-type controls. Intestinal epithelial cells of Apc (Min/+) mice showed increased expression of pro-survival signaling, pluripotency and self-renewal ability. Furthermore, the enteroids formed from the intestinal Dclk1(+) cells of Apc (Min/+) mice display higher pluripotency and pro-survival signaling. Dclk1 knockdown in Apc (Min/+) mice attenuates intestinal adenomas and adenocarcinoma, and decreases pro-survival signaling and self-renewal. Knocking down RELA and NOTCH1

  6. Mutational analysis of circulating tumor cells from colorectal cancer patients and correlation with primary tumor tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lyberopoulou

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs provide a non-invasive accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. The cellular heterogeneity within CTC populations is of great clinical importance regarding the increasing number of adjuvant treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas, in order to eliminate residual disease. Moreover, the molecular profiling of these rare cells might lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies than simple CTCs counting. In the present study we investigated the feasibility to detect KRAS, BRAF, CD133 and Plastin3 (PLS3 mutations in an enriched CTCs cell suspension from patients with colorectal cancer, with the hypothesis that these genes` mutations are of great importance regarding the generation of CTCs subpopulations. Subsequently, we compared CTCs mutational status with that of the corresponding primary tumor, in order to access the possibility of tumor cells characterization without biopsy. CTCs were detected and isolated from blood drawn from 52 colorectal cancer (CRC patients using a quantum-dot-labelled magnetic immunoassay method. Mutations were detected by PCR-RFLP or allele-specific PCR and confirmed by direct sequencing. In 52 patients, discordance between primary tumor and CTCs was 5.77% for KRAS, 3.85% for BRAF, 11.54% for CD133 rs3130, 7.69% for CD133 rs2286455 and 11.54% for PLS3 rs6643869 mutations. Our results support that DNA mutational analysis of CTCs may enable non-invasive, specific biomarker diagnostics and expand the scope of personalized medicine for cancer patients.

  7. Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells: Five Core Technologies for Their Commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Junghwan; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kim, Heejoo; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-09-01

    The past two decades of vigorous interdisciplinary approaches has seen tremendous breakthroughs in both scientific and technological developments of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells (OSCs) based on nanocomposites of π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Because of their unique functionalities, the OSC field is expected to enable innovative photovoltaic applications that can be difficult to achieve using traditional inorganic solar cells: OSCs are printable, portable, wearable, disposable, biocompatible, and attachable to curved surfaces. The ultimate objective of this field is to develop cost-effective, stable, and high-performance photovoltaic modules fabricated on large-area flexible plastic substrates via high-volume/throughput roll-to-roll printing processing and thus achieve the practical implementation of OSCs. Recently, intensive research efforts into the development of organic materials, processing techniques, interface engineering, and device architectures have led to a remarkable improvement in power conversion efficiencies, exceeding 11%, which has finally brought OSCs close to commercialization. Current research interests are expanding from academic to industrial viewpoints to improve device stability and compatibility with large-scale printing processes, which must be addressed to realize viable applications. Here, both academic and industrial issues are reviewed by highlighting historically monumental research results and recent state-of-the-art progress in OSCs. Moreover, perspectives on five core technologies that affect the realization of the practical use of OSCs are presented, including device efficiency, device stability, flexible and transparent electrodes, module designs, and printing techniques. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Performance improvement of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells by using dihydroxybenzene as additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Cong; YANG Li-ying; WANG Ya-ling; QIN Wen-jing; YIN Shou-gen; ZHANG Feng-ling

    2011-01-01

    We report the enhanced performance of organic solar cells (OSCs) based on regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)and methanofullerene [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend by using dihydroxybenzene as additive in the active layer. The effect of the content of the additives on electrical characteristics of the device is studied. The device with 0.2 wt% dihydroxybenzene additive achieves the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.58% with Jsc of 12.5 mA/cm2, Voc of 0.65 V, and FF of 66.6% under simulated solar illumination of AM 1.5G (100 mW/cm2), compared with the control device with PCE of 3.39% (35% improvement compared with the control device). The XRD measurement reveals that the addition of additives induces the crystallization of P3HT and establishes good inter-network to increase the contact area of donor and acceptor, and then helps charge to be effectively transferred to the electrode to reduce the chance of recombination. All evidences indicate that the dihydroxybenzene is likely to be a promising new type additive that can enhance the performance of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells.

  9. Tilted bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells grown by oblique angle deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate small molecule bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells using oblique angle vacuum deposition. Obliquely deposited donor chloroaluminum phthalocyanine (ClAlPc) films on indium tin oxide have surface feature sizes of ˜30 nm, resulting in ClAlPc/C60 donor-acceptor heterojunctions (HJs) with approximately twice the interface area of HJs grown at normal incidence. This results in nearly twice the external quantum efficiency in the ClAlPc absorption band compared with analogous, planar HJs. The efficiency increase is attributed to the increased surface area presented by the donor-acceptor junction to the incident illumination by ClAlPc protrusions lying obliquely to the substrate plane formed during deposition. The power conversion efficiency improves from (2.0±0.1)% to (2.8±0.1)% under 1 sun, AM 1.5G simulated solar illumination. Similarly, the power efficiency of copper phthalocyanine/C60 organic photovoltaic cells is increased from (1.3±0.1)% to (1.7±0.1)%.

  10. Understanding Solvent Manipulation of Morphology in Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuxia; Zhan, Chuanlang; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-10-06

    Film morphology greatly influences the performance of bulk-heterojunction (BHJ)-structure-based solar cells. It is known that an interpenetrating bicontinuous network with nanoscale-separated donor and acceptor phases for charge transfer, an ordered molecular packing for exciton diffusion and charge transport, and a vertical compositionally graded structure for charge collection are prerequisites for achieving highly efficient BHJ organic solar cells (OSCs). Therefore, control of the morphology to obtain an ideal structure is a key problem. For this solution-processing BHJ system, the solvent participates fully in film processing. Its involvement is critical in modifying the nanostructure of BHJ films. In this review, we discuss the effects of solvent-related methods on the morphology of BHJ films, including selection of the casting solvent, solvent mixture, solvent vapor annealing, and solvent soaking. On the basis of a discussion on interaction strength and time between solvent and active materials, we believe that the solvent-morphology-performance relationship will be clearer and that solvent selection as a means to manipulate the morphology of BHJ films will be more rational.

  11. 25th anniversary article: Bulk heterojunction solar cells: understanding the mechanism of operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeger, Alan J

    2014-01-08

    The status of understanding of the operation of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is reviewed. Because the carrier photoexcitation recombination lengths are typically 10 nm in these disordered materials, the length scale for self-assembly must be of order 10-20 nm. Experiments have verified the existence of the BHJ nanostructure, but the morphology remains complex and a limiting factor. Three steps are required for generation of electrical power: i) absorption of photons from the sun; ii) photoinduced charge separation and the generation of mobile carriers; iii) collection of electrons and holes at opposite electrodes. The ultrafast charge transfer process arises from fundamental quantum uncertainty; mobile carriers are directly generated (electrons in the acceptor domains and holes in the donor domains) by the ultrafast charge transfer (≈70%) with ≈30% generated by exciton diffusion to a charge separating heterojunction. Sweep-out of the mobile carriers by the internal field prior to recombination is essential for high performance. Bimolecular recombination dominates in materials where the donor and acceptor phases are pure. Impurities degrade performance by introducing Shockly-Read-Hall decay. The review concludes with a summary of the problems to be solved to achieve the predicted power conversion efficiencies of >20% for a single cell.

  12. Polymer:Nonfullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells with Exceptionally Low Recombination Rates

    KAUST Repository

    Gasparini, Nicola

    2017-09-01

    Organic semiconductors are in general known to have an inherently lower charge carrier mobility compared to their inorganic counterparts. Bimolecular recombination of holes and electrons is an important loss mechanism and can often be described by the Langevin recombination model. Here, the device physics of bulk heterojunction solar cells based on a nonfullerene acceptor (IDTBR) in combination with poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) are elucidated, showing an unprecedentedly low bimolecular recombination rate. The high fill factor observed (above 65%) is attributed to non-Langevin behavior with a Langevin prefactor (β/βL) of 1.9 × 10−4. The absence of parasitic recombination and high charge carrier lifetimes in P3HT:IDTBR solar cells inform an almost ideal bimolecular recombination behavior. This exceptional recombination behavior is explored to fabricate devices with layer thicknesses up to 450 nm without significant performance losses. The determination of the photoexcited carrier mobility by time-of-flight measurements reveals a long-lived and nonthermalized carrier transport as the origin for the exceptional transport physics. The crystalline microstructure arrangement of both components is suggested to be decisive for this slow recombination dynamics. Further, the thickness-independent power conversion efficiency is of utmost technological relevance for upscaling production and reiterates the importance of understanding material design in the context of low bimolecular recombination.

  13. Structure–property relationships of oligothiophene–isoindigo polymers for efficient bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Zaifei

    2014-01-01

    A series of alternating oligothiophene (nT)-isoindigo (I) copolymers (PnTI) were synthesized to investigate the influence of the oligothiophene block length on the photovoltaic (PV) properties of PnTI:PCBM bulk-heterojunction blends. Our study indicates that the number of thiophene rings (n) in the repeating unit alters both polymer crystallinity and polymer-fullerene interfacial energetics, which results in a decreasing open-circuit voltage (Voc) of the solar cells with increasing n. The short-circuit current density (Jsc) of P1TI:PCBM devices is limited by the absence of a significant driving force for electron transfer. Instead, blends based on P5TI and P6TI feature large polymer domains, which limit charge generation and thus Jsc. The best PV performance with a power conversion efficiency of up to 6.9% was achieved with devices based on P3TI, where a combination of a favorable morphology and an optimal interfacial energy level offset ensures efficient exciton separation and charge generation. The structure-property relationship demonstrated in this work would be a valuable guideline for the design of high performance polymers with small energy losses during the charge generation process, allowing for the fabrication of efficient solar cells that combine a minimal loss in Voc with a high Jsc. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Ring substituents mediate the morphology of PBDTTPD-PCBM bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Warnan, Julien

    2014-04-08

    Among π-conjugated polymer donors for efficient bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell applications, poly(benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b′]dithiophene- thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione) (PBDTTPD) polymers yield some of the highest open-circuit voltages (VOC, ca. 0.9 V) and fill-factors (FF, ca. 70%) in conventional (single-cell) BHJ devices with PCBM acceptors. In PBDTTPD, side chains of varying size and branching affect polymer self-assembly, nanostructural order, and impact material performance. However, the role of the polymer side-chain pattern in the intimate mixing between polymer donors and PCBM acceptors, and on the development of the BHJ morphology is in general less understood. In this contribution, we show that ring substituents such as furan (F), thiophene (T) and selenophene (S)-incorporated into the side chains of PBDTTPD polymers-can induce significant and, of importance, very different morphological effects in BHJs with PCBM. A combination of experimental and theoretical (via density functional theory) characterizations sheds light on how varying the heteroatom of the ring substituents impacts (i) the preferred side-chain configurations and (ii) the ionization, electronic, and optical properties of the PBDTTPD polymers. In parallel, we find that the PBDT(X)TPD analogs (with X = F, T, or S) span a broad range of power conversion efficiencies (PCEs, 3-6.5%) in optimized devices with improved thin-film morphologies via the use of 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO), and discuss that persistent morphological impediments at the nanoscale can be at the origin of the spread in PCE across optimized PBDT(X)TPD-based devices. With their high VOC ∼1 V, PBDT(X)TPD polymers are promising candidates for use in the high-band gap cell of tandem solar cells. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  15. Hypertonic saline impedes tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction by reducing adhesion molecule and laminin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline infusion dampens inflammatory responses and suppresses neutrophil-endothelial interaction by reducing adhesion molecule expression. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertonic saline attenuates tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a similar mechanism. METHODS: Human colon cancer cells (LS174T) were transfected with green fluorescent protein and exposed to lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 under hypertonic and isotonic conditions for 1 and 4 hours. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were similarly exposed. Cellular apoptosis and expression of adhesion molecules and laminin were measured by flow cytometry. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelium and laminin was assessed with fluorescence microscopy. Data are represented as mean +\\/- standard error of mean, and an ANOVA test was performed to gauge statistical significance, with P <.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Hypertonic exposure significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion despite the presence of the perioperative cell stressors (42 +\\/- 2.9 vs 172.5 +\\/- 12.4, P <.05), attenuated tumor cell beta-1 integrin (14.43 vs 23.84, P <.05), and endothelial cell laminin expression (22.78 +\\/- 2.2 vs 33.74 +\\/- 2.4, P <.05), but did not significantly alter cell viability. CONCLUSION: Hypertonic saline significantly attenuates tumor cell adhesion to endothelium by inhibiting adhesion molecule and laminin expression. This may halt the metastatic behavior of tumor cells shed at surgery.

  16. Transportation characteristics of nolatrexed in three tumor cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-lei; ZHAO Ai-guo; WU Shu-guang

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the association of the transportation characteristics of nolatrexed in tumor cells with its drug sensitivity. Methods: The sensitivity of 3 tumor cell lines, C6, SRS82 and LoVo, to nolatrexed were determined by growth inhibition study. After exposure to 20 μmol/L nolatrexed at different time intervals ranging from 0 to 30 min, or to nolatrexed at different concentrations ranging from 0 to 40μmol/L for 10 min, the intracellular drug concentration was measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: C6 was the most sensitive cell line among the three, with sensitivity 6. 8-fold and 13.8-fold those of SRS-82 and LoVo cells respectively. Transportation of nolatrexed in the 3 cell lines were qualitatively similar, which rapidly achieved steady-state within 5 min, and linear relationship between the intracellular and extracellular drug concentration was observed. The intracellular steady-state level achieved in C6 was significantly higher than those in the other two cell lines, the latter having comparable levels. Conclusion: Nolatrexed enters the cell very quickly and different transport capacities are involved in the generation of varied sensitivity to nolatrexed in tumor cells.

  17. Photoacoustic monitoring of circulating tumor cells released during medical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    Many cancer deaths are related to metastasis to distant organs due to dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from the primary tumor. For many years, oncologists believed some medical procedures may provoke metastasis; however, no direct evidence has been reported. We have developed a new, noninvasive technology called in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC), which provides ultrasensitive detection of CTCs. When CTCs with strongly light-absorbing intrinsic melanin pass through a laser beam aimed at a peripheral blood vessel, laser-induced acoustic waves from CTCs were detected using an ultrasound transducer. We focused on melanoma as it is one of the most metastatically aggressive malignancies. The goal of this research was to determine whether melanoma manipulation, like compression, incisional biopsy, or tumor excision, could enhance penetration of cancer cells from the primary tumor into the circulatory system. The ears of nude mice were inoculated with melanoma cells. Blood vessels were monitored for the presence of CTCs using in vivo PAFC. We discovered some medical procedures, like compression of the tumor, biopsy, and surgery may either initiate CTC release in the blood which previously contained no CTCs, or dramatically increased (10-30-fold) CTC counts above the initial level. Our results warn oncologists to use caution during physical examination, and surgery. A preventive anti-CTC therapy during or immediately after surgery, by intravenous drug administration could serve as an option to treat the resulting release of CTCs.

  18. Busulfan, Melphalan, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and a Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed Solid Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-04

    Solid Tumor; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Ex Vivo Behaviour of Human Bone Tumor Endothelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infante, Teresa [SDN-Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, IRCCS, 80143 Naples (Italy); Cesario, Elena [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy); Gallo, Michele; Fazioli, Flavio [Division of Skeletal Muscles Oncology Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); De Chiara, Annarosaria [Anatomic Pathology Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tutucci, Cristina; Apice, Gaetano [Medical Oncology of Bone and Soft Sarcoma tissues Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Nigris, Filomena de, E-mail: filomena.denigris@unina2.it [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2013-04-11

    Cooperation between endothelial cells and bone in bone remodelling is well established. In contrast, bone microvasculature supporting the growth of primary tumors and metastasis is poorly understood. Several antiangiogenic agents have recently been undergoing trials, although an extensive body of clinical data and experimental research have proved that angiogenic pathways differ in each tumor type and stage. Here, for the first time, we characterize at the molecular and functional level tumor endothelial cells from human bone sarcomas at different stages of disease and with different histotypes. We selected a CD31{sup +} subpopulation from biopsies that displayed the capability to grow as adherent cell lines without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our findings show the existence in human primary bone sarcomas of highly proliferative endothelial cells expressing CD31, CD44, CD105, CD146 and CD90 markers. These cells are committed to develop capillary-like structures and colony formation units, and to produce nitric oxide. We believe that a better understanding of tumor vasculature could be a valid tool for the design of an efficacious antiangiogenic therapy as adjuvant treatment of sarcomas.

  20. Tumor associated antigen specific T-cell populations identified in ex vivo expanded TIL cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Niels; Kvistborg, Pia; Køllgaard, Tania

    2012-01-01

    Ex vivo expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from malignant melanoma (MM) and head & neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) share a similar oligoclonal composition of T effector memory cells, with HLA class I restricted lysis of tumor cell lines. In this study we show that ex vivo expanded...... the heterogeneous tumors upon adoptive transfer; increasing the probability of tumor control by minimizing immune evasion by tumor cell escape variants....

  1. Spatial organization and correlations of cell nuclei in brain tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiao

    Full Text Available Accepting the hypothesis that cancers are self-organizing, opportunistic systems, it is crucial to understand the collective behavior of cancer cells in their tumorous heterogeneous environment. In the present paper, we ask the following basic question: Is this self-organization of tumor evolution reflected in the manner in which malignant cells are spatially distributed in their heterogeneous environment? We employ a variety of nontrivial statistical microstructural descriptors that arise in the theory of heterogeneous media to characterize the spatial distributions of the nuclei of both benign brain white matter cells and brain glioma cells as obtained from histological images. These descriptors, which include the pair correlation function, structure factor and various nearest neighbor functions, quantify how pairs of cell nuclei are correlated in space in various ways. We map the centroids of the cell nuclei into point distributions to show that while commonly used local spatial statistics (e.g., cell areas and number of neighboring cells cannot clearly distinguish spatial correlations in distributions of normal and abnormal cell nuclei, their salient structural features are captured very well by the aforementioned microstructural descriptors. We show that the tumorous cells pack more densely than normal cells and exhibit stronger effective repulsions between any pair of cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that brain gliomas are organized in a collective way rather than randomly on intermediate and large length scales. The existence of nontrivial spatial correlations between the abnormal cells strongly supports the view that cancer is not an unorganized collection of malignant cells but rather a complex emergent integrated system.

  2. Circulating Tumor Cells Versus Circulating Tumor DNA in Colorectal Cancer: Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Carlyn Rose C; Zhou, Lanlan; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) are emerging noninvasive multifunctional biomarkers in liquid biopsy allowing for early diagnosis, accurate prognosis, therapeutic target selection, spatiotemporal monitoring of metastasis, as well as monitoring response and resistance to treatment. CTCs and ctDNA are released from different tumor types at different stages and contribute complementary information for clinical decision. Although big strides have been taken in technology development for detection, isolation and characterization of CTCs and sensitive and specific detection of ctDNA, CTC-, and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies may not be widely adopted for routine cancer patient care until the suitability, accuracy, and reliability of these tests are validated and more standardized protocols are corroborated in large, independent, prospectively designed trials. This review covers CTC- and ctDNA-related technologies and their application in colorectal cancer. The promise of CTC-and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies is envisioned.

  3. Giant cell tumor-like lesion of the urinary bladder: a report of two cases and literature review; giant cell tumor or undifferentiated carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oznur Meltem

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary Giant cell tumor, excluding its prototype in bone, is usually a benign but local aggressive neoplasm originating from tendon sheath or soft tissue. Malignant behavior is uncommon. Visceral organ involvement including urinary bladder is rare. Giant cell tumors in visceral organs usually accompany epithelial tumors and the clinical behavior of giant cell tumor in urinary bladder is similar to its bone counterpart. Here, we report two cases of giant cell tumor located in urinary bladder in comparison with nine reported cases in the English literature. Concurrent noninvasive urothelial carcinoma was also described in all these previous reports and only one patient with follow-up died of disease. One of the two cases we present had no concurrent urothelial tumor at the time of diagnosis but had a history of a low grade noninvasive urothelial carcinoma with three recurrences. The histology of these two cases was similar to the giant cell tumor of bone and composed of oval to spindle mononuclear cells with evenly spaced osteoclast-like giant cells. Immunohistochemically, the giant cells showed staining with osteoclastic markers including CD68, TRAP, and LCA. Immunohistochemical expression of vimentin, CD68, LCA, and smooth muscle actin in mononuclear cells supported a mesenchymal origin with histiocytic lineage. The histologic and immunohistochemical properties in our cases as well as their clinical courses were consistent with a giant cell tumor. Consequently, tumors in urinary bladder showing features of giant cell tumor of bone may also be considered and termed "giant cell tumor".

  4. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin.

  5. Morphological Control of the Photoactive Layer in Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Yisong

    2011-07-23

    For its inherent advantages, such as lightweight, low cost, flexibility, and opportunity to cover large surface areas, organic solar cells have attracted more and more attention in both academia and industry. However, the efficiency of organic solar cell is still much lower than silicon solar cells, but steadily rising as it now stands above 8%. The architecture of bulk heterojunction solar cells can improve the performance of organic solar cell a lot, but these improvements are highly dependent on the morphology of photoactive layer. Therefore, by controlling the morphology of photoactive layer, most commonly composed of a P3HT donor polymer and PCBM small molecule, the performance of organic solar cells could be optimized. The use of solvent additives in the solution formulation is particularly interesting, because it is a low cost method of controlling the phase separation of the photoactive layer and possibly removing the need for subsequent thermal and solvent vapor annealing. However, the role of the solvent additive remains not well understood and much debate remains on the mechanisms by which it impacts phase separation. In the first part of this thesis, we investigate the role of the solvent additive on the individual components (solvent, donor and acceptor) of the solution and the photoactive layer both in the bulk solution, during solution-processing and in the post-processing solid state of the film. In the second part of this thesis, we investigate the role of the additive on the blended solution state and resulting thin film phase separation. Finally, we propose a new method of controlling phase separation based on the insight into the role of the solvent additive. In the first part, we used an additive [octandiethiol (OT)] in the solvent to help the aggregation of P3HT in the solution. From the UV-vis experiments, the crystallinity of P3HT in the solutions increased while it decreased in thin films with steady increase of additive concentration. This

  6. Clear cell renal cell tumors: Not all that is "clear" is cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Sean R; Cheng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Continued improvement of our understanding of the clinical, histologic, and genetic features of renal cell tumors has progressively evolved renal tumor classification, revealing an expanding array of distinct tumor types with different implications for prognosis, patient counseling, and treatment. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma is unequivocally the most common adult renal tumor, there is growing evidence that some "clear cell" renal neoplasms, such as exemplified by multilocular cystic clear cell renal neoplasm of low malignant potential (formerly multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma), do not have the same potential for insidious progression and metastasis, warranting reclassification as low malignant potential tumors or benign neoplasms. Still other novel tumor types such as clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma have been more recently recognized, which similarly have shown a conspicuous absence of aggressive behavior to date, suggesting that these too may be recategorized as noncancerous or may be premalignant neoplasms. This importance for prognosis is increasingly significant in the modern era, in which renal masses are increasingly found incidentally by imaging techniques at a small tumor size, raising consideration for less aggressive management options guided by renal mass biopsy diagnosis, including imaging surveillance, tumor ablation, or partial nephrectomy.

  7. The Mutational Landscape of Circulating Tumor Cells in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Mishima

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensitive and non-invasive “liquid biopsies” presents new opportunities for longitudinal monitoring of tumor dissemination and clonal evolution. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs is prognostic in multiple myeloma (MM, but there is little information on their genetic features. Here, we have analyzed the genomic landscape of CTCs from 29 MM patients, including eight cases with matched/paired bone marrow (BM tumor cells. Our results show that 100% of clonal mutations in patient BM were detected in CTCs and that 99% of clonal mutations in CTCs were present in BM MM. These include typical driver mutations in MM such as in KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF. These data suggest that BM and CTC samples have similar clonal structures, as discordances between the two were restricted to subclonal mutations. Accordingly, our results pave the way for potentially less invasive mutation screening of MM patients through characterization of CTCs.

  8. [Radiation-induces increased tumor cell aggressiveness of tumors of the glioblastomas?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Alexander T; Moncharmont, Coralie; Guilbert, Matthieu; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Alphonse, Gersende; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Rivoirard, Romain; Gilormini, Marion; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiform is the most common and aggressive brain tumor with a worse prognostic. Ionizing radiation is a cornerstone in the treatment of glioblastome with chemo-radiation association being the actual standard. As a paradoxal effect, it has been suggested that radiotherapy could have a deleterious effect on local recurrence of cancer. In vivo studies have studied the effect of radiotherapy on biological modification and pathogenous effect of cancer cells. It seems that ionizing radiations with photon could activate oncogenic pathways in glioblastoma cell lines. We realized a review of the literature of photon-enhanced effect on invasion and migration of glioblastoma cells by radiotherapy.

  9. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of the liver coexisting with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlos Eduardo Paiva; Francisco Alves Moraes Neto; Abbas Agaimy; Maria Aparecida Custódio Domingues; Silvia Regina Rogatto

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) develop other neoplasms,either synchronously or metachronously.In this report we describe coexistence of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor and a hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) in a 51-year-old woman with no evidence of tuberous sclerosis.A subcapsular hepatic nodule (0.8 cm in diameter) was found during surgery for symptomatic gastric neoplasm (15 cm in diameter) arising from the lesser curvature.Both tumors revealed histomorphological and immunohistochemical features confirming a diagnosis of a small incidental hepatic PEComa and a high risky extramural gastric GIST,respectively.The patient remained disease-free 25 mo after surgery with no evidence of tumor recurrence or new neoplasms.To our knowledge,this is the first report of PEComa in a patient with GIST.Hepatic lesions detected synchronously or metachronously in patients with GISTs may represent histogenetically distinct lesions and should be sampled to confirm or exclude metastatic GISTs.

  10. Neuroblastoma cell lines contain pluripotent tumor initiating cells that are susceptible to a targeted oncolytic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Y Mahller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although disease remission can frequently be achieved for patients with neuroblastoma, relapse is common. The cancer stem cell theory suggests that rare tumorigenic cells, resistant to conventional therapy, are responsible for relapse. If true for neuroblastoma, improved cure rates may only be achieved via identification and therapeutic targeting of the neuroblastoma tumor initiating cell. Based on cues from normal stem cells, evidence for tumor populating progenitor cells has been found in a variety of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four of eight human neuroblastoma cell lines formed tumorspheres in neural stem cell media, and all contained some cells that expressed neurogenic stem cell markers including CD133, ABCG2, and nestin. Three lines tested could be induced into multi-lineage differentiation. LA-N-5 spheres were further studied and showed a verapamil-sensitive side population, relative resistance to doxorubicin, and CD133+ cells showed increased sphere formation and tumorigenicity. Oncolytic viruses, engineered to be clinically safe by genetic mutation, are emerging as next generation anticancer therapeutics. Because oncolytic viruses circumvent typical drug-resistance mechanisms, they may represent an effective therapy for chemotherapy-resistant tumor initiating cells. A Nestin-targeted oncolytic herpes simplex virus efficiently replicated within and killed neuroblastoma tumor initiating cells preventing their ability to form tumors in athymic nude mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that human neuroblastoma contains tumor initiating cells that may be effectively targeted by an oncolytic virus.

  11. Recombinant human erythropoietin alpha improves the efficacy of radiotherapy of a human tumor xenograft, affecting tumor cells and microvessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevey, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Bereczky, B.; Gilly, R.; Kenessey, I.; Raso, E.; Simon, E.; Timar, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Dobos, J. [Dept. of Tumor Progression, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Vago, A. [Central Lab., National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Kasler, M. [Head and Neck Surgery, National Inst. of Oncology, Budapest (Hungary); Doeme, B. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); Tovari, J. [National Koranyi Inst. of TBC and Pulmonology, Budapest (Hungary); 1. Inst. of Pathology and Experimental Cancer Research, Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: tumor-induced anemia often occurs in cancer patients, and is corrected by recombinant human erythropoietins (rHuEPOs). Recent studies indicated that, besides erythroid progenitor cells, tumor and endothelial cells express erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) as well; therefore, rHuEPO may affect their functions. Here, the effect of rHuEPO{alpha} on irradiation in EPOR-positive human squamous cell carcinoma xenograft was tested. Material and methods: A431 tumor-bearing SCID mice were treated from the tumor implantation with rHuEPO{alpha} at human-equivalent dose. Xenografts were irradiated (5 Gy) on day 14, and the final tumor mass was measured on day 22. The systemic effects of rHuEPO{alpha} on the hemoglobin level, on tumor-associated blood vessels and on hypoxia-inducible factor-(HIF-)1{alpha} expression of the tumor xenografts were monitored. The proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity of A431 cancer cells treated with rHuEPO{alpha} and irradiation were also tested in vitro. Results: in vitro, rHuEPO{alpha} treatment alone did not modify the proliferation of EPOR-positive A431 tumor cells but enhanced the effect of irradiation on proliferation, apoptosis and clonogenic capacity. In vivo, rHuEPO{alpha} administration compensated the tumor-induced anemia in SCID mice and decreased tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression but had no effect on tumor growth. At the same time rHuEPO{alpha} treatment significantly increased the efficacy of radiotherapy in vivo (tumor weight of 23.9 {+-} 4.7 mg and 34.9 {+-} 4.6 mg, respectively), mediated by increased tumoral blood vessel destruction. Conclusion: rHuEPO{alpha} treatment may modulate the efficacy of cancer radiotherapy not only by reducing systemic hypoxia and tumoral HIF-1{alpha} expression, but also by destroying tumoral vessels. (orig.)

  12. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Yu [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Nakahama, Ken-ichi, E-mail: nakacell@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsuaki [Department of Cardivascular Medicine, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Morita, Ikuo [Department of Cellular Physiological Chemistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  13. Oncogenic Properties of Apoptotic Tumor Cells in Aggressive B Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Catriona A.; Petrova, Sofia; Pound, John D.; Voss, Jorine J.L.P.; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Cuff, Simone; Wheadon, Helen; Dobbin, Edwina; Ogden, Carol Anne; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.; Dunbar, Donald R.; Murray, Paul G.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E.; Hume, David A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Goodlad, John R.; Freeman, Tom C.; Gregory, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cells undergoing apoptosis are known to modulate their tissue microenvironments. By acting on phagocytes, notably macrophages, apoptotic cells inhibit immunological and inflammatory responses and promote trophic signaling pathways. Paradoxically, because of their potential to cause death of tumor cells and thereby militate against malignant disease progression, both apoptosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with poor prognosis in cancer. We hypothesized that, in progression of malignant disease, constitutive loss of a fraction of the tumor cell population through apoptosis could yield tumor-promoting effects. Results Here, we demonstrate that apoptotic tumor cells promote coordinated tumor growth, angiogenesis, and accumulation of TAMs in aggressive B cell lymphomas. Through unbiased “in situ transcriptomics” analysis—gene expression profiling of laser-captured TAMs to establish their activation signature in situ—we show that these cells are activated to signal via multiple tumor-promoting reparatory, trophic, angiogenic, tissue remodeling, and anti-inflammatory pathways. Our results also suggest that apoptotic lymphoma cells help drive this signature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, upon induction of apoptosis, lymphoma cells not only activate expression of the tumor-promoting matrix metalloproteinases MMP2 and MMP12 in macrophages but also express and process these MMPs directly. Finally, using a model of malignant melanoma, we show that the oncogenic potential of apoptotic tumor cells extends beyond lymphoma. Conclusions In addition to its profound tumor-suppressive role, apoptosis can potentiate cancer progression. These results have important implications for understanding the fundamental biology of cell death, its roles in malignant disease, and the broader consequences of apoptosis-inducing anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25702581

  14. ONE-CLASS DETECTION OF CELL STATES IN TUMOR SUBTYPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    SOKOLOV, ARTEM; PAULL, EVAN O.; STUART, JOSHUA M.

    2016-01-01

    The cellular composition of a tumor greatly influences the growth, spread, immune activity, drug response, and other aspects of the disease. Tumor cells are usually comprised of a heterogeneous mixture of subclones, each of which could contain their own distinct character. The presence of minor subclones poses a serious health risk for patients as any one of them could harbor a fitness advantage with respect to the current treatment regimen, fueling resistance. It is therefore vital to accurately assess the make-up of cell states within a tumor biopsy. Transcriptome-wide assays from RNA sequencing provide key data from which cell state signatures can be detected. However, the challenge is to find them within samples containing mixtures of cell types of unknown proportions. We propose a novel one-class method based on logistic regression and show that its performance is competitive to two established SVM-based methods for this detection task. We demonstrate that one-class models are able to identify specific cell types in heterogeneous cell populations better than their binary predictor counterparts. We derive one-class predictors for the major breast and bladder subtypes and reaffirm the connection between these two tissues. In addition, we use a one-class predictor to quantitatively associate an embryonic stem cell signature with an aggressive breast cancer subtype that reveals shared stemness pathways potentially important for treatment. PMID:26776204

  15. Cloning of aminopeptidase Npromoter and its activity in hematopoietic cell and different tumor cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN) promoter region was cloned and sequenced from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The recombinant reporter construct containing the promoter and luciferase gene, designated pXP1-APNLuc, was introduced into myeloblastic cell line, T lymphocyte cell line and various tumor cell lines. Luciferase assay showed that APN upstream promoter is myeloid-specific for high expression in myeloblastic cell line and much lower expres sion in T lymphocyte cell line. The promoter activity was relatively high in lung adenoma cell line compared with other tumor cell lines including hepatoma cell line, tong cancer cell line and esophageal cancer cell line in which the promoter activity significantly diminished or was almost undetectable. The characteristics of APN promoter may pro vide a new strategy for specific myeloprotection while tumor patients are being treated with chemotherapy and/or radio therapy.

  16. Gracilaria edulis extract induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Satyajit; Muthuraman, Meenakshi Sundaram

    2013-11-25

    Marine environment is inestimable for their chemical and biological diversity and therefore is an extraordinary resource for the discovery of new anticancer drugs. Recent development in elucidation of the mechanism and therapeutic action of natural products helped to evaluate for their potential activity. We evaluated Gracilaria edulis J. Ag (Brown algae), for its antitumor potential against the Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) in vivo and in vitro. Cytotoxicity evaluation of Ethanol Extract of Gracilaria edulis (EEGE) using EAT cells showed significant activity. In vitro studies indicated that EEGE cytotoxicity to EAT cells is mediated through its ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and therefore decreasing intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels may be attributed to oxidative stress. Apoptotic parameters including Annexin-V positive cells, increased levels of DNA fragmentation and increased caspase-2, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities indicated the mechanism might be by inducing apoptosis. Intraperitoneally administration of EEGE to EAT-bearing mice helped to increase the lifespan of the animals significantly inhibited tumor growth and increased survival of mice. Extensive hematology, biochemistry and histopathological analysis of liver and kidney indicated that daily doses of EEGE up to 300 mg/kg for 35 days are well tolerated and did not cause hematotoxicity nor renal or hepatotoxicity. Comprehensive antitumor analysis in animal model and in Ehrlich Ascites Tumor cells was done including biochemical, and pathological evaluations indicate antitumor activity of the extract and non toxic in vivo. It was evident that the mechanism explains the apoptotic activity of the algae extract.

  17. MicroRNA regulating metabolic reprogramming in tumor cells: New tumor markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Otero-Albiol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic reprogramming is a feature of cancer cells that provides fast energy production and the abundance of precursors required to fuel uncontrolled proliferation. The Warburg effect, increase in glucose uptake and preference for glycolysis over oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS as major source of energy even in the presence of oxygen, is the main metabolic adaptation of cancer cells but not the only one. Increased glutaminolysis is also observed in cancer cells, being another source of adenosine triphosphate production and supply of intermediates for macromolecule biosynthesis. The ability to shift from OXPHOS to glycolysis and vice versa, known as metabolic plasticity, allows cancer cells to adapt to continuous changes in the tumor microenvironment. Metabolic reprogramming is linked to the deregulation of pathways controlled by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha, MYC, or p53, and microRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as key regulators of these signaling pathways. miRNAs target metabolic enzymes, oncogenes, and tumor suppressors involved in metabolic reprogramming, becoming crucial elements in the cross talk of molecular pathways that promotes survival, proliferation, migration, and consequently, tumor progression and metastasis. Moreover, several miRNAs have been found downregulated in different human cancers. Due to this fact and their central role in metabolism regulation, miRNAs may be considered as biomarkers for cancer therapy.

  18. Tumor microenvironment derived exosomes pleiotropically modulate cancer cell metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are a major cellular component of tumor microenvironment in most solid cancers. Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, and much of the published literature has focused on neoplastic cell-autonomous processes for these adaptations. We demonstrate tha...

  19. Molecular determinants of treatment response in human germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Mayer; J.A. Stoop (Hans); G.L. Scheffer (George); R. Scheper; J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); C. Bokemeyer

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are highly sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This feature is unexplained, as is the intrinsic chemotherapy resistance of mature teratomas and the resistant phenotype of a minority of refractory GCTs. Various cellular pathways ma

  20. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Stoop (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Natural Killer Cell Trafficking in Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galli, Filippo; Rapisarda, Anna Serafina; Stabile, Helena; Malviya, Gaurav; Manni, Isabella; Bonanno, Elena; Piaggio, Giulia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela; Signore, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NKs) are important effectors of the innate immune system, with marked antitumor activity. Imaging NK trafficking in vivo may be relevant to following up the efficacy of new therapeutic approaches aiming at increasing tumor-infiltrating NKs (TINKs). The specific aims of present

  2. The Challenges of Detecting Circulating Tumor Cells in Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Brown, Hannah K.; Young, Robin; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin, many of which have a propensity to develop distant metastases. Cancer cells that have escaped from the primary tumor are able to invade into surrounding tissues, to intravasate into the bloodstream to become circulating tumor cells (CTCs), and are responsible for the generation of distant metastases. Due to the rarity of these tumors and the absence of specific markers expressed by sarcoma tumor cells, the characterization of sarcoma CTCs has to date been relatively limited. Current techniques for isolating sarcoma CTCs are based on size criteria, the identification of circulating cells that express either common mesenchymal markers, sarcoma-specific markers, such as CD99, CD81, or PAX3, and chromosomal translocations found in certain sarcoma subtypes, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, detection of osteoblast-related genes, or measurement of the activity of specific metabolic enzymes. Further studies are needed to improve the isolation and characterization of sarcoma CTCs, to demonstrate their clinical significance as predictive and/or prognostic biomarkers, and to utilize CTCs as a tool for investigating the metastatic process in sarcoma and to identify novel therapeutic targets. The present review provides a short overview of the most recent literature on CTCs in sarcoma. PMID:27656422

  3. Granular cell tumor with orbital involvement in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fabiano [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Radiologia; Iyeyasu, Josie Naomi; Carvalho, Keila Monteiro de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Oftalmo-Otorrinolaringologia; Altemani, Albina Messias [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Anatomia Patologica

    2011-09-15

    The authors report a rare case of granular cell tumor in the left medial rectus muscle of a seven-year-old boy. Clinical, pathologic and radiologic findings of the present case are described and a brief literature review is undertaken. (author)

  4. After clouds sun again shines on circulating tumor cells research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriere, Guislaine; Rigaud, Michel

    2013-07-01

    In the Science issue of first February 2013 Yu M et al. characterized epithelial and mesenchymal circulating tumor cells (CTC) by RNA-in situ hybridization. In this editorial we comment their results and emphasize the different CTC subpopulations arising from epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT).

  5. Pathobiology of germ cell tumors - Applying the gossip test!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractResidual mature teratoma, a frequent finding in clinical pathology since the introduction of cisplatin-based chemotherapy, put Wolter Oosterhuis on the track of germ cell tumors (GCTs). These neoplasms in the borderland between developmental biology and oncology have fascinated him ever

  6. Review: Biological relevance of disseminated tumor cells in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethdorf, Sabine; Wikman, Harriet; Pantel, Klaus

    2008-11-01

    The prognosis of cancer patients is largely determined by the occurrence of distant metastases. In patients with primary tumors, this relapse is mainly due to clinically occult micrometastasis present in secondary organs at primary diagnosis but not detectable even with high resolution imaging procedures. Sensitive and specific immunocytochemical and molecular assays enable the detection and characterization of disseminated tumor cells (DTC) at the single cell level in bone marrow (BM) as the common homing site of DTC and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood. Because of the high variability of results in DTC and CTC detection, there is an urgent need for standardized methods. In this review, we will focus on BM and present currently available methods for the detection and characterization of DTC. Furthermore, we will discuss data on the biology of DTC and the clinical relevance of DTC detection. While the prognostic impact of DTC in BM has clearly been shown for primary breast cancer patients, less is known about the clinical relevance of DTC in patients with other carcinomas. Current findings suggest that DTC are capable to survive chemotherapy and persist in a dormant nonproliferating state over years. To what extent these DTC have stem cell properties is subject of ongoing investigations. Further characterization is required to understand the biology of DTC and to identify new targets for improved risk prevention and tailoring of therapy. Our review will focus on breast, colon, lung, and prostate cancer as the main tumor entities in Europe and the United States.

  7. Towards Optimal Diagnosis of Type II Germ Cell Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Stoop (Hans)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the work described in this thesis is to improve the understanding of the pathobiology of testicular cancer (type II Germ Cell Tumors) to create possibilities for optimalization of diagnosis for this type of malignancy in routine pathology laboratories. The different studies pr

  8. Molecular determinants of treatment response in human germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Mayer; J.A. Stoop (Hans); G.L. Scheffer (George); R. Scheper; J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); C. Bokemeyer

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are highly sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This feature is unexplained, as is the intrinsic chemotherapy resistance of mature teratomas and the resistant phenotype of a minority of refractory GCTs. Various cellular pathways

  9. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Mark R.; Harvey, Richard A.; Sebire, Neil J.; Kaur, Baljeet; Sarwar, Naveed; Seckl, Michael J.; Fisher, Rosemary A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA) in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26981554

  10. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Openshaw

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis.

  11. Genetically modified T cells targeting neovasculature efficiently destroy tumor blood vessels, shrink established solid tumors and increase nanoparticle delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinping; Rivera, Armando; Tao, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2013-11-15

    Converting T cells into tumor cell killers by grafting them with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has shown promise as a cancer immunotherapeutic. However, the inability of these cells to actively migrate and extravasate into tumor parenchyma has limited their effectiveness in vivo. Here we report the construction of a CAR containing an echistatin as its targeting moiety (eCAR). As echistatin has high binding affinity to αvβ3 integrin that is highly expressed on the surface of endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature, T cells engrafted with eCAR (T-eCAR) can efficiently lyse human umbilical vein endothelial cells and tumor cells that