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Sample records for bulk shielding reactor

  1. Technical specifications for the bulk shielding reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report provides information concerning the technical specifications for the Bulk Shielding Reactor. Areas covered include: safety limits and limiting safety settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and monitoring of airborne effluents. 10 refs

  2. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxiliary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supersedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR.

  3. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxillary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supercedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR

  4. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxillary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supercedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR.

  5. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxiliary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supersedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR

  6. Operation of the low power reactor assembly in the University of Illinois TRIGA bulk shielding facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, G.P.; Thayer, G.

    1972-01-01

    The Low Power Reactor Assembly (LOPRA) is a rectangular assembly of TRIGA fuel elements located in the bulk shielding facility of the Illinois Advanced TRIGA Reactor (TRIGA). The LOPRA is coupled to the TRIGA by a thermal column that extends from the TRIGA core to the bulk shielding facility. The LOPRA will be utilized for studying steady-state and transient coupling between the two reactors. Spatial variations in the flux at the LOPRA will be measured for different operating conditions of the TRIGA. These measurements will be made with both systems in low power critical states or in subcritical states

  7. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  8. Neutronics model of the bulk shielding reactor (BSR): validation by comparison of calculations with the experimental measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.; Miller, L.F.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1981-05-01

    A neutronics model for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Bulk Shielding Reactor (ORNL-SAR) was developed and verified by experimental measurements. A cross-section library was generated from the 218 group Master Library using the AMPX Block Code system. A series of one-, two-, and three-dimensional neutronics calculations were performed utilizing both transport and diffusion theory. Spectral comparison was made with 58 Ni(n,p) reaction. The results of the comparison between the calculational model and other experimental measurements showed agreement within 10% and therefore the model was determined to be adequate for calculating the neutron fluence for future irradiation experiments in the ORNL-BSR

  9. Evaluation of alternative methods of simulating asymmetric bulk heating in fusion reactor blanket/shield components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, G.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Wadkins, R.P.; Wessol, D.E.

    1981-10-01

    As a part of Phase O, Test Program Element-II of the Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program, a study was conducted by EG and G Idaho, Inc., to identify, characterize, and recommend alternative approaches for simulating fusion bulk heating in blanket/shield components. This is the report on that effort. Since the usefulness of any simulation approach depends upon the particular experiment considered, classes of problem types (thermal-hydraulic, thermomechanical, etc.) and material types (structure, solid breeder, etc.) are developed. The evaluation of the various simulation approaches is performed for the various significant combinations of problem class and material class. The simulation approaches considered are discrete-source heating, direct resistance, electromagnetic induction, microwave heating, and nuclear heating. From the evaluations performed for each experiment type, discrete - source heating emerges as a good approach for bulk heating simulation in thermal - hydraulics experiments, and nuclear heating appears to be a good approach in experiments addressing thermomechanics and combined thermal-hydraulic/thermomechanics

  10. ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizul Khakim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI. Bulk shielding merupakan fasilitas yang terintegrasi dengan reaktor Kartini yang berfungsi sebagai penyimpanan sementara bahan bakar bekas. Fasilitas ini merupakan fasilitas yang termasuk dalam struktur, sistem dan komponen (SSK yang penting bagi keselamatan. Salah satu fungsi keselamatan dari sistem penanganan dan penyimpanan bahan bakar adalah mencegah kecelakaan kekritisan yang tak terkendali dan membatasi naiknya temperatur bahan bakar. Analisis keselamatan paling kurang harus mencakup analisis keselamatan dari sisi neutronik dan termo hidrolik Bulk shielding. Analisis termo hidrolik ditujukan untuk memastikan perpindahan panas dan proses pendinginan bahan bakar bekas berjalan baik dan tidak terjadi akumulasi panas yang mengancam integritas bahan bakar. Code tervalidasi PARET/ANL digunakan untuk analisis pendinginan dengan mode konveksi alam. Hasil perhitungan menunjukkan bahwa mode pendinginan konvekasi alam cukup memadai dalam mendinginkan panas sisa tanpa mengakibatkan kenaikan temperatur bahan bakar yang signifikan. Kata kunci: Bulk shielding, bahan bakar bekas, konveksi alam, PARET.   ABSTRACT THERMAL HYDRAULIC SAFETY ANALYSIS OF BULK SHIELDING KARTINI REACTOR. Bulk shielding is an integrated facility to Kartini reactor which is used for temporary spent fuels storage. The facility is one of the structures, systems and components (SSCs important to safety. Among the safety functions of fuel handling and storage are to prevent any uncontrolable criticality accidents and to limit the fuel temperature increase. Safety analyses should, at least, cover neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations of the bulk shielding. Thermal hydraulic analyses were intended to ensure that heat removal and the process of the spent fuels cooling takes place adequately and no heat accumulation that challenges the fuel integrity. Validated code, PARET/ANL was used for analysing the

  11. Radiation shielding for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Radiation shielding requirements for fusion reactors present different problems than those for fission reactors and accelerators. Fusion devices, particularly tokamak reactors, are complicated by geometry constraints that complicate disposition of fully effective shielding. This paper reviews some of these shielding issues and suggested solutions for optimizing the machine and biological shielding. Radiation transport calculations are essential for predicting and confirming the nuclear performance of the reactor and, as such, must be an essential part of the reactor design process. Development and optimization of reactor components from the first wall and primary shielding to the penetrations and containment shielding must be carried out in a sensible progression. Initial results from one-dimensional transport calculations are used for scoping studies and are followed by detailed two- and three-dimensional analyses to effectively characterize the overall radiation environment. These detail model calculations are essential for accounting for the radiation leakage through ports and other penetrations in the bulk shield. Careful analysis of component activation and radiation damage is cardinal for defining remote handling requirements, in-situ replacement of components, and personnel access at specific locations inside the reactor containment vessel. (author)

  12. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  13. Safety analysis report for the National Low-Temperature Neutron Irradiation Facility (NLTNIF) at the ORNL Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coltman, R.R. Jr.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Richardson, S.A.

    1986-06-01

    This report provides information concerning: the experiment facility; experiment assembly; instrumentation and controls; materials; radioactivity; shielding; thermodynamics; estimated or measured reactivity effects; procedures; hazards; and quality assurance

  14. Radiation shield for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esenov, Amra; Pustovgar, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    One of the chief structures of a reactor pit is a 'dry' shield. Setting up a 'dry' shield includes the technologically complex process of thermal processing of serpentinite concrete. Modern advances in the area of materials technology permit avoiding this complex and demanding procedure, and this significantly decreases the duration, labor intensity, and cost of setting it up. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  16. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable

  17. Channels in tokamak reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchipakin, O.L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of calculations of neutron transport through the channels in the tokamak reactor radiation shields, obtained by the Monte Carlo method and by the method of discrete ordinates, are considered. The given data show that the structural materials of the channel and that of the blanket and shields in the regions close to it are subjected to almost the same irradiation as the first wall and therefore they should satisfy the technical requirements. The radiation energy release in the injector channel wall, caused by neutron shooting, substantially depends on the channel dimensions. At the channel large diameter (0.7-10 m) this dependence noticeably decreases. The investigation of the effect of the injector channel cross section form on the neutron flux density through the channel, testifies to weak dependence of shooting radiation intensity on the form of the channel cross section. It is concluded that measures to decrease unfavourable effect of the channels on the safety of the power tokamak reactor operation and maintenance cause substantial changes in reactor design due to which the channel protection must be developed at first stages. The Monte Carlo method is recommended to be used for variant calculations and when calculating the neutron flux functionals in specific points of the system the discrete ordinate method is preferred [ru

  18. Neutronic design of MYRRHA reactor hall shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celik Yurdunaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral shielding of a 600 MeV proton linear accelerator beam line in the MYRRHA reactor hall has been assessed using neutronic calculations by the MCNPX code complemented with analytical predictions. Continuous beam losses were considered to define the required shielding thickness that meets the requirements for the dose rate limits. Required shielding thicknesses were investigated from the viewpoint of accidental full beam loss as well as beam loss on collimator. The results confirm that the required shielding thicknesses are highly sensitive to the spatial shape of the beam and strongly divergent beam losses. Therefore shielding barrier should be designed according to the more conservative assumptions.

  19. Reactor shielding. Report of a panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Reactor shielding is necessary that people may work and live in the vicinity of reactors without receiving detrimental biological effects and that the necessary materials and instrumentation for reactor operation may function properly. Much of the necessary theoretical work and experimental measurement has been accomplished in recent years. Scientists have developed some very sophisticated methods which have contributed to a more thorough understanding of the problems involved and have produced some very reliable results leading to significant reductions in shield configurations. A panel of experts was convened from 9 to 13 March 1964 in Vienna at the Headquarters of the International Atomic Energy Agency to discuss the present status of reactor shielding. The participants were prominent shielding experts from most of the laboratories engaged in this field throughout the world. They presented status reports describing the past history and plans for further development of reactor shielding in their countries and much valuable discussion took place on some of the most relevant aspects of reactor shielding. All this material is presented in this report, together with abstracts of the supporting papers read to the Panel

  20. Shield structure for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, C.A.; Simnad, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shield structure is described for use where there are significant amounts of fast neutron flux above an energy level of approximately 70 keV. The shield includes structural supports and neutron moderator and absorber systems. A portion at least of the neutron moderator material is magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron. (U.K.)

  1. PRORA - program for calculating neutron flux in reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindilaru, G.; Cuculeanu, V.

    1978-06-01

    In order to perform the reactor shielding calculations for the reactor design, it is necessary a fast, accurate method which should take into account the proper shielding geometry. Thus, the PRORA program calculates space-energy neutron distribution in the reactor shielding using age-diffusion approximation and the multigroup formalism. (author)

  2. Methodology of shielding calculation for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, J.R.; Mendonca, A.G.; Otto, A.C.; Yamaguchi, Mitsuo

    1982-01-01

    A methodology of calculation that coupling a serie of computer codes in a net that make the possibility to calculate the radiation, neutron and gamma transport, is described, for deep penetration problems, typical of nuclear reactor shielding. This net of calculation begining with the generation of constant multigroups, for neutrons and gamma, by the AMPX system, coupled to ENDF/B-IV data library, the transport calculation of these radiations by ANISN, DOT 3.5 and Morse computer codes, up to the calculation of absorbed doses and/or equivalents buy SPACETRAN code. As examples of the calculation method, results from benchmark n 0 6 of Shielding Benchmark Problems - ORNL - RSIC - 25, namely Neutron and Secondary Gamma Ray fluence transmitted through a Slab of Borated Polyethylene, are presented. (Author) [pt

  3. Design of radiation shields in nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi Shirazi, A.; Daneshvar, Sh.; Aghanajafi, C.; Jahanfarnia, Gh.; Rahgoshay, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article consists of designing radiation shields in the core of nuclear reactors to control and restrain the harmful nuclear radiations in the nuclear reactor cores. The radiation shields protect the loss of energy. caused by nuclear radiation in a nuclear reactor core and consequently, they cause to increase the efficiency of the reactor and decrease the risk of being under harmful radiations for the staff. In order to design these shields, by making advantages of the O ppenheim Electrical Network m ethod, the structure of the shields are physically simulated and by obtaining a special algorithm, the amount of optimized energy caused by nuclear radiations, is calculated

  4. Fe-based bulk metallic glasses used for magnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şerban, Va; Codrean, C.; Uţu, D.; Ercuţa, A.

    2009-01-01

    The casting in complex shapes (tubullar) and the main magnetic properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) alloys from the ferromagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni-Ga-P-Si-C system, with a small adittion of Ni (3%) were studied. Samples as rods and sockets having the thickness up to 1 mm were obtained from master alloys by melt injection by low cooling rates into a Cu mold and annealed in order to ensure adequate magnetic requirements. The structure was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the basic magnetic properties (coercivity, magnetic remanence, initial susceptibility, etc.) were determined by conventional low frequency induction method. The experimental investigations on producing of BMG ferromagnetic alloys with 3% Ni show the possibility to obtain magnetic shields of complex shape with satisfactory magnetic properties. The presence of Ni does not affect the glass forming ability, but reduce the shielding capacity.

  5. Fe-based bulk metallic glasses used for magnetic shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serban, Va; Codrean, C; UTu, D [Politehnica University of Timisoara, Depart for Materials Science and Welding, 1, M. Viteazu Bvd., 300222, Timisoara (Romania); ErcuTa, A, E-mail: serban@mec.upt.r [West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Physics, 4, Vasile Parvan Bdv., Timisoara 300223 (Romania)

    2009-01-01

    The casting in complex shapes (tubular) and the main magnetic properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMG) alloys from the ferromagnetic Fe-Cr-Ni-Ga-P-Si-C system, with a small addition of Ni (3%) were studied. Samples as rods and sockets having the thickness up to 1 mm were obtained from master alloys by melt injection by low cooling rates into a Cu mold and annealed in order to ensure adequate magnetic requirements. The structure was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the basic magnetic properties (coercivity, magnetic remanence, initial susceptibility, etc.) were determined by conventional low frequency induction method. The experimental investigations on producing of BMG ferromagnetic alloys with 3% Ni show the possibility to obtain magnetic shields of complex shape with satisfactory magnetic properties. The presence of Ni does not affect the glass forming ability, but reduce the shielding capacity.

  6. Evaluation of a permanent reactor vessel head shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.S.; Johnson, T.G.; Tipswork, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports that Virginia Power recently completed installing permanent reactor vessel head shields at all four of its nuclear units-Surry 1 and 2 (781-MWe Westinghouse PWRs) and North Anna 1 and 2 (893-MWe Westinghouse PWRs). Permanent shields were chosen over the use of temporary shielding based on a cost/benefit analysis. Factors that were taken into account in the analysis included the cost of the shields, the one-time dose commitment for installation of permanent shields, dose and manpower commitments for installation and removal of temporary shielding during each outage, decontamination and storage of temporary shielding between outages, and projected dose savings for both types of shields. Basically, permanent shields were found to be more cot-effective because each required only a one-time dose commitment for installation

  7. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented

  8. Fusion reactor blanket/shield design study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Clemmer, R.G.; Harkness, S.D.

    1979-07-01

    A joint study of tokamak reactor first-wall/blanket/shield technology was conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC). The objectives of this program were the identification of key technological limitations for various tritium-breeding-blanket design concepts, establishment of a basis for assessment and comparison of the design features of each concept, and development of optimized blanket designs. The approach used involved a review of previously proposed blanket designs, analysis of critical technological problems and design features associated with each of the blanket concepts, and a detailed evaluation of the most tractable design concepts. Tritium-breeding-blanket concepts were evaluated according to the proposed coolant. The ANL effort concentrated on evaluation of lithium- and water-cooled blanket designs while the MDAC effort focused on helium- and molten salt-cooled designs. A joint effort was undertaken to provide a consistent set of materials property data used for analysis of all blanket concepts. Generalized nuclear analysis of the tritium breeding performance, an analysis of tritium breeding requirements, and a first-wall stress analysis were conducted as part of the study. The impact of coolant selection on the mechanical design of a tokamak reactor was evaluated. Reference blanket designs utilizing the four candidate coolants are presented.

  9. Method for temporary shielding of reactor vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, N.P.; Sejvar, J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for shielding stored internals for reactor vessel annealing. It comprises removing nuclear fuel from the reactor vessel containment building; removing and storing upper and lower core internals under water in a refueling canal storage area; assembling a support structure in the refueling canal between the reactor vessel and the stored internals; introducing vertical shielding tanks individually through a hatch in the containment building and positioning each into the support structure; introducing horizontal shielding tanks individually through a hatch in the containment building and positioning each above the stored internals and vertical tanks; draining water from the refueling canal to the level of a flange of the reactor vessel; placing an annealing apparatus in the reactor vessel; pumping the remaining water from the reactor vessel; and annealing the reactor vessel

  10. Basic nuclear data and reactor shielding design formulaire PROPANE Do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estiot, J.C.; Salvatores, M.; Trapp, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents a calculational scheme - formulaire PROPANE - to calculate the deep neutron penetration in the fast reactor shield. The emphasis is put on the multigroup data and method approximations. The performances of this formulaire are presented

  11. Thermal analysis of biological shield of fast breeder test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, D.; Sarda, V.

    1976-01-01

    A design optimisation of the biological shield of fast breeder test reactor was carried out using computer code HEATING. The effect of different heat sources, variation of coolant tube pitch circle radius, coolant temperature, angular pitch of coolant tubes and thermal conductivity of concrete on the temperature distribution within the shield has been studied. (author)

  12. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, David I.; Ade, Brian J.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Leichliter, Katrina J.; Dixon, David D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density.

  13. Water and Regolith Shielding for Surface Reactor Missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, David I.; Sadasivan, Pratap; Dixon, David D.; Ade, Brian J.; Leichliter, Katrina J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates potential shielding options for surface power fission reactors. The majority of work is focused on a lunar shield that uses a combination of water in stainless-steel cans and lunar regolith. The major advantage of a water-based shield is that development, testing, and deployment should be relatively inexpensive. This shielding approach is used for three surface reactor concepts: (1) a moderated spectrum, NaK cooled, Hastalloy/UZrH reactor, (2) a fast-spectrum, NaK-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor, and (3) a fast-spectrum, K-heat-pipe-cooled, SS/UO2 reactor. For this study, each of these reactors is coupled to a 25-kWt Stirling power system, designed for 5 year life. The shields are designed to limit the dose both to the Stirling alternators and potential astronauts on the surface. The general configuration used is to bury the reactor, but several other options exist as well. Dose calculations are presented as a function of distance from reactor, depth of buried hole, water boron concentration (if any), and regolith repacked density

  14. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. The shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station and advanced manned lunar base. (author)

  15. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances, and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. Shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station, and advanced manned lunar base

  16. The optimum shielding for a power reactor using local components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHajali, S.; Kharita, M. H.; Yousef, S.; Naoom, B.; Al-Nassar, M.

    2009-07-01

    Some local concrete mixtures have been picked out (selected) to be studied as shielding concrete for prospective nuclear power reactor in Syria. This research has interested in the attenuation of gamma radiation and neutron fluxes by these local concretes in the ordinary conditions. In addition to the heat effect on the shielding and physical properties of local concrete. Furthermore the neutron activation of the elements of the local concrete mixtures have been studied that for selection the low-activation materials (low dose rate and short half life radioisotopes). In this way biological shielding for nuclear reactor can be safe during operation of nuclear power reactor, in addition to be low radioactive waste after decommissioning the reactor. (author)

  17. Shielding device for control rod in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo; Tomatsu, Tsutomu.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention shields radiation emitted from control rods to greatly reduce an operator's radiation exposure even if reactor water level is lowered and the upper portion of the control rod is exposed upon inspection of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a shield assembly has a structure comprising a set of four columnar shields in a two-row and two-column arrangement, which can be inserted into a control rod guide tube. Upon conducting inspection, the control rod is lowered into the control rod guide tube, and in this state, the columnar shields of the shield assembly are inserted to the control rod in the control rod guide tube. With such procedures, the upper portion of the control rod protruded from the control rod guide tube is covered with the shield assembly. As a result, radiation leaked from the control rod is shielded. Accordingly, irradiation in the reactor due to leaked radiation can be prevented thereby enabling to reduce an operator's radiation exposure. (I.S.)

  18. Thermal shield support degradation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Fry, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Damage to the thermal shield support structures of three pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to flow-induced vibrations was recently discovered during refueling. In two of the reactors, severe damage occurred to the thermal shield, and in one reactor the core support barrel (CSB) was damaged, necessitating extended outages for repairs. In all three reactors, several of the thermal shield supports were either loose, damaged, or missing. The three plants had been in operation for approximately 10 years before the damage was apparent by visual inspection. Because each of the three US PWR manufacturers have experienced thermal shield support degradation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyze ex-core neutron detector noise data to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient thermal shield support degradation. Results of the noise data analysis indicate that thermal shield support degradation probably began early in the life of both severely damaged plants. The degradation was characterized by shifts in the resonant frequencies of core internal structures and the appearance of new resonances in the ex-core neutron detector noise. Both the data analyses and the finite element calculations indicate that these changes in resonant frequencies are less than 3 Hz. 11 refs., 16 figs

  19. Radiological shielding of low power compact reactor: calculation and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, Raul

    2004-01-01

    The development of compact reactors becoming a technology that offers great projection and innumerable use possibilities, both in electricity generation and in propulsion.One of the requirements for the operation of this type of reactor is that it must include a radiological shield that will allow for different types of configurations and that, may be moved with the reactor if it needs to be transported.The nucleus of a reactor emits radiation, mainly neutrons and gamma rays in the heat of power, and gamma radiation during the radioactive decay of fission products.This radiation must be restrained in both conditions of operation to avoid it affecting workers or the public.The combination of different materials and properties in layers results in better performance in the form of a decrease in radiation, hence causing the dosage outside the reactor, whether in operation or shut down, to fall within the allowed limits.The calculations and design of radiological shields is therefore of paramount importance in reactor design.The choice of material and the design of the shield have a strong impact on the cost and the load capacity, the latter being one of the characteristics to optimize.The imposed condition of design is that the reactor can be transported together with the decay shield in a standard container of 40 foot [es

  20. Gamma dose from activation of internal shields in IRIS reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, Stefano; Cammi, Antonio; Garlati, Luisella; Lombardi, Carlo; Padovani, Enrico

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure is a modular pressurised water reactor with an integral design. This means that all the primary system components, such as the steam generators, pumps, pressuriser and control rod drive mechanisms, are located inside the reactor vessel, which requires a large diameter. For the sake of better reliability and safety, it is desirable to achieve the reduction of vessel embrittlement as well as the lowering of the dose beyond the vessel. The former can be easily accomplished by the presence of a wide downcomer, filled with water, which surrounds the core region, while the latter needs the presence of additional internal shields. An optimal shielding configuration is under investigation, for reducing the ex-vessel dose due to activated internals and for limiting the amount of the biological shielding. MCNP 4C calculations were performed to evaluate the neutron and the gamma dose during operation and the 60Co activation of various shields configurations. The gamma dose beyond the vessel from activation of its structural components was estimated in a shutdown condition, with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA 2002 and the MicroShield software. The results of the two codes are in agreement and show that the dose is sufficiently low, even without an additional shield.

  1. Gamma dose from activation of internal shields in IRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Cammi, A.; Garlati, L.; Lombardi, C.; Padovani, E.

    2005-01-01

    The International Reactor Innovative and Secure is a modular pressurised water reactor with an integral design. This means that all the primary system components, such as the steam generators, pumps, pressurizer and control rod drive mechanisms, are located inside the reactor vessel, which requires a large diameter. For the sake of better reliability and safety, it is desirable to achieve the reduction of vessel embrittlement as well as the lowering of the dose beyond the vessel. The former can be easily accomplished by the presence of a wide downcomer, filled with water, which surrounds the core region, while the latter needs the presence of additional internal shields. An optimal shielding configuration is under investigation, for reducing the ex-vessel dose due to activated internals and for limiting the amount of the biological shielding. MCNP 4C calculations were performed to evaluate the neutron and the gamma dose during operation and the 60 Co activation of various shields configurations. The gamma dose beyond the vessel from activation of its structural components was estimated in a shutdown condition, with the Monte Carlo code FLUKA 2002 and the MicroShield software. The results of the two codes are in agreement and show that the dose is sufficiently low, even without an additional shield. (authors)

  2. Alternative methodology for irradiation reactor experimental shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellozo, Sergio de Oliveira; Vital, Helio de Carvalho

    1996-01-01

    Due to a change in the project of the Experimental Irradiation Reactor, its shielding design had to be recalculated according to an alternative simplified analytical approach, since the standard transport calculations were temporarily unavailable. In the calculation of the new width for the shielding made up of steel and high-density concrete layers, the following radiation components were considered: fast neutrons and primary gammas (produced by fission and beta decay), from the core; and secondary gammas, produced by thermal neutron capture in the shielding. (author)

  3. Bulk outlet temperature limits and increased reactor power levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.S.

    1958-06-13

    In a recent report, means of circumventing the present bulk temperature limits are suggested. These have definite merit but do not present an over-all picture of the problem. Therefore, this bulk temperature limit is reviewed in order to place the problem in its full perspective. A program of action is suggested that should lead to: Revised operating conditions and process piping to obtain higher power levels at the same bulk outlet temperature; The completion of production tests to permit higher bulk outlet temperatures with no significant changes in reactor piping; or Redesign of the effluent system to eliminate bulk temperatures as a reactor operating limit.

  4. Shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides in fusion reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Vishvanath P.; Badiger, Nagappa M.; Gerward, Leif

    2016-01-01

    at energies 0.015 MeV to15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mean free paths. Fast-neutron shielding efficiency has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section. It is shown that ZrH2 and VH2 are very good shielding materials for gamma rays and fast neutrons due to their suitable......Mass attenuation coefficients, mean free paths and exposure buildup factors have been used to characterize the shielding efficiency of metal hydrides and borohydrides, with high density of hydrogen. Gamma ray exposure buildup factors were computed using five-parameter geometric progression fitting...... combination of low-and high-Z elements. The present work should be useful for the selection and design of blankets and shielding, and for dose evaluation for components in fusion reactors....

  5. Radiation shielding conceptual design of RRI-50 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir Hamzah; Iman Kuntoro

    2015-01-01

    One of the parameters that must be met in the design of nuclear reactors is radiation shielding design to ensure the security and safety of workers and the surrounding community. This study has been conducted to design radiation shielding of RRI-50 with high density U 9 Mo-Al fuel elements that consist of 21 pieces of plate type fuel elements with dimension as same as RSG-GAS fuel elements but the active length is 70 cm. Core configurations consist of 16 fuel elements and 4 control elements and 5 irradiation positions to form a matrix of 5 x 5. The objective of this research is to design radiation shielding and determine the distribution of dose rates in the working area and the environment of RRI-50 reactor. The early stages of this research is to calculate source strength and inventory of radioactive materials within the reactor core with one operation pattern cycle of 50 MW for 20 days using ORGEN2.1 program. Based on core source strength and models that are created using the VisEd software, the analysis parameter of the shielding was determined iteratively using MCNPX program. In the final stage, an analysis of the dose rate distributions in the whole space inside and outside the reactor building was conducted also using MCNPX program. The results show that the height of the water surface is 1000 cm and the combination of heavy concrete thickness of 90 cm and ordinary concrete thickness of 60 cm can be used as an biological shield. This design can reduce the dose rate to 0.05 µSv/h in the Operations Room while in the Experiments Room and outside the reactor building to 4.2 µSv/h and 0.03 µSv/h during reactor operation. The results also suggest that the installation of additional radiation shield of 280 cm thickness within 300 cm in front of the open radial neutron beam tube can reduce gamma and neutron dose rate to 3.3 µSv/h and 3.1 x 10 -11 µSv/h. The results of this study indicate that the radiation shield design is made to make reactor RRI-50 to be safe

  6. Loss of coolant analysis for the tower shielding reactor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radcliff, T.D.; Williams, P.T.

    1990-06-01

    The operational limits of the Tower Shielding Reactor-2 (TSR-2) have been revised to account for placing the reactor in a beam shield, which reduces convection cooling during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A detailed heat transfer analysis was performed to set operating time limits which preclude fuel damage during a LOCA. Since a LOCA is survivable, the pressure boundary need not be safety related, minimizing seismic and inspection requirements. Measurements of reactor component emittance for this analysis revealed that aluminum oxidized in water may have emittance much higher than accepted values, allowing higher operating limits than were originally expected. These limits could be increased further with analytical or hardware improvements. 5 refs., 7 figs

  7. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  8. Shielding plug for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Ko.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable effective removal of liquid metals deposited, if any, in the gaps between a rotary plug and a fixed plug in LMFBR type reactors. Constitution: A plate incorporated with a heater and capable of projecting in a gap between a rotary plug and a fixed plug, and a scraper connected in perpendicular to it are provided to the rotary plug. Solidified liquid metals such as sodium deposited in the gap are effectively removed by the heating with the heater and the scraping action due to the rotation. (Horiuchi, T.)

  9. Neutron activation measurements in research reactor concrete shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Bozic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The results of activation measurement inside TRIGA research reactor concrete shielding are given. Samples made of ordinary and barytes concrete together with gold and nickel foils were irradiated in the reactor body. Long-lived neutron-induced gamma-ray-emitting radioactive nuclides in the samples were measured with HPGe detector. The most active longlived radioactive nuclides in ordinary concrete samples were found to be 60 Co and 152 Eu and in barytes concrete samples 60 Co, 152 Eu and 133 Ba. Measured activity density of all nuclides was found to decrease almost linearly with depth in logarithmic scale.(author)

  10. Bulk shielding facility quarterly report, October, November, and December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, III, S. S.; Lance, E. D.; Thomas, J. R.

    1977-08-01

    The BSR operated at an average power level of 1,836 kw for 78.01 percent of the time during October, November, and December. Water-quality control in both the reactor primary and secondary cooling systems was satisfactory. The PCA was used in training programs and was operated on two occasions when the University of Kentucky students actively participated in training laboratories.

  11. Method for limiting movement of a thermal shield for a nuclear reactor, and thermal shield displacement limiter therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Boyd, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method of limiting the movement of a thermal shield of a nuclear reactor. It comprises: machining at least four (4) pockets in upper portions of a thermal shield circumferentially about a core barrel of a nuclear reactor to receive key-wave inserts; tapping bolt holes in the pockets of the thermal shield to receive bolts; positioning key-wave inserts into the pockets of the thermal shield to be bolted in place with the bolt holes; machining dowel holes at least partially through the positioned key-way inserts and the thermal shield to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the key-way insert and thermal shield to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; sliding limiter keys into the key-way inserts and bolting the limiter keys to the core barrel to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative and the core barrel while allowing radial and axial movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; machining dowel holes through the limiter key and at least partially through the core barrel to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the limiter key and core barrel to restrain tangential movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel of the nuclear reactor

  12. Tools and applications for core design and shielding in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Outline: • Modeling of SFR cores using the Serpent-DYN3D code sequence; • Core shielding assessment for the design of FASTEF-MYRRHA; • Neutron shielding studies on an advanced Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) design

  13. Uranium self-shielding in fast reactor blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadiroglu, O.K.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1976-03-01

    The effects of heterogeneity on resonance self-shielding are examined with particular emphasis on the blanket region of the fast breeder reactor and on its dominant reaction--capture in /sup 238/U. The results, however, apply equally well to scattering resonances, to other isotopes (fertile, fissile and structural species) and to other environments, so long as the underlying assumptions of narrow resonance theory apply. The heterogeneous resonance integral is first cast into a modified homogeneous form involving the ratio of coolant-to-fuel fluxes. A generalized correlation (useful in its own right in many other applications) is developed for this ratio, using both integral transport and collision probability theory to infer the form of correlation, and then relying upon Monte Carlo calculations to establish absolute values of the correlation coefficients. It is shown that a simple linear prescription can be developed for the flux ratio as a function of only fuel optical thickness and the fraction of the slowing-down source generated by the coolant. This in turn permitted derivation of a new equivalence theorem relating the heterogeneous self-shielding factor to the homogeneous self-shielding factor at a modified value of the background scattering cross section per absorber nucleus. A simple version of this relation is developed and used to show that heterogeneity has a negligible effect on the calculated blanket breeding ratio in fast reactors.

  14. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  15. Method of shielding a liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayre, R.K.

    1978-01-01

    The primary heat transport system of a nuclear reactor - particularly for a liquid-metal-cooled fast-breeder reactor - is shielded and protected from leakage by establishing and maintaining a bed of a powdered oxide closely and completely surrounding all components thereof by passing a gas upwardly therethrough at such a rate as to slightly expand the bed to the extent that the components of the system are able to expand without damage and yet the particles of a the bed remain close enough so that the bed acts as a guard vessel for the system. Preferably the gas contains 1 to 10% oxygen and the gas is passed upwardly through the bed at such a rate that the lower portion of the bed is a fixed bed while the upper portion is a fluidized bed, the line of demarcation therebetween being high enough that the fixed bed portion of the bed serves as guard vessel for the system

  16. Shielding design aspects of thermionic space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    It has been well documented that nuclear power sources will be required for the future exploration of space. Higher power levels [>10 kW (electric)] will be enabling, if not absolutely necessary, for the continued expansion of a human presence in the solar system and beyond. Space missions that will directly benefit continued life on Earth, including the monitoring for climate change and global warming, high-capacity communication satellites, and large, space-based radar systems to monitor the flow of airline traffic, will require progressively larger amounts of electrical power. Military applications, even with the ending of the Cold War, will continue to be needed for treaty verification activities. A thermionic energy conversion-based nuclear reactor system is one of the many different technologies proposed for the utilization of nuclear energy in space. How the energy conversion is accomplished and the equipment requiring shielding have a profound effect on the overall shielding requirements for the system. There exist two configurations of this technology that can be exploited and will have a significant effect on shielding needs. The paper discusses in-core thermionic conversion and out-of-core conversion concepts

  17. Magnetic shielding of an inhomogeneous magnetic field source by a bulk superconducting tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, K; Fagnard, J-F; Wéra, L; Vanderheyden, B; Vanderbemden, P

    2015-01-01

    Bulk type-II irreversible superconductors can act as excellent passive magnetic shields, with a strong attenuation of low frequency magnetic fields. Up to now, the performances of superconducting magnetic shields have mainly been studied in a homogenous magnetic field, considering only immunity problems, i.e. when the field is applied outside the tube and the inner field should ideally be zero. In this paper, we aim to investigate experimentally and numerically the magnetic response of a high-T c bulk superconducting hollow cylinder at 77 K in an emission problem, i.e. when subjected to the non-uniform magnetic field generated by a source coil placed inside the tube. A bespoke 3D mapping system coupled with a three-axis Hall probe is used to measure the magnetic flux density distribution outside the superconducting magnetic shield. A finite element model is developed to understand how the magnetic field penetrates into the superconductor and how the induced superconducting shielding currents flow inside the shield in the case where the emitting coil is placed coaxially inside the tube. The finite element modelling is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Results show that a concentration of the magnetic flux lines occurs between the emitting coil and the superconducting screen. This effect is observed both with the modelling and the experiment. In the case of a long tube, we show that the main features of the field penetration in the superconducting walls can be reproduced with a simple analytical 1D model. This model is used to estimate the maximum flux density of the emitting coil that can be shielded by the superconductor. (paper)

  18. Up-dating of the RA-0 reactor shielding. Gamma and neutron isodoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murua, Carlos A.; Chautemps, Norma A.; Ackerley, Alejandro F.; Alexeiew, Vladimiro

    1999-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the historical shielding configurations of the RA-0 reactor is performed and the comparison methodology is described. The gamma and neutron dose mapping of the last two stages of the reactor shielding has been carried out and the results are analysed

  19. Space reactor system and subsystem investigations: assessment of technology issues for the reactor and shield subsystem. SP-100 Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, D.F.; Lillie, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    As part of Rockwell's effort on the SP-100 Program, preliminary assessment has been completed of current nuclear technology as it relates to candidate reactor/shield subsystems for the SP-100 Program. The scope of the assessment was confined to the nuclear package (to the reactor and shield subsystems). The nine generic reactor subsystems presented in Rockwell's Subsystem Technology Assessment Report, ESG-DOE-13398, were addressed for the assessment

  20. Activation of TRIGA Mark II research reactor concrete shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, Tomaz; Ravnik, Matjaz; Bozic, Matjaz

    2002-01-01

    To determine neutron activation inside the TRIGA research reactor concrete body a special sample-holder for irradiation inside horizontal channel was developed and tested. In the sample-holder various samples can be irradiated at different concrete shielding depths. In this paper the description of the sample-holder, experiment conditions and results of long-lived activation measurements are given. Long-lived neutron-induced gamma-ray-emitting radioactive nuclides in the samples were measured with HPGe detector. The most active long-lived radioactive nuclides in ordinary concrete samples were found to be 60 Co and 152 Eu and in barytes concrete samples 60 Co, 152 Eu and 133 Ba. Measured activity density of all nuclides was found to decrease almost linearly with depth in logarithmic scale. (author)

  1. Nuclear data needs for fast breeder reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblow, E.M.; Perey, F.G.

    1978-11-01

    A review of neutron and gamma-ray cross section data needs for fast reactor shielding is presented in light of the recent advances made in assessing these needs through sensitivity studies. Total and partial cross sections and energy and angular distribution data for neutrons are surveyed as well as gamma-ray production cross sections. The strengths and deficiencies of currently available benchmark-quality integral experiments are also discussed with respect to their use in creating adjusted cross section libraries for design work. The availability of first round covariance data in ENDF/B-IV and plans for ENDF/B-V are also reviewed. This latter information makes it possible to quantitatively assess the quality of current cross section data libraries and also puts adjustment and data assessment procedures on a firmer basis

  2. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  3. Numerical simulation of a reinforced concrete shield around a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahama, Mumuni Salifu

    1996-02-01

    Ghana currently operates a Research Reactor and other nuclear facilities including a Gamma Irradiation Facility, a Radiographic Non-Destructive Testing laboratory and would be operating in the nearest future a Radiotherapy Centre. Each of these has a concrete radiation shield as a major safety device. In carrying out its functions, a concrete radiation shield may be subjected to thermal and mechanical stresses. A facility for analysing these stresses is desirable. Two computer codes have been developed under this programme for radiation shielding computation and stress analysis of cylindrical reactor shields. (au)

  4. Engineering and Fabrication Considerations for Cost-Effective Space Reactor Shield Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Thomas A.; Disney, Richard K.

    2004-01-01

    Investment in developing nuclear power for space missions cannot be made on the basis of a single mission. Current efforts in the design and fabrication of the reactor module, including the reactor shield, must be cost-effective and take into account scalability and fabricability for planned and future missions. Engineering considerations for the shield need to accommodate passive thermal management, varying radiation levels and effects, and structural/mechanical issues. Considering these challenges, design principles and cost drivers specific to the engineering and fabrication of the reactor shield are presented that contribute to lower recurring mission costs

  5. Effect of the measuring holes in the reactor on the shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Wenfa; Wei Shi

    1998-01-01

    A calculating method in the shielding design of the reactor is presented. The physics calculating model of the measuring holes is described. To some practical problems in the design of the reactor, a lot of calculating is made and some parameters are chosen properly. The results are satisfactory and they are concurrent with the requirement of accuracy. They show that the measurement holes have the effects on the shielding of the reactor. If some protection methods are used, the dose equivalent rate can be limited in an allowed range and the safety of the reactor is assured. These results provide some important reference values for the shielding design of the reactor, which supply the scientific basement to the reactor safety

  6. Minimum thickness blanket-shield for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karni, Y.; Greenspan, E.

    1989-01-01

    A lower bound on the minimum thickness fusion reactor blankets can be designed to have, if they are to breed 1.267 tritons per fusion neutron, is identified by performing a systematic nucleonic optimization of over a dozen different blanket concepts which use either Be, Li 17 Pb 83 , W or Zr for neutron multiplication. It is found that Be offers minimum thickness blankets; that the blanket and shield (B/S) thickness of Li 17 Pb 83 based blankets which are supplemented by Li 2 O and/or TiH 2 are comparable to the thickness of Be based B/S; that of the Be based blankets, the aqueous self-cooled one offers one of the most compact B/S; and that a number of blanket concepts might enable the design of B/S which is approximately 12 cm and 39 cm thinner than the B/S thickness of, respectively, conventional self-cooled Li 17 Pb 83 and Li blankets. Aqueous self-cooled tungsten blankets could be useful for experimental fusion devices provided they are designed to be heterogeneous. (orig.)

  7. Radiation distribution through serpentine concrete using local materials and its application as a reactor biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansouh, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New serpentine concrete was made and examined as a reactor biological shield. ► Ilmenite–limonite concrete is a better reactor biological shield. ► New serpentine concrete is a better reactor fast neutrons shield than ordinary and hematite–serpentine concretes. ► Serpentine concrete has lower properties as a reactor total gamma rays shields. - Abstract: In the present work attempt has been made to estimate the shielding parameters of the new serpentine concrete (density = 2.4 g/cm 3 ) using local materials on the shielding parameters for two types of heat resistant concretes, namely hematite–serpentine (density = 2.5 g/cm 3 ) and ilmenite–limonite (density = 2.9 g/cm 3 ). Shielding parameters for ordinary concrete (density = 2.3 g/cm 3 ) were also discussed. These parameters were determined experimentally for serpentine concrete and compared with previously published values for other concretes, which had also been obtained using local materials. The leakage spectra of reactor fast neutrons and total gamma photon beams from cylindrical samples of these concrete shields were also investigated using a collimated beam from ET-RR-1 reactor. A neutron–gamma spectrometer was used in order to obtain pulse height spectra of reactor fast neutrons and the total gamma rays leakage through the investigated concrete samples. These spectra were utilized to obtain the energy spectra required in these investigations. Removal cross section Σ R (E n ) and linear attenuation coefficient μ(E g ) for reactor fast neutrons and total gamma rays and their relative coefficients were evaluated and presented. Measured results were compared with those previously measured for other concretes. The results show that ilmenite–limonite concrete is a better reactor biological shield than the other three concretes. Serpentine concrete under investigation is a better reactor fast neutrons shield than ordinary and hematite–serpentine concretes. Serpentine concrete

  8. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  9. Design of the shield door and transporter for the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor Mark II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, J.A.S.

    1980-04-01

    In the Culham Conceptual Tokamak Reactor MK II access to the interior for blanket maintenance is through large openings in the fixed shield structure closed by removable shield doors when the reactor is operational. This report describes the design of the 200 tonne doors and the associated special-purpose remote operating transporter manipulator. The design, which has not been optimised, generally uses available commercial equipment and state-of-the-art techniques. (U.K.)

  10. Radiological Shielding Design for the Neutron High-Resolution Backscattering Spectrometer EMU at the OPAL Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, Tunay; Esposto, Fernando; Souza, Nicolas R. de

    2017-09-01

    The shielding for the neutron high-resolution backscattering spectrometer (EMU) located at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO) was designed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 5-1.60. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies, such as the neutron pre-monochromator bunker with sliding cylindrical block shields to accommodate a range of neutron take-off angles, and in the experimental area - shielding of neutron focusing guides, choppers, flight tube, backscattering monochromator, and additional shielding elements inside the Scattering Tank. These shielding assemblies meet safety and engineering requirements and cost constraints. The neutron dose rates around the EMU instrument were reduced to < 0.5 µSv/h and the gamma dose rates to a safe working level of ≤ 3 µSv/h.

  11. Radiological characterization of the concrete biological shield of the APSARA reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan Priya; Srinivasan Panchapakesan; Thomas Shibu; Gopalakrishnan R.K.; Goswami A.

    2013-01-01

    The first Indian research reactor, APSARA, was utilized for various R&D programmes from 1956 until its shutdown in 2009. The biological shield of the reactor developed residual activity due to neutron irradiation during the operation of the reactor. Dose rate mapping and in-situ gamma spectrometry of the concrete structures of the reactor pool were carried out. Representative concrete samples collected from various locations were subjected to high-resolution gamma spectrometry analysis....

  12. A Cylindrical Shielding Design Concept for the Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Sunghwan; Kim, Sang Ji

    2014-01-01

    In the Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR), a metal fueled, blanket-free, pool type SFR concept is adopted to acquire the inherent safety characteristics and high proliferation-resistance. In the pool type fast reactor, the intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs), which transfer heat from the primary sodium pool to a secondary sodium loop, are placed inside of the reactor vessel. Hence, secondary sodium passing the IHXs can be radioactivated by a 23 Na(n,g) 24 Na reaction, and radioactivated secondary sodium causes a significant dose in the Steam Generator Building (SGB). Therefore, a typical core of a pool type fast reactor is usually surrounded by a massive quantity of shields. In addition, the blanket composed of depleted uranium plays a role as superior shielding material; a significant increase in shields is required in the blanket-free pool type SFR. In this paper, a new cylindrical shielding design concept is proposed for a blanket-free pool type SFR. In a conventional shielding design, massive axial shields are required to prevent irradiation of secondary sodium passing IHXs and they should be replaced according to the subassembly replacement in spite of negligible depletion of the shielding material. The proposed shielding design concept minimizes the quantity of shields without their replacement. In this paper, a new cylindrical shielding design concept is proposed for a blanket-free pool type SFR such as a PGSFR. The proposed design concept satisfied the dose limit in the steam generator building successfully without introducing a large quantity of B 4 C shielding inside the subassembly

  13. Shielding Calculations for PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) Fuel Transfer Cask with Micro shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurhayati Ramli; Ahmad Nabil Abdul Rahim; Ariff Shah Ismail

    2011-01-01

    The shielding calculations for RTP fuel transfer cask was performed by using computer code Micro shield 7.02. Micro shield is a computer code designed to provide a model to be used for shielding calculations. The results of the calculations can be obtained fast but the code is not suitable for complex geometries with a shielding composed of more than one material. Nevertheless, the program is sufficient for As Low As Reasonable Achievable (ALARA) optimization calculations. In this calculation, a geometry based on the conceptual design of RTP fuel transfer cask was modeled. Shielding material used in the calculations were lead (Pb) and stainless steel 304 (SS304). The results obtained from these calculations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  14. Apparatus for sealing a rotatable shield plug in a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkleblack, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing a rotatable shield plug in a nuclear reactor having liquid metal coolant is described. The apparatus includes a dip -ring seal adapted to provide a fluid barrier between the liquid metal and the atmosphere and to permit rotation of the shield plug. The apparatus also includes a static seal for the rotatable shield plug located between the dip-ring seal and the liquid metal. The static seal isolates the dip-ring seal from the liquid metal vapor during operation at power and can be disengaged for rotation of the shield plug

  15. Decommissioning of the ASTRA research reactor: Dismantling of the biological shield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Franz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the dismantling of the inactive and activated areas of the biological shield of the ASTRA research reactor at the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf. The calculation of the parameters determining the activated areas at the shield (reference nuclide, nuclide vector in the barite concrete and horizontal and vertical reduction behaviors of activity concentration and the activation profiles within the biological shield for unrestricted release, release restricted to permanent deposit and radioactive waste are presented. Considerations of located activation anomalies in the shield, e.g. in the vicinities of the beam-tubes, were made according to the reactor's operational history. Finally, an overview of the materials removed from the biological shield is given.

  16. The Benchmark experiment on stainless steel bulk shielding at the Frascati neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, P.; Angelone, M.; Martone, M.; Pillon, M.; Rado, V.

    1994-11-01

    In the framework of the European Technology Program for NET/ITER, ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment) - Frascati and CEA (Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique) - Cadarache collaborated on a Bulk Shield Benchmark Experiment using the 14-MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). The aim of the experiment was to obtain accurate experimental data for improving the nuclear database and methods used in shielding designs, through a rigorous analysis of the results. The experiment consisted of the irradiation of a stainless steel block by 14-MeV neutrons. The neutron reaction rates at different depths inside the block were measured by fission chambers and activation foils characterized by different energy response ranges. The experimental results have been compared with numerical results calculated using both S N and Monte Carlo transport codes and as transport cross section library the European Fusion File (EFF). In particular, the present report describes the experimental and numerical activity, including neutron measurements and Monte Carlo calculations, carried out by the ENEA Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment) team

  17. The stainless steel bulk shielding benchmark experiment at the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, P.; Angelone, M.; Martone, M.; Petrizzi, L.; Pillon, M.; Rado, V.; Santamarina, A.; Abidi, I.; Gastaldi, G.; Joyer, P.; Marquette, J.P.; Martini, M.

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of the European Technology Program for NET/ITER, ENEA (Ente Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente), Frascati and CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique), Cadarache, are collaborating on a bulk shielding benchmark experiment using the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG). The aim of the experiment is to obtain accurate experimental data for improving the nuclear database and methods used in the shielding designs, through a rigorous analysis of the results. The experiment consists of the irradiation of a stainless steel block by 14 MeV neutrons. The neutron flux and spectra at different depths, up to 65 cm inside the block, are measured by fission chambers and activation foils characterized by different energy response ranges. The γ-ray dose measurements are performed with ionization chambers and thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD). The first results are presented, as well as the comparison with calculations using the cross section library EFF (European Fusion File). ((orig.))

  18. Study on bulk shielding for a spallation neutron source facility in the high-intensity proton accelerator project

    CERN Document Server

    Maekawa, F; Takada, H; Teshigawara, M; Watanabe, N

    2002-01-01

    Under the JAERI-KEK High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, a spallation neutron source driven by a 3 GeV-1 MW proton beam is planed to be constructed in a main part of the Materials and Life Science Facility. This report describes results of a study on bulk shielding performance of a biological shield for the spallation neutron source by means of a Monte Carlo calculation method, that is important in terms of radiation safety and cost reduction. A shielding configuration was determined as a reference case by considering preliminary studies and interaction with other components, then shielding thickness that was required to achieve a target dose rate of 1 mu Sv/h was derived. Effects of calculation conditions such as shielding materials and dimensions on the shielding performance was investigated by changing those parameters. By taking all the results and design margins into account, a shielding configuration that was identified as the most appropriate was finally determined as follows. An iron shield regi...

  19. Microwave processed bulk and nano NiMg ferrites: A comparative study on X-band electromagnetic interference shielding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra Babu Naidu, K., E-mail: chandrababu954@gmail.com [Ceramic Composite Laboratory, Centre for Crystal Growth, SAS, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamilnadu (India); Madhuri, W., E-mail: madhuriw12@gmail.com [Ceramic Composite Laboratory, Centre for Crystal Growth, SAS, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamilnadu (India); IFW, Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research, Technische Universität Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    Bulk and nano Ni{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0–1) samples were synthesized via microwave double sintering and microwave assisted hydrothermal techniques respectively. The diffraction pattern confirmed the formation of cubic spinel phases in case of both the ferrites. The larger bulk densities were achieved to the bulk than that of nano. In addition, a comparative study on X-band (8.4–12 GHz) electromagnetic interference shielding properties of current bulk and nanomaterials was elucidated. The results showed that the bulk Ni{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} composition revealed the highest total shielding efficiency (SE{sub T}) of ∼17 dB. In comparison, the shielding efficiency values of all bulk contents were higher than that of nano because of larger bulk densities. Moreover, the ac-electromagnetic parameters such as electrical conductivity (σ{sub ac}), the respective real (ε′ & μ′) and imaginary parts (ε″ & μ″) of complex permittivity and permeability were investigated as a function of gigahertz frequency. The bulk ferrites of x = 0.4 & 0.6 showed the high ε″ of 10.26 & 6.71 and μ″ of 3.65 & 3.09 respectively at 12 GHz which can work as promising microwave absorber materials. Interestingly, nanoferrites exhibited negative μ″ values at few frequencies due to geometrical effects which improves the microwave absorption. - Highlights: • Bulk and nano NiMg ferrites are prepared by microwave and hydrothermal method. • X-band EMI shielding properties are studied for both bulk and nano ferrites. • Bulk Ni{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} revealed the highest SE{sub T} of ∼17 dB at 8.4 GHz. • Bulk x = 0.4 & 0.6 showed the high ε″ and μ″ at 12 GHz for absorber applications.

  20. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. One of the most critical issues for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. The establishment of man on the moon will require power from greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are extremely we11 suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), Boron Carbide, and others. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to remove the potential for radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. MSFC has developed the experience and fac necessary to do this evaluation in the Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  1. Numerical evaluation of shielding analysing procedures for the upgraded JRR-3 research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ise, Takeharu; Maruo, Takeshi; Umeda, Kentaro.

    1986-11-01

    Description is about the numerical evaluation of the analytical parameters in the shielding analysing procedures for the upgraded JRR-3 research reactor: number of energy groups, number of spatial meshes, number of angular quadratures and the bootstraps' width used in S N calculations; dose rate attenuation curves; and radiation source. (author)

  2. Seismic and cask drop excitation evaluation of the tower shielding reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.P.; Stover, R.L.; Johnson, J.J.; Sumodobila, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    During the current shutdown of the Tower Shielding Reactor II (TSR-II), analyses were performed to determine the effect of nearby cask drops on the structural and mechanical integrity of the reactor. This evaluation was then extended to include the effects of earthquakes. Several analytic models were developed to simulate the effects of earthquake and cask drop excitation. A coupled soil-structure model was developed. As a result of the analyses, several hardware modifications and enhancements were implemented to ensure reactor integrity during future operations. 6 figs

  3. Seismic and cask drop excitation evaluation of the Tower Shielding Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stover, R.L.; Harris, S.P.; Johnson, J.J.; Sumodobila, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    During the current shutdown of the Tower Shielding Reactor II (TSR-II), analyses were performed to determine the effect of nearby cask drops on the structural and mechanical integrity of the reactor. This evaluation was then extended to include the effects of earthquakes. Several analytic models were developed to simulate the effects of earthquake and cask drop excitation. A coupled soil-structure model was developed. As a result of the analyses, several hardware modifications and enhancements were implemented to ensure reactor integrity during future operations

  4. Neutron activation of building materials used in the reactor shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, A.T.; Perez, G.; D'Alessandro, K.

    1993-01-01

    Cuban concretes and their main components (mineral aggregates and cement) were investigated through long-lived activation products induced by neutrons from a reactor. The multielemental content in the materials studied was obtained by neutron activation analysis in an IBR-2 reactor and gamma activation analysis in an MT-25 microtron from Join Institute of Nuclear Research of Dubna. After irradiation of building materials for 30 years by a neutron flow of unitary density, induced radioactivity was calculated according to experimental data. The comparative evaluation of different concretes aggregates and two types of cement related to the activation properties is discussed

  5. Boiling water reactor radiation shielded Control Rod Drive Housing Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baversten, B.; Linden, M.J. [ABB Combustion Engineering Nuclear Operations, Windsor, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Control Rod Drive (CRD) mechanisms are located in the area below the reactor vessel in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Specifically, these CRDs are located between the bottom of the reactor vessel and above an interlocking structure of steel bars and rods, herein identified as CRD Housing Supports. The CRD Housing Supports are designed to limit the travel of a Control Rod and Control Rod Drive in the event that the CRD vessel attachement went to fail, allowing the CRD to be ejected from the vessel. By limiting the travel of the ejected CRD, the supports prevent a nuclear overpower excursion that could occur as a result of the ejected CRD. The Housing Support structure must be disassembled in order to remove CRDs for replacement or maintenance. The disassembly task can require a significant amount of outage time and personnel radiation exposure dependent on the number and location of the CRDs to be changed out. This paper presents a way to minimize personal radiation exposure through the re-design of the Housing Support structure. The following paragraphs also delineate a method of avoiding the awkward, manual, handling of the structure under the reactor vessel during a CRD change out.

  6. Remote cutting systems for dismantlement of the Japan power demonstration reactor concrete biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Narazaki, T.; Yasoshima, H.; Konno, T.

    1988-01-01

    The decommissioning programme of the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) is under way. For the purpose of dismantling the biological shield of JPDR safely without increasing the radiation exposures to workers, two remote cutting systems, namely, a diamond sawing and coring and an abrasive-waterjet, have been developed. These systems are to be applied to the highly-activated region of the biological shield. The features of these systems and the dismantling procedures by these systems are described in this paper including the fundamental test results used for the system design. (author)

  7. The fundamental study to control the magnetic field for MDDS using shielding currents of HTS tapes and bulks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S.B., E-mail: kim@ec.okayama-u.ac.jp; Eritate, I.; Abe, T.; Shima, S.; Takahashi, M.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • MDDS is a key technology to reduce the side effects. • The field control method for MDDS was studied using HTS tapes and bulks. • The shielding current due to Meissner effect was used to generate the field gradient. • HTS bulks and films were combined with iron blocks, and they are very effective. • The magnetic field gradient which is higher than the external field was obtained. - Abstract: The magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) is a key technology to reduce the side effects in the medical applications, and the magnetic force control is a very important issue in MDDS. In general, the high magnetic field along the axial direction and high magnetic field gradient along the longitudinal direction are very useful for MDDS. So, we proposed the new magnetic force control system that consists of superconducting magnet, high temperature superconductors (HTS) bulks or tapes and ferromagnetic substances. In this new system, the shielding currents in HTS bulks and tapes due to diamagnetism of the superconductor generate the magnetic field with same direction of external magnetic field, and we can control the magnetic field gradient along the longitudinal direction by the arrangement of the HTS bulks, tapes and ferromagnetic substances. In this study, the stacked GdBCO tapes without stabilizer were used in experiments and electromagnetic analysis based on finite element method (FEM) was carried out to optimize the arrangement of the superconductors and the irons. It was confirmed that the control of magnetic field gradient along the longitudinal direction was possible by arranging the HTS bulks, tapes and irons on the superconducting magnet and then it was possible to obtain a magnetic field higher than the external field.

  8. FFTF reactor-characterization program: gamma-ray measurements and shield characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunch, W.L.; Moore, F.S. Jr.

    1983-02-01

    A series of experiments is to be made during the acceptance test program of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to measure the gamma ray characteristics of the Fast Test Reactor (FTR) and to establish the performance characteristics of the reactor shield. These measurements are a part of the FFTF Reactor Characterization Program (RCP). Detailed plans have been developed for these experiments. During the initial phase of the Characteristics Program, which will be carried out in the In-Reactor Thimble (IRT), both active and passive measurement methods will be employed to obtain as much information concerning the gamma ray environment as is practical. More limited active gamma ray measurements also will be made in the Vibration Open Test Assembly (VOTA).

  9. Collimator and shielding design for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility at TRIGA MARK II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rafi Mohd Solleh; Abdul Aziz Tajuddin; Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Eid Mahmoud Eid Abdel Munem; Mohamad Hairie Rabir; Julia Abdul Karim; Yoshiaki, Kiyanagi

    2011-01-01

    The geometry of reactor core, thermal column, collimator and shielding system for BNCT application of TRIGA MARK II Reactor were simulated with MCNP5 code. Neutron particle lethargy and dose were calculated with MCNPX code. Neutron flux in a sample located at the end of collimator after normalized to measured value (Eid Mahmoud Eid Abdel Munem, 2007) at 1 MW power was 1.06 x 10 8 n/ cm 2 / s. According to IAEA (2001) flux of 1.00 x 10 9 n/ cm 2 / s requires three hours of treatment. Few modifications were needed to get higher flux. (Author)

  10. Determination of boron in Jabroc wood used as a shielding material in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Manisha, V.; Venkatesh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Jabroc are non-impregnated, densified wood laminates developed commercially for a wide range of industrial applications. Jabroc can be used with other neutron shielding materials such as Lead to form complex shielding structures. Its relative light weight and cleanliness in handling are additional features that make it a suitable candidate for the standard design of neutron shielding equipment. Jabroc can also be impregnated with Boron up to a maximum of 4% to be used in areas where Gamma radiation produced on Neutron capture reaches unacceptable dose rates. Boron impregnated Jabroc wood finds application in TAPS 3 and 4 as a shielding material for the Ion Chambers and the Horizontal Flux Units (HFU). The shielding property of this material is optimized by incorporating requisite amount of boron in wood. Boron content in this material has to be determined accurately prior to its use in the nuclear reactors. In this work a method was standardized to determine boron in Jabroc wood samples to check for conformance to specifications. The wood sample flakes were wetted with saturated barium hydroxide solution and dries under IR. The sample was ashed in a muffle furnace at 600℃ for 2 h

  11. Efficiency Studies with Gamma Ray Portion of Specialized Reactor-Shield Monte Carlo Program 18-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capo, M. A.

    1961-08-01

    Application studies were made with Specialized Reactor-Shield Monte Carlo Program 18-0 to determine the efficiency and feasibility of calculating energy deposition due to primary core gamma rays throughout the XNJ140E-1 reactor-shield assembly. Monte Carlo results are presented in tabular form for all geometrical regions used to describe the shield. Described here is a means of obtaining adequate and valid heating rates in about 47 hours on the IBM-704 digital computer. Comparison of Monte Carlo and point kernel data are included.

  12. The application of semianalytic method for calculating the thickness of biological shields of nuclear reactors. Part 2. Attenuation of gamma rays. An example of shield's thickness calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukaszek, W.; Kucypera, S.

    1982-01-01

    The semianalytic method was used for calculating the attenuation of gamma rays and the thickness of biological shield of graphite moderated reactor. A short description of computer code as well as the exemplary results of calculations are given. (A.S.)

  13. RESONANCE SELF-SHIELDING EFFECT IN UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION OF FISSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GO CHIBA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to properly quantify fission reactor neutronics parameter uncertainties, we have to use covariance data and sensitivity profiles consistently. In the present paper, we establish two consistent methodologies for uncertainty quantification: a self-shielded cross section-based consistent methodology and an infinitely-diluted cross section-based consistent methodology. With these methodologies and the covariance data of uranium-238 nuclear data given in JENDL-3.3, we quantify uncertainties of infinite neutron multiplication factors of light water reactor and fast reactor fuel cells. While an inconsistent methodology gives results which depend on the energy group structure of neutron flux and neutron-nuclide reaction cross section representation, both the consistent methodologies give fair results with no such dependences.

  14. Design of the segment structure and coolant ducts for a fusion reactor blanket and shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briaris, D.A.; Stanbridge, J.R.

    1978-05-01

    An outline design and analysis of a support structure for the replaceable first wall of a helium cooled fusion reactor blanket has been undertaken. The proposed structure supports all the segment gravitational loads with maximum deflections limited to < 10 mm, and is itself supported off the outer shield by a simple vee-in-groove arrangement. It is a feature of the design that the coaxial coolant pipes and the segment structure operate at the same temperature, making it possible for them to be integrated, thereby avoiding the necessity for pipe bellows. The requirements of cooling the inner arm of the structure and increasing the major radius of the torus by approximately = 0.5 m, have been identified as problems associated with the 'horseshoe' shaped structure applicable to the reactor with divertor. For a ring structure, i.e. reactor without divertor, these problems do not arise. (author)

  15. Characterisation of the inventory of radioisotopes induced in the biological shield a WWER-440 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feher, S.; Czifrus, Sz.; Zsolnay, E.M.; Szondi, E.

    2001-01-01

    A significant part of the radwaste originating from the decommissioning of NPPs is made up of the activated concrete and steel components of the biological shield. The paper presents the results of studies aimed at the determination of the amount of radionuclides accumulating in the serpentinous and ordinary concrete shield around the WWER-440 reactors of the Paks NPP. For the calculations, the reactor, vessel and shield were modelled in detail both in terms of geometry and material composition. The spatial and energy distribution of the activating neutron spectrum was determined by certain modules of SCALE 4.3 and the code TORT in two and three dimensions, while the activation was calculated using ORIGEN-S for 22 geometrical regions. The results showed that the activity of the concrete structures at final shutdown after 30 years of operation is approximately 50 TBq, which decreases to 20, 12, 1.1 TBq and 27 GBq after 1 month, 1 year, 10 and 100 years, respectively (Authors)

  16. Design of a management information system for the Shielding Experimental Reactor ageing management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Jie, E-mail: hejiejoe@163.co [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xu Xianhong [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The problem of nuclear reactor ageing is a topic of increasing importance in nuclear safety recent years. Ageing management is usually implemented for reactors maintenance. In the practice, a large number of data and records need to be processed. However, there are few professional software applications that aid reactor ageing management, especially for research reactors. This paper introduces the design of a new web-based management information system (MIS), named the Shielding Experimental Reactor Ageing Management Information System (SERAMIS). It is an auxiliary means that helps to collect data, keep records, and retrieve information for a research reactor ageing management. The Java2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and network database techniques, such as three-tiered model, Model-View-Controller architecture, transaction-oriented operations, and JavaScript techniques, are used in the development of this system. The functionalities of the application cover periodic safety review (PSR), regulatory references, data inspection, and SSCs classification according to ageing management methodology. Data and examples are presented to demonstrate the functionalities. For future work, techniques of data mining will be employed to support decision-making.

  17. Design of a management information system for the Shielding Experimental Reactor ageing management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jie; Xu Xianhong

    2010-01-01

    The problem of nuclear reactor ageing is a topic of increasing importance in nuclear safety recent years. Ageing management is usually implemented for reactors maintenance. In the practice, a large number of data and records need to be processed. However, there are few professional software applications that aid reactor ageing management, especially for research reactors. This paper introduces the design of a new web-based management information system (MIS), named the Shielding Experimental Reactor Ageing Management Information System (SERAMIS). It is an auxiliary means that helps to collect data, keep records, and retrieve information for a research reactor ageing management. The Java2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and network database techniques, such as three-tiered model, Model-View-Controller architecture, transaction-oriented operations, and JavaScript techniques, are used in the development of this system. The functionalities of the application cover periodic safety review (PSR), regulatory references, data inspection, and SSCs classification according to ageing management methodology. Data and examples are presented to demonstrate the functionalities. For future work, techniques of data mining will be employed to support decision-making.

  18. Bulk-shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1982-07-01

    The accelerator-based Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility will provide a high-fluence, fusion-like radiation environment for the testing of materials. While the neutron spectrum produced in the forward direction by the 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a flowing lithium target is characterized by a broad peak around 14 MeV, a high energy tail extends up to about 50 MeV. Some shield design considerations are reviewed

  19. Calculation of neutron fluxes in biological shield of the TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozic, M.; Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.

    2001-01-01

    The complete calculation of neutron fluxes in biological shield and verification with experimental results is presented. Calculated results are obtained with TORT code (TORT-Three Dimensional Oak Ridge Discrete Ordinates Neutron/Photon Transport Code). Experimental results used for comparison are available from irradiation experiment with selected type of concrete and other materials in irradiation channel 4 in TRIGA Mark II reactor. These experimental results were used as a benchmark. Homogeneous type of problem (without inserted irradiation channel) and problem with asymmetry (inserted beam port 4, filled with different materials) were of interest for neutron flux calculation. Deviation from material data set up as original parameters is also considered (first of all presence of water in concrete and density of concrete) for type of concrete in biological shield and for selected type of concrete in irradiation channel. BUGLE-96 (47 neutron energy groups) library is used. Excellent agreement between calculated and experimental results for reaction rate is received.(author)

  20. Methods and experimental coefficients used in the computation of reactor shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, J.; Lafore, P.; Millot, J.P.; Rastoin, J.; Vathaire, F. de

    1958-01-01

    1. The concept of an effective removal cross section has been developed in order more easily to compute reactor shielding thicknesses. We have built an experimental facility for the purpose of measuring effective removal cross sections, the value of which had not been published at that time. The first part of this paper describes the device or facility used, the computation method applied, and the results obtained. 2. Starting from this concept, we endeavored to define a removal cross section as a function of energy. This enabled us to use the method for computations bearing on the attenuation of fast neutrons of any spectrum. An experimental verification was carried out for the case of fission neutrons filtered by a substantial thickness of graphite. 3. Finally, we outline a computation method enabling us to determine the sources of captured gamma rays by the age theory and we give an example of the application in a composite shield. (author) [fr

  1. Fast reactors bulk sodium coolant disposal NOAH process application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magny, E. de; Berte, M.

    1997-01-01

    Within the frame of the fast reactors decommissioning, the becoming of contaminated sodium coolant from primary, secondary and auxiliary circuits is an important aspect. The 'NOAH' sodium disposal process, developed by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), is presented as the only process, for destroying large quantities of contaminated sodium, that has attained industrial status. The principles and technical options of the process are described and main advantages such as safety , operating simplicity and compactness of the plant are put forward. The process has been industrially validated in 1993/1994 by successfully reacting the 37 metric tons of primary contaminated sodium from the French Rapsodie experimental reactor. The main outstanding aspects and experience gained from this so called 'DESORA' operation (DEstruction of SOdium from RApsodie) are recalled. Another industrial application concerns the current project for destroying more than 1500 metric tons of contaminated sodium from the British PFR (Prototype Fast Reactor) in Scotland. Although the design is in the continuity of DESORA, it has taken into account the specific requirements of PFR application and the experience feed back from Rapsodie. The main technical options and performances of the PFR sodium reaction unit are presented while mentioning the design evolution. (author)

  2. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M.N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required

  3. Development of the breeding blanket and shield model for the fusion power reactors system SYCOMORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li-Puma, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.lipuma@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jaboulay, Jean-Charles, E-mail: Jean-Charles.jaboulay@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martin, Brunella, E-mail: brunella.martin@gmail.com [Incka, 19-21 Rue du 8 mai 1945, F-94110 Arcueil (France)

    2014-10-15

    SYCOMORE, a fusion reactor system code based on a modular approach is under development at CEA. Within this framework, this paper describes the relevant sub-modules which have been implemented to model the main outputs of the breeding blanket and shield block of the system code: tritium breeding ratio, peak energy deposition in toroidal field coils, reactor layout and power deposition, blanket pressure drops and materials inventory. Blanket and shield requirements are calculated by several sub-modules: the blanket assembly and layout sub-module, the neutronic sub-module, the blanket design sub-module (thermal hydraulic and thermo-mechanic pre-design tool). A power flow module has also been developed which is directly linked to the blanket thermo-dynamic performances, which is not described in this paper. For the blanket assembly and layout and the blanket module design sub-modules, explicit analytic models have been developed and implemented; for the neutronic sub-module neural networks that replicate the results of appropriate simplified 1D and 2D neutronic simulations have been built. Presently, relevant model for the Helium Cooled Lithium Lead is available. Sub-modules have been built in a way that they can run separately or coupled into the breeding blanket and shield module in order to be integrated in SYCOMORE. In the paper, the objective and main input/output parameters of each sub-module are reported and relevant models discussed. The application to previous studied reactor models (PPCS model AB, DEMO-HCLL 2006–2007 studies) is also presented.

  4. Bibliography, subject index, and author index of the literature examined by the Radiation Shielding Information Center (Reactor and Weapons Radiation Shielding). [1973--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    An indexed bibliography is presented of literature selected by the Radiation Shielding Information Center since the previous volume was published in 1974 in the area of radiation transport and shielding against radiation from nuclear reactors, x-ray machines, radioisotopes, nuclear weapons (including fallout), and low-energy accelerators (e.g., neutron generators). In addition to lists of literature titles by subject categories (accessions 3501-4950), author and keyword indexes are given. Most of the literature selected for Vol. V was published in the years 1973 to 1976.

  5. Bibliography, subject index, and author index of the literature examined by the radiation shielding information center. Volume 6. Reactor and weapons radiation shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-05-01

    An indexed bibliography is presented of literature selected by the Radiation Shielding Information Center since the previous volume was published in 1978 in the area of radiation transport and shielding against radiation from nuclear reactors, x-ray machines, radioisotopes, nuclear weapons (including fallout), and low energy accelerators (e.g., neutron generators). The bibliography was typeset from data processed by computer from magnetic tape files. In addition to lists of literature titles by subject categories (accessions 4951-6200), an author index is given.

  6. Bibliography, subject index, and author index of the literature examined by the radiation shielding information center. Volume 6. Reactor and weapons radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    An indexed bibliography is presented of literature selected by the Radiation Shielding Information Center since the previous volume was published in 1978 in the area of radiation transport and shielding against radiation from nuclear reactors, x-ray machines, radioisotopes, nuclear weapons (including fallout), and low energy accelerators (e.g., neutron generators). The bibliography was typeset from data processed by computer from magnetic tape files. In addition to lists of literature titles by subject categories (accessions 4951-6200), an author index is given

  7. Formulary for neutron propagation in sodium-steel media for the fast reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouteau, F.; Caumette, P.; Khairallah, A.; Oceraies, Y.; Devillers, C.

    1975-01-01

    The simplified calculational tool (''formulary'') for neutron propagation in the shields of fast reactors, being developed at CEA, has two objectives: to reduce the cost of the major part of design calculations, without a significant loss of accuracy; to facilitate the adjustment of the calculational tool with the results of the program of integral propagation experiments, which is conducted in parallel with the development of the calculational method. The version 0 (i.e. before any adjustment) of the formulary and a first test of its validity as compared to the results of integral measurements are presented [fr

  8. Integral experiments for fusion-reactor shield design. Summary of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra from the reactions of approx. 14-MeV neutrons in blanket and shield materials and from the streaming of these neutrons through a cylindrical duct (L/D approx. 2) have been measured and calculated. These data are being obtained in a series of integral experiments to verify the radiation transport methods and nuclear data that are being used in nuclear design calculations for fusion reactors. The experimental procedures and analytical methods used to obtain the calculated data are reviewed. Comparisons between measured and calculated data for the experiments that have been performed to date are summarized

  9. Mesos-scale modeling of irradiation in pressurized water reactor concrete biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pape, Yann [ORNL; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2016-01-01

    Neutron irradiation exposure causes aggregate expansion, namely radiation-induced volumetric expansion (RIVE). The structural significance of RIVE on a portion of a prototypical pressurized water reactor (PWR) concrete biological shield (CBS) is investigated by using a meso- scale nonlinear concrete model with inputs from an irradiation transport code and a coupled moisture transport-heat transfer code. RIVE-induced severe cracking onset appears to be triggered by the ini- tial shrinkage-induced cracking and propagates to a depth of > 10 cm at extended operation of 80 years. Relaxation of the cement paste stresses results in delaying the crack propagation by about 10 years.

  10. Bulk Shielding Facility quarterly report, July, August, and September of 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, III, S. S.; Lance, E. D.; Thomas, J. R.

    1977-06-01

    The BSR operated at an average power level of 1637 kW for 50.05 percent of the time during July, August, and September. Water-quality control in both the reactor primary and secondary cooling systems was satisfactory. The BSR was operated at low and variable power during this quarter for 27.327 hours as part of the training programs for nuclear reactor operator trainees from Memphis State University. The PCA was also used in the above-mentioned training programs and was operated on six occasions when the Oak Ridge Associated Universities or Memphis State University students actively participated in training laboratories.

  11. Experimental study of neutron streaming through steel-walled annular ducts in reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshimas, M.; Nobuo, S.

    1983-01-01

    For the purpose of providing experimental data to assess neutron streaming calculations, neutron flux measurements were performed along the axes of the steel-walled annular ducts set up in a water shield of the pool-type reactor JRR-4. An annular duct simulated the air gap around the main coolant pipe. Another duct simulated the streaming path around the primary circulating pump of the integrated-type marine reactor. A 90-deg bend annular duct was also studied. In a set of measurements, the distance Z between the core center and the duct axis and the annular gap width delta were taken as parameters, that is, Z = 0, 80, and 160 cm and delta = 2.2, 4.7, and 10.1 cm. The reaction rates and the fluxes measured by the activation method are given in terms of absolute magnitude within an accuracy of + or - 30%. An empirical formula is derived based on those measured data, which describes the axial distribution of the neutron flux in the steel-walled annular duct in reactor shields. It is expressed by a simple function of the axial distance in units of the square root of the line-of-sight area, S /SUB l/ . The accuracy of the formula is examined by taking into account the duct location with respect to the reactor core, the neutron energy, the steel wall thickness, and the media outside of the steel wall. The accuracy of the formula is, in general, <30% in the axial distance between 3√S /SUB l/ and 30√S /SUB l/

  12. Burst shield for a pressurized nuclear-reactor core and method of operating same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beine, B.; Schilling, F.

    1976-01-01

    A pressurized nuclear-reactor core stands on a base up from which extends a cylindrical side wall formed of a plurality of hollow iron castings held together by circumferential and longitudinal prestressed elements. A cylindrical space between this shield and the core serves for inspection of the core and is normally filled with cast-iron segmental slabs so that if the core bursts pieces thrown out do not acquire any dangerous kinetic energy before engaging the burst shield. The top of the shield is removably secured to the side so that it can be moved out of the way periodically for removal of the filler slabs and inspection of the core. An anchor on the upper end of each longitudinal prestressing element bears against a sleeve pressing against the uppermost side element, and a nut engageable with this anchor is engageable down over the top to hold it in place, removal of this nut leaving the element prestressed in the side wall. 11 claims, 16 drawing figures

  13. Application of SCALE 6.1 MAVRIC Sequence for Activation Calculation in Reactor Primary Shield Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong IL

    2014-01-01

    Activation calculation requires flux information at desired location and reaction cross sections for the constituent elements to obtain production rate of activation products. Generally it is not an easy task to obtain fluxes or reaction rates with low uncertainties in a reasonable time for deep penetration problems by using standard Monte Carlo methods. The MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence in SCALE 6.1 code package is intended to perform radiation transport on problems that are too challenging for standard, unbiased Monte Carlo methods. And the SCALE code system provides plenty of ENDF reaction types enough to consider almost all activation reactions in the nuclear reactor materials. To evaluate the activation of the important isotopes in primary shield, SCALE 6.1 MAVRIC sequence has been utilized for the KSNP reactor model and the calculated results are compared to the isotopic activity concentration of related standard. Related to the planning for decommission, the activation products in concrete primary shield such as Fe-55, Co-60, Ba-133, Eu-152, and Eu-154 are identified as important elements according to the comparisons with related standard for exemption. In this study, reference data are used for the concrete compositions in the activation calculation to see the applicability of MAVRIC code to the evaluation of activation inventory in the concrete primary shield. The composition data of trace elements as shown in Table 1 are obtained from various US power plant sites and accordingly they have large variations in quantity due to the characteristics of concrete composition. In practical estimation of activation radioactivity for a specific plant related to decommissioning, rigorous chemical analysis of concrete samples of the plant would first have to be performed to get exact information for compositions of concrete. Considering the capability of solving deep penetration transport problems and richness

  14. Methods of preventing fast breeder reactor shield plug from adhesion of sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, Koh; Hara, Johji; Nei, Hiromichi; Daiku, Motoichi; Wagatsuma, Kenji

    1980-01-01

    The shield plug, which is located at the upper part of a reactor vessel of a sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor, is composed of a rotating and a stationary plug. Fuel exchange is performed easily by the rotation of the rotating plug. The vapor or mist of sodium evaporated from liquid sodium deposits on the gap surfaces of the rotating and stationary plugs and is solidified or changed into a solid reactant. If such condition continues for a long period, harmful effects are exerted on the fuel exchange operation. In order to develop methods of preventing the sodium deposition, investigation was made on the phenomenon of sodium deposition. By the use of the testing equipment simulating the shield plug, deposition tests and specimen measurements were made for different gap width test section size and condition. On the basis of the effects of these parameters clarified by experiments, the effectiveness of three kinds of mechanism for preventing sodium deposition were investigated experimentally. In addition, by using a thermo-siphon analogical model, analysis was performed to deduce experimental equations for sodium deposition. (author)

  15. Neutronics shielding analysis for the end plug of a tandem mirror fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragheb, Magdi M. H.; Maynard, Charles W.

    1981-10-01

    A neutronics analysis using the Monte Carlo method is carried out for the end-plug penetration and magnet system of a tandem mirror fusion reactor. Detailed penetration and the magnets' three-dimensional configurations are modeled. A method of position dependent angular source biasing is developed to adequately sample the DT fusion source in the central cell region and obtain flux contributions at the penetration components. To assure cryogenic stability, the barrier cylindrical solenoid is identified as needing substantial shielding of about 1 m of a steel-lead-boron-carbide-water mixture. Heating rates there would require a thermal-hydraulic design similar to that in the central cell blanket region. The transition coils, however, need a minimal 0.2 m thickness shield. The leakage neutron flux at the direct converters is estimated at 1.3×1015 n/(m2·s), two orders of magnitude lower than that reported at the neutral beam injectors for tokamaks around 1017 n/(m2·s) for a 1 MW/m2 14 MeV neutron wall loading. This result is obtained through a coupling between the nuclear and plasma physics designs in which hydrogen ions rather than deuterium atoms are used for energy injection at the end plug, to avoid creating a neutron source there. This lower and controllable radiation leakage problem is perceived as a potential major advantage of tandem mirrors compared to tokamaks and laser reactor systems.

  16. Neutron flux measurements at the TRIGA reactor in Vienna for the prediction of the activation of the biological shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Stefan; Djuricic, Mile; Villa, Mario; Böck, Helmuth; Steinhauser, Georg

    2011-11-01

    The activation of the biological shield is an important process for waste management considerations of nuclear facilities. The final activity can be estimated by modeling using the neutron flux density rather than the radiometric approach of activity measurements. Measurement series at the TRIGA reactor Vienna reveal that the flux density next to the biological shield is in the order of 10(9)cm(-2)s(-1) at maximum power; but it is strongly influenced by reactor installations. The data allow the estimation of the final waste categorization of the concrete according to the Austrian legislation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Requirement of nuclear data and inaccuracy of nuclear data in evaluating the target values of shielding calculations for the light water reactor and the high-temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kicherer, G.; Hehn, G.

    1982-01-01

    This study tries to investigate for the first time systematically and quantitatively the influence on the prediction of reactor shieldings from inaccuracies in nuclear data playing an essential part in design, monitoring, and estimation of the useful life of power reactors. The main objective is to calculate the contribution of the error in nuclear data to the inaccuracy of the targets of reactor shielding calculations expressed in terms of radiation dose, radiation damages and radiation heat, that have got a high safety relevance. As a result, it can be determined if there remains a sufficiently large margin for the errors from the mathematical method and the geometrical approximation. In the first part of the paper the most important international nuclear data libraries are compared by means of a one-dimensional shielding calculation for the BWR KRB II. In the second part a systematic sensitivity study for the shielding targets of a BWR (KRB II/1300 MWsub(el)) and a HTGR (THTR-300/300 MWsub(el)) is performed for the cross-section data of the individual nuclides. In relation with the evaluated nuclear data errors and the result of the sensitivity study the error in the nuclear data used for the prediction of the radiation damage to the RPV or liner respectively and of the radiation dose in the concrete of the primary shield can be analyzed for light water and high-temperature reactors. (orig.) [de

  18. Multi-objective optimization of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor computational model for biological shielding design using innovative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunes, M.A., E-mail: matheus.tunes@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C.R.E. de, E-mail: cassiano@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Farris Engineering Center, 221, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1070 (United States); Schön, C.G., E-mail: schoen@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of two n-γ transport codes leads to optimized model of compact nuclear reactor. • It was possible to safely reduce both weight and volume of the biological shielding. • Best configuration obtained by using new composites for both γ and n attenuation. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to develop a computational model of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) to investigate the use of innovative materials to enhance the biological shielding effectiveness. Two radiation transport codes were used: the first one – MCNP – for the PWR design and the GEM/EVENT to simulate (in a 1D slab) the behavior of several materials and shielding thickness on gamma and neutron radiation. Additionally MATLAB Optimization Toolbox was used to provide new geometric configurations of the slab aiming at reducing the volume and weight of the walls by means of a cost/objective function. It is demonstrated in the reactor model that the dose rate outside biological shielding has been reduced by one order of magnitude for the optimized model compared with the initial configuration. Volume and weight of the shielding walls were also reduced. The results indicated that one-dimensional deterministic code to reach an optimized geometry and test materials, combined with a three-dimensional model of a compact nuclear reactor in a stochastic code, is a fast and efficient procedure to test shielding performance and optimization before the experimental assessment. A major outcome of this research is that composite materials (ECOMASS 2150TU96) may replace (with advantages) traditional shielding materials without jeopardizing the nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  19. Neutronics shielding analysis of the last mirror-beam duct system for a laser fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.M.H.; Klein, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    A Monte Carlo three-dimensional neutronics analysis for the last mirror-beam duct system for the SOLASE conceptual laser-driven fusion power reactor design is presented. Detailed geometric configurations including the reactor cavity, the two last mirrors, and the three-section two-right-angle bends duct are modeled. Measurements are given of the dimensions and compositions of the reactor components, and of neutron scalar fluxes, spatial dependencies and neutron volumetric heating rates for the cases of aluminum or Boral as laser beam duct liners, and ordinary concrete or lead mortar as shield material. A three-dimensional modeling of laser-driven reactor penetrations is employed. The particle leakage is found to be excessively high for the configuration of the conceptual design considered and the advantages and disadvantages of various solutions, such as the use of Boral as a duct liner and the use of lead mortar instead of ordinary concrete as a shield material, are considered

  20. Radiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank from the Shippingport reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The irradiation embrittlement of neutron shield tank (NST) material (A212 Grade B steel) from the Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Irradiation increases the Charpy transition temperature (CTT) by 23--28{degrees}C (41--50{degrees}F) and decreases the upper-shelf energy. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) surveillance specimens. However, the actual value of the CTT is higher than that for the HFIR data. The increase in yield stress is 51 MPa (7.4 ksi), which is comparable to HFIR data. The NST material is weaker in the transverse orientation than in the longitudinal orientation. Some effects of position across the thickness of the wall are also observed; the CTT shift is slightly greater for specimens from the inner region of the wall. Annealing studies indicate complete recovery from embrittlement after 1 h at 400{degrees}C (752{degrees}F). Although the weld metal is significantly tougher than the base metal, the shifts in CTT are comparable. The shifts in CTT for the Shippingport NST are consistent with the test and Army reactor data for irradiations at <232{degrees}C (<450{degrees}F) and show very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR). The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence rate, and neutron flux spectrum are discussed. The results indicate that fluence rate has no effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s and at the low operating temperatures of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C (130{degrees}F). This suggests that the accelerated embrittlement of HFIR surveillance samples is most likely due to the relatively higher proportion of thermal neutrons in the HFIR spectrum compared to that for the test reactors. 28 refs., 25 figs.

  1. Conception of thermonuclear reactor with a shielding layer of the first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, S.V.

    1979-01-01

    Considered is the way of the shielding of the first wall of a thermonuclear reactor by the layer of ISSEC (Internal spectral shifter and Energy Converter). It is a constructive non-power element placed between a plasma and the first wall, and intended for the softening of the spectrum and intensity reduction of particle fluxes falling on the first wall. Results of neutron-physical calculations of the UWMAK-type reactor blanket (in the S 4 -P 3 approximation) are presented. While comparing five materials (C, Mo, Nb, V,W) by the rate of radiation damage formation, gas production, radioactivity level and energy output in the blanket with the 316 stainless steel first wall, it is obvious that the conception of ISSEC permits to prolong the service period of the first wall. Construction elements should be then in the same irradiation conditions as those in fast reactors. Molybdenum has been taken as the best ISSEC material. It reduces the number of displaced atoms of the first wall by 20% and decreases helium production by about 100%, increases energy output in the blanket by 15-18%. However, graphite is advantageous, while comparing it to molybdenum in values of residual energy output, radioactivity level, costs and manufacture simplicity. One problem stays unsolved, which is connected with chemical sputtering of graphite at the formation of C 2 H 2 in the high temperature range. So it is hard to prefer any material now

  2. Discrete nodal integral transport-theory method for multidimensional reactor physics and shielding calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, R.D.; Dorning, J.J.

    1980-01-01

    A coarse-mesh discrete nodal integral transport theory method has been developed for the efficient numerical solution of multidimensional transport problems of interest in reactor physics and shielding applications. The method, which is the discrete transport theory analogue and logical extension of the nodal Green's function method previously developed for multidimensional neutron diffusion problems, utilizes the same transverse integration procedure to reduce the multidimensional equations to coupled one-dimensional equations. This is followed by the conversion of the differential equations to local, one-dimensional, in-node integral equations by integrating back along neutron flight paths. One-dimensional and two-dimensional transport theory test problems have been systematically studied to verify the superior computational efficiency of the new method

  3. ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] shield and blanket work package report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report summarizes nuclear-related work in support of the US effort for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Study. The purpose of this work was to prepare for the first international ITER workshop devoted to defining a basic ITER concept that will serve as a basis for an indepth conceptual design activity over the next 2-1/2 years. Primary tasks carried out during the past year included: design improvements of the inboard shield developed for the TIBER concept, scoping studies of a variety of tritium breeding blanket options, development of necessary design guidelines and evaluation criteria for the blanket options, further safety considerations related to nuclear components and issues regarding structural materials for an ITER device. 44 refs., 31 figs., 29 tabs

  4. Benchmark shielding calculations for the NEACRP [Nuclear Energy Agency-Committee on Reactor Physics] Working Group on shielding assessment of transportation packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Brady, M.C.; Parks, C.V.

    1990-11-01

    In 1985, the Nuclear Energy Agency-Committee on Reactor Physics (NEACRP) established a working group on shielding assessment of transportation packages. Following the initial distribution of a set of six problems, discussions were held at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Headquarters in Paris, France, in June/July 1986, May 1988, and February/March 1990. The US contribution to the working group is documented in this report. The results from this effort permit the evaluation of a number of approximations and effects that must be considered in a typical shielding analysis of a transportation cask. Among the effects reported here are the performance of multiple cross-section sets, the comparison of several source generation codes, and multidimensional versus one-dimensional (1-D) analyses. 18 refs., 16 figs., 33 tabs

  5. Research Reactor MZFR, Karlsruhe, Germany Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and of the Thermal Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, A.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m 3 . Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (authors)

  6. Influence of carrier concentration on the control of Galactomyces geotrichum bulking and bacterial community of biofilm reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, M.; Pereira, M. A.; Nicolau, Ana; Rodrigues, A. L.; Brito, A. G.; Nogueira, R.

    2012-01-01

    The present work aims to evaluate a strategy to solve Galactomyces geotrichum bulking based on the incorporation of a biofilm carrier in activated sludge systems. For this study, four sequencing batch reactors (SBR) were operated without (SBR1) and with a carrier for biofilm growth (5% [SBR2], 10% [SBR3], and 20% [SBR4] of the reactor volume). As expected, G. geotrichum bulking was observed in the SBR operating just with suspended biomass, as ascertained by direct microscopic inspection. The ...

  7. Development of a low activation concrete shielding wall by multi-layered structure for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Satoshi; Maegawa, Toshio; Yoshimatsu, Kenji; Sato, Koichi; Nonaka, Akira; Takakura, Kosuke; Ochiai, Kentaro; Konno, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    A multi-layered concrete structure has been developed to reduce induced activity in the shielding for neutron generating facilities such as a fusion reactor. The multi-layered concrete structure is composed of: (1) an inner low activation concrete, (2) a boron-doped low activation concrete as the second layer, and (3) ordinary concrete as the outer layer of the neutron shield. With the multi-layered concrete structure the volume of boron is drastically decreased compared to a monolithic boron-doped concrete. A 14 MeV neutron shielding experiment with multi-layered concrete structure mockups was performed at FNS and several reaction rates and induced activity in the mockups were measured. This demonstrated that the multi-layered concrete effectively reduced low energy neutrons and induced activity.

  8. Tower Shielding Reactor II design and operation report. Vol. 3. Assembling and testing of the control mechanism assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.R.; Holland, L.B.

    1979-09-01

    The mechanisms that are operated to control the reactivity of the Tower Shielding Reactor II(TSR-II) are mounted on a Control Mechanism Housing (CMH) that is centered inside the reactor core. The information required to procure, fabricate, inspect, and assemble a CMH is contained in the ORNL engineering drawings listed in the appropriate sections. The components are fabricated and inspected from these drawings in accordance with a Quality Assurance Plan and a Manufacturing Plan. The material in this report describes the acceptance and performance tests of CMH subassemblies used ty the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) staff but it can also be used by personnel fabricating the components. This information which was developed and used before the advent of the formalized QA Program and Manufacturing Plans evolved during the fabrication and testing of the first five CMHs

  9. ARES: A Parallel Discrete Ordinates Transport Code for Radiation Shielding Applications and Reactor Physics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixue Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ARES is a multidimensional parallel discrete ordinates particle transport code with arbitrary order anisotropic scattering. It can be applied to a wide variety of radiation shielding calculations and reactor physics analysis. ARES uses state-of-the-art solution methods to obtain accurate solutions to the linear Boltzmann transport equation. A multigroup discretization is applied in energy. The code allows multiple spatial discretization schemes and solution methodologies. ARES currently provides diamond difference with or without linear-zero flux fixup, theta weighted, directional theta weighted, exponential directional weighted, and linear discontinuous finite element spatial differencing schemes. Discrete ordinates differencing in angle and spherical harmonics expansion of the scattering source are adopted. First collision source method is used to eliminate or mitigate the ray effects. Traditional source iteration and Krylov iterative method preconditioned with diffusion synthetic acceleration are applied to solve the linear system of equations. ARES uses the Koch-Baker-Alcouffe parallel sweep algorithm to obtain high parallel efficiency. Verification and validation for the ARES transport code system have been done by lots of benchmarks. In this paper, ARES solutions to the HBR-2 benchmark and C5G7 benchmarks are in excellent agreement with published results. Numerical results are presented which demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of these methods.

  10. Extensive neutronic sensitivity-uncertainty analysis of a fusion reactor shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogenbirk, A.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the results are presented of an extensive neutronic sensitivity-uncertainty study performed for the design of a shielding blanket for a next-step fusion reactor, such as ITER. A code system was used, which was developed at ECN Petten. The uncertainty in an important response parameter, the neutron heating in the inboard superconducting coils, was evaluated. Neutron transport calculations in the 100 neutron group GAM-II structure were performed using the code ANISN. For the sensitivity and uncertainty calculations the code SUSD was used. Uncertainties due to cross-section uncertainties were taken into account as well as uncertainties due to uncertainties in energy and angular distributions of scattered neutrons (SED and SAD uncertainties, respectively). The subject of direct-term uncertainties (i.e. uncertainties due to uncertainties in the kerma factors of the superconducting coils) is briefly touched upon. It is shown that SAD uncertainties, which have been largely neglected until now, contribute significantly to the total uncertainty. Moreover, the contribution of direct-term uncertainties may be large. The total uncertainty in the neutron heating, only due to Fe cross-sections, amounts to approximately 25%, which is rather large. However, uncertainty data are scarce and the data may very well be conservative. It is shown in this paper that with the code system used, sensitivity and uncertainty calculations can be performed in a straightforward way. Therefore, it is suggested that emphasis is now put on the generation of realistic, reliable covariance data for cross-sections as well as for angular and energy distributions. ((orig.))

  11. Shielding and activation calculations around the reactor core for the MYRRHA ADS design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Anna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of the FP7 European project MAXSIMA, an extensive simulation study has been done to assess the main shielding problems in view of the construction of the MYRRHA accelerator-driven system at SCK·CEN in Mol (Belgium. An innovative method based on the combined use of the two state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and FLUKA has been used, with the goal to characterize complex, realistic neutron fields around the core barrel, to be used as source terms in detailed analyses of the radiation fields due to the system in operation, and of the coupled residual radiation. The main results of the shielding analysis are presented, as well as the construction of an activation database of all the key structural materials. The results evidenced a powerful way to analyse the shielding and activation problems, with direct and clear implications on the design solutions.

  12. Shielding and activation calculations around the reactor core for the MYRRHA ADS design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Anna; Mueller, Stefan; Konheiser, J.; Castelliti, D.; Sarotto, M.; Stankovskiy, A.

    2017-09-01

    In the frame of the FP7 European project MAXSIMA, an extensive simulation study has been done to assess the main shielding problems in view of the construction of the MYRRHA accelerator-driven system at SCK·CEN in Mol (Belgium). An innovative method based on the combined use of the two state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and FLUKA has been used, with the goal to characterize complex, realistic neutron fields around the core barrel, to be used as source terms in detailed analyses of the radiation fields due to the system in operation, and of the coupled residual radiation. The main results of the shielding analysis are presented, as well as the construction of an activation database of all the key structural materials. The results evidenced a powerful way to analyse the shielding and activation problems, with direct and clear implications on the design solutions.

  13. Radiation safety aspects during nondestructive testing of reactor shielding components by gamma radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, S.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    In nuclear facilities, effective shielding of radioactive components and structures are essential to ensure radiation protection to operating personnel. The shield structures are made of lead, steel and concrete with varying thickness of up to 1200 mm. It needs to be verified for shielding integrity, presence of voids, blowholes and defects to avoid exposure to workers and to public at large. Radiometry using gamma source serves as excellent tool for non-destructive examination of such structures and components. Gamma sources of high activity up to 50 Curies (gamma camera type) depending on the thickness of component have to be used. During the testing exposure to the operating personnel needs to be minimized, this requires certain safety procedures to be followed. This paper focuses the methodology to be adapted by means of selection of source, effective training of personnel, compliance with safety requirements and maintenance of source devices

  14. Comparison of neutron fluxes obtained by 2-D and 3-D geometry with different shielding libraries in biological shield of the TRIGA MARK II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozic, M.; Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.

    2003-01-01

    Neutron fluxes in different spatial locations in biological shield are obtained with TORT code (TORT-Three Dimensional Oak Ridge Discrete Ordinates Neutron/Photon Transport Code). Libraries used with TORT code were BUGLE-96 library (coupled library with 47 neutron groups and 20 gamma groups) and VITAMIN-B6 library (coupled library with 199 neutron groups and 42 gamma groups). BUGLE-96 library is derived from VITAMIN-B6 library. 2-D and 3-D models for homogeneous type of problem (without inserted beam port 4) and problem with asymmetry (non-homogeneous problem; inserted beam port 4, filled with different materials) were of interest for neutron flux calculation. The main purpose is to verify the possibility for using 2-D approximation model instead of large 3-D model in some calculations. Another purpose of this paper was to compare neutron spectral constants obtained from neutron fluxes (3-D model) determined with smaller BUGLE-96 library with new constants obtained from fluxes calculated with bigger VITAMIN-B6 library. These neutron spectral constants are used in isotopic calculation with SCALE code package (ORIGEN-S). In past only neutron spectral constants determined by neutron fluxes from BUGLE-96 library were used. Experimental results used for isotopic composition comparison are available from irradiation experiment with selected type of concrete and other materials in beam port 4 (irradiation channel 4) in TRIGA Mark II reactor. These experimental results were used as a benchmark in this paper. (author)

  15. Optimization of tritium breeding and shielding analysis to plasma in ITER fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indah Rosidah, M., E-mail: indah.maymunah@gmail.com; Suud, Zaki, E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id [Department of Nuclear Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Yazid, Putranto Ilham [Research and Development of Nuclear Association (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    The development of fusion energy is one of the important International energy strategies with the important milestone is ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) project, initiated by many countries, such as: America, Europe, and Japan who agreed to set up TOKAMAK type fusion reactor in France. In ideal fusion reactor the fuel is purely deuterium, but it need higher temperature of reactor. In ITER project the fuels are deuterium and tritium which need lower temperature of the reactor. In this study tritium for fusion reactor can be produced by using reaction of lithium with neutron in the blanket region. With the tritium breeding blanket which react between Li-6 in the blanket with neutron resulted from the plasma region. In this research the material used in each layer surrounding the plasma in the reactor is optimized. Moreover, achieving self-sufficiency condition in the reactor in order tritium has enough availability to be consumed for a long time. In order to optimize Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) value in the fusion reactor, there are several strategies considered here. The first requirement is making variation in Li-6 enrichment to be 60%, 70%, and 90%. But, the result of that condition can not reach TBR value better than with no enrichment. Because there is reduction of Li-7 percent when increasing Li-6 percent. The other way is converting neutron multiplier material with Pb. From this, we get TBR value better with the Be as neutron multiplier. Beside of TBR value, fusion reactor can analyze the distribution of neutron flux and dose rate of neutron to know the change of neutron concentration for each layer in reactor. From the simulation in this study, 97% neutron concentration can be absorbed by material in reactor, so it is good enough. In addition, it is required to analyze spectrum neutron energy in many layers in the fusion reactor such as in blanket, coolant, and divertor. Actually material in that layer can resist in high temperature

  16. Proposal for a radiation shielding study aiming the implantation of neutrons beam shutter in the J-9 radiation channel of the Argonauta reactor of the Nuclear Engineering Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xavier, Larissa R.P.; Cardoso, Domingos D’Oliveira, E-mail: larissa.xavier@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: domingosoliveiralvr71@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ferreira, Francisco José de Oliveira; Voi, Dante Luiz, E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.br, E-mail: dante@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Argonauta, the only nuclear research reactor situated in Rio de Janeiro, located at the Institute of Nuclear Engineering (IEN), regularly serves a network of users focused on research and development, and also provides its infrastructure for experimental classes and completion work course. Due to increasing demand for non-destructive thermal neutron assays and production of radioisotopes, there is a search for new procedures and/or devices that optimize users' exposure to neutrons. The implementation of mechanisms that allow access to the irradiation channels without the reactor being turned off and with a shielding configuration that limits the occupational doses at this location is very useful for the operation of the reactor. In order to achieve this, the present work proposes the establishment of a neutron beam shutter of the J-9 irradiation channel of the IEN's Argonauta reactor. In a first step, experimental measurements were made in the irradiation channel of the reactor using a BF3 detector, which is coupled to a spectrometer. In this phase, the neutron beam was aligned to the spectrometer, and different materials were used as shields, aiming the attenuation of the beam. To validate and/or change the configuration of the barrier that best meets the material irradiation needs, a second planned phase is involving the neutron flux simulation of the reactor and the various shields with different boundary conditions using the particle transport code, Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended (MCNP- X). (author)

  17. Shielding design of highly activated sample storage at reactor TRIGA PUSPATI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naim Syauqi Hamzah; Julia Abdul Karim; Mohamad Hairie Rabir; Muhd Husamuddin Abdul Khalil; Mohd Amin Sharifuldin Salleh

    2010-01-01

    Radiation protection has always been one of the most important things considered in Reaktor Triga PUSPATI (RTP) management. Currently, demands on sample activation were increased from variety of applicant in different research field area. Radiological hazard may occur if the samples evaluation done were misjudge or miscalculated. At present, there is no appropriate storage for highly activated samples. For that purpose, special irradiated samples storage box should be provided in order to segregate highly activated samples that produce high dose level and typical activated samples that produce lower dose level (1 - 2 mR/ hr). In this study, thickness required by common shielding material such as lead and concrete to reduce highly activated radiotracer sample (potassium bromide) with initial exposure dose of 5 R/ hr to background level (0.05 mR/ hr) were determined. Analyses were done using several methods including conventional shielding equation, half value layer calculation and Micro shield computer code. Design of new irradiated samples storage box for RTP that capable to contain high level gamma radioactivity were then proposed. (author)

  18. Self-consistent Analysis of a Blanket and Shielding of a Fusion Reactor Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk Kwon; Hong, B. G.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. O.

    2008-01-01

    To develop the concept of a DEMO reactor, a tokamak reactor system analysis code has been developed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). The system analysis code incorporates prospects of the development of plasma physics and the technologies in a simple mathematical model and it helps to develop the concept of a fusion reactor and to identify the necessary R and D areas for a realization of the concept. In the system code, a plant power balance equation and a plasma power balance equation are solved to find plant parameters which satisfy the plasma physics and technology constraints, simultaneously. The outcome of the system analysis is to identify which areas of plasma physics and technologies and to what extent they should be developed for a realization of given fusion reactor concepts

  19. Structural evaluation of the Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, L.E.; Chou, C.K.; Lo, T.; Schwartz, M.W.

    1988-06-01

    A structural evaluation of Shippingport Reactor Pressure Vessel and Neutron Shield Tank package for impact and puncture loads under the normal and hypothetical accident conditions of 10 CFR 71 was performed. Component performance criteria for the Shippingport package and the corresponding structural acceptance criteria for these components were developed based on a review of the package geometry, the planned transport environment, and the external radiation standards and dispersal limits of 10 CFR 71. The evaluation was performed using structural analysis methods. A demonstration combining simplified model tests and nonlinear finite element analyses was made to substantiate the structural analysis methods used to evaluate the Shippingport package. The package was analyzed and the results indicate that the package meets external radiation standards and release limits of 10 CFR 71. 13 refs., 50 figs., 19 tabs

  20. Calculation of self-shielding coefficients, flux depression and cadmium factor for thermal neutron flux measurement of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Andre Luis Ferreira; Ting, Daniel Kao Sun; Mendonca, Arlindo Gilson

    1996-01-01

    A calculation methodology of Flux Depression, Self-Shielding and Cadmium Factors is presented, using the ANISN code, for experiments conducted at the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor. The correction factors were determined considering thermal neutron flux and 0.125 e 0.250 mm diameter of 197 Au wires. (author)

  1. On The Deign And Construction Of A Radiation Shielding System For Development Of Neutron Beams Based On The Horizontal Channel No.2 Of Dalat Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuong Huu Tan; Pham Ngoc Son; Nguyen Nhi Dien

    2011-01-01

    An optimal structural system of filtered neutron beam and radiation shielding has been designed and calculated using the Monte-Carlo code MCNP5. The system was constructed and installed into the horizontal channel No. 2 of the Dalat reactor. The neutron beam is applied for experimental studies on nuclear physics, nuclear data measurements, and personal training. (author)

  2. Criticality and shielding calculations for containers in dry of spent fuel of TRIGA Mark III reactor of ININ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco R, F.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis criticality and shielding calculations to evaluate the design of a container of dry storage of spent nuclear fuel generated in research reactors were made. The design of such container was originally proposed by Argentina and Brazil, and the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) of Mexico. Additionally, it is proposed to modify the design of this container to store spent fuel 120 that are currently in the pool of TRIGA Mark III reactor, the Nuclear Center of Mexico and calculations and analyzes are made to verify that the settlement of these fuel elements is subcritical limits and dose rates to workers and the general public are not exceeded. These calculations are part of the design criteria for security protection systems in dry storage system (Dss for its acronym in English) proposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of the United States. To carry out these calculations simulation codes of Monte Carlo particle transport as MCNPX and MCNP5 were used. The initial design (design 1) 78 intended to store spent fuel with a maximum of 115. The ININ has 120 fuel elements and spent 3 control rods (currently stored in the reactor pool). This leads to the construction of two containers of the original design, but for economic reasons was decided to modify (design 2) to store in a single container. Criticality calculations are performed to 78, 115 and fresh fuel elements 124 within the container, to the two arrangements described in Chapter 4, modeling the three-dimensional geometry assuming normal operating conditions and accident. These calculations are focused to demonstrate that the container will remain subcritical, that is, that the effective multiplication factor is less than 1, in particular not greater than 0.95 (as per specified by the NRC). Spent fuel 78 and 124 within the container, both gamma radiation to neutron shielding calculations for only two cases were simulated. First actinides and fission products generated

  3. A New Method for Predicting the Penetration and Slowing-Down of Neutrons in Reactor Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjaerne, L.; Leimdoerfer, M.

    1965-05-01

    A new approach is presented in the formulation of removal-diffusion theory. The 'removal cross-section' is redefined and the slowing-down between the multigroup diffusion equations is treated with a complete energy transfer matrix rather than in an age theory approximation. The method, based on the new approach contains an adjustable parameter. Examples of neutron spectra and thermal flux penetrations are given in a number of differing shield configurations and the results compare favorably with experiments and Moments Method calculations

  4. Integral data testing of JENDL-3.2 for fusion reactor and shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio

    1995-01-01

    Integral data testing of JENDL-3.2 is being performed in the activities of two working groups of the Japanese Nuclear Data Committee. The continuous and group-wise libraries prepared from JENDL-3.2 are planned to be tested by the working groups. In this paper, the continuous library FSXLIB-J3R2 processed from JENDL-3.2 for MCNP was tested for fission and fusion neutrons using data of integral experiments and compared to the results of JENDL-3.1. The results of integral data testing of JENDL-3.2 for fusion and shielding application are reviewed. (author)

  5. Shield calculation of research reactor IAN-R1 by Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puerta, J.; Buritica, D.A.; Cardenas, H.F.

    1993-01-01

    Using the Monte Carlo Method a computer program has been developed to simulate the neutron radiation transport and determine the basic parameters in shielding calculations. The program has been tested comparing dose conversion factors with kerma factors issued by the international commission on radiation units and measurements (ICRU) on its report (No 26 of 1987) giving errors less than ten percent showing the goodness of the method. The program computer transmitted backscattered and absorbed flux on energy less on each collision. when neutrons are produced by region source with knowing energy; results are given like conversion factors and reliability of this program allows a wide application on radiological and medical physics

  6. The SGR Multipurpose - Generation IV - Transportable Cogeneration Nuclear Reactor with Innovative Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahladsingh, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Deregulation and liberalization are changing the global energy-markets. At the same time innovative technologies are introduced in the electricity industry; often as a requirement from the upcoming Digital Society. Energy solutions for the future are more seen as a mix of energy-sources for generation-, transmission- and distribution energy-services. The Internet Energy-web based 'Virtual' enterprises are coming up and will gradually change our society. It the fast changing world we have to realize that there will be less time to look for the adequate solutions to anticipate on global developments and the way they will influence our own societies. Global population may reach 9 billion people by 2030; this will put tremendous pressure on energy-, water- and food supply in the global economy. It is time to think about some major issues as described below and come up with the right answers. These are needed on very short term to secure a humane global economic growth and the sustainable global environment. The DOE (Department of Energy - USA) has started the Generation IV initiative for the new generation of nuclear reactors that must lead to much better safety, economics and public acceptance the new reactors. The SGR (Simplified Gas-cooled Reactor) is being proposed as a Generation IV modular nuclear reactor, using graphite pebbles as fuel, whereby an attempt has been made to meet all the DOE requirements, to be used for future nuclear reactors. The focus in this paper is on the changing and emerging global energy-markets and shows some relevant criteria to the nuclear industry and how we can anticipate with improved and new designs towards the coming Digital Society. (author)

  7. Optimization of a partially non-magnetic primary radiation shielding for the triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II

    CERN Document Server

    Pyka, N M; Rogov, A

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to optimize the monochromator shielding of the polarized cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II. By using the Monte Carlo program MCNP-4B, the density of the total spectrum of incoming neutrons and gamma radiation from the beam tube SR-2 has been determined during the three-dimensional diffusion process in different types of heavy concrete and other absorbing material. Special attention has been paid to build a compact and highly efficient shielding, partially non-magnetic, with a total biological radiation dose of less than 10 mu Sv/h at its outsides. Especially considered was the construction of an albedo reducer, which serves to reduce the background in the experiment outside the shielding. (orig.)

  8. Initial progress in the first wall, blanket, and shield Engineering Test Program for magnetically confined fusion-power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, H.; Baker, C.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1981-10-01

    The first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program (ETP) progressed from the planning stage into implementation during July, 1981. The program, generic in nature, comprises four Test Program Elements (TPE's), the emphasis of which is on defining the performance parameters for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) and the major fusion device to follow FED. These elements are: (1) nonnuclear thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing of first wall and component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads and heat transient (i.e., plasma disruption) effects; (2) nonnuclear and nuclear testing of FW/B/S components and assemblies with emphasis on bulk (nuclear) heating effects, integrated FW/B/S hydraulics and mechanics, blanket coolant system transients, and nuclear benchmarks; (3) FW/B/S electromagnetic and eddy current effects testing, including pulsed field penetration, torque and force restraint, electromagnetic materials, liquid metal MHD effects and the like; and (4) FW/B/S Assembly, Maintenance and Repair (AMR) studies focusing on generic AMR criteria, with the objective of preparing an AMR designers guidebook; also, development of rapid remote assembly/disassembly joint system technology, leak detection and remote handling methods

  9. Initial progress in the first wall, blanket, and shield Engineering Test Program for magnetically confined fusion-power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, H.; Baker, C.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1981-10-01

    The first wall/blanket/shield (FW/B/S) Engineering Test Program (ETP) progressed from the planning stage into implementation during July, 1981. The program, generic in nature, comprises four Test Program Elements (TPE's), the emphasis of which is on defining the performance parameters for the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) and the major fusion device to follow FED. These elements are: (1) nonnuclear thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing of first wall and component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads and heat transient (i.e., plasma disruption) effects; (2) nonnuclear and nuclear testing of FW/B/S components and assemblies with emphasis on bulk (nuclear) heating effects, integrated FW/B/S hydraulics and mechanics, blanket coolant system transients, and nuclear benchmarks; (3) FW/B/S electromagnetic and eddy current effects testing, including pulsed field penetration, torque and force restraint, electromagnetic materials, liquid metal MHD effects and the like; and (4) FW/B/S Assembly, Maintenance and Repair (AMR) studies focusing on generic AMR criteria, with the objective of preparing an AMR designers guidebook; also, development of rapid remote assembly/disassembly joint system technology, leak detection and remote handling methods.

  10. Results from the decontamination of and the shielding arrangements in the reactor pressure vessel in Oskarshamn 1-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowendahl, B. [OKG Aktiebolag, Figeholm (Sweden)

    1995-03-01

    In September 1992 Oskarshamn 1 was shut down in order to carry out measures to correct discovered deficiencies in the emergency cooling systems. Due to the results of a comprehensive non destructive test programme it was decided to perform a major replacement of pipes in the primary systems including a full system decontamination using the Siemens CORD process. The paper briefly presents the satisfying result of the decontamination performed in May-June 1993. When in late June 1993 cracks also were detected in the feed-water pipes situated inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) the plans were reconsidered and a large project was formed with the aim, in a first phase, to verify the integrity of the RPV. In order to make it possible to perform work manually inside the RPV special radiation protection measures had to be carried out. In January 1994 the lower region of the RPV was decontaminated, again using the CORD-process, followed by the installation of a special shielding construction in the RPV. The surprisingly good results of these efforts are also briefly described in the paper.

  11. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  12. Design of boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel of the outer irradiation channel of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefah, R G; Sogbadji, R B M; Ampomah-Amoako, E; Birikorang, S A; Odoi, H C; Nyarko, B J B

    2011-01-01

    The MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 was redesigned to incorporate a boron carbide-shielded irradiation channel in one of the outer irradiation channels. Extensive investigations were made before arriving at the final design of only one boron carbide covered outer irradiation channel; as all the other designs that were considered did not give desirable results of neutronic performance. The concept of redesigning a new MCNP model, which has a boron carbide-shielded channel is to equip the Ghana Research Reactor-1 with the means of performing efficient epithermal neutron activation analysis. After the simulation, a comparison of the results from the original MCNP model for the Ghana Research Reactor-1 and the new redesigned model of the boron carbide shielded channel was made. The final effective criticality of the original MCNP model for the GHARR-1 was recorded as 1.00402 while that of the new boron carbide designed model was recorded as 1.00282. Also, a final prompt neutron lifetime of 1.5245 × 10(-4)s was recorded for the new boron carbide designed model while a value of 1.5571 × 10(-7)s was recorded for the original MCNP design of the GHARR-1. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Measurements of tokamak fusion test reactor D-T radiation shielding efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Ascione, G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Elwood, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Gilbert, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Ku, L.P. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Levine, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Rule, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Azziz, N. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York (United States); Goldhagen, P. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York (United States); Hajnal, F. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York (United States); Shebell, P. [USDOE Environmental Measurements Lab., New York (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Measurements of neutron and gamma dose-equivalents were performed in the test cell, at the outer test cell wall, in nearby work areas, and out to the nearest property lines at a distance of 180m. Argon ionization chambers, moderated {sup 3}He proportional counters, and fission chamber detectors were used to obtain measurements of neutron and gamma dose-equivalents per D-T neutron during individual tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) discharges. These measured neutron and gamma D-T dose-equivalents per TFTR neutron characterize the effects of local variations in material density resulting from the complex asymmetric site geometry. The measured dose-equivalents per TFTR D-T neutron and the cumulative neutron production were used to determine that the planned annual TFTR neutron production of 1 x 10{sup 21} D-T neutrons is consistent with the design objective of limiting the total dose-equivalent at the property line, from all radiation sources and pathways, to less than 10mrem per year. (orig.).

  14. Modular Hybrid Plasma Reactor for Low Cost Bulk Production of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Kong

    2011-12-01

    INL developed a bench scale modular hybrid plasma system for gas phase nanomaterials synthesis. The system was being optimized for WO3 nanoparticles production and scale model projection to a 300 kW pilot system. During the course of technology development many modifications had been done to the system to resolve technical issues that had surfaced and also to improve the performance. All project tasks had been completed except 2 optimization subtasks. These 2 subtasks, a 4-hour and an 8-hour continuous powder production runs at 1 lb/hr powder feeding rate, were unable to complete due to technical issues developed with the reactor system. The 4-hour run had been attempted twice and both times the run was terminated prematurely. The modular electrode for the plasma system was significantly redesigned to address the technical issues. Fabrication of the redesigned modular electrodes and additional components had been completed at the end of the project life. However, not enough resource was available to perform tests to evaluate the performance of the new modifications. More development work would be needed to resolve these problems prior to scaling. The technology demonstrated a surprising capability of synthesizing a single phase of meta-stable delta-Al2O3 from pure alpha-phase large Al2O3 powder. The formation of delta-Al2O3 was surprising because this phase is meta-stable and only formed between 973-1073 K, and delta-Al2O3 is very difficult to synthesize as a single phase. Besides the specific temperature window to form this phase, this meta-stable phase may have been stabilized by nanoparticle size formed in a high temperature plasma process. This technology may possess the capability to produce unusual meta-stable nanophase materials that would be otherwise difficult to produce by conventional methods. A 300 kW INL modular hybrid plasma pilot scale model reactor had been projected using the experimental data from PPG Industries 300 kW hot wall plasma reactor. The

  15. Measurements of thermal- and slow-neutron dose distributions in ordinary concrete shield using a reactor neutron beam of different energy ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megahid, R.M.; Makarious, A.S.; El-Kolaly, M.A.; Afifi, Y.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental studies on the distribution and attenuation of thermal and slow neutron doses in ordinary concrete shield have been carried-out. A collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor was used. Measurements were performed using, a direct beam, cadmium filtered beam and boron carbide filtered beam. The neutron doses were measured using thermolumin-escent Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ detectors. The measured data have been analyzed and a group of attenuation curves were given for beams of reactor neutrons of different energy. These curves show that cadmium and boron carbide filters tend to decrease the neutron doses specially at the beginning of penetration. The data were transformed to that which would be obtained using neutron sources of different geometries.

  16. Fast Neutron Transport in the Biological Shielding Model and Other Regions of the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Košťál Michal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of benchmark experiments was carried out in the full scale VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0 in order to validate neutron transport calculation methodologies and to perform the optimization of the shape and locations of neutron flux operation monitors channels inside the shielding of the new VVER-1000 type reactors. Compared with previous experiments on the VVER-1000 mock-up on the reactor LR-0, the fast neutron spectra were measured in the extended neutron energy interval (0.1–10 MeV and new calculations were carried out with the MCNPX code using various nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B VII.0, JEFF 3.1, JENDL 3.3, JENDL 4, ROSFOND 2009, and CENDL 3.1. Measurements and calculations were carried out at different points in the mock-up. The calculation and experimental data are compared.

  17. The assessment of iodine-in-milk levels in bulk milk supplies following a reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, R.E.

    1961-10-01

    The suitability of some readily available, portable, beta-gamma measuring instruments has been assessed for field use in monitoring bulk supplies of milk, contained in standard 10 gallon cans, contaminated with Iodine-131 in the range 400 μμc/litre to 325 mμc/litre. The Jefferson probe scintillation detector, employing a 1 1/2 inch diameter by 1 inch thick sodium iodide crystal, used in conjunction with a 1320c rate-meter was shown to be the most satisfactory. Air hazard and decontamination problems were also evaluated. (author)

  18. Development and testing of multigroup library with correction of self-shielding effects in fusion-fission hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jun; He Zhaozhong; Zeng Qin; Qiu Yuefeng; Wang Minghuang

    2010-01-01

    A multigroup library HENDL2.1/SS (Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library/Self-Shielding) based on ENDF/B-VII.0 evaluate data has been generated using Bondarenko and flux calculator method for the correction of self-shielding effect of neutronics analyses. To validate the reliability of the multigroup library HENDL2.1/SS, transport calculations for fusion-fission hybrid system FDS-I were performed in this paper. It was verified that the calculations with the HENDL2.1/SS gave almost the same results with MCNP calculations and were better than calculations with the HENDL2.0/MG which is another multigroup library without self-shielding correction. The test results also showed that neglecting resonance self-shielding caused underestimation of the K eff , neutron fluxes and waste transmutation ratios in the multigroup calculations of FDS-I.

  19. Kinetics and Mechanism of Bulk Polymerization of Vinyl Chloride in a Polymerization Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl chloride (PVC is the third most commonly produced polymer and is important because of its mechanical characteristics. The most common method of PVC manufacturing is the process of suspension. Although, there are several benefits associated with suspension, this study will focus on the bulk polymerization of vinyl chloride; highlight the physical and chemical properties of PVC, which can be changed through an estimation of the optimum ratio that exists between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic parts of the polymer’s surface, and propose a new mathematical model which will be helpful for the conversion of PVC into a useful form. The result will be the proposal of a new dynamic mathematical model for the three-phase structure model. All particles have been taken into account in the proposed model, which helped contribute to the reaction in gel, solid, and liquid phases, emphasizing the use of mercury (Hg as a catalyst. The proposed mathematical model considers the heat and mass transfer between the liquid, gel, and solid phases with chemical reactions that occur between the liquid and solid phases, and between the gel and solid phases. The effect of the catalyst and volumetric flow rates of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM on the system have been evaluated through the proposed mathematical model. Furthermore, the study’s experimental data have been compared with the findings of the suggested model in the context of concentration and temperature reaction. Obtained results show good agreement between the proposed mathematical model and the actual plant data.

  20. Primary shield displacement and bowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor primary shield is constructed of high density concrete and surrounds the reactor core. The inlet, outlet and side primary shields were constructed in-place using 2.54 cm (1 in) thick steel plates as the forms. The plates remained as an integral part of the shields. The elongation of the pressure tubes due to thermal expansion and pressurization is not moving through the inlet nozzle hardware as designed but is accommodated by outward displacement and bowing of the inlet and outlet shields. Excessive distortion of the shields may result in gas seal failures, intolerable helium gas leaks, increased argon-41 emissions, and shield cooling tube failures. The shield surveillance and testing results are presented

  1. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Nagatomi, Shozo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a jet and missile protective wall of a configuration being inflated toward the center of a reactor container on the inside of a body of the reactor container disposed within a biological shield wall to thereby increase safety of the reactor container. Structure: A jet and missile protective wall comprised of curved surfaces internally formed with a plurality of arch inflations filled with concrete between inner and outer iron plates and shape steel beam is provided between a reactor container surrounded by a biological shield wall and a thermal shield wall surrounding the reactor pressure vessel, and an adiabatic heat insulating material is filled in space therebetween. (Yoshino, Y.)

  2. Radiation protection/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. In the following discussion, the system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection will be described, and the program developed to implement this approach will be defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems of LMFBR nuclear reactor systems will be discussed in realtion to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  3. Processes, Techniques, and Successes in Welding the Dry Shielded Canisters of the TMI-2 Reactor Core Debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirker, L.R.; Rankin, R.A.; Ferrell, L.J.

    2002-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is operated by Bechtel-BWXT Idaho LLC (BBWI), which recently completed a very successful $100 million Three-Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) program for the Department of Energy (DOE). This complex and challenging program used an integrated multidisciplinary team approach that loaded, welded, and transported an unprecedented 25 dry shielded canisters (DSC) in seven months, and did so ahead of schedule. The program moved over 340 canisters of TMI-2 core debris that had been in wet storage into a dry storage facility at the INEEL. The main thrust of this paper is relating the innovations, techniques, approaches, and lessons learned associated to welding of the DSC's. This paper shows the synergism of elements to meet program success and shares these lessons learned that will facilitate success with welding of dry shielded canisters in other DOE complex dry storage programs

  4. The Evaluation of Lithium Hydride for Use in a Space Nuclear Reactor Shield, Including a Historical Perspective, for NR Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Poeth

    2005-01-01

    LiH was one of the five primary shield materials the NRPCT intended to develop (along with beryllium, boron carbide, tungsten, and water) for potential Prometheus application. It was also anticipated that 10 B metal would be investigated for feasibility at a low level of effort. LiH historically has been selected as a low mass, neutron absorption material for space shields (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP), Topaz, SP-100). Initial NRPCT investigations did not produce convincing evidence that LiH was desirable or feasible for a Prometheus mission due to material property issues (primarily swelling and hydrogen cover gas containment), and related thermal design complexity. Furthermore, if mass limits allowed, an option to avoid use of LiH was being contemplated to lower development costs and associated risks. However, LiH remains theoretically the most efficient neutron shield material per unit mass, and, with sufficient testing and development, could be an optimal material choice for future flights

  5. Structural design of shield-integrated thin-wall vacuum vessel and manufacturing qualification tests for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsusuke; Shibui, Masanao; Koizumi, Koichi; Kanamori, Naokazu; Nishio, Satoshi; Sasaki, Takashi; Tada, Eisuke

    1992-09-01

    Conceptual design of shield-integrated thin-wall vacuum vessel has been done for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). The vacuum vessel concept is based on a thin-double-wall structure, which consists of inner and outer plates and rib stiffeners. Internal shielding structures, which provide neutron irradiation shielding to protect TF coils, are set up between the inner plate and the outer plate of the vessel to avoid complexity of machine systems such as supporting systems of blanket modules. The vacuum vessel is assembled/disassembled by remote handling, so that welding joints are chosen as on-site joint method from reliability of mechanical strength. From a view point of assembling TF coils, the vacuum vessel is separated at the side of port, and is divided into 32 segments similar to the ITER-CDA reference design. Separatrix sweeping coils are located in the vacuum vessel to reduce heat fluxes onto divertor plates. Here, the coil structure and attachment to the vacuum vessel have been investigated. A sectorized saddle-loop coil is available for assembling and disassembling the coil. To support electromagnetic loads on the coils, they are attached to the groove in the vacuum vessel by welding. Flexible multi-plate supporting structure (compression-type gravity support), which was designed during CDA, is optimized by investigating buckling and frequency response properties, and concept on manufacturing and fabrication of the gravity support are proposed. Partial model of the vacuum vessel is manufactured for trial, so that fundamental data on welding and fabrication are obtained. From mechanical property tests of weldment and partial models, mechanical intensity and behaviors of the weldment are obtained. Informations on FEM-modeling are obtained by comparing analysis results with experimental results. (author)

  6. Design lead shielded casks for shipment and spent fuel from power reactors to reprocessing plant at Tarapur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seetharamaiah, P.

    1975-01-01

    Spent fuels from the Tarapur and Rajasthan Atomic Power Stations (TAPS and RAPS) are shipped to Fuel Reprocessing Plant at Tarapur in heavily lead shielded casks weighing about 65 tonnes as they are highly radioactive. The design of the casks has to meet stringemt requirements of safety and the integrity should be ensured to contain activity under credible accidents during handling and transportation. The paper presents the design of two casks for TAPS and RAPS spent fuel transportation particularly with reference to stress analysis considerations. The analysis also includes the handling gadgets and tie down attachments on the rail wagon and road trailer. (author)

  7. Radiation shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, Yasuaki

    1993-01-01

    In the present invention, the thickness of the radiation shields is minimized to save the quantity of shields thereby utilizing spaces in a facility effectively. That is, the radiation shields of the present invention comprise first and second shields forming stepwise gaps. They are disposed between a high dose region and a low dose region. The first and second shields have a feature in that the thickness thereof can be set to a size capable of shielding the gaps in accordance with the strength of the radiation source to be shielded. With such a constitution, the thickness of the shields of the radiation processing facility can be minimized. Accordingly, the quantity of the shields can be greatly saved. Spaces in the facility can be utilized effectively. (I.S.)

  8. Heat shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatabe, Hiroshi; Motoya, Koji; Kodama, Hiroshi.

    1997-01-01

    Panel-like water cooling tubes are disposed on a shielding concrete wall as a floor surface on which a reactor pressure vessel of a HTGR type reactor is settled. The panel like water cooling tube comprises a large number of water cooling tubes and fin plates connecting them with each other. A heat shielding device is disposed to the opening of an air vent hole on the shielding concrete wall. The heat shielding device has a plurality of supports are disposed between a disk-like upper support plate larger than the opening of the vent hole and covered with a heat insulation material and a lower support plate having a vent hole at the center. The lower support plate is connected with the fin plate. A portion between the supports is formed as pressure releasing channels. Radiation heat from the reactor pressure vessel is transferred to the fin plate by way of the upper support plate, support and a lower support plate and transferred to cooling water of a water-cooling pipeline. Accordingly, radiation heat of the reactor pressure vessel is not transferred to the vent holes. (I.N.)

  9. Thermal shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Takenori.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To suppress the amount of heat released from a pressure vessel and reliably shield neutron fluxes and gamma rays from a reactor core by the addition of cooling ducts in a thermal shielding wall provided with a blower and an air cooling cooler. Constitution: A thermal shielding wall is located on a pedestal so as to surround a pressure vessel and the pressure vessel is located by way of a skirt in the same manner. Heat insulators are disposed between the pressure vessel and the shielding wall while closer to the skirt in the skirt portion and closer to the shielding wall in the vessel body portion. A plurality of cooling ducts are arranged side by side at the inner side in the shielding wall. A through-duct radially passing through the wall is provided in the lower portion thereof and a blower fan for cooling air and a cooler for cooling returned air are connected by way of a communication duct to the other end of the through-duct. This enables to provide a shielding wall capable of suppressing the amount of heat released from the pressure vessel as much as possible and giving more effective cooling. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Shian V.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  11. Criticality and shielding calculations for containers in dry of spent fuel of TRIGA Mark III reactor of ININ; Calculos de criticidad y blindaje para contenedores en seco de combustible gastado del reactor Triga Mark III del ININ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco R, F.

    2015-07-01

    In this thesis criticality and shielding calculations to evaluate the design of a container of dry storage of spent nuclear fuel generated in research reactors were made. The design of such container was originally proposed by Argentina and Brazil, and the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) of Mexico. Additionally, it is proposed to modify the design of this container to store spent fuel 120 that are currently in the pool of TRIGA Mark III reactor, the Nuclear Center of Mexico and calculations and analyzes are made to verify that the settlement of these fuel elements is subcritical limits and dose rates to workers and the general public are not exceeded. These calculations are part of the design criteria for security protection systems in dry storage system (Dss for its acronym in English) proposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of the United States. To carry out these calculations simulation codes of Monte Carlo particle transport as MCNPX and MCNP5 were used. The initial design (design 1) 78 intended to store spent fuel with a maximum of 115. The ININ has 120 fuel elements and spent 3 control rods (currently stored in the reactor pool). This leads to the construction of two containers of the original design, but for economic reasons was decided to modify (design 2) to store in a single container. Criticality calculations are performed to 78, 115 and fresh fuel elements 124 within the container, to the two arrangements described in Chapter 4, modeling the three-dimensional geometry assuming normal operating conditions and accident. These calculations are focused to demonstrate that the container will remain subcritical, that is, that the effective multiplication factor is less than 1, in particular not greater than 0.95 (as per specified by the NRC). Spent fuel 78 and 124 within the container, both gamma radiation to neutron shielding calculations for only two cases were simulated. First actinides and fission products generated

  12. Parameters calculation of shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavazza, S.

    1986-02-01

    The radiation transport methodology comparing the calculated reactions and dose rates for neutrons and gama-rays, with experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in the YAYOI reactor is evaluated. The ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system, for cross sections generation collapsed by the ANISN code were used. The transport calculations were made using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the boundary iron shield source spectrum to the reactions and dose rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The neutron and gamma ray distributions calculated on the iron shield presented reasonable agreement with experimental measurements. An experimental arrangement using the IEA-R1 reactor to determine a shielding benchmark is proposed. (Author) [pt

  13. Method for dismantling shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Rokuro; Kondo, Nobuhiro; Kamiyama, Yoshinori; Kawasato, Ken; Hiraga, Tomoaki.

    1990-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to enable operators to dismantle shieldings contaminated by radioactivity easily and in a short period of time without danger of radiation exposure. A plurality of introduction pipes are embedded previously to the shielding walls of shielding members which contain a reactor core in a state where both ends of the introduction pipes are in communication with the outside. A wire saw is inserted into the introduction pipes to cut the shieldings upon dismantling. Then, shieldings can be dismantled easily in a short period of time with no radiation exposure to operator's. Further, according to the present invention, since the wire saw can be set easily and a large area can be cut at once, operation efficiency is improved. Further, since remote control is possible, cutting can be conducted in water and complicated places of the reactor. Biting upon starting the wire saw in the introduction pipe is reduced to facilitate startup for the rotation. (I.S.)

  14. VELM61 and VELM22: Multigroup cross-section libraries for sodium-cooled reactor shield analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, C.Y.; Ingersoll, D.T.

    1987-04-01

    Two coupled neutron and photon multigroup cross-section libraries, derived from ENDF/B-V nuclear data, are described. The energy group structures, 61n/23..gamma.. and 22n/10..gamma.., are subsets of the Vitamin-E 174n/38..gamma.. group structure, and are tailored to the iron and sodium resonances, windows, and capture gamma-ray spectra. Each of the two libraries are available in two formats, the AMPX master format and the ANISN format. Cross sections for all materials in the Vitamin-E library were collapsed using a standard energy weighting function, and in addition, several cross-section sets for each of the major constituents of commercial grade sodium, stainless steel (types 304 and 316), and carbon steel were derived using several problem-dependent weighting functions for averaging the fine groups. Effects of various group structures and weighting functions on the accuracy of the broad group libraries are studied by ANISN analysis of a typical sodium-iron shield configuration.

  15. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Nobuo; Ito, Masato; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Takeshi, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A radiation shielding member comprises a metal vessel and a liquid therein, and is disposed to the upper surface of a lower flange of a reactor core shroud. Waterproof hot wires are contained in the liquid and are connected to a power source disposed at the outside. Electric current is supplied to the hot wires to elevate the temperature of the liquid, and the temperature of the vessel is kept higher than an atmospheric temperature thereby suppressing generation of dew condensation or water droplets. In addition, a water repellent coating is applied to the shielding member itself to prevent deposition of water droplets. Further, the bottom of the shielding member is inclined, and a water droplet-recovering vessel is disposed at the lower portion of the shielding member, so that the water droplets collected by the inclination of the bottom are recovered to the water droplet recovering vessel. With such a constitution, access of an operator to the inside of a reactor pressure vessel is facilitated, and at the same time, the working circumstance at the reactor bottom can be improved. (I.N.)

  16. Release measurements, release from regulatory control and inactive removal of the heavy concrete from the biological shield of the Seibersdorf research reactor; Freimessen, Freigabe und Entsorgung des Barytbetons vom biologischen Schild des Forschungsreaktors Seibersdorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, F.; Steger, F.; Djuricic, M.; Metzker, E.; Lechner, C. [Nuclear Engineering Seibersdorf GmbH (NES), Seibersdorf (Austria); Feichtinger, J. [Oesterreichisches Forschungszentrum Seibersdorf GmbH, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    The ASTRA reactor in the Research Centre Seibersdorf was switched off finally on 31 July 1999 after 38 years successful operation and thus the decommissioning and dismantling of the reactor was decided. Apart from other system parts the biological shield, made of barite concrete was dismantled. As a dismantling and/or deconstruct method 'a block-by-block' removal was selected and used. Because on the upper parts of the biological shield no activation could be expected, these parts were free-measured only gammaspectrometrically using ISOCS (in-Situ Object Counting system) and disposed. Afterwards the lower, neutronactivated part was removed with the same cut technology as the upper part, mechanically reduced and the reinforcing irons removed. The broken heavy concrete was filled into Standard-200-Liter-barrels, was free-measured by the measuring system RADOS and disposed. Not released parts were taken to the interim storage facility of NES. (orig.)

  17. MFTF-α+T end cell vacuum vessel and nuclear shield trade studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, J.

    1984-01-01

    Three separate and distinct vacuum vessel and nuclear shield trade studies were performed in series. The studies are: vacuum topology, nuclear shield location and composition, and water bulk shield location and material selection

  18. MMW [multimegawatt] shielding design and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Reactor shielding for multimegawatt (MMW) space power must satisfy a mass constraint as well as performance specifications for neutron fluence and gamma dose. A minimum mass shield is helpful in attaining the launch mass goal for the entire vehicle, because the shield comprises about 1% to 2% of the total vehicle mass. In addition, the shield internal heating must produce tolerable temperatures. The analysis of shield performance for neutrons and gamma rays is emphasized. Topics addressed include cross section preparation for multigroup 2D S/sub n/-transport analyses, and the results of parametric design studies on shadow shield performance and mass versus key shield design variables such as cone angle, number, placement, and thickness of layers of tungsten, and shield top radius. Finally, adjoint methods are applied to the shield in order to spatially map its relative contribution to dose reduction, and to provide insight into further design optimization. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  19. First wall/blanket/shield design and power conversion for the ARIES-IV tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.Z.; Conn, R.W.; Najmabadi, F.

    1994-01-01

    ARIES-IV is a conceptual, D-T burning, steady-state tokamak fusion reactor producing 1000 MWe net. It operates in the second plasma stability regime. The structural material is SiC composite and the primary coolant is helium at 10 MPa base pressure. The coolant flows poloidally in two loops, one inboard and one outboard. The coolant channels are circular tubes that form shells and are placed between two purge plates; the space between two adjacent tubes and the plate is purge gas flow area. The solid breeder is Li 2 O, and Be is used as neutron multiplier to ensure adequate TBR. Beryllium and Li 2 O are placed in between the adjacent tube shells. A computer code was developed to perform and optimize thermal-hydraulic design. Minimization of blanket thickness and the amount of Be, and the maximization of breeder zone thickness were done by iteration with neutronics. The gross thermal efficiency is 49%. The cost of electricity is 68 mills/kWh. The use of low activation SiC composite as the structural material, Li 2 O as the solid breeder, and avoidance of tungsten in the divertor has resulted in a good safety performance, and LSA rating of 1. Overall, SiC/He/Li 2 O ARIES-IV design is expected to have attractive economic and safety advantages

  20. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  1. Shielding container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, K.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    A shielding container incorporates a dense shield, for example of depleted uranium, cast around a tubular member of curvilinear configuration for accommodating a radiation source capsule. A lining for the tubular member, in the form of a close-coiled flexible guide, provides easy replaceability to counter wear while the container is in service. Container life is extended, and maintenance costs are reduced. (author)

  2. Shielding Effectiveness of Laminated Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Rao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Shielding prevents coupling of undesired radiated electromagnetic energy into equipment otherwise susceptible to it. In view of this, some studies on shielding effectiveness of laminated shields with conductors and conductive polymers using plane-wave theory are carried out in this paper. The plane wave shielding effectiveness of new combination of these materials is evaluated as a function of frequency and thickness of material. Conductivity of the polymers, measured in previous investigations by the cavity perturbation technique, is used to compute the overall reflection and transmission coefficients of single and multiple layers of the polymers. With recent advances in synthesizing stable highly conductive polymers these lightweight mechanically strong materials appear to be viable alternatives to metals for EM1 shielding.

  3. Shielding around spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragopoulou, M; Manolopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Brandt, R; Westmeier, W; Krivopustov, M; Sosnin, A; Golovatyuk, S; Zamani, M

    2006-01-01

    Spallation neutron sources provide more intense and harder neutron spectrum than nuclear reactors for which a substantial amount of shielding measurements have been performed. Although the main part of the cost for a spallation station is the cost of the shielding, measurements regarding shielding for the high energy neutron region are still very scarce. In this work calculation of the neutron interaction length in polyethylene moderator for different neutron energies is presented. Measurements which were carried out in Nuclotron accelerator at the Laboratory of High Energies (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna) and comparison with calculation are also presented. The measurements were performed with Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs)

  4. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  5. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  6. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  7. Thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takao; Saito, Yasushi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the seismic wave responsivity of an exhaust duct shields thereby preventing the release of tritium in an evacuating device due to failures upon earthquakes. Constitution: The ends on the cutting side of upper outer exhaust duct shields of a thermonuclear reactor are connected with a plurality of support beams. In a case where seismic vibrations are exerted to such a thermonuclear reactor, since the ends on the cutting side are coupled with the support beams, vibrations of the upper outer exhaust duct shields are greatly restricted. Thus, since there is no more such a possibility, for example, that an exhaust duct connected to the upper portion of a reactor main body is greatly distorted due to the seismic response of the upper outside exhaust duct shields to result in the failure of the connection portion with a vacuum pump, the release of tritium due to failure of the evacuating device can be prevented. (Yoshino, Y.)

  8. Nuclear reactor instrumentation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Katsumi; Nemesawa, Shigeki; Nemoto, Yuji; Ohashi, Masahisa.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention can appropriately monitor the state of a reactor core in an FBR type reactor which has a system of storing spent fuel assemblies in a reactor container while reducing the weight and making the structure compact in the reactor. That is, a fuel assembly having a shield lacking portion in upper axial shields is disposed. The shield lacking portion defines neutrons' leaking path from the reactor core. The leakage of neutrons from the path is detected by a neutron monitor disposed just above the fuel assembly. With such a constitution, influence of neutrons from stored spent fuel assemblies disposed to the out side of the radial shields can be reduced by a shielding effect of the existent radial shields around the reactor core. Further, if a shield lacking portion is locally disposed in the region of the upper axial shields just below the neutron monitor, neutrons from the reactor core can be monitored while suppressing excessive neutron leakage. As a result, it is unnecessary to dispose shields on the outer side of the spent fuel assembly disposed in the reactor core. (I.S.)

  9. Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R.; Johnson, J.D.; Reardon, P.C.; Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W.

    1996-08-01

    Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters

  10. Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reardon, P.C. [PCRT Technologies, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters.

  11. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  12. The application of semianalytic method for calculating the thickness of biological shields of nuclear reactors. Part 1. Theoretical basis of a semianalytic method. Attenuation of neutrons' radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukaszek, W.; Kucypera, S.

    1982-01-01

    The basis of a semianalytic method for calculating attenuation of rays (neutron, gamma) in material medium is described. The method was applied in determining the neutrons' flux density in one dimensional Cartesian geometry of the reflector and the shield. (author)

  13. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  14. Microbial dynamics and properties of aerobic granules developed in a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor with an intermediate filamentous bulking stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, H; Basuvaraj, M; Hall, M; Neufeld, J D; Liss, S N

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic granules offer enhanced biological nutrient removal and are compact and dense structures resulting in efficient settling properties. Granule instability, however, is still a challenge as understanding of the drivers of instability is poorly understood. In this study, transient instability of aerobic granules, associated with filamentous outgrowth, was observed in laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs). The transient phase was followed by the formation of stable granules. Loosely bound, dispersed, and pinpoint seed flocs gradually turned into granular flocs within 60 days of SBR operation. In stage 1, the granular flocs were compact in structure and typically 0.2 mm in diameter, with excellent settling properties. Filaments appeared and dominated by stage 2, resulting in poor settleability. By stage 3, the SBRs were selected for larger granules and better settling structures, which included filaments that became enmeshed within the granule, eventually forming structures 2-5 mm in diameter. Corresponding changes in sludge volume index were observed that reflected changes in settleability. The protein-to-polysaccharide ratio in the extracted extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) from stage 1 and stage 3 granules was higher (2.8 and 5.7, respectively), as compared to stage 2 filamentous bulking (1.5). Confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging of the biomass samples, coupled with molecule-specific fluorescent staining, confirmed that protein was predominant in stage 1 and stage 3 granules. During stage 2 bulking, there was a decrease in live cells; dead cells predominated. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprint results indicated a shift in bacterial community composition during granulation, which was confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In particular, Janthinobacterium (known denitrifier and producer of antimicrobial pigment) and Auxenochlorella protothecoides (mixotrophic green algae) were predominant during stage

  15. GFR Sub-Assembly Shielding Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Parry

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the methodology and results for a preliminary study for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) subassembly fast neutron shielding configurations. The purpose of the shielding in the subassembly is to protect reactor components from fast (E>0.1 MeV) neutrons. The subassembly is modeled in MCNP version 5 release 1.30. Parametric studies were performed varying the thickness of the shielding and calculating the fast neutron flux at the vessel head and the core grid plate. This data was used to determine the minimum thickness needed to protect the vessel head and the core grid plate. These thicknesses were used to analyze different shielding configurations incorporating coolant passages and also to estimate the neutron and photon energy deposition in the shielding material.

  16. Digital, remote control system for a 2-MW research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battle, R.E.; Corbett, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    A fault-tolerant programmable logic controller (PLC) and operator workstations have been programmed to replace the hard-wired relay control system in the 2-MW Bulk Shielding Reactor (BSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition to the PLC and remote and local operator workstations, auxiliary systems for remote operation include a video system, an intercom system, and a fiber optic communication system. The remote control station, located at the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2.5 km from the BSR, has the capability of rector startup and power control. The system was designed with reliability and fail-safe features as important considerations. 4 refs., 3 figs

  17. PWR upper/lower internals shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homyk, W.A. [Indian Point Station, Buchanan, NY (United States)

    1995-03-01

    During refueling of a nuclear power plant, the reactor upper internals must be removed from the reactor vessel to permit transfer of the fuel. The upper internals are stored in the flooded reactor cavity. Refueling personnel working in containment at a number of nuclear stations typically receive radiation exposure from a portion of the highly contaminated upper intervals package which extends above the normal water level of the refueling pool. This same issue exists with reactor lower internals withdrawn for inservice inspection activities. One solution to this problem is to provide adequate shielding of the unimmersed portion. The use of lead sheets or blankets for shielding of the protruding components would be time consuming and require more effort for installation since the shielding mass would need to be transported to a support structure over the refueling pool. A preferable approach is to use the existing shielding mass of the refueling pool water. A method of shielding was devised which would use a vacuum pump to draw refueling pool water into an inverted canister suspended over the upper internals to provide shielding from the normally exposed components. During the Spring 1993 refueling of Indian Point 2 (IP2), a prototype shield device was demonstrated. This shield consists of a cylindrical tank open at the bottom that is suspended over the refueling pool with I-beams. The lower lip of the tank is two feet below normal pool level. After installation, the air width of the natural shielding provided by the existing pool water. This paper describes the design, development, testing and demonstration of the prototype device.

  18. LOFT shield tank steady state temperatures with addition of gamma and neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyllingstad, G.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of introducing a neutron and gamma shield into the annulus between the reactor vessel and the shield tank is analyzed. This addition has been proposed in order to intercept neutron streaming up the annulus during nuclear operations. Its installation will require removal of approximately 20- 1 / 2 inches of stainless steel foil insulation at the top of the annulus. The resulting conduction path is believed to result in increased water temperatures within the shield tank, possibly beyond the 150 0 F limit, and/or cooling of the reactor vessel nozzles such that adverse thermal stresses would be generated. A two dimensional thermal analysis using the finite element code COUPLE/MOD2 was done for the shield tank system illustrated in the figure (1). The reactor was assumed to be at full power, 55 MW (th), with a loop flow rate of 2.15 x 10 6 lbm/hr (268.4 kg/s) at 2250 psi (15.51 MPa). Calculations indicate a steady state shield tank water temperature of 140 0 F (60 0 C). This is below the 150 0 F (65.56 0 C) limit. Also, no significant changes in thermal gradients within the nozzle or reactor vessel wall are generated. A spacer between the gamma shield and the shield tank is recommended, however, in order to ensure free air circulation through the annulus

  19. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  20. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  1. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    Disclosed is a neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch. 1 claim, 16 figures

  2. Neutronics analysis of the modular stellarator power reactor UWTOR-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.

    1983-05-01

    Neutronics and photonics analysis for UWTOR-M was carried out to assess radiation streaming effects on reactor performance. The effect the lithium enrichment in the Li 17 Pb 83 breeder has on radiation streaming was investigated. Using an enrichment of 35% was found to yield an adequate tritium breeding ratio of 1.08 and an overall energy multiplication of 1.153. The bulk shield was optimized to reduce the radiation effects in the superconducting magnets with the limited shielding space available in the design. Detailed analysis for the radiation streaming into the divertor regions has been performed. The divertor targets were found to recover 91% of the streaming energy

  3. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  4. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  5. Technology development for radiation shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jung Woo; Lee, Jae Kee; Kim, Jong Kyung

    1986-12-01

    Radiation shielding analysis in nuclear engineering fields is an important technology which is needed for the calculation of reactor shielding as well as radiation related safety problems in nuclear facilities. Moreover, the design technology required in high level radioactive waste management and disposal facilities is faced on serious problems with rapidly glowing nuclear industry development, and more advanced technology has to be developed for tomorrow. The main purpose of this study is therefore to build up the self supporting ability of technology development for the radiation shielding analysis in order to achieve successive development of nuclