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Sample records for bulk tank milk

  1. Milk quality parameters associated with the occurrence of veterinary drug residues in bulk tank milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Cristina Almeida Picinin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Veterinary drug residues in bulk tank milk are important to all sectors of the dairy chain because they are one of the major factors which determine the safety of the final product. This study attempted to identify milk quality parameters that are associated with the occurrence of veterinary drug residues using multivariate principal component analysis (PCA. A total of 132 raw milk samples were collected from 45 dairy farms in the state of Minas Gerais - Brazil and analyzed for 42 analytes, including pyrethroids, macrocyclic lactones and antibacterials, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry in tandem mode and gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Out of the 132 milk samples, 40 samples tested positive for at least one analyte (above the detection limit. The milk parameters associated with the antimicrobial residues by confirmatory tests were lactose and nonfat concentrations, as revealed by PCA. This analysis showed that fat and total solid concentrations, as well as the somatic cell and total bacteria counts were associated with macrocyclic lactone residues in bulk tank milk. A PCA assessing pyrethroid residues in bulk tank milk revealed that the lactose and nonfat solid concentrations and titratable acidity were inversely associated with these residues. Thus, the data analysis indicated that the veterinary drug residues were associated with certain milk quality parameters that can be used to target farms at higher risk of veterinary drug residue contamination for testing programs in combination with incentives, education and training programs to improve mammary health, milk hygiene and safety.

  2. Testing of bulk tank milk for Salmonella Dublin infection in Danish dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedderkopp, A.; Stroger, U.; Bitsch, V.

    2001-01-01

    of being test-negative in the third test round was 0.926 for a herd with 2 previous test-negative results. It was concluded that the investigated ELISA method was in general accordance with the cases of clinical S. Dublin infection recorded. and that the method has a potential for national screening......The usefulness of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was investigated as a simple method to screen for Salmonella Dublin infection in dairy herds, examining bulk tank milk samples for lipopolysaccharide (O:1,9,12) antibodies. The cut-off value for the ELISA on bulk tank milk was established...... based on individual milk samples (n = 2887) and bulk tank milk from 52 herds. Bulk tank milk samples (n = 5108) were collected from 1464 dairy herds located in 19 different areas. About 10% of the dairy herds in Denmark participated in the study. The percentage of herds changing from test...

  3. Phytoestrogens and Their Metabolites in Bulk-Tank Milk: Effects of Farm Management and Season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, Steffen A; Purup, Stig; Hansen-Møller, Jens

    2015-01-01

    had the highest red clover proportions in the herbage. This study shows that production system, grassland management, and season affect milk concentrations of phytoestrogens. However, compared to soy products, milk concentrations of phytoestrogens are low and future studies are required to investigate...... organic and conventional production systems and assess seasonal variation on phytoestrogen concentrations in bulk-tank milk. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were analyzed in bulk-tank milk sampled three times in two subsequent years from 28 dairy farms: Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either......, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. The proportion of red clover (Trifolium pretense L.) in the herbage was positively correlated with milk concentrations of the mammalian isoflavone equol. Therefore, organically produced bulk-tank milk contained...

  4. Climate conditions associated with the occurrence of antimicrobial and macrocyclic lactone residues in bulk tank milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C.A. Picinin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The present study aimed to identify the climate condition parameters that are associated with the occurrence of antimicrobial and macrocyclic lactone residues in bulk tank milk using a multivariate principal components analysis (PCA. A total of 132 raw milk samples were collected at dairy farms in Minas Gerais State in Brazil and analyzed for 35 analytes, comprising macrocyclic lactones and antibacterials, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry in tandem mode spectrometry. Of the 132 samples, 34 (25.76% bulk tank milk samples were positive for at least one analyte. PCA showed that antimicrobial residues in bulk tank milk occurred less frequently on days with a higher average temperature, maximum temperature and temperature-humidity index. In contrast, relative humidity was inversely associated with antimicrobial residues in raw milk. The PCA showed that daily milk production was also related to macrocyclic lactone residues, while rainfall showed an inverse association. Thus, some climate conditions, such as average temperature, maximum temperature and temperature-humidity index, can predict the moments with lower risk of occurrence of antimicrobial residues in bulk tank milk, in contrast to relative humidity. Furthermore, the risk of macrocyclic lactone residues in bulk tank milk was higher in months with less rainfall.

  5. Prevalence and Fingerprinting of Listeria monocytogenes Strains Isolated from Raw Whole Milk in Farm Bulk Tanks and in Dairy Plant Receiving Tanks

    OpenAIRE

    Waak, Elisabet; Tham, Wilhelm; Danielsson-Tham, Marie-Louise

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of Listeria species in raw whole milk from farm bulk tanks and from raw milk in storage at a Swedish dairy plant was studied. Listeria monocytogenes was found in 1.0% and Listeria innocua was found in 2.3% of the 294 farm bulk tank (farm tank) milk specimens. One farm tank specimen contained 60 CFU of L. monocytogenes ml−1. L. monocytogenes was detected in 19.6% and L. innocua was detected in 8.5% of the milk specimens from the silo receiving tanks at the dairy (dairy silos). Mo...

  6. DETECTION OF AFLATOXIN M1 IN BULK-TANK MILK AND SHEEP CHEESE

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    F. Cossu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 content in 118 bulk-tank sheep milk samples was evaluated using an ELISA commercial kit. During a lactation, three bulk-tank milk samples were collected from each of 40 semi-extensive farms, selected on the basis of high level of concentrate supplementation as risk factor for exposure to Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1. The AFM1 content was also determined in 38 sheep cheese samples collected from a dairy plant where the farms enrolled in the survey shipped the milk. In the three sampling the concentrate supplementation recorded in the farms ranged between (mean±sd 492.2±257.7 and 397.7±214.3. AFM1 was detected in 1 bulk-tank sheep milk sample (0.8% at concentrations as little as 5.2 ng/L while in 117 it was not detectable (<5 ng/L. AFM1 was also detected in 5 (13.2% out of 38 samples of ripened sheep cheese at levels (mean±sd of 58.1±7.8 ng/Kg. A very low AFM1 content in bulk mik and cheese was observed, as the result of the implementation of good agricultural and good farming practices.

  7. Short communication: Evaluation of bulk tank milk microbiological quality of nine dairy farms in Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, B E; Lewis, M J; Boonyayatra, S; Maxwell, M L; Saxton, A; Oliver, S P; Almeida, R A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bulk tank milk (BTM) quality of 9 East Tennessee dairy farms and to determine its relationship with selected quality milk parameters. Bulk tank milk samples (n=1,141) were collected over a 42-mo period (June 2006 through November 2009) from farms, based on their preliminary incubation count (PIC) history. Parameters of BTM quality evaluated in this study included somatic cell count (SCC), standard plate count (SPC), PIC, laboratory pasteurization count (LPC), Staphylococcus spp. count, Streptococcus spp. count, and coliform count. Strong correlations between SPC and Streptococcus spp. counts (0.72) and between SPC and PIC (0.70) were found. However, moderate correlations were seen among other milk quality parameters. In addition, seasonal variations for some milk quality parameters were noted. For example, milk quality parameters such as SCC, SPC, LPC, and coliform count were significantly higher in summer, whereas Streptococcus spp. counts were significantly higher in winter. No seasonal variation in PIC or Staphylococcus spp. counts was observed. Summarizing, results from this investigation showed the importance of using several bacterial counts (SCC, SPC, PIC, LPC, Streptococcus spp. count, Staphylococcus spp. count, and coliform counts) as simultaneous indicators of milk quality. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Microbiological quality of bulk tank raw milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmoslemany, A M; Keefe, G P; Dohoo, I R; Dingwell, R T

    2009-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate microbiological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island, to evaluate correlation among milk quality criteria, and to determine seasonal effects on milk quality parameters. Bulk tank raw milk quality was evaluated on all Prince Edward Island dairy herds (n = 235) over a 2-yr period (March 2005 to March 2007). Biweekly total aerobic (TAC), preliminary incubation (PIC), laboratory pasteurization, and coliform (CC) counts were determined using a Petrifilm culture system. Additionally, bulk tank somatic cell count was determined weekly. The mean and median values were 12.8 x 10(3) and 4.9 x 10(3) cfu/mL for TAC, 29.6 x 10(3) and 13 x 10(3) cfu/mL for PIC, 87 and 12 cfu/mL for laboratory pasteurization count, 21 and 5 cfu/mL for CC, and 218 x 10(3) and 187 x 10(3) cells/mL for somatic cell count. There was moderate correlation (0.57) between TAC and PIC. All other correlation coefficients were low (<0.26). Correlation results suggest that a single quality parameter could not predict others used in this study. Seasonal data indicate that 1) in general, all counts tended to be low in winter, 2) the CC and somatic cell count were always high in summer, and 3) TAC tended to be high during summer.

  9. A flow cytometric technique for quantification and differentiation of bacteria in bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, C.; Mathiasen, T.; Jespersen, Lene

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: The present study describes a flow cytometric technique for quantification and differentiation of bacteria in bulk tank milk according to the main cause of elevated counts. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 75 Danish bulk tank milk samples exceeding the grading level of 3.0 x 10(4) CFU ml(-1......) were examined by both flow cytometry and traditional microbiological analyses. The correlation coefficient (r) between the two methods was 0.71. For the differential analyses of the dominant bacterial populations four different parameters were used to give a species-characteristic pattern. The four...... parameters were as follows: staining with Oregon Green conjugated wheat germ agglutinin that binds to the cell wall of bacteria, staining with hexidium iodide that binds to all bacterial DNA, the flow cytometric forward scatter and the flow cytometric side scatter. Three regions in the flow cytometric plot...

  10. Phytoestrogens and their metabolites in bulk-tank milk: effects of farm management and season.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen A Adler

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens have structures similar to endogenous steroids and may induce or inhibit the response of hormone receptors. The objectives of the present study were to compare the effects of long-term vs. short-term grassland management in organic and conventional dairy production systems, compare organic and conventional production systems and assess seasonal variation on phytoestrogen concentrations in bulk-tank milk. The concentrations of phytoestrogens were analyzed in bulk-tank milk sampled three times in two subsequent years from 28 dairy farms: Fourteen organic (ORG dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON farms with respect to grassland management. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. The proportion of red clover (Trifolium pretense L. in the herbage was positively correlated with milk concentrations of the mammalian isoflavone equol. Therefore, organically produced bulk-tank milk contained more equol than conventionally produced milk, and milk from ORG-SG farms had more equol than milk from ORG-LG farms. Milk produced during the indoor-feeding periods had more equol than milk produced during the outdoor feeding period, because pastures contained less red clover than fields intended for silage production. Organically produced milk had also higher concentrations of the mammalian lignan enterolactone, but in contrast to equol, concentrations increased in the outdoor-feeding periods compared to the indoor-feeding periods. There were no indications of fertility problems on ORG-SG farms who had the highest red clover proportions in the herbage. This study shows that production system, grassland management, and season affect milk concentrations of

  11. Effect of omitting teat preparation on bacterial levels in bulk tank milk

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    Gleeson David

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of omitting teat preparation prior to milking on the bacterial levels in milk directly after milking and after a period of milk storage. Eighty Holstein–Friesian dairy cows were assigned to two pre-milking teat preparation treatments: (i washing of teats and drawing of foremilk, followed by drying with paper towels and (ii no teat preparation. Individual cow measurements included individual quarter somatic cell count (SCC and teat swabs for the presence of Bacillus cereus sensu lato. On seven monthly occasions, all milk produced over a 24 h period from each treatment group was segregated into a separate tank and sampled. Sub-samples of this milk were stored at 4 °C for 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, and the milk was analysed for total bacterial count (TBC, thermoduric bacterial count and the presence of B. cereus s. I. Individual quarter SCCs were numerically higher for unprepared teats (159,000 cells/mL compared with those for prepared teats (133,000 cells/mL; P < 0.09. A similar trend was observed for bulk tank SCC, with the unprepared teat treatment tending to have a higher SCC (155,857 cells/mL compared to the prepared teat treatment (102,286 cells/mL; P< 0.09. The TBC was not significantly higher from unprepared teats (3,152 cfu/ mL compared with milk from prepared teats (1,678 cfu/mL (P< 0.10. Milk TBC was significantly higher after storage for 72 h compared with that after 0, 24 and 48 h (P< 0.01. The results of this study indicate that under good hygienic conditions in an outdoor grazing situation, the omission of pre-milking teat preparation has a minimal effect on TBC and SCC.

  12. Prevalence, antimicrobial resistance, and molecular characterization of Campylobacter spp. in bulk tank milk and milk filters from US dairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Collo, Laura P; Karns, Jeffrey S; Biswas, Debabrata; Lombard, Jason E; Haley, Bradd J; Kristensen, R Camilla; Kopral, Christine A; Fossler, Charles P; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S

    2017-05-01

    Campylobacter spp. are frequently isolated from dairy cows as commensal organisms. Sporadic Campylobacter infections in humans in the United States are generally attributed to poultry, but outbreaks are also commonly associated with dairy products, particularly unpasteurized or raw milk. Bulk tank milk samples and milk filters from US dairy operations were collected during the National Animal Health Monitoring System Dairy 2014 study and analyzed using real-time PCR and traditional culture techniques for the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter species. The weighted prevalence of operations from which we detected Campylobacter spp. in either bulk tank milk or milk filters was 24.9%. We detected Campylobacter spp. in a higher percentage of operations with 100-499 cows (42.8%) and 500 or more cows (47.5%) than in operations with 30-99 cows (6.5%). Campylobacter spp. were also more frequently detected in operations in the west than the east (45.9 and 22.6%, respectively). We isolated Campylobacter spp. from approximately half of PCR-positive samples, representing 12.5% (weighted prevalence) of operations. The majority (91.8%) of isolates were C. jejuni, but C. lari and C. coli were also isolated. We detected resistance to tetracycline in 68.4% of C. jejuni isolates, and resistance to ciprofloxacin and nalidixic acid in 13.2% of C. jejuni isolates. Based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, we found that dairy-associated C. jejuni were genotypically diverse, although clonal strains were isolated from different geographic regions. These results suggest that bulk tank milk can be contaminated with pathogenic Campylobacter spp., and that the consumption of unpasteurized or raw milk presents a potential human health risk. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular identification and thermoresistance to boiling of Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica from bovine bulk tank milk

    OpenAIRE

    Condas, L.a.z [UNESP; Ribeiro, M.G.; T. Gonoi; Matsuzawa, T.; Yazawa, K.; Motta,R.G.; Franco,M.M.J.; Listoni,F.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Two strains of Nocardia spp. were isolated from bovine milk of two individual bulk tank. Molecular identification classified the strains as Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica. The thermorresistance to boiling of the isolates was carried out and was observed bacterial growth after boiling. Our findings indicate the potential risk of pathogen transmission to humans through contaminated milk with Nocardia spp.

  14. Molecular identification and thermoresistance to boiling of Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica from bovine bulk tank milk

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    L.A.Z. Condas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two strains of Nocardia spp. were isolated from bovine milk of two individual bulk tank. Molecular identification classified the strains as Nocardia farcinica and Nocardia cyriacigeorgica. The thermorresistance to boiling of the isolates was carried out and was observed bacterial growth after boiling. Our findings indicate the potential risk of pathogen transmission to humans through contaminated milk with Nocardia spp.

  15. Stochastic simulation modeling to determine time to detect Bovine Viral Diarrhea antibodies in bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foddai, Alessandro; Enøe, Claes; Krogh, Kaspar

    2014-01-01

    ). With SVANOVIR ELISA the incidenceof PIs and dead born calves could be limited and the impact of the disease on the animalwelfare and income of farmers (before detection) could be minimized. The results from thesimulation modeling can be used to improve the current Danish BVD surveillance programin detecting......A stochastic simulation model was developed to estimate the time from introduction ofBovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) in a herd to detection of antibodies in bulk tank milk(BTM) samples using three ELISAs. We assumed that antibodies could be detected, after afixed threshold prevalence...... of seroconverted milking cows was reached in the herd. Differentthresholds were set for each ELISA, according to previous studies. For each test, antibodydetection was simulated in small (70 cows), medium (150 cows) and large (320 cows)herds. The assays included were: (1) the Danish blocking ELISA, (2...

  16. Risk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Part 1: overall risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmoslemany, A M; Keefe, G P; Dohoo, I R; Jayarao, B M

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine on-farm risk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk. Bulk tank raw milk quality was evaluated on all Prince Edward Island dairy herds (n = 235) over a 2-yr period (March 2005 to March 2007). Biweekly total bacterial, preliminary incubation, laboratory pasteurization, and coliform counts were conducted using a Petrifilm culture system. For the assessment of risk factors, a case-control study was conducted from January 2006 to May 2007. Case and control herds were defined based on the last 6 analyses of bulk tank bacterial counts before on-farm evaluation. Cases were herds that had multiple elevated counts for any of the parameters measured. A total of 69 herds (39 cases and 30 control herds) were evaluated. Data collection included 1) observation and questionnaire on basic hygiene and farm management practices; 2) complete wash analysis of the milking equipment, monitoring the presence of bacterial films on equipment and evaluation of cooling system function; and 3) environmental and cow hygiene scoring. Data were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. The results of the final model indicated that high alkalinity in the wash water and poor teat-end cleanliness were associated with high bacterial counts in bulk tank milk (odds ratios = 12 and 5.3, respectively). It was also observed that high water temperature of detergent wash and the use of a water softener were associated with low bacterial counts in bulk tank milk (odds ratios = 0.87 and 0.11, respectively). A significant association between udder hair clipping and teat-end cleanliness was also observed. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of udder hygiene and milking system washing factors on hygienic quality of bulk tank milk.

  17. Prevalence of contagious mastitis pathogens in bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Riekerink, Richard G M; Barkema, Herman W; Veenstra, Stefan; Poole, Doris E; Dingwell, Randy T; Keefe, Gregory P

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to 1) estimate the herd prevalence of contagious mastitis pathogens in bulk milk from Prince Edward Island (PEI) dairy farms, 2) determine the association between bulk milk culture results and mean bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC), and 3) investigate the agreement of repeated bulk milk cultures. Three consecutive bulk milk samples were obtained at weekly intervals from all 258 PEI dairy herds and were cultured using routine laboratory methods. Cumulative prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Mycoplasma spp. (M. bovis and M. alkalescens) was 74%, 1.6%, and 1.9%, respectively. Bulk milk somatic cell count of Staph. aureus-positive herds was higher than that of negative herds. Agreement for Staph. aureus isolation between 3 consecutive tests was moderate (kappa = 0.46). Mycoplasma bovis and M. alkalescens in bulk milk are being reported for the 1st time in PEI ever and in Canada since 1972.

  18. Molecular characterization of Salmonella spp. isolated from bulk tank milk and cull dairy cow fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murinda, S E; Nguyen, L T; Ivey, S J; Gillespie, B E; Almeida, R A; Draughon, F A; Oliver, S P

    2002-07-01

    The consumption of meat from cull dairy cows and of raw milk has been associated with foodborne salmonellosis. This survey was conducted to establish the prevalence of Salmonella in cull dairy cow fecal samples and bulk tank milk and to determine the proportion of Salmonella-positive dairy farms (n = 30) in east Tennessee. Food and Drug Administration bacteriological analytical protocols were generally used for Salmonella isolation. Primary enrichment was performed with lactose broth, and secondary enrichment was conducted with tetrathionate broth. Eosin methylene blue, hektoen enteric, xylose lysine desoxycholate, bismuth sulfite, and brilliant green (BG) were used as isolation agars. BG agars supplemented with individual antibiotics and/or sulfur compounds were also evaluated. Six of 268 (2.24%) bulk tank milk samples and 9 of 415 (2.17%) fecal samples from 7 of 30 (25.3%) dairy farms were Salmonella-positive. Most isolates (11 of 15) were obtained between September and December. Salmonella isolates were further characterized using polyvalent somatic O Salmonella antiserum, o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG), and Analytical Profile Index (API) 20E strips for Enterobacteriaceae. Serological evaluation of presumptive positive Salmonella isolates resulted in substantial numbers of false positives (41.2%). ONPG and API 20E tests enabled further biochemical distinction of the majority of Salmonella spp. from Salmonella Arizonae and closely related members of Enterobacteriaceae like Citrobacter youngae. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of SpeI-digested Salmonella DNA was used to subtype isolates. The isolates grouped into four clusters. The baseline information generated in this survey is being used to develop preharvest pathogen reduction programs on selected farms.

  19. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae in bulk tank milk from German dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenthal, Sabrina; Akineden, Ömer; Usleber, Ewald

    2016-12-05

    Although the dairy farm environment is a known source of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria, surveillance data on ESBL in the milk production chain are still scarce. This study aimed at estimating the dimensions of the problem for public health and animal welfare by surveying ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in raw bulk tank milk in Germany. Samples from 866 dairy farms, comprising about 1% of the total number of dairy farms in Germany, were first screened for presence of cefotaxime-resistant bacteria by selective enrichment. Suspect colonies were identified phenotypically and further characterized by biochemical and molecular methods, including analysis of resistance genes and clonal diversity in ESBL-producing isolates. Bulk tank milk from 82 (9.5%) farms yielded Enterobacteriaceae with confirmed ESBL-production. The most frequent ESBL-producing species was Escherichia coli (75.6%), followed by Citrobacter spp. (9.6%), Enterobacter cloacae (6.1%), and Klebsiella oxytoca (3.7%), a few isolates belonged to other species within the genera Hafnia, Raoutella and Serratia. The majority of isolates (95.1%) harbored the β-lactamase blaCTX-M gene, which has gained increased importance among ESBL-producing strains worldwide; the CTX-M group 1 was found to be the dominating (88.4%) phylogenetic group. All ESBL-positive Escherichia coli isolates were clonally heterogeneous, as determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The results from this survey demonstrate that ESBL-producing bacteria are distributed widely in the dairy farm environment in Germany. Therefore, raw milk is a potential source of exposure for the consumer, which is of increasing importance considering the trend of farmer-to-consumer direct marketing. Furthermore, dairy farm staff have an increased likelihood of exposure to ESBL-producing bacteria. Finally, ESBL-producing bacteria may also be transferred via waste milk to calves, thus further spreading antibiotic resistance in the

  20. Prevalence of Bovine Mastitis Pathogens in Bulk Tank Milk in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya Jing; Qin, Yun; Guix Vallverdú, Roger; Maldonado García, Jaime; Sun, Wei; Li, Shengli; Cao, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the herd prevalence of major mastitis pathogens in bulk tank milk (BTM) in China dairy herds, to determine the relationship between the presence of mastitis pathogens and bulk tank milk somatic cell counts (BTSCC), and to investigate the impact of different dairy cattle farming modes and region on bacterial species. BTM samples collected from 894 dairy herds in China were examined for the presence of mastitis pathogens. The Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) cards were used for BTM sample collection, storage, and transportation and bacterial DNA amplification by real-time PCR. Among contagious pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae were detected in 50.1, 92.2, and 72.3% of the 894 BTM samples, respectively. Among environmental pathogens, E. coli, Streptococcus uberis, Enterococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Serratia marcescens, Corynebacterium bovis, and Arcanobacterium pyogenes were detected in 28.6, 8.9, 35.7, 20.0, 1.3, 17.0, and 67.2% of the BTM samples, respectively. Staphylococcal β-lactamase gene was detected in 61.7% of the BTM samples. The presence of Staphylococcus aureus and Arcanobacterium pyogenes were significantly associated with high BTSCC, respectively. Significant differences were found in presence of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus dysgalactiae in BTM sampled from the small household farms, dairy-farming communities, and large-scaled dairy farms. There were significant differences in the presence of Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Arcanobacterium pyogenes, staphylococcal β-lactamase gene, Staphylococcus spp., Klebsiella spp., Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus uberis in BTM among Inner Mongolia, Heilongjiang, and Hebei province. In conclusion, contagious mammary pathogens are predominated among pathogens in BTM samples in China. PMID:27187065

  1. Genomic investigation of Danish Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bulk tank milk and dairy cows with clinical mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronco, Troels; Klaas, Ilka C.; Stegger, Marc

    2018-01-01

    wholegenome sequenced and further analyzed. Thus, the main objective was to investigate the population structure and genomic content of isolates from bulk tank milk and clinical mastitis, using whole-genome sequencing. This may reveal the origin of strains that cause clinical mastitis. S. aureus isolates from...

  2. Prevalence and risk factors for Coxiella burnetii (Q fever) in Dutch dairy cattle herds based on bulk tank milk testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, E. van; Schotten, N.; Schimmer, B.; Hautvast, J.L.; Schaik, G. van; Duijnhoven, Y.T. van

    2014-01-01

    Despite cattle herds can harbor Coxiella burnetii, risk factors for C. burnetii presence in dairy cattle herds are largely unknown. Therefore, C. burnetii herd prevalence and risk factors for bulk tank milk (BTM) positivity were investigated. In this cross-sectional study, a questionnaire was filled

  3. The use of bulk tank milk samples to monitor trends in antimicrobial resistance on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Anna Catharina B; Champagne, Staci C; Finger, Regina M; Sischo, William M

    2007-01-01

    The routine monitoring of bacteria obtained from bulk tank milk (BTM) may be an important tool for detecting farm-level trends in antimicrobial resistance on dairy farms. This study describes and compares antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica (Salmonella) and Escherichia coli recovered from dairy BTM. BTM from more than 400 dairies in a dairy-intense region of California were sampled eight times at 2- to 3-month intervals over a 29-month period. From Salmonella positive and Salmonella negative herds any one Salmonella and three E. coli isolates per sample were tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials. The prevalence of multiple drug resistant (MDR) E. coli was assessed in relation to Salmonella on the farm, farm size, season, MDR Salmonella, and serovar. At each sampling period, 10-21% and 54-77% of the dairy farms were positive for Salmonella and E. coli, respectively. The most commonly recovered Salmonella serovars were Montevideo (33%), Typhimurium (14%), Dublin (13%), and Give (11%). Two-thirds, respectively, of 478 Salmonella and 1577 E. coli isolates were pan-susceptible. The antimicrobial resistance patterns of MDR Salmonella tended to be serovar dependent and were different from the antimicrobial resistance patterns of MDR E. coli. MDR E. coli were more likely to be recovered from dairies with MDR Salmonella. There were no associations between MDR E. coli and season, Salmonella serovar detected in the BTM, or dairy herd size. Bulk milk E. coli and Salmonella could be valuable to monitor the dynamics of antimicrobial resistance in dairy milk production.

  4. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in bulk tank milk and milk filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Bogdanovičová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus prevalence in raw milk and milk filters, its antibiotic resistance and detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Samples of raw cow´s milk and milk filters were collected in the period from 2012 till 2014, from 50 dairy farms in the Czech Republic. The total of 261 samples (164 samples of raw milk and 97 milk filters were cultivated on Baird-Parker agar. Both the typical and atypical colonies were examined by plasmacoagulase test and PCR method was used for detection of species specific fragment SA442 and mecA gene. Standard disk diffusion method was used to determinate resistance to antimicrobial agents. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was detected on 25 farms (50%. The antimicrobial resistance showed differences between the farms. Total of 58 samples were positive for Staphylococcus aureus, of which were 37 (14.2% isolated from raw milk samples and 21 (8.1% from milk filters. From these samples we isolated 62 Staphylococcus aureus strains, 41 isolates bacteria S. aureus from raw milk (66.1% and 21 isolates S. aureus from milk filters (33.9%. The presence of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates was low, most of them were resistant to amoxicilin. According to the results obtained by the PCR method for the methicillin - resistant S. aureus (MRSA, the mecA gene was present in 6 strains (9.7%, 4 isolates obtained from milk samples (6.5% and 2 isolates from milk filters (3.2%.  These isolates can be considered as a possible source of resistance genes, which can be spread through the food chain. Nowadays, a globally unfavourable increasing trend of prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococci strains especially Staphylococcus aureus is being observed worldwide. The improper hygiene and poor farm management practices contributed to the presence of S. aureus in the milk. This may have contributed to the high level of S. aureus isolated

  5. Risk factors for Coxiella burnetii antibodies in bulk tank milk from Danish dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Jens Frederik; Paul, Suman; Christoffersen, Anna-Bodil

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to identify risk factors associated with Coxiella burnetii antibody positivity in bulk tank milk (BTM) samples from 100 randomly selected Danish dairy cattle herds. Antibody levels were measured by an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Before testing the herds, the farm managers were...... of calving and disease pens also showed significant association in univariable analysis. This study demonstrates that strict biosecurity is important for the prevention of infections with C. burnetii....

  6. Dynamics of relationship between the presence of Coxiella burnetii DNA, antibodies, and intrinsic variables in cow milk and bulk tank milk from Danish dairy cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angen, Øystein; Ståhl, Marie; Agerholm, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    protein concentration in milk. The antibody levels in bulk tank milk and prevalence levels of C. burnetii DNA and antibodies in individual cow milk samples were correlated. A significant correlation was also found between the quantification cycle values of the cow samples (weighted according to milk yield......Milk samples of 12 Danish dairy herds were collected 3 times during an 11-mo period and tested for Coxiella burnetii DNA by real-time PCR, detecting the IS1111 element, and for the presence of antibodies against the bacterium by ELISA. On average, 25% of 1,514 samples were seropositive and 32% were...... positive for C. burnetii DNA. Among the 485 DNA-positive samples, quantification cycle values ranging from 15.8 to 37.8 were found. Test sensitivity did not increase after DNA extraction from the cream fraction compared with full milk. The relationship between antibody levels and bacterial shedding...

  7. Salmonella dublin in Danish dairy herds: Frequency of change to positive serological status in bulk tank milk ELISA in relation to serostatus of neighbouring farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedderkopp, A.; Strøger, U.; Lind, Peter

    2001-01-01

    Bulk tank milk from 1,429 herds were collected in 3 rounds from 19 different geographic areas. The milk samples were tested by use of indirect LPS-ELISA procedure to detect Salmonella dublin antibodies. From the obtained OD-values herd seroprevalence in the given area was determined and GR...

  8. The prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus and their virulence genes in bulk tank milk in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmeti, Ibrahim; Bytyqi, Hysen; Muji, Skender; Nes, Ingolf F; Diep, Dzung B

    2017-03-31

    Milk is considered to be a healthy, nutritious food product. Microbiological quality is an important aspect in evaluating the quality of milk. A total of 603 bulk tank milk samples from 221 farms distributed across ten different regions were collected for milk quality assessment. Quality was judged by total viable count, and the prevalence of two foodborne pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus) by using selective media and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The presence of virulence genes was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers. Milk from only 7% (15/221) of farms were found to comply with the European Union standard. Interestingly, the microbiological quality of milk from the larger herd size farms (more than 10 cows) was better than in smaller herds. L. monocytogenes was found in 2.7% (6/221) of farms, and all the examined L. monocytogenes isolates were positive with respect to the virulence genes prfA, actA, and hlyA. S. aureus was found in 39.8% (88/221) of the farms. In total, 30.7% (27/88) of the staphylococci were positive for enterotoxin production. The enterotoxins identified were toxin B (40.7%), toxin D (33.4%), toxin C (18.5%), and toxin A (7.4%). The total number of bacteria in milk was very high. The presence of two foodborne pathogens in raw milk represents a great health risk to consumers. To improve the microbial quality of milk in Kosovo, important measures to improve hygiene, including better information, guidance, and control, are needed.

  9. Latent class analysis of bulk tank milk PCR and ELISA testing for herd level diagnosis of Mycoplasma bovis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kantsø; Petersen, Mette Bisgaard; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum

    2015-01-01

    of this study was to evaluate the herd-level diagnostic performance of an indirect ELISA test by comparison to a real-time PCR test when diagnosing M. bovis in cattle herds of bulk tank milk. Bulk tank milk samples from Danish dairy herds (N=3437) were analysed with both the antibody detecting BIO K 302 M....... bovis ELISA kit and the antigen detecting PathoProof Mastitis Major-3 kit. As none of these are considered a gold standard test for herd-level diagnostics we applied a series of Bayesian latent class analyses for a range of ELISA cut-off values. The negative and positive predictive values were...... calculated for hypothetical true national prevalences (1, 5, 10, 15 and 20%) of infected herds. We estimated that the ELISA test had a median sensitivity and specificity of 60.4 [37.5-96.2 95% Posterior Credibility Interval] and 97.3 [94.0-99.8 95% PCI] at the currently recommended cut-off (37% Optical...

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from raw bulk-tank milk samples of goats and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D; Corti, S; Muehlherr, J E; Zweifel, C; Stephan, R

    2004-06-21

    Two hundred and ninety-three isolates of Staphylococcus aureus obtained from 127 bulk-tank milk samples of goats and sheep from Switzerland were characterised by pheno- and genotypic traits. Of the 293 S. aureus isolates, 193 (65.9%) were egg yolk-negative and 15 (5.1%) were negative for clumping factor and/or protein A determined by a latex agglutinating test system. For 285 isolates, PCR amplification of the 3' end of the coagulase gene showed a single amplicon. Five differently sized PCR products of 500, 580, 660, 740 and 820 bp were distinguished. In 191 isolates (n = 293) staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes were detected: 123 isolates tested positive for SEC gene, 31 for SEG gene, 28 for SEA gene, 26 for SEJ gene, 24 for SEI gene, 4 for SEB gene and 4 for SED gene. Furthermore, 126 isolates were positive for the gene encoding the toxic shock syndrome toxin 1. Coagulase gene restriction profile analysis of the 145 isolates harbouring SEA or SEC genes revealed six different patterns using AluI and five different patterns using HaeIII. In summary, within these two groups, high genotypic uniformity within the different sized coagulase gene amplicons was demonstrated. This is the first study providing comprehensive characterisation data of S. aureus strains originating from bulk-tank milk samples of goats and sheep. Remarkable differences in phenotypic traits between S. aureus originating from goats and sheep and bovine milk were found. Moreover, the high prevalence of toxin-producing S. aureus may be important as it is relevant to food hygiene. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Prevalence, characterization, and antimicrobial resistance of Yersinia species and Yersinia enterocolitica isolated from raw milk in farm bulk tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Hossein; Paydar, Mohammadjavad; Radmehr, Behrad; Ismail, Salmah

    2015-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and to characterize and determine the antibiotic resistance of Yersinia spp. isolates from raw milk. From September 2008 to August 2010, 446 raw milk samples were obtained from farm bulk milk tanks in Varamin, Iran. Yersinia spp. were detected in 29 (6.5%) samples, out of which 23 (79.3%), 5 (17.2%), and 1 (3.4%) were isolated from cow, sheep, and goat raw milk, respectively. The most common species isolated was Yersinia enterocolitica (65.5%), followed by Yersinia frederiksenii (31%), and Yersinia kristensenii (3.4%). Of the 19 Y. enterocolitica isolates, 14 (73.7%) were grouped into bioserotype 1A/O:9, 4 (21.1%) belonged to bioserotype 1B:O8, 1 (5.3%) belonged to bioserotype 4/O:3, and 1 isolate (biotype 1A) was not typable. All the isolates of biotypes 1B and 4harbored both the ystA and ail genes. However, all the isolates of biotype 1A were only positive for the ystB gene. The tested Yersinia spp. showed the highest percentages of resistance to tetracycline (48.3%), followed by ciprofloxacin and cephalothin (each 17.2%), ampicillin (13.8%), streptomycin (6.9%), and amoxicillin and nalidixic acid (each 3.4%). All of the tested isolates demonstrated significant sensitivity to gentamicin and chloramphenicol. Recovery of potentially pathogenic Y. enterocolitica from raw milk indicates high risks of yersiniosis associated with consumption of raw milk. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance Patterns of Gram-Negative Psychrotrophic Bacteria from Bulk Tank Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decimo, Marilù; Silvetti, Tiziana; Brasca, Milena

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major global health problem and resistance of Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae is a serious concern. We investigated the prevalence of drug-resistance in a total of 80 psychrotrophic strains from bulk milk belonging to Pseudomonas genus (n. 63) and Enterobacteriaceae group (n. 17). All the strains were tested against 16 antibiotics. Pseudomonas were further investigated for their sensitivity against 12 additional antibiotics. Pseudomonas showed a high susceptibility toward fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and piperacillin and, to a lesser extent, to imipenem, ceftazidime, cefepime. Thirty-five out of 63 Pseudomonas strains were susceptible to meropenem, while among antibiotics for which recommended breakpoints are not yet available, 55% of Pseudomonas strains had no inhibition halo in presence of nitrofurantoin, highlighting a resistance toward this drug. The results obtained in this study indicate a high efficiency of fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol (94%), and kanamycin (76%) for Enterobacteriaceae while a high prevalence of resistant strains was found to ampicillin (13/17). Serratia marcescens is highly susceptible to fluoroquinolones, chloramphenicol, and kanamycin. Moreover, mupirocin seems to be the new antibiotic with the less efficacy for Enterobacteriaceae, with 41% of strains without halo, pointing out an important resistance. Further knowledge on resistance to known and new antibiotics among Pseudomonas species and Enterobacteriaceae of milk origin was acquired. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular typing of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in bulk tank milk from southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A; Caruso, M; Normanno, G; Latorre, L; Sottili, R; Miccolupo, A; Fraccalvieri, R; Santagada, G

    2016-09-01

    This paper assesses the prevalence of MRSA in bulk tank milk (BTM) samples from southern Italy, and the relationship between the Coagulase Positive Staphylococci count (CPS) and MRSA prevalence. Of 486 BTM samples tested, 12 samples (2.5%) resulted positive for the presence of MRSA. Great genetic diversity was found among the isolates: ST1/t127 and t174/IVa, ST5/t688/V, ST8/t unknown/IVa/V, ST45/t015/IVa, ST71/t524/V, ST88/t786/Iva, ST398/t011 and t899/IVa/V and ST2781/t1730/V. All isolates were pvl-negative and icaA positive. The majority of strains (58%) carried the ses (sec, seh, seg, seo, sem and sen) genes. All tested strains resulted susceptible to amikacin, cephalotin, cloramphenicol, gentamycin, trimethoprim - sulfamethoxazole, tobramycin and vancomycin, and variably resistant to ampicillin, oxacillin and tetracycline. No statistical association between the CPS count and MRSA detection was found in the MRSA-positive samples. Although some of the spa-types and STs detected in our survey are known to cause human infections, raw milk from Italian herds in the considered area is not a common source of MRSA. Nonetheless, it is necessary to assess the risk of foodborne infection and the risk related to the handling of milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between antibodies to Coxiella burnetii in bulk tank milk and perinatal mortality of Danish dairy calves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Katrine T.; Nielsen, Søren S.; Agger, Jens F.

    2011-01-01

    on two outcomes associated with parturition in cattle: a) stillbirth; and b) stillbirth and neonatal mortality combined (perinatal death). Methods: Twenty-four Danish dairy herds were tested repeatedly for antibodies to C. burnetii in BTM using a commercial ELISA. Samples were collected monthly from July...... herds. Consequently, changes in BTM antibody levels were not found to be associated with neither risk of stillbirth nor the risk of perinatal mortality. However, the risk of stillborn calves and perinatal death was higher with high level of BTM antibodies 8 to 9 months after the incident......Background: Coxiella burnetii is a well-known cause of placentitis and subsequent abortion in ruminants, but there are no reports on the relationship with perinatal mortality. The study was performed to determine the influence of level and change of bulk tank milk (BTM) antibodies to C. burnetii...

  15. A bulk tank milk survey of Ostertagia ostertagi antibodies in dairy herds in Prince Edward Island and their relationship with herd management factors and milk yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Javier; Dohoo, Ian

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship of the levels of antibodies to Ostertagia ostertagi in bulk-tank milk samples from Prince Edward Island (PEI) dairy farms to milk production and to herd-management practices potentially related to gastrointestinal nematode infections. The milk samples were obtained from 289 to 322 dairy farms during 2000; production and management data were available from 197 and 200 farms, respectively. Cow exposure to pasture and whole-herd anthelmintic treatment were the only herd management variables significantly associated with antibody levels in the fall of 2000. An increase in antibody levels from the observed 25th percentile to the 75th percentile (interquartile range) was associated with a drop in milk production of 1.2 kg/cow/day. The results of this study indicate that the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for O. ostertagi antibody is a potentially useful technique to measure parasite exposure in adult dairy cows and that parasite burdens in lactating cattle in PEI have an important impact on milk production.

  16. Comparison of antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bulk tank milk in organic and conventional dairy herds in the midwestern United States and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K; Bennedsgaard, T W; Bartlett, P C; Erskine, R J; Kaneene, J B

    2004-06-01

    An observational study was conducted to compare the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bulk tank milk in organic and conventional dairy farms in Wisconsin, United States, and southern Jutland, Denmark. Bulk tank milk samples and data regarding management and production were collected from 30 organic and 30 conventional dairy farms in Wisconsin and 20 organic and 20 conventional dairy farms in Denmark. S. aureus isolates were tested for resistance against 15 antimicrobial agents by semiautomatic microbroth dilution methods in each country. Of the 118 bulk tank milk samples in Wisconsin, 71 samples (60%) yielded at least one S. aureus isolate, and a total of 331 isolates were collected. Of the 40 bulk tank milk samples from Denmark, 27 samples (55%) yielded at least one S. aureus isolate, and a total of 152 isolates were collected. Significant differences between organic and conventional dairies were detected only to ciprofloxacin in Wisconsin and avilamycin in Denmark. Significant differences (P organic and conventional farm types in each country and larger differences between the two national agricultural systems.

  17. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis specific IS900 insertion sequences in bulk-tank milk samples obtained from different regions throughout Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Roger

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP was isolated from intestinal tissue of a human patient suffering Crohn's disease, a controversial discussion exists whether MAP have a role in the etiology of Crohn's disease or not. Raw milk may be a potential vehicle for the transmission of MAP to human population. In a previous paper, we have demonstrated that MAP are found in raw milk samples obtained from a defined region in Switzerland. The aim of this work is to collect data about the prevalence of MAP specific IS900 insertion sequence in bulk-tank milk samples in different regions of Switzerland. Furthermore, we examined eventual correlation between the presence of MAP and the somatic cell counts, the total colony counts and the presence of Enterobacteriaceae. Results 273 (19.7% of the 1384 examined bulk-tank milk samples tested IS900 PCR-positive. The prevalence, however, in the different regions of Switzerland shows significant differences and ranged from 1.7% to 49.2%. Furthermore, there were no statistically significant (p >> 0.05 differences between the somatic cell counts and the total colony counts of PCR-positive and PCR-negative milk samples. Enterobacteriaceae occur as often in IS900 PCR-positive as in PCR-negative milk samples. Conclusion This is the first study, which investigates the prevalence of MAP in bulk-tank milk samples all over Switzerland and infers the herd-level prevalence of MAP infection in dairy herds. The prevalence of 19.7% IS900 PCR-positive bulk-milk samples shows a wide distribution of subclinical MAP-infections in dairy stock in Switzerland. MAP can therefore often be transmitted to humans by raw milk consumption.

  18. A new integrated approach to analyze bulk tank milk and raw milk filters for the presence of the E. coli serogroups frequently associated with VTEC status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albonico, Francesca; Gusmara, Claudia; Gugliotta, Theo; Loiacono, Monica; Mortarino, Michele; Zecconi, Alfonso

    2017-12-01

    We optimized a combination of microbiological and molecular methods to quickly identify the presence of the O157 and the six non-O157 serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121 and O145) most frequently associated with VTEC status, at herd level. The lower detection limit of this methodology is 101CFU/ml for each of the serogroups tested. We tested 67 bulk tank milk (BTM) and raw milk filters (RMF) derived from dairy herds located in Lombardy and Trentino Alto Adige. We identified 3 positive samples and 20 positive samples out of 67 respectively in the BTM and RMF. Interestingly, several samples showed positivity for more than one serogroups at the same time. We also identified the presence of E. coli O45 and O121 for the first time in raw milk and raw milk filters. Once screened the seven serogroups of interest in our samples, we evaluated the real pathogenicity of our positive, non-O157 samples through two parallel molecular biology methods: virulence gene research by PCR, and HRMA and sequencing. The most frequently isolated serogroups in milk were O157 (2.64%), O103 (2.11%), and O145 (1.06%), while in RMF the frequencies were, respectively 14.92%, 4.48%, and 2.98%. Moreover, this is the first published report in Italy of positive recovery of O45 and O121 serogroups in milk and milk filters. The new diagnostic approach proposed investigate the presence of the O157 and big six non-O157 serogroups at farm level and not to identify VTEC hazard only once the product is processed and/or is ready to be consumed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of Coxiella burnetii status in dairy cattle herds with bulk-tank milk positive by ELISA and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñero, A; Barandika, J F; Hurtado, A; García-Pérez, A L

    2014-04-01

    Bulk-tank milk (BTM) samples are frequently used to evaluate the health status of dairy livestock. A large-scale investigation carried out in BTM samples from dairy cattle herds from a Q fever-endemic region in Northern Spain revealed a high degree of exposure to Coxiella burnetii. This study was aimed at assessing the value of BTM samples analysis as an indicator of the C. burnetii status in dairy cattle herds. Three herds with BTM samples positive for C. burnetii by ELISA and PCR were selected, and blood, faeces and individual milk and BTM samples were analysed by serology and PCR. In spite of the high antibodies titres found in BTM samples, only one of the three farms presented an active infection by C. burnetii, as revealed by the presence of bacterial DNA in vaginal mucus and in environmental samples collected in the calving area, a seroprevalence around 40% in heifers and the seroconversion rate observed in cows. Results obtained indicated that the analysis of BTM samples is a good epidemiological tool at the population level that can be used to discriminate between seropositive and seronegative herds, but at the herd level, additional tests are necessary to evaluate whether Q fever is a potential problem in the farm. When Q fever is suspected in a cattle herd, sera from a small group of 1- to 3-year-old animals need to be analysed to investigate recent contact with C. burnetii. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Effect of clinical contagious agalactia on the bulk tank milk somatic cell count in Murciano-Granadina goat herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, J C; Sánchez, A; Luengo, C; Poveda, J B; Contreras, A

    2004-10-01

    From 19 herds of Murciano-Granadina goats, weekly bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) were performed from October to April, and suspicious milk (n = 182), synovial fluid, and ocular swabs (n = 15) from diseased goats were processed for mycoplasma isolation and identification. Also BTSCC from 65 herds were determined (n = 2693). A mixed model procedure was used to establish the effect of the herd and the lactation month on the BTSCC. Monthly rolling values were calculated for each herd using data collected over the preceding 3 complete months, and 4 different BTSCC thresholds were considered: 1,750,000, 1,500,000, 1,000,000, and 750,000 cells/mL. The mean log BTSCC for the 7-mo study period was 5.89 +/- 0.28 for herds without mycoplasma detection from clinical cases, 5.91 +/- 0.31 for mycoplasma-infected herds without clinical contagious agalactia (CA), and 6.47 +/- 0.32 for the herd with clinical CA. The posthoc tests revealed that only the herd that suffered a clinical CA outbreak showed counts that were significantly higher. No significant differences were found for BTSCC between herds not showing clinical episodes of CA, regardless of whether the mycoplasma had been isolated or not. The 1,750,000-cells/mL threshold would only be surpassed by a few herds with serious mastitis problems (clinical outbreak of CA for example). Seventy percent of the goat herds studied were in compliance with the proposed European Union legal limit of 1,500,000 cells/mL for goat milk.

  1. Effect of short-term versus long-term grassland management and seasonal variation in organic and conventional dairy farming on the composition of bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Govasmark, E

    2013-01-01

    Bulk tank milk from 28 dairy farms was sampled every second month for 2 yr to assess the effects of grassland management, production system and season on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins, Se, and milk sensory quality. Grassland management varied in terms...... of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long...... feeding periods had potential health benefits due to FA composition. In contrast, the higher milk-fat proportions of saturated FA in milk from ORG farms may be perceived as negative for human health....

  2. Effect of oilseed type on milk fatty acid composition of individual cows, and also bulk tank milk fatty acid composition from commercial farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliem, K E; Humphries, D J; Reynolds, C K; Morgan, R; Givens, D I

    2017-02-01

    Supplementing dairy cow diets with oilseed preparations has been shown to replace milk saturated fatty acids (SFA) with mono- and/or polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, PUFA), which may reduce risk factors associated with cardio-metabolic diseases in humans consuming milk and dairy products. Previous studies demonstrating this are largely detailed, highly controlled experiments involving small numbers of animals, but in order to transfer this feeding strategy to commercial situations further studies are required involving whole herds varying in management practices. In experiment 1, three oilseed supplements (extruded linseed (EL), calcium salts of palm and linseed oil (CPLO) and milled rapeseed (MR)) were included in grass silage-based diets formulated to provide cows with ~350 g oil/day, and compared with a negative control (Control) diet containing no supplemental fat, and a positive control diet containing 350 g/cow per day oil as calcium salt of palm oil distillate (CPO). Diets were fed for 28-day periods in a 5×4 Latin Square design, and milk production, composition and fatty acid (FA) profile were analysed at the end of each period. Compared with Control, all lipid supplemented diets decreased milk fat SFA concentration by an average of 3.5 g/100 g FA, by replacement with both cis- and trans-MUFA/PUFA. Compared with CPO, only CPLO and MR resulted in lower milk SFA concentrations. In experiment 2, 24 commercial dairy farms (average herd size±SEM 191±19.3) from the south west of the United Kingdom were recruited and for a 1 month period asked to supplement their herd diets with either CPO, EL, CPLO or MR at the same inclusion level as the first study. Bulk tank milk was analysed weekly to determine FA concentration by Fourier Transform mid-IR spectroscopy prediction. After 4 weeks, EL, CPLO and MR all decreased herd milk SFA and increased MUFA to a similar extent (average -3.4 and +2.4 g/100 g FA, respectively) when compared with CPO. Differing responses

  3. Herd-level prevalence of Map infection in dairy herds of southern Chile determined by culture of environmental fecal samples and bulk-tank milk qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruze, J; Monti, G; Schulze, F; Mella, A; Leiva, S

    2013-09-01

    Paratuberculosis, an infectious disease of domestic and wild ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map), is an economically important disease in dairy herds worldwide. In Chile the disease has been reported in domestic and wildlife animals. However, accurate and updated estimations of the herd-prevalence in cattle at national or regional level are not available. The objectives of this study were to determine the herd-level prevalence of dairy herds with Map infected animals of Southern Chile, based on two diagnostic tests: culture of environmental fecal samples and bulk-tank milk qPCR. Two composite environmental fecal samples and one bulk-tank milk sample were collected during September 2010 and September 2011 from 150 dairy farms in Southern Chile. Isolation of Map from environmental fecal samples was done by culture of decontaminated samples on a commercial Herrold's Egg Yolk Medium (HEYM) with and without mycobactin J. Suspicious colonies were confirmed to be Map by conventional IS900 PCR. Map detection in bulk-tank milk samples was done by real time IS900 PCR assay. PCR-confirmed Map was isolated from 58 (19.3%) of 300 environmental fecal samples. Holding pens and manure storage lagoons were the two more frequent sites found positive for Map, representing 35% and 33% of total positive samples, respectively. However, parlor exits and cow alleyways were the two sites with the highest proportion of positive samples (40% and 32%, respectively). Herd prevalence based on environmental fecal culture was 27% (true prevalence 44%) compared to 49% (true prevalence 87%) based on bulk-tank milk real time IS900 PC. In both cases herd prevalence was higher in large herds (>200 cows). These results confirm that Map infection is wide spread in dairy herds in Southern Chile with a rough herd-level prevalence of 28-100% depending on the herd size, and that IS900 PCR on bulk-tank milk samples is more sensitive than environmental fecal culture to detect

  4. Coxiella burnetii in bulk tank milk samples from dairy goat and dairy sheep farms in The Netherlands in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brom, R; van Engelen, E; Luttikholt, S; Moll, L; van Maanen, K; Vellema, P

    2012-03-24

    In 2007, a human Q fever epidemic started, mainly in the south eastern part of The Netherlands with a suspected indirect relation to dairy goats, and, to a lesser degree, to dairy sheep. This article describes the Q fever prevalences in Dutch dairy goat and dairy sheep bulk tank milk (BTM) samples, using a real-time (RT) PCR and ELISA. Results of BTM PCR and ELISA were compared with the serological status of individual animals, and correlations with a history of Q fever abortion were determined. When compared with ELISA results, the optimal cut-off value for the RT-PCR was 100 bacteria/ml. In 2008, there were 392 farms with more than 200 dairy goats, of which 292 submitted a BTM sample. Of these samples, 96 (32.9 per cent) were PCR positive and 87 (29.8 per cent) were ELISA positive. All farms with a history of Q fever abortion (n=17) were ELISA positive, 16 out of 17 were also PCR positive. BTM PCR or ELISA positive farms had significantly higher within-herd seroprevalences than BTM negative farms. In the south eastern provinces, the area where the human Q fever outbreak started in 2007, a significantly larger proportion of the BTM samples was PCR and ELISA positive compared to the rest of The Netherlands. None of the BTM samples from dairy sheep farms (n=16) were PCR positive but three of these farms were ELISA positive. The higher percentage of BTM positive farms in the area where the human Q fever outbreak started, supports the suspected relation between human cases and infected dairy goat farms.

  5. Occurrence of mycobacteria in bovine milk samples from both individual and collective bulk tanks at farms and informal markets in the southeast region of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Paes, Antonio Carlos; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; de Figueiredo Pantoja, José Carlos; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Miyata, Marcelo; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; Motta, Rodrigo Garcia; Listoni, Fernando José Paganini

    2013-04-24

    Mycobacterium spp. is one of the most important species of zoonotic pathogens that can be transmitted from cattle to humans. The presence of these opportunistic, pathogenic bacteria in bovine milk has emerged as a public-health concern, especially among individuals who consume raw milk and related dairy products. To address this concern, the Brazilian control and eradication program focusing on bovine tuberculosis, was established in 2001. However, bovine tuberculosis continues to afflict approximately 1,3 percent of the cattle in Brazil. In the present study, 300 samples of milk from bovine herds, obtained from both individual and collective bulk tanks and informal points of sale, were cultured on Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based tests and restriction-enzyme pattern analysis were then performed on the colonies exhibiting phenotypes suggestive of Mycobacterium spp., which were characterized as acid-fast bacilli. Of the 300 bovine milk samples that were processed, 24 were positively identified as Mycobacterium spp.Molecular identification detected 15 unique mycobacterial species: Mycobacterium bovis, M. gordonae, M. fortuitum, M. intracellulare, M. flavescens, M. duvalii, M. haemophilum, M. immunogenum, M. lentiflavum, M. mucogenicum, M. novocastrense, M. parafortuitum, M. smegmatis, M. terrae and M. vaccae. The isolation of bacteria from the various locations occurred in the following proportions: 9 percent of the individual bulk-tank samples, 7 percent of the collective bulk-tank samples and 8 percent of the informal-trade samples. No statistically significant difference was observed between the presence of Mycobacterium spp. in the three types of samples collected, the milk production profiles, the presence of veterinary assistance and the reported concerns about bovine tuberculosis prevention in the herds. The microbiological cultures associated with PCR-based identification tests are possible tools for the

  6. Occurrence of mycobacteria in bovine milk samples from both individual and collective bulk tanks at farms and informal markets in the southeast region of Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium spp. is one of the most important species of zoonotic pathogens that can be transmitted from cattle to humans. The presence of these opportunistic, pathogenic bacteria in bovine milk has emerged as a public-health concern, especially among individuals who consume raw milk and related dairy products. To address this concern, the Brazilian control and eradication program focusing on bovine tuberculosis, was established in 2001. However, bovine tuberculosis continues to afflict approximately 1,3 percent of the cattle in Brazil. In the present study, 300 samples of milk from bovine herds, obtained from both individual and collective bulk tanks and informal points of sale, were cultured on Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based tests and restriction-enzyme pattern analysis were then performed on the colonies exhibiting phenotypes suggestive of Mycobacterium spp., which were characterized as acid-fast bacilli. Results Of the 300 bovine milk samples that were processed, 24 were positively identified as Mycobacterium spp. Molecular identification detected 15 unique mycobacterial species: Mycobacterium bovis, M. gordonae, M. fortuitum, M. intracellulare, M. flavescens, M. duvalii, M. haemophilum, M. immunogenum, M. lentiflavum, M. mucogenicum, M. novocastrense, M. parafortuitum, M. smegmatis, M. terrae and M. vaccae. The isolation of bacteria from the various locations occurred in the following proportions: 9 percent of the individual bulk-tank samples, 7 percent of the collective bulk-tank samples and 8 percent of the informal-trade samples. No statistically significant difference was observed between the presence of Mycobacterium spp. in the three types of samples collected, the milk production profiles, the presence of veterinary assistance and the reported concerns about bovine tuberculosis prevention in the herds. Conclusion The microbiological cultures associated with PCR-based identification tests are

  7. Associations of risk factors with somatic cell count in bulk tank milk on organic and conventional dairy farms in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicconi-Hogan, K M; Gamroth, M; Richert, R; Ruegg, P L; Stiglbauer, K E; Schukken, Y H

    2013-06-01

    In the past decade, the demand for organic agricultural products has increased rapidly in the United States and worldwide. Milk quality research is of major interest to both consumers and dairy farmers alike. However, scientific data on milk quality, herd management methods, and animal welfare on organic farms in the United States has been lacking before the research from this study. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of bulk tank milk somatic cell count (SCC) with management characteristics on organic and conventional dairy farms in New York, Oregon, and Wisconsin. Data from similarly sized organic farms (n=192), conventional nongrazing farms (n=64), and conventional grazing farms (n=36) were collected at a single farm visit. Of the 292 farms visited, 290 bulk tank milk samples were collected. Overall, no difference in SCC was observed between the conventional and organic grazing systems. Two models were created to assess the effects of various management and herd characteristics on the logarithmic transformation of the SCC (LSCC), one using data from all herds and one using data from organic herds only. From the total herd model, more grain fed per cow per day was negatively associated with LSCC, whereas a positive bulk tank culture for Staphylococcus aureus and years that a farmer reported being in the dairy business were both positively associated with LSCC. In the organic herd model, a seasonal effect indicated that LSCC tended to increase in the summer and decrease in the winter. Grain fed per cow per day, the use of anionic salts in transition-cow diets, the use of gloves during milking, and regular use of a quarantine unit at milking were all negatively associated with LSCC. Similar to the total herd model, a Staph. aureus-positive bulk tank culture was positively associated with LSCC in the organic model. Standard plate count was also positively associated with LSCC in the organic model. Several variables that were associated with

  8. Effect of short-term versus long-term grassland management and seasonal variation in organic and conventional dairy farming on the composition of bulk tank milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, S K; Govasmark, E; Steinshamn, H

    2013-09-01

    Bulk tank milk from 28 dairy farms was sampled every second month for 2 yr to assess the effects of grassland management, production system and season on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins, Se, and milk sensory quality. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Within ORG farms, SG farms differed from LG farms in herbage botanical composition, but not in concentrate FA concentrations, dry matter intake, or milk yield. Within CON farms, herbage composition, concentrate FA concentrations, dry matter intake, and milk yield showed no or insignificant variations. The ORG farms differed from CON farms in herbage botanical composition, concentrate FA concentrations, concentrate intake, and milk yield. Compared with ORG-LG farms, ORG-SG farms produced milk fat with higher proportions of C10:0 and C12:0 associated with higher herbage proportions of legumes (Fabaceae) and lower proportions of other dicotyledon families. Compared with milk from CON farms, milk fat from ORG farms had higher proportions of most saturated FA and all n-3 FA, but lower proportions of C18:0 and C18:1 cis-9 associated with higher forage proportion and differences in concentrations of FA in concentrates. Compared with the outdoor-feeding periods, the indoor feeding periods yielded milk fat with higher proportions of most short-chain and medium-chain FA and lower proportions of most C18-FA associated with grazing and higher forage proportions. Milk concentrations of α-tocopherol and β-carotene were lower during the grazing periods. Inclusion of fishmeal in

  9. Risk factors for bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Part 2: bacteria count-specific risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmoslemany, A M; Keefe, G P; Dohoo, I R; Jayarao, B M

    2009-06-01

    A case-control study was conducted to identify specific on-farm risk factors that influence bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk in Prince Edward Island dairy herds. Total aerobic (TAC), preliminary incubation (PIC), laboratory pasteurization (LPC), and coliform (CC) counts were used to assess the bacteriological quality of bulk tank milk. Four case-control groups were defined based on the last 6 results of each test before on farm evaluation. A herd was classified as a TAC, PIC, or CC case when the herd had at least 4 high TAC, PIC, or CC counts out of the last 6 analyses for each test, respectively. For the LPC case group, a herd was required to have at least 3 high results out of the last 6 analyses. Control groups had low counts in the last 6 analyses for each test in the corresponding case group (TAC, PIC, CC, and LPC). The results of the study showed that TAC and PIC were mainly associated with cow and stall hygiene: washing the teats with water, not using teat predip, and dirty teats were risk factors. The LPC and CC were related to equipment hygiene, with high counts being associated with low temperature of the cleaning solution, high water-hardness score, and high alkalinity of alkaline detergent wash. Based on the findings of this study it can be concluded that TAC, PIC, LPC, and CC counts are of considerable value in identifying practices that could influence milk quality.

  10. Short communication: effect of storage and preservation on total bacterial counts determined by automated flow cytometry in bulk tank goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, D; Sánchez, A; Contreras, A; Luengo, C; Corrales, J C; de la Fe, C; Guirao, I; Morales, C T; Gonzalo, C

    2009-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of different storage conditions on total bacterial count (TBC) determinations made in goat bulk tank milk using an automated flow cytometry method. The storage conditions tested were storage temperature (refrigeration at 4 and 10 degrees C or freezing at -20 degrees C), the use of a preservative (no preservative, NP; azidiol, AZ; or bronopol, BR), and the age of the milk samples for each analytical condition (storage times at 4 degrees C: from 0 h to 5 d for NP; and from 0 h to 22 d for AZ and BR; storage times at 10 degrees C: from 24 h to 2 d for NP and from 24 h to 22 for AZ and BR; storage times at -20 degrees C: from 24 h to 22 d for NP, AZ, and BR). Significant effects on individual bacterial count (IBC) variation were shown by the bulk tank milk sample, preservative, storage temperature, interaction preservative x storage temperature, and milk age within the interaction preservative x storage temperature. In preserved samples, the highest IBC were obtained for AZ and the lowest counts were obtained in samples preserved with BR. Because of the variation in IBC recorded in BR-preserved samples, we recommend that BR should not be used for TBC determinations using the automated flow cytometry method. The NP samples stored at 4 and 10 degrees C showed significantly higher IBC at 24 h postcollection, also invalidating these analytical conditions for TBC analyses. The practical implications of our findings are that goat milk samples preserved with AZ and stored at 10 or 4 degrees C are appropriate for TBC by the BactoScan flow cytometry method for up to 24 h and 11 d postcollection, respectively.

  11. Study of the association of atmospheric temperature and relative humidity with bulk tank milk somatic cell count in dairy herds using Generalized additive mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Francesco; Marano, Giuseppe; Ambrogi, Federico; Boracchi, Patrizia; Casula, Antonio; Biganzoli, Elia; Moroni, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    Elevated bulk tank milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) has a negative impact on milk production, milk quality, and animal health. Seasonal increases in herd level somatic cell count (SCC) are commonly associated with elevated environmental temperature and humidity. The Temperature Humidity Index (THI) has been developed to measure general environmental stress in dairy cattle; however, additional work is needed to determine a specific effect of the heat stress index on herd-level SCC. Generalized Additive Model methods were used for a flexible exploration of the relationships between daily temperature, relative humidity, and bulk milk somatic cell count. The data consist of BMSCC and meteorological recordings collected between March 2009 and October 2011 of 10 dairy farms. The results indicate that, an average increase of 0.16% of BMSCC is expected for an increase of 1°C degree of temperature. A complex relationship was found for relative humidity. For example, increase of 0.099%, 0.037% and 0.020% are expected in correspondence to an increase of relative humidity from 50% to 51%, 80% to 81%; and 90% to 91%, respectively. Using this model, it will be possible to provide evidence-based advice to dairy farmers for the use of THI control charts created on the basis of our statistical model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Geographical and temporal aspects of an outbreak of off-flavours in bulk-tank milk in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounchili, A; Wichtel, J J; Sanchez, J

    2006-05-17

    The geographical and temporal dynamics of the outbreak of off-flavours in bulk-tank milk that occurred between September 2000 and June 2002 in Prince Edward Island (PEI) dairy herds were described using spatial, temporal and space-time scan statistics. Results suggested clustering both in time and space. We found one primary cluster (six case herds, feed off-flavour, October 2000 to January 2001) and two secondary clusters formed of feed (5 case herds, October 2000 to January 2001)) and rancid (five case herds, December 2000 to March 2001) off-flavours, respectively. The relative risk (RR) for producing off-flavoured milk was similar for these three clusters (RR=6.4).

  13. Short communication: investigation of Coxiella burnetii occurrence in dairy sheep flocks by bulk-tank milk analysis and antibody level determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, A L; Astobiza, I; Barandika, J F; Atxaerandio, R; Hurtado, A; Juste, R A

    2009-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in the dairy sheep population from the Basque Country (northern Spain), a study was carried out combining molecular and serological techniques. First, bulk-tank milk samples from 154 flocks belonging to the Latxa Breed Farmers Association were analyzed by PCR, with 22% of flocks testing positive for C. burnetii. Then, a selection of 34 flocks (7 PCR positive and 17 negative) was investigated for the presence of serum antibodies by ELISA test on 1,011 ewes (approximately 30 ewes per flock). A total of 8.9% of the animals were seropositive, 67.6% of the flocks had at least one seropositive animal, but only in 14.7% of them was seroprevalence greater than 25%. Older ewes showed a significantly greater prevalence (17.5%) compared with yearlings (7.5%) or replacement lambs (1.5%). A marginally significant association was found between seroprevalence and PCR detection of C. burnetii in bulk-tank milk. The widespread distribution of C. burnetii in the region advocates for the implementation of Q fever control strategies and highlights the potential risk of sheep as a reservoir and infection source for other domestic and wildlife species and the human population.

  14. Bulk tank milk surveillance as a measure to detect Coxiella burnetii shedding dairy goat herds in the Netherlands between 2009 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Brom, R; Santman-Berends, I; Luttikholt, S; Moll, L; Van Engelen, E; Vellema, P

    2015-06-01

    In the period from 2005 to 2009, Coxiella burnetii was a cause of abortion waves at 28 dairy goat farms and 2 dairy sheep farms in the Netherlands. Two years after the first abortion waves, a large human Q fever outbreak started mainly in the same region, and aborting small ruminants were regarded as most probable source. To distinguish between infected and noninfected herds, a surveillance program started in October 2009, based on PCR testing of bulk tank milk (BTM) samples, which had never been described before. The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of this surveillance program and to evaluate both the effect of culling of pregnant dairy goats on positive farms and of vaccination on BTM results. Bulk tank milk samples were tested for C. burnetii DNA using a real-time PCR, and results were analyzed in relation to vaccination, culling, and notifiable (officially reported to government) C. burnetii abortion records. In spring and autumn, BTM samples were also tested for antibodies using an ELISA, and results were evaluated in relation to the compulsory vaccination campaign. Between October 2009 and April 2014, 1,660 (5.6%) out of 29,875 BTM samples from 401 dairy goat farms tested positive for C. burnetii DNA. The percentage of positive samples dropped from 20.5% in 2009 to 0.3% in 2014. In a multivariable model, significantly higher odds of being PCR positive in the BTM surveillance program were found in farms of which all pregnant dairy goats were culled. Additionally, the risk for C. burnetii BTM PCR positivity significantly decreased after multiple vaccinations. Bulk tank milk ELISA results were significantly higher after vaccination than before. The ELISA results were higher after multiple vaccinations compared with a single vaccination, and ELISA results on officially declared infected farms were significantly higher compared with noninfected farms. In conclusion, BTM surveillance is an effective and useful tool to detect C. burnetii shedding

  15. Bulk tank milk ELISA for detection of antibodies to Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis: Correlation between repeated tests and within-herd antibody-prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Detection of bulk tank milk (BTM) antibodies using ELISA (BTM-ELISA) may constitute an inexpensive test for surveillance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in dairy cattle herds provided that the test is accurate and consistent. The objectives of this study were...... Danish Holstein herds over a period of one year. All samples were tested using a commercial indirect ELISA for detection of MAP specific antibodies. The individual cow's results were dichotomised and used to estimate the within-herd antibody prevalence at each test-date. These prevalences were...... then combined with the ELISA reading on the BTM test-date closest to the cow-level test-date. A mixed-effect analysis of covariance with autoregressive type 1 correlation structure was carried out using the log-transformed BTM-ELISA results as outcome. This model was used to assess the correlation between...

  16. Somatic cell counts in bulk milk and their importance for milk processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, N. R.; Mikulec, D. P.; Radovanović, R. S.

    2017-09-01

    Bulk tank milk somatic cell counts are the indicator of the mammary gland health in the dairy herds and may be regarded as an indirect measure of milk quality. Elevated somatic cell counts are correlated with changes in milk composition The aim of this study was to assess the somatic cell counts that significantly affect the quality of milk and dairy products. We examined the somatic cell counts in bulk tank milk samples from 38 farms during the period of 6 months, from December to the May of the next year. The flow cytometry, Fossomatic was used for determination of somatic cell counts. In the same samples content of total proteins and lactose was determined by Milcoscan. Our results showed that average values for bulk tank milk samples were 273,605/ml from morning milking and 292,895/ml from evening milking. The average values for total proteins content from morning and evening milking are 3,31 and 3,34%, respectively. The average values for lactose content from morning and evening milking are 4,56 and 4,63%, respectively. The highest somatic cell count (516,000/ml) was detected in bulk tank milk sample from evening milk in the Winter and the lowest content of lactose was 4,46%. Our results showed that obtained values for bulk tank milk somatic cell counts did not significantly affected the content of total proteins and lactose.

  17. Comparative analysis of bacterial community composition in bulk tank raw milk by culture-dependent and culture-independent methods using the viability dye propidium monoazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Mareike; Geißert, Janina; Kruse, Myriam; Lipski, André

    2014-11-01

    Microbial diversity of 3 raw milk samples after 72 h of storage at 4 °C in a bulk tank was analyzed by culture-dependent and -independent methods. The culture-dependent approach was based on the isolation of bacteria on complex and selective media, chemotaxonomic differentiation of isolates, and subsequent identification by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The culture-independent approach included the treatment of raw milk with the dye propidium monoazide before direct DNA extraction by mechanic and enzymatic cell lysis approaches, and cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes. The selective detection of viable bacteria improved the comparability between bacterial compositions of raw milk based on culture-dependent and -independent methods, which was the major objective of this study. Several bacterial species of the phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria were detected by the culture-dependent method, whereas mainly bacteria of the phylum Proteobacteria as well as low proportions of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria were detected by the culture-independent method. This led to the conclusion that the phylum Firmicutes was strongly discriminated by the culture-independent approach. Generally, species richness detected by the culture-dependent method was higher than that detected by the culture-independent method for all samples. However, few taxa could be detected solely by the direct DNA-based method. In conclusion, the combination of culture-dependent and -independent methods led to the detection of the highest bacterial diversity for the raw milk samples analyzed. It was shown that DNA extraction from raw milk as the essential step in culture-independent methods causes the discrimination of taxa by incomplete cell lysis. Treatment of raw milk with the viability dye propidium monoazide was optimized for the application in raw milk without former removal of milk ingredients and proved to be a suitable tool to ensure comparability

  18. Estimation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis load in raw bulk tank milk in Emilia-Romagna Region (Italy) by qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricchi, Matteo; Savi, Roberto; Bolzoni, Luca; Pongolini, Stefano; Grant, Irene R; De Cicco, Caterina; Cerutti, Giulia; Cammi, Giuliana; Garbarino, Chiara A; Arrigoni, Norma

    2016-08-01

    Consumption of milk and dairy products is considered one of the main routes of human exposure to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Quantitative data on MAP load in raw cows' milk are essential starting point for exposure assessment. Our study provides this information on a regional scale, estimating the load of MAP in bulk tank milk (BTM) produced in Emilia-Romagna region (Italy). The survey was carried out on 2934 BTM samples (88.6% of the farms herein present) using two different target sequences for qPCR (f57 and IS900). Data about the performances of both qPCRs are also reported, highlighting the superior sensitivity of IS900-qPCR. Seven hundred and eighty-nine samples tested MAP-positive (apparent prevalence 26.9%) by IS900 qPCR. However, only 90 of these samples were quantifiable by qPCR. The quantifiable samples contained a median load of 32.4 MAP cells mL(-1) (and maximum load of 1424 MAP cells mL(-1) ). This study has shown that a small proportion (3.1%) of BTM samples from Emilia-Romagna region contained MAP in excess of the limit of detection (1.5 × 10(1) MAP cells mL(-1) ), indicating low potential exposure for consumers if the milk subsequently undergoes pasteurization or if it is destined to typical hard cheese production. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. European Union bulk tank SCC standards and proposed US standards: Compliance based on data from four Federal Milk Marketing Orders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate compliance of US producers with the proposed BTSCC limits. Four different SCC levels of compliance were evaluated: 750K; 600K; 500K; 400K. For the 12 month period ending October 2010, 1.0% of producers and 0.2% of milk exceeded the current US limit of 750K...

  20. Prevalence and characteristics of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from livestock, chicken carcasses, bulk tank milk, minced meat, and contact persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zweifel Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CNS are of increasing importance to animal and public health. In veterinary medicine and along the meat and milk production line, only limited data were so far available on MR-CNS characteristics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of MR-CNS, to identify the detected staphylococci to species level, and to assess the antibiotic resistance profiles of isolated MR-CNS strains. Results After two-step enrichment and growth on chromogenic agar, MR-CNS were detected in 48.2% of samples from livestock and chicken carcasses, 46.4% of samples from bulk tank milk and minced meat, and 49.3% of human samples. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, 414 selected MR-CNS strains belonged to seven different species (S. sciuri, 32.6%; S. fleurettii, 25.1%; S. haemolyticus, 17.4%; S. epidermidis, 14.5%, S. lentus, 9.2%; S. warneri, 0.7%; S. cohnii, 0.5%. S. sciuri and S. fleurettii thereby predominated in livestock, BTM and minced meat samples, whereas S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus predominated in human samples. In addition to beta-lactam resistance, 33-49% of all 414 strains were resistant to certain non-beta-lactam antibiotics (ciproflaxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline. Conclusions A high prevalence of MR-CNS was found in livestock production. This is of concern in view of potential spread of mecA to S. aureus (MRSA. Multiresistant CNS strains might become an emerging problem for veterinary medicine. For species identification of MR-CNS isolated from different origins, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be a fast and reliable tool and is suitable for screening of large sample amounts.

  1. Prevalence and characteristics of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci from livestock, chicken carcasses, bulk tank milk, minced meat, and contact persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Helen; Ziegler, Dominik; Pflüger, Valentin; Vogel, Guido; Zweifel, Claudio; Stephan, Roger

    2011-01-27

    Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CNS) are of increasing importance to animal and public health. In veterinary medicine and along the meat and milk production line, only limited data were so far available on MR-CNS characteristics. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of MR-CNS, to identify the detected staphylococci to species level, and to assess the antibiotic resistance profiles of isolated MR-CNS strains. After two-step enrichment and growth on chromogenic agar, MR-CNS were detected in 48.2% of samples from livestock and chicken carcasses, 46.4% of samples from bulk tank milk and minced meat, and 49.3% of human samples. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), 414 selected MR-CNS strains belonged to seven different species (S. sciuri, 32.6%; S. fleurettii, 25.1%; S. haemolyticus, 17.4%; S. epidermidis, 14.5%, S. lentus, 9.2%; S. warneri, 0.7%; S. cohnii, 0.5%). S. sciuri and S. fleurettii thereby predominated in livestock, BTM and minced meat samples, whereas S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus predominated in human samples. In addition to beta-lactam resistance, 33-49% of all 414 strains were resistant to certain non-beta-lactam antibiotics (ciproflaxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, tetracycline). A high prevalence of MR-CNS was found in livestock production. This is of concern in view of potential spread of mecA to S. aureus (MRSA). Multiresistant CNS strains might become an emerging problem for veterinary medicine. For species identification of MR-CNS isolated from different origins, MALDI-TOF MS proved to be a fast and reliable tool and is suitable for screening of large sample amounts.

  2. Cost-effectiveness of bulk-tank milk testing for surveys to demonstrate freedom from infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and bovine enzootic leucosis in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, A; Reist, M; Schwermer, H

    2012-05-01

    In Switzerland, annual surveys to substantiate freedom from infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) and enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) are implemented by a random allocation of farms to the respective survey as well as blood sampling of individual animals at farm level. Contrary to many other European countries, bulk-tank milk (BTM) samples have not been used for active cattle disease surveillance for several years in Switzerland. The aim of this project was to provide a financial comparison between the current surveillance programme consisting of blood sampling only and a modified surveillance programme including BTM sampling. A financial spreadsheet model was used for cost comparison. Various surveillance scenarios were tested with different sample sizes and sampling frequencies for BTM samples. The costs could be halved without compromising the power to substantiate the freedom from IBR and EBL through the surveillance programme. Alternatively, the sensitivity could be markedly increased when keeping the costs at the actual level and doubling the sample size. The risk-based sample size of the actual programme results in a confidence of 94,18 % that the farm level prevalence is below 0,2 %. Which the doubled sample size, the confidence is 99,69 % respectively.

  3. A retrospective evaluation of a Bovine Herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) antibody ELISA on bulk-tank milk samples for classification of the BHV-1 status of Danish dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylin, Britta; Strøger, Ulla; Rønsholt, Leif

    2000-01-01

    performance characteristics of the BHV-1 blocking ELISA in 1039 BHV-1-seropositive and 502 repeatedly BHV-1-negative dairy herds using the results of blood testing of the individual animals as the true infection status. At a cut-off value of 30% blocking reaction, the herd-level relative sensitivity......Bulk-tank milk samples analysed in a Bovine Herpesvirus-1 (BHV-1) blocking ELISA are still in use in the Danish BHV-1 programme as a tool to classify dairy herds as BHV-1 infected or BHV-1 free herds. in this retrospective study, we used data from the Danish BHV-1 eradication campaign to evaluate...... samples. The BHV-1 blocking ELISA on bulk-tank milk could detect seropositive herds (few), with prevalence proportions as low as one seropositive cow out of 70 cows....

  4. Antibodies to major pasture borne helminth infections in bulk-tank milk samples from organic and nearby conventional dairy herds in south-central Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Johan; Dahlström, Frida; Engström, Annie; Hessle, Anna; Jakubek, Eva-Britt; Schnieder, Thomas; Strube, Christina; Sollenberg, Sofia

    2010-08-04

    The objective of this randomised pairwise survey was to compare the regional distribution of antibody levels against the three most important helminth infections in organic and conventional dairy herds in Sweden. Bulk-tank milk from 105 organic farms and 105 neighbouring conventional dairy farms with access to pasture in south-central Sweden were collected in September 2008. Samples were also collected from 8 organic and 8 conventional herds located in a much more restricted area, on the same as well as 3 additional occasions during the grazing season, to reveal evidence for seasonal patterns against cattle stomach worm (Ostertagia ostertagi). Antibody levels to the stomach worm (O. ostertagi), liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica) and lungworm (Dictyocaulus viviparus) were then determined by detection of specific antibodies using three different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). According to the Svanovir Ostertagia ELISA, the mean optical density ratio (ODR) was significantly higher in the milk from organic compared to conventional herds, i.e. 0.82 (95% CL=0.78-0.86) versus 0.66 (0.61-0.71). However, no significant differences were observed in the samples collected at different time points from the same 16 herds (F(3,39)=1.18, P=0.32). Antibodies to D. viviparus infection were diagnosed with an ELISA based on recombinant major sperm protein (MSP), and seropositivity was found in 21 (18%) of the 113 organic herds and 11 (9%) of the 113 conventional herds. The seroprevalence of D. viviparus was somewhat higher in the organic herds (Chi-square=3.65, P=0.056), but with the positive conventional herds were located in the vicinity of infected organic herds. Of the 16 herds that were sampled on repeated occasions, as many as 10 (63%), were seropositive on at least one sampling occasion. Many of these turned positive towards the end of the grazing season. Only one herd was positive in all 4 samples and 3 were positive only at turn-out. Considering F. hepatica there

  5. Short communication: comparing real-time PCR and bacteriological cultures for Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus in bulk-tank milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, G; Caminiti, A; Delle Donne, G; Moroni, P; Santi, A; Galletti, G; Tamba, M; Bolzoni, G; Bertocchi, L

    2014-09-01

    For more than 30 yr, a control plan for Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus has been carried out in more than 1,500 dairy herds of the province of Brescia (northern Italy). From 2010 to 2011, the apparent prevalence of Strep. agalactiae has been relatively stable around 10%, but the apparent prevalence of Staph. aureus has been greater than 40% with an increasing trend. The aim of this paper was to estimate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of 3 assays for the detection of Strep. agalactiae and Staph. aureus in bulk-tank milk samples (BTMS) in field conditions. The assays were a qualitative and a quantitative bacteriological culture (BC) for each pathogen and a homemade multiplex real-time PCR (rt-PCR). Because a gold standard was not available, the sensitivities (Se) and specificities (Sp) were evaluated using a Bayesian latent class approach. In 2012 we collected one BTMS from 165 dairy herds that were found positive for Strep. agalactiae in the previous 2-yr campaigns of eradication plan. In most cases, BTMS collected in these herds were positive for Staph. aureus as well, confirming the wide spread of this pathogen. At the same time we also collected composite milk samples from all the 8,624 lactating cows to evaluate the within-herd prevalence of Strep. agalactiae. Streptococcus agalactiae samples were cultured using a selective medium Tallium Kristalviolette Tossin, whereas for Staph. aureus, we used Baird Parker modified medium with added Rabbit Plasma Fibrinogen ISO-Formulation. In parallel, BTMS were tested using the rt-PCR. Regarding Strep. agalactiae, the posterior median of Se and Sp of the 2 BC was similar [qualitative BC: Se=98%, posterior credible interval (95%PCI): 94-100%, and Sp=99%, 95%PCI: 96-100%; quantitative BC: Se=99%, 95%PCI: 96-100%, and Sp=99%, 95%PCI: 95-100%] and higher than those of the rt-PCR (at 40 cycle threshold, Se=92%, 95%PCI: 85-97%; Sp=94%, 95%PCI: 88-98%). Also in case of Staph. aureus, the posterior medians

  6. Risk analysis of investments in-farm milk cooling tanks

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    Danielle D. Sant´Anna

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A risk analysis for the installation of milk cooling tanks (250, 500 and 1,000 L on Brazilian rural properties was conducted in this study. The results showed that all investments had a return higher than the annual 12% minimum rate of attractiveness. There was a direct relationship between tank size and investment profitability and an inverse relation between size and risk. The probability of achieving returns lower than the opportunity cost was highest for the smallest tank (42%. In order to make the investment in small cooling tanks more attractive, the dairy industry incentives offered to farmers for supplying cooled milk could be increased. However, this approach might make investments in bulk milk collection by dairy companies infeasible. Thus, a recommendable strategy for a successful modernization of the Brazilian dairy sector’s inbound logistics would be to promote an increase in the volume of the milk produced per farm.

  7. Prevalence of bovine viral diarrhoea virus antibodies in bulk tank milk of industrial dairy cattle herds in suburb of Mashhad-Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoussi, M Talebkhan; Haghparast, A; Estajee, H

    2008-04-17

    Bulk milk for the presence of antibodies against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) from 38 industrial dairy cattle herds complexes with 250-3000 Holstein dairy cows in suburb of Mashhad-Iran was tested. None of the herds were vaccinated against BVDV. Commercial indirect ELISA-kit for the detection of specific antibodies was used. The result could be read visually where the optical density (OD) was measured at 450 nm. The percent positivity (PP) values >or=7 and prevalence of BVDV antibody-positive herds was 89.47 and 93.98%, respectively. The range of PP was 1.59-107.66 among the herds. The OD in 52.63% bulk milk of the herds was very high. It is concluded that exposure to BVD virus was widely distributed in the dairy cattle herds in suburb of Mashhad-Iran.

  8. Isolation of Prototheca spp. from cows with mastitis, bulk tanks milk and in the environment of the animals/ Isolamento de Prototheca spp. de vacas com mastite, de leite de tanques de expansão e do ambiente dos animais

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    Agda de Godoy

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The dairy cattle mammary gland infections cause serious economic losses to dairy farmers due to the decrease in milk production, therapeutic procedures and culling of chronic infected animals. High incidence of mastitis in herds also alters both the composition and the quality of the milk. Mastitis pathogens can also cause infections and poisoning in humans. In the last years, emphasis has been given to intramammary infections caused by the genus Prototheca which, besides their zoonotic characteristics, are considered mastitis pathogens of persistent infection and are refractory to traditional therapeutic procedures. The objective of this work was the isolation and identification of Prototheca spp. from milk samples collected from bulk tanks and milk cans, cows presenting mastitis and the dairy herd environment. Milk samples were collected from 81 bulk tanks and milk cans of 81 dairy herds. Prototheca zopfii was identified in milk samples in 10 dairy herds. From these, eight dairy herds were studied regarding Prototheca spp. mastitis and environmental occurrence as well as the main mastitis bacterial agents. Bacteria, algae and yeasts were isolated from 324 milk samples from 197 cows. P. zopfii was isolated in three dairy herds from eleven milk samples from five cows with clinical and subclinical mastitis. In these dairy herds with positive isolation of P. zopfii the agent was isolated from the herd environment, excrements of the calves and teat cup rubbers. The results of this work demonstrate the importance of isolation in bulk tanks as an indicative of Prototheca spp. presence in dairy herds.As infecções da glândula mamária de vacas leiteiras acarretam sérios prejuízos ao produtor pela diminuição da produção leiteira, tratamento e descarte de animais com infecções crônicas. Elevada incidência de mastite no rebanho também altera a composição e qualidade do leite. Agentes de mastite podem causar infecções ou intoxicações no

  9. Implications of PCR and ELISA results on the routes of bulk-tank contamination with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, A; Cazer, C L; Ruegg, P L; Gröhn, Y T; Schukken, Y H

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiologic agent of Johne's disease in dairy cattle, may enter the bulk tank via environmental contamination or direct excretion into milk. Traditionally, diagnostics to identify MAP in milk target either MAP antibodies (by ELISA) or the organism itself (by culture or PCR). High ELISA titers may be directly associated with excretion of MAP into milk but only indirectly linked to environmental contamination of the bulk tank. Patterns of bulk-milk ELISA and bulk-milk PCR results could therefore provide insight into the routes of contamination and level of infection or environmental burden. Coupled with questionnaire responses pertaining to management, the results of these diagnostic tests could reveal correlations with herd characteristics or on-farm practices that distinguish herds with high and low environmental bulk-tank MAP contamination. A questionnaire on hygiene, management, and Johne's specific parameters was administered to 292 dairy farms in New York, Oregon, and Wisconsin. Bulk-tank samples were collected from each farm for evaluation by real-time PCR and ELISA. Before DNA extraction and testing of the unknown samples, bulk-milk template preparation was optimized with respect to parameters such as MAP fractionation patterns and lysis. Two regression models were developed to explore the relationships among bulk-tank PCR, ELISA, environmental predictors, and herd characteristics. First, ELISA optical density (OD) was designated as the outcome in a linear regression model. Second, the log odds of being PCR positive in the bulk tank were modeled using binary logistic regression with penalized maximum likelihood. The proportion of PCR-positive bulk tanks was highest for New York and for organic farms, providing a clue as to the geographical patterns of MAP-positive bulk-tank samples and relationship to production type. Bulk-milk PCR positivity was also higher for large relative to small herds. The models

  10. QUALIDADE DE LEITE CRU PRODUZIDO E ARMAZENADO EM TANQUES DE EXPANSÃO NO ESTADO DE GOIÁS RAW QUALITY OF MILK PRODUCED AND STORED IN BULK TANKS IN GOIAS STATE, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcele Louise Tadaieski Arruda

    2008-12-01

    raw milk quality in samples obtained from bulk tanks in the Goiás State. Thirty raw milk  samples of 1000 mL were harvest. It was performed the following analyses: total bacterial count (TBC by Flow Citometry, search for the presence of residues of antimicrobial agents by the Delvotest® SP kit and investigation for the fraud by adding to milk the following substances: hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, sodium bicarbonate and sodium hydroxide. It was not found any residues of antimicrobial agents in all (100% samples. Physicochemical test also showed the absence of hydrogen peroxide, formaldehyde, sodium bicarbonate and sodium hydroxide in milk. About TBC, it was observed that 30% (9/30 of bulk tanks showed TBC>106 CFU/mL, in 46.67% (14/30 the TBC was between 105 to 106 CFU/mL and 23.33% (7/30 showed TBC <105 CFU/mL. Means observed were TBC of 9.2 X 106, TBC of 4.5 X 105, TBC of 5.1 X 104, respectively. From bulk tanks with TBC>106 CFU/mL, 100% were available for common utilization and had significantly higher values for TBC (P<0.05. Educational standards and training about the hygienic procedures applied to milk obtainment and to milking equipments, a well implemented mastitis control program and correct use of milk cooling system after milking must be adopted in order to provide a better raw milk quality. These measures provide benefits to industry due to the higher income of quality raw material. It also provides benefits for the farmer, since they can receive a better wage from dairy companies that pay higher for better quality products; to the trade because quality products have a longer shelf-life and to consumer, that can have an increase in quality of life.

    KEY WORDS: CFU, raw milk,  quality, residues.

  11. Presence of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in bulk tank milk from Argentine dairy farms Presencia de Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxigénico en leche de tanque de frío de tambos de Argentina

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    Verónica E. Neder

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most prevalent bovine mastitis pathogen in Argentina. The ability of this organism to produce enterotoxins is linked to staphylococcal food poisoning. Staphylococcal enterotoxins are low molecular weight proteins, highly resistant to heat and proteolytic enzyme activity. The aim of this study was to determine the ability to produce enterotoxins and types of enterotoxins A through E produced among 94 S. aureus isolated from bulk tank milk in Argentina by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Eleven isolates (11.7 % produced enterotoxins. Seven of them (7.4 % produced enterotoxin C, two (2.1 % enterotoxin D, one (1.1 % enterotoxin B and one (1.1 % enterotoxins C-D-E. None of the isolates produced enterotoxins A or E alone. Since presence of staphylococcal enterotoxins constitute a potential risk to public health, these findings underscore the need to control S. aureus bovine mastitis and to limit bacterial multiplication in bulk tank milk.Staphylococcus aureus es el patógeno causante de mastitis más prevalente en Argentina. Las enterotoxinas producidas por este organismo constituyen una de las causas más importantes de intoxicación alimentaria en seres humanos. Las enterotoxinas estafilocócicas son proteínas de bajo peso molecular, termoestables y resistentes a enzimas proteolíticas. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue determinar por enzimoinmunoensayo la presencia de enterotoxinas A-E y establecer su tipo en 94 aislamientos de Staphylococcus aureus obtenidos de leche de tanque de frío de tambos de Argentina. Se identificaron 11 % aislamientos enterotoxigénicos (11,7 %; siete (7,4 % produjeron enterotoxina C, dos produjeron enterotoxina D (2,1 %, uno produjo enterotoxina B (1,1 % y uno produjo enterotoxinas C-D-E (1,1 %. No se detectaron aislamientos que produjeran enterotoxinas A o E solamente. Estos hallazgos indican la necesidad de implementar un eficaz control de la mastitis bovina para disminuir la

  12. Avaliação da sensibilidade da cultura de leite do tanque para isolamento de agentes contagiosos da mastite bovina Evaluation of the sensitivity of bulk tank milk cultures for the isolation of contagious bovine mastitis pathogens

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    Maria Aparecida V. P. Brito

    1998-01-01

    ,7% para os quartos mamários. S. aureus foi isolado de todas três amostras do tanque dos rebanhos A, B e D. Somente a terceira amostra do rebanho C foi positiva para S. aureus. S agalactiae foi recuperado de todas as amostras do rebanho D, duas do rebanho C e de uma do rebanho A. Todas as amostras do tanque dos rebanhos A, B, C e D apresentaram contaminação com coliformes e somente uma das amostras coletadas na plataforma de recepção da indústria foi negativa para coliformes. Leveduras foram isoladas de 16 amostras coletadas na indústria e de todas amostras do tanque dos rebanhos A, B, C e D. Não foram isolados coliformes ou leveduras dos quartos mamários dos animais destes rebanhos, sugerindo que ocorreu contaminação do leite durante ou após a ordenha, provavelmente devido a deficiências nos processos de limpeza e higienização. A análise dos resultados das culturas do leite do tanque mostrou que o exame foi específico para detectar os patógenos contagiosos da mastite. A sensibilidade do teste aumentou quando se examinaram mais de duas amostras consecutivas.Samples of bulk tank milk from 33 herds were collected at the dairy processing plant and cultured, as a means of detecting specific (contagious bovine mastitis pathogens. Somatic cell counts (SCC were made on a Fossomatic 90. Two and three weekly consecutive samples were obtained from 13 and 12 herds, respectively. Only one sample was examined from eight herds. Three daily consecutive samples of bulk milk and individual quarter samples from all lactating cows from four herds (A, B, C and D were also examined. Milk from individual quarters were cultured on blood agar, while tank milk samples were cultured on TKT, Mannitol Salt, MacConkey agars and Sabouraud containing chloramphenicol. Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from 26 of the 33 herds sampled in the dairy processing plant. Nine of these samples also contained Streptococcus agalactiae. Nine herds had SCC above 500,000 ml-1. The remaining 23

  13. Implications of PCR and ELISA results on the routes of bulk-tank contamination with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaver, A.; Cazer, C. L.; Ruegg, P. L.; Gröhn, Y. T.; Schukken, Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiologic agent of Johne's disease in dairy cattle, may enter the bulk tank via environmental contamination or direct excretion into milk. Traditionally, diagnostics to identify MAP in milk target either MAP antibodies (by ELISA) or the organism

  14. Pseudomonas spp.: contamination sources in bulk tanks of dairy farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M.C. Vidal

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study focused on isolating Pseudomonas spp. during milking process in ten dairy farms with manual and mechanical milking systems during dry and rainy seasons, and evaluating DNA homology and patterns of distribution between isolates, in order to identify main sources of milk contamination by Pseudomonas spp. A total of 167 isolates of Pseudomonas spp. were obtained from water, milkers’ hands, cows’ teats, teat cups, cooling tanks and raw milk. Bacteria of Pseudomonas spp. genus were isolated from 85 and 82 sampling points in dairy farms with manual and mechanical milking system, respectively. A significant difference (p=0.02 on Pseudomonas spp. isolation was observed among samples of surface of cows’ teats before and after pre-dipping, but no significant difference (p>0.05 was observed among milking systems or seasons. The possibility of the same Pseudomonas spp. patterns are distributed in different farms and seasons using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP technique was demonstrated. Milkers’ hands, surface of cows’ teats, teat cups and cooling tanks were associated with raw milk contamination with Pseudomonas spp. on farms with manual and mechanical milking system, showing that regardless of the type of milking system and season, proper hygiene procedures of equipment, utensils and workers’ hands are essential to avoid contamination of the milk and, therefore, improve milk quality.

  15. [Staphylococcus aureus in bulk milk samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, P; Vyletĕlová, M

    1995-07-01

    In the years 1993-1994 the occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in bulk milk samples in the area where a Baby Food Factory at Zábreh in Moravia is located, and in Bruntál, Zlín and Policka districts. Evaluation of the results was based on ECC Directive 92/46, while the dynamics of S. aureus presence was followed for the whole period of observation as well as in the particular seasons. A total of 4,485 samples was processed. Out of these, 50.7% contained less than 100 CFU/ml of S. aureus, 41.4% contained 100-500 CFU/ml, 6.73% 500-2,000 CFU/ml and 1.14% contained more than 2,000 CFU/ml (Fig. 1). The samples were divided into three categories: private new-established farms, cooperative and State-owned enterprises in the area of the Zábĕh Factory and others (Zlín, Bruntál and Policka districts). There were highly significant differences in the content of staphylococci (P = 0.01%) between the three categories of samples. Ninety-eight percent of samples from private farms, 96% samples from the Zábreh Factory area and 85% of the other samples comply with the regulation EEC 92/64 (Tab. I) for raw cow's milk for the manufacture of products "made with raw milk" whose manufacturing process does not involve any heat treatment (Fig. 2). The occurrence of S. aureus in the Zábreh Factory area shows an expressive seasonal dynamics (P = 0.005%) with maximum values in winter months (December-March) and minimum values in summer months (July-October)-Fig. 3. The same relationship can be seen on more extensive data files for the particular producers (Fig. 4).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Farm management factors associated with bulk tank total bacterial count in irish dairy herds during 2006/07

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    Kelly PT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research has shown that total bacterial count (TBC, which is the bacterial growth per ml of milk over a fixed period of time, can be decreased by good hygiene and farm management practices. The objective of the current study was to quantify the associations between herd management factors and bulk tank TBC in Irish spring calving, grass-based dairy herds. The relationship between bulk tank TBC and farm management and infrastructure was examined using data from 400 randomly selected Irish dairy farms where the basal diet was grazed grass. Herd management factors associated with bulk tank TBC were identified using linear models with herd annual total bacterial score (i.e., arithmetic mean of the natural logarithm of bulk tank TBC included as the dependent variable. All herd management factors were individually analysed in a separate regression model, that included an adjustment for geographical location of the farm. A multiple stepwise regression model was subsequently developed. Median bulk tank TBC for the sample herds was 18,483 cells/ml ranging from 10,441 to 130,458 cells/ml. Results from the multivariate analysis indicated that the following management practices were associated with low TBC; use of heated water in the milking parlour; participation in a milk recording scheme; and tail clipping of cows at a frequency greater than once per year. Increased level of hygiene of the parlour and cubicles were also associated with lower TBC. Herd management factors associated with bulk tank TBC in Irish grazing herds were generally in agreement with most previous studies from confinement systems of milk production.

  17. Monitoring the bulk milk antibody response to bovine viral diarrhea in dairy herds vaccinated with inactivated vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A M; Arnaiz, I; Eiras, C; Camino, F; Sanjuán, M L; Yus, E; Diéguez, F J

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to determine long-term responses in dairy herds after vaccination with 1 of 3 inactivated bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccines with regard to antibodies against p80 protein in bulk tank milk samples, as detected by ELISA. In the present study, 29 dairy herds were vaccinated with Bovilis BVD (MSD Animal Health, Milton Keynes, UK), 11 with Hiprabovis Balance (Laboratorios Hipra, Amer, Spain), and 9 with Pregsure BVD (Zoetis, Florham Park, NJ). In these herds, bulk tank milk samples were collected and examined at the time of the first vaccination and every 6 mo during a 3-yr period. Samples were analyzed with a commercial ELISA test for the p80 protein of BVDV. The results demonstrated that vaccination affected the level of antibodies against p80. Hence, vaccination status should be taken into consideration when interpreting bulk tank milk antibody tests. Copyright © 2014 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Composition and enzymatic activity in bulk milk from dairy farms with conventional or robotic milking systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, Monika; Lundh, Åse; Vries, de Ruben; Sjaunja, Kerstin Svennersten

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the studies reported in this research communication was to investigate differences in composition and enzymatic activities in bulk milk samples provided from Swedish dairy farms with different management systems, i.e. automated (AMS) and conventional milking systems (CMS). A bulk

  19. Repeatability of differential goat bulk milk culture and associations with somatic cell count, total bacterial count, and standard plate count

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koop, G.; Dik, N.; Nielen, M.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess how different bacterial groups in bulk milk are related to bulk milk somatic cell count (SCC), bulk milk total bacterial count (TBC), and bulk milk standard plate count (SPC) and to measure the repeatability of bulk milk culturing. On 53 Dutch dairy goat farms,

  20. Investigations of waste heat recovery from bulk milk cooler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.N. Sapali

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulk milk coolers are used to chill the milk from its harvest temperature of 35–4 °C to arrest the bacterial growth and maintain the quality of harvested milk. Milk chilling practices are energy intensive with low coefficient of performance (COP of about 3.0. Increased energy cost concern encouraged an investigation of heat recovery from bulk milk cooler as one conservation alternative for reducing water heating cost in dairy industry. Heat dissipated to atmosphere through condenser is recovered to improve the energy efficiency of plant. The waste heat is utilized to heat the water which is used to clean the milk processing equipments thus saving thermal or electrical energy used to heat the water separately. Shell and coil type heat exchanger is designed and used to recover the waste heat during condensation process. Heat rejected in condensation process consists of superheat and latent heat of the refrigerant. In this work, attempt has been made to recover complete superheat along with part of latent heat which is a present research issue. The results show that complete superheat and 35% of latent heat is recovered. Heat recovery rate is measured for various mass flow rates. Water is flowing on shell side and refrigerant through tubes. The effectiveness of the heat exchanger is determined and the results achieved are presented in this paper. Significant improvements have been achieved and COP of the system is increased from 3 to 4.8.

  1. A comparison of two ELISAs for the detection of antibodies to bovine leucosis virus in bulk-milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, S E; Galvin, J W

    2005-07-01

    To estimate the sensitivity, specificity and detection limits for two bulk-milk enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, the Svanovir BLV-gp51-Ab and the Lactelisa BLV Ab Bi indirect tank 250, for the detection of antibody to bovine leucosis virus in milk. Milk samples from 27 cows known to have enzootic bovine leucosis (EBL) were serially diluted with milk from a herd known to be free from the disease. The dilution at which antibodies could no longer be detected by each test was determined. A total of 1959 bulk-milk samples submitted to a laboratory for the Victorian (EBL) eradication program were tested with both the Svanovir and the Lactelisa assays. A Bayesian approach was used to calculate maximum-likelihood estimates of test sensitivity and specificity. An additional 660 bulk-milk samples were tested with both the Svanovir and the Lactelisa assays. Herds that had positive results on either or both of the assays were subjected to blood or milk testing of individual cattle. The dilution of milk at which the Svanovir assay failed to detect enzootic bovine leucosis antibody in half of the samples was 1 in 40, whereas the comparable value for the Lactelisa was 1 in 200. Computer modeling of the operating characteristics of the Svanovir assay indicated that the sensitivity of that assay would be considerably lower than that for the Lactelisa, and the specificity was estimated to be higher. Evaluation of the assays using 660 bulk-milk samples showed that the Lactelisa assay detected four infected herds that were not detected by the Svanovir test. No false positive results were recorded for either assay. Use of the Lactelisa assay in the Victorian EBL eradication program will enhance disease detection and eradication, but may also result in an increased frequency of false positive bulk-milk test results.

  2. Evaluation of milk quality in delivering sterilized milk with soft tank transportation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, C; Rula, Sa; Asano, H; Ando, K

    2009-09-01

    A new transportation system is proposed recently to improve the defects of liquid transportation by tank trucks. This method is called "soft tank transportation system"; a driver installs a sac-like container (soft tank), which is made from a tarpaulin with high-pressure resistant-waterproof zippers, in a general cargo vehicle. To evaluate the quality of sterilized milk by using the soft tank transportation system, ground and marine transportation for a long distance which took about 36 h from the shipper's loading to the receiver's unloading in a high-temperature summer season (average outside temperature was 33.4 degrees C) were carried out. Although the difference of milk temperature before and after the delivery varied from -0.7 to +1.4 degrees C, there was no difference in milk quality (fat, nonfat solids, total dissolved solids, and pH) and no coliform bacteria were detected. It can be evaluated that sterilized milk was carried in keeping good conditions by soft tank transportation system.

  3. Molecular detection of Coxiella burnetii in goat bulk milk samples in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of C. burnetii in bulk milk samples from dairy goat herds in Fars, Ghom, Kerman, Khuzestan and Yazd provinces, Iran. In this study, 296 bulk milk samples from 89 dairy goat ...

  4. Optimizing bulk milk dioxin monitoring based on costs and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascano-Alcoser, V H; Velthuis, A G J; van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Hoogenboom, L A P; Oude Lansink, A G J M

    2013-07-01

    Dioxins are environmental pollutants, potentially present in milk products, which have negative consequences for human health and for the firms and farms involved in the dairy chain. Dioxin monitoring in feed and food has been implemented to detect their presence and estimate their levels in food chains. However, the costs and effectiveness of such programs have not been evaluated. In this study, the costs and effectiveness of bulk milk dioxin monitoring in milk trucks were estimated to optimize the sampling and pooling monitoring strategies aimed at detecting at least 1 contaminated dairy farm out of 20,000 at a target dioxin concentration level. Incidents of different proportions, in terms of the number of contaminated farms, and concentrations were simulated. A combined testing strategy, consisting of screening and confirmatory methods, was assumed as well as testing of pooled samples. Two optimization models were built using linear programming. The first model aimed to minimize monitoring costs subject to a minimum required effectiveness of finding an incident, whereas the second model aimed to maximize the effectiveness for a given monitoring budget. Our results show that a high level of effectiveness is possible, but at high costs. Given specific assumptions, monitoring with 95% effectiveness to detect an incident of 1 contaminated farm at a dioxin concentration of 2 pg of toxic equivalents/g of fat [European Commission's (EC) action level] costs €2.6 million per month. At the same level of effectiveness, a 73% cost reduction is possible when aiming to detect an incident where 2 farms are contaminated at a dioxin concentration of 3 pg of toxic equivalents/g of fat (EC maximum level). With a fixed budget of €40,000 per month, the probability of detecting an incident with a single contaminated farm at a dioxin concentration equal to the EC action level is 4.4%. This probability almost doubled (8.0%) when aiming to detect the same incident but with a dioxin

  5. Association between Dictyocaulus viviparus status and milk production parameters in Dutch dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dank, M.; Holzhauer, M.; Veldhuis, A.; Frankena, K.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the association between Dictyocaulus viviparus bulk tank milk (BTM) test results and milk production and milk composition parameters in adult Dutch dairy cattle herds. Bulk tank milk samples were collected in August and November 2013, and ELISA tests were

  6. Association between product quality control and process quality control of bulk milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velthuis, A.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of dairy-milk quality is based on product quality control (testing bulk-milk samples) and process quality control (auditing dairy farms). It is unknown whether process control improves product quality. To quantify possible association between product control and process control a

  7. Occurrence of listeria monocytogenes in bulked raw milk and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fermented dairy product sold at most informal milk cooling points in Uganda, were assessed for occurrence of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes. Total plate counts (TPC), holding temperature, pH and titratable acidity were also determined in all the milk products at the point of collection using standard methods.

  8. Visible and near-infrared bulk optical properties of raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aernouts, B; Van Beers, R; Watté, R; Huybrechts, T; Lammertyn, J; Saeys, W

    2015-10-01

    The implementation of optical sensor technology to monitor the milk quality on dairy farms and milk processing plants would support the early detection of altering production processes. Basic visible and near-infrared spectroscopy is already widely used to measure the composition of agricultural and food products. However, to obtain maximal performance, the design of such optical sensors should be optimized with regard to the optical properties of the samples to be measured. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the visible and near-infrared bulk absorption coefficient, bulk scattering coefficient, and scattering anisotropy spectra for a diverse set of raw milk samples originating from individual cow milkings, representing the milk variability present on dairy farms. Accordingly, this database of bulk optical properties can be used in future simulation studies to efficiently optimize and validate the design of an optical milk quality sensor. In a next step of the current study, the relation between the obtained bulk optical properties and milk quality properties was analyzed in detail. The bulk absorption coefficient spectra were found to mainly contain information on the water, fat, and casein content, whereas the bulk scattering coefficient spectra were found to be primarily influenced by the quantity and the size of the fat globules. Moreover, a strong positive correlation (r ≥ 0.975) was found between the fat content in raw milk and the measured bulk scattering coefficients in the 1,300 to 1,400 nm wavelength range. Relative to the bulk scattering coefficient, the variability on the scattering anisotropy factor was found to be limited. This is because the milk scattering anisotropy is nearly independent of the fat globule and casein micelle quantity, while it is mainly determined by the size of the fat globules. As this study shows high correlations between the sample's bulk optical properties and the milk composition and fat globule size, a

  9. Optimizing bulk milk dioxin monitoring based on costs and effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lascano Alcoser, V.; Velthuis, A.G.J.; Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Dioxins are environmental pollutants, potentially present in milk products, which have negative consequences for human health and for the firms and farms involved in the dairy chain. Dioxin monitoring in feed and food has been implemented to detect their presence and estimate their levels in food

  10. Fermentation capability of bulk milk under usual conditions

    OpenAIRE

    BOUŠKOVÁ, Lucie

    2012-01-01

    The evaluation of changes during fermentation of heat-modified milk in connection with different fermentation temperatures was main goal of this thesis. Titrable acidity, active acidity and growth dynamics of bacteria strains - Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus were observed during fermentation process.

  11. Improving farm management by modeling the contamination of farm tank milk with butyric acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Driehuis, F.; Giffel, te M.C.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Control of contamination of farm tank milk (FTM) with the spore-forming butyric acid bacteria (BAB) is important to prevent the late-blowing defect in semi-hard cheeses. The risk of late blowing can be decreased via control of the contamination level of FTM with BAB. A modeling approach was applied

  12. The economic impact of mastitis-control procedures used in Scottish dairy herds with high bulk-tank somatic-cell counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, C; Stott, A W; Logue, D N; Gunn, J

    1999-07-20

    We used multiple-regression analysis of field data to quantify the marginal impacts of various mastitis-control procedures on bulk-tank somatic-cell count (BTSCC). Estimates of milk-yield depression and the probability of herds paying a BTSCC penalty due to the presence of subclinical mastitis were made. An assessment of the economic efficiency of mastitis control by high BTSCC producers was also made using a loss-expenditure frontier. Significant interactions were detected between premilking udder-preparation methods (UP) and post-milking teat disinfection (PMTD), and also between the milking system of the herds and both the use of dry-cow therapy (DCT) and a regular milking-machine test (MMT). Udder preparation involving washing was associated with a higher SCC and had a detrimental effect on the efficacy of PMTD. Amongst herds facing a high-BTSCC problem (BTSCC >400,000 cells/ml), herds using PMTD without UP (regardless of the type of milking system), those using DCT (in parlour systems), and those with a parlour system having their milking machines tested obtained returns of Pound Sterling 1.4, Pound Sterling 3.9 and Pound Sterling 1.1, respectively, per Pound Sterling 1 investment in each of these procedures as a result of reductions in milk-yield losses and BTSCC penalties. The minimum total cost of disease within these herds was Pound Sterling 65.50/cow/year (due to Pound Sterling 41.40 revenue losses plus Pound Sterling 24.10 mastitis-control expenditure) attained by herds which had a parlour system and used DCT, MMT and PMTD (without UP). However, the average cost of subclinical mastitis for all high-BTSCC farms was Pound Sterling 100/cow/yr; hence, the difference (pound Sterling 34.50) could be saved by the more-efficient application of mastitis-control procedures.

  13. Bulk tank somatic cell counts analyzed by statistical process control tools to identify and monitor subclinical mastitis incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, J M; Hawkins, D M; Kinsel, M L; Reneau, J K

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between monthly Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) subclinical mastitis and new infection rate estimates and daily bulk tank somatic cell count (SCC) summarized by statistical process control tools. Dairy Herd Improvement Association test-day subclinical mastitis and new infection rate estimates along with daily or every other day bulk tank SCC data were collected for 12 mo of 2003 from 275 Upper Midwest dairy herds. Herds were divided into 5 herd production categories. A linear score [LNS = ln(BTSCC/100,000)/0.693147 + 3] was calculated for each individual bulk tank SCC. For both the raw SCC and the transformed data, the mean and sigma were calculated using the statistical quality control individual measurement and moving range chart procedure of Statistical Analysis System. One hundred eighty-three herds of the 275 herds from the study data set were then randomly selected and the raw (method 1) and transformed (method 2) bulk tank SCC mean and sigma were used to develop models for predicting subclinical mastitis and new infection rate estimates. Herd production category was also included in all models as 5 dummy variables. Models were validated by calculating estimates of subclinical mastitis and new infection rates for the remaining 92 herds and plotting them against observed values of each of the dependents. Only herd production category and bulk tank SCC mean were significant and remained in the final models. High R2 values (0.83 and 0.81 for methods 1 and 2, respectively) indicated a strong correlation between the bulk tank SCC and herd's subclinical mastitis prevalence. The standard errors of the estimate were 4.02 and 4.28% for methods 1 and 2, respectively, and decreased with increasing herd production. As a case study, Shewhart Individual Measurement Charts were plotted from the bulk tank SCC to identify shifts in mastitis incidence. Four of 5 charts examined signaled a change in bulk tank SCC before

  14. Farm business and operator variables associated with bulk tank somatic cell count from dairy herds in the southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Karen L; Lambert, Dayton M; Schexnayder, Susan; Krawczel, Peter; Fly, Mark; Garkovich, Lorraine; Oliver, Steve

    2017-11-01

    Mastitis is a worldwide problem in dairy cows and results in reduced milk production, the culling of cows, and other economic losses. Bulk tank somatic cell count (BTSCC) over 200,000 cells/mL often indicates underlying subclinical mastitis in dairy herds. Several preventative measures that can be implemented to help improve the incidence of mastitis exist, but surveys find these practices not fully adopted by producers. The goal of this research was to analyze the farm and operator characteristics associated with BTSCC in dairy herds by analyzing a survey of dairy producers in the southeastern United States. We examined this region because it has experienced a decline in the number of dairy farms, dairy cows, and milk production over the past 2 decades. The southeast region is also associated with higher BTSCC levels than the national average. Dairy farms in Georgia, Mississippi, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia were surveyed. Producers were asked questions about the BTSCC at which they take action to address BTSCC, the information sources they use to learn about and manage BTSCC, farm structure and management characteristics, and attitudinal variables associated with profitability, managerial control, and planning horizon. Least squares regression was used to determine how these factors were associated with BTSCC levels across the 7-state region. Concern over mastitis, financial consequences of mastitis, and increased previous-year BTSCC were associated with higher current BTSCC levels. Obtaining information about mastitis from veterinarians and extension personnel, taking action against mastitis at a BTSCC less than 300,000 cells/mL, and perceived ability to control processes and mastitis incidence were associated with reduced BTSCC. We found average BTSCC was lower in North Carolina and Virginia. These results suggest that proactive producers (i.e., those that perceive they can control BTSCC and seek information from reliable

  15. Characterization of three commercial ELISA kits for detection of BOHV-1 gE specific antibodies in serum and milk samples and applicability of bulk milk for determination of herd status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tignon, Marylène; De Baere, Miet; Hanon, Jean-Baptiste; Goolaerts, Annelies; Houtain, Jean-Yves; Delooz, Laurent; Cay, Ann Brigitte

    2017-07-01

    Vaccination of animals with gE-deleted vaccine strains (gE- marker vaccines) and differential detection of vaccinated vs infected animals with antibody ELISA targeting the gE or the gB proteins have been proved to be useful tools in programs for control and eradication of the bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) responsible for infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), a major pathogen of cattle. The diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp) of three commercial gE ELISA kits from IDEXX, IDVet and CIV-HIPRA were compared for serum and milk matrices. Limiting the analysis to 198 individual with concordant ELISA results in serum (91 naïve, 37 vaccinated and 70 infected) the DSe of gE kits was estimated to 0,97 for IDEXX, 0,93 for CIV-HIPRA and 0,53 for IDVet using milk samples and the DSp to 0,95 for IDEXX, 1,00 for IDVet and CIV-HIPRA. The applicability of gE ELISA for individual or bulk milk testing as an additional tool in control programs dedicated to the certification and control of vaccinated herds was evaluated. Two of the three evaluated gE ELISA kits presented substantial to good agreement individual milk and serum samples. The bulk-tank milk also proved to be suitable for the detection of BoHV-1 in vaccinated herds provided that gE prevalence is superior to 10% as false negative results are often observed at lower gE herd prevalence. This limitation could be reduced to 8% of prevalence when a prior concentration step was applied to bulk milk samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of some additive residues in bulk raw milk collected from Pakdasht area in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Moosavi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Milk is one of the most important sources of human nutrition and because of high nutrient content; it is a very suitable medium for microbial growth and spoilage. Sometimes farmers cheat and add some additives to milk in order to cover the spoilage or other defects in milk. In this study 120 samples of bulk raw milk (10 samples each month were collected from dairy farms of Pakdasht under sterile condition and send to veterinary faculty of GarmsarUniversity. The following tests were done on each sample: Anti-microbial residues, residues milk acidity neutralizer, evaluation of sugar, formalin, Hydrogen peroxide, Salicylic acid and salt presence. Results were analyzed with Spss software and the results of the first six months of the year were compared statistically with the results of the second six months of the year. The mean of antimicrobial agents, milk acid neutralizer, formalin, hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid showed no significant difference. But sugar in first semester were more than second semester (p

  17. 40 CFR 63.11087 - What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline terminal, pipeline breakout station, or pipeline... CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Source Category: Gasoline... § 63.11087 What requirements must I meet for gasoline storage tanks if my facility is a bulk gasoline...

  18. Correlation between precipitation and geographical location of the δ2H values of the fatty acids in milk and bulk milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehtesham, E.; Baisden, W. T.; Keller, E. D.; Hayman, A. R.; Van Hale, R.; Frew, R. D.

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) have become a tool for food traceability and authentication of agricultural products. The principle is that the isotopic composition of the produce is influenced by environmental and biological factors and hence exhibits a spatial differentiation of δ2H. This study investigates the variation in δ2H values of New Zealand milk, both in the bulk powder and individual fatty acids extracted from milk samples from dairy factories across New Zealand. Multivariate statistical analyses were used to test for relationships between δ2H of bulk milk powder, milk fatty acid and geographical location. Milk powder samples from different regions of New Zealand were found to exhibit patterns in isotopic composition similar to the corresponding regional precipitation associated with their origin. A model of δ2H in precipitation was developed based on measurements between 2007 and 2010 at 51 stations across New Zealand (Frew and Van Hale, 2011). The model uses multiple linear regressions to predict daily δ2H from 2 geographic and 5 rain-weighted climate variables from the 5 × 5 km New Zealand Virtual Climate Station Network (VCSN). To approximate collection radius for a drying facility the modelled values were aggregated within a 50 km radius of each dairy factory and compared to observed δ2H values of precipitation and bulk milk powder. Daily δ2H predictions for the period from August to December for the area surrounding the sample collection sites were highly correlated with the δ2H values of bulk milk powder. Therefore the δ2H value of milk fatty acids demonstrates promise as a tool for determining the provenance of milk powders and products where milk powder is an ingredient. Separation of milk powder origin to geographic sub-regions within New Zealand was achieved. Hydrogen isotope measurements could be used to complement traditional tracking systems in verifying point of origin.

  19. Somatic Cells in Bulk Samples and Purchase Prices of Cow Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jindřich Kvapilík

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There were calculated the somatic cell count (SCC 209 (36 – 468 103ml–1, the total count of microorganisms (TCM 25 103ml–1 (from 5 to 377, fat 3.84 % (from 3.23 to 4.46 and protein content 3.39 % (from 3.04 to 3.75 and milk freezing point (MFP –0.525 °C (from –0.534 to –0.395 of the 522 monthly bulk milk samples from 11 experimental stables during the period from 2012 to 2015. Residues of inhibitory substances were not detected in any sample. Milk sale reached 7,999 liters (l with fluctuating between 6,150 and 10,532 l per cow. This can be deduced from the regression coefficients that due to increase in the SCC by 100 103ml–1 the TCM increased by 2.9 to 4.2 103ml–1, the fat content decreased by 0.09 to 0.13 % and protein about 0.01 to 0.05 %. Influence of SCC, TCM and the fat and protein content calculated from monthly samples for individual stables can be estimated at –0.12 CZC, fluctuations between the stables at +0.46 to –0.84 CZC per l of milk. The increase in milk price by 0.17 CZC in the range of –0.92 to +0.92 CZC per l of milk corresponds to averages of indicators calculated from 522 samples.

  20. Risk factors for bulk milk somatic cell counts and total bacterial counts in smallholder dairy farms in the 10th region of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schaik, G; Green, L E; Guzmán, D; Esparza, H; Tadich, N

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the principal management factors that influenced bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) and total bacterial count (TBC) of smallholder dairy farms in the 10th region of Chile. One hundred and fifty smallholder milk producers were selected randomly from 42 milk collection centres (MCCs). In April and May of 2002, all farms were visited and a detailed interview questionnaire on dairy-cow management related to milk quality was conducted. In addition, the BMSCC and TBC results from the previous 2 months' fortnightly tests were obtained from the MCCs. The mean BMSCC and TBC were used as the dependent variables in the analyses and were normalised by a natural-logarithm transformation (LN). All independent management variables were categorised into binary outcomes and present (=1) was compared with absent (=0). Biserial correlations were calculated between the LNBMSCC or LNTBC and the management factors of the smallholder farms. Management factors with correlations with P0.05) factors. A random MCC effect was included in the models to investigate the importance of clustering of herds within MCC. In the null model for mean LNTBC, the random effect of MCCs was highly significant. It was explained by: milk collected once a day or less compared with collection twice a day, not cleaning the bucket after milking mastitic cows versus cleaning the bucket and cooling milk in a vat of water versus not cooling milk or using ice or a bulk tank to cool milk. Other factors that increased the LNTBC were a waiting yard with a soil or gravel floor versus concrete, use of plastic buckets for milking instead of metal, not feeding California mastitis test (CMT)-positive milk to calves and cows of dual-purpose breed. The final model explained 35% of the variance. The model predicted that a herd that complied with all the management practices had a mean predicted TBC of 105 colony forming units (cfu)/ml, whereas a herd that did not comply with any of these management factors had

  1. Trends in the quality and hygiene parameters of bulk Italian Mediterranean buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) milk: A three year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Marina; Osimani, Andrea; Tavoletti, Stefano; Moreno, Itzhak; Clementi, Francesca; Trombetta, Maria Federica

    2017-09-29

    Buffalo milk represents an indispensable source of nourishment in many parts of the world and it is the second most consumed milk worldwide. Buffalo milk is actually used for the production of many dairy products such as pasteurized or concentrated milk, butter, yogurt, ice-cream, dehydrated milk products and cheeses. Due to its high nutritional value and the presence of natural bioactive substances, buffalo milk can also provide health benefits to consumers. In Italy, buffalo milk is used mainly for cheese making, mozzarella PDO (Protected Designation of Origin), which is a highly valued dairy product. This 3-year study, carried out between 2011 and 2013, was aimed at evaluating the quality of bulk Italian Mediterranean buffalo milk by monitoring physico-chemical parameters, somatic cell and total bacterial counts. A total of 51 samples of bulk milk were collected from one herd throughout the monitored period. Analysis of variance, carried out to test month, season and year main effects, highlighted remarkable seasonal effects for fat, protein and lactose content, as well as for predicted mozzarella cheese yield, and somatic cell counts. The calculation of simple correlations allowed the identification of positive correlations between estimated cheese yield and fat and protein content. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Coxiella burnetii Antibodies in Bulk Milk from Cattle, Sheep, and Goats in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaidat, Mohammad M; Kersh, Gilbert J

    2017-04-01

    This large-scale cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence, geographical distribution, and risk factors for the presence of antibodies against Coxiella burnetii in bulk tank milk derived from dairy cattle, sheep, and goats in Jordan. Bulk milk samples were collected from 78 dairy cattle, 48 sheep, and 23 goat farms from various places in Jordan according to the density of these animal species in each region of the country. The samples were tested for C. burnetii antibodies using the CHEKIT Q-Fever Antibody ELISA kit. A standardized questionnaire was also used to collect data from each farm to identify and rank the risk factors for the presence of C. burnetii antibodies. The results revealed that 62.9% (95% confidence interval: 55.1 to 70.0%) of the tested ruminant farms were positive for C. burnetii antibodies. Positive results were obtained from 70.9% (60.6 to 79.5%) of dairy cattle farms, 52.1% (38.3 to 65.5%) of sheep farms, and 56.0% (37.1 to 73.3%) of goat farms. Six factors were associated with the presence of these antibodies on cattle farms, and five factors were associated with these antibodies on sheep and goat farms (chi-square test). The multivariate logistic regression model revealed that large dairy cattle farms, farms that add new animals to the herd, farms that infrequently clean the feeders, and farms in particular areas are 28.6, 19.9, 8.0, and 6.4 times more likely, respectively, to have animals with C. burnetii antibodies. Sheep and goat farms that mix their animals with those from other farms, graze more than 5 km, and infrequently sanitize the feeders were 8.0, 0.06, and 13.6 times more likely, respectively, to have animals with C. burnetii antibodies. These data reveal the widespread exposure of Jordanian ruminants to C. burnetii and suggest a high risk for public health.

  3. Dairy Herd Mastitis Program in Argentina: Farm Clusters and Effects on Bulk Milk Somatic Cell Counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vissio1*, SA Dieser2, CG Raspanti2, JA Giraudo1, CI Bogni2, LM Odierno2 and AJ Larriestra1

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research has been conducted to characterize dairy farm clusters according to mastitis control program practiced among small and medium dairy producer from Argentina, and also to evaluate the effect of such farm cluster patterns on bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC. Two samples of 51 (cross-sectional and 38 (longitudinal herds were selected to identify farm clusters and study the influence of management on monthly BMSCC, respectively. The cross-sectional sample involved the milking routine and facilities assessment of each herd visited. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to find the most discriminating farm attributes in the cross sectional sample. Afterward, the herd cluster typologies were identified in the longitudinal sample. Herd monthly BMSCC average was evaluated during 12 months fitting a linear mixed model. Two clusters were identified, the farms in the Cluster I applied a comprehensive mastitis program in opposite to Cluster II. Post-dipping, dry cow therapy and milking machine test were routinely applied in Cluster I. In the longitudinal study, 14 out of 38 dairy herds were labeled as Cluster I and the rest were assigned to Cluster II. Significant difference in BMSCC was found between cluster I and II (60,000 cells/mL. The present study showed the relevance and potential impact of promoting mastitis control practices among small and medium sized dairy producers in Argentina.

  4. Bayesian inference for within-herd prevalence of Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo using bulk milk antibody testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Fraser I; Gunn, George J; McKendrick, Iain J; Murray, Fiona M

    2009-10-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis throughout the world and human mortality from severe disease forms is high even when optimal treatment is provided. Leptospirosis is also one of the most common causes of reproductive losses in cattle worldwide and is associated with significant economic costs to the dairy farming industry. Herds are tested for exposure to the causal organism either through serum testing of individual animals or through testing bulk milk samples. Using serum results from a commonly used enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test for Leptospira interrogans serovar Hardjo (L. hardjo) on samples from 979 animals across 12 Scottish dairy herds and the corresponding bulk milk results, we develop a model that predicts the mean proportion of exposed animals in a herd conditional on the bulk milk test result. The data are analyzed through use of a Bayesian latent variable generalized linear mixed model to provide estimates of the true (but unobserved) level of exposure to the causal organism in each herd in addition to estimates of the accuracy of the serum ELISA. We estimate 95% confidence intervals for the accuracy of the serum ELISA of (0.688, 0.987) and (0.975, 0.998) for test sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Using a percentage positivity cutoff in bulk milk of at most 41% ensures that there is at least a 97.5% probability of less than 5% of the herd being exposed to L. hardjo. Our analyses provide strong statistical evidence in support of the validity of interpreting bulk milk samples as a proxy for individual animal serum testing. The combination of validity and cost-effectiveness of bulk milk testing has the potential to reduce the risk of human exposure to leptospirosis in addition to offering significant economic benefits to the dairy industry.

  5. Comparison of an indirect ELISA with the Brucella milk ring test for detection of antibodies to Brucella abortus in bulk milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzini, V R; Aguirre, N P; Valentini, B S; Torioni de Echaide, S; Lugaresi, C I; Marchesino, M D; Nielsen, K

    2001-09-03

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of Brucella abortus antibodies in bovine bulk milk samples was evaluated. About 31 individual milk samples from B. abortus infected cows were diluted into bulk milk from a brucellosis free herd. Individual milk samples obtained from 96 negative or positive herds to ELISA or Brucella ring test (BRT), were tested by ELISA. All positive cows were bled and serum samples were tested by the complement-fixation test (CFT) which was considered the definitive test. A herd was considered infected if at least, one cow was positive in the CFT. Four samples were negative in the BRT at the dilution 1:10 but positive in the ELISA. For samples positive in both tests, BRT titers ranged from 1:10 to 1:480 while ELISA titers ranged from 1:10 to 1:3200. Using bulk milk samples, the sensitivity of the ELISA (98.1%) was higher than the BRT (72.2%) but the specificity of BRT (90.5%) was not statistically different (P=1.0) from the ELISA (88.1%). The implications of the results for brucellosis control are discussed.

  6. Characterization of Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae in producer-distributor bulk milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntuli, V; Njage, P M K; Buys, E M

    2016-12-01

    The current study was undertaken to characterize Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae in raw and pasteurized producer-distributor bulk milk (PDBM). A total of 258 samples were collected from purchase points in 8 provinces in South Africa. The samples were tested for antibiotic residues, phosphatase, total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and E. coli counts. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for identification of isolates. Escherichia coli isolates were characterized for virulence factors, antimicrobial resistance, serotypes, and presumptive E. coli O157:H7. Antibiotic residues and alkaline phosphatase were detected in 2% of both raw and pasteurized PDBM (n=258) and 21% pasteurized PDBM (n=104) samples, respectively. A total of 729 isolates belonging to 21 genera and 59 species were identified. Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Raoultella ornithinolytica were the most abundant species. Spoilage Enterobacteriaceae species exceeded 50% of the total isolates. Escherichia coli was detected and isolated from 36% of the milk samples. Thirty-one E. coli isolates harbored virulence genes stx1/stx2 and 38% (n=121) were presumptive O157:H7. The prevalence of samples with presumptive shigatoxin producing E. coli was 10%. Antimicrobial-resistant E. coli isolates were detected in 70% of the milk samples with 36% of stx1/stx2 positive E. coli showing multi-drug resistance. Information obtained from the study will be used for modeling the public health risk posed by milkborne pathogens in PDBM, which in many cases is consumed by poor and vulnerable members of the population. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in bulk milk to estimate the prevalence of Neospora caninum on dairy farms in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wapenaar, Wendela; Barkema, Herman W; O'Handley, Ryan M; Bartels, Chris J M

    2007-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of bulk milk as a diagnostic tool for estimation of herd-level Neospora caninum exposure in Atlantic Canada; it was used to estimate the prevalence of dairy farms with a within-herd N. caninum-seroprevalence > or = 15% in Prince Edward Island (PEI). The variation over time of N. caninum antibodies in bulk milk is also reported. Skimmed bulk milk and individual serum samples were analyzed for N. caninum antibodies by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Bulk milk samples were collected in May 2004 (n = 235), May 2005 (n = 189), and June 2005 (n = 235). The prevalence of dairy farms with a within-herd seroprevalence > or = 15% on PEI was 6.4% in May 2004. In May and June 2005, respectively, 10.1% and 10.2% of farms had a > or = 15% within-herd seroprevalence. In 11 farms that were considered positive based on bulk milk samples, blood samples were collected from all adult cows in September 2005, in conjunction with a 4th bulk milk sample on the same day. The correlation coefficient between serology and bulk milk ELISA was 0.87. The results of this study demonstrate that the prevalence of N. caninum in dairy farms can be estimated by using a bulk milk ELISA.

  8. The prevalence of Neospora caninum antibodies in bulk milk of dairy herds in the Czech Republic: a case report

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hůrková, L.; Halova, D.; Modrý, David

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 12 (2005), s. 549-552 ISSN 0375-8427 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : cattle * iscom ELISA * bulk milk ELISA Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 0.621, year: 2005

  9. Potential of milk fatty acid composition to predict diet composition and authenticate feeding systems and altitude origin of European bulk milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, M; Chassaing, C; Ferlay, A; Agabriel, C; Laurent, C; Borreani, G; Barcarolo, R; Baars, T; Kusche, D; Harstad, O M; Verbič, J; Golecký, J; Delavaud, C; Chilliard, Y; Martin, B

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this work were to elucidate the potential of using milk fatty acid (FA) concentration to predict cow diet composition and altitude of bulk milk collected in 10 different European countries and to authenticate cow-feeding systems and altitude of the production area using a data set of 1,248 bulk cow milk samples and associated farm records. The predictions based on FA for cow diet composition were excellent for the proportions of fresh herbage [coefficient of determination (R2)=0.81], good for hay, total herbage-derived forages, and total preserved forages (R2>0.73), intermediate for corn silage and grass silage (R2>0.62), and poor for concentrates (R2diet. Milk samples were assigned to groups according to feeding system, level of concentrate supplementation, and altitude origin. Milk FA composition successfully authenticated cow-feeding systems dominated by a main forage (>93% of samples correctly classified), but the presence of mixed diets reduced the discrimination. Altitude prediction reliability was intermediate (R2composition was not able to authenticate concentrate supplementation level in the diet (composition (composition to authenticate cow feeding was confirmed using a data set representative of the diversity of European production conditions. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of precipitation, geographical location and biosynthesis on New Zealand milk powder bulk and fatty acids D/H ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frew, R.; Emad Ehtesham, R.; Van Hale, R.; Hayman, A.; Baisden, T.

    2012-04-01

    D/H ratio measurements provide useful information for the investigation of biogeochemical influences on natural and agricultural produce, particularly with application to food traceability and authentication. Numerous studies have shown that variation of a product's D/H ratio is influenced by both environmental factors and biological processes. This study investigates the D/H ratio of New Zealand milk powder and individual fatty acids, and causal determinants of isotopic variation. One of the key environmental factors is precipitation, and the D/H ratio "isoscaping" of NZ has been undertaken. New Zealand provides a unique geography for these kinds of study in terms of proximity to the ocean and natural geographical variability from sea level to elevations as high as 3700 m. Milk powder samples were collected from different geographical regions from milk processing units, which were supplied by producers in the immediate region. H/D ratios of bulk milk powder and of individual fatty acids were determined. Initial comparison of the precipitation and milk powder bulk D/H data show a very good differentiation from north to southernmost parts of New Zealand and a relation between rain and milk bulk D/H abundance ratio. Almost 98% of milk FAs are in the form of triglycerides that have been extracted and hydrolysed to free FAs. Free FAs were esterified and analyzed with GC-IRMS. Individual FAs show variation in D/H ratio, and all values are depleted relative to the precipitation data. The difference in D/H ratio amongst individual FAs reflects the geographical environment and biological processes i.e. micro-organisms activity in the rumen of the cow. Short chain FAs (less than 8 carbons), particularly C4 (Butyric acid), appear to be key determinants. The variation in the data can be rationalized using statistical multivariate analysis.

  11. Handling milking as a risk factor in the occurrence of microorganisms in raw milk

    OpenAIRE

    Tony Picoli; João Luíz Zani; Fernando da Silva Bandeira; Victor Fernando Büttow Roll; Maria Edi Rocha Ribeiro; Gilberto D'Ávila Vargas; Sílvia Oliveira Hübner; Marcelo Lima; Mário Carlos Araújo Meireles; Geferson Fischer

    2014-01-01

    Milk is naturally a good provider of a whole range of nutrients, however an inadequate milking may significantly interfere on its nutritional and microbiological quality. The main purpose of this study was to isolate and identify microorganisms from bulk tanks of southern Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil and establish a correlation between animal management and presence of pathogens in the milk. To this end, raw milk samples were collected from different dairy herds and submitted to microbiolo...

  12. TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF BULK VITRIFICATION PROCESS & PRODUCT FOR TANK WASTE TREATMENT AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2006-07-21

    At the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being constructed to immobilize both high-level waste (IUW) for disposal in a national repository and low-activity waste (LAW) for onsite, near-surface disposal. The schedule-controlling step for the WTP Project is vitrification of the large volume of LAW, current capacity of the WTP (as planned) would require 50 years to treat the Hanford tank waste, if the entire LAW volume were to be processed through the WTP. To reduce the time and cost for treatment of Hanford Tank Waste, and as required by the Tank Waste Remediation System Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision and the Hanford Federal Facility Consent Agreement (Tn-Party Agreement), DOE plans to supplement the LAW treatment capacity of the WTP. Since 2002, DOE, in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency and State of Washington Department of Ecology has been evaluating technologies that could provide safe and effective supplemental treatment of LAW. Current efforts at Hanford are intended to provide additional information to aid a joint agency decision on which technology will be used to supplement the WTP. A Research, Development and Demonstration permit has been issued by the State of Washington to build and (for a limited time) operate a Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) facility to provide information for the decision on a supplemental treatment technology for up to 50% of the LAW. In the Bulk Vitrification (BV) process, LAW, soil, and glass-forming chemicals are mixed, dried, and placed in a refractory-lined box, Electric current, supplied through two graphite electrodes in the box, melts the waste feed, producing a durable glass waste-form. Although recent modifications to the process have resulted in significant improvements, there are continuing technical concerns.

  13. Isolation of Campylobacter jejuni from raw milk.

    OpenAIRE

    Lovett, J; Francis, D W; Hunt, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from raw milk by a method that can routinely detect less than or equal to 1 organism per ml. This procedure was used in a survey of 195 separate farms and showed a 1.5% incidence of C. jejuni in milk from bulk tanks.

  14. Occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus in raw milk produced in dairy farms in São Paulo state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Fagundes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus in milk produced in 37 farms located in the regions of Ribeirão Preto and São Carlos, state of São Paulo, Brazil. Two-hundred and eight samples of milk from individual cows showing subclinical mastitis, and 37 samples of bulk tank milk were analyzed. S. aureus strains were detected in 18 (7.3% milk samples: 14 (6.7% from samples of individual cows, and 4 (10.8% from bulk tank milk. Two individual milk samples (14.3% and two bulk milk samples contained enterotoxigenic S. aureus. PFGE analysis revealed the genetic heterogeneity of the strains isolated from raw milk, which presented to 13 S. aureus patterns. Results confirmed the potential transmission of staphylococcal food poisoning to consumers via milk of cows affected by subclinical mastitis, mainly when raw milk is ingested.

  15. Dairy cows with metritis: Coxiella burnetii test results in uterine, blood and bulk milk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskens, J; van Maanen, C; Mars, M H

    2011-01-10

    In cattle, Coxiella burnetii infections are generally asymptomatic but can also be associated with reproductive disorders. Metritis is considered as one of the symptoms of C. burnetii infections, but reliable information is lacking. Therefore, information on the presence of C. burnetii in the uterine content of cows with metritis is important to increase our knowledge on this pathogen. In this study, the uterine content of 45 dairy cows with metritis belonging to 12 herds was tested for C. burnetii with a real-time PCR assay. Only one uterine sample tested PCR (highly) positive, all other samples were PCR negative. The PCR positive cow tested also positive for antibodies. Three other cows from other herds tested antibody positive. The bulk milk (BM) samples of these 12 herds were tested by real-time PCR assay and antibody-ELISA. Six BM samples (50%) were positive in PCR and 10 (83%) were positive in ELISA. Culturing the uterus samples by bacteriology, the most frequently cultured bacteria were arcanobacterium (n=24), E. coli (n=16), other streptococci (n=10), Streptococcus uberis (n=8) and Streptococcus dysgalactiae (n=5). This study indicates that C. burnetii is not an important cause for metritis in dairy herds, although apparently C. burnetii was or had been present in most of these herds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lead-contaminated drinking water in bulk-water storage tanks--Arizona and California, 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-10-21

    Lead poisoning is a major environmental health problem for children in the United States (1,2): during 1988-1991, approximately 1.7 million U.S. children aged 1-5 years had elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) (> or = 10 micrograms/dL) (3). To determine the source of lead exposure for children with BLLs > or = 20 micrograms/dL, the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) conducts environmental investigations. In 1993, as a result of investigations of increased BLLs in two children in southwestern Arizona, ADHS detected lead levels approximately 30 times the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) action level of 15 parts per billion (ppb) in bulk-delivered drinking water in the homes of these children. Because two of the three companies that supplied bulk water to southwestern Arizona were based in California, ADHS notified the California State Department of Health Services (CSDHS) about the problem. As a result, CSDHS conducted a separate investigation and identified one child with an elevated BLL whose drinking water sources included bulk-delivered water with lead levels exceeding EPA standards. This report summarizes the investigations of elevated BLLs in these three children and high lead levels in bulk-delivered drinking water in Arizona and California.

  17. Microbiological quality and somatic cell count in bulk milk of dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius): descriptive statistics, correlations, and factors of variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, P; Faye, B; Marko, O; Thomas, S; Wernery, U; Juhasz, J

    2013-09-01

    The objectives of the present study were to monitor the microbiological quality and somatic cell count (SCC) of bulk tank milk at the world's first large-scale camel dairy farm for a 2-yr period, to compare the results of 2 methods for the enumeration of SCC, to evaluate correlation among milk quality indicators, and to determine the effect of specific factors (year, season, stage of lactation, and level of production) on milk quality indicators. The study was conducted from January 2008 to January 2010. Total viable count (TVC), coliform count (CC), California Mastitis Test (CMT) score, and SCC were determined from daily bulk milk samples. Somatic cell count was measured by using a direct microscopic method and with an automatic cell counter. In addition, production parameters [total daily milk production (TDM, kg), number of milking camels (NMC), average milk per camel (AMC, kg)] and stage of lactation (average postpartum days, PPD) were recorded for each test day. A strong correlation (r=0.33) was found between the 2 methods for SCC enumeration; however, values derived using the microscopic method were higher. The geometric means of SCC and TVC were 394×10(3) cells/mL and 5,157 cfu/mL during the observation period, respectively. Somatic cell count was >500×10(3) cells/mL on 14.6% (106/725) and TVC was >10×10(3) cfu/mL on 4.0% (30/742) of the test days. Both milk quality indicators had a distinct seasonal pattern. For log SCC, the mean was lowest in summer and highest in autumn. The seasonal pattern of log TVC was slightly different, with the lowest values being recorded during the spring. The monthly mean TVC pattern showed a clear difference between years. Coliform count was <10 cfu/mL in most of the samples (709/742, 95.6%). A positive correlation was found between log SCC and log TVC (r=0.32), between log SCC and CMT score (r=0.26), and between log TVC and CC in yr 1 (r=0.30). All production parameters and stage of lactation showed strong seasonal

  18. Application of the simulation of a tank capacity proposal for loading and unloading process of bulk material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janka Šaderová

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available n this paper, the algorithm is given - how to design a tankfor bulk materials. An important part of the proposal is to setthe loading and unloading of a tank, which is also closely related to the proposal of its capacity and volume. Loading and unloadingprocess is dependent on several factors but the main are: method and speed of loading which represents the parameter - hour powerof loading device (e.g. continuous by a conveyor belt, method andspeed of unloading (continuousor at intervals and a typeand capacity of means of transport, in which the material loading (truck, rail car, conveyor belt system. The paper presents twomethods for determination of the loadingand unloading process - the graphic method and determination during the simulation -creating a simulation model.

  19. How are flexible tanks becoming a solution for wine in bulk transportation?

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Alisa

    2015-01-01

    Past decades have proven that logistics is taking a crucial role in both domestic and international trade. Additionally, logistics have played an essential role in wars recorded in past human history. Bulk shipping is becoming an increasingly attractive option for wine shippers around the world because this method of shipping allows transporting up to 13,400 litres more of the product when compared to the conventional method of wine transportation, which dramatically cuts transportation costs...

  20. Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, ovine, caprine, and camel herds in Iran as determined by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Ameri, Mehrdad; Karim, Guity; Doosti, Abbas

    2011-02-01

    Q fever is a widespread zoonosis caused by the obligate intracellular micro-organism Coxiella burnetii. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of C. burnetii in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, ovine, caprine, and camel herds in Isfahan province, Iran. In the present study, 567 bulk milk samples from 186 dairy bovine, ovine, caprine, and camel herds were tested for C. burnetii using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay. The animals whose milk samples collected for this study were clinically healthy. In total, 8 of 247 (3.2%) bovine milk samples were positive; the positive samples originated from 6 of 90 (6.7%) dairy herds. Eight of 140 (5.7%) ovine bulk milk samples from 42 sheep breeding farms and 5 of 110 (4.5%) caprine bulk milk samples from 32 goat breeding farms were positive for C. burnetii. One of 70 (1.4%) camel bulk milk samples from 22 camel breeding farms was also positive for C. burnetii. Although no extensive prevalence study was undertaken, the results of this study indicate that clinically healthy dairy animals are important sources of C. burnetii infection in Iran. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first report of direct identification of C. burnetii using polymerase chain reaction in bulk milk samples from dairy ovine herds in Iran and the first report of direct identification of C. burnetii in bulk milk samples from dairy camel herds. Further intensive prevalence studies on Coxiella infection and on possible risks of dairy products will be needed to elucidate the epidemiology of Q fever in Iran.

  1. Evaluation of milk yield losses associated with Salmonella antibodies in bulk tank milk in bovine dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T D; Green, L E; Kudahl, Anne Margrethe Braad

    2012-01-01

    from 7 to 15 mo after the estimated herd infection date, compared with that of first-parity cows in the same herds in the 12 mo before the estimated herd infection date. Yield for parity 3+ cows was reduced by a mean of 3.0 kg (95% confidence interval: 1.3 to 4.8) of ECM/cow per day from 7 to 15 mo...

  2. Feeding untreated and pasteurized waste milk and bulk milk to calves: effects on calf performance, health status and antibiotic resistance of faecal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aust, V; Knappstein, K; Kunz, H-J; Kaspar, H; Wallmann, J; Kaske, M

    2013-12-01

    Non-saleable milk (waste milk, WM) is contaminated with an undefined spectrum of potentially harmful pathogens and antimicrobial residues. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of feeding bulk milk (BM) or WM - both pasteurized or not - on calf performance, health and the antibiotic resistance of specific faecal bacteria. A total of 114 calves from a large-scale dairy were housed outdoors in individual hutches and were randomly assigned to one of four feeding groups. The calves were fed either WM, pasteurized WM (pWM), BM or pasteurized BM (pBM) from day 3 to 56 of life. Milk samples taken from the pasteurizer and calves' nipple buckets were investigated at regular intervals for total plate count and counts of thermoduric bacteria, coliforms and mastitis pathogens. Faecal samples were taken on days 2, 14, 28 and 56 of life from randomly selected calves of the WM, pWM and BM groups (each N = 8-9) and processed to obtain from each sample preferably two isolates of Escherichia (E.) coli and Enterococcus spp. respectively. Isolates were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibility to 25 antimicrobial agents by broth microdilution. Daily weight gain, milk and calf starter intake and health parameters did not differ significantly between the calves of the four feeding groups. The proportion of resistant E. coli isolates was significantly higher in calves fed WM and in calves fed pWM (most pronounced for cephalosporins) than in calves receiving BM. No differences in resistance were found for Enterococus spp. Thus, the concerns for selecting resistant faecal bacteria by feeding WM seem to be justified. Nonetheless, pasteurized WM of cows not treated with antimicrobials represents an acceptable feed for young calves. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Potentials to differentiate milk composition by different feeding strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slots, Tina; Butler, G.; Leifert, C.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of the dietary intake of the cow on milk composition, bulk-tank milk was collected on 5 occasions from conventional (n = 15) and organic (n = 10) farms in Denmark and on 4 occasions from low-input nonorganic farms in the United Kingdom, along with management and production...

  4. Prevalence and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin resistant strains, isolated from bulk can milk and raw milk products in pastoral communities of South-West Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiimwe, Benon B; Baldan, Rossella; Trovato, Alberto; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2017-06-13

    Staphylococcus aureus strains are now regarded as zoonotic agents. In pastoral settings where human-animal interaction is intimate, multi-drug resistant microorganisms have become an emerging zoonotic issue of public health concern. The study of S. aureus prevalence, antimicrobial resistance and clonal lineages in humans, animals and food in African settings has great relevance, taking into consideration the high diversity of ethnicities, cultures and food habits that determine the lifestyle of the people. Little is known about milk carriage of methicillin resistant S. aureus strains (MRSA) and their virulence factors in Uganda. Here, we present the prevalence of MRSA in bulk can milk and raw milk products in pastoral communities of south-west Uganda. We also present PFGE profiles, spa-types, as well as frequency of enterotoxins genes. S. aureus was identified by the coagulase test, susceptibility testing by the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and E-test methods and MRSA by detection of the mecA gene and SCCmec types. The presence of Panton - Valentine Leucocidin (PVL) genes and staphylococcal enterotoxins was determined by PCR, while genotyping was by PFGE and spa typing. S. aureus were isolated from 30/148 (20.3%) milk and 11/91(12%) sour milk samples. mecA gene carriage, hence MRSA, was detected in 23/41 (56.1%) of the isolates, with 21 of the 23 (91.3%) being SCCmec type V; while up to 30/41 (73.2%) of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Only five isolates carried the PVL virulence gene, while PFGE typing revealed ten clusters (ranging from two seven isolates each) that comprised 83% of the sample, and only eight isolates with unique pulsotypes. The largest PFGE profile (E) consisted of seven isolates while t7753, t1398, and t2112 were the most common spa-types. Thirty seven of the 41 strains (90.2%) showed at least one of the eight enterotoxin genes tested, with sem 29 (70.7%), sei 25 (61%) and seg 21 (51.2%) being the most frequently observed genes. This

  5. A time series analysis of bulk tank somatic cell counts of dairy herds located in Brazil and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Gonçalves Rodrigues

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bulk tank somatic cell counts (BTSCC is widely used to monitore the mammary gland health at the herd and regional level. The BTSCC time series from specific regions or countries can be used to compare the mammary gland health and estimate the trend of subclinical mastitis at the regional level. Three time series of BTSCC from dairy herds located in the USA and the Southeastern Brazil were evaluated from 1995 to 2014. Descriptive statistics and a linear regression model were used to evaluate the data of the BTSCC time series. The mean of annual geometric mean of BTSCC (AGM and the percentage of dairy herds with a BTSCC greater than 400,000 cells mL-1 (%>400 were significantly different (P400 (P400, respectively. The linear regression model for the Brazil time series was not significant (P>0.05 for both dependent variables (AGM and %>400. The Brazil time series showed no increasing or decreasing trend for the AGM and %>400. Consequently, approximately 40 to 50% of the dairy herds from southeastern Brazil will not achieve the regulatory limits for BTSCC over the next years.

  6. M1 AFLATOXIN, TOTAL BACTERIAL COUNT AND SOMATIC CELL COUNT IN ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Coccollone

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparative quality evaluation of organic and conventional milk produced in similar environmental condition was performed. Bulk-tank milk was sampled once a week during 30 weeks from 10 organic and 10 conventional dairy farms where aflatoxin M1 level was previous tested during 11 months on bulk-tank milk from tanker at the processing plant. Somatic Cells and Total Microbial Counts did not show differences that can be related to the organic production system, suggesting an effect induced by farm size and technical factors. Higher level of Aflatoxin M1 was found in organic than conventional milk.

  7. DNA carryover in milk samples from routine milk recording used for PCR-based diagnosis of bovine Staphylococcus aureus mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmmod, Yasser Saadeldien Ibrahim; Klaas, Ilka Christine; Enevoldsen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    -aseptically collected composite samples taken at routine milk recording from cows milked consecutively with the same milking unit and milk meter; and (2) to formulate practical and plausible guidelines for understanding the diagnostic implications of PCR testing for Staph. aureus intramammary infection at routine milk...... recording. The study included 4 herds with conventional milking parlors and repeatedly low Ct-values for Staph. aureus (representing a high DNA load) in bulk tank milk. Composite milk samples were collected from all cows at all milking units during routine milk recording using the Tru-Test electronic milk...... influenced by the group of the antecedent cow. Statistical relationships in the intermediate range gave a plausible indication of a dose-response relationship. Carryover of bacterial DNA via the milking unit and milk meter is very likely to affect PCR results for Staph. aureus. Therefore, information about...

  8. EVALUATION OF METHODS OF ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE THE SOMATIC CELL COUNT IN RAW MILK, KEPT IN THE COOLING TANK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Pereira Neto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the quality of raw milk from eight dairy property in Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, stored in a cooling tank, in order to evaluate methods for determining somatic cell counts (SCC. The Somaticell® kit and a portable Direct Cell Counter (DCC were compared with each other and with the MilkoScanTM FT+ (FOSS Denmark, which uses Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIS. Direct cell counter data were processed for somatic cell scores (log-transformed somatic cell count and analyzed with the SAS®, Statistical Analysis System. Comparison of means and correlation of somatic cell scores were conducted using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and the Tukey Test at 1%. No significant difference was observed for comparison of means. The correlation between somatic cell scores was significant, that is, 0.907 and 0.876 between the MilkoScanTM FT + and the Somaticell® kit and Direct Cell Count (DCC respectively, and 0.943 between the Somaticell® kit and Direct Cell Count (DCC. The methods can be recommended for monitoring the quality of raw milk kept in a cooling tank in the production unit.

  9. A wireless electronic monitoring system for securing milk from farm to processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womble, Phillip; Hopper, Lindsay; Thompson, Chris; Alexander, Suraj M.; Crist, William; Payne, Fred; Stombaugh, Tim; Paschal, Jon; Moore, Ryan; Luck, Brian; Tabayehnejab, Nasrin

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Health and Human Services have targeted bulk food contamination as a focus for attention. The contamination of bulk food poses a high consequence threat to our society. Milk transport falls into three of the 17 targeted NIPP (National Infrastructure Protection Plan) sectors including agriculture-food, public health, and commercial facilities. Minimal security safeguards have been developed for bulk milk transport. The current manual methods of securing milk are paper intensive and prone to errors. The bulk milk transportation sector requires a security enhancement that will both reduce recording errors and enable normal transport activities to occur while providing security against unauthorized access. Milk transportation companies currently use voluntary seal programs that utilize plastic, numbered seals on milk transport tank openings. Our group has developed a Milk Transport Security System which is an electromechanical access control and communication system that assures the secure transport of milk, milk samples, milk data, and security data between locations and specifically between dairy farms, transfer stations, receiving stations, and milk plants. It includes a security monitoring system installed on the milk transport tank, a hand held device, optional printers, data server, and security evaluation software. The system operates automatically and requires minimal or no attention by the bulk milk hauler/sampler. The system is compatible with existing milk transport infrastructure, and has the support of the milk producers, milk transportation companies, milk marketing agencies, and dairy processors. The security protocol developed is applicable for transport of other bulk foods both nationally and internationally. This system adds significantly to the national security infrastructure for bulk food transport. We are currently demonstrating the system in central Kentucky and will report on the results

  10. Enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus spp. from bulk goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Daniele G; Sousa, Francisca G C; Borges, Maria F; Givisiez, Patrícia E N; Queiroga, Rita C R E; Souza, Evandro L; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Oliveira, Celso J B

    2013-02-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated as the main Staphylococcus species causing human food poisoning, recent studies have shown that coagulase-negative Staphylococcus could also harbor enterotoxin-encoding genes. Such organisms are often present in goat milk and are the most important mastitis-causing agents. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes among coagulase-positive (CoPS) and coagulase-negative (CoNS) staphylococci isolated from raw goat milk produced in the semi-arid region of Paraiba, the most important region for goat milk production in Brazil. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were screened in 74 staphylococci isolates (30 CoPS and 44 CoNS) by polymerase chain reaction targeting the genes sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were found in nine (12.2%) isolates, and four different genes (sea, sec, seg, and sei) were identified amongst the isolates. The most frequent genes were seg and sei, which were often found simultaneously in 44.5% of the isolates. The gene sec was the most frequent among the classical genes, and sea was found only in one isolate. All CoPS isolates (n=7) harboring enterotoxigenic genes were identified as S. aureus. The two coagulase-negative isolates were S. haemolyticus and S. hominis subsp. hominis and they harbored sei and sec genes, respectively. A higher frequency of enterotoxin-encoding genes was observed amongst CoPS (23.3%) than CoNS (4.5%) isolates (p<0.05), reinforcing the importance of S. aureus as a potential foodborne agent. However, the potential risk posed by CoNS in goat milk should not be ignored because it has a higher occurrence in goat milk and enterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in some isolates.

  11. Occurrence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hanna; Ruusunen, Marjo; Lindström, Miia

    2017-11-16

    The increased availability of packaged raw drinking milk necessitates the investigation of the occurrence and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in raw milk during distribution and storage. The occurrence of L. monocytogenes in 105 retailed raw milk bottles, 115 bulk tank milk samples, 23 in-line milk filter socks and in 50 environmental samples collected from an on-farm dairy establishment were investigated. Growth of inoculated low-level L. monocytogenes contamination was also investigated in two types of raw milk packaging, namely in 1-litre plastic bottles and 3-litre bag-in-boxes, both stored at three different storage temperatures of 6, 8 and 10°C. The occurrence of L. monocytogenes was higher (4.8%) in bottled raw milk stored until the use-by-date of the package compared to fresh bulk tank milk (1.7%). L. monocytogenes counts were ≤13CFU/ml in bottled raw milk and ≤1CFU/ml in bulk tank milk. L. monocytogenes was not detected in the packaging facility, but occurred very frequently (39%) in the milk filter socks. Subtyping of L. monocytogenes isolates using pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis revealed seven pulsotypes, of which two occurred in multiple samples. Targeted inoculum levels of 1-2CFU/ml yielded L. monocytogenes counts≥100CFU/ml within seven days of storage in 22% of the raw milk packages stored at 6°C, and in all of the raw milk packages stored at 8°C. The frequent occurrence of L. monocytogenes in raw milk and the ability of a low-level L. monocytogenes contamination to grow at refrigeration temperatures highlight the importance of consumer education regarding the appropriate raw milk storage and handling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictive modeling of Bacillus cereus spores in farm tank milk during grazing and housing periods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, M.M.M.; Giffel, M.C.T.; Driehuis, F.; Jong, de P.; Lankveld, J.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The shelf life of pasteurized dairy products depends partly on the concentration of Bacillus cereus spores in raw milk. Based on a translation of contamination pathways into chains of unit-operations, 2 simulation models were developed to quantitatively identify factors that have the greatest effect

  13. Prevalence and seasonality of bulk milk antibodies against Dictyocaulus viviparus and Ostertagia ostertagi in Irish pasture-based dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemhoff, Yris; Forbes, Andrew; Good, Barbara; Morgan, Eric; Mulcahy, Grace; Strube, Christina; Sayers, Ríona

    2015-04-15

    Infections with Dictyocaulus viviparus and Ostertagia ostertagi nematode parasites are of importance to bovine health and production in temperate areas across the world. Losses due to these parasites in dairy herds can be considerable due to decreased milk productivity and fertility. However, information on current epidemiological patterns in Irish dairy herds is limited. Bulk milk samples were collected from a total of 319 dairy farms across the Republic of Ireland. The D. viviparus samples were tested with an ELISA based on recombinant major sperm protein, while the O. ostertagi samples were tested with an ELISA based on crude saline extract, whole worm O. ostertagi antigen. Management data were collected from the farms using a questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to find significant associations between the presence of antibodies against D. viviparus and O. ostertagi and management factors. The overall prevalence of D. viviparus infection was 62.8%, while over 98% of herds had antibodies to O. ostertagi at the specified cut-off. Both D. viviparus and O. ostertagi antibodies were highest in November, which could be explained by the accumulated uptake of larvae through the grazing season. In herds of farmers that dosed their in-calf heifers with anthelmintics were significantly more likely to be positive for antibodies against D. viviparus infection. This study highlights that both D. viviparus and O. ostertagi infections are widespread in dairy herds in Ireland throughout the grazing season. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Control measures in officially acknowledged brucellosis-free and leukosis unsuspected dairy herds on the basis of bulk milk samples in combination with ELISA tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forschner, E; Bünger, I; Krause, H P; Küttler, D

    1989-01-01

    1. EC- and National Regulations. Since 1988 the EC-regulations accept in addition to the on Agar Gel Immunodiffusion test (AGIDT) based blood serum testing of cattle herds that are filed as "free from Enzootic Bovine Leucosis" the use of ELISA for this purpose. The regular testings in dairy cattle herds can be done alternatively with single or pooled milk samples, in other herds with pooled blood sera using ELISA. General condition is only a minimal sensitivity of the test to detect the European EBL Antibody Standard ("E4") in a dilution of 1:10 in negative serum or 1:250 in negative milk. Adequate national regulations are in preparation. The present limitation of pool sizes, blood maximum 50 animals without preparation steps 20, and milk after concentration treatment 50 cows is neutralized by proceedings in development of higher sensitive ELISA tests. This limitation should be canceled. Herd bulk milk samples without size limitations are accepted to be tested with "Milk Ring Test" by EC for the regular testings in filed "Brucellosis Free Dairy Cattle Herds". The alternative use of more sensitive (and more specific) ELISA tests for this purpose including the technical conditions is in a final discussion. 2. Scientific-Technical Base for Using the Chances of the Proceeding in the EC-Regulations. The realisation of the EC accepted or final discussed ELISA based bulk milk testing to control filed "EBL- and/or Brucellosis Free Herds" depends on some basic conditions like sensitivity, specificity, and variability of the ELISA systems. Field trials of more than 20,000 bulk milk samples in case of Brucellosis and more than 2,000 in case of EBL show the feasibilities and the limits of the ELISA systems in defining the status of the herds. The Brucellosis respectively the EBL situations of the dairy cattle herds tested in this trail were well known by history and by investigation of single animal blood samples using conventional tests. Special test run variations of

  15. Detection of Antibodies and Confirmation of Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Using Nested PCR in Bulk Milk Samples from Nakasongola and Sembabule Districts, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniface Okuni, Julius; Oyo, Tony; Kisekka, Magid; Ochwo, Sylvester; Kalenzi Atuhaire, David; Afayoa, Mathias; Olaho-Mukani, William; Ojok, Lonzy

    2013-12-16

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is an emerging pathogen in many livestock and wildlife populations around the world. Concerns range from the serious economic impacts on livestock productivity to its suspected role in the human inflammatory bowel disease syndrome. Milk and faeces of infected animals are the main vehicles through which the organism spreads from infected to susceptible hosts. In this study, a survey was done in Nakasongola and Sembabule districts of Uganda involving a total of seven dairy collection centres to determine the prevalence of antibodies to MAP in bulk milk samples. The milk was tested with a commercial ELISA kit for MAP testing in milk. Positive and suspicious milk samples were further tested using nested PCR. Of the 257 milk samples tested, 11 (4.3%) were positive and five (1.9%) were suspicious. All the ELISA positive and suspicious milk samples were positive using nested PCR. The results show that MAP infection occurs in cattle from the two districts and highlight the need for a paratuberculosis control program in these and other districts where MAP infection has been reported.

  16. A survey on Aflatoxin M1 content in sheep and goat milk produced in Sardinia Region, Italy (2005-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Virdis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the results of a survey conducted in Sardinia Region on Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 contamination in milk of small ruminants from 2005 to 2013 are reported. A total of 517 sheep and 88 goat milk samples from bulk tank, tank trucks and silo tank milk were collected. Analyses were performed by the Regional Farmers Association laboratory using high-performance liquid chromatography following the ISO 14501:1998 standard. None of the sheep milk samples analysed during 2005- 2012 showed AFM1 contamination. In sheep milk samples collected in 2013, 8 out of 172 (4.6% were contaminated by AFM1 with a concentration (mean±SD of 12.59±14.05 ng/L. In one bulk tank milk sample 58.82 ng/L AFM1 was detected, exceeding the EU limit. In none of goat milk samples analysed from 2010 to 2012 AFM1 was detected. In 2013, 9 out of 66 goat milk samples (13.6% showed an AFM1 concentration of 47.21±19.58 ng/L. Two of these samples exceeded the EU limit, with concentrations of 62.09 and 138.6 ng/L. Higher contamination frequency and concentration rates were detected in bulk tank milk samples collected at farm than in bulk milk truck or silo samples, showing a dilution effect on AFM1 milk content along small ruminants supply chain. The rate and levels of AFM1 contamination in sheep and goat milk samples were lower than other countries. However, the small number of milk samples analysed for AFM1 in Sardinia Region in 2005-2013 give evidence that food business operators check programmes should be improved to ensure an adequate monitoring of AFM1 contamination in small ruminant dairy chain.

  17. Correlation between mastitis occurrence and the count of microorganisms in bulk raw milk of bovine dairy herds in four selective culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Luís I M; Minagawa, Clarice Y; Telles, Evelise O; Garbuglio, Márcio A; Amaku, Marcos; Melville, Priscilla A; Dias, Ricardo A; Sakata, Sonia T; Benites, Nilson R

    2010-02-01

    Milk is the normal secretion of the mammary gland, practically free of colostrum and obtained by the complete milking of one or more healthy animals. Mastitis is an inflammatory process of the mammary gland and it may cause alterations in the milk. The present work aimed to verify whether it is possible, by means of the counts of microorganism in the bulk raw milk in four selective culture media, to establish a correlation with the occurrence of mastitis and therefore, to monitor this disease in bovine dairy herds. The following selective culture media were used: KF Streptococcus Agar, Edwards Agar, Baird-Parker Agar, Blood Agar plus potassium tellurite. Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated in order to compare the occurrence of mastitis (percentage) in each herd with respective selective culture media counts of microorganisms in bulk raw milk. Thirty-six possibilities were analysed (Tamis and CMT-positive rates were compared with the log-transformed count in four selective culture media) and there was a negative correlation between Tamis 3 and the Baird-Parker Agar plate count. The total results of microbiological tests showed that there were three correlations of the counts in selective culture media. Fifty-two possibilities were analysed and there was a negative correlation between no-bacterial-growth mastitis rates and log10 of KF Streptoccocus Agar plate count and there were two positive correlations between coagulase-positive staphylococci and log10 of Baird-Parker Agar plate count and Blood Agar plus potassium tellurite plate count.

  18. Evaluation of the specificity of three enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of antibodies against Salmonella in bovine bulk milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Ann-Kristin J; Ågren, Estelle C C; Bergström, Karin; Wahlström, Helene

    2013-01-30

    The Swedish Salmonella control program has been running for decades and has resulted in a low prevalence of Salmonella in Swedish food producing animals. Routine bacteriology is used to detect Salmonella, however, bacteriology is time consuming, costly and has a low sensitivity. Different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have been developed for detection of antibodies against Salmonella Dublin and S. Typhimurium in bovine bulk milk, individual milk samples as well as in sera. Screening bulk milk for antibodies against Salmonella spp. could improve the cost-effectiveness of the surveillance in Swedish dairy cattle, but as characteristics of tests may vary in different populations, tests should always be evaluated in the specific population where they will be used. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the specificities of three bovine ELISAs when used to analyse bulk milk samples from Swedish dairy cattle. A second aim was to compare the performance of the two Dublin ELISAs tested. Bulk milk samples for analysis were randomly selected from samples collected within the Swedish bulk milk sampling scheme and analyzed with the three ELISAs; a Danish in-house Dublin ELISA, PrioCHECK(®) Salmonella Ab bovine Dublin ELISA and PrioCHECK(®) Salmonella Ab bovine ELISA (hereafter named mixed ELISA). The specificities of the ELISAs were calculated assuming a disease-free status in Sweden i.e. that all test positive samples were assumed to be false positive results. This assumption can be used when a disease is known to be infrequent. The calculated specificities of the two Dublin ELISAs and the mixed ELISA, when using the producer's recommended cut-off value of the corrected optic-density percent (ODC%) were 99.4% (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 98.8% -99.8%), 99.4% (95% CI: 98.8% -99.8%) and 97.9% (95% CI: 96.8% -98.7%), respectively. The correlation between the ODC% values of the two Dublin ELISAs was 0.83. We conclude that the evaluated ELISAs have

  19. Reação de imunofluorescência indireta para detecção de anticorpos anti-Neospora caninum em amostras coletivas de leite Indirect fluorescent antibody test to detection of Neospora caninum antibodies in samples of bulk milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Camillo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a presença de anticorpos anti-Neospora caninum em amostras coletivas de leite, através da reação de imunofluorescência indireta (RIFI. Para isso, foram coletadas amostras do leite dos tanques refrigerados de 36 rebanhos, das quais foram selecionadas 14 para coletas de amostras individuais de soro sanguíneo e de leite das vacas. Encontrou-se correlação em 12 dos 14 rebanhos selecionados para a amostragem individual dos animais, em comparação à detecção de anticorpos nas amostras coletivas de leite. Foi observada uma concordância de 76% comparando-se o resultado das amostras coletivas com os resultados individuais de leite. Observaram-se baixos títulos de anticorpos (50 no soro sanguíneo dos animais soropositivos, cujos resultados da RIFI no leite coletivo e no sangue foram discordantes. Assim, a partir dos resultados deste estudo, pode-se concluir que a utilização de testes sorológicos para detecção de anticorpos anti-N. caninum em amostras coletivas de leite através da RIFI pode ser uma opção ao diagnóstico para a triagem de rebanhos positivos bem como para estudos epidemiológicos.The aim of this study was to determine the presence of anti-N. caninum in the bulk milk samples by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFAT. For this, it was collected samples of milk from refrigerated tanks from 36 herds, of which 14 were selected for sampling of individual blood serum and milk of cows. It was found concordance for 12 of the 14 herds selected for samples of individual animals, compared to the detection of antibodies in the bulk milk samples. Concordance was of 76% when comparing the results of the pooled sample with the results of individual milk. It was observed low antibody titers (50 in the serum of animals positive whose results in IFA of bulk milk and blood were discordant. Thus, with the results of this study, it can be concluded that the use of serological tests for detection of

  20. Detection of antimicrobial and anthelmintic residues in bulk tank milk from four different mesoregions of Minas Gerais State - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M.O.P. Cerqueira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a presença de resíduos antimicrobianos (ceftiofur, estreptomicinas, quinolonas, tetraciclinas, tianfenicol e tilosina e anti-helmínticos (benzimidazóis, aminobenzimidazóis, levamisol, avermectinas, tiabendazóis, moxidectina e triclabendazóis em, respectivamente, 70 e 83 amostras de leite cru provenientes de quatro mesorregiões (Triângulo Mineiro/Alto Paranaíba, Central Mineira, Oeste de Minas e Metropolitana de Belo Horizonte do estado de Minas Gerais. Este estudo demonstrou a presença de quinolonas (2,86%, estreptomicinas (2,86% e tetraciclinas (11,43% nas amostras de leite cru analisadas. Ademais, observou-se expressiva porcentagem de amostras de leite cru positivas para os anti-helmínticos amino- benzimidazóis (55,42%, levamisol (53,57%, avermectinas (60,24%, tiabendazóis (67.47%, moxidectina (73,49% e triclabendazóis (45,78%, e em menor porcentagem os benzimidazóis (6,02%. Desta forma, os resultados do presente estudo indicam que os resíduos de antimicrobianos e anti-helmínticos no leite em Minas Gerais devem ser constantemente monitorados pelas autoridades competentes com intuito de oferecer aos consumidores um alimento sem riscos à saúde humana.

  1. Real-time evaluation of milk quality as reflected by clotting parameters of individual cow's milk during the milking session, between day-to-day and during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Gabriel; Merin, Uzi; Jacoby, Shamay; Bezman, Dror; Lemberskiy-Kuzin, Liubov; Katz, Gil

    2013-09-01

    Real-time analysis of milk coagulation properties as performed by the AfiLab™ milk spectrometer introduces new opportunities for the dairy industry. The study evaluated the performance of the AfiLab™ in a milking parlor of a commercial farm to provide real-time analysis of milk-clotting parameters -Afi-CF for cheese manufacture and determine its repeatability in time for individual cows. The AfiLab™ in a parlor, equipped with two parallel milk lines, enables to divert the milk on-line into two bulk milk tanks (A and B). Three commercial dairy herds of 220 to 320 Israeli Holstein cows producing ∼11 500 l during 305 days were selected for the study. The Afi-CF repeatability during time was found significant (P milk and log somatic cell count (SCC) had no significant effect. Fat, protein and lactose significantly affected Afi-CF and the empirical van Slyke equation. Real-time simulations were performed for different cutoff levels of coagulation properties where the milk of high Afi-CF cutoff value was channeled to tank A and the lower into tank B. The simulations showed that milk coagulation properties of an individual cow are not uniform, as most cows contributed milk to both tanks. Proportions of the individual cow's milk in each tank depended on the selected Afi-CF cutoff. The assessment of the major causative factors of a cow producing low-quality milk for cheese production was evaluated for the group that produced the low 10% quality milk. The largest number of cows in those groups at the three farms was found to be cows with post-intramammary infection with Escherichia coli and subclinical infections with streptococci or coagulase-negative staphylococci (∼30%), although the SCC of these cows was not significantly different. Early time in lactation together with high milk yield >50 l/day, and late in lactation together with low milk yieldquality milk. However, ∼50% of the tested variables did not explain any of the factors responsible for the cow

  2. Milk fat saturation and reproductive performance in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostens, M; Fievez, V; Leroy, J L M R; van de Burgwal, E J; Van Ranst, B; Vlaeminck, B; Opsomer, G

    2013-10-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) cannot be synthesized by mammalian cells due to a lack of desaturase enzymes. Combined with their limited supply to the small intestines, UFA have been proposed as nutraceuticals to ameliorate dairy cow fertility. However, field studies based on a large number of animals are lacking on this subject. Therefore the aim of the present study was to analyze a large dataset containing individual cow fertility records from dairy herds and link fertility key-performance-indicators like conception rate to first insemination (CRFI), days in milk to first insemination (DIMFI) and days in milk to conception (DIMCONC), to the level of UFA in bulk tank samples, the latter being a proxy for the dietary fatty acid profile on these herds. Within the two year study period, information from 15,055 lactations and 35,433 bulk tank milk samples was collected on 90 herds. The multilevel logistic regression model used, revealed a decreased CRFI on herds with a higher bulk tank UFA level. The decrease in CRFI was larger for higher producing herds. Increased bulk tank UFA was furthermore associated with higher DIMFI which, together with the lower CRFI, subsequently increased DIMCONC. Interestingly, higher variability in UFA, expressed by an increased coefficient of variation, was associated with an increased CRFI and decreased DIMFI and DIMCONC. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that increasing the UFA content of milk should not be a goal as such when supplementing UFA to dairy cows as higher bulk tank UFA are associated with worsened fertility results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Real-time evaluation of individual cow milk for higher cheese-milk quality with increased cheese yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, G; Merin, U; Bezman, D; Lavie, S; Lemberskiy-Kuzin, L; Leitner, G

    2016-06-01

    Cheese was produced in a series of experiments from milk separated in real time during milking by using the Afilab MCS milk classification service (Afikim, Israel), which is installed on the milk line in every stall and sorts milk in real time into 2 target tanks: the A tank for cheese production (CM) and the B tank for fluid milk products (FM). The cheese milk was prepared in varying ratios ranging from ~10:90 to ~90:10 CM:FM by using this system. Cheese was made with corrected protein-to-fat ratio and without it, as well as from milk stored at 4°C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8d before production. Cheese weight at 24h increased along the separation cutoff level with no difference in moisture, and dry matter increased. The data compiled allowed a theoretical calculation of cheese yield and comparing it to the original van Slyke equation. Whenever the value of Afi-Cf, which is the optical measure of curd firmness obtained by the Afilab instrument, was used, a better predicted level of cheese yield was obtained. In addition, 27 bulk milk tanks with milk separated at a 50:50 CM:FM ratio resulted in cheese with a significantly higher fat and protein, dry matter, and weight at 24h. Moreover, solids incorporated from the milk into the cheese were significantly higher in cheeses made of milk from A tanks. The influence of storage of milk up to 8d before cheese making was tested. Gross milk composition did not change and no differences were found in cheese moisture, but dry matter and protein incorporated in the cheese dropped significantly along the storage time. These findings confirm that milk stored for several days before processing is prone to physico-chemical deterioration processes, which result in loss of milk constituents to the whey and therefore reduced product yield. The study demonstrates that introducing the unknown parameters for calculating the predicted cheese yield, such as the empiric measured Afi-Cf properties, are more accurate and the increase in cheese

  4. 46 CFR 154.439 - Tank design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.439 Section 154.439 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type A § 154.439 Tank design. An independent tank type A must meet the deep tank standard of the...

  5. 46 CFR 154.420 - Tank design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.420 Section 154.420 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Integral Tanks § 154.420 Tank design. (a) The structure of an integral tank must meet the deep tank scantling standards...

  6. 7 CFR 58.218 - Surge tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surge tanks. 58.218 Section 58.218 Agriculture....218 Surge tanks. If surge tanks are used for hot milk, and temperatures of product including foam being held in the surge tank during processing, is not maintained at a minimum of 150 °F, then two or...

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium Complexes by Real-Time PCR in Bovine Milk from Brazilian Dairy Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, André Vinícius Andrade; Dos Reis, Emily Marques; Rodrigues, Rogério Oliveira; Cenci, Alexander; Cerva, Cristine; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos

    2015-05-01

    Foodborne diseases are a public health problem worldwide. The consumption of contaminated raw milk has been recognized as a major cause of transmission of bovine tuberculosis to humans. Other mycobacteria that may be present in raw milk and may cause diseases are those belonging to the Mycobacterium avium complex. In this study, molecular biology tools were applied to investigate raw milk contamination with Mycobacterium spp. in family dairy farms from Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil. Furthermore, different variables related to the source of the milk, herd characteristics, and management were evaluated for their effect on milk contamination. Five hundred and two samples were analyzed, of which 354 were from the Northwest region (102 farms with samples from 93 bulk tanks and 261 animals) and 148 from the South region of the state (22 farms with samples from 23 bulk tanks and 125 animals). Among them, 10 (1.99%) and 7 (1.39%) were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (9 confirmed as Mycobacterium bovis) and M. avium complexes, respectively. There was no difference in the frequencies of positive samples between the regions or the sample sources. Of the positive samples, 4 were collected from a bulk tank (1 positive for M. avium and 3 for M. tuberculosis). Moreover, 1 sample was positive concomitantly for M. tuberculosis and M. avium complexes. On risk analysis, no variable was associated with raw milk contamination by M. tuberculosis complex species. However, washing the udders of all animals and drying them with paper towels were weakly classified as risk factors for M. avium contamination. Positive samples were obtained from both animals and bulk tanks, which emphasizes the importance of tuberculosis control programs and provides evidence that milk monitoring can be used as a control practice. Moreover, the findings of this study reinforce the need for awareness of the problems of raw milk consumption among the general population.

  8. Relations between basic milk components and free fatty acid content in Holstein cow milk as lipolysis parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luděk Stádník

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate in detail the relationship between the basic milk components (fat and protein percentage and the free fatty acids (FFA content, as indicators of spontaneous and/or induced lipolysis. The additional aim of the study was to compare the FFA content of milk with respect to spontaneous and induced lipolysis. Milking was carried out in herringbone parlour twice a day. In total, 540 milk samples were obtained for evaluation of spontaneous (n=240 and induced lipolysis (n=300. The milk samples for determination of basic milk components and FFA (li¬polysis levels were collected during four subsequent lactation weeks. Milk samples for spontaneous lipolysis detection were taken directly in parlour immediately after milking using the ICAR methodology and subsequently grouped. Induced lipolysis was observed from bulk milk in time 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 hours after milking (T0-T4. The evaluation of basic components and FFA content was carried on MILKOSCAN F120 (Foss Electronic; Denmark. Statistical evaluation was carried out using SAS 9.3. (SAS/STAT® 9.3, 2011. An increase of one percentage of milk fat was equal to 0.318 mmol x 100 g-1 FFA decline (spontaneous lipolysis or from 0.232 to 0.370 mmol x 100 g-1 FFA decline (induced lipolysis T0-T4 respectively. One percentage increase of milk protein was equal to 1.219 mmol x 100 g-1 FFA increase (spontaneous lipolysis or 0.421 to 1.531 mmol x 100 g-1 FFA decrease (induced lipolysis T0 - T4 respectively. Significant differences (P<0.01 were detected among FFA content in relation to spontaneous and induced lipolysis evaluated during storage and cooling after milking. The minimal differences were detected between the FFA content during 4 hours cooling and storage of milk in the tank.

  9. Lead excretion in milk of accidentally exposed dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Karyn; Higgins, William; Thompson, Belinda; Ebel, Joseph G

    2014-01-01

    Lead (Pb) exposure in dairy cattle is associated with economic losses due to mortality and treatment costs, but with production animals there is also risk to the human food chain. The first objective of this study was to quantify the Pb concentration in milk from Pb-exposed cattle. The second objective was to correlate blood and milk Pb concentrations from individual cows. The third objective was long-term monitoring to determine the duration of milk contamination after exposure ceased. A dairy herd of more than 100 cows was accidentally exposed to Pb-contaminated feed. Milk and blood were collected for Pb analysis. Serial collection of milk samples continued for 2.5 years. The initial concentration of Pb in bulk tank milk was 0.0999 mg l⁻¹. The highest milk Pb concentration from an individual cow was 0.4657 mg l⁻¹ and the highest blood Pb concentration was 1.216 mg l⁻¹. One milk sample collected at the end of the study (day 922) contained 0.0117 mg Pb l⁻¹ of Pb. The calculated relationship between milk (y) and blood (x) Pb concentration was ln(y) = 3.4(x) - 2.21 (R² = 0.98).

  10. 46 CFR 154.446 - Tank design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank design. 154.446 Section 154.446 Shipping COAST... SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Independent Tank Type B § 154.446 Tank design. An independent tank type B must meet the calculations under § 154...

  11. Oxidative stability of structured lipids containing C18:0, C18:1, C18:2, C18:3 or CLA in sn 2-position - as bulk lipids and in milk drinks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Xu, Xuebing

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we compared the oxidative stability of a specific structured lipid (SL) containing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in the sn2-position with SL containing other C18 fatty acids of different degree of unsaturation (stearic, oleic, linoleic or linolenic acid). SL was produced by enzyma......In this study, we compared the oxidative stability of a specific structured lipid (SL) containing conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in the sn2-position with SL containing other C18 fatty acids of different degree of unsaturation (stearic, oleic, linoleic or linolenic acid). SL was produced...... by enzymatic interesterification with caprylic acid. Oxidative stability was compared in the five lipids themselves and in milk drinks containing 5% of the different SL. During storage, samples were taken for chemical and physical analyses. Moreover, sensory assessments were performed on milk drinks....... The oxidative stability of our SL was very different when comparing (a) bulk lipids and milk drink and (b) the five different batches of each product. SL based on oleic acid was the most unstable as bulk lipid, while SL based on linoleic acid was the most unstable in milk drink. SL based on CLA was the second...

  12. Survey on the fatty acids profile of fluid goat milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pittau

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluid goat milk submitted to thermal treatment has interesting nutritional properties and a potential expanding market. The present study was aimed to conduct fatty acids profile characterisation of goat milk placed on market. Forty-nine fluid milk samples were collected: 12 pasteurised, 12 pasteurised at high temperature, 11 ultrahigh temperature (UHT whole milk and 14 UHT semi-skimmed milk. Milk samples were collected at retail level from 7 different companies and from different production batches. After extraction and methilation, fatty acids (FAs profile was determined on each sample using a gas chromatograph with flame ionisation detector (GC-FID with high-polarity capillary column. The concentration (g/100mL of saturated fatty acids (SFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, trans fatty acids (t-FAs, and isomers of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA was determined. N-6/n-3 ratio, atherogenic index (AI and thrombogenic index (TI were also assessed. Fluid goat milk lipid profile was characterised by SFAs (68.4% of total FAs, PUFAs (5.3%, MUFAs (21.3%, t-FAs (3.6% and CLA (0.8%. The most represented fatty acids were: 16:0 (24.5%, 9cis-18:1 (18.2%, 18:0 (9.6%, 14:0 (9.5%, 10:0 (9.3% and 12:0 (4.5%. Nutritional indices were 2.8-6.8 for n-6/n-3 ratio; 2.3-2.9 for AI; and 2.7-3.2 for TI. Milk produced by small scale plants, with no milk fat standardisation, showed greater differences in fatty acid profile as compared to industrial plants milk. Large scale production is characterised by commingled bulk tank milk of different origins and then is more homogeneous. The whole goat milk supply chain should be controlled to obtain milk with fatty acids of high nutritional value.

  13. Tank truck purging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazin, G.R.

    1984-09-04

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for purging a vehicle tank compartment to permit access for repair, or maintenance without environmental pollution or hazard to workmen entering the tank. In accordance with the invention an elongated cylindrical storage tank is tilted about its horizontal axis, to form a reservoir for purge water. The tank is connectable as by flexible hoses to fill and drain connections for a tank compartment of a truck, rail car, or other bulk liquid vehicle. Purge water is pumped from the storage tank at a level above the lower tilted end of the elongated tank and vapor displaced from the tank compartment by the water is recovered through a vapor recovery system. Desirably, the compartment is filled until it overflows into the vapor recovery line. Water is returned to the storage tank at a position near the upwardly tilted end. The tilted arrangement permits gravity separation and accumulation of minor amounts of light hydrocarbons, such as diesel fuel or gasoline at an upper separation zone formed by the upwardly tilted end. A similar separation zone or volume for accumulation of rust particles, sludge and the like is formed at the lower tilted end. Hydrocarbons lighter than water are flushed from the tilted upper end of the reservoir tank by adding water to the reservoir tank so that it overflows through a line connected to a separator tank. Heavy particles from the lower tilted end are removed through a cleanout line entering near the lower tilted end of the reservoir tank. Water may also be removed from the tank to lower the water level at the upper tilted end to increase the surface area of the separation zone for accumulation of such lighter hydrocarbons.

  14. High-throughput metataxonomic characterization of the raw milk microbiota identifies changes reflecting lactation stage and storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Conor J; Gleeson, David; O'Toole, Paul W; Cotter, Paul D

    2017-08-16

    Low temperature is used to control the growth of bacteria in milk, both pre- and post-pasteurization. As the duration of refrigerated storage extends, psychrotrophs dominate the milk microbiota, that can produce heat stable lipases which negatively impact the organoleptic qualities of milk. Here we examine the influence that refrigeration temperature (2°C, 4°C and 6°C) and storage duration (96h) have on the microbiota composition (16S profiling) of raw bulk tank milk (BTM). To reflect a proposed change to current farming practices, raw milk was blended after each milking (8 milkings) and stored for five consecutive days in each temperature-specific tank. Here 16S rRNA-based microbiota compositional analysis was performed after milk was collected on day 1 and again after the final addition of milk at day 5. In addition to assessing the impact of the duration and temperature of storage, the influence of lactation stage, i.e. mid- versus late-lactation, on the microbiota of the blended BTM was also examined. Overall, both temperature and length of storage had surprisingly little influence on the raw milk microbiota, other than an increase in proportions of Gammaproteobacteria in the blended milk samples collected after pooling on day 5, and in samples stored at 6°C. However, lactation stage had a considerable influence on microbiota composition, with milk from mid-lactation containing higher proportions of Bacteroides, Faecalibacterium, Campylobacter and Rhodanobacter, and late-lactation milk containing higher proportions of Actinobacteria. Overall, the study demonstrates that current temperature and storage duration practises impact the microbiota of raw milk, but these impacts are modest relative to the more considerable differences between mid and late-lactation milk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Handling milking as a risk factor in the occurrence of microorganisms in raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Picoli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Milk is naturally a good provider of a whole range of nutrients, however an inadequate milking may significantly interfere on its nutritional and microbiological quality. The main purpose of this study was to isolate and identify microorganisms from bulk tanks of southern Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil and establish a correlation between animal management and presence of pathogens in the milk. To this end, raw milk samples were collected from different dairy herds and submitted to microbiological analyses. Mean bacterial counts were Staphylococcus sp. (5,32x106 CFU/mL, S. aureus (1,33x105 CFU/mL and enterobacteria (1,82x107 CFU/mL. The major pathogens isolated and their respective frequency were Escherichia coli (27.8%, Streptococcus agalactiae (6.2%, S. dysgalactiae (37.2%, S. uberis (16.8%, Candida sp. (15.7%, Aspergillus sp. (5.8%, Trichosporum sp. (3.6% and Cryptococcus sp. (1.5%. In addition, it was identified an Odds Ratio of 3.2 for S. agalactiae regarding manual milking and 3.1 when a single cloth towel was used for drying the udder. For S. bovis the Odds Ratio was 2.8 in properties milking their animals in stalls wood. Somatic cell count (SCC was significantly higher (p=0,003 in milk samples manually extracted in comparison with machine milking. Likewise, manual milking resulted in the increase in S. aureus counts (p=0.04. Pre-dipping practice have contributed for a significant reduction (p=0.04 in the Staphylococcus sp. counts. Taken together, our results show that the adoption of poor management practices can negatively interfere in the microbiological quality of milk increasing the risks of occurrence of pathogens and their counts.

  16. Effect of addition of CO₂ to raw milk on quality of UHT-treated milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, P C B; Walter, E H M; Dias, M E F; Faria, J A F; Netto, F M; Gigante, M L

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of addition of CO(2) to raw milk on UHT milk quality during storage. Control milk (without CO(2) addition) and treated milk (with CO(2) addition up to pH 6.2) were stored in bulk tanks at 4°C for 6d. After storage, both samples were UHT processed using indirect heating (140°C for 5s). Samples were aseptically packed in low-density polyethylene pouches and stored in the dark at room temperature. Raw milk was evaluated upon receipt for physicochemical composition, proteolysis, lipolysis, standard plate count, psychrotrophic bacteria, and Pseudomonas spp. counts, and after 6d of storage for proteolysis, lipolysis, and microbial counts. After processing, UHT milk samples were evaluated for physicochemical composition, proteolysis, and lipolysis. Samples were evaluated for proteolysis and lipolysis twice a month until 120d. Peptides from pH 4.6-soluble N filtrates were performed by reversed-phase HPLC after 1 and 120d of storage. A split-plot design was used and the complete experiment was carried out in triplicate. The results were evaluated by ANOVA and Tukey's test. After 6d of storage, CO(2)-treated raw milk kept its physicochemical and microbiological quality, whereas the untreated milk showed significant quality losses. A significant increase in proteolysis occurred during 120d of storage in both treatments, but the increase occurred 1.4 times faster in untreated UHT milk than in CO(2)-treated UHT milk. In both UHT milks, the proteolysis was a consequence of the action of plasmin and microbial proteases. However, the untreated UHT milk showed higher microbial protease activity than the treated UHT milk. The addition of CO(2) to the raw milk maintained the quality during storage, resulting in UHT milk with less proteolysis and possibly longer shelf life, which is usually limited by age gelation of UHT milk. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Heat Treatment on the Freezing Points of Cow and Goat Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohumíra Janštová

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to monitor the impact of heat treatment variables on the freezing point of cow and goat milk. The freezing point (FP was established in 30 bulk tank samples of goat milk and in 30 bulk tank samples of cow milk which were subject to laboratory heat treatment at temperatures of 72 °C (A, 85 °C (B, 95 °C (C, with the same exposition times of 20 s. Freezing point measurements of raw and heat-treated milk were carried out in compliance with the Standard CTS 57 0538 by a thermistor cryoscope. The FP of raw cow milk increased with heat treatment from the initial values of -0.5252 ± 0.0114 °C (O by 0.0023 °C (A, 0.0034 °C (B and 0.0051°C (C. Changes in FP values of goat milk were detected, from its initial value of –0.5530 ± 0.0086 °C there was an increase in the FP depending on the mode of heat treatment due to pasteurization by an average of 0.0028 °C (A, 0.0036 °C (B and 0.0054 °C (C. The dynamics of the changes were similar both in goat and cow milk. Freezing point values in cow and goat milk differed (P ⪬ 0.01 when compared to the freezing point of untreated milk after the individual interventions as well as when compared between each other. An increase in the heat treatment temperature of cow and goat milk causes an increase in the freezing point (a shift towards zero. These results can be used in practice for checking the raw material in dairy industry.

  18. The Influence of Season on the Cow Milk Quantity, Quality and Hygiene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Toma Cziszter

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of season of collection on the quantity, quality and hygienicproperties of the raw milk delivered from one dairy farm. The studied traits were: bulk tank milk yield, chemicalcomposition (fat, protein, lactose, and total solids, freezing point, density, total bacteria count, coliform bacteriacount and somatic cell count, during years 2010 and 2011. A total of 727 samples were drawn and analysed in twolaboratories, using the standard methods. Average milk production per day per head in the farm was 13.58 kg,obtained from 252 cows. Year of collection had a significant effect on the bulk tank raw milk yield, quality andhygiene, except for freezing point and total bacteria count. The raw milk yield and chemical composition improved(p<0.05 from year 2010 to year 2011, as well as the hygienic quality. Season of collection had a significant (p<0.05influence on the milk yield and chemical composition, the highest milk yield with the lowest concentration beingobtained during summer, while the lowest milk yield with the highest chemical composition was obtained in winter.Physical properties of the raw milk were less affected by the season of collection, with the lowest freezing point inthe winter and the highest density in the autumn. The highest somatic cell count and coliform bacteria count wasobtained during the spring and the lowest total bacteria count was obtained in winter season. There was a significant(p<0.05 interaction between year and season of production for all raw milk traits.

  19. THE MICROBIOLOGICAL LOAD OF SHEEP MILK FROM PRIMARY PRODUCTION TO ITS PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Farkašová

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In the breeding with the average number of 220 sheep (zošľachtená valaška with traditional hand milking in the Eastern Slovakia the microbiological load of milk during the process of primary production, transport, before and after pasteurisation as well as during dairy processing to cheese curd was observed. The results in three seasons were compared to those obtained at finishing of milking in the season before. The microbiological load of milk was observed using the bacteriological methods for determination of the presence of Staphylococcus sp. and other bacteria, and determination of the total number of staphylococci: a  in milliliter of pool milk sample; b  the transport control – smears from transport tank and determination of the total number of staphylococci in the tank milk sample; c bacteriological examination of bulk tank milk in the dairy plant before and after pasteurisation, including examination of cheese curd. After pasteurisation no staphylococci were recorded as in milk as in cheese. Out of 112 strains of Staphylococcus aureus only four strain produced staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE, but in another 7 strains a gene for production of SE, type C was found. The measures introduced during the following season led to the fact that total numbers of coagulase-positive staphylococci in milk within the process of primary production and transport did not exceed the limit permitted by legislation, and after pasteurisation of milk and cheese curd they were not found at all.  doi:10.5219/58

  20. [Occurrence and typing of Listeria monocytogenes isolated from raw cow's milk collected on farms and from vending machines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbícová, T; Karpísková, R

    2012-04-01

    Evaluation of the incidence and characteristics of L. monocytogenes in samples of raw cow's milk collected on farms (bulk tank milk samples) and from vending machines. Detection of L. monocytogenes and enumeration were carried out according to EN/ISO 11290--1, 2. Strains were characterised by serotyping and macrorestriction analysis using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The presence of L. monocytogenes was detected in 3,2 % (11/346) of bulk tank milk samples and 1,8 % (4/219) samples of raw cow's milk from vending machines. Findings of L. monocytogenes in raw milk were sporadic. Only on one farm strains of L. monocytogenes were detected repeatedly. Thirteen strains of L. monocytogenes belonged to serotype 1/2a, two strains to serotype 1/2b and one to serotype 4b. Macrorestriction analysis revealed considerable heterogeinity of profiles, with nine different pulsotypes being detected. Pulsotype 711 was the most frequent. This pulsotype was found on three different farms. The incidence of L. monocytogenes in raw cow's milk is relatively low in the Czech Republic. The results confirmed that some clones of L. monocytogenes from raw milk are identical with food and human strains.

  1. Detection of Coxiella burnetii in the bulk tank milk from a farm with vaccinated goats, by using a specific PCR technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brom, van der R.; Engelen, van E.; Vos, J.; Luttikholt, S.J.; Moll, L.; Roest, H.I.J.; Heijden, van der H.M.J.F.; Vellema, P.

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonotic disease, caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Between 2007 and 2010, Q fever has been a major public health concern in the Netherlands, with almost 3500 human cases reported and dairy goats considered to be the most probable source. At the end of

  2. A space-time analysis of Mycoplasma bovis: bulk tank milk antibody screening results from all Danish dairy herds in 2013-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arede, Margarida; Nielsen, Per Kantsø; Ahmed, Syed Sayeem Uddin

    2016-01-01

    as test-positive or test-negative using a cut-off of 50 optical density coefficient %. The spatial global clustering was evaluated through a modified K-function method, and local clusters were identified by scan statistics. The results showed that M. bovis test-positive herds had a dynamic pattern...... in space. The global clustering analysis showed that M. bovis test-positive herds were spatially correlated in rounds one, three and four. These findings were supported to some extent by the local clustering analysis, which found significant high- and low-risk spatial clusters in rounds one and three...... in the north and south of the mainland. The clusters with a high risk of observing test-positive herds did not remain between sampling rounds, indicating that M. bovis did not tend to persist upon emergence in dairy herds. In contrast, the clusters with a low risk of observing test-positive herds persisted...

  3. Quality of bulk tank milk samples from Danish dairy herds based on real-time polymerase chain reaction identification of mastitis pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katholm, Jørgen; Bennedsgaard, T.W.; Koskinen, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    pathogens Klebsiella spp., Enterococcus spp., and Escherichia coli, low Ct values had a correlation with higher TBC. Staphylococcus spp. were found in the BTM from all herds, Strep. uberis in 95%, Staph. aureus in 91%, and Strep. dysgalactiae in 86%, whereas E. coli, Klebsiella, and Strep. agalactiae were...

  4. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LAMBERT, S.L.

    1999-02-23

    In April 1993, Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-102 was sampled to determine waste feed characteristics for the Hanford Grout Disposal Program. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics, expected bulk inventory, and concentration data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and information on the history of the tank. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding tank operational safety issues.

  5. Cow's milk and the emergence of group B streptococcal disease in newborn babies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A Q; Yeates, D G R; Marciano, A; Goldacre, M; Anthony, M

    2011-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS), the most significant cause of neonatal bacterial sepsis, is thought to have emerged in the 1960s. GBS also causes mastitis in cows, and there is indirect evidence that human GBS is derived from a bovine ancestor. A major change in the collection of milk from farms, using bulk tanks rather than churns, occurred in the 1960s. We sought to define the temporal relationship between this change in farming and the emergence of GBS neonatal disease. We searched PubMed for reports of GBS disease from 1930 until 1980 to more exactly determine the time of emergence of neonatal infection and supported this data with UK hospital admission statistics for GBS infections. We identified the dates of the change from churns to bulk tanks by searching the internet and books for information on the history of milk transportation, farming and milk collection in the UK. There are no PubMed reports of neonatal GBS disease between 1930 and 1950, and reports from the UK only emerged in the mid-1960s, confirming the notion that GBS neonatal infection was a newly emergent disease in the 1960s. No national data on hospital admissions are available around this time, but the Oxford Record Linkage Study, with admission data available for Oxford from 1968, showed no cases of neonatal disease until 1974. Cow's milk collection in the UK switched to bulk tank between 1960 and 1979, and publications relating to GBS disease emerged soon after. There is a temporal relationship between the emergence of neonatal GBS disease reports in the UK in the 1960s and a change in cow's milk collection. This finding may be a temporal coincidence or may add support to the notion that human GBS was historically derived from a bovine ancestor. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Evaluation of a microbiological indicator test for antibiotic detection in ewe and goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comunian, R; Paba, A; Dupré, I; Daga, E S; Scintu, M F

    2010-12-01

    Antibiotics are widely used for therapeutic and prophylactic purposes in dairy animals. The presence of residual antibiotics in milk could cause potentially serious problems in human health and have technological implication in the manufacturing of dairy products. The aim of this study was to evaluate Delvotest Accelerator (DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands), a new system for a fully automated microbial test to detect antibiotic residues in ewe and goat milk. Forty-three samples of raw, whole, refrigerated bulk-tank milk samples (22 of ewe milk and 21 of goat milk) were analyzed during the whole lactation period. Four concentrations of 4 antibiotics were diluted in milk: penicillin G at 1, 2, 3, and 4 μg/L; sulfadiazine at 25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/L; tetracycline at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μg/L; and gentamicin at 25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/L. The detection limit of the Delvotest Accelerator was calculated as the range of antibiotic concentrations within which 95% of positive result lie. The range of detection limit of penicillin G and sulfadiazine was easily detected by Delvotest Accelerator at or below the European Union maximum residue limits, both for ewe and goat milk samples. In contrast, the system showed a lower ability to detect tetracycline and gentamicin both for ewe and goat milk samples. Very low percentages of false-positive outcomes were obtained. Lactation phase did not seem to be a crucial factor affecting the ability of the Delvotest Accelerator to detect spiked milk samples. A higher detection ability was observed for goat milk samples compared with ewe milk samples. A negative correlation between the percentage of positive milk samples detected and milk fat, protein, and lactose contents was observed for gentamicin only. Copyright © 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Presence of Mycobacterium avium subs. paratuberculosis DNA in milk used to feed calves in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Célia; Botelho, Ana; Martins, Elisabete; Aguiar, Carla; Rebelo, Inês; Nunes, Telmo; Bexiga, Ricardo

    2017-05-01

    This Technical Research communication describes results of a study aimed at detecting the presence of Map in milk fed to calves, and identifying possible risk factors for that presence. A questionnaire was performed on 37 dairy farms and waste milk samples were collected on 3 occasions separated by a minimum of 1 week. For farms not feeding waste milk, bulk tank milk samples were collected instead. A real time PCR for the detection of the IS900 sequence was performed for the detection of Map. A majority of farms (89·2%) fed waste milk, with only one pasteurising the milk before feeding it to calves. Results of the PCR showed that 51·5% of the farms that were feeding waste milk had a positive result for Map on that milk. None of the studied risk factors were significantly associated with the presence of Map in milk samples, possibly due to the small number of farms entering the study. However, the prevalence of positive samples for Map on PCR was 3·5 times higher for farms that bought in animals from a single origin and 1·9 times higher for farms that bought from multiple farms, when compared with closed farms. Having a calving area for multiple cows also increased the risk of a positive Map result by 1·5 when compared with single pens. The risk of having a positive Map result on waste milk was 1·6 times higher for farms feeding that milk to male calves and 1·4 for farms feeding to both male and female calves, when compared with farms not feeding waste milk. This study highlights paratuberculosis as one of the potential risks of feeding waste milk to calves, and the need for mitigation strategies to be in place to avoid unnecessary disease transmission.

  8. Factors affecting insulin-like growth factor-I concentration in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, R J; Miller, M A; Hildebrandt, J R; Torkelson, A R; White, T C; Madsen, K S; Vicini, J L; Eppard, P J; Lanza, G M

    1991-09-01

    To establish the naturally occurring range of insulin-like growth factor-I concentrations in bovine milk, samples from individual cows (n = 409) managed on five Missouri dairy herds were assayed. Parity, stage of lactation, and farm affected milk insulin-like growth factor-I concentration. Milk insulin-like growth factor-I concentration was higher in early lactation than mid and late lactation with concentrations in multiparous cows exceeding those in primiparous cows. Insulin-like growth factor-I concentration was negatively correlated to milk production the day of sample collection (r = -.15) and not correlated to predicted 305-d milk yields. Unprocessed bulk tank milk samples (n = 100) from a commercial processing plant had a mean concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I in milk of 4.32 ng/ml with a range of 1.27 to 8.10 ng/ml. This distribution was similar to the range detected in samples from individual cows, but values were lower than those reported for human milk. Concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I in milk was not altered by pasteurization (at 79 degrees C for 45 s). However, insulin-like growth factor-I was undetectable in milk heated to temperatures (121 degrees C for 5 min) required for infant formula preparation or in commercially available infant formula. These data indicated that insulin-like growth factor-I is a normal but quantitatively variable component of bovine milk that is not destroyed by pasteurization but is undetectable in infant formula. Concentration of insulin-like growth factor-I in bovine milk is lower than concentrations reported for human milk yet similar to those reported for human saliva.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Associations between fasciolosis and milk production, and the impact of anthelmintic treatment in dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köstenberger, Kerstin; Tichy, Alexander; Bauer, Karl; Pless, Peter; Wittek, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Liver fluke is a ubiquitous parasite that causes extensive production losses in cattle and is a zoonosis. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of fasciolosis in 178 dairy cattle herds in Styria (federal state of Austria) and its influence on production, to detect the risk factors for infection, and to explore effective strategies in management and control. A questionnaire on farm management, prophylaxis, and therapy was developed and applied. Furthermore, production parameters (milk yield, milk protein content, butter fat content, non-return rate 90, calving to conception interval, service period) were recorded for 2014 and 2015, and a commercial ELISA for detection of Fasciola hepatica antibodies was applied in bulk tank milk in March 2014 and March 2015. Analysis of bulk tank milk samples showed a prevalence of 61.3% in 2014 and 45.5% in 2015. No associations could be found between F. hepatica exposure and farm structure or pasture management. Farms with highly positive (optical density ratio (ODR) ≥ 0.6 and lying above the upper interquartile range) antibody levels had a significantly lower annual milk yield of 438 kg per cow per year (p = 0.045), butterfat content of 0.091% (p = 0.004), and milk protein content of 0.046% (p = 0.024). However, fertility parameters were not significantly associated with liver fluke exposure. Anthelmintic treatment led to significantly lower antibody levels in the subsequent year (p = 0.042) and had a significant influence on protein content in milk (p = 0.003). This study highlighted the importance of fasciolosis in Austria and its influence on milk production and the need for veterinary advice regarding prophylactic measures to reduce economic losses.

  10. WWTP Process Tank Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jesper

    hydrofoil shaped propellers. These two sub-processes deliver the main part of the supplied energy to the activated sludge tank, and for this reason they are important for the mixing conditions in the tank. For other important processes occurring in the activated sludge tank, existing models and measurements...... zones in mind, its special construction poses strict demands to the hydrodynamic model. In case study three the model is extended to a three-phase model where also the injection of air bubbles during the aeration process is modeled. The aeration of sludge is controlled through a simple expression...... for the reoxygenation of the wastewater phase as a function of the local volume fraction of air and the concentration of soluble oxygen. A simple model for the bulk consumption of oxygen is linked to the reoxygenation expression in order to model measured oxygen concentrations in the suspension. In the final case study...

  11. Risk factors for milk off-flavours in dairy herds from Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounchili, A; Wichtel, J J; Dohoo, I R; Keefe, G P; Halliday, L J

    2004-07-16

    A sudden increase in the incidence of milk off-flavours in bulk tank milk from Prince Edward Island (Canada) dairy farms in the late 1990s prompted an investigation of potential herd-level risk factors. A prospective case-control study was conducted from 2000 to 2002. Data on herd management were obtained by questionnaire and field investigation from all the 62 identified off-flavour positive farms (cases) and 62 loosely matched (for data-collection convenience) off-flavour negative farms (controls). Forty-three of the 62 cases (69%) of milk off-flavours identified during the study period were classified as "transmitted" (feed) off-flavours, and 9 (15%), 6 (10%), and 4 (6%) as "rancid", "oxidized" and "malty" off-flavours, respectively. Given this evidence and the relatively low incidence of other flavour defects in milk, only transmitted-flavour cases were considered in the analyses of risk factors. Poor air quality in the lactating cows' barn (OR = 40.8), using baled silage as the main forage (OR = 10.6), as well as feeding roughage before milking (OR = 253.3) or as a free choice (OR = 3.2) all were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with the incidence of transmitted flavours in bulk-tank milk. Clipping the hair on the cows' udder (OR = 0.07) and changing the bedding material more than once a day (OR = 0.12) were protective. The finding about feeding baled silage before milking has raised hypotheses about silage composition (in particular the off-flavour compounds or their precursors) and also about the process of silage making itself.

  12. Short communication: Analytical method and amount of preservative added to milk samples may alter milk urea nitrogen measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Holley L; Hristov, Alexander N

    2017-02-01

    Milk urea N (MUN) is used by dairy nutritionists and producers to monitor dietary protein intake and is indicative of N utilization in lactating dairy cows. Two experiments were conducted to explore discrepancies in MUN results provided by 3 milk processing laboratories using different methods. An additional experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1, 3-diol (bronopol) on MUN analysis. In experiment 1, 10 replicates of bulk tank milk samples, collected from the Pennsylvania State University's Dairy Center over 5 consecutive days, were sent to 3 milk processing laboratories in Pennsylvania. Average MUN differed between laboratory A (14.9 ± 0.40 mg/dL; analyzed on MilkoScan 4000; Foss, Hillerød, Denmark), laboratory B (6.5 ± 0.17 mg/dL; MilkoScan FT + 6000), and laboratory C (7.4 ± 0.36 mg/dL; MilkoScan 6000). In experiment 2, milk samples were spiked with urea at 0 (7.3 to 15.0 mg/dL, depending on the laboratory analyzing the samples), 17.2, 34.2, and 51.5 mg/dL of milk. Two 35-mL samples from each urea level were sent to the 3 laboratories used in experiment 1. Average analyzed MUN was greater than predicted (calculated for each laboratory based on the control; 0 mg of added urea): for laboratory A (23.2 vs. 21.0 mg/dL), laboratory B (18.0 vs. 13.3 mg/dL), and laboratory C (20.6 vs. 15.2 mg/dL). In experiment 3, replicated milk samples were preserved with 0 to 1.35 mg of bronopol/mL of milk and submitted to one milk processing laboratory that analyzed MUN using 2 different methods. Milk samples with increasing amounts of bronopol ranged in MUN concentration from 7.7 to 11.9 mg/dL and from 9.0 to 9.3 mg/dL when analyzed on MilkoScan 4000 or CL 10 (EuroChem, Moscow, Russia), respectively. In conclusion, measured MUN concentrations varied due to analytical procedure used by milk processing laboratories and were affected by the amount of bronopol used to preserve milk sample, when milk was analyzed using a mid-infrared analyzer

  13. In-field evaluation of clinoptilolite feeding efficacy on the reduction of milk aflatoxin M1 concentration in dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis D. Katsoulos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite with high adsorption capacity for polar mycotoxins such as aflatoxins. The efficacy of clinoptilolite in ameliorating the toxic effects of aflatoxicosis has been proven in monogastric animals, but there is no such evidence for ruminants. The aim of this study was to evaluate, under field conditions, whether the dietary administration of clinoptilolite in dairy cows could reduce the concentration of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1 in bulk-tank milk, in farms with higher than or close to 0.05 μg/kg of milk (European maximum allowed residual level. An objective of the present study was also to investigate the effect of particle size of clinoptilolite on aflatoxin binding. Methods Fifteen commercial Greek dairy herds with AFM1 concentrations in bulk tank milk ≥0.05 μg/kg were selected. Bulk tank milk AFM1 was determined prior to the onset and on day 7 of the experiment. Clinoptilolite was added in the total mixed rations of all farms at the rate of 200 g per animal per day, throughout this period. Two different particle sizes of clinoptilolite were used; less than 0.15 mm in 9 farms (LC group and less than 0.8 mm in 6 farms (HC group. Results Clinoptilolite administration significantly reduced AFM1 concentrations in milk in all farms tested at an average rate of 56.2 % (SD: 15.11. The mean milk AFM1 concentration recorded on Day 7 was significantly (P < 0.001 lower compared to that of Day 0 (0.036 ± 0.0061 vs. 0.078 ± 0.0074 μg/kg. In LC group farms the reduction of milk AFM1 concentration was significantly higher than HC group farms (0.046 ± 0.0074 vs. 0.036 ± 0.0061 μg/kg, P = 0.002. As indicated by the Pearson correlation, there was a significant and strong linear correlation among the milk AFM1 concentrations on Days 0 and 7 (R = 0.95, P < 0.001. Conclusions Dietary administration of clinoptilolite, especially of smallest particle size, at the rate of

  14. In-field evaluation of clinoptilolite feeding efficacy on the reduction of milk aflatoxin M1 concentration in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsoulos, Panagiotis D; Karatzia, Maria A; Boscos, Constantinos; Wolf, Petra; Karatzias, Harilaos

    2016-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a natural zeolite with high adsorption capacity for polar mycotoxins such as aflatoxins. The efficacy of clinoptilolite in ameliorating the toxic effects of aflatoxicosis has been proven in monogastric animals, but there is no such evidence for ruminants. The aim of this study was to evaluate, under field conditions, whether the dietary administration of clinoptilolite in dairy cows could reduce the concentration of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) in bulk-tank milk, in farms with higher than or close to 0.05 μg/kg of milk (European maximum allowed residual level). An objective of the present study was also to investigate the effect of particle size of clinoptilolite on aflatoxin binding. Fifteen commercial Greek dairy herds with AFM1 concentrations in bulk tank milk ≥0.05 μg/kg were selected. Bulk tank milk AFM1 was determined prior to the onset and on day 7 of the experiment. Clinoptilolite was added in the total mixed rations of all farms at the rate of 200 g per animal per day, throughout this period. Two different particle sizes of clinoptilolite were used; less than 0.15 mm in 9 farms (LC group) and less than 0.8 mm in 6 farms (HC group). Clinoptilolite administration significantly reduced AFM1 concentrations in milk in all farms tested at an average rate of 56.2 % (SD: 15.11). The mean milk AFM1 concentration recorded on Day 7 was significantly (P farms the reduction of milk AFM1 concentration was significantly higher than HC group farms (0.046 ± 0.0074 vs. 0.036 ± 0.0061 μg/kg, P = 0.002). As indicated by the Pearson correlation, there was a significant and strong linear correlation among the milk AFM1 concentrations on Days 0 and 7 (R = 0.95, P < 0.001). Dietary administration of clinoptilolite, especially of smallest particle size, at the rate of 200 g per cow per day can effectively reduce milk AFM1 concentration in dairy cattle and can be used as a preventive measure for the amelioration of the risks associated

  15. The bacteriological quality of goat and ovine milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Bogdanovičová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study concentrates on information concerning the microbiological hazards that can be present in raw milk from animal species other than cows. A total of 54 (23 of ovine and 31 of goat bulk tank milk samples from 10 farms in the Czech Republic were collected in years 2013 - 2014. The sampling was done at regular time intervals during the whole year, with five to eight samples collected from each of the 10 dairy farms involved in the study. All milk samples were collected into sterile sampling bottles and transported in a cooler sampling case to the laboratory for immediate examination. Farms were randomly selected to cover the whole area of the Czech Republic. The prevalence and characteristic of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Listeria monocytogenes was studied. Raw cow's milk can be contaminated by E. coli intramammarily during clinical or subclinical mastitis and either directly through animal feces or indirectly during milk collection through farm employees or the milking equipment. E. coli was detected in 90.3% of the goat milk and 95.7% of the ovine milk samples. The genes encoding Shiga toxins 1 and 2- (stx1, stx2 were not detected and no STEC was identified. The Eae was the detected in 3 (4.6% isolates. S. aureus was detected in 9 (29.0% samples of goat milk and 8 (34.8% samples of ovine milk. A total 12 (57.1% enterotoxin positive S. aureus were obtained; 6 (28.6% were positive for the production of sec encoding enterotoxin SEC; in 4 (19.0% isolates the gene seh was detected; 2 (9.5% isolates were proven positive for seg (4.8% and combination seg and sei (4.8%. The presence of MRSA was not detected in the tested samples in our study. L. monocytogenes was detected in 1 (3.2% samples of goat milk and 1 (4.3% samples of ovine milk. The serotype (1/2a, 1/2b was detected in our study. Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. were not isolated from any of the samples. These results form

  16. Short communication: Antioxidant activity of calf milk replacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberon, M A; Liu, R H; Cherney, D J R

    2012-05-01

    A calf milk replacer (CMR) is designed to replace whole, saleable milk as a lower cost nutrient source for calves while striving to nourish a newborn calf, reduce calf mortality, strengthen immunity, and increase animal life span and productivity. Antioxidants (AO) can enhance immune defense by reducing oxidative damage, but CMR are traditionally not formulated for AO activity. The objective of this study was to compare total AO activities of bovine milk and 6 CMR (A to F) that vary in the amount and source of fat and protein. Calf milk replacers were donated by Milk Products LLC (Chilton, WI). Milk was obtained from the Cornell Dairy Research Farm bulk tank, representing milk produced within 24h by 455 cows. Milk replacers were mixed to 150 g/L with 40°C purified water. All samples were extracted in triplicate. Following hexane lipid extraction, both milk and CMR samples were extracted 5 times with ethyl acetate and then evaporated and reconstituted with 70% methanol:water. Samples were assessed for total AO activity using the peroxyl radical scavenging capacity assay where each sample was diluted to 5 descending concentrations, plated in triplicate. Ascorbic and gallic acids were standards for each plate. Type of protein (soy) had a positive effect on AO activity for CMR A, which exhibited the highest total AO activity. Natural bovine milk had the second highest AO activity. Many factors may explain the difference in AO activity between natural milk and formulated CMR, including fat, vitamin, and mineral contents, enzymatic AO, phenolics, flavonoids, fatty acid profile, and AA composition. When comparing AO activity of CMR, it is important to consider the diversity in feeding recommendations, which will alter the vitamin and mineral content, thus influencing AO activity. The opportunity exists to enhance AO activity of CMR to more closely mimic that of bovine milk. Future research is warranted to compare a broader range of CMR using methods that account for

  17. 7 CFR 58.250 - Dry whole milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dry whole milk. 58.250 Section 58.250 Agriculture... Products Bearing Usda Official Identification § 58.250 Dry whole milk. Dry whole milk in commercial bulk... Grades of Dry Whole Milk. Quality requirements for dry whole milk in consumer packages shall be for U.S...

  18. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxigenic strains in bovine raw milk by reversed passive latex agglutination and multiplex polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa Samy Mansour

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This review gives an outline of the assessment of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus tainting levels in raw milk from different sources in Egypt and characterization of enterotoxigenic strains utilizing a technique in light of PCR to identify genes coding for the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE. The obtained data were compared with results from the application of the reversed passive latex. Materials and Methods: Multiplex PCR and reversed passive latex agglutination (RPLA were used. A total of 141 samples of raw milk (cow's milk=33, buffalo's milk=58, and bulk tank milk=50 were investigated for S. aureus contamination and tested for enterotoxin genes presence and toxin production. Results: S. aureus was detected in 23 (16.3% samples phenotypically and genotypically by amplification of nuc gene. The S. aureus isolates were investigated for SEs genes (sea to see by multiplex PCR and the toxin production by these isolates was screened by RPLA. SEs genes were detected in six isolates (26.1% molecularly; see was the most observed gene where detected in all isolates, two isolates harbored seb, and two isolates harbored sec. According to RPLA, three isolates produced SEB and SEC. Conclusion: The study revealed the widespread of S. aureus strains caring genes coding for toxins. The real significance of the presence of these strains or its toxins in raw milk and their possible impact a potential hazard for staphylococcal food poisoning by raw milk consumption. Therefore, detection of enterotoxigenic S. aureus strains in raw milk is necessary for consumer safety.

  19. Prediction of fat globule particle size in homogenized milk using Fourier transform mid-infrared spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marzo, Larissa; Cree, Patrick; Barbano, David M

    2016-11-01

    Our objective was to develop partial least square models using data from Fourier transform mid-infrared (MIR) spectra to predict the particle size distributions d(0.5) and d(0.9), surface volume mean diameter D[3,2], and volume moment mean diameter D[4,3] of milk fat globules and validate the models. The goal of the study was to produce a method built into the MIR milk analyzer that could be used to warn the instrument operator that the homogenizer is near failure and needs to be replaced to ensure quality of results. Five homogenizers with different homogenization efficiency were used to homogenize pasteurized modified unhomogenized milks and farm raw bulk milks. Homogenized milks were collected from the homogenizer outlet and then run through an MIR milk analyzer without an in-line homogenizer to collect a MIR spectrum. A separate portion of each homogenized milk was analyzed with a laser light-scattering particle size analyzer to obtain reference values. The study was replicated 3 times with 3 independent sets of modified milks and bulk tank farm milks. Validation of the models was done with a set of 34 milks that were not used in the model development. Partial least square regression models were developed and validated for predicting the following milk fat globule particle size distribution parameters from MIR spectra: d(0.5) and d(0.9), surface volume mean diameter D[3,2], and volume moment mean diameter D[4,3]. The basis for the ability to model particle size distribution of milk fat emulsions was hypothesized to be the result of the partial least square modeling detecting absorbance shifts in MIR spectra of milk fat due to the Christiansen effect. The independent sample validation of particle size prediction methods found more variation in d(0.9) and D[4,3] predictions than the d(0.5) and D[3,2] predictions relative to laser light-scattering reference values, and this may be due to variation in particle size among different pump strokes. The accuracy of the

  20. Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in Hungary: screening of dairy cows, sheep, commercial milk samples, and ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyuranecz, Miklós; Dénes, Béla; Hornok, Sándor; Kovács, Péter; Horváth, Gábor; Jurkovich, Viktor; Varga, Tamás; Hajtós, István; Szabó, Réka; Magyar, Tibor; Vass, Nóra; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Erdélyi, Károly; Bhide, Mangesh; Dán, Ádám

    2012-08-01

    Q fever is an important zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. There are few reliable data about C. burnetii infection available. The aim of this study was to assess the importance and potential infectious sources of Q fever in Hungary. A total of 215 milk samples (10 individual samples from each herd and 1 bulk tank milk sample from each cattle herd), and 400 serum samples (20 from each herd) were tested from 15 dairy cattle herds and 5 sheep flocks located in different parts of Hungary. The study found 19.3% (58/300) and 38.0% (57/150) seropositivity in cattle, and 0% (0/100) and 6.0% (3/50) seropositivity in sheep, by complement fixation test (CFT) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. C. burnetii DNA was detected by IS1111 element-based TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 8.7% (13/150) of individual dairy cow milk samples, 4.0% (2/50) of individual sheep milk samples, and 66.7% (10/15) of dairy bulk tank milk samples. Samples taken from nine different commercially-available pasteurized cow milk products from different Hungarian producers were also tested for the presence of C. burnetii DNA, and eight of these samples were found to be positive (88.9%). The real-time PCR examination of 5402 ixodid ticks collected from different parts of the country yielded negative results. Knowledge of the true prevalence of Q fever is crucial for policymakers involved in evidence-based decision making.

  1. Interspecies and seasonal differences of retinol in dairy ruminant´s milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Hodulová

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Milk is an essential source of macronutrients and among lipophilic vitamins is significant source of retinol. The contribution of milk to the reference daily intake for retinol varies from 11% to 16%, worldwide. The most consumed dairy products are fresh, dehydrated and condensed milk in which the amonuts of retinol are not modified to those of in whole milk. Retinol is essential to ensure a good functionality of the immune system and plays a critical role in vision, reproduction, cell differentiation as well as growth and development and is found only in animal tissues. The aim of our study was to evaluate the interspecies differences in the retinol concentration of whole raw bovine, caprine and ovine milk and to observe seasonal variation of retinol in bulk tank milk samples. Samples of raw milk were colleceted on different farms in the Czech Republic between 2013 and 2014. Retinol was measured by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (325 nm in isocratic mode after alkaline saponification with methanolic potassium hydroxide solution and liquid-liquid extraction into non polar organic solvent of whole raw milk. To avoid vitamin losses or degradation during the procedure, antioxidants were added to the sample extraction media. Our results indicate significant interspecies differences between bovine and ovine milk and caprine and ovine milk. Concentration of retinol is very similar in bovine and caprine milk 0.96 ±0.11 mg/L, 0.94 ±0.25 mg/L, respectively. The mean concentration in sheep´s milk is 1.75 ±0.24 mg/L. The seasonal variation of retinol in raw bovine milk was detected as high significant, with the highest concentration during winter. These results contribute to the nutrition evaluation of milk in the Czech Republic and indicate, that the sheep´s milk is the best source of retinol among the milks of ruminants kept in the Czech Republic, however it is not used in its fluid form for human consumption.

  2. Brucella contamination in raw milk by polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khalili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human brucellosis is a significant public health problem in many middle east countries including Iran. Brucella organisms, which are small aerobic, facultative intracellular coccobacilli, localize in the reproductive organs of host animals, causing abortions and sterility. They are shed in large numbers in the animal’s urine, milk, placental fluid, and other fluids. Dairy product from raw milk are a potential threat to public health in endemic developing countries. The gold standard for the diagnosis of brucellosis is isolation of Brucella species. However, isolation Brucella species is time consuming and needed to level 3 biocontainment facilities and highly skilled technical personnel to handle samples and live bacteria for eventual identification. Handling Brucella species increase risk of laboratory infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR with high sensitivity and specifity overcomed to these disadvantages. The aim of this study was to detect Brucella species in milk from dairy cattle farms in Kerman province, Iran by PCR technique. Methods: Forty and eight bulk tank milk (BTM were collected from October 2015 to March 2016 from 48 dairy cattle farm including 4200 cows. DNA of milk samples extracted by lysis buffer and proteinase K method. All milk samples were examined by PCR to detect Brucella-specific DNA targeting IS 711. Positive samples must be showed 317 bp amplified, corresponding to the expected size of the IS 711 genome region in all Brucella species. Results: Using IS711 primer were detected in 4 samples (8.3% Brucella spp. from 48 BTM samples in this area. Conclusion: The results indicate that brucellosis by Brucella species is endemic in the Kerman province dairy farms. Consumption of raw milk dairy products by individual farmers operating under poor hygienic conditions represents an high risk to public health. The need for implementing control measures and raising public awareness on zoonotic transmission of

  3. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section 154.195 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its...

  4. SRS tank closure. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1999-08-01

    High-level waste (HLW) tank closure technology is designed to stabilize any remaining radionuclides and hazardous constituents left in a tank after bulk waste removal. Two Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW tanks were closed after cleansing and then filling each tank with three layers of grout. The first layer consists of a chemically reducing grout. The fill material has chemical properties that retard the movement of some radionuclides and chemical constituents. A layer of controlled low-strength material (CLSM), a self-leveling fill material, is placed on top of the reducing grout. CLSM provides sufficient strength to support the overbearing weight. The final layer is a free-flowing, strong grout similar to normal concrete. After the main tank cavity is filled, risers are filled with grout, and all waste transfer piping connected to the tank is isolated. The tank ventilation system is dismantled, and the remaining systems are isolated. Equipment that remains with the tank is filled with grout. The tank and ancillary systems are left in a state requiring only limited surveillance. Administrative procedures are in place to control land use and access. DOE eventually plans to remove all of its HLW storage tanks from service. These tanks are located at SRS, Hanford, and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Low-activity waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge Reservation are also scheduled for closure.

  5. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  6. The effect of patent Dictyocaulus viviparus (re)infections on individual milk yield and milk quality in pastured dairy cows and correlation with clinical signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Katharina; Brügemann, Kerstin; König, Sven; Strube, Christina

    2018-01-08

    Infections with the bovine lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus might lead to reduced milk production and detrimental impacts on milk quality resulting in considerable economic losses in dairy farming. In the presented field study, 1988 faecal samples were collected from 1166 Black and White dairy cows allocated in 17 small and medium-sized German grassland farms. Faecal samples were collected in summer and autumn 2015 to assess D. viviparus larvae excretion. Test-day records were used to estimate the association between patent D. viviparus infections in individual cows and the milk production parameters milk yield, milk protein and milk fat content by using linear mixed models. Bulk tank milk (BTM) samples from each farm and individual milk samples from those cows which were excreting larvae in summer were collected in autumn. In addition, occurrence of the clinical symptom "coughing" was noted in individual cows during autumn sampling to determine its association with patent lungworm infections. Patent D. viviparus infections were found on 23.5% (4/17) of farms with a prevalence at the individual cow level of 0.9% (9/960) in summer and 3.4% (35/1028) in autumn. No BTM sample exceeded the BTM ELISA cut-off value of 0.410 optical density ratio (ODR), the mean value was 0.168 ODR. Only one individual milk sample exceeded the individual milk ELISA cut-off value of 0.573 ODR (mean value of 0.302 ODR). A patent D. viviparus infection status was associated with a lower average daily milk yield of 1.62 kg/cow/day (P = 0.0406). No significant association was found with milk protein or fat content representing milk quality parameters. Coughing was observed in 5.9% (61/1028) of cows. Of the coughing cows, only 4.9% (3/61) had a patent lungworm infection. Fisher's exact test showed no significant difference between infected and non-infected coughing cows. Farmers and veterinarians should be aware that patent lungworm (re)infections in dairy cows reduce milk yield, despite

  7. Robotic milking and milk quality: effects on the cheese-making properties of milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Pirlo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Robotic milking systems (RMS modify dairy herd management and therefore some aspects of production. The mainresults from scientific literature on RMS and cheese-making properties have been reported. The decrease in fat content,as a consequence of the increased milking frequency, is generally confirmed. The lack of specific studies on creamingproperties of milk from robotic milking experiences and with different milking frequencies has been highlighted.Indications on clotting features were obtained with a different milking frequency in a traditional milking parlour; theseresults showed an improvement in the casein index of milk from three daily milkings. A reduction of casein exposure tothe plasminogen-plasmin complex activity in the mammary gland between two consecutive milkings seems to explainthis result. The effect of RMS on milk quality for cheese-making purposes was first evaluated in a two-year monitoringstudy in a herd representative of Po Valley dairy farms. Preliminary results from laboratory tests on bulk milk samplesindicate that milk from RMS seems suitable for cheese-making processes.

  8. Safety evaluation for packaging transport of LSA-II liquids in MC-312 cargo tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlstrom, R.F.

    1996-09-11

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes the onsite transfer of bulk LSA-II radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory Cargo Tank and Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility Cargo Tanks (which are U.S. Department of Transportation MC-312 specification cargo tanks) from their operating facilities to tank farm facilities.

  9. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  10. Evaluation of the MilkoScan FT 6000 milk analyzer for determining the freezing point of goat's milk under different analytical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, A; Sierra, D; Luengo, C; Corrales, J C; de la Fe, C; Morales, C T; Contreras, A; Gonzalo, C

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the Milko-Scan FT 6000 (Foss Electric, Hillerød, Denmark) for determining the freezing point (FP) of goat's milk under different analytical conditions. The FP was determined in duplicate in 1,800 milk aliquots obtained from 45 bulk tank milk samples from 10 Murciano-Granadina goat herds, using the MilkoScan method and a reference thermistor cryoscopy method (Advanced Instrument Inc., Norwood, MA). Five different preservation strategies--no preservative, preservation with azidiol (0.006 or 0.018 g of sodium azide/100 mL), and preservation with bronopol (0.020 or 0.040 g/100 mL)--were then used to preserve the milk. For each preservation strategy, 8 different amounts of water were added (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7% total volume). The results obtained with each method under these 40 analytical conditions were examined by comparison of means, comparison of the standard deviations of repeatability (s(r) and its relative value s(r)%), and a regression analysis. Under most analytical conditions, the FP was recorded as lower by the MilkoScan method, with a mean difference of 1.5 m degrees C compared with the reference method. Both methods showed similar repeatabilities (the overall s(r)% was 0.22% for the MilkoScan method and 0.20% for the reference method). In comparisons of the 2 methods, the highest regression coefficients were obtained with aliquots containing >3% added water. The best regression coefficients (0.85 to 1.02) were obtained for milk samples preserved with bronopol at 0.020 g/100 mL. These results allow the MilkoScan method to be used with goat's milk for screening purposes. The factors of added water, preservative, analytical method, lactose concentration, and the effect of the bulk tank milk sample within each lactose group contributed significantly to the observed variation in FP. For practical purposes, either of the bronopol concentrations could be used when determining the FP of goat's milk with the methods

  11. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  12. Monitoring the Freezing Point of Buffalo Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Pesce, Antonella; Salzano, Caterina; De Felice, Anna; Garofalo, Francesca; Liguori, Salvatore; De Santo, Annunziata; Palermo, Pierpaolo; Guarino, Achille

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic freezing point of buffalo milk. Bulk milk samples were collected from buffalo and cattle farms in Caserta area from 2008 to 2014. The analysis involved a total of 1886 buffalo milk samples and 1711 bovine milk samples. These were also tested for fat, protein and lactose contents by means of infrared spectrometry. The freezing point was determined by means of a thermistor cryoscope. Data underwent statistical analysis. Our research showed an aver...

  13. Milk Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to cow's milk are also allergic to soy milk. Food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) A food ... formulas are based on soy protein instead of milk. Soy formulas are fortified to be nutritionally complete — but, ...

  14. Milk Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Milk Allergy KidsHealth > For Teens > Milk Allergy Print A A ... to find out. What Happens With a Milk Allergy? Food allergies involve the body's immune system, which ...

  15. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  16. Fluid slosh dynamics of surface tension tanks in three axis stabilized spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beig, H. G.; Hornung, E.

    A method for investigating propellant-tank interaction, satellite-tank interaction, and dynamic behavior of propellant in the tank is summarized. Sloshing with small and large amplitudes, and movement in bulks are considered. The ERNO MAUS tank experiment (EMTE) is described. The EMTE is a spaceborne experiment to study the dynamic behavior, orientation, and stability of liquids in tanks in reduced gravity. The sinusoidal excitation setup, and measurement and observation systems are outlined. Integration in a TEXUS rocket is illustrated.

  17. 46 CFR 151.13-5 - Cargo segregation-tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo segregation-tanks. 151.13-5 Section 151.13-5... CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Cargo Segregation § 151.13-5 Cargo segregation—tanks. (a... and list the various degrees of segregation required. Paragraphs and (2) of this section explain the...

  18. 27 CFR 24.168 - Identification of tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Construction and Equipment § 24.168 Identification of tanks. (a) General. Each tank, barrel, puncheon, or similar bulk container, used to ferment wine or used to process or store wine, spirits, or wine making materials will have the contents marked and will be marked as...

  19. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  20. 33 CFR 157.10 - Segregated ballast tanks and crude oil washing systems for certain new vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Design, Equipment, and Installation... necessary to obtain full immersion of the propeller. (d) Segregated ballast tanks required in paragraph (b...

  1. Monitoring the Freezing Point of Buffalo Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Antonella; Salzano, Caterina; De Felice, Anna; Garofalo, Francesca; Liguori, Salvatore; De Santo, Annunziata; Palermo, Pierpaolo; Guarino, Achille

    2016-04-19

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the basic freezing point of buffalo milk. Bulk milk samples were collected from buffalo and cattle farms in Caserta area from 2008 to 2014. The analysis involved a total of 1886 buffalo milk samples and 1711 bovine milk samples. These were also tested for fat, protein and lactose contents by means of infrared spectrometry. The freezing point was determined by means of a thermistor cryoscope. Data underwent statistical analysis. Our research showed an average freezing point of -0.528°C for buffalo milk and -0.522°C for bovine milk. Given the lack of data on the freezing point of buffalo milk, our study provides the first indication of a basic freezing point of the milk of this species in Italy.

  2. Udder Health in Organic Dairy Herds in the US with a Strategy of Non-use of Antimicrobial Drugs - Evaluated on the basis of systematic clinical examinations, test day results, bulk tank milk samples, treatment protocols and interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Solgaard, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    Mastitis is often considered the most common production disease in organic and conventional dairy herds and most antibiotic treatnments in cattle are due to mastitis. Moreover, mastitis is of great importance for animal welfare. One of the main goals in organic livestock farmin is the promotion of health and welfare. Use of antimicrobial drugs to treat sick animals are considered to be in controversy with th organic aims of a production based on naturalness and the risk of antimicrobial r...

  3. RECENT PROGRESS IN DOE WASTE TANK CLOSURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C

    2008-02-01

    The USDOE complex currently has over 330 underground storage tanks that have been used to process and store radioactive waste generated from the production of weapons materials. These tanks contain over 380 million liters of high-level and low-level radioactive waste. The waste consists of radioactively contaminated sludge, supernate, salt cake or calcine. Most of the waste exists at four USDOE locations, the Hanford Site, the Savannah River Site, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center and the West Valley Demonstration Project. A summary of the DOE tank closure activities was first issued in 2001. Since then, regulatory changes have taken place that affect some of the sites and considerable progress has been made in closing tanks. This paper presents an overview of the current regulatory changes and drivers and a summary of the progress in tank closures at the various sites over the intervening six years. A number of areas are addressed including closure strategies, characterization of bulk waste and residual heel material, waste removal technologies for bulk waste, heel residuals and annuli, tank fill materials, closure system modeling and performance assessment programs, lessons learned, and external reviews.

  4. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-10-14

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft{sup 3} of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  5. Energy Efficient Solar Milk Chiller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneeb Bin Muzzamal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Life stock is the major sector of agriculture which is of great importance for Pakistan. It has a major contribution towards the economy of Pakistan with a 55.9 participation in agriculture sector. Pakistan is fourth largest country in milk production with 50.9 Billion tons per annum out of which only 5 is processed and pasteurized hardly and remaining milk is handled by milk men under non-hygienic conditions which causes milk borne diseases. Milk is perishable food having shelf life of few hours therefore milk processing is done to deactivate the microorganisms in the milk and increase its shelf life for future use. It is an energy intensive process and mostly conventional form of energy is used for this purpose. Solar power is the sustainable source of energy and there is an average solar global radiation of 5.3kWhm2day persist in the country with more than 300 sunny days in a year. The objective of the study was to design and develop a solar assisted milk pasteurizer and to evaluate its performance. The developed solar assisted milk pasteurizer consisted of heating and cooling unit. Heating unit made of shell and tube type coil to heat up the milk up-to 730C for 15 seconds. Cooling unit has a chiller for sudden cool down the milk from 350C to 40C within 2 hours. Solar milk chiller had capacity of 200 liters chiller semicircular pug mill type SS-304 a 2kWp PV system having eight PV modules each of 250Wp a hybrid inverter 3kVA that convert 24V DC current into 220V AC current and two batteries 150Ah each as a backup source to meet weather fluctuations. One ton of vapor compression refrigeration system was filled with R410a refrigerant with inlet pressure of 118psi and the outlet pressure of 300psi was coupled with the chiller through coils at bottom side of the vessel. An agitator was installed with a lid on the tank to stir the milk continuously inside the chiller to make sure that homogeneous milk cooling to avoid freezing of the milk in the

  6. Fate of ivermectin residues in ewes' milk and derived products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerkvenik, V.; Perko, B.; Rogelj, I.; Doganoc, D.Z.; Skubic, V.; Beek, W.M.J.; Keukens, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    The fate of ivermectin (IVM) residues was studied throughout the processing of daily bulk milk from 30 ewes (taken up to 33 d following subcutaneous administration of 0·2 mg IVM/kg b.w.) in the following milk products: yoghurt made from raw and pasteurized milk; cheese after pressing; 30- and 60-day

  7. Milk Thistle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Milk Thistle Share: On This Page Background How Much ... Foster This fact sheet provides basic information about milk thistle—common names, usefulness and safety, and resources ...

  8. Milk removal

    OpenAIRE

    Ferneborg, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Milk from dairy cows is a staple dietary component for humans all over the world. Regardless of whether milk is consumed in its purest, unaltered form or as high-end products such as fine cheese or ice cream, it needs to be of high quality when taken from the cow, produced at a low price and produced in a system that consider aspects such as animal health, animal welfare and sustainability. This thesis investigated the role of milk removal and the importance of residual milk on milk yield...

  9. Tank characterization report: Tank 241-C-109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borshiem, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Single-shell tank 241-C-109 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in September 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-109 were conducted to support the resolution of the ferrocyanide unreviewed safety question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and consent Order (Tri- Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. This report describes this analysis.

  10. [Milk fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M

    1989-05-01

    Infectious complications following delivery were, in the past, attributed to "milk fever": these were milk congestion, milk deposits, rancid milk, etc., that were held responsible. The milk was reabsorbed into the blood of the patient and settled in the peritoneum ("milk peritonitis"), in the broad ligaments (pelvic abscess), in the thighs (phlebitis) and also in the breasts (breast abscess). This belief, originated by Aristotle, was accepted by excellent authors like Andre Levret (1703-1780), one of the most famous French obstetricians and Nicolas Puzos, at the same time. More recently, authors alluded to it and blamed "milk fever" for being at the origin of dramatic pictures which they described in their novels, like Victor Hugo and Guy de Maupassant, for instance.

  11. Colostrum and milk pasteurization improve health status and decrease mortality in neonatal calves receiving appropriate colostrum ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, Ramon; Fraile, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate if on-farm heat treatment of colostrum and bulk tank milk can improve calf health status and morbidity and mortality rates during the first 21d of life in neonatal Holstein calves receiving appropriate colostrum ingestion. A total of 587 calves were randomly assigned to 2 groups of males and females over 18mo. The nonpasteurized group (n=287, 143 males and 144 females) was fed frozen (-20°C) colostrum (6-8L during the first 12h of life) that was previously reheated up to 40°C. They were also fed refrigerated (4°C) raw milk from the bulk tank that was also reheated up to 40°C (1.8L every 12h). The pasteurized group (n=300, 150 males and 150 females) was also fed colostrum and milk, but both were pasteurized before freezing. Blood samples were drawn from all calves to obtain serum at 2 to 5d of life. Serum total protein (g/dL) was determined using a commercially available refractometer. Colostrum and milk underwent routine bacteriological analysis to determine total plate counts (cfu/mL) and total coliform counts (cfu/mL). All the calves underwent clinical examination every 24h during the first 21d of life. Every day, calves were clinically diagnosed either as being healthy or suffering from respiratory disease, neonatal calf diarrhea, or suffering other diseases. On-farm heat treatment for colostrum and milk reduced total plate counts and total coliform counts between 1 and 2 log10. Pasteurization of colostrum and milk significantly decreased the morbidity and mortality (5.2 and 2.8%) in comparison with calves receiving nonpasteurized colostrum and milk (15.0 and 6.5%), respectively, during the first 21d of life, even in animals receiving appropriate colostrum ingestion. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-S-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiCenso, A.T.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-29

    In July and August 1992, Single-Shell Tank 241-S-104 was sampled as part of the overall characterization effort directed by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Sampling was also performed to determine proper handling of the waste, to address corrosivity and compatibility issues, and to comply with requirements of the Washington Administrative Code. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics. It also presents expected concentration and bulk inventory data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and background historical and surveillance tank information. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding operational safety. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics the waste in Single-Shell Tank 241-S-104 (hereafter, Tank 241-S-104) based on information obtained from a variety of sources. This report summarizes the available information regarding the chemical and physical properties of the waste in Tank 241-S-104, and using the historical information to place the analytical data in context, arranges this information in a format useful for making management and technical decisions concerning waste tank safety and disposal issues. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are presented based on safety issues and further characterization needs.

  13. Cow's milk and goat's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turck, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Cow's milk is increasingly suggested to play a role in the development of chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders whereas goat's milk is advocated as having several health benefits. Cow's milk is a rich and cheap source of protein and calcium, and a valuable food for bone health. Despite their high content in saturated fats, consumption of full-fat dairy products does not seem to cause significant changes in cardiovascular disease risk variables. Early introduction of cow's milk is a strong negative determinant of iron status. Unmodified cow's milk does not meet nutritional requirements of infants although it is acceptable to add small volumes of cow's milk to complementary foods. Cow's milk protein allergy has a prevalence ranging from 2 to 7%, and the age of recovery is usually around 2-3 years. The evidence linking cow's milk intake to a later risk of type 1 diabetes or chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders (obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension) is not convincing. Milk probably protects against colorectal cancer, diets high in calcium are a probable cause of prostate cancer, and there is limited evidence suggesting that high consumption of milk and dairy products increases the risk for prostate cancer. There is no evidence to support the use of a cow's milk-free diet as a primary treatment for individuals with autistic spectrum disorders. Unmodified goat's milk is not suitable for infants because of the high protein and minerals content and of a low folate content. Goat's milk has no clear nutritional advantage over cow's milk and is not less allergenic. The European Food Safety Authority recently stated that proteins from goat's milk can be suitable as a protein source for infant and follow-on formula, provided the final product complies with the compositional criteria laid down in Directive 2006/141/EC. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    The emergence of more think tanks in recent decades has spawned some interest in how they function and impact policy-making in the European Union and its member states. So far however few empirical studies of think tanks have been carried out and think tanks have mainly been studied in their nati......The emergence of more think tanks in recent decades has spawned some interest in how they function and impact policy-making in the European Union and its member states. So far however few empirical studies of think tanks have been carried out and think tanks have mainly been studied...

  15. Comparison of culture and a multiplex probe PCR for identifying Mycoplasma species in bovine milk, semen and swab samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alysia M Parker

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma spp. are a major cause of mastitis, arthritis and pneumonia in cattle, and have been associated with reproductive disorders in cows. While culture is the traditional method of identification the use of PCR has become more common. Several investigators have developed PCR protocols to detect M. bovis in milk, yet few studies have evaluated other sample types or other important Mycoplasma species. Therefore the objective of this study was to develop a multiplex PCR assay to detect M. bovis, M. californicum and M. bovigenitalium, and evaluate its analytical performance against traditional culture of bovine milk, semen and swab samples. The PCR specificity was determined and the limit of detection evaluated in spiked milk, semen and swabs. The PCR was then compared to culture on 474 field samples from individual milk, bulk tank milk (BTM, semen and swab (vaginal, preputial, nose and eye samples. Specificity analysis produced appropriate amplification for all M. bovis, M. californicum and M. bovigenitalium isolates. Amplification was not seen for any of the other Mollicutes or eubacterial isolates. The limit of detection of the PCR was best in milk, followed by semen and swabs. When all three Mycoplasma species were present in a sample, the limit of detection increased. When comparing culture and PCR, overall there was no significant difference in the proportion of culture and PCR positive samples. Culture could detect significantly more positive swab samples. No significant differences were identified for semen, individual milk or BTM samples. PCR identified five samples with two species present. Culture followed by 16S-23S rRNA sequencing did not enable identification of more than one species. Therefore, the superior method for identification of M. bovis, M. californicum and M. bovigenitalium may be dependent on the sample type being analysed, and whether the identification of multiple target species is required.

  16. Camel milk and milk products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Brezovečki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Camel milk and camel milk products have always been highly esteemed playing even today an important role in the diet of the population in the rural areas of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, with scarce agricultural areas, high temperatures and small amount of precipitation. In aggravated environmental circumstances, camels may produce more milk than any other species, while their demand for food is very modest. A camel produces between 1000 and 2000 L of milk during the lactation period of 8 to 18 months, while the daily production of milk is between 3 and 10 L. The goal of the overview is to present the chemical composition of camel milk, and products made from camel milk. On average camel milk contains 81.4-87 % water, 10.4 % dry matter, 1.2-6.4 % milk fat, 2.15-4.90 % protein, 1.63-2.76 % casein, 0.65-0.80 % whey protein, 2.90-5.80 % lactose and 0.60-0.90 % ash. Variations in the contents of camel milk may be attributed to several factors such as analytical methods, geographical area, nutrition conditions, breed, lactation stage, age and number of calvings. Camel milk is becoming an increasingly interesting product in the world, not only for its good nutritive properties, but also for its interesting and tasteful products.

  17. Variation in milk protein composition and its importance for the quality of cheese milk

    OpenAIRE

    Wedholm, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Variations within the bovine milk protein profile can have both positive and negative impacts on the quality of cheese milk. As main contributors to the cheese structure, the caseins are important for the cheese yield. During the last decades, the proportion of casein in relation to the total protein amount (the casein number) has decreased in Swedish bulk milk. This decline is unexplained and the reason for this deteriorating trend is unknown. Therefore, more knowledge in how the protein com...

  18. Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-02-06

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ``A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information``. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters.

  19. Genetic characterization of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from ewes' milk, sheep farm environments, and humans by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Verónica; Rodríguez-Calleja, José-María; Otero, Andrés; García-López, María-Luisa; Santos, Jesús A

    2013-10-01

    A collection of 81 isolates of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) was obtained from samples of bulk tank sheep milk (62 isolates), ovine feces (4 isolates), sheep farm environment (water, 4 isolates; air, 1 isolate), and human stool samples (9 isolates). The strains were considered atypical EPEC organisms, carrying the eae gene without harboring the pEAF plasmid. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was carried out with seven housekeeping genes and 19 sequence types (ST) were detected, with none of them having been previously reported for atypical EPEC. The most frequent ST included 41 strains isolated from milk and human stool samples. Genetic typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) resulted in 57 patterns which grouped in 24 clusters. Comparison of strains isolated from the different samples showed phylogenetic relationships between milk and human isolates and also between milk and water isolates. The results obtained show a possible risk for humans due to the presence of atypical EPEC in ewes' milk and suggest a transmission route for this emerging pathogen through contaminated water.

  20. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  1. BACILLUS CEREUS: ISOLATION IN JENNET MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Scatassa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Jennet milk as human food is hypoallergenic for patients affected by Cow Milk Protein Allergy and multiple food allergies. For these pathologies, jennet milk represents the best alternative to other types of milk. Therefore, jennet milk consumers are very sensible to the effects of pathogens' contaminations, and several hygienic practices during the milk production need to be adopted. During regular monitoring in one Sicilian jennet farm, Bacillus cereus in the milk was detected. In 3 bulk milk samples (maximum concentration: 1.2 x 103 ufc/ml, in 3 individual milk samples (10, 20 e 60 ufc/ml, in the milk filter (5 ufc/cm2, in the soil (maximum concentration: 1.5 x 103 ufc/g, on the hands and the gloves of two milkers, on the animal hide (from 1 to 3 ufc/cm2. No spores were detected. A total of 8 Bacillus cereus s.s. strains were analyzed for diarrhoic toxin, and 6 strains producing enterotoxins resulted. The improvement of environmental and milking hygienic conditions reduced Bacillus cereus concentration.

  2. Detection and enumeration of four foodborne pathogens in raw commingled silo milk in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Emily E; Erten, Edibe S; Maddi, Neeraj; Graham, Thomas E; Larkin, John W; Blodgett, Robert J; Schlesser, Joseph E; Reddy, Ravinder M

    2012-08-01

    A nationwide survey was conducted to obtain qualitative and quantitative data on bacterial contamination of raw commingled silo milk intended for pasteurization. The levels of total aerobic bacteria, total coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus were determined using the TEMPO system. The prevalence rates and levels of presumptive Bacillus cereus, E. coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella spp. were determined in 214 samples. B. cereus was detected in 8.91% of samples, at 3.0 to 93 CFU/ml. E. coli O157:H7 was detected in 3.79 to 9.05% of samples, at detected in 50.00% of samples, at detected with the TEMPO system and the presence or levels of any pathogen except E. coli O157:H7. A higher average log-transformed count of total viable bacteria was observed in samples positive for this organism. The high prevalence rates of target pathogens may be attributed to a variety of factors, including detection methods, sample size, and commingling of the milk in the silo. The effects of commingling likely contributed to the high prevalence rates and low levels of target pathogens because of the inclusion of milk from multiple bulk tanks. The high prevalence rates also may be the result of analysis of larger sample volumes using more sensitive detection methods. These quantitative data could be utilized to perform more accurate risk assessments and to better estimate the appropriate level of protection for dairy products and processing technologies.

  3. 33 CFR Appendix A to Part 157 - Damage Assumptions, Hypothetical Outflows, and Cargo Tank Size and Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Outflows, and Cargo Tank Size and Arrangements A Appendix A to Part 157 Navigation and Navigable Waters... MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Pt. 157, App. A Appendix A to Part 157... from tank vessels, three dimensions of the extent of damage of a parallelepiped on the side and bottom...

  4. Designer milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabikhi, Latha

    2007-01-01

    Dairy biotechnology is fast gaining ground in the area of altering milk composition for processing and/or animal and human health by employing nutritional and genetic approaches. Modification of the primary structure of casein, alteration in the lipid profile, increased protein recovery, milk containing nutraceuticals, and replacement for infant formula offer several advantages in the area of processing. Less fat in milk, altered fatty acid profiles to include more healthy fatty acids such as CLA and omega-fats, improved amino acid profiles, more protein, less lactose, and absence of beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) are some opportunities of "designing" milk for human health benefits. Transgenic technology has also produced farm animals that secrete in their milk, human lactoferrin, lysozyme, and lipase so as to simulate human milk in terms of quality and quantity of these elements that are protective to infants. Cow milk allergenicity in children could be reduced by eliminating the beta-LG gene from bovines. Animals that produce milk containing therapeutic agents such as insulin, plasma proteins, drugs, and vaccines for human health have been genetically engineered. In order to cater to animal health, transgenic animals that express in their mammary glands, various components that work against mastitis have been generated. The ultimate acceptability of the "designer" products will depend on ethical issues such as animal welfare and safety, besides better health benefits and increased profitability of products manufactured by the novel techniques.

  5. Tracking sources of microbiologic contamination of raw milk during milking process in dairy farms from Agreste of Pernambuco/ Rastreamento de fontes da contaminação microbiológica do leite cru durante a ordenha em propriedades leiteiras do Agreste Pernambucano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Camelo Travassos de Arruda

    Full Text Available The procedures employed in milking process are determinant for obtaining milk with good microbiological quality. The study of contaminant microorganisms permits the identification of its source, what allows the adoption of control measures that will conform to the standards established by legislation. The aim of this work was to determine main points of milk microbiological contamination during milking process. For that mesophilic aerobes (MA, psychrotrophics (PS, coagulase positive Staphylococci (CPE, total coliforms (TC and Escherichia coli (EC were quantified in different steps of milking in six dairy farms and one communitarian bulk tank on Agreste region of Pernambuco, between august and september of 2005. Poor microbiological milk quality was indicated by the high counts of the groups of microorganisms studied. The average counts of microorganisms in milk samples from the dairy farms were 8,3 x 106 (MA, 2,6 x 107 (PS, 1,3 x 104 (CPE, 2,5 x 105 (TC and 3,7 x 103 (EC. In the milk collected from the communitarian bulk tank counts were 6,1 x 107 (MA, 3,4 x 107 (PS, 6,5 x 104 (CPE, > 1,5 x 104 (TC and 2,0 x 103 (EC.Most contaminated points found were residual water of cans, the bottom of cans, bulk tank, teats, first three jets of milk, teatcups, bucket and milker’s hands, and the main cause of milk contamination is improper employ or the absence of good hygiene practices during milking process.Os procedimentos empregados na ordenha são determinantes para a obtenção de leite de boa qualidade microbiológica. O estudo dos grupos de microrganismos contaminantes permite identificar sua origem, o que possibilita a adoção de medidas de controle de forma a atender os padrões estabelecidos pela legislação. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar os principais pontos de contaminação microbiológica do leite durante a ordenha. Para isso foram enumerados microrganismos aeróbios mesófilos (AM, psicrotróficos (PS, Estafilococos coagulase

  6. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from the...

  7. Tank SY-102 remediation project: Flowsheet and conceptual design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, S.L.; Punjak, W.A.; Schreiber, S.B.; Dunn, S.L.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Pope, N.G.; Agnew, S.; Birnbaum, E.R.; Thomas, K.W.; Ortic, E.A.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to safely manage and dispose of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks on the Hanford Site. A major program in TWRS is pretreatment which was established to process the waste prior to disposal. Pretreatment is needed to resolve tank safety issues and to separate wastes into high-level and low-level fractions for subsequent immobilization and disposal. There is a fixed inventory of actinides and fission products in the tank which must be prepared for disposal. By segregating the actinides and fission products from the bulk of the waste, the tank`s contents can be effectively managed. Due to the high public visibility and environmental sensitivity of this problem, real progress and demonstrated efforts toward addressing it must begin as soon as possible. As a part of this program, personnel at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) have developed and demonstrated a flowsheet to remediate tank SY-102 which is located in the 200 West Area and contains high-level radioactive waste. This report documents the results of the flowsheet demonstrations performed with simulated, but radioactive, wastes using an existing glovebox line at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The tank waste was characterized using both a tank history approach and an exhaustive evaluation of the available core sample analyses. This report also presents a conceptual design complete with a working material flow model, a major equipment list, and cost estimates.

  8. Think tanks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete

    2016-01-01

    outside the media. The study shows that the two largest and oldest think tanks in Denmark, the liberal think tank CEPOS and the social democratic think tank ECLM, are very active and observable in the media; that the media’s distribution of attention to these think tanks, to some extent, confirms a re......-politicization of Danish newspapers; but also that the news media as an arena of influence is only one part of the equation, since some of the corporatist political networks are still intact and working outside the media...... half of the 2010s, because in this national setting think tanks are still a relatively new phenomenon. Based on theories of mediatization and de-corporatization, we present 1) an analysis of the visibility of selected Danish think tanks in the media and 2) an analysis of their political networks...

  9. Sensitive and specific detection of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in raw milk by the peptide-mediated magnetic separation-phage assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foddai, A C G; Grant, I R

    2017-05-01

    To validate an optimized peptide-mediated magnetic separation (PMS)-phage assay for detection of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in milk. Inclusivity, specificity and limit of detection 50% (LOD50 ) of the optimized PMS-phage assay were assessed. Plaques were obtained for all 43 MAP strains tested. Of 12 other Mycobacterium sp. tested, only Mycobacterium bovis BCG produced small numbers of plaques. LOD50 of the PMS-phage assay was 0·93 MAP cells per 50 ml milk, which was better than both PMS-qPCR and PMS-culture. When individual milks (n = 146) and bulk tank milk (BTM, n = 22) obtained from Johne's affected herds were tested by the PMS-phage assay, viable MAP were detected in 31 (21·2%) of 146 individual milks and 13 (59·1%) of 22 BTM, with MAP numbers detected ranging from 6-948 plaque-forming-units per 50 ml milk. PMS-qPCR and PMS-MGIT culture proved to be less sensitive tests than the PMS-phage assay. The optimized PMS-phage assay is the most sensitive and specific method available for the detection of viable MAP in milk. Further work is needed to streamline the PMS-phage assay, because the assay's multistep format currently makes it unsuitable for adoption by the dairy industry as a screening test. The inclusivity (ability to detect all MAP strains), specificity (ability to detect only MAP) and detection sensitivity (ability to detect low numbers of MAP) of the optimized PMS-phage assay have been comprehensively demonstrated for the first time. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. The impact of changes in the milk payment system and season on the hygienic quality of milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat PAŠIĆ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this paper were to investigate the impact of changes in the milk payment system and the season on the hygienic quality of raw milk. The bulk cow’s milk samples were collected throughout the whole area of Bosnia and Herzegovina over the period of four years (2010-2013, from farms that deliver milk to the dairy industry. The total bacterial count (TBC was analysed in 52,999 milk samples and the somatic cell count (SCC in 53,363 milk samples. The results of the research showed that the proportion of bulk milk with the SCC < 300,000 mL-1 significantly increased in the observed period, as well as the proportion of farms that produce milk of EU quality (P < 0.05. The season had a significant effect (P < 0.05 on the SCC; in April the proportion of bulk milk with SCC < 300,000 mL-1 was significantly higher (P < 0.05. A significant increase (P < 0.05 in the proportion of milk with the TBC < 200,000 cfu∙mL -1 was perceived, as well as the proportion of farms which deliver that type of milk (P < 0.05. A Significant lower (P < 0.05 proportion of milk in the summer period with TBC < 200,000 cfu∙mL-1 was determined. It can be concluded that consistent appliance of regulations which determine the quality of milk, leads to the improvement of the hygienic quality of redeemed milk, as illustrated by the case of Bosnia and Herzegovina. This kind of milk payment system is important for both, the higher economic benefit of farms and the dairy processing industry.

  11. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-07-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System`s tank waste retrieval Program.

  12. Commercial Submersible Mixing Pump For SRS Tank Waste Removal - 15223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Mike [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Herbert, James E. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States); Scheele, Patrick W. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC., Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-01-12

    product lubricated canned motor pumps designed to fit within available risers and have significant agitation capabilities to suspend waste solids. Waste removal and closure of two tanks has been accomplished with agitation provided by 3 SMPs installed within the tanks. In 2012, a team was assembled to investigate alternative solids removal technologies to support waste removal for closing tanks. The goal of the team was to find a more cost effective approach that could be used to replace the current mixing pump technology. This team was unable to identify an alternative technology outside of mixing pumps to support waste agitation and removal from SRS waste tanks. However, the team did identify a potentially lower cost mixing pump compared to the baseline SLPs and SMPs. Rather than using the traditional procurement using an engineering specification, the team proposed to seek commercially available submersible mixer pumps (CSMP) as alternatives to SLPs and SMPs. SLPs and SMPs have a high procurement cost and the actual cost of moving pumps between tanks has shown to be significantly higher than the original estimates that justified the reuse of SMPs and SLPs. The team recommended procurement of “off-the-shelf” industry pumps which may be available for significant savings, but at an increased risk of failure and reduced operating life in the waste tank. The goal of the CSMP program is to obtain mixing pumps that could mix from bulk waste removal through tank closure and then be abandoned in place as part of tank closure. This paper will present the development, progress and relative advantages of the CSMP.

  13. Fuel tank integrity research : fuel tank analyses and test plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into fuel tank : crashworthiness. Fuel tank research is being performed to : determine strategies for increasing the fuel tank impact : resistance to ...

  14. Discrepancies in Evaluating Farm Management Routines as Risk Factors of Raw Milk and Udder Hygiene in Selected Dairy Farms of Fars Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi MOHEBBI-FANI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The management practices relevant to bulk tank milk quality were studied in 29 dairy farms of Fars Province, Iran. Farm management practices were obtained by completion of a questionnaire and direct observation. Bulk milk was evaluated by performing standard plate count (SPC, preliminary incubation count (PIC, laboratory pasteurization count (LPC, coliform count (CC, somatic cell count (SCC and detection of the contagious mastitis agents. The farms were divided into low and high SPC groups (below and above 100,000 CFU/mL based on Iranian standards. Comparisons of the laboratory results between groups were done using two independent samples t-test. The relationships between the laboratory results were studied by Pearson’s correlation coefficients, all after logarithmic transformation. Associations of managerial risk factors (obtained by the questionnaire and one time of observation with laboratory results were investigated using two independent samples t-test. P-values 0.05. Strong correlations were detected between SPC and PIC, SPC and CC, and PIC and CC, but many of the well explained risk factors of undesired milk quality lacked any relation with high bacterial counts of raw milk. This could be due to the small number of the studied farms, almost similar faults in the farms, wrong answers of the employees to the questions and modification of the milking practices in the presence of an inspector. Infections with Staphylococcus aureus and Mycoplasma bovis could be potential problems in the studied farms, contributing to the elevation of SCC and/or SPC levels. Veterinary interventions could not be based on the questionnaire results. Direct and frequent observations of farm routines could be recommended.

  15. ENTEROTOXIGENIC STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN SHEEP RAW MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giacinti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 366 raw milk samples from 30 sheep farms were examined quantitatively for Staphylococcus aureus. Enterotoxin production by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated was investigated. S. aureus was detected in 19 farms (63,3%. The ability to synthetise enterotoxins was found in ten strains (52,6%. Production of staphylococcal enterotoxins C (SEC was recorded in 6 (60% and production of SEC together with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA in 4 (40% staphylococcal isolates. Raw milk products are vulnerable to contamination by S. aureus. Strategies to reduce the occurrence of S. aureus in bulk milk are of particular importance on farms where milk is used for raw milk products.

  16. 33 CFR 157.102 - Plans for foreign tank vessels: Submission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels General § 157.102 Plans for foreign...) The design of each COW machine; (c) The arrangement, location, and installation of the COW machines... nozzles of the COW machines on the surfaces of each tank, showing the surface areas not reached by direct...

  17. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR THE ABOVE GROUND TANK FAILURE REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MARCHESE, A.R.

    2005-03-03

    This document analyzes aboveground tank failure accident scenarios for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification system (DBVS). The radiological and toxicological consequences are determined for a range of aboveground tank failure accident scenarios to determine the representative accident for DBVS. Based on the consequence results and accident frequency evaluations, risk bins are determined and control decisions are made.

  18. Tank 241-BX-103 tank characterization plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-04-21

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BX-103.

  19. Protein, casein and micellar salts in milk: Current content and historical perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, E.; Valenberg, van H.J.F.; Huppertz, T.; Hooijdonk, van A.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    The protein and fat content of Dutch bulk milk has been monitored since the 1950s and has increased considerably, by 11 and 20%, respectively, whereas milk yield has more than doubled. The change in protein and fat content of milk is advantageous for the dairy industry, as these are the 2 most

  20. Seasonal variation, method of determination of bovine milk stability, and its relation with physical, chemical, and sanitary characteristics of raw milk

    OpenAIRE

    Sandro Charopen Machado; Vivian Fischer; Marcelo Tempel Stumpf; Sheila Cristina Bosco Stivanin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this research was to determine the variation of milk stability evaluated with ethanol, boiling, and coagulation time tests (CTT) to identify milk components related with stability and verify the correlation between the three methods. Bulk raw milk was collected monthly at 50 dairy farms from January 2007 to October 2009 and physicochemical attributes, somatic cell (SCC), and total bacterial counts (TBC) were determined. Milk samples were classified into low, medium, ...

  1. Microencapsulation of babassu coconut milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audirene Amorim Santana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to obtain babassu coconut milk powder microencapsulated by spray drying process using gum Arabic as wall material. Coconut milk was extracted by babassu peeling, grinding (with two parts of water, and vacuum filtration. The milk was pasteurized at 85 ºC for 15 minutes and homogenized to break up the fat globules, rendering the milk a uniform consistency. A central composite rotatable design with a range of independent variables was used: inlet air temperature in the dryer (170-220 ºC and gum Arabic concentration (10-20%, w/w on the responses: moisture content (0.52-2.39%, hygroscopicity (6.98-9.86 g adsorbed water/100g solids, water activity (0.14-0.58, lipid oxidation (0.012-0.064 meq peroxide/kg oil, and process yield (20.33-30.19%. All variables influenced significantly the responses evaluated. Microencapsulation was optimized for maximum process yield and minimal lipid oxidation. The coconut milk powder obtained at optimum conditions was characterized in terms of morphology, particle size distribution, bulk and absolute density, porosity, and wettability.

  2. Bulk Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C. C.; Langdon, T. G.; Lavernia, E. J.

    2017-11-01

    This paper will address three topics of importance to bulk nanostructured materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are defined as bulk solids with nanoscale or partly nanoscale microstructures. This category of nanostructured materials has historical roots going back many decades but has relatively recent focus due to new discoveries of unique properties of some nanoscale materials. Bulk nanostructured materials are prepared by a variety of severe plastic deformation methods, and these will be reviewed. Powder processing to prepare bulk nanostructured materials requires that the powders be consolidated by typical combinations of pressure and temperature, the latter leading to coarsening of the microstructure. The thermal stability of nanostructured materials will also be discussed. An example of bringing nanostructured materials to applications as structural materials will be described in terms of the cryomilling of powders and their consolidation.

  3. Milk Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and cheese products, leading to cross-contact. Margarine Nisin Non-dairy products, as many contain casein Nougat ... unsure about an item’s ingredients. Milk in Kosher Foods Kosher Dairy: A “D” or the word “dairy” ...

  4. Development of smart solar tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Andersen, Elsa

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the project is to develop smart solar tanks. A smart solar tank is a tank in which the domestic water can bee heated both by solar collectors and by an auxiliary energy supply system. The auxiliary energy supply system heats up the hot-water tank from the top and the water volume heated...

  5. Ocean Technology Development Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The new SWFSC laboratory in La Jolla incorporates a large sea- and fresh-water Ocean Technology Development Tank. This world-class facility expands NOAA's ability to...

  6. Sonar Tank Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Sonar Tank Facility permits low cost initial 'wet' testing and check out prior to full scale deployment at sea. It can manage controlled conditions calibration...

  7. Coagulation properties of milk

    OpenAIRE

    Hallén, Elin

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of the different proteins in milk are important for the outcome of the coagulation processes which yield our dairy products, whereas total milk protein content is a poor indicator of coagulation properties of milk. In order to design the milk protein composition to meet dairy processing requirements, selection for genetic variants of milk proteins have been proposed. This work aimed to study genetic milk protein polymorphism and its association with the detailed milk protein co...

  8. A comparison of the composition, coagulation characteristics and cheesemaking capacity of milk from Friesian and Jersey dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auldist, Martin J; Johnston, Keith A; White, Nicola J; Fitzsimons, W Paul; Boland, Michael J

    2004-02-01

    Twenty-nine multiparous cows of each of the Jersey and Friesian breeds, all kappa-casein AB phenotype, were grazed together and managed identically. On three occasions during 10 d in spring (early lactation), milk was collected from all cows at four consecutive milkings and bulked according to breed. On a separate occasion, milk samples were also collected from each cow at consecutive a.m. and p.m. milkings to form one daily sample per cow. The bulked milks (800-1000 l per breed on each occasion) were standardized to a protein:fat (P:F) ratio of 0.80, and 350 l from each breed was made into Cheddar cheese. The solids content of the remaining Friesian milk was then increased by ultrafiltration to a solids concentration equal to that of the Jersey milk. This solids-standardized Friesian milk and a replicate batch of P:F standardized Jersey milk were made into two further batches of Cheddar cheese in 350-l vats. Compared with Friesian milk, Jersey milk had higher concentrations of most milk components measured, including protein, casein and fat. There were few difference in milk protein composition between breeds, but there were differences in fat composition. Friesian milk fat had more conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) than Jersey milk fat. Jersey milk coagulated faster and formed firmer curd than Friesian milk. Concentrations of some milk components were correlated with coagulation parameters, but relationships did not allow prediction of cheesemaking potential. Jersey milk yielded 10% more cheese per kg than Friesian milk using P:F standardized milk, but for milks with the same solids concentration there were no differences in cheese yield. No differences in cheese composition between breeds were detected. Differences in cheesemaking properties of milk from Jerseys and Friesians were entirely related to the concentrations of solids in the original milk.

  9. Theoretical comparison between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon; Bales, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that solar combisystems based on bikini tanks for low energy houses perform better than solar domestic hot water systems based on mantle tanks. Tank-in-tank solar combisystems are also attractive from a thermal performance point of view. In this paper, theore...

  10. 46 CFR 153.370 - Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature cargo tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum relief valve setting for ambient temperature...) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS... temperature cargo tanks. The relief valve setting for a containment system that carries a cargo at ambient...

  11. LIFE ESTIMATION OF HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK STEEL FOR F-TANK FARM CLOSURE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT - 9310

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, K; Bruce Wiersma, B; Stephen Harris, S

    2009-01-12

    High level radioactive waste (HLW) is stored in underground carbon steel storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The underground tanks will be closed by removing the bulk of the waste, chemical cleaning, heel removal, stabilizing remaining residuals with tailored grout formulations, and severing/sealing external penetrations. The life of the carbon steel materials of construction in support of the performance assessment has been completed. The estimation considered general and localized corrosion mechanisms of the tank steel exposed to grouted conditions. A stochastic approach was followed to estimate the distributions of failures based upon mechanisms of corrosion accounting for variances in each of the independent variables. The methodology and results used for one-type of tank is presented.

  12. Association between antibody status to bovine herpesvirus 1 and quality of milk in dairy herds in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rola, J G; Larska, M; Grzeszuk, M; Rola, J

    2015-02-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV1) is one of the most important pathogens of cattle; however, its effect on somatic cell count and milk components is not completely understood. The aim of the current study was to examine the effect of BoHV1 infection on quality of bovine bulk tank milk (BTM). A total of 1,790 individual blood samples collected at 28 dairy farms were used to determine the BoHV1 infection status of the herds with ELISA tests. The quality parameters of milk were evaluated by instrumental methods with BTM samples collected at monthly intervals from May 2011 to May 2012. The statistical analysis was performed to study the associations between BoHV1 herd status, quality of BTM, and herd-specific parameters. The risk factors influencing bulk milk somatic cell count (BMSCC) were estimated using the multivariable mixed-effects maximum likelihood regression model. The true prevalences of BoHV1 infection at the animal and herd levels were 49.3 and 64.6%, respectively. The average BMSCC differed significantly between the herds grouped accordingly to their BoHV1 infection status. Interestingly, the highest BMSCC was observed in the vaccinated herds (240.3×10(3) cells/mL). Additionally, the BoHV1 herd status had a significant effect on the fat content of BTM. The largest herds that were investigated had a BoHV1 seroprevalence over 30%. The herd status was considerably influenced by the numbers of cows in the herds. Besides, no significant differences in total bacterial count or protein content in milk from BoHV1-infected und uninfected herds were observed. An increase in BMSCC was observed during summer compared with the winter months regardless of the BoHV1 status of the herds. In the final multivariable regression model, the main risk factors associated with BMSCC were BoHV1 herd status, the percentage of BoHV1 infected animals in a herd, the number of cows in a herd, and the season. Our study suggests that BoHV1 infection may influence BMSCC levels, which are key

  13. Microbiological Quality of Raw Goat Milk in Bogor, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Taufik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Milk samples were investigated for counts and prevalence of indicator bacteria, which were TPC, coliforms, coagulase positive Staphylococci (CPS, and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS. Ten potential risk factors were also evaluated in relation to the prevalence of indicator bacteria. The results showed that the median values of indicator bacterial counts from overall udder-half milk samples were 3.74, 0.70, 1.70, and 2.52 log cfu/ml and from bulk milk samples were 5.69, 2.98, 3.66 and 3.32 log cfu/ml for TPC, coliforms, CPS, and CNS, respectively. None of the median values of overall udder-half milk samples exceeded the maximum limit of the standards for all indicator bacteria. However, in the bulk milk samples only the median value of TPC below the maximum limit of the standards. Overall prevalence of coliforms, CPS and CNS from udder-half milk samples were 46.3%, 37.7%, and 66.0%, respectively, and from bulk milk samples were 86.7%, 76.7%, and 86.7%, respectively. Saanen crossbreed, fifth parity and udders with inflammation were found to be risk factors. This study results indicated that the hygienic practices in the dairy goat farms are still need to be increased. To increase the hygienic level of the milk, the identified significant risk factors must be controlled.

  14. Total Plate Count of Milk from Dairy Cooperatives in Yogyakarta and East Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Septiani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Most of the local populations in Indonesia, especially in Sleman, Yogyakarta and Tulungagung, East Java consume cow milk. Cow milk is more widely consumed than that of horse or goat because of the people  habit and the raw milk is more easily found in the market. The majority of people consume milk without knowing the number of bacteria contained and neither the presence nor absence of harmful bacteria in the milk consumed. This study aimed to identify the total number of bacteria in several dairy cooperatives in Sleman, Yogyakarta and Tulungagung, East Java. Milk samples were taken from two tanks in Koperasi Sarono Makmur (KSM, three tanks (were taken four times, once a week in Koperasi Warga Mulya (KWM Sleman, Yogyakarta, and two tanks (twice in the morning and once in the evening in Koperasi Unit Tani Ternak (KUTT Tulungagung, East Java. Milk from each tank were taken 500 mL and put into the cooler that was given ice cubes. Then the samples to be tested for total bacteria from each tank with plate count agar medium. The number of samples was 19. Milk samples were statistically analyzed with one way ANOVA. The results showed that the total number of bacteria of milk of KSM is 1.0 x 106 CFU/mL, KWM 3.6 x 106 CFU/mL, whereas cow's milk KUTT 4.0 x 106 CFU/mL. The average total number of bacteria of KWM and KUTT exceeds the requirements of the Indonesian National Standard (SNI 01-3141-1998 (1,0 x 106 CFU/mL.

  15. Covariance among milking frequency, milk yield, and milk composition from automatically milked cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvendahl, Peter; Chagunda, G G

    2011-01-01

    Automatic milking systems allow cows voluntary access to milking and concentrates within set limits. This leads to large variation in milking intervals, both within and between cows, which further affects yield per milking and composition of milk. This study aimed to describe the degree to which...... differences in milking interval were attributable to individual cows, and how this correlated to individual differences in yield and composition of milk throughout lactation. Data from 288,366 milkings from 664 cow-lactations were used, of which 229,020 milkings had milk composition results. Cows were...... milking was found to be highly repeatable in all breeds, with the highest values occurring by the end of lactation. Fat percentage had only moderate repeatability in early to mid lactation but increased toward the end of lactation. Individual level correlations showed that cows with higher milking...

  16. Milk Allergy in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... commercial baby formulas). Every time the child has milk, the body thinks these proteins are harmful invaders and works ... thing as lactose intolerance , which is when the body has trouble digesting milk. Some babies with a milk allergy have an ...

  17. Pregnancy test via milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemes, H.; Woelders, H.

    2011-01-01

    Determining a pregnancy through the milk. Wageningen University is researching the possibilities. The first steps have been taken. Researchers have identified five milk proteins that release a signal of a pregnancy. A pregnancy test via the milk comes within sight.

  18. Isolation of [i]Listeria monocytogenes[/i] from milks used for Iranian traditional cheese in Lighvan cheese factories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mir-Hassan Moosavy; Saber Esmaeili; Ehsan Mostafavi; Fahimeh Bagheri Amiri

    2014-01-01

    ... (sampling carried out from large milk tanks used cheese making in factories). Isolation of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] was performed according to ISO 11290 and biochemical tests were done to identify and confirm L...

  19. The hygienic quality of raw reindeer milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kurki

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The somatic cell count (SCC and total bacterial count (TBC as well as the presence of major food-borne pathogens and udder pathogens in reindeer raw milk were studied. Two groups of 4 female reindeer were milked on alternate days for six weeks. A milk sample from each quarter was taken before milking and of the bulk milk at the end of milking. Micrococcus sp. was observed in one, Staphylococcus aureus in one and coagulase-negative staphylococci in five of the quarter samples (n=318. In the bulk milk (n=19 TBC varied between 700 and 1 700 000 cfu (colony forming units/ml and SCC between 52 000 and 183 000 cells/ml. No Bacillus cereus, S. aureus or Listeria monocytogenes were detected in the bulk milk, but Escherichia coli and Enterobacteriaceae were found in 5 bulk milk samples. According to the bacteriological examination the udder health of the reindeer was good. Indicative information on the SCC of healthy reindeer was obtained. None of the common potential food-poisoning bacteria were found in raw milk. There was great variation in the bulk milk TBC and the average TBC was rather high (ca. 300 000 cfu/ml. The hygienic quality of raw reindeer milk makes it well suited for food manufacture. However, the results indicate that the milking conditions may be crucial for the quality of raw milk.Abstract in Finnish / Yhteenveto:Tutkimuksen kohteena oli poron raakamaidon solupitoisuus ja kokonaispesäkeluku sekä tärkeimpien elintarvike- ja utarepatogeenien esiintyminen raakamaidossa. Kaksi 4 vaatimen ryhmää lypsettiin vuoropäivinä 6 viikon ajan. Ennen lypsyä vaatimista otettiin vedinkohtaiset näytteet ja lypsyn päätyttyä näyte yhteismaidosta. Micrococcus sp. todettiin yhdessä, Staphylococcus aureus yhdessä ja koagulaasinegatiivisia stafylokokkeja viidessä vedinkohtaisessa näytteessä (n=318. Yhteismaitonäytteiden (n=19 kokonaispesäkeluvut vaihtelivat välillä 700-1 700 000 pmy (pesäkkeitä muodostava yksikkö/ml ja somaattisten

  20. Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrick, A.P.; Blackburn, L.D.; Brehm, W.F.; Carlos, W.C.; Hauptmann, J.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Danielson, M.J.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Divine, J.R. [ChemMet Ltd., West Richland, WA (United States); Foster, G.M. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy`s high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provides an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements: assessed. each requirement: and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of ASME SA 515, Grade 70, carbon steel.

  1. Inerting ballast tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, Gabriel L.; Bronneberg, Jos [SBM Offshore, AA Schiedam (Netherlands); Barros, Maria A.S.D. de [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This report expands upon the work conducted by SBM Offshore to develop a tank preservation treatment, which is intended to achieve a service life of 30 years. This work focuses on the corrosion problems, in the ballast tanks, based on new built hulls, both for the Gas Exploration Market, the FLNG - Floating Liquefied Natural Gas, and for the Oil Exploration market - FPSO's - Floating Production Storage and offloading Units. Herein, the corrosion rate input comes from the various references related to the process of nitrogen injection, which is expected to extend the vessel's time life. The essential elements of this solution comprise the deoxygenation process, corrosion models, coating effects, tests from laboratory, shipboard tests, corrosion institutes and regulations applicable to the operation. The best corrosion protection system for ballast tanks area combines a coating system and an inert gas system. The condition of the tanks will be dependent upon the level of protection applied to the steel structure, including, but not limited to coating, cathodic protection, etc. There is a need for products which extend the life time. It is not sufficient, only have good theoretical base for the corrosion and an excellent treatment system. In addition, the design of the ships structure must also eliminate the presence of local stress concentrations which can result in fatigue cracking and rupture of the protective coating barrier starting the corrosion. As a direct result of this, more problems in corrosion can be mitigated, vessels can have a better corrosion performance with less maintenance and repairs to coating systems in ballast tanks. Furthermore ships will be positively impacted operationally due to less frequent dry docking. There is a huge potential in the application of inert gas to combat the corrosion rate inside the ballast tanks, one of the most corrosive environments on earth. This application can have a direct impact on vessel structure

  2. Genetic characterization and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine milk in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Said, M; Abbassi, M S; Bianchini, V; Sghaier, S; Cremonesi, P; Romanò, A; Gualdi, V; Hassen, A; Luini, M V

    2016-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major agent of bovine mastitis in dairy herds, causing economic losses in dairy industry worldwide. In addition, milk and milk-products contaminated by Staph. aureus can cause harmful human diseases. The aim of this study was to characterize Staph. aureus strains isolated from dairy farms in Tunisia. Bulk tank milk (n = 32) and individual cow milk (n = 130) samples were collected during the period of 2013-2014. Forty-three Staph. aureus isolates were recovered and typed by spa typing, 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer (RS-PCR) and multiplex PCRs for 22 virulence genes. Antimicrobial resistance was also investigated with a disc diffusion test. A selected subsample of 22 strains was additionally genotyped by multilocus sequence typing. Seventeen spa types were recovered, and t2421 (n = 10), t521 (n = 6) and t2112 (n = 5) were the most common. Fourteen different RS-PCR genotypes grouped into 11 clusters were detected in our study, with predominance of the RVI genotype (n = 24). Eight sequence types were identified and Clonal Complex 97, corresponding to RS-PCR cluster R, was the most common (n = 10), followed by CC1 (n = 4), CC15 (n = 3) and other four accounting for one or two strains. Different combinations of virulence genes were reported, and enterotoxin genes were present in few strains (seh, n = 4; sea, n = 2; sea and seh, n = 2; sec and sel, n = 2). The majority of strains were resistant only to penicillin; only one strain was found to be multiresistant and no methicillin-resistant Staph. aureus was demonstrated. Our study reported the isolation of CC97 from bovine milk in Tunisia for the first time and confirmed the relevance of this lineage in intramammary infection in cows. This paper describes the characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bulk tank and individual cow milk in Tunisia. All strains were genotyped by spa typing and RS-PCR, a method based on the amplification of the 16S-23S r

  3. TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILLIS WL; AHRENDT MR

    2009-08-11

    Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

  4. Dwelling Water Tanks in Diyarbakir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ceylan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In this connection, the object of this study has been to identify and compare the microbiological contamination and residue chlorine levels in the main network water that is taken from the Dicle Dam and distributed in Diyarbakir Province Centre and in the tanks of dwellings that use this water as well as the effects of the maintenance, hygiene, and physical conditions of these tanks on microbiological contamination. METHODS: Water samples were taken from both the tank input side network water and tank output side tank waters of 200 dwellings with water tanks in Diyarbakir city centre (tank entrance network side water for 200 and tank output side tank water for 200 within the framework of the research study. RESULTS: Coliform bacteria were detected in 35% of the tank entrance side network water samples and in 52.0% percent of the tank output side water samples. Faecal coliform bacteria were not detected in tank entrance side network water samples, but they existed in 2.5% of the tank output side water samples. Free residue chlorine level was found to be over 0.2 ppm in 67% of tank entrance side network water samples and in 35% of the tank output side water samples. Coliform bacteria were detected in 95.5% of the tank entrance side network water samples, of which free residue chlorine level were below 0.2 ppm. Total germ growth was detected in 52.0% of the tank entrance side network water samples and in 67.5% of the tank output side water samples. The most frequently isolated bacteria both in tank entrance side network and tank output side water samples were found to be Bacillus spp. Bacillus type bacteria were found in 48% of tank entrance side network water samples and 57.5% of the tank output side water samples. Filamentous fungi were prevalent in 8% of all the samples examined within the study and the most commonly isolated filamentous fungi were Aspergillus spp (5.5% and Penicillum spp (2.5%. Water tanks of dwellings contain more

  5. Tank plan for tank 241-C-104 retrieval testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING, D.L.

    1999-05-21

    Tank 241-C-104 has been identified as one of the first tanks to be retrieved for high-level waste pretreatment and immobilization. Retrieval of the tank waste will require dilution. Laboratory tests are needed to determine the amount of dilution required for safe retrieval and transfer of feed. The proposed laboratory tests are described in this document.

  6. Think Tank Initiative and Think Tank Fund Peer Exchanges | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Think Tank Initiative (TTI) and the Think Tank Fund (TTF) are partnering to support peer exchanges between think tanks in regions where the programs are active: Africa, Latin America, South Asia, and Central and Eastern Europe (the former Soviet Union). This project will help reduce cooperation barriers among ...

  7. Coxiella burnetii Circulation in a Naturally Infected Flock of Sheep: Individual Follow-Up of Antibodies in Serum and Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joulié, A; Rousset, E; Gasqui, P; Lepetitcolin, E; Leblond, A; Sidi-Boumedine, K; Jourdain, E

    2017-07-01

    antibody levels are stable over time and seropositivity and vaginal shedding are not clearly correlated, whereas antibody levels in milk are strongly correlated with those in serum. Accordingly, we find that antibody levels in bulk tank milk are consistent with the variations observed in the serum of dairy females over time. We report the existence of maternal antibody transmission to ewe lambs and we show that the presence of maternal antibodies at birth does not prevent the development of a serological response to vaccination at the age of 4 months. Finally, we report that adult ewes generally seroconvert after vaccination, including during pregnancy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Qualidade microbiológica do leite refrigerado nas fazendas Microbiological quality of refrigerated milk on farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.F. Arcuri

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se a qualidade microbiológica do leite obtido mecanicamente e refrigerado durante 48 horas, em 24 rebanhos, e a associação entre a contaminação microbiana e os procedimentos de higienização dos equipamentos de ordenha e armazenamento do leite. Os procedimentos de higiene foram avaliados in loco com auxilio de questionários. Foram realizadas a contagem padrão em placas, a contagem de coliformes totais e a pesquisa de Staphylococcus aureus e Streptococcus agalactiae. No leite de 14 rebanhos, foram pesquisadas Salmonella spp. e Listeria monocytogenes. As médias geométricas da contagem padrão foram 10³ UFC/ml foram verificadas em sete rebanhos. S. aureus e S. agalactiae foram isolados em 22 e 12 dos 24 rebanhos, respectivamente, e não foram encontradas Salmonella spp. e L. monocytogenes. O uso de detergentes alcalino e ácido, mais o de sanitizante foi associado (P5×10(5 UFC/ml.The effect of bulk tank and milking machine cleaning procedures (determined from a questionnaire on bacterial contamination of 48-hour refrigerated milk was examined in 24 herds. Milk samples were analyzed for standard plate count (SPC and for total coliform, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae contamination. Milk samples from 14 herds were cultured for Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes. Geometrical means of SPC were 10³ UFC/ml of total coliforms were observed in seven herds. S. aureus and S. agalactiae were found in 22 and 12 herds, respectively. Salmonella and L. monocytogenes were not found in any of the samples. The use of alkaline and acid detergents plus sanitizing was associated (P5.0×10(5 UFC/ml.

  9. Cattle milk quality in the Semiarid region of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcone Macêdo Tôrres Angicano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the composition and quality of raw milk that was refrigerated in tanks, according to the farm structures, bovine diet, and production levels of the dairy producers that provide milk for the Association of Small-Scale Ranchers of the Angicos Wilderness (ASRAW. Data were collected from 47 dairy farmers from different cities of the state of Rio Grande do Norte who are associated with ASRAW. Twenty-three tanks were sampled throughout the month of June 2013, with two collections per week and five samples per tank, for a total of 920 samples. The properties were characterized according to the type of tank (private or community, the food provided during milk collection (voluminous or voluminous and concentrated, the structure of the dairy producer (family producer or non-family producer, and the amounts of each component. Analyses of fat content, total protein, casein levels, lactose levels, total solids, degreased dry extract (DDE, freezing point, urea levels, somatic cell counts (SCC, and antibiotic residues were performed. Statistical analyses were conducted for each group, and the means were compared by Tukey tests, with a critical significance level of 5% probability calculated with the PROC GLM procedure of the SAS® program. Most components differed significantly for each parameter. The highest difference was noted between the urea and SCC levels, which was probably due to the wide variety of dairy producer profiles. The SCC values exhibited the largest amplitude variations. Most milk components significantly differed according to the strata, producer, food, and tank. These changes probably had little influence on the animal’s physiology and productivity. Therefore, despite the small variations in the components of the milk supplied by ASRAW, the different types of milk storage tank, milk volume produced, and type of dairy producer affected the overall milk quality.

  10. The comparison of milk production and quality in cows from conventional and automatic milking systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Touov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two different types of milking systems (conventional parlour vs. automatic milking system and the season of the year on the composition and hygienic quality of milk from Czech Fleckvieh cows. A total of 500 cows were involved; 200 and 300 in conventional and automatic milking systems, respectively. Bulk milk samples were collected for 12 months from July 2010 to June 2011. The following milk components and quality indicators were determined: % of fat, % of protein, % of lactose, % of fat-free dry matter (FFDM, % of casein, urea content, somatic cell count (SSC, total germ count (TGC and milk freezing point (FP. The data were processed and evaluated with MS Excel and the statistical software SAS 9.1. Significantly higher (P<0.05 0.01 contents of fat, protein, FFDM and casein and increased TGC were observed in the automatic milking system, whereas SCC and FP were significantly lower (P<0.01. The highest contents of fat, protein and casein, and the lowest lactose content were found in the winter season. The highest contents of FFDM, urea and SCC were observed in autumn, whereas TGC was highest in summer (P<0.05 0.01. Only FP was not influenced by the season.

  11. Verification of fresh grass feeding, pasture grazing and organic farming by cows farm milk fatty acid profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Edoardo; van der Veer, Grishja; Boerrigter-Eenling, Rita; Elgersma, Anjo; Rademaker, Jan; Sterian, Adriana; van Ruth, Saskia M

    2014-12-01

    The present study investigated the use of fatty acid (FA) profiling in combination with chemometric modelling to verify claims for cow milk in terms of fresh grass feeding, pasture grazing and organic/biodynamic farming. The FA profile was determined for 113 tank milk samples collected in the Netherlands from 30 farms over four different months, and used to develop classification models based on the PLS-DA algorithm. Milk from cows with daily rations of fresh grass could be successfully distinguished from milk from cows with no fresh grass in their diet. Milk from cows at pasture could easily be distinguished from milk from stabled cows without fresh grass in the diet, but the correct prediction of milk from stabled cows fed fresh grass indoors proved difficult. The FA profile of organic/biodynamic milk was different compared to conventional milk but an unequivocal discrimination was not possible either in summer or in winter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fuel tank crashworthiness : loading scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research and Development is conducting research into fuel tank crashworthiness. The breaching of fuel tanks during passenger : rail collisions and derailments increases the potential of serious injury...

  13. C-tank transfers: Transuranic sludge removal from the C-1, C-2, and W-23 waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahl, T.L.; Lay, A.C.; Taylor, S.A.; Moore, J.W.

    1999-05-01

    Two fluidic pulse jet mixing systems were used to successfully mobilize remote-handled transuranic sludge for retrieval from three 50,000-gal horizontal waste storage tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The results of this operation indicate that the pulse jet system should be considered for mixing and bulk retrieval of sludges in other vertical and horizontal waste tanks at ORNL and at other U.S. Department of Energy sites.

  14. Effects of adsorbents in dairy cow diet on milk quality and cheese-making properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pirlo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of adsorbents (clinoptilolite+sepiolite in the diet of cows was evaluated in two trials. A total of 52 Italian Friesian cows were assigned to one of two dietary treatments, control and adsorbent (CON vs. ADS. Individual and bulk milk samples were collected. On individual data, no significant difference was found between treatments in milk yield, milk fat, protein, and lactose concentrations, milk protein yield, pH, and titratable acidity, both in summer and spring. In spring only, there was a trend (P = 0.07 for a higher milk fat yield and a lower somatic cell number in ADS than in CON group. In summer only, milk clotting time was higher in ADS than in CON group (P < 0.05. On bulk milk, no significant differences in components and technological features were found between the CON and ADS groups. The bulk milk contents in total and soluble Ca were 1100 vs. 1108 mg/kg and 378 vs. 369 mg/kg for CON and ADS respectively, proving to be unaffected by treatment and suggesting a lack of interference by ADS on milk Ca availability for cheese-making process.We concluded that, for a period of 12 weeks, the addition of 1% on DM of the diet for lactating cows of non-nutritional adsorbents does not negatively affect milk yield, milk composition, and cheese-making features.

  15. Heat transport in bulk/nanoporous/bulk silicon devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criado-Sancho, M. [Departamento de Ciencias y Técnicas Físicoquimicas, Facultad de Ciencias, UNED, Senda del Rey 9, 20040 Madrid (Spain); Jou, D., E-mail: David.Jou@uab.cat [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Catalans, Carme 47, 08001 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-02-04

    We study heat transport in bulk/nanoporous/bulk silicon devices; we show that, despite bulk/nanoporous devices may act as thermal rectifiers, the non-linear aspects of their joint thermal conductance are not strong enough to lead to a negative differential thermal resistance, necessary to allow bulk/nanoporous/bulk Si devices to act as thermal transistors. Furthermore, we explicitly study the effective thermal conductivity of the mentioned devices for several temperatures, geometries, porosities, and pore size.

  16. Fuel Tank Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    material resistance to the saprophytic microorganisms is necessary. Some coatings formerly used in fuel tanks, such as the MIL-S-4383 Buna-N, were... microorganisms at bay. It can not be assumed however, that the problem will not arise again. QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS Existing military specifications for

  17. Competitive Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    the view that changing policy environments results in convergence of think tank strategies across Europe. As a perspective the paper shows that competitive think tanks do have a high average impact pr. staff on both mass and new media compared to other types of think tanks. This may indicate...

  18. "Understanding" cosmological bulk viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Zimdahl, Winfried

    1996-01-01

    A universe consisting of two interacting perfect fluids with the same 4-velocity is considered. A heuristic mean free time argument is used to show that the system as a whole cannot be perfect as well but neccessarily implies a nonvanishing bulk viscosity. A new formula for the latter is derived and compared with corresponding results of radiative hydrodynamics.

  19. Bulk chemicals from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the current robust forces driving sustainable production, and available biomass conversion technologies, biomass-based routes are expected to make a significant impact on the production of bulk chemicals within 10 years, and a huge impact within 20-30 years. In the Port of Rotterdam there is a

  20. Milk market after abolition of milk quotas

    OpenAIRE

    Iurchevici, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    In the past two years in Romania, it was recorded one of the sharpest decreases in the amount of cow's milk collected by processing units and at the same time a sharp decline in the price of milk, compared with the average price in the European Union. The obvious conclusion is that milk production in Romania is facing serious problems. This indicates that the milk processing industry and Romanian farmers were not prepared to face the barrier removal of milk quotas. Cattle breeders organizatio...

  1. Alternative Chemical Cleaning Methods for High Level Waste Tanks: Actual Waste Testing with SRS Tank 5F Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, William D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, Michael S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-30

    Solubility testing with actual High Level Waste tank sludge has been conducted in order to evaluate several alternative chemical cleaning technologies for the dissolution of sludge residuals remaining in the tanks after the exhaustion of mechanical cleaning and sludge sluicing efforts. Tests were conducted with archived Savannah River Site (SRS) radioactive sludge solids that had been retrieved from Tank 5F in order to determine the effectiveness of an optimized, dilute oxalic/nitric acid cleaning reagent toward dissolving the bulk non-radioactive waste components. Solubility tests were performed by direct sludge contact with the oxalic/nitric acid reagent and with sludge that had been pretreated and acidified with dilute nitric acid. For comparison purposes, separate samples were also contacted with pure, concentrated oxalic acid following current baseline tank chemical cleaning methods. One goal of testing with the optimized reagent was to compare the total amounts of oxalic acid and water required for sludge dissolution using the baseline and optimized cleaning methods. A second objective was to compare the two methods with regard to the dissolution of actinide species known to be drivers for SRS tank closure Performance Assessments (PA). Additionally, solubility tests were conducted with Tank 5 sludge using acidic and caustic permanganate-based methods focused on the “targeted” dissolution of actinide species.

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-08-03

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  3. Analysis Of The Tank 5F Final Characterization Samples-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2012-09-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 5F FINAL CHARATERIZATION SAMPLES-2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.

    2012-01-20

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by SRR to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 5F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Two types of samples were collected and delivered to SRNL: floor samples across the tank and subsurface samples from mounds near risers 1 and 5 of Tank 5F. These samples were taken from Tank 5F between January and March 2011. These samples from individual locations in the tank (nine floor samples and six mound Tank 5F samples) were each homogenized and combined in a given proportion into 3 distinct composite samples to mimic the average composition in the entire tank. These Tank 5F composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 5F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble species. With analyses for certain challenging radionuclides as the exception, all composite Tank 5F samples were analyzed and reported in triplicate. The target detection limits for isotopes analyzed were based on customer desired detection limits as specified in the technical task request documents. SRNL developed new methodologies to meet these target detection limits and provide data for the extensive suite of components. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 5F, as specified in the technical task request, some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The Technical Task Request allows that while the analyses of these isotopes is needed, meeting the detection limits for these isotopes is a lower priority than meeting detection limits for the other specified isotopes. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included the

  5. Microbiological quality of goat's milk obtained under different production systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Kyozaire

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the safety of milk produced by smallholder dairy goat farms, a farm-based research study was conducted on commercial dairy goat farms to compare the microbiological quality of milk produced using 3 different types of dairy goat production systems (intensive, semi-intensive and extensive. A survey of dairy goat farms in and around Pretoria carried out by means of a questionnaire revealed that most of the smallholder dairy goat farms surveyed used an extensive type of production system. The method of milking varied with the type of production system, i.e. machine milking; bucket system machine milking and hand-milking, respectively. Udder half milk samples (n=270 were analysed, of which 31.1 % were infected with bacteria. The lowest intra-mammary infection was found amongst goats in the herd under the extensive system (13.3 %, compared with 43.3 % and 36.7 % infection rates under the intensive and semi-intensive production systems, respectively. Staphylococcus intermedius (coagulase positive, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus simulans (both coagulase negative, were the most common cause of intramammary infection with a prevalence of 85.7 % of the infected udder halves. The remaining 14.3 % of the infection was due to Staphylococcus aureus. Bacteriology of bulk milk samples on the other hand, showed that raw milk obtained by the bucket system milking machine had the lowest total bacterial count (16 450 colony forming units (CFU/mℓ compared to that by pipeline milking machine (36 300 CFU/mℓ or handmilking (48 000 CFU/mℓ. No significant relationship was found between the somatic cell counts (SCC and presence of bacterial infection in goat milk. In comparison with the herds under the other 2 production systems, it was shown that dairy goat farming under the extensive production system, where hand-milking was used, can be adequate for the production of safe raw goat milk.

  6. Theoretical study of solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    . Findings - Based on the calculations it is concluded that low flow solar combisystems based on bikini tanks are promising for low energy buildings, while solar combisystems based on tank-in-tank stores are attractive for the houses with medium heating demand and old houses with high heating demand...

  7. Tank farm nuclear criticality review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratzel, D.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-11

    The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site.

  8. Do Fish Enhance Tank Mixing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Laursen, Jesper; Craig, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    potential and operational profitability. The hydrodynamic performance of tanks, therefore, represents an important parameter during the tank design process. Because there are significant complexities in combining the rigid principles of hydrodynamics with the stochastic behaviour of fish, however, most data......The design of fish rearing tanks represents a critical stage in the development of optimal aquaculture systems, especially in the context of recirculating systems. Poor hydrodynamics can compromise water quality, waste management and the physiology and behaviour of fish, and thence, production...... upon tank hydrokinetics has been derived using tanks void of fish. Clearly, the presence of randomly moving objects, such as fish, in a water column will influence not only tank volumes by displacing water, but due to their activity, water dynamics and associated in-tank processes. In order...

  9. Relationship of goat milk flow emission variables with milking routine, milking parameters, milking machine characteristics and goat physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, G; Panzalis, R; Ruegg, P

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the relationship between milk flow emission variables recorded during milking of dairy goats with variables related to milking routine, goat physiology, milking parameters and milking machine characteristics, to determine the variables affecting milking performance and help the goat industry pinpoint farm and milking practices that improve milking performance. In total, 19 farms were visited once during the evening milking. Milking parameters (vacuum level (VL), pulsation ratio and pulsation rate, vacuum drop), milk emission flow variables (milking time, milk yield, maximum milk flow (MMF), average milk flow (AVMF), time until 500 g/min milk flow is established (TS500)), doe characteristics of 8 to 10 goats/farm (breed, days in milk and parity), milking practices (overmilking, overstripping, pre-lag time) and milking machine characteristics (line height, presence of claw) were recorded on every farm. The relationships between recorded variables and farm were analysed by a one-way ANOVA analysis. The relationships of milk yield, MMF, milking time and TS500 with goat physiology, milking routine, milking parameters and milking machine design were analysed using a linear mixed model, considering the farm as the random effect. Farm was significant (Pvariables. Milk emission flow variables were similar to those recommended in scientific studies. Milking parameters were adequate in most of the farms, being similar to those recommended in scientific studies. Few milking parameters and milking machine characteristics affected the tested variables: average vacuum level only showed tendency on MMF, and milk pipeline height on TS500. Milk yield (MY) was mainly affected by parity, as the interaction of days in milk with parity was also significant. Milking time was mainly affected by milk yield and breed. Also significant were parity, the interaction of days in milk with parity and overstripping, whereas overmilking showed a slight tendency

  10. Milk production, raw milk quality and fertility of dromedary camels (Camelus Dromedarius) under intensive management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Péter; Thomas, Sonia; Markó, Orsolya; Juhász, Jutka

    2013-03-01

    In many arid countries, dromedaries play an important role as a milk source in rural areas. However, the milk and meat production potential of this species is not well understood and documented. A large-scale camel dairy farm was established in 2006 in the United Arab Emirates. This study summarises the most important data on milk production, raw milk quality and reproductive efficiency collected on this farm during the first three years of operation. The average daily milk production, the mean length of lactation and the mean total milk production per lactation of 174 dromedaries were 6.0 ± 0.12 kg (± SEM), 586 ± 11.0 days (± SEM) and 3314 ± 98.5 kg (± SEM), respectively. The lactation curve reached its peak during the 4th month after parturition (mean ± SEM, 8.9 ± 0.04 kg), then it declined gradually, falling to 50% of the maximum by the 16th month postpartum (mean ± SEM, 4.3 ± 0.06 kg). Milking three times a day did not increase daily milk production compared to two times milking. Mean total viable bacterial count (TVC) and mean somatic cell count (SCC, ± SEM) of bulk raw camel milk were 4,403 ± 94 CFU/cm3 and 392,602 ± 5,999 cells/cm3 for a one-year period, respectively. There was a significant difference among months (P milk samples were 2.51 ± 0.03%, 2.60 ± 0.01%, 4.03 ± 0.03%, 9.98 ± 0.03% and 7.56 ± 0.03%, respectively. Lactation period, average daily milk production and morning vs. evening milking significantly influenced milk chemical composition. For the 470 camels in the breeding programme, end-of-season pregnancy rate and birth rate were 87.0% and 82.6%, respectively, after natural mating. We have demonstrated that sustainable milk production is possible from a traditional species, the dromedary camel, under an intensive management system.

  11. Diffusion or bulk flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    symplasmic pathway from mesophyll to sieve elements. Crucial for the driving force is the question where water enters the pre-phloem pathway. Surprisingly, the role of PD in water movement has not been addressed so far appropriately. Modeling of assimilate and water fluxes indicates that in symplasmic...... the concentration gradient or bulk flow along a pressure gradient. The driving force seems to depend on the mode of phloem loading. In a majority of plant species phloem loading is a thermodynamically active process, involving the activity of membrane transporters in the sieve-element companion cell complex. Since...... is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous...

  12. Diffusion or bulk flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous...... the concentration gradient or bulk flow along a pressure gradient. The driving force seems to depend on the mode of phloem loading. In a majority of plant species phloem loading is a thermodynamically active process, involving the activity of membrane transporters in the sieve-element companion cell complex. Since...... assimilate movement includes an apoplasmic step, this mode is called apoplasmic loading. Well established is also the polymer-trap loading mode, where the phloem-transport sugars are raffinose-family oligomers in herbaceous plants. Also this mode depends on the investment of energy, here for sugar...

  13. Micromegas in a bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Giomataris, Ioanis; Andriamonje, Samuel A; Aune, S; Charpak, Georges; Colas, P; Giganon, Arnaud; Rebourgeard, P C; Salin, P; Rebourgeard, Ph.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel way to manufacture the bulk Micromegas detector. A simple process based on the PCB (Printed Circuit Board) technology is employed to produce the entire sensitive detector. Such fabrication process could be extended to very large area detectors made by the industry. The low cost fabrication together with the robustness of the electrode materials will make it extremely attractive for several applications ranging from particle physics and astrophysics to medicine

  14. Micromegas in a bulk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giomataris, I. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France)]. E-mail: ioa@hep.saclay.cea.fr; De Oliveira, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Andriamonje, S. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France); Aune, S. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France); Charpak, G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Colas, P. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France); Fanourakis, G. [Institute of Nuclear Physcis, NCSR Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi 15310 (Greece); Ferrer, E. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France); Giganon, A. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France); Rebourgeard, Ph. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France); Salin, P. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F91191 Gif sur Yvette CEDEX (France)

    2006-05-10

    In this paper, we present a novel way to manufacture the bulk Micromegas detector. A simple process based on the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology is employed to produce the entire sensitive detector. Such a fabrication process could be extended to very large area detectors made by the industry. The low cost fabrication together with the robustness of the electrode materials will make it attractive for several applications ranging from particle physics and astrophysics to medicine.

  15. TankSIM: A Cryogenic Tank Performance Prediction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Hedayat, A.; Hastings, L. J.; Moder, J. P.; Schnell, A. R.; Sutherlin, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the thermodynamic state of the cryogenic propellants in launch vehicle tanks is necessary for mission planning and successful execution. Cryogenic propellant storage and transfer in space environments requires that tank pressure be controlled. The pressure rise rate is determined by the complex interaction of external heat leak, fluid temperature stratification, and interfacial heat and mass transfer. If the required storage duration of a space mission is longer than the period in which the tank pressure reaches its allowable maximum, an appropriate pressure control method must be applied. Therefore, predictions of the pressurization rate and performance of pressure control techniques in cryogenic tanks are required for development of cryogenic fluid long-duration storage technology and planning of future space exploration missions. This paper describes an analytical tool, Tank System Integrated Model (TankSIM), which can be used for modeling pressure control and predicting the behavior of cryogenic propellant for long-term storage for future space missions. It is written in the FORTRAN 90 language and can be compiled with any Visual FORTRAN compiler. A thermodynamic vent system (TVS) is used to achieve tank pressure control. Utilizing TankSIM, the following processes can be modeled: tank self-pressurization, boiloff, ullage venting, and mixing. Details of the TankSIM program and comparisons of its predictions with test data for liquid hydrogen and liquid methane will be presented in the final paper.

  16. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-04-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. It is probable that tank 241-C-112 exceeds the 1,000 g-mol inventory criteria established for the Ferrocyanide USQ; however, extensive energetic analysis of the waste has determined a maximum exothermic value of -9 cal/g dry waste. This value is substantially below any levels of concern (-75 cal/g). In addition, an investigation of potential mechanisms to generate concentration levels of radionuclides high enough to be of concern was performed. No credible mechanism was postulated that could initiate the formation of such concentration levels in the tank. Tank 241-C-112 waste is a complex material made up primarily of water and inert salts. The insoluble solids are a mixture of phosphates, sulfates, and hydroxides in combination with aluminum, calcium, iron, nickel, and uranium. Disodium nickel ferrocyanide and sodium cesium nickel ferrocyanide probably exist in the tank; however, there appears to have been significant degradation of this material since the waste was initially settled in the tank.

  17. North Tank Farm data report for the Gunite and Associated Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, V.A. [XL Associates, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burks, B.L. [Providence Group, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hoesen, S.D. van [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, in cooperation with the Oak Ridge Environmental Management Program, has developed and demonstrated the first full-scale remotely operated system for cleaning radioactive liquid and waste from large underground storage tanks. The remotely operated waste retrieval system developed and demonstrated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is designed to accomplish both retrieval of bulk waste, including liquids, thick sludge, and scarified concrete, and final tank cleaning. This report provides a summary of the North Tank Farm (NTF) operations data and an assessment of the performance and efficiency of the waste retrieval system during NTF operations data and an assessment of the performance and efficiency of the waste retrieval system during NTF operations. The organization of this report is as follows: Section 1 provides an introduction to the report. Section 2 describes the NTF tank structures (W-3 and W-4 only) and the contents of the tanks. Section 3 outlines the objectives of the NTF testing and explains how these objectives were met. Section 4 provides a description of the various operating systems used in the NTF operations. Sections 5 and 6 present a summary of the data collected during NTF operations. Section 7 summarizes the maintenance activities performed and Section 8 summarizes the on-the-job training performed in the NTF. Section 9 summarizes the capital cost for the waste retrieval and characterization equipment and operating costs for performing the NTF work. Section 10 provides observations and lessons learned, and Section 11 provides a summary and conclusions.

  18. Improved Tank Testing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Nordseewerke Emden Hitachi Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Ltd. Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries Company, Ltd. Kawasaki Heavy Industries , Ltd... Harima Heavy Industries Co., LTD (U.S. office) Newport News ShipbuildingCo. Sun Shipbuildingand Dry Dock Co. Davie ShipbuildingLtd. Cargo tanks...shipbuilders listed below: American Bureau of Shipping U.S. Coast Guard Avondale Shipyards Co. General Dynamics/Quincy Shipbuilding Division 4 Ishikawajima

  19. Occurrence and characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae in food producing animals, minced meat and raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geser Nadine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of food animals as a possible reservoir for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae, and the dissemination of such strains into the food production chain need to be assessed. In this study 334 fecal samples from pigs, cattle, chicken and sheep were investigated at slaughter. Additionally, 100 raw milk samples, representing bulk tank milk of 100 different dairy farms, 104 minced meat (pork and beef samples and 67 E. coli isolates from cattle E. coli mastitis were analyzed. Results As many as 15.3% of the porcine, 13.7% of the bovine, 8.6% of the sheep and 63.4% of the chicken fecal samples yielded ESBL producers after an enrichment step. In contrast, none of the minced meat, none of the bulk tank milk samples and only one of the mastitis milk samples contained ESBL producing strains. Of the total of 91 isolates, 89 were E. coli, one was Citrobacter youngae and one was Enterobacter cloacae. PCR analysis revealed that 78 isolates (85.7% produced CTX-M group 1 ESBLs while six isolates (6.6% produced CTX-M group 9 enzymes. Five detected ESBLs (5.5% belonged to the SHV group and 2 isolates (2.2% contained a TEM-type enzyme. A total of 27 CTX-M producers were additionally PCR-positive for TEM-beta-lactamase. The ESBL-encoding genes of 53 isolates were sequenced of which 34 produced CTX-M-1, 6 produced CTX-M-14, 5 produced CTX-M-15 and also 5 produced SHV-12. Two isolates produced TEM-52 and one isolate expressed a novel CTX-M group 1 ESBL, CTX-M-117. One isolate--aside from a CTX-M ESBL-- contained an additional novel TEM-type broad-spectrum beta-lactamase, TEM-186. Conclusions The relatively high rates of ESBL producers in food animals and the high genetic diversity among these isolates are worrisome and indicate an established reservoir in farm animals.

  20. Cow's Milk Contamination of Human Milk Purchased via the Internet

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keim, Sarah A; Kulkarni, Manjusha M; McNamara, Kelly; Geraghty, Sheela R; Billock, Rachael M; Ronau, Rachel; Hogan, Joseph S; Kwiek, Jesse J

    2015-01-01

    .... Recipient infants risk the possibility of consuming contaminated or adulterated milk. Our objective was to test milk advertised for sale online as human milk to verify its human origin and to rule out contamination with cow's milk...

  1. ANALYSIS OF THE TANK 6F FINAL CHARACTERIZATION SAMPLES-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L.; Diprete, D.; Coleman, C.; Hay, M.; Shine, G.

    2012-06-28

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite

  2. Analysis of the Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm- 243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite

  3. Analysis Of The Tank 6F Final Characterization Samples-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.; Shine, E. P.

    2012-09-27

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 6F final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Fourteen residual Tank 6F solid samples from three areas on the floor of the tank were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August 2011. These Tank 6F samples were homogenized and combined into three composite samples based on a proportion compositing scheme and the resulting composite samples were analyzed for radiological, chemical and elemental components. Additional measurements performed on the Tank 6F composite samples include bulk density and water leaching of the solids to account for water soluble components. The composite Tank 6F samples were analyzed and the data reported in triplicate. Sufficient quality assurance standards and blanks were utilized to demonstrate adequate characterization of the Tank 6F samples. The main evaluation criteria were target detection limits specified in the technical task request document. While many of the target detection limits were met for the species characterized for Tank 6F some were not met. In a few cases, the relatively high levels of radioactive species of the same element or a chemically similar element precluded the ability to measure some isotopes to low levels. The isotopes whose detection limits were not met in all cases included Sn-126, Sb-126, Sb-126m, Eu-152, Cm-243 and Cf-249. SRNL, in conjunction with the customer, reviewed all of these cases and determined that the impacts of not meeting the target detection limits were acceptable. Based on the analyses of variance (ANOVA) for the inorganic constituents of Tank 6F, all the inorganic constituents displayed heterogeneity. The inorganic results demonstrated consistent differences across the composite samples: lowest concentrations for Composite Sample 1, intermediate-valued concentrations for Composite

  4. [Milk and health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Anna; Christophersen, Olav Albert; Høstmark, Arne T; Harstad, Odd Magne

    2007-10-04

    Milk has been an important part of Norwegian nutrition for generations. The article is a review of literature concerning research on milk and health. Relevant literature with results that were confirmed by others were chosen from acknowledged journals from Pubmed in the period 1977-2006, by using the search words milk, fat, atherosclerosis, omega-3, omega-6, cancer, allergy, trace elements, iodine and selenium. Milk and milk products contain many essential nutrients. The content of oleic acid, conjugated linoleic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, short- and medium chain fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and bioactive compounds may promote positive health effects. Certain studies indicate that a moderate intake of milk fat reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, possibly through reduced formation of small dense LDL-particles, despite of its inherent tendency to increase total cholesterol. For individuals with genetic metabolic defects, milk proteins, fat and milk sugar may cause health problems. The low pH in fermented milk and the formation of substances during the fermentation process may have a beneficial effect. Full-fat milk and fermented milk lead to delayed gastric emptying, and thereby to reduced glycaemia and reduced appetite. Harmful substances may be formed when proteins react with sugar, especially at a high temperature; a fact that should be considered with an increasing use of sweetened milk products. The cow's diet affects the milk's content of many nutrients as for example fatty acids, iodine and selenium. The composition of milk for commercial use should be investigated.

  5. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  6. [Cow's milk protein allergy through human milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, M; Loras-Duclaux, I; Lachaux, A

    2012-03-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) is the first allergy that affects infants. In this population, the incidence rate reaches 7.5%. The multiplicity and aspecificity of the symptoms makes its diagnosis sometimes complicated, especially in the delayed type (gastrointestinal, dermatological, and cutaneous). CMPA symptoms can develop in exclusively breastfed infants with an incidence rate of 0.5%. It, therefore, raises questions about sensitization to cow's milk proteins through breast milk. Transfer of native bovine proteins such as β-lactoglobulin into the breast milk is controversial: some authors have found bovine proteins in human milk but others point to cross-reactivity between human milk proteins and cow's milk proteins. However, it seems that a small percentage of dietary proteins can resist digestion and become potentially allergenic. Moreover, some authors suspect the transfer of some of these dietary proteins from the maternal bloodstream to breast milk, but the mechanisms governing sensitization are still being studied. Theoretically, CMPA diagnosis is based on clinical observations, prick-test or patch-test results, and cow's milk-specific IgE antibody concentration. A positive food challenge test usually confirms the diagnosis. No laboratory test is available to make a certain diagnosis, but the detection of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in the mother's milk, for example, seems to be advantageous since it is linked to CMA. Excluding cow's milk from the mother's diet is the only cure when she still wants to breastfeed. Usually, cow's milk proteins are reintroduced after 6 months of exclusion. Indeed, the prognosis for infants is very good: 80% acquire a tolerance before the age of 3 or 4 years. Mothers should not avoid dairy products during pregnancy and breastfeeding as preventive measures against allergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. 9 CFR 94.16 - Milk and milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Milk and milk products. 94.16 Section... and milk products. (a) The following milk products are exempt from the provisions of this part: (1... the United States under this part; (2) Butter; and (3) Butteroil. (b) Milk and milk products...

  8. Bayesian estimation of test characteristics of real-time PCR, bacteriological culture and California mastitis test for diagnosis of intramammary infections with Staphylococcus aureus in dairy cattle at routine milk recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmmod, Yasser S; Toft, Nils; Katholm, Jørgen; Grønbæk, Carsten; Klaas, Ilka C

    2013-11-01

    Danish farmers can order a real-time PCR mastitis diagnostic test on routinely taken cow-level samples from milk recordings. Validation of its performance in comparison to conventional mastitis diagnostics under field conditions is essential for efficient control of intramammary infections (IMI) with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Therefore, the objective of this study was to estimate the sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of real-time PCR, bacterial culture (BC) and California mastitis test (CMT) for the diagnosis of the naturally occurring IMI with S. aureus in routinely collected milk samples using latent class analysis (LCA) to avoid the assumption of a perfect reference test. Using systematic random sampling, a total of 609 lactating dairy cows were selected from 6 dairy herds with bulk tank milk PCR cycle threshold (Ct) value ≤39 for S. aureus. At routine milk recordings, automatically obtained cow-level (composite) milk samples were analyzed by PCR and at the same milking, 2436 quarter milk samples were collected aseptically for BC and CMT. Results showed that 140 cows (23%) were positive for S. aureus IMI by BC while 170 cows (28%) were positive by PCR. Estimates of Se and Sp for PCR were higher than test estimates of BC and CMT. SeCMT was higher than SeBC however, SpBC was higher than SpCMT. SePCR was 91%, while SeBC was 53%, and SeCMT was 61%. SpPCR was 99%, while SpBC was 89%, and SpCMT was 65%. In conclusion, PCR has a higher performance than the conventional diagnostic tests (BC and CMT) suggesting its usefulness as a routine test for accurate diagnosis of S. aureus IMI from dairy cows at routine milk recordings. The use of LCA provided estimates of the test characteristics for two currently diagnostic tests (BC, CMT) and a novel technique (real-time PCR) for diagnosing S. aureus IMI under field conditions at routine milk recordings in Denmark. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tank 12H Acidic Chemical Cleaning Sample Analysis And Material Balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. J.; Reboul, S. H.; Wiersma, B. J.; Coleman, C. J.

    2013-11-08

    A process of Bulk Oxalic Acid (BOA) chemical cleaning was performed for Tank 12H during June and July of 2013 to remove all or a portion of the approximately 4400 gallon sludge heel. Three strikes of oxalic acid (nominally 4 wt% or 2 wt%) were used at 55°C and tank volumes of 96- to 140-thousand gallons. This report details the sample analysis of a scrape sample taken prior to BOA cleaning and dip samples taken during BOA cleaning. It also documents a rudimentary material balance for the Tank 12H cleaning results.

  10. Accountability Tanks Calibration Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, James G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Salazar, William Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Finstad, Casey Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-25

    MET-1 utilizes tanks to store plutonium in solution. The Nuclear Material Control & Accountability group at LANL requires that MET-1 be able to determine the amount of SNM remaining in solution in the tanks for accountability purposes. For this reason it is desired to determine how well various operators may read the volume of liquid left in the tank with the tank measurement device (glass column or slab). The accuracy of the measurement is then compared to the current SAFE-NMCA acceptance criteria for lean and rich plutonium solutions to determine whether or not the criteria are reasonable and may be met.

  11. Tank Characterization Report for Double Shell Tank (DST) 241-AN-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ADAMS, M.R.

    2000-03-23

    This report interprets information about the tank answering a series of six questions covering areas such as information drivers, tank history, tank comparisons, disposal implications, data quality and quantity, and unique aspects of the tank.

  12. Tal en tanke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent F.; Stjernfelt, Frederik

    Den svenske biskop og poet Esais Tegnèr har engang sagt: "Menneskers ord og tanker fødes sammen, at tale uklart er at tænke uklart." Denne lærebog er et lynkursus i at tænke og tale klart - og i at være på vagt over for uklar tænkning og tale, hvor den end optræder.Tal en tanke er hurtigt læst og...

  13. Tank closure reducing grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, T.B.

    1997-04-18

    A reducing grout has been developed for closing high level waste tanks at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. The grout has a low redox potential, which minimizes the mobility of Sr{sup 90}, the radionuclide with the highest dose potential after closure. The grout also has a high pH which reduces the solubility of the plutonium isotopes. The grout has a high compressive strength and low permeability, which enhances its ability to limit the migration of contaminants after closure. The grout was designed and tested by Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc. Placement methods were developed by the Savannah River Site personnel.

  14. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at least...

  15. Pilot study: tendency of increasing iodine content in human milk and cow's milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, N; Möller, U; Leiterer, M; Franke, K; Jahreis, G

    2005-01-01

    The iodine supply in Germany has improved throughout the last decade, albeit with enormous differences between individuals and regions. In the Thuringian city of Jena, analyses of the iodine content of human milk have been undertaken regularly since 1982. Significantly increasing iodine concentrations in human and cow's milk have been found. Therefore, the current situation and the effectiveness of measures to prevent iodine deficiency demands re-evaluation. The iodine content of human milk from 32 lactating mothers was analysed on the 5th day (mean) postpartum and mothers' dietary iodine intake during the last two months of pregnancy was assessed by means of a food frequency questionnaire. To corroborate the assumption that the increasing iodine levels of cow's milk are one of the main reasons for the improved iodine supply, the iodine concentration of 34 cow's milk bulk-samples was also determined. Both human and cow's milk samples were analysed by the ICP-MS method. Twenty women took iodine supplements (mean daily intake = 175 microg). The average daily iodine intake of the 20 supplemented and 12 non-supplemented women was 258 microg and 116 microg, respectively. Daily iodine intake from food and beverages was significantly lower in supplemented women (83 microg/day). The average iodine content of human milk was 169 +/- 88 microg/l with a range of 33 - 348 microg/l. This content is two times higher than levels from 1994 in the same area. There was no difference in the human milk iodine content between mothers taking supplements and those who did not. Cow's milk samples showed a mean iodine concentration of 178 +/- 131 microg/l (range 48 - 661 microg/l).

  16. Cow's milk and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these problems, your health care provider may recommend soy milk. But many children who are allergic to milk are also allergic to soy. Children usually outgrow allergies or intolerances by the ...

  17. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  18. 27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tank car and tank truck... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport spirits for use in wine production will be constructed...

  19. 27 CFR 27.174 - Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tank cars and tank trucks... Tank cars and tank trucks to be sealed. Where a shipment of distilled spirits from customs custody to the distilled spirits plant is made in a tank car or tank truck, all openings affording access to the...

  20. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  1. Milk demystified by chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2014-09-01

    This article traces the decline of milk from a heavenly elixir to a tradeable food. Early cultures regarded milk not as a simple nutrient, but a living fluid. Heroes and gods were believed to have been nurtured by animals after being abandoned. Character traits were assumed to be transmitted by milk; infantile diseases were attributed to "bad milk", whereas "good milk" was used as a remedy. With chemical methods developed at the end of the 18th century, it became known that human milk was higher in sugar and lower in protein than cow's milk. During the 19th century, "scientific" feeding emerged that meant modifying cow's milk to imitate the proportion of nutrients in human milk. In Boston from 1893, Rotch initiated the "percentage" method, requiring a physician's prescription. In Paris from 1894, Budin sterilized bottled infant milk. In Berlin in 1898, Rubner measured oxygen and energy uptake by calorimetry, prompting feeding by calories, and Czerny introduced regulated feeding by the clock. These activities ignored the emotional dimension of infant nutrition and the anti-infective properties of human milk. They may have also enhanced the decline in breastfeeding, which reached an all-time low in 1971. Milk's demystification made artificial nutrition safer, but paved the way for commercially produced infant formula.

  2. Special Milk Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Special Milk Program provides milk to children in schools, child care institutions and eligible camps that do not participate in other Federal child nutrition meal service programs. The program reimburses schools and institutions for the milk they serve. In 2008, 4,676 schools and residential child care institutions participated, along with…

  3. Research Award: Think Tank Iniave

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division teams. The Think Tank Iniave is a global program that supports independent policy research organizaons – or "think tanks" – in ...

  4. Enhanced Waste Tank Level Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M.R.

    1999-06-24

    'With the increased sensitivity of waste-level measurements in the H-Area Tanks and with periods of isolation, when no mass transfer occurred for certain tanks, waste-level changes have been recorded with are unexplained.'

  5. Surplus yeast tank failing catastrophically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2016-01-01

    GOOD REASON FOR CAUTION I A large surplus yeast tank shot into the air leaving the floor plate and the contents behind. Although not designed for overpressure, the tank was kept at “very slight overpressure” to suppress nuisance foaming. The brewery was unaware of the hazards of compressed air...

  6. Solitons in a wave tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M.; Smith, H.; Scott, Alwyn C.

    1984-01-01

    A wave tank experiment (first described by the nineteenth-century engineer and naval architect John Scott Russell) relates a linear eigenvalue problem from elementary quantum mechanics to a striking feature of modern nonlinear wave theory: multiple generation of solitons. The tank experiment...

  7. Cleaning Validation of Fermentation Tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Satu; Friis, Alan; Wirtanen, Gun

    2008-01-01

    Reliable test methods for checking cleanliness are needed to evaluate and validate the cleaning process of fermentation tanks. Pilot scale tanks were used to test the applicability of various methods for this purpose. The methods found to be suitable for validation of the clenlinees were visula...

  8. Research Award: Think Tank Initiative

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    One important dimension of the Initiative is to capture and share learning about strategies for supporting and managing policy research organizations. The Think Tank Initiative ... proposals could address one/some of the following research questions: •. How do think tanks communicate effectively in policy environments?

  9. Modelling of baffled stirred tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstedt, H.; Lahtinen, M. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The three-dimensional flow field of a baffled stirred tank has been calculated using four different turbulence models. The tank is driven by a Rushton-type impeller. The boundary condition for the impeller region has been given as a source term or by calculating the impeller using the sliding mesh technique. Calculated values have been compared with measured data. (author)

  10. CHARACTERIZATION AND ACTUAL WASTE TEST WITH TANK 5F SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, M. S.; Crapse, K. P.; Fink, S. D.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2007-08-30

    The initial phase of bulk waste removal operations was recently completed in Tank 5F. Video inspection of the tank indicates several mounds of sludge still remain in the tank. Additionally, a mound of white solids was observed under Riser 5. In support of chemical cleaning and heel removal programs, samples of the sludge and the mound of white solids were obtained from the tank for characterization and testing. A core sample of the sludge and Super Snapper sample of the white solids were characterized. A supernate dip sample from Tank 7F was also characterized. A portion of the sludge was used in two tank cleaning tests using oxalic acid at 50 C and 75 C. The filtered oxalic acid from the tank cleaning tests was subsequently neutralized by addition to a simulated Tank 7F supernate. Solids and liquid samples from the tank cleaning test and neutralization test were characterized. A separate report documents the results of the gas generation from the tank cleaning test using oxalic acid and Tank 5F sludge. The characterization results for the Tank 5F sludge sample (FTF-05-06-55) appear quite good with respect to the tight precision of the sample replicates, good results for the glass standards, and minimal contamination found in the blanks and glass standards. The aqua regia and sodium peroxide fusion data also show good agreement between the two dissolution methods. Iron dominates the sludge composition with other major contributors being uranium, manganese, nickel, sodium, aluminum, and silicon. The low sodium value for the sludge reflects the absence of supernate present in the sample due to the core sampler employed for obtaining the sample. The XRD and CSEM results for the Super Snapper salt sample (i.e., white solids) from Tank 5F (FTF-05-07-1) indicate the material contains hydrated sodium carbonate and bicarbonate salts along with some aluminum hydroxide. These compounds likely precipitated from the supernate in the tank. A solubility test showed the material

  11. Microfabricated Bulk Piezoelectric Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Oliver M.

    Piezoelectric voltage transformers (PTs) can be used to transform an input voltage into a different, required output voltage needed in electronic and electro- mechanical systems, among other varied uses. On the macro scale, they have been commercialized in electronics powering consumer laptop liquid crystal displays, and compete with an older, more prevalent technology, inductive electromagnetic volt- age transformers (EMTs). The present work investigates PTs on smaller size scales that are currently in the academic research sphere, with an eye towards applications including micro-robotics and other small-scale electronic and electromechanical sys- tems. PTs and EMTs are compared on the basis of power and energy density, with PTs trending towards higher values of power and energy density, comparatively, indicating their suitability for small-scale systems. Among PT topologies, bulk disc-type PTs, operating in their fundamental radial extension mode, and free-free beam PTs, operating in their fundamental length extensional mode, are good can- didates for microfabrication and are considered here. Analytical modeling based on the Extended Hamilton Method is used to predict device performance and integrate mechanical tethering as a boundary condition. This model differs from previous PT models in that the electric enthalpy is used to derive constituent equations of motion with Hamilton's Method, and therefore this approach is also more generally applica- ble to other piezoelectric systems outside of the present work. Prototype devices are microfabricated using a two mask process consisting of traditional photolithography combined with micropowder blasting, and are tested with various output electri- cal loads. 4mm diameter tethered disc PTs on the order of .002cm. 3 , two orders smaller than the bulk PT literature, had the followingperformance: a prototype with electrode area ratio (input area / output area) = 1 had peak gain of 2.3 (+/- 0.1), efficiency of 33 (+/- 0

  12. The influence of chemical composition of milk on yield of semi-hard cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Bojanić-Rašović M.; Mirecki S.; Nikolić N.; Rašović R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of paper was to examine the impact of the milk quality on yield of semi-hard naturally dried cheese, produced in cheese plant factory ZZ 'Cijevna' in Podgorica. Tests were conducted on 6 samples of bulk milk of cows and 6 productive batch of cheese. Chemical tests of the bulk milk have been done on the device MilcoScan 4000, and the determination content dry matter of whey and dry matter of cheese on the device MilcoScan FT 120. Theoretical yield of cheese wa...

  13. Human Milk Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Unexpected Decrease in Milk Production after Fenbendazole Treatment of Dairy Cows during Early Grazing Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinet, Nadine; Chartier, Christophe; Bareille, Nathalie; Lehebel, Anne; Ponnau, Adeline; Brisseau, Nadine; Chauvin, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) infection can impair milk production (MP) in dairy cows. To investigate whether MP would be optimized by spring targeted-selective anthelmintic treatment in grazing cows, we assessed (1) the effect on MP of an anthelmintic treatment applied 1.5 to 2 months after turn-out, and (2) herd and individual indicators associated with the post-treatment MP response. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted in 13 dairy farms (578 cows) in western France in spring 2012. In each herd, lactating cows of the treatment group received fenbendazole orally, control cows remained untreated. Daily cow MP was recorded from 2 weeks before until 15 weeks after treatment. Individual serum pepsinogen and anti-Ostertagia antibody levels (expressed as ODR), faecal egg count and bulk tank milk (BTM) Ostertagia ODR were measured at treatment time. Anthelmintic treatment applied during the previous housing period was recorded for each cow. In each herd, information regarding heifers’ grazing and anthelmintic treatment history was collected to assess the Time of Effective Contact (TEC, in months) with GIN infective larvae before the first calving. The effect of treatment on weekly MP averages and its relationships with herd and individual indicators were studied using linear mixed models with two nested random effects (cow within herd). Unexpectedly, spring treatment had a significant detrimental effect on MP (-0.92 kg/cow/day on average). This negative MP response was particularly marked in high producing cows, in cows not treated during the previous housing period or with high pepsinogen levels, and in cows from herds with a high TEC or a high BTM ODR. This post-treatment decrease in MP may be associated with immuno-inflammatory mechanisms. Until further studies can assess whether this unexpected result can be generalized, non-persistent treatment of immunized adult dairy cows against GIN should not be recommended in early grazing season. PMID

  15. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine milk in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Kheirabadi, Elahe Kazemi

    2012-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in humans is one of the most common infections worldwide. However, the origin and transmission of this bacterium has not been clearly explained. One of the suggested theories is transmission via raw milk from animals to human beings. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate of H. pylori in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds in Iran. In the present study, 447 bulk milk samples from 230 dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds were collected in four provinces and tested for H. pylori by cultural method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of the ureC (glmM) gene. The animals whose milk samples collected for this study were clinically healthy. Using the cultural method, three of 447 milk samples (0.67%), including two sheep (2.2%) and one buffalo (1.6%) milk samples, were found to be contaminated with H. pylori. H. pylori ureC gene was detected in 56 (12.5%) of milk samples, including 19 cow (14.1%), 11 sheep (12.2%), nine goat (8.7%), two camel (3.6%), and 15 buffalo (23.4%) milk samples. Using PCR method, there were significant differences (pmilk samples collected from different species. The present study is the first report of the isolation of H. pylori from raw sheep and buffalo milk in Iran and the first demonstration of H. pylori DNA in camel and buffalo milk.

  16. Tank farms hazards assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-30

    Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

  17. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  18. Supporting document for the Southeast Quadrant historical tank content estimate report for SY-tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Consort, S.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Southeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground double-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East and West Areas. This report summarizes historical information such as waste history, temperature profiles, psychrometric data, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance are included. Components of the data management effort, such as Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layer Model, Supernatant Mixing Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates which generate these tank content estimates, are also given in this report.

  19. Effect of fresh grass feeding, pasture grazing and organic/biodynamic farming on bovine milk triglyceride profile and implications for authentication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capuano, E.; Boerrigter-Eenling, G.R.; Eigersma, A.; Ruth, van S.M.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, 113 tank milk samples were collected from 30 farms located in the Netherlands and analyzed for their triacylglycerol (TAG) and cholesterol profiles. Significant differences in the TAG profile between winter and spring–early summer milk were observed. The differences between

  20. Estrone, 17β-estradiol and progesterone concentrations in processed milk with different fat contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snoj Tomaž

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to determine estrone (E1, 17β-estradiol (E2 and progesterone (P4 concentrations in processed milk with different fat contents and to compare the concentrations of these hormones in commercial ultrahigh temperature (UHT processed milk and commercial pasteurized milk. Materials and Methods. Commercial milks with different fat contents (UHT 0.5 %, UHT 1.5 %, UHT 3.5 % and pasteurized 3.5 % (10 samples of each type of milk were purchased in local stores. E1, E2 and P4 concentrations were determined by commercial ELISA kits. Results and Conclusions. E1 concentrations were below the limit of detection (15 pg mL-1 in all milks except in two UHT 3.5 % (out of 10 and two pasteurized 3.5 % (out of 10 milk samples. Mean E2 and P4 concentrations in UHT 3.5 % milk (25.37 ± 1.15 pg mL-1 and 10.76 ± 0.43 ng mL-1, respectively were significantly higher than in UHT 0.5 % milk (19.38 ± 0.79 pg mL-1 and 7.06 ± 0.26 ng mL-1, respectively. Significant positive correlations were determined between hormone concentrations and milk fat contents. Relatively high E2 and P4 concentrations indicate that the bulk of milk in the commercial milks examined originated from pregnant cows.

  1. Association between milk protein polymorphism and milk production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Milk production traits were chosen as milk yield, average daily milk yield and lactation length. These traits were associated with milk protein types. Genetic variants of milk protein were identified by starch gel electrophoresis containing mercaptoethanol and urea. The allele gene frequencies of A, B, and C of as1-Cn loci and ...

  2. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  3. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS & RADIOLOGICAL & TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SANDGREN, K.R.

    2005-03-03

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farm safety analyses. The current revision also includes atmospheric dispersion coefficients used for analyses of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System. The basic equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included.

  4. The potential of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of milk samples to predict energy intake and efficiency in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McParland, S; Berry, D P

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of animal-level and herd-level energy intake, energy balance, and feed efficiency affect day-to-day herd management strategies; information on these traits at an individual animal level is also useful in animal breeding programs. A paucity of data (especially at the individual cow level), of feed intake in particular, hinders the inclusion of such attributes in herd management decision-support tools and breeding programs. Dairy producers have access to an individual cow milk sample at least once daily during lactation, and consequently any low-cost phenotyping strategy should consider exploiting measureable properties in this biological sample, reflecting the physiological status and performance of the cow. Infrared spectroscopy is the study of the interaction of an electromagnetic wave with matter and it is used globally to predict milk quality parameters on routinely acquired individual cow milk samples and bulk tank samples. Thus, exploiting infrared spectroscopy in next-generation phenotyping will ensure potentially rapid application globally with a negligible additional implementation cost as the infrastructure already exists. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS) analysis is already used to predict milk fat and protein concentrations, the ratio of which has been proposed as an indicator of energy balance. Milk FTIRS is also able to predict the concentration of various fatty acids in milk, the composition of which is known to change when body tissue is mobilized; that is, when the cow is in negative energy balance. Energy balance is mathematically very similar to residual energy intake (REI), a suggested measure of feed efficiency. Therefore, the prediction of energy intake, energy balance, and feed efficiency (i.e., REI) from milk FTIRS seems logical. In fact, the accuracy of predicting (i.e., correlation between predicted and actual values; root mean square error in parentheses) energy intake, energy balance, and REI from milk FTIRS in

  5. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T. B.

    2013-10-01

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

  6. Evaluation of the bacteriological quality of raw cow's milk at various stages of the milk production chain on farms in Algeria. © OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health), 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamiroune, M; Berber, A; Boubekeur, S

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluates hygiene practices on 53 dairy farms in the Jijel and Blida regions of Algeria. A survey questionnaire was drawn up covering milking conditions and cleaning of the equipment. In parallel, bacteriological analyses were carried out to estimate the rate, source and development of bacterial contamination in raw milk produced on the farm. In addition, screening was performed to detect the presence of inhibitor residues. The results of the survey revealed poor livestock conditions and milking practices that could explain the presence of bacteria in cow's milk. The bacteriological results showed that 76.1% of milk samples taken from cow udders complied with legal standards, compared with only 35.8% of milk samples taken from storage tanks. Moreover, bacterial inhibitors were detected in 28.8% of milk samples. These results showed that the hands of milkers, udders, teat cups, utensils, the water used during milking and the milking environment were all potential sources of milk contamination by the bacteria under investigation. These results suggest that, to improve the bacteriological quality of milk, there is a need to introduce a quality policy which places a premium on milk of high bacteriological quality and aims to generalise good hygiene practices throughout the dairy production chain. © OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health), 2016.

  7. Cow's milk proteins in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscia, A; Orrù, S; Di Nicola, P; Giuliani, F; Rovelli, I; Peila, C; Martano, C; Chiale, F; Bertino, E

    2012-01-01

    Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics techniques cow's milk allergens in human colostrum of term and preterm newborns' mothers, not previously detected, in order to understand if such allergens could be cause of sensitization during lactation. Term colostrum samples from 62 healthy mothers and preterm colostrum samples from 11 healthy mothers were collected for this purpose. The most relevant finding was the detection of the intact bovine alpha-S1-casein in both term and preterm colostrum. Using this method, which allows direct proteins identification, beta-lactoglobulin was not detected in any of colostrum samples. According to our results bovine alpha 1 casein that is considered a major cow's milk allergen is readily secreted in human milk: further investigations are needed in order to clarify if alpha-1-casein has a major role in sensitization or tolerance to cow's milk of exclusively breastfed predisposed infants.

  8. 49 CFR 229.217 - Fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel tank. 229.217 Section 229.217 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Crashworthiness Design Requirements § 229.217 Fuel tank. (a) External fuel tanks. Locomotives equipped with external fuel tanks shall, at a minimum...

  9. Underground Storage Tanks in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Underground storage tank (UST) sites which store petroleum in Iowa. Includes sites which have been reported to DNR, and have active or removed underground storage...

  10. ROMANIAN MILK MARKET ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvius T. STANCIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the evolution of Romanian milk market in the European market context: primary production, milk processing, supply and demand, consumption, prices and quality; marketing, the domestic market. Deficiencies in the dairy sector has created conditions for import rising. Last year brought about significant increases in imports of raw milk, decreased milk product supplied by local farmers and keeping the main positions of the processors on the market. Domestic consumption of milk per capita remains low in comparison with the European average. The reduction of milk quotas will be a challenge to domestic producers. Development of associations of producers may be a viable option to ensure the continuity of business for the Romanian farmers.

  11. Review of High Level Waste Tanks Ultrasonic Inspection Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B

    2006-03-09

    A review of the data collected during ultrasonic inspection of the Type I high level waste tanks has been completed. The data was analyzed for relevance to the possibility of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion. The review of the Type I tank UT inspection data has confirmed that the vapor space general corrosion is not an unusually aggressive phenomena and correlates well with predicted corrosion rates for steel exposed to bulk solution. The corrosion rates are seen to decrease with time as expected. The review of the temperature data did not reveal any obvious correlations between high temperatures and the occurrences of leaks. The complex nature of temperature-humidity interaction, particularly with respect to vapor corrosion requires further understanding to infer any correlation. The review of the waste level data also did not reveal any obvious correlations.

  12. Vibration considerations for cryogenic tanks using glass bubbles insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werlink, Rudy John; Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared P.

    2012-06-01

    The use of glass bubbles as an efficient and practical thermal insulation system hasbeen previously demonstrated in cryogenic storage tanks. One such example is a spherical,vacuum-jacketed liquid hydrogen vessel of 218,000 liter capacity where the boiloff rate hasbeen reduced by approximately 50 percent. Further applications may include non-stationarytanks such as mobile tankers and tanks with extreme duty cycles or exposed to significantvibration environments. Space rocket launch events and mobile tanker life cycles representtwo harsh cases of mechanical vibration exposure. A number of bulk fill insulationmaterials including glass bubbles, perlite powders, and aerogel granules were tested forvibration effects and mechanical behavior using a custom design holding fixture subjectedto random vibration on an Electrodynamic Shaker. The settling effects for mixtures ofinsulation materials were also investigated. The vibration test results and granular particleanalysis are presented with considerations and implications for future cryogenic tankapplications.

  13. Mercury Dispersion Modeling And Purge Ventilation Stack Height Determination For Tank 40H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Giboyeaux, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-19

    The SRNL Atmospheric Technologies Group performed an analysis for mercury emissions from H-Tank Farm - Tank 40 ventilation system exhaust in order to assess whether the Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL), or Threshold Limit Value (TLV) levels for mercury will be exceeded during bulk sludge slurry mixing and sludge removal operations. The American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) was used as the main dispersion modelling tool for this analysis. The results indicated that a 45-foot stack is sufficient to raise the plume centerline from the Tank 40 release to prevent mercury exposure problems for any of the stack discharge scenarios provided. However, a 42-foot stack at Tank 40 is sufficient to prevent mercury exposure concerns in all emission scenarios except the 50 mg/m3 release. At a 42-foot stack height, values exceeding the exposure standards are only measured on receptors located above 34 feet.

  14. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION OF HANFORD SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) WASTES LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING, D.L.

    2006-12-05

    Laboratory studies demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable process for separating Hanford medium-curie waste into high-curie and low-curie fractions. The product salt from the crystallization process qualifies as low-curie feed to a supplemental treatment system (e.g., bulk vitrification). The high-curie raffinate is returned to the double-shell tank system, eventually to be sent as feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Process flowsheet tests were designed with the aid of thermodynamic chemical modeling. Laboratory equipment design and test procedures were developed using simulated tank waste samples. Proof-of-concept flowsheet tests were carried out in a shielded hot cell using actual tank waste samples. Data from both simulated waste tests and actual tank waste tests demonstrate that the process exceeded all of the separation criteria established for the program.

  15. Safety evaluation for packaging 222-S laboratory cargo tank for onetime type B material shipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, P.M.

    1994-08-19

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to evaluate and document the safety of the onetime shipment of bulk radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory cargo tank (222-S cargo tank). The 222-S cargo tank is a US Department of Transportation (DOT) MC-312 specification (DOT 1989) cargo tank, vehicle registration number HO-64-04275, approved for low specific activity (LSA) shipments in accordance with the DOT Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). In accordance with the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1A, Chapter III (RL 1988), an equivalent degree of safety shall be provided for onsite shipments as would be afforded by the DOT shipping regulations for a radioactive material package. This document demonstrates that this packaging system meets the onsite transportation safety criteria for a onetime shipment of Type B contents.

  16. Comparison of Chamcham manufactured from cow milk and buffalo milk

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, M A; M. H. Rashid; Kajal, M.F.I.; Istiak, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to study quality of Chamcham manufactured from cow milk and to compare it with Chamcham manufactured from buffalo milk and mixture of cow and buffalo milk. Three types of Chamcham were prepared from cow milk(A), buffalo milk(B) and 50% cow +50% buffalo milk(C).In this experiment the quality of prepared Chamcham were evaluated with the help of chemical test. The moisture, total solids, protein, fat, ash and carbohydrate contents of cow milk and buffalo milk Chamch...

  17. Milk: Past and Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulajić, S.; Đorđević, J.; Ledina, T.; Šarčević, D.; Baltić, M. Ž.

    2017-09-01

    Although milk/dairy consumption is part of many cultures and is recommended in most dietary guidelines around the world, its contribution to overall diet quality remains a matter of controversy, leading to a highly polarized debate within the scientific community, media and public sector. The present article, at first, describes the evolutionary roots of milk consumption, then reviews the milk-derived bioactive peptides as health-promoting components. The third part of the article, in general, presents the associations between milk nutrients, disease prevention, and health promotion.

  18. Sphingosine basis in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Ribar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids are widespread membrane components that are found in all eukaryotic cells. They are defined as compounds having a long-chain sphingoid base as the backbone. The most frequent long-chain bases in most of the mammals are D-erythro-sphinganine and sphingosine. Sphingolipids can be expected in minor quantities in all food products. Milk fat contains a number of different sphingolipid classes. Originally they were presumed to contribute to the structural integrity of membranes, but there nowadays it is confirmed that they have an important physiological role. Dietary sphingolipids have gained attention because of their possibility to inhibit colon cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the concentrations of free and total sphinganine and sphingosine in milk (human, cow's, sheep’s, goat’s, soy’s Sphingolipids were extracted from milk. Free and total sphingoid bases were obtained by alkaline and acid hydrolysis respectively. Sphinganin and sphingosine were determined by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. The results of this research illustrate the differences between the concentrations of sphingoid bases in cow’s milk with various content of milk fat. The concentrations of free sphingosine and sphinganine in cow’s milk were lower than in human milk. In sheep’s and goat’s milk, the concentrations of total sphingoid bases were higher than in human and cow’s milk. Quantity of the most sphingoid bases decreased during pasteurization.

  19. Milk and soy allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Jacob D; Cocco, Renata R; Järvinen, Kirsi M

    2011-04-01

    Cow's milk allergy (CMA) affects 2% to 3% of young children and presents with a wide range of IgE and non-IgE-mediated clinical syndromes, which have a significant economic and lifestyle effect. It is logical that a review of CMA would be linked to a review of soy allergy because soy formula is often an alternative source of nutrition for infants who do not tolerate cow's milk. This review examines the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, natural history, and diagnosis of cow's milk and soy allergy. Cross-reactivity and management of milk allergy are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from milks used for Iranian traditional cheese in Lighvan cheese factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavy, Mir-Hassan; Esmaeili, Saber; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Bagheri Amiri, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Lighvan cheese is a semi-hard cheese which has a popular market in Iran and neighboring countries. The aim of this study was evaluating the contamination of milks used for Lighvan cheese making with Listeria monocytogenes. Raw milk samples were randomly collected from different cheese producing factories (sampling carried out from large milk tanks used cheese making in factories). Isolation of L. monocytogenes was performed according to ISO 11290 and biochemical tests were done to identify and confirm L. monocytogenes. 9 samples (50%) of the 18 collected samples from milk tanks in Lighvan cheese producing factories were contaminated with L. monocytogenes. The concentration of L. monocytogenes in all 9 positive samples was 40 CFU/ml. This study is the first report of L. monocytogenes contamination in raw milks used for Lighvan cheese production in Iran. Regarding the fact that these cheeses are produced from raw milk and no heating process is performed on them its milk contamination can be a potential risk for consumers.

  1. Effect of increased milking frequency and residual milk removal on milk production and milk fatty acid composition in lactating cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferneborg, Sabine; Kovac, Lucia; Shingfield, Kevin J; Agenäs, Sigrid

    2017-11-01

    It has been well established that milk yield is affected both by milking frequency and due to the removal of residual milk, but the influence of a combination of these factors is unclear. In this study, four mid-lactation cows were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design to test the hypothesis that the effects of more frequent milking and residual milk removal on milk yield and composition are additive and alter milk fatty acid composition. Treatments comprised two or four times daily milking in combination with (or without) residual milk removal over a 96 h interval preceded by a 2 d pretreatment period and followed by a 8 d washout in each 14 d experimental period. Milk was sampled at each milking for the analysis of gross composition and SCC. Samples of available and residual milk collected on the last milking during each treatment period were collected and submitted for fatty acid composition analysis. Increases in milking frequency and residual milk removal alone or in combination had no effect on milk yield or on the secretion of lactose and protein in milk. However, residual milk removal during more frequent milking increased milk fat yield. Milking treatments had no major influence on the fatty acid composition of available milk, but resulted in rather small changes in the relative abundance of specific fatty acids, with no evidence that the additive effects of treatments were due to higher utilisation of preformed fatty acids relative to fatty acid synthesis de novo. For all treatments, fat composition of available and residual milk was rather similar indicating a highly uniform fatty acid composition of milk fat within the mammary gland.

  2. Milk-borne campylobacter infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, D A; Jones, D M

    1981-01-01

    The common factor in 13 recent outbreaks of Campylobacter jejuni enteritis was the consumption of unpasteurised or incompletely pasteurised milk. C jejuni is a common commensal in the alimentary tract of milking cows, but it is not clear how the milk becomes contaminated with the organism. Pasteurisation will readily eliminate the organism from milk. In England and Wales 3% of milk retailed is still unpasteurised, and in the light of these findings it is suggested that only pasteurised milk s...

  3. Radiation effects in bulk silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Cor; Vanhellemont, Jan

    1994-01-01

    This paper highlights important aspects related to irradiation effects in bulk silicon. Some basic principles related to the interaction of radiation with material, i.e. ionization and atomic displacement, are briefly reviewed. A physical understanding of radiation effects strongly depends on the availability of appropriate analytical tools. These tools are critically accessed from a silicon bulk viewpoint. More detailed information, related to the properties of the bulk damage and some dedicated application aspects, is given for both electron and proton irradiations. Emphasis is placed on radiation environments encountered during space missions and on their influence on the electrical performance of devices such as memories and image sensors.

  4. Public health risk of some milk borne pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M.A. Zeinhom

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 150 samples of raw milk, 75 each of farm and market milk were collected from different farms and supermarkets in Beni-Suef Governorate, in addition to 30 stool samples from milk handlers and 25 milker's hand swabs were examined for the presence of Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, Aeromonas and Yersinia. Isolates were identified biochemically and serologically. The obtained results revealed that E. coli was detected in a percentage of 26.7% and 16% in the examined raw market and bulk farm milk respectively, while in stool and hand swabs samples were 16.6% and 16%, respectively. E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. failed to be detected in any of the examined samples. Additionally, 45% and 16.7% of the recovered E. coli strains from the examined raw market and farm milk samples were enteropathogenic O166, while 55% and 83.3 were untypable, respectively. On the other hand 60% of human stool samples isolates were O 148 and 40% of the isolates were untypable, while 100% of the hand swab isolates were untypable. The results also exhibits isolation rate of Aeromonas hydrophila in a percentage of 24%, 13.3%, 10% and 16% from market milk, farm milk samples, stool and hand swabs respectively. While Yersinea enterocolitica represent 3.3% in the stool samples only. The public health significance of isolated strains as well as suggested control measures were discussed.

  5. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Landry

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original

  6. Hydrogen no-vent fill testing in a 1.2 cubic foot (34 liter) tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Driscoll, Susan L.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental results of no-vent fill testing with liquid hydrogen in a 1.2 cubic foot (34 liter) stainless steel tank are presented. More than 40 tests were performed with various liquid inlet temperatures, inlet flowrates, initial tank wall temperatures, and liquid injection techniques. Fill levels equal to or exceeding 90 percent by volume were achieved in 40 percent of the tests with the tank pressure limited to a maximum of 30 psia. Three liquid injection techniques were employed; top spray, upward pipe discharge, and bottom diffuser. Effects of each of the varied parameters on the tank pressure history and final fill level are evaluated. The final fill level is found to be indirectly proportional to the initial wall and inlet liquid temperatures and directly proportional to the inlet liquid flowrate. Furthermore, the top spray is the most efficient no-vent fill method of the three configurations examined. The success of this injection method is primarily due to condensation of the ullage vapor onto the incoming liquid droplets. Ullage condensation counteracts the tank pressure rise resulting from energy exchange between the fluid and the warmer tank walls, and ullage compression. Upward pipe discharge from the tank bottom is the next most efficient method. Fluid circulation induced by this fill configuration tends to diminish thermal stratification in the bulk liquid, thus enhancing condensation at the liquid gas interface.

  7. Modification of a liquid hydrogen tank for integrated refrigeration and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanger, A. M.; Jumper, K. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Notardonato, W. U.

    2015-12-01

    The modification and outfitting of a 125,000-liter liquid hydrogen tank was performed to provide integrated refrigeration and storage capability. These functions include zero boil-off, liquefaction, and densification and therefore require provisions for sub-atmospheric tank pressures within the vacuum-jacketed, multilayer insulated tank. The primary structural modification was to add stiffening rings inside the inner vessel. The internal stiffening rings were designed, built, and installed per the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII, to prevent collapse in the case of vacuum jacket failure in combination with sub-atmospheric pressure within the tank. For the integrated refrigeration loop, a modular, skeleton-type heat exchanger, with refrigerant temperature instrumentation, was constructed using the stiffening rings as supports. To support the system thermal performance testing, three custom temperature rakes were designed and installed along the 21-meter length of the tank, once again using rings as supports. The temperature rakes included a total of 20 silicon diode temperature sensors mounted both vertically and radially to map the bulk liquid temperature within the tank. The tank modifications were successful and the system is now operational for the research and development of integrated refrigeration technology.

  8. Development and flight test of metal-lined CFRP cryogenic tank for reusable rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Ken; Takeuchi, Shinsuke; Sato, Eiichi; Naruo, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Namiki, Fumiharu; Tanaka, Kohtaro; Watabe, Yoko

    2005-07-01

    A cryogenic tank made of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) shell with aluminum thin liner has been designed as a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank for an ISAS reusable launch vehicle, and the function of it has been proven by repeated flights onboard the test vehicle called reusable vehicle testing (RVT) in October 2003. The liquid hydrogen tank has to be a pressure vessel, because the fuel of the engine of the test vehicle is supplied by fuel pressure. The pressure vessel of a combination of the outer shell of CFRP for strength element at a cryogenic temperature and the inner liner of aluminum for gas barrier has shown excellent weight merit for this purpose. Interfaces such as tank outline shape, bulk capacity, maximum expected operating pressure (MEOP), thermal insulation, pipe arrangement, and measurement of data are also designed to be ready onboard. This research has many aims, not only development of reusable cryogenic composite tank but also the demonstration of repeated operation including thermal cycle and stress cycle, familiarization with test techniques of operation of cryogenic composite tanks, and the accumulation of data for future design of tanks, vehicle structures, safety evaluation, and total operation systems.

  9. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2010-06-21

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2009 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2009 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per LWO-LWE-2008-00423, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2009, were completed. All Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2009 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 1, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.4. UT inspections were performed on Tank 29 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00559, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2009, Waste Tank 29. Post chemical cleaning UT measurements were made in Tank 6 and the results are documented in SRNL-STI-2009-00560, Tank Inspection NDE Results Tank 6, Including Summary of Waste Removal Support Activities in Tanks 5 and 6. A total of 6669 photographs were made and 1276 visual and video inspections were performed during 2009. Twenty-Two new leaksites were identified in 2009. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.4. Fifteen leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Five leaksites at Tank 6 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. Two new leaksites were identified at Tank 19 during waste removal activities. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tanks 5 and 12 during waste removal activities. Also, a very small amount of additional leakage from a previously identified leaksite at Tank 14 was observed.

  10. Silicon Bulk Micromachined Vibratory Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, T. K.; Gutierrez, R. C.; Wilcox, J. Z.; Stell, C.; Vorperian, V.; Calvet, R.; Li, W. J.; Charkaborty, I.; Bartman, R.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on design, modeling, fabrication, and characterization of a novel silicon bulk micromachined vibratory rate gyroscope designed for microspacecraft applications. The new microgyroscope consists of a silicon four leaf cloverstructure with a post attached to the center.

  11. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  12. Herpesviruses and breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrasanta, C; Ghirardi, B; Manca, M F; Uccella, S; Gualdi, C; Tota, E; Pugni, L; Mosca, F

    2014-06-30

    Breast milk has always been the best source of nourishment for newborns. However, breast milk can carry a risk of infection, as it can be contaminated with bacterial or viral pathogens. This paper reviews the risk of acquisition of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpesviruses frequently detected in breastfeeding mothers, via breast milk, focusing on the clinical consequences of this transmission and the possible strategies for preventing it. Maternal VZV infections are conditions during which breastfeeding may be temporarily contraindicated, but expressed breast milk should always be given to the infant. CMV infection acquired through breast milk rarely causes disease in healthy term newborns; an increased risk of CMV disease has been documented in preterm infants. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) does not regard maternal CMV seropositivity as a contraindication to breastfeeding; according to the AAP, in newborns weighing less than 1500 g, the decision should be taken after weighing the benefits of breast milk against the risk of transmission of infection. The real efficacy of the different methods of inactivating CMV in breast milk should be compared in controlled clinical trials, rigorously examining the negative consequences that each of these methods can have on the immunological and nutritional properties of the milk itself, with a view to establish the best risk-benefit ratio of these strategies before they are recommended for use in clinical practice.

  13. Transglutaminase inhibitor from milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, G.A.H. de; Wijngaards, G.; Koppelman, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cross-linking experiments of skimmed bovine milk with bacterial transglutaminase isolated from Streptoverticillium mobaraense showed only some degree of formation of high-molecular-weight casein polymers. Studies on the nature of this phenomenon revealed that bovine milk contains an inhibitor of

  14. Herpesviruses and breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pietrasanta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast milk has always been the best source of nourishment for newborns. However, breast milk can carry a risk of infection, as it can be contaminated with bacterial or viral pathogens. This paper reviews the risk of acquisition of varicella-zoster virus (VZV and cytomegalovirus (CMV, herpesviruses frequently detected in breastfeeding mothers, via breast milk, focusing on the clinical consequences of this transmission and the possible strategies for preventing it. Maternal VZV infections are conditions during which breastfeeding may be temporarily contraindicated, but expressed breast milk should always be given to the infant. CMV infection acquired through breast milk rarely causes disease in healthy term newborns; an increased risk of CMV disease has been documented in preterm infants. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP does not regard maternal CMV seropositivity as a contraindication to breastfeeding; according to the AAP, in newborns weighing less than 1500 g, the decision should be taken after weighing the benefits of breast milk against the risk of transmission of infection. The real efficacy of the different methods of inactivating CMV in breast milk should be compared in controlled clinical trials, rigorously examining the negative consequences that each of these methods can have on the immunological and nutritional properties of the milk itself, with a view to establish the best risk-benefit ratio of these strategies before they are recommended for use in clinical practice.

  15. Urea in Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Projectsatbangalore

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a low-cost, portable instrument using CO2 and NH3 gas sensor technology to quantify and differentiate milk samples containing excess urea. Milk containing urea, in presence of urease enzyme hydrolyses urea to form ammonia and carbon dioxide.

  16. Proceedings of BulkTrans '89

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Papers were presented on bulk commodity demand; steel industry bulk trades; grains and the world food economy; steam coal and cement demand; shipping profitability; bulk carrier design and economics; bulk ports and terminals; ship unloading; computers in bulk terminals; and conveyors and stockyard equipment.

  17. Combatting bulking sludge with ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuensch, B.; Heine, W.; Neis, U. [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Bulking and floating sludge cause great problems in many waste water treatment plants with biological nutrient removal. The purification as well as the sludge digestion process can be affected. These problems are due to the interlaced structure of filamentous microorganisms, which have an impact on the sludge's settling behaviour. Foam is able to build up a stable layer, which does not settle in the secondary clarifier. Foam in digestion causes a reduction of the degree of stabilisation and of the biogas production. We use low-frequency ultrasound to combat filamentous organisms in bulking sludge. Low-frequency ultrasound is suitable to create high local shear stresses, which are capable of breaking the filamentous structures of the sludge. After preliminary lab-scale tests now a full-scale new ultrasound equipment is operating at Reinfeld sewage treatment plant, Germany. The objective of this study is to explore the best ultrasound configuration to destroy the filamentous structure of bulking and foaming sludge in a substainable way. Later this study will also look into the effects of ultrasound treated bulking sludge on the anaerobic digestion process. Up to now results show that the settling behaviour of bulking sludge is improved. The minimal ultrasound energy input for destruction of bulking structure was determined. (orig.)

  18. TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-17

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single

  19. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  20. 241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

    2013-08-26

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

  1. 241-AP Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2014-04-04

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AP tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AP tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AP tank farm, the sixth double-shell tank farm constructed, tank bottom flatness, refractory material quality, post-weld stress relieving, and primary tank bottom weld rejection were improved.

  2. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  3. Milk urea concentration as an indicator of ammonia emission from dairy cow barn under restricted grazing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duinkerken, G; Smits, M C J; André, G; Sebek, L B J; Dijkstra, J

    2011-01-01

    Bulk milk urea concentration was evaluated to assess its potential as an indicator of ammonia emission from a dairy cow barn in a situation with restricted grazing. An experiment was carried out with a herd of, on average, 52 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. The cows were housed in a naturally ventilated barn with cubicles and a slatted floor, were fed ensiled forages and feed supplements, and each day were allowed 8.5 h of grazing. The experiment was a balanced randomized block design, replicated 3 times. The experimental factor was the bulk milk urea level, which was adjusted to levels of 15, 35, and 55 mg of urea per 100 g of milk, respectively, by changing the level of nitrogen fertilization of the pasture, the herbage mass and grass regrowth age, and the level and type of feed supplement. Ammonia emission from the barn was measured using sulfur hexafluoride as the tracer gas. Ammonia emission generally increased upon an increase in adjusted milk urea levels. A dynamic regression model was used to predict ammonia emission from bulk milk urea concentration, temperature, and a slurry mixing index. This model accounted for 66% of the total variance in ammonia emission and showed that emission increases exponentially with increasing milk urea concentration. At levels of 20 and 30 mg of urea per 100 g of milk, ammonia emission increased by about 2.5 and 3.5%, respectively, when milk urea concentration increased by 1 mg/100 g. Furthermore, emissions from the barn increased 2.6% when temperature increased by 1°C. The study showed that bulk milk urea concentration is a useful indicator for ammonia emissions from a dairy cow barn in a situation with restricted grazing. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Source apportionment of heavy metals and ionic contaminants in rainwater tanks in a subtropical urban area in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, R; Chan, Y C; Chapman, H; Gardner, T; Shaw, G

    2012-03-15

    Due to prolonged droughts in recent years, the use of rainwater tanks in urban areas has increased in Australia. In order to apportion sources of contribution to heavy metal and ionic contaminants in rainwater tanks in Brisbane, a subtropical urban area in Australia, monthly tank water samples (24 sites, 31 tanks) and concurrent bulk deposition samples (18 sites) were collected during mainly April 2007-March 2008. The samples were analysed for acid-soluble metals, soluble anions, total inorganic carbon and total organic carbon, and characteristics such as total solid and pH. The Positive Matrix Factorisation model, EPA PMF 3.0, was used to apportion sources of contribution to the contaminants. Four source factors were identified for the bulk deposition samples, including 'crustal matter/sea salt', 'car exhausts/road side dust', 'industrial dust' and 'aged sea salt/secondary aerosols'. For the tank water samples, apart from these atmospheric deposition related factors which contributed in total to 65% of the total contaminant concentration on average, another six rainwater collection system related factors were identified, including 'plumbing', 'building material', 'galvanizing', 'roofing', 'steel' and 'lead flashing/paint' (contributing in total to 35% of the total concentration on average). The Australian Drinking Water Guideline for lead was exceeded in 15% of the tank water samples. The collection system related factors, in particular the 'lead flashing/paint' factor, contributed to 79% of the lead in the tank water samples on average. The concentration of lead in tank water was found to vary with various environmental and collection system factors, in particular the presence of lead flashing on the roof. The results also indicated the important role of sludge dynamics inside the tank on the quality of tank water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Milk production, quality, and consumption in Jimma (Ethiopia): Facts and producers', retailers', and consumers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, T; Verbeke, J; Piepers, S; Tefera, M; Getachew, Y; Supré, K; DeVliegher, S

    2016-02-01

    Four studies were performed to quantify milk production, quality and consumption in the town Jimma, Ethiopia. First, 47 dairy farmers and 44 milk retailers were interviewed to gain more insights in dairy farming and marketing, and associated constraints. Second, bulk milk samples (n=188) were collected for 4 consecutive weeks to investigate milk quality [Total Bacterial Counts (TBC), Coliform Counts (CC), Somatic Cell Counts (SCC), and antimicrobial residues]. Third, (bulk) milk samples from 32 farms, 46 milk retailers and the 3 local milk collection centers were collected to determine the presence of oxacillin susceptible-and oxacillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Fourth, 208 adult inhabitants were interviewed to gain more insight in milk consumption and associated concerns of consumers. The average dairy farm included in the studies consisted of 5 lactating cows, produced 43 liters of milk per day and was owned by male, literate adults. Milk was sold to retailers (71% of the production) and directly to customers (25%) without any quality control, whereas 4% was self-consumed. Shortage of animal nutrition and adulteration of the milk were the main constraints for farmers and retailers, respectively. The median TBC, CC and SCC were 122,500CFU/mL, 1,005CFU/mL and 609,500cells/mL, respectively. Antimicrobial residues were detected in 20% of all samples. In general, the milk quality was considered to be poor (TBC>10,000CFU/mL, and/or CC>100CFU/mL, and/or SCC>400,000cells/mL and/or presence of antimicrobial residues) in 97% of all samples. S. aureus was isolated from 12 (38%), 13 (33%), and 2 out of 3 of the milk samples originating from the dairy farms, the milk retailers, and the milk collection centers, respectively. Seven (26%) of the isolates were resistant to oxacillin suggesting the presence of MRSA (Lee, 2003). Local milk is occasionally consumed by adults but more frequently by children. Adults mainly drink spontaneously fermented milk (57% of 105

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A SMART SOLAR TANK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furbo, Simon; Andersen, Elsa

    1999-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations of small SDHW systems based on so-called smart solar tanks are presented. A smart solar tank is a hot water tank in which the domestic water can both be heated by solar collectors and by an auxiliary energy supply system. The auxiliary energy supply....... The investigations showed that the yearly thermal performance of small SDHW systems can be increased by up to about 30 % if a smart solar tank is used instead of a traditional solar combi tank. The thermal increase is strongly influenced by the hot water consumption and consumption pattern. Recommendations...... for future development of smart solar tanks are given....

  7. first tank of Linac 1

    CERN Multimedia

    This was the first tank of the linear accelerator Linac1, the injection system for the Proton Synchrotron, It ran for 34 years (1958 - 1992). Protons entered at the far end and were accelerated between the copper drift tubes by an oscillating electromagnetic field. The field flipped 200 million times a second (200 MHz) so the protons spent 5 nanoseconds crossing a drift tube and a gap. Moving down the tank, the tubes and gaps had to get longer as the protons gained speed. The tank accelerated protons from 500 KeV to 10 MeV. Linac1 was also used to accelerate deutrons and alpha particles for the Intersecting Storage Rings and oxygen and sulpher ions for the Super Proton Synchrotron heavy ion programme.

  8. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a topical review of the current state of the art in modelling the magnetization of bulk superconductors, including both (RE)BCO (where RE = rare earth or Y) and MgB2 materials. Such modelling is a powerful tool to understand the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards the commercialization stage of their development in the coming years. In addition to the analytical and numerical techniques currently used by researchers for modelling such materials, the commonly used practical techniques to magnetize bulk superconductors are summarized with a particular focus on pulsed field magnetization (PFM), which is promising as a compact, mobile and relatively inexpensive magnetizing technique. A number of numerical models developed to analyse the issues related to PFM and optimise the technique are described in detail, including understanding the dynamics of the magnetic flux penetration and the influence of material inhomogeneities, thermal properties, pulse duration, magnitude and shape, and the shape of the magnetization coil(s). The effect of externally applied magnetic fields in different configurations on the attenuation of the trapped field is also discussed. A number of novel and hybrid bulk superconductor structures are described, including improved thermal conductivity structures and ferromagnet-superconductor structures, which have been designed to overcome some of the issues related to bulk superconductors and their magnetization and enhance the intrinsic properties of bulk superconductors acting as trapped field magnets. Finally, the use of hollow bulk cylinders/tubes for shielding is analysed.

  9. Use of milk-based kombucha inoculum for milk fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Kolarov Ljiljana A.; Milanović Spasenija D.; Lončar Eva S.; Malbaša Radomir V.

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation fermented milk beverages with 0.9% of milk fat were produced using 10 and 15% (v/v) of traditional and milk-based kombucha inoculum by application of appropriate technological process. Milk fermentation using two types and concentrations of kombucha inoculum were stopped when the pH reached 4.5. Sigmoidal fermentation profiles were noticed with traditional kombucha inoculums and linear with milk-based kombucha inoculums. Chemical content and physico-chemical characterist...

  10. Automated monitoring of milk meters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, de R.M.; Andre, G.

    2009-01-01

    Automated monitoring might be an alternative for periodic checking of electronic milk meters. A computer model based on Dynamic Linear Modelling (DLM) has been developed for this purpose. Two situations are distinguished: more milking stands in the milking parlour and only one milking stand in the

  11. Tank calibration; Arqueacao de tanques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Ana [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    This work relates the analysis of the norms ISO (International Organization for Standardization) for calibration of vertical cylindrical tanks used in fiscal measurement, established on Joint Regulation no 1 of June 19, 2000 between the ANP (National Agency of Petroleum) and the INMETRO (National Institute of Metrology, Normalization and Industrial Quality). In this work a comparison between norms ISO and norms published by the API (American Petroleum Institute) and the IP (Institute of Petroleum) up to 2001 was made. It was concluded that norms ISO are wider than norms API, IP, and INMETRO methods in the calibration of vertical cylindrical tanks. (author)

  12. Detecting β-Casein Variation in Bovine Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Caroli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In bovine species, β-casein (β-CN is characterized by genetic polymorphism. The two most common protein variants are β-CN A2 (the original one and A1, differing from A2 for one amino acid substitution (Pro67 to His67. Several bioactive peptides affecting milk nutritional properties can originate from β-CN. Among them, β-casomorphin-7 (BCM7 ranging from amino acid 60 to 66 can be released more easily from β-CN variants carrying His67 (A1 type instead of Pro67 (A2 type. Nowadays, “A2 milk” is produced in different countries claiming its potential benefits in human health. The aim of this study was to further develop and apply an isoelectric focusing electrophoresis (IEF method to bulk and individual milk samples in order to improve its use for β-CN studies. We succeeded in identifying A2 milk samples correctly and quantifying the percentage of A2, A1, and B variants in bulk samples not derived from A2 milk as well as in individual milk samples. The method allows us to quantify the relative proportion of β-CN variants in whole milk without eliminating whey protein by acid or enzymatic precipitation of caseins. The aim of this study was also to study the different behavior of β-CN and β-lactoglobulin (β-LG in the presence of trichloroacetic acid (TCA. The higher sensitivity of β-CN to TCA allows quantifying β-CN variants after TCA fixation because β-LG is not visible. Monitoring β-CN variation in cattle breeds is important in order to maintain a certain balance between Pro67 and His67 in dairy products. Overall, the debate between A1 and A2 milk needs further investigation.

  13. Cytokines in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past 30 years to investigate the protective functions of human milk strongly support the notion that breastfeeding prevents infantile infections, particularly those affecting the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, more recent clinical and experimental observations also suggest that human milk not only provides passive protection, but also can directly modulate the immunological development of the recipient infant. The study of this remarkable defense system in human milk has been difficult because of its biochemical complexity, the small concentration of certain bioactive components, the compartmentalization of some of these agents, the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes of milk during lactation, and the lack of specific reagents to quantify these agents. However, a host of bioactive substances, including hormones, growth factors, and immunological factors such as cytokines, have been identified in human milk. Cytokines are pluripotent polypeptides that act in autocrine/paracrine fashions by binding to specific cellular receptors. They operate in networks and orchestrate the development and functions of immune system. Several different cytokines and chemokines have been discovered in human milk in the past years, and the list is growing very rapidly. This article will review the current knowledge about the increasingly complex network of chemoattractants, activators, and anti-inflammatory cytokines present in human milk and their potential role in compensating for the developmental delay of the neonate immune system. Copyright 2010. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  14. Incidence of Listeria species in bovine, ovine, caprine, camel and water buffalo milk using cultural method and the PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Rahimi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence rate of Listeria species in bovine, ovine, caprine, camel and water buffalo milk in Iran. Methods: From September 2010 to December 2011 a total of 260 bulk milk samples including 85 bovine, 37 camel, 34 water buffalo, 56 ovine and 48 caprine bulk milk samples were collected from commercial dairy herds, in Fars and Khuzestan provinces, Iran and were evaluated for the presence of Listeria species using cultural method and the PCR assay. Results: Using cultural method, 19 samples (7.3% were positive for Listeria spp. The highest prevalence of Listeria was found in raw water buffalo milk (11.8%, followed by raw bovine milk (10.6%, raw ovine milk (7.1%, and raw caprine milk (4.2% samples. All 37 camel milk samples from 20 camel breeding farms were negative for Listeria spp. The overall prevalence of Listeria was 7.3%, in which Listeria innocua was the most recovered species (4.2%; the remaining isolates were Listeria monocytogenes (1.9%, Listeria ivanovii (0.08% and Listeria seeligari (0.04%. The PCR assay could identify 8 Listeria-contaminated milk samples that were negative using the cultural method. Conclusions: The results presented in this study indicate the potential risk of infection with Listeria in people consuming raw and unpasteurized milk.

  15. Selected abiotic factors that influence raw cow milk freezing point depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oto Hanuš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Freezing point depression (FPD is an important property of milk that is influenced primarily by milk components connected to osmotic pressure. Under certain conditions it is possible to detect the addition of water to milk. It is necessary to have the right FPD limit in legislation for milk quality control. The aim of this study was to improve the estimation procedure of this limit. Apart from factors related to dairy cow nutrition, cattle breed and milk yield, it is important to take into account CO2 (6%, water steam evaporation and pasteurization under technological conditions. Bulk milk samples (1, 30, 6, 6, 10, 1 according to experiment from Holstein and Czech Fleckvieh breed (1:1 were used in the experiments and technologically treated. The effects of water addition (water saturated and unsaturated by CO2, carbon dioxide evaporation and pasteurization (80 °C for 22 min were quantified. Pasteurization aggravation of FPD was -0.00394 ± 0.00171 ºC (P P < 0.001 depending on practice. Increase in FPD is recorded after milking during technological procedures of milk storage, mixing, pumping, transport shaking and warming. During FPD shift, the acuteness of FPD data sets increases. This fact should be considered in the process of deriving standard raw cow milk FPD limits. Similar experimental analysis of milk FPD technological shifts has not been performed in this way until now.

  16. 7 CFR 1160.109 - Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Milk. 1160.109 Section 1160.109 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FLUID MILK PROMOTION PROGRAM Fluid Milk Promotion Order Definitions § 1160.109 Milk. Milk means any class of cow's milk produced in the United States. ...

  17. Donor milk: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Giuliani,1 Ilaria Rovelli,1 Chiara Peila,1 Stefania Alfonsina Liguori,2 Enrico Bertino,1 Alessandra Coscia1 1SCDU Neonatologia, Dipartimento di Scienze Pediatriche e dell'Adolescenza, Università degli Studi di Torino, Torino, Italy; 2SC Neonatologia, Ospedale Maria Vittoria, Torino, Italy Abstract: Mother's own milk is widely recognized as the optimal feeding for term infants, but increasing evidence exists of its benefits also for sick and preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units. However, the nutritional needs for appropriate growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes of such a particular population of infants should be attentively evaluated, considering also the indication to an appropriate fortification of human milk. The target is to achieve growth potential for preterm newborns while ensuring good metabolic outcomes and normal neurological development. When mother's milk is unavailable or in short supply, donor human milk (DHM represents the second best choice and, although somewhat modified by the Holder pasteurization process, it preserves many benefits when compared to formula, as documented by more and more reports, randomized controlled trials, and meta-analyses published in the past few years. Evidence exists of the protection exerted by DHM from necrotizing enterocolitis, while further studies are required to look at possible beneficial effects regarding infections, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, long-term cardiovascular risk factors, feeding tolerance, neurological outcome, and allergy. Finally, the concern that the use of DHM might decrease preterm infant breastfeeding is being raised. Conversely, publications exist showing that the use of DHM in the neonatal unit increases breastfeeding rates at discharge for infants of very low birth weight. Keywords: human milk, preterm infant feeding, milk bank, breast milk, mother's own milk, pasteurized human milk, fortification

  18. Fortification of maternal milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Di Natale

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of human milk (HM, well recognized for the term infant, extend to the feeding of premature infants, because their nutrition support must be designed to compensate for metabolic and gastrointestinal immaturity, immunologic compromise, and maternal psycosocial conditions. Studies show that preterm milk contains higher protein levels and more fat than term human milk. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that preterm neonates should receive sufficient nutrients to enable them to grow at a rate similar to that of fetuses of the same gestational age. There are no doubts about the fact that maternal milk is the best food for all neonates, but unfortified human breast milk may not meet the recommended nutritional needs of growing preterm infants. Human milk must therefore be supplemented (fortified with the nutrients in short supply. The objective of fortification is to increase the concentration of nutrients to such levels that at the customary feeding volumes infants receive amounts of all nutrients that meet the requirements. The are two different forms of fortification of human milk: standard and individualized. The new concepts and recommendations for optimization of human milk fortification is the “individualized fortification”. Actually, two methods have been proposed for individualization: the “targeted/tailored fortification” and the “adjustable fortification”. In summary, the use of fortified human milk produces adequate growth in premature infants and satisfies the specific nutritional requirements of these infants. The use of individualized fortification is recommended. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  19. NMR-based milk metabolomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundekilde, Ulrik; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Bertram, Hanne Christine S.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is a key component in infant nutrition worldwide and, in the Western parts of the world, also in adult nutrition. Milk of bovine origin is both consumed fresh and processed into a variety of dairy products including cheese, fermented milk products, and infant formula. The nutritional quality...... and processing capabilities of bovine milk is closely associated to milk composition. Metabolomics is ideal in the study of the low-molecular-weight compounds in milk, and this review focuses on the recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics trends in milk research, including applications linking...... the milk metabolite profiling with nutritional aspects, and applications which aim to link the milk metabolite profile to various technological qualities of milk. The metabolite profiling studies encompass the identification of novel metabolites, which potentially can be used as biomarkers or as bioactive...

  20. A COMPREHENSIVE TECHNICAL REVIEW OF THE DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHAUS, P.S.

    2006-09-29

    In May 2006, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project. However, a number of technical issues were found that could significantly affect the project's ability to meet its overall mission as stated in the project ''Justification of Mission Need'' document, if not satisfactorily resolved. The ERP recognizes that the project has changed from an accelerated schedule demonstration project to a formally chartered project that must be in full compliance with DOE 413.3 requirements. The perspective of the ERP presented herein, is measured against the formally chartered project as stated in the approved Justification of Mission Need document. A justification of Mission Need document was approved in July 2006 which defined the objectives for the DBVS Project. In this document, DOE concluded that bulk vitrification is a viable technology that requires additional development to determine its potential applicability to treatment of a portion of the Hanford low activity waste. The DBVS mission need statement now includes the following primary objectives: (1) process approximately 190,000 gallons of Tank S-109 waste into fifty 100 metric ton boxes of vitrified product; (2) store and dispose of these boxes at Hanford's Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF); (3) evaluate the waste form characteristics; (4) gather pilot plant operability data, and (5) develop the overall life cycle system performance of bulk vitrification and produce a comparison of the bulk vitrification process to building a second LAW

  1. Correlation between whole and partial milk yields of dairy cows milked using the automatic milking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Chládek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to quantify the correlations between milk indicators of partial milk yields and whole milk output; we analysed 576 milk samples taken from 2 to 4 partial milk yields of 156 Holstein dairy cows milked using the automatic milking system (AMS. In the accredited (EN ISO 17025 milk laboratory in Brno–Tuřany the samples were analysed for the content of fat (T; g . 100g−1, crude protein (B; g . 100g−1, lactose (L; lactose monohydrate; g . 100g−1 and somatic cell count (SCC; 103.ml−1. The average values in the whole milk output were as follows: T = 3.69 g . 100g−1, B = 3.39 g . 100g−1, L = 4.92 g . 100g−1, PSB = 345.103 ml−1 and log SCC = 1.9695, at a whole milk output of 29.88 kg.day1 of milk. The correlation coefficients between the milk indicators (T, B, L, PSB and log PSB of partial milk yields and whole milk output ranged from the minimum r = 0.786 (between the content of T in the whole and 3rd milk yield to the maximum r = 0.979 (between the content of B in the whole milk output and identically in the 1st, 3rd and 4th milk yields and in all cases they were statistically highly significant (P ≤ 0.001. Next we calculated the regression equations for the estimation of milk indicators of the whole milk output from milk indicators of the 1st to 4th partial milk yields.

  2. Effect of flavored milk vs plain milk on total milk intake and nutrient provision in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayet-Moore, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    Concerns surrounding added sugars and their effects on health have created a need to review the literature to assess consumption of flavored milk, consumer preferences for flavored milk, behavior related to the intake of flavored milk, and the effect of flavored milk on the diet and health of children. A review of the literature was performed using the following keywords: milk, flavored, flavoured, sweetened, and chocolate. The search was limited to articles published in English, studies conducted in children, and studies reporting on prevalence of consumption, trends in consumption, preferences for flavored milk, intakes of milk and nutrients, and health outcomes. Fifty-three studies were included. Flavored milk receives the highest palatability rating among children. Children drink more flavored milk than plain milk and, when flavored milk is not available, children drink less plain milk and, consequently, less milk overall. Consumers of flavored milk have a higher total milk intake. Micronutrient intake among consumers of flavored milk is similar to that among consumers of plain milk, while intakes of energy and sugars vary, owing to differences in reporting across studies. There is no association between flavored milk intake and weight status among normal-weight children, and some contradictory effects of flavored milk intake have been observed in subgroups of overweight children. Flavored milk is a palatable beverage choice that helps children to meet calcium targets. Further research to test the effect of flavored milk consumption among overweight children is warranted. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Soy formulas and nonbovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Maria Antonella; Giampietro, Paolo G; Galli, Elena

    2002-12-01

    Cow's milk allergy is frequently observed during the first year of life when nutritional requirements are critical. In those cases where breast-feeding is not available, a safe and adequate substitute to cow's milk should be offered. The primary aim of this review is to evaluate the clinical use of milk derived from vegetable proteins, such as soy, or from animals such as goat, mare, or donkey, or elemental diet in children with cow's milk allergy. MEDLINE searches were conducted with key words such as soy, goat's milk, donkey's milk, mare's milk, and elemental diet. Additional articles were identified from references in books or articles. Original research papers and review articles from peer-reviewed journals were chosen. Soy formulas are nutritionally adequate and can be used in children with immunoglobulin E-mediated nongastrointestinal manifestations of cow's milk allergy. Goat's milk is as allergenic as cow's milk. Mare's milk and donkey's milk may be used in selected cases of cow's milk allergy after appropriate modification to make them suitable for human infants. Elemental diets are usually restricted to the most severe cases of cow's milk allergy (ie, sensitivity to extensively hydrolyzed protein formulas). Vegetable formulas obtained from soy and milk derived from other mammals, such as mare or donkey, homemade preparations, and elemental diet may represent valid alternatives for children with cow's milk allergy. Extensive clinical trials are needed on the safety profile of any alternative mammal-derived milk. The choice of alternative milk should take into account the clinical profile of the child allergic to cow's milk, particularly as concerns age, severity of symptoms, degree of sensitivity to cow's milk proteins, and any multiple food allergies.

  4. 40 CFR 61.343 - Standards: Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... or permanent deformation of the tank or cover resulting from filling or emptying the tank, diurnal... efforts at repair shall be made as soon as practicable, but not later than 45 calendar days after...

  5. The Politics of Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    of a typology of think tanks, quantitative data and interviews with think tank practitioners, the interplay between state and market dynamics and the development of different types of think tanks is analysed. Although think tanks develop along different institutional trajectories, it is concluded that the Anglo......In the 21st century, think tanks have become more than a buzzword in European public discourse. They now play important roles in the policy-making process by providing applied research, building networks and advocating policies. The book studies the development of think tanks and contemporary...... consequences in the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and at the EU-level. A Continental think tank tradition in which the state plays a pivotal role and an Anglo-American tradition which facilitates interaction in public policy on market-like terms have shaped the development of think tanks. On the basis...

  6. The Politics of Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    In the 21st century, think tanks have become more than a buzzword in European public discourse. They now play important roles in the policy-making process by providing applied research, building networks and advocating policies. The book studies the development of think tanks and contemporary...... consequences in the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and at the EU-level. A Continental think tank tradition in which the state plays a pivotal role and an Anglo-American tradition which facilitates interaction in public policy on market-like terms have shaped the development of think tanks. On the basis...... of a typology of think tanks, quantitative data and interviews with think tank practitioners, the interplay between state and market dynamics and the development of different types of think tanks is analysed. Although think tanks develop along different institutional trajectories, it is concluded that the Anglo...

  7. Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1986, Congress created the Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) Trust Fund to address releases from federally regulated underground storage tanks (USTs) by amending Subtitle I of the Solid Waste Disposal Act.

  8. Lightweight, Composite Cryogenic Tank Structures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcosm has developed and qualified strong, all-composite LOX tanks for launch vehicles. Our new 42-inch diameter tank design weighs 486 lbs and burst without...

  9. The Politics of Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    In the 21st century, think tanks have become more than a buzzword in European public discourse. They now play important roles in the policy-making process by providing applied research, building networks and advocating policies. The book studies the development of think tanks and contemporary...... consequences in the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and at the EU-level. A Continental think tank tradition in which the state plays a pivotal role and an Anglo-American tradition which facilitates interaction in public policy on market-like terms have shaped the development of think tanks. On the basis...... of a typology of think tanks, quantitative data and interviews with think tank practitioners, the interplay between state and market dynamics and the development of different types of think tanks is analysed. Although think tanks develop along different institutional trajectories, it is concluded that the Anglo-American...

  10. 49 CFR 179.400-16 - Access to inner tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113... design. (b) If a welded closure is used, it must be designed to allow it to be reopened by grinding or...

  11. Characterization of Oxidative Stability of Fish Oil- and Plant Oil-Enriched Skimmed Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saga, Linda C.; Kristinova, Vera; Kirkhus, Bente

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the oxidative stability of fish oil blended with crude plant oils rich in naturally occurring antioxidants, camelina oil and oat oil, respectively, in bulk and after supplementation of 1 wt% of oil blends to skimmed milk emulsions. Ability of crude...... oat oil and camelina oil to protect fish oil in bulk and as fish oil-enriched skimmed milk emulsions was evaluated. Results of oxidative stability of bulk oils and blends assessed by the Schaal oven weight gain test and by the rancimat method showed significant increase in oxidative stability when oat......, skimmed milk supplemented with fish-oat oil blend gave the highest scores for off-flavors in the sensory evaluation, demonstrating that several methods, including sensory analysis, should be combined to illustrate the complete picture of lipid oxidation in emulsions....

  12. External Tank - The Structure Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzyn, Kenneth; Pilet, Jeffrey C.; Diecidue-Conners, Dawn; Worden, Michelle; Guillot, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    The External Tank forms the structural backbone of the Space Shuttle in the launch configuration. Because the tank flies to orbital velocity with the Space Shuttle Orbiter, minimization of weight is mandatory, to maximize payload performance. Choice of lightweight materials both for structure and thermal conditioning was necessary. The tank is large, and unique manufacturing facilities, tooling, handling, and transportation operations were required. Weld processes and tooling evolved with the design as it matured through several block changes, to reduce weight. Non Destructive Evaluation methods were used to assure integrity of welds and thermal protection system materials. The aluminum-lithium alloy was used near the end of the program and weld processes and weld repair techniques had to be refined. Development and implementation of friction stir welding was a substantial technology development incorporated during the Program. Automated thermal protection system application processes were developed for the majority of the tank surface. Material obsolescence was an issue throughout the 40 year program. The final configuration and tank weight enabled international space station assembly in a high inclination orbit allowing international cooperation with the Russian Federal Space Agency. Numerous process controls were implemented to assure product quality, and innovative proof testing was accomplished prior to delivery. Process controls were implemented to assure cleanliness in the production environment, to control contaminants, and to preclude corrosion. Each tank was accepted via rigorous inspections, including non-destructive evaluation techniques, proof testing, and all systems testing. In the post STS-107 era, the project focused on ascent debris risk reduction. This was accomplished via stringent process controls, post flight assessment using substantially improved imagery, and selective redesigns. These efforts were supported with a number of test programs to

  13. Milking Efficiency – A Milkability Trait for Automatically Milked Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvendahl, Peter; Lassen, Jan; Chagunda, M G G

    Data from an experimental herd with automatic milkings from 486 first lactation cows were used to study alternative measures of milkability. One trait was milking efficiency, (kg milk per minute used in robot) the other “residual milking box time” using a linear regression to adjust daily time...... for daily fat and protein corrected yield. Both traits were moderate to highly heritable and closely correlated (ra = 0.85). The two traits differed by milking efficiency being correlated to yield (ra = 0.48). Residual box time was closely correlated to milking time (ra = 0.93) compared to milking...... efficiency which showed only intermediate correlation. Both traits had weak correlations to somatic cell counts. It is concluded that either trait will be effective in selecting for cows giving more milk per minute occupying the milking robot, without increasing risk of mastitis...

  14. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

    1998-11-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

  15. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shine, E. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Diprete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  16. Think Tanks, Education and Elite Policy Actors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Glenn C.

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen think tanks operate in sophisticated ways to influence the development of education policies. In this paper, I reflect upon the influence of think tanks in the formation of national reform, using the Common Core State Standards initiative in the USA as an illustrative case. In doing so, I explore how certain think tanks,…

  17. 33 CFR 183.510 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tanks. 183.510 Section 183... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.510 Fuel tanks. (a) Each fuel tank in a boat must have been tested by its manufacturer under § 183.580 and not leak when...

  18. 7 CFR 58.427 - Paraffin tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Paraffin tanks. 58.427 Section 58.427 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....427 Paraffin tanks. The metal tank should be adequate in size, have wood rather than metal racks to...

  19. Elevated Tank Due to Earthquake Even

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotrasová Kamila

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Elevated reservoirs are mainly used for storing of variety water. During earthquake activity the fluid exerts impulsive and convective (sloshing effects on the walls and bottom of tank. This paper provides theoretical background for analytical calculating of elevated water tank due to earthquake even and deals with simplified seismic design procedures for elevated tanks.

  20. 40 CFR 264.1084 - Standards: Tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... is used for the primary seal, the metallic shoe seal shall be designed so that one end extends into... maximum organic vapor pressure limit for the tank's design capacity category as follows: (A) For a tank design capacity equal to or greater than 151 m3, the maximum organic vapor pressure limit for the tank is...

  1. Results of Hg speciation testing on tank 39 and 1Q16 tank 50 samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team.i,ii The seventeenth shipment of samples was designated to include two Tank 39 samples and the 1Q16 Tank 50 Quarterly WAC sample. The surface Tank 39 sample was pulled at 262.1” from the tank bottom, and the depth Tank 39 sample was pulled at 95” from the tank bottom. The 1Q16 Tank 50 WAC sample was drawn from the 1-L variable depth sample received by SRNL.

  2. Breast milk jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... babies who show signs of hunger are given pacifiers. Breast milk jaundice may run in families. It ... look at blood cell shapes and sizes Blood type Complete blood count Reticulocyte count (number of slightly ...

  3. Cow's Milk Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Arne; Halken, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    with CMP. Milk from other mammals such as mare and donkey may be tolerated by some children with CMPA. Soy protein is as allergenic as CMP and soy formula is not recommended for young children with CMPA because of a great risk of development of allergy to soy, whereas soymilk is normally tolerated in older......Since the 1930's the scientific literature on cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) has accumulated. Over the last decade new diagnostic tools and treatment approaches have been developed. The diagnosis of reproducible adverse reactions to cow's milk proteins (CMP), i.e. CMPA, still has to be confirmed...... by controlled elimination and challenge procedures. Advanced diagnostic testing using epitope and microarray technology may in the future improve the diagnostic accuracy of CMPA by determination of specific IgE against specific allergen components of cow's milk protein. The incidence of CMPA in early childhood...

  4. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  5. 49 CFR 173.24b - Additional general requirements for bulk packagings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... sufficient outage, vacant space must be left in the shell to provide the required outage. (b) Equivalent... appropriate: Formula for metric units e1 = (12.74e0) / (Rm1 A1)1/3 Formula for non-metric units e1 = (144.2e0... the vapor space of the tank. (d) A bulk packaging may not be loaded with a hazardous material that: (1...

  6. Comparative analysis of antibiotic residue in milk using enzyme and microbiological methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Jelena

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic residue can have a harmful effect on human health and can disrupt the processing of milk and milk products. In order to prevent these unwanted effects of residue, different screening methods are used today. The basic goal of this paper is to compare screening methods performed during the testing of milk from different points of the production chain. In this paper we have comparatively analyzed three screening methods: microbiological methods - the Delvo SP test and the diffusion method with B. stearothermophilus as the test microorganism, and an enzyme method - the Penzym S test. Twenty samples of farm milk from collective tanks were analyzed, as well as 20 samples of milk from transport cisterns, 10 samples of pasteurized milk and 10 samples of sterilized market milk. Based on the comparative analysis of the diffusion method, Delvo SP test and Panzym S test, we conclude that all three methods are in hgih mutual accordance (the kappa value oscillates from nearly ideal to ideal coinciding and thus meet one of the criteria for being included in the systematic control of milk for the presence of antibiotic residue.

  7. Human milk banking guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadva, Ketan; Tiwari, Satish; Mishra, Sudhir; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Yadav, Balraj; Agarwal, R K; Kumar, Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    WHO and UNICEF state that the use of human milk from other sources should be the first alternative when it is not possible for the mother to breastfeed. Human milk banks should be made available in appropriate situations. The IYCF Chapter is actively concerned about the compelling use of formula feeds in the infants because of the non availability of human breast milk banks. A National Consultative Meet for framing guidelines was summoned by the IYCF Chapter and the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India on 30th June, 2013, with representations from various stakeholders. The guidelines were drafted after an extensive literature review and discussions. Though these guidelines are based on the experiences and guidelines from other countries, changes have been made to suit the Indian setup, culture and needs, without compromising scientific evidence. To ensure quality of donated breast milk as a safe end product. Human Milk Banking Association should be constituted, and human milk banks should be established across the country. National coordination mechanism should be developed with a secretariat and technical support to follow-up on action in States. Budgetary provisions should be made available for the activities.

  8. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise...

  9. Bulk fields with brane terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguila, F. del [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos and Centro Andaluz de Fisica de Particulas Elementales (CAFPE), Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Perez-Victoria, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Universita di Padova and INFN, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padua (Italy); Santiago, J. [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In theories with branes, bulk fields get in general divergent corrections localized on these defects. Hence, the corresponding brane terms are renormalized and should be included in the effective theory from the very beginning. We review the phenomenology associated to brane kinetic terms for different spins and backgrounds, and point out that renormalization is required already at the classical level. (orig.)

  10. Fatty acid composition of caprine milk and milk products

    OpenAIRE

    PECOVÁ, Lenka

    2017-01-01

    Changes occur in milk during the technological processing of raw milk, which also affect the properties of milk fat. Dairy products may have different properties compared to the raw milk. Chemical and microbial processes can alter the presence and distribution of individual fatty acids and thus influence the nutritional value of the product. The aim of this thesis was to assess the presence of fatty acids in milk fat of goat milk and to evaluate differences in the spectrum of fatty acids in g...

  11. Fish stocking density impacts tank hydrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Lunger, Angela; Laursen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    The effect of stocking density upon the hydrodynamics of a circular tank, configured in a recirculation system, was investigated. Red drums Sciaenops ocellatus of approximately 140 g wet weight, were stocked at five rates varying from 0 to 12 kg m-3. The impact of the presence of fish upon tank...... hydrodynamics was established using in-tank-based Rhodamine WT fluorometry at a flow rate of 0.23 l s-1 (tank exchange rate of 1.9 h-1). With increasing numbers of animals, curvilinear relationships were observed for dispersion coefficients and tank mixing times. Stocking densities of 3, 6, 9 and 12 kg m-3...

  12. Addition to thermized milk of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris M104, a wild, novel nisin a-producing strain, replaces the natural antilisterial activity of the autochthonous raw milk microbiota reduced by thermization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lianou, Alexandra; Samelis, John

    2014-08-01

    Recent research has shown that mild milk thermization treatments routinely used in traditional Greek cheese production are efficient to inactivate Listeria monocytogenes and other pathogenic or undesirable bacteria, but they also inactivate a great part of the autochthonous antagonistic microbiota of raw milk. Therefore, in this study, the antilisterial activity of raw or thermized (63°C, 30 s) milk in the presence or absence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris M104, a wild, novel, nisin A-producing (Nis-A+) raw milk isolate, was assessed. Bulk milk samples were taken from a local cheese plant before or after thermization and were inoculated with a five-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (approximately 4 log CFU/ml) or with the cocktail, as above, plus the Nis-A+ strain (approximately 6 log CFU/ml) as a bioprotective culture. Heat-sterilized (121°C, 5 min) raw milk inoculated with L. monocytogenes was used as a control treatment. All milk samples were incubated at 37°C for 6 h and then at 18°C for an additional 66 h. L. monocytogenes grew abundantly (>8 log CFU/ml) in heat-sterilized milk, whereas its growth was completely inhibited in all raw milk samples. Conversely, in thermized milk, L. monocytogenes increased by 2 log CFU/ml in the absence of strain M104, whereas its growth was completely inhibited in the presence of strain M104. Furthermore, nisin activity was detected only in milk samples inoculated with strain M104. Thus, postthermal supplementation of thermized bulk milk with bioprotective L. lactis subsp. cremoris cultures replaces the natural antilisterial activity of raw milk reduced by thermization.

  13. Chosen biotic factors influencing raw cow milk freezing point

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oto Hanuš

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The milk freezing point depression (FPD is important physical property. FPD is influenced by milk composition especially by components with osmotic pressure activity and by other physiological factors. There is possible to indicate a foreign (extraneous water addition into milk by FPD. This is necessary to have a good estimated legislative FPD discrimination limit (FPD–L for purpose of milk quality control. This paper was aimed at obtaining information to improve such estimation. Impacts factors as season variations, estimated state of dairy cow nutrition and some milk components and properties on milk FPD and their relations to FPD were quantified (n 11 540 – 72 607 bulk raw cow milk samples. The highest FPD was in Spring (−0.52097 ± 0.004877 °C, the lowest in Autumn (−0.52516 ± 0.005725 °C; P < 0.001. Correlation between FPD and lactose was 0.35 (P < 0.001. 12% and 5.4% of FPD variability is explainable by lactose and casein variability. Relationship between FPD and urea (U was 0.26 (P < 0.001 in March. The worst FPD was in group with presupposed (according to milk urea and protein combination nitrogen matter (NM and energy (E insufficiency (−0.51855 ± 0.007288 °C. The best FPD was in group with presupposed NM and E surplus in feeding ration (−0.52536 ± 0.004785 °C; P < 0.001. The FPD was worse in suspicion on E deficiency (on the basis of fat/crude protein ratio as compared to presumption for balanced E nourishment of dairy herds (−0.52105 ± 0.006436 °C > −0.52244 ± 0.005367 °C; P < 0.001. Results can improve the estimation of objective FPD–L.

  14. Cow's Milk Contamination of Human Milk Purchased via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim, Sarah A; Kulkarni, Manjusha M; McNamara, Kelly; Geraghty, Sheela R; Billock, Rachael M; Ronau, Rachel; Hogan, Joseph S; Kwiek, Jesse J

    2015-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration recommends against feeding infants human milk from unscreened donors, but sharing milk via the Internet is growing in popularity. Recipient infants risk the possibility of consuming contaminated or adulterated milk. Our objective was to test milk advertised for sale online as human milk to verify its human origin and to rule out contamination with cow's milk. We anonymously purchased 102 samples advertised as human milk online. DNA was extracted from 200 μL of each sample. The presence of human or bovine mitochondrial DNA was assessed with a species-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction assay targeting the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase subunit 5 gene. Four laboratory-created mixtures representing various dilutions of human milk with fluid cow's milk or reconstituted infant formula were compared with the Internet samples to semiquantitate the extent of contamination with cow's milk. All Internet samples amplified human DNA. After 2 rounds of testing, 11 samples also contained bovine DNA. Ten of these samples had a level of bovine DNA consistent with human milk mixed with at least 10% fluid cow's milk. Ten Internet samples had bovine DNA concentrations high enough to rule out minor contamination, suggesting a cow's milk product was added. Cow's milk can be problematic for infants with allergy or intolerance. Because buyers cannot verify the composition of milk they purchase, all should be aware that it might be adulterated with cow's milk. Pediatricians should be aware of the online market for human milk and the potential risks. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Pad B Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Felicia

    2007-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is home to two liquid hydrogen storage tanks, one at each launch pad of Launch Complex 39. The liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad B has a significantly higher boil off rate that the liquid hydrogen storage tank at Launch Pad A. This research looks at various calculations concerning the at Launch Pad B in an attempt to develop a solution to the excess boil off rate. We will look at Perlite levels inside the tank, Boil off rates, conductive heat transfer, and radiant heat transfer through the tank. As a conclusion to the research, we will model the effects of placing an external insulation to the tank in order to reduce the boil off rate and increase the economic efficiency of the liquid hydrogen storage tanks.

  16. Milk Enhancements Improve Milk Consumption and Increase Meal Participation in the NSLP: The School Milk Pilot Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Karen; Zipay, Diane; Patey, Camellia; Meyer, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objective of the School Milk Pilot Test and the Westside School Milk Pilot Study was to test the effect of a milk enhancement initiative to make milk more appealing and attractive to elementary and secondary school students and to improve milk consumption. Methods: 146 schools participated in the national School Milk Pilot…

  17. Alternative to decrease cholesterol in sheep milk cheeses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Cortés, P; Viturro, E; Juárez, M; de la Fuente, M A

    2015-12-01

    The presence of cholesterol in foods is of nutritional interest because high levels of this molecule in human plasma are associated with an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease and nowadays consumers are demanding healthier products. The goal of this experiment was to diminish the cholesterol content of Manchego, the most popular Spanish cheese manufactured from ewes milk. For this purpose three bulk milks coming from dairy ewe fed with 0 (Control), 3 and 6% of linseed supplement on their diet were used. Nine cheeses (3 per bulk milk) were manufactured and ripened for 3 months. Cholesterol of ewes milk cheese from 6% to 12% linseed supplemented diets decreased by 9.6% and 16.1% respectively, therefore supplying a healthier profile. In a second experiment, different sources of unsaturated fatty acids (rich in oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acids) were supplemented to dairy ewes and no significant differences were found on cheese cholesterol levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Isolation of [i]Listeria monocytogenes[/i] from milks used for Iranian traditional cheese in Lighvan cheese factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-Hassan Moosavy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Lighvan cheese is a semi-hard cheese which has a popular market in Iran and neighboring countries. The aim of this study was evaluating the contamination of milks used for Lighvan cheese making with[i] Listeria monocytogenes[/i]. Raw milk samples were randomly collected from different cheese producing factories (sampling carried out from large milk tanks used cheese making in factories. Isolation of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] was performed according to ISO 11290 and biochemical tests were done to identify and confirm L. monocytogenes. 9 samples (50% of the 18 collected samples from milk tanks in Lighvan cheese producing factories were contaminated with [i]L. monocytogenes[/i]. The concentration of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] in all 9 positive samples was 40 CFU/ml. This study is the first report of [i]L. monocytogenes[/i] contamination in raw milks used for Lighvan cheese production in Iran. Regarding the fact that these cheeses are produced from raw milk and no heating process is performed on them its milk contamination can be a potential risk for consumers.

  19. DEWATERING TREATMENT SCALE-UP TESTING RESULTS OF HANFORD TANK WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEDESCHI AR

    2008-01-23

    This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low-activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process.

  20. Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

    2000-02-01

    One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

  1. Organic Milk Quality in the Netherlands : Distinguishable from conventional milk?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hospers-Brands, A.J.T.M.; Burgt, van der G.J.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated possible positive interactions between organic animal production and, particularly, and various vitamins. As possible distinguishing quality parameters for organic milk, the differences between organic and conventional milk in Netherlands for fatty acid composition and

  2. Use of milk-based kombucha inoculum for milk fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolarov Ljiljana A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation fermented milk beverages with 0.9% of milk fat were produced using 10 and 15% (v/v of traditional and milk-based kombucha inoculum by application of appropriate technological process. Milk fermentation using two types and concentrations of kombucha inoculum were stopped when the pH reached 4.5. Sigmoidal fermentation profiles were noticed with traditional kombucha inoculums and linear with milk-based kombucha inoculums. Chemical content and physico-chemical characteristics of kombucha fermented milk beverages were typical and yoghurt-like for all obtained products. The best textural and sensory characteristics possesed beverage obtained in fermentation of milk using 10% (v/v of milk-based kombucha inoculum.

  3. Association of Genetic Variants of Milk Proteins with Milk Production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Aschaffenburg & Drewry,. 1955; 1957) researchers have become interested in the genetic polymorphism of milk proteins. It is known today that there are at least 39 genetic variants of six milk protein fractions (Eigel et al., 1984; Bouniol et al.,.

  4. Milk contamination in different points of the dairy process. ii mesophilic, psychrotrophic and proteolytic microorganisms/ Contaminação do leite em diferentes pontos da produção leiteira: ii microrganismos mesófilos, psicrotróficos e proteolíticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Vieira Gusmão

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychrotrophics microorganisms are able to multiply under refrigeration temperatures. They can produce heat-resistant extracellular enzymes that cause organoleptic and structural changes in milk and dairy products. With the objective of determining the frequency of microorganisms in the dairy process, four farms were evaluated in Londrina city – Brazil and different points were assessed. Mesophilic (48hs at 35oC, psychrotrophic (25hs at 21oC and proteolytic (72hs at 22oC microorganisms were researched, and the proteolytic predominant microflora were determined by using the Gram stain technique. The main psychrotrophic contamination points were the residual water on milk cans, on bulk tank and bad cleaned teats, and milk cans and teats were the most important sources of proteolytics. Gram negative bacilli represented 69% of the microorganisms in the refrigerated milk that means 45% of the total proteolytics microorganisms in the dairy process. Gram negative bacilli is most frequent on bad cleaned teats, teatcups, residual water in milk cans and bulk tank. The psychrotroph count in the refrigerated milk was more than the mesophilic count, showing that that psychrotrophics are the best indicatator for refrigerated milk contamination. The psycrotrophics count at all points assessed were greater than the ideal limit (10% of the mesophilic count. Thus as refrigeration at 4oC is not sufficient to control the multiplication of the psycrotrophics group, good practices should be associated to avoid or control milk contamination by psycrotrophics.Os psicrotróficos são microrganismos que têm capacidade de multiplicação em temperaturas de refrigeração. Produzem enzimas termorresistentes como proteases e lipases que promovem alterações organolépticas no leite e comprometem a produção de derivados. Com o objetivo de determinar a freqüência desses microrganismos a produção do leite, foram estudadas 04 propriedades da região de Londrina, PR

  5. External tank space debris considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfer, N.; Baillif, F.; Robinson, J.

    1992-01-01

    Orbital debris issues associated with maintaining a Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) on orbit are presented. The first issue is to ensure that the ET does not become a danger to other spacecraft by generating space debris, and the second is to protect the pressurized ET from penetration by space debris or meteoroids. Tests on shield designs for penetration resistance showed that when utilized with an adequate bumper, thermal protection system foam on the ET is effective in preventing penetration.

  6. Flexible polyimide fuel tank sealants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.J.; Cassey, H.N.

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for elastomers or compliant polymers used as integral fuel tank sealant materials and as seals in high-performance military aircraft are examined, and a polyimide system with the appropriate properties is described. The system contains methylene dianiline, 4,4'-diaminostilbene, polyethyleneoxide diamine, and bis(4-(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxyl)phenyl) sulfone dianhydride. Development, preparation, and applications of the polyimide sealant are discussed.

  7. Models of liquid storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, K.A.R. [Departamento de Engenharia Termica e Fluidos, FEM, UNICAMP, Campinas (Brazil); Leal, J.F.B. [Departamento Basico, FAENQUIL, Lorena (Brazil); Zanardi, M.A. [Departamento de Energia, FEG, UNESP, Guaratingueta (Brazil)

    1997-08-01

    We present the results of a comparative study on thermally stratified tanks for hot storage. A two-dimensional model is employed. A numerical solution was obtained using the control-volume technique due to Patankar. The two-dimensional model was simplified for the pure conduction case. Results from the two models were compared with each other and with available numerical and experimental results. (Author)

  8. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal stratification and natural convection in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank during standby periods are presented. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by heat loss are investigated...... on the natural buoyancy resulting in downward flow along the tank side walls due to heat loss of the tank and the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow and the corresponding upward flow in the central parts of the tank. Water temperatures at different levels of the tank...... by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and by thermal measurements. A tank with uniform temperatures and thermal stratification is studied. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is measured by tests and used as input to the CFD model. The investigations focus...

  9. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal stratification and natural convection in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank during standby periods are presented. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by heat loss are investigated...... on the natural buoyancy resulting in downward flow along the tank side walls due to heat loss of the tank and the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow and the corresponding upward flow in the central parts of the tank. Water temperatures at different levels of the tank...... by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and by thermal measurements. A tank with uniform temperatures and thermal stratification is studied. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is measured by tests and used as input to the CFD model. The investigations focus...

  10. IS SOY MILK? THE ECONOMICS OF THE SOY MILK MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Tirtha Pratim; Foltz, Jeremy D.

    2004-01-01

    This study uses revealed preferences of consumers to study the consumer benefits from soy milk. The study specifies and estimates structural demand and reduced form models of competition for different milk types using US supermarket scanner data. The introduction of soy milk is used to estimate consumer benefits and valuations. We decompose benefits into two components, competitive and variety effects. Results show relatively small consumer benefits from soy milk.

  11. Relationship between somatic cell count and lactose content in milk of various species of mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oto Hanuš

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatic cell count (SCC is an indicator of mammary gland health state. Lactose (L can be reduced with mastitis and SCC increase. Mammary gland health is an essential factor of milk quality. Monitoring of mammary gland health is important for prevention and treatment of milk secretion disorders. The goal of this work was to analyse the relationship between SCC and L in various biological species. 7 sets of individual and bulk milk samples (MSs were analysed (n = 479, 479, 345, 80, 90 and 102 for SCC and L content. 3 sets were with cow (C milk and 1 set with goat (G, 1 with sheep (S and 1 with human (H MSs. The relations in C milk were used as reference. SCC geometric means were markedly lower in C milk (62, 99 and 81 103 . ml−1 and H milk (103 103 . ml−1 as compared to small ruminants (G 3 509 and S 609 103 . ml−1. The mean L values were lower in small ruminants (G 4.36% and S 4.42% as compared to C milk (4.95%, 4.97% and in 1st lactation 5.10% and higher in H milk (5.77%. L contents in Czech Fleckvieh and Holstein correlated negatively to SCC (log SCC in all lactations (−0.36 P < 0.001 and −0.33 P < 0.001. L content in 1st lactation correlated with SCC markedly narrower than in cows for all lactations (−0.49 P < 0.001. The SCC×L relationship in G (White short–haired milk (−0.35 P < 0.01 was in good relation to C milk and in S (Tsigai milk (−0.51 P < 0.001 was markedly narrower as in C and G milk. Lower mean SCC in H milk as compared to G and S milk and comparable to C milk did not show significant negative relationship to L which was 0.08 (P > 0.05 for original SCC values. Surprisingly there was not found the SCC×L relationship in H milk which could be comparable to other mammal species milk. It could be caused by bacteriologically negative results in MSs with higher SCC (> 300 103 . ml−1. As well as at C milk also at G and S milk and in contrast to H milk it is possible to use the SCC×L relationship

  12. 7 CFR 1126.13 - Producer milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Producer milk. 1126.13 Section 1126.13 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE SOUTHWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 1126.13 Producer milk. Producer milk means the skim milk (or the skim equivalent of...

  13. 7 CFR 1131.13 - Producer milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Producer milk. 1131.13 Section 1131.13 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 1131.13 Producer milk. Producer milk means the skim milk (or the skim equivalent of...

  14. 7 CFR 58.137 - Excluded milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Excluded milk. 58.137 Section 58.137 Agriculture... Milk § 58.137 Excluded milk. A plant shall not accept milk from a producer if: (a) The milk has been in...) Three of the last five milk samples have exceeded the maximum bacterial estimate of 500,000 per ml...

  15. 7 CFR 1001.13 - Producer milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Producer milk. 1001.13 Section 1001.13 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE NORTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 1001.13 Producer milk. Producer milk means the skim milk (or the skim equivalent of...

  16. 7 CFR 1032.13 - Producer milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Producer milk. 1032.13 Section 1032.13 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE CENTRAL MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 1032.13 Producer milk. Producer milk means the skim milk (or the skim equivalent of...

  17. 7 CFR 1006.13 - Producer milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Producer milk. 1006.13 Section 1006.13 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 1006.13 Producer milk. Producer milk means the skim milk (or the skim equivalent of...

  18. 7 CFR 1033.13 - Producer milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Producer milk. 1033.13 Section 1033.13 Agriculture... and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE MIDEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 1033.13 Producer milk. Producer milk means the skim milk (or the skim equivalent of...

  19. Milk and Soy Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattan, Jacob D.; Cocco, Renata R.; Järvinen, Kirsi M.

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Cow’s milk allergy (CMA) affects 2% to 3% of young children and presents with a wide range of immunoglobulin E (IgE-) and non-IgE-mediated clinical syndromes, which have a significant economic and lifestyle impact. Definitive diagnosis is based on a supervised oral food challenge (OFC), but convincing clinical history, skin prick testing, and measurement of cow’s milk (CM)-specific IgE can aid in the diagnosis of IgE-mediated CMA and occasionally eliminate the need for OFCs. It is logical that a review of CMA would be linked to a review of soy allergy, as soy formula is often an alternative source of nutrition for infants who do not tolerate cow’s milk. The close resemblance between the proteins from soy and other related plants like peanut, and the resulting cross-reactivity and lack of predictive values for clinical reactivity, often make the diagnosis of soy allergy far more challenging. This review examines the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, natural history and diagnosis of cow’s milk and soy allergy. Cross-reactivity and management of milk allergy are also discussed. PMID:21453810

  20. Influence of Temperature‑Humidity Relations During Years on Milk Production and Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renáta Toušová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate influence of climatic conditions represented by daily air temperature and relative air humidity on indicators of Holstein cows’ milk quality and production. The first dataset represented individual milk production in day of milk performance recording (milk kg, fat %, protein %, and somatic cells count thous.*ml−1. The second dataset represented total daily milk characteristics of herd (milk kg, fat %, protein % and somatic cells count thous.*ml−1. A total of 654 Holstein cows were observed and evaluated. Both datasets were evaluated in relation to selected external influences (year, month, average daily air temperature, and average daily relatively air humidity. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.3, and UNIVARIATE, REG and GLM procedure. Three groups of daily air temeperature (< 4.4 °C; 4.4 – 13.2 °C; > 13.2 °C, and daily relative air humidity (< 65.3 %; 65.3 – 80.4 %; > 80.4 % were conducted for evaluation. Significant (P < 0.05 linear regressions were computed among daily air temperature and all milk production indicators, except of somatic cells count attribute. The highest individual daily milk production (35.94 kg, P < 0.01, and protein content (3.41 %, P < 0.01 were achieved with the highest average daily air temperature. Opposite results were observed for milk yield of herd as well as protein content. Average daily relative air humidity had lower influence on individual and bulk milk samples. The better results were achieved for both datasets (individual and bulk samples in groups (65.3 – 80.4 %; > 80.4 % of average daily relative air humidity. Obtained results point out importance of outdoor climatic parameters monitoring and preventive measures of climatic conditions in the stable.

  1. Microbiological Quality of Raw Cow Milk across the Milk Supply ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The milk samples were subjected to laboratory analyses to evaluate total aerobic mesophilic bacteria count (TAMBC), total coliform count (TCC), yeast count (YC) and mold count (MC) in the laboratory to determine the microbiological quality of the milk. Mean TAMBC, TCC, YC and MC for raw cow milk samples collected ...

  2. CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

    2012-03-28

    The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

  3. A Heuristic and Hybrid Method for the Tank Allocation Problem in Maritime Bulk Shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Charlotte; Larsen, Jesper; Lusby, Richard Martin

    ship route. We have developed a randomised heuristic for eciently nding feasible allocations and computational results show that it can solve 99% of the considered instances within 0.5 seconds and all of them if allowed longer time. The heuristic is designed to work as an ecient subproblem solver...... and in such a setting with running times below e.g. 5 seconds, the heuristic clearly outperforms an earlier method by consistently solving more instances and eectively cutting 84% of the average running time. Furthermore, we have combined our heuristic with a modied version of the earlier method to derive a hybrid...

  4. A heuristic and hybrid method for the tank allocation problem in maritime bulk shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Charlotte; Larsen, Jesper; Lusby, Richard Martin

    2016-01-01

    finding a feasible solution. We have developed a heuristic that can efficiently find feasible cargo allocations. Computational results show that it can solve 99 % of the considered instances within 0.4 s and all of them if allowed longer time. We have also modified an optimality based method from...... the literature. The heuristic is much faster than this modified method on the vast majority of considered instances. However, the heuristic struggles on two instances which are relatively quickly solved by the modified optimality based method. These two methods therefore complement each other nicely and so, we...... have created a hybrid method that first runs the heuristic and if the heuristic fails to solve the problem, then runs the modified optimality based method on the parts of the problem that the heuristic did not solve. This hybrid method cuts between 90 and 94 % of the average running times compared...

  5. A Heuristic and Hybrid Method for the Tank Allocation Problem in Maritime Bulk Shipping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Charlotte; Larsen, Jesper; Lusby, Richard Martin

    finding a feasible solution. We have developed a heuristic that can efficiently find feasible cargo allocations. Computational results show that it can solve 99% of the considered instances within 0.4 seconds and all of them if allowed longer time. We have also modified an optimality based method from...... the literature. The heuristic is much faster than this modified method on the vast majority of considered instances. However, the heuristic struggles on two instances which are relatively quickly solved by the modified optimality based method. These two methods therefore complement each other nicely and so, we...... have created a hybrid method that first runs the heuristic and if the heuristic fails to solve the problem, then runs the modified optimality based method on the parts of the problem that the heuristic did not solve. This hybrid method cuts between 90% and 94% of the average running times compared...

  6. Calculation of Containment Concentrations While Coating the Interior of a Bulk Storage Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-01

    pulmonary edema (fluid in .lungs). These effects are usually reversible. Chemical or hypersensitive pneumonitis, with flu-like symptoms (e.g.; fever...amines, strong bases, metal compounds or surface active materials. This product contains trimethylol propane a.ad should hot be combined with phosphorus...edema (fluid in lungs). These effects are usually reversible. Chemical or hypersensitive pneumonitis, with flu-like synptoms (e.g., fever, chills), has

  7. Human milk benefits and breastfeeding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fani Anatolitou

    2012-01-01

    .... Milk changes with time of day and during the course of lactation. Extensive research has demonstrated health, nutritional, immunologic, developmental, psychological, social, economic and environmental benefits of human milk...

  8. 241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-25

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

  9. 241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-30

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

  10. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM - 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2012-06-21

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2011 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2011 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2011-00026, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2011, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2011 met the requirements of C-ESR-G-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 25, 26 and 34 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00495, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2011, Waste Tanks 25, 26, 34 and 41. A total of 5813 photographs were made and 835 visual and video inspections were performed during 2011. A potential leaksite was discovered at Tank 4 during routine annual inspections performed in 2011. The new crack, which is above the allowable fill level, resulted in no release to the environment or tank annulus. The location of the crack is documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.6.

  11. In situ vitrification of radioactive underground tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koegler, S.S.; Gibby, R.D.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-10-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a treatment process with great potential for remediating underground tanks previously used for storing radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Tests at several scales have demonstrated the utility of ISV for these tanks. An engineering-scale test vitrified a 30-cm-diameter buried steel and concrete tank that contained simulated tank sludge. Hazardous components of the tank sludge were immobilized, or removed and captured in the off-gas treatment system, and the tank walls were melted or incorporated into the ISV block. A pilot-scale ISV test vitrified a 1-m simulated underground tank than contained a simulated refractory sludge. The ISV process completely vitrified the tank, its contents, and the soil below the tank to a depth of 2.4 m, producing a uniform glass and crystalline monolith with an estimated mass of 30 tons. A large-scale underground tank test is scheduled for early 1991. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  12. The influence of milking procedures on cow’s teat tissue, milk yield and milking time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Špoljar

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two different milking procedures on teat length and diameter, milk yield and milking time. During the first milking procedure the milker decides when to remove the milking cluster from the udder, while in the second an automatic cluster removal, when milk flow was lower than 200 g/min, was performed. Measurements were made on two commercial farms B and A on 15 randomly chosen cows without any clinical sign of mastitis. There were no significant differencesbetween those farms in teat length and diameter differences before and after the milking. Average milking time on farm A was 6 min and 58 s, while on farm B was 5 min and 3 s. Average milk yield was 12.9 kg on farm B and 13.4 kg on farm A. Milking time was considerably shorter on farm B compared to farm A, while milk yield was almost equal on both farms. Automatic cluster weighting 2 kg removal was performed when milk flow was lower than 200 g/min in order to shorten the time needed to milk the cow, ensuring good udder health.

  13. RETRIEVAL & TREATMENT OF HANFORD TANK WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EACKER, J.A.; SPEARS, J.A.; STURGES, M.H.; MAUSS, B.M.

    2006-01-20

    The Hanford Tank Farms contain 53 million gal of radioactive waste accumulated during over 50 years of operations. The waste is stored in 177 single-shell and double-shell tanks in the Hanford 200 Areas. The single-shell tanks were put into operation from the early 1940s through the 1960s with wastes received from several generations of processing facilities for the recovery of plutonium and uranium, and from laboratories and other ancillary facilities. The overall hanford Tank Farm system represents one of the largest nuclear legacies in the world driving towards completion of retrieval and treatment in 2028 and the associated closure activity completion by 2035. Remote operations, significant radiation/contamination levels, limited access, and old facilities are just some of the challenges faced by retrieval and treatment systems. These systems also need to be able to successfully remove 99% or more of the waste, and support waste treatment, and tank closure. The Tank Farm retrieval program has ramped up dramatically in the past three years with design, fabrication, installation, testing, and operations ongoing on over 20 of the 149 single-shell tanks. A variety of technologies are currently being pursued to retrieve different waste types, applications, and to help establish a baseline for recovery/operational efficiencies. The paper/presentation describes the current status of retrieval system design, fabrication, installation, testing, readiness, and operations, including: (1) Saltcake removal progress in Tanks S-102, S-109, and S-112 using saltcake dissolution, modified sluicing, and high pressure water lancing techniques; (2) Sludge vacuum retrieval experience from Tanks C-201, C-202, C-203, and C-204; (3) Modified sluicing experience in Tank C-103; (4) Progress on design and installation of the mobile retrieval system for sludge in potentially leaking single-shell tanks, particularly Tank C-101; and (5) Ongoing installation of various systems in the next

  14. Persistence strategies of Bacillus cereus spores isolated from dairy silo tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Svensson, Birgitta; Andersson, Maria A; Christiansson, Anders; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja

    2010-05-01

    Survival of Bacillus cereus spores of dairy silo tank origin was investigated under conditions simulating those in operational dairy silos. Twenty-three strains were selected to represent all B. cereus isolates (n = 457) with genotypes (RAPD-PCR) that frequently colonised the silo tanks of at least two of the sampled eight dairies. The spores were studied for survival when immersed in liquids used for cleaning-in-place (1.0% sodium hydroxide at pH 13.1, 75 degrees C; 0.9% nitric acid at pH 0.8, 65 degrees C), for adhesion onto nonliving surfaces at 4 degrees C and for germination and biofilm formation in milk. Four groups with different strategies for survival were identified. First, high survival (log 15 min kill hot-alkaline wash liquid. Second, efficient adherence of the spores to stainless steel from cold water. Third, a cereulide producing group with spores characterised by slow germination in rich medium and well preserved viability when exposed to heating at 90 degrees C. Fourth, spores capable of germinating at 8 degrees C and possessing the cspA gene. There were indications that spores highly resistant to hot 1% sodium hydroxide may be effectively inactivated by hot 0.9% nitric acid. Eight out of the 14 dairy silo tank isolates possessing hot-alkali resistant spores were capable of germinating and forming biofilm in whole milk, not previously reported for B. cereus. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bulk density of small meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikwaya, J.-B.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Brown, P. G.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: Here we report on precise metric and photometric observations of 107 optical meteors, which were simultaneously recorded at multiple stations using three different intensified video camera systems. The purpose is to estimate bulk meteoroid density, link small meteoroids to their parent bodies based on dynamical and physical density values expected for different small body populations, to better understand and explain the dynamical evolution of meteoroids after release from their parent bodies. Methods: The video systems used had image sizes ranging from 640 × 480 to 1360 × 1036 pixels, with pixel scales from 0.01° per pixel to 0.05° per pixel, and limiting meteor magnitudes ranging from Mv = +2.5 to +6.0. We find that 78% of our sample show noticeable deceleration, allowing more robust constraints to be placed on density estimates. The density of each meteoroid is estimated by simultaneously fitting the observed deceleration and lightcurve using a model based on thermal fragmentation, conservation of energy and momentum. The entire phase space of the model free parameters is explored for each event to find ranges of parameters which fit the observations within the measurement uncertainty. Results: (a) We have analysed our data by first associating each of our events with one of the five meteoroid classes. The average density of meteoroids whose orbits are asteroidal and chondritic (AC) is 4200 kg m-3 suggesting an asteroidal parentage, possibly related to the high-iron content population. Meteoroids with orbits belonging to Jupiter family comets (JFCs) have an average density of 3100 ± 300 kg m-3. This high density is found for all meteoroids with JFC-like orbits and supports the notion that the refractory material reported from the Stardust measurements of 81P/Wild 2 dust is common among the broader JFC population. This high density is also the average bulk density for the 4 meteoroids with orbits belonging to the Ecliptic shower-type class (ES) also

  16. Development of a hot water tank simulation program with improved prediction of thermal stratification in the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Yue, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    A simulation program SpiralSol was developed in previous investigations to calculate thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water (SDHW) system with a hot water tank with a built-in heat exchanger spiral [1]. The simulation program is improved in the paper in term of prediction of thermal......, taking into account the influences of tank volume, height to diameter ratio, tank insulation, thickness and material property of the tank and initial thermal conditions of the tank. The equation is validated for a tank volume between 150 l and 500 l, a tank height to tank diameter ratio of 1-5, a tank...... property of the tank wall on thermal stratification in the tank. It is elucidated how thermal stratification in the tank is influenced by the natural convection and how the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The existing...

  17. Cow's milk allergy in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnostic tests. IgE-mediated CMA. Skin-prick testing (with fresh milk or commercial reagents) and ImmunoCAP-. RAST (for determining specific IgE against cow's milk protein) are the currently available tests. In children older than 2 years a skin-prick test (SPT) reaction with a wheal diameter ≥8 mm (Table II)5 or milk- ...

  18. Lactoferrin concentration in buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Giacinti

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to quantify lactoferrin (Lfe in buffalo milk and to examine the factors affecting milk Lfe, such as the lactation stage, daily milk yield, parity, and milk somatic cells count (SCC. Milk Lfe concentration was detected by the SDS-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. The overall mean of Lfe concentration was 0.332±0.165 g/L and ranged from 0.030 to 0.813 g/L. Milk Lfe concentrations increased (P<0.01 with the increase of days in milk, but it was not affected by parity. It was estimated an increase of 0.0015 g/L daily of Lfe in milk during lactation. Milk Lfe concentration was significantly affected by SCC. The differences became significant when the levels of SCC increased up to 200.000/mL. This is the first investigation on the levels of Lfe in buffalo milk in reference to daily milk production, lactation stage, parity and SCC. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between Lfe and SCC in buffalo milk.

  19. Milking procedures, milk flow curves and somatic cell count in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zanini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent availability of electronic mobile milk flow meters allows to study in details milk flow patterns during milking. A normal milk flow profile is characterized by an incline phase, with increasing milk flow, a plateau phase, with steady milk flow, and a decline phase. In these phases milk flow is influenced by many factors: genetic characteristics of the cows, regulation of milking machine and milking routine.

  20. Human Milk-Treatment and Quality of Banked Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaud, Jean-Charles; Buffin, Rachel

    2017-03-01

    The aim of human milk banks is to deliver safe and high quality donor human milk. Treatment of human milk has to destroy most microorganisms while preserving immunological and nutrient components, which is obtained when using low time low temperature pasteurization. However it destroys bile-simulated lipase, reduces lactoferrin, lysozyme, immunoglobulins, and bactericidal capacity of human milk. New methods are under investigation such as high temperature short time pasteurization, high pressure processing, or ultraviolet irradiation. They have been tested in experimental conditions and there are promising results, but they have to be tested in real conditions in human milk bank. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Yoghurt fermentation trials utilizing mare milk: comparison with cow milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Giangiacomo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mare milk shows a very interesting nutritional composition, similar to human milk. Whey protein fraction represents about 50% of total proteins, with a good amount of essential amino acids, and high lysozyme concentration (Jauregui-Adell, 1975. Mare milk contains essential fatty acids, progenitors of ω3 and ω6, higher than cow milk (Csapò et al., 1995; Curadi et al., 2002. In east european countries mare milk is utilized in dietetics and therapeutics for gastroenteric and cardiac pathologies (Sharmanov et al., 1982; Mirrakimov et al., 1986, or as a drink obtained from lactic and alcoholic fermentation (Koumiss...

  2. Microthrix parvicella abundance associates with activated sludge settling velocity and rheology - Quantifying and modelling filamentous bulking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wágner, Dorottya Sarolta; Ramin, Elham; Szabo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    high variability, and no significant association with filamentous abundance. A two-dimensional, axi-symmetrical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used to assess calibration scenarios to model filamentous bulking. Our results suggest that model predictions can significantly benefit from...... explicitly accounting for filamentous bulking by calibrating the hindered settling velocity function. Furthermore, accounting for the transient and compression settling velocity in the computational domain is crucial to improve model accuracy when modelling filamentous bulking. However, the case......The objective of this work is to identify relevant settling velocity and rheology model parameters and to assess the underlying filamentous microbial community characteristics that can influence the solids mixing and transport in secondary settling tanks. Parameter values for hindered, transient...

  3. Simple characterisation of solar DHW tanks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Elsa; Furbo, Simon

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the project is to compare different methods used for testing small solar domestic hot water tanks. A small hot water tank is tested at three different European laboratories by means of the test methods normally used at the laboratories. The tank is marketed in Denmark.The test carried...... out at the Department for Buildings and Energy compromises determination of the heat loss coefficient for the tank and the heat transfer coefficient for the auxiliary helix. A dynamic test is performed and a simulation model of the tank is made and validated against measured energy quantities...... and temperatures. The annual thermal performance for a solar domestic hot water system based on the tested tank is calculated. Further, proposal for a future test on mixing during draw-off as well as proposal for a maximum acceptable mixing during draw-off is given....

  4. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  5. Characterization of the March 2017 Tank 15 Waste Removal Slurry Sample (Combination of Slurry Samples HTF-15-17-28 and HTF-15-17-29)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-09

    Two March 2017 Tank 15 slurry samples (HTF-15-17-28 and HTF-15-17-29) were collected during the second bulk waste removal campaign and submitted to SRNL for characterization. At SRNL, the two samples were combined and then characterized by a series of physical, elemental, radiological, and ionic analysis methods. Sludge settling as a function of time was also quantified. The characterization results reported in this document are consistent with expectations based upon waste type, process knowledge, comparisons between alternate analysis techniques, and comparisons with the characterization results obtained for the November 2016 Tank 15 slurry sample (the sample collected during the first bulk waste removal campaign).

  6. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

  7. ANNUAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE TANK INSPECTION PROGRAM 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, B.; Waltz, R.

    2011-06-23

    Aqueous radioactive wastes from Savannah River Site (SRS) separations and vitrification processes are contained in large underground carbon steel tanks. Inspections made during 2010 to evaluate these vessels and other waste handling facilities along with evaluations based on data from previous inspections are the subject of this report. The 2010 inspection program revealed that the structural integrity and waste confinement capability of the Savannah River Site waste tanks were maintained. All inspections scheduled per SRR-LWE-2009-00138, HLW Tank Farm Inspection Plan for 2010, were completed. Ultrasonic measurements (UT) performed in 2010 met the requirements of C-ESG-00006, In-Service Inspection Program for High Level Waste Tanks, Rev. 3, and WSRC-TR-2002-00061, Rev.6. UT inspections were performed on Tanks 30, 31 and 32 and the findings are documented in SRNL-STI-2010-00533, Tank Inspection NDE Results for Fiscal Year 2010, Waste Tanks 30, 31 and 32. A total of 5824 photographs were made and 1087 visual and video inspections were performed during 2010. Ten new leaksites at Tank 5 were identified in 2010. The locations of these leaksites are documented in C-ESR-G-00003, SRS High Level Waste Tank Leaksite Information, Rev.5. Ten leaksites at Tank 5 were documented during tank wall/annulus cleaning activities. None of these new leaksites resulted in a release to the environment. The leaksites were documented during wall cleaning activities and the waste nodules associated with the leaksites were washed away. Previously documented leaksites were reactivated at Tank 12 during waste removal activities.

  8. Tank 241-A-105 leak assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-06-01

    Tank 241-A-105 is one of 149 single shell tanks constructed at Hanford to contain and store highly radioactive wastes originating from the processing of spent nuclear reactor fuel. Radiation detection and temperature monitoring devices installed beneath the tank indicate that several episodes of leakage of waste from the tank have occurred. The aim of this study was to evaluate the previous estimates and reanalyze the data to provide a more accurate estimate of leakage from the tank. The principal conclusions of this study are as follows: Earlier investigators estimated leakage prior to August 1968 at 5,000 to 15,000 gallons. Their estimate appears reasonable. Leakage while the tank was being sluiced (8/68--11/70) probably exceeded 5,000 gallons, but probably did not exceed 30,000 gallons. Insufficient data are available to be more precise. Cooling water added to the tank during the sprinkling phase (11/70 -- 12/78) was approximately 610,000 gallons. Sufficient heat was generated in the tank to evaporate most, and perhaps nearly all, of this water. Radionuclides escaping into the soil under the tank cannot be estimated directly because of many uncertainties. Based on a range of leakage from 10,000 to 45,000 gallons, assumed compositions, and decayed to 1/1/91, radioactivity under the tank is expected to be in the range of 85,000--760,000 curies. Measured radiation peaks were nearly all located directly below the perimeter of the tank and, except in rare cases, they showed no tendency to spread horizontally. Moreover, the maximum radiation readings detected are a very small fraction of the radiation reading in the tank. This is the basis for the conclusion that the rate of leakage and, most likely, the quantity leaked, was small. 51 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Surge Tank Atlas for Hydropower Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Sandvåg, Simon Utseth

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this master's thesis is to describe the existing surge tank solutions and additional improvements, and to simulate the hydraulic behavior of the surge tanks and how it affects the hydropower plant. The high head hydropower plant Torpa and the low head hydropower plant Åna-Sira are used for the case study, thus the surge tanks can be simulated under different hydraulic conditions. Turbine pressures and mass oscillations after a complete turbine shutdown, and turbine regulation...

  10. Criteria: waste tank isolation and stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, W.P.; Ogren, W.E.

    1976-09-01

    The crystallized Hanford high-level wastes stored in single-shell underground tanks consist of sludges and salt cakes covered with supernatural liquor. Purpose of stabilization and isolation is to reduce the releases and losses as a result of a loss of tank integrity. The tanks will be modified so that no inadvertent liquid additions can be made. Criteria for the isolation and stabilization are given and discussed briefly. (DLC)

  11. Alternative Chemical Cleaning Methods for High Level Waste Tanks: Simulant Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); King, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-19

    Solubility testing with simulated High Level Waste tank heel solids has been conducted in order to evaluate two alternative chemical cleaning technologies for the dissolution of sludge residuals remaining in the tanks after the exhaustion of mechanical cleaning and sludge washing efforts. Tests were conducted with non-radioactive pure phase metal reagents, binary mixtures of reagents, and a Savannah River Site PUREX heel simulant to determine the effectiveness of an optimized, dilute oxalic/nitric acid cleaning reagent and pure, dilute nitric acid toward dissolving the bulk non-radioactive waste components. A focus of this testing was on minimization of oxalic acid additions during tank cleaning. For comparison purposes, separate samples were also contacted with pure, concentrated oxalic acid which is the current baseline chemical cleaning reagent. In a separate study, solubility tests were conducted with radioactive tank heel simulants using acidic and caustic permanganate-based methods focused on the “targeted” dissolution of actinide species known to be drivers for Savannah River Site tank closure Performance Assessments. Permanganate-based cleaning methods were evaluated prior to and after oxalic acid contact.

  12. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    OpenAIRE

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5 mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644 K, a glass transition temperature of 401 K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58 K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system...

  13. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents numerical investigations of thermal stratification in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank established by standby heat loss from the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are calculated by means of validated...... computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The measured heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is used as input to the CFD model. Parametric studies are carried out using the validated models to investigate the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow...... the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The results show that 20–55% of the side heat loss drops to layers below in the part of the tank without the presence of thermal stratification. A heat loss removal factor is introduced...

  14. Utilities:Water:Water Tanks at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona (Utilities.gdb:Water:tanks)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents tanks at Pipe Spring National Monument, Arizona. It consists of 2 polygons representing the Tunnel Spring Division Tank and the 1/2...

  15. Camel milk: an alternative for cow's milk allergy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlayel, Mohammad S; Hazeima, Khalid Abu; Al-Mesaifri, Fatima; Bener, Abdulbari

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of cow's milk allergy (CMA) in children includes avoidance of cow's milk and providing a milk substitute. This study was designed to determine whether CMA children could safely consume camel's milk as an alternative, and skin-prick test (SPT) to camel's milk could be a reliable tool in selecting them. Between April 2007 and February 2010, children with confirmed CMA seen at the Allergy-Immunology Clinic, Hamad Medical Corp., were enrolled into this prospective cohort study. Subjects had a detailed history and medical examination, complete blood count with differential count, total serum IgE, and specific IgE test and SPT to cow's milk. Patients with positive SPT and an elevated cow's milk-specific IgE had negative SPT to camel's milk. Of 35 children (23 male and 12 female children) aged 4-126 months (median, 21 months), 23 patients (65.7%) presented with acute urticaria, 17 (48.6%) with atopic dermatitis, 9 (25.7%) with anaphylaxis, 8 (22.9%) with failure to thrive, and 5 (14.3%) with chronic vomiting. Twenty-eight patients (80%) had family history of allergy. Twenty-six patients (74.3%) were breast-fed for ≤18 months. Mean white blood cell count was 9860.5 cells/μL, absolute eosinophil count was 1219 cells/μL, IgE was 682 IU/mL, and cow's milk-specific IgE was 22.01 kU/L. Only 7 patients (20%) had positive SPT to camel's milk and 28 (80%) were negative to camel's milk. All patients with negative SPT took camel's milk without any reactions. In children with CMA, SPT is a reliable clinical test in ruling out reactivity to camel's milk so these children could safely take camel's milk as an alternative nutrient.

  16. Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shine, E. P.

    2012-08-01

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements

  17. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shine, E.

    2012-03-14

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their

  18. Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shine, E. P.

    2013-01-31

    Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements

  19. Tank waste remediation system (TWRS) mission analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieck, R.H.

    1996-10-03

    The Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis provides program level requirements and identifies system boundaries and interfaces. Measures of success appropriate to program level accomplishments are also identified.

  20. Hybrid Composite Cryogenic Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid lightweight composite tank has been created using specially designed materials and manufacturing processes. The tank is produced by using a hybrid structure consisting of at least two reinforced composite material systems. The inner composite layer comprises a distinct fiber and resin matrix suitable for cryogenic use that is a braided-sleeve (and/or a filamentwound layer) aramid fiber preform that is placed on a removable mandrel (outfitted with metallic end fittings) and is infused (vacuum-assisted resin transfer molded) with a polyurethane resin matrix with a high ductility at low temperatures. This inner layer is allowed to cure and is encapsulated with a filamentwound outer composite layer of a distinct fiber resin system. Both inner and outer layer are in intimate contact, and can also be cured at the same time. The outer layer is a material that performs well for low temperature pressure vessels, and it can rely on the inner layer to act as a liner to contain the fluids. The outer layer can be a variety of materials, but the best embodiment may be the use of a continuous tow of carbon fiber (T-1000 carbon, or others), or other high-strength fibers combined with a high ductility epoxy resin matrix, or a polyurethane matrix, which performs well at low temperatures. After curing, the mandrel can be removed from the outer layer. While the hybrid structure is not limited to two particular materials, a preferred version of the tank has been demonstrated on an actual test tank article cycled at high pressures with liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen, and the best version is an inner layer of PBO (poly-pphenylenebenzobisoxazole) fibers with a polyurethane matrix and an outer layer of T-1000 carbon with a high elongation epoxy matrix suitable for cryogenic temperatures. A polyurethane matrix has also been used for the outer layer. The construction method is ideal because the fiber and resin of the inner layer has a high strain to failure at cryogenic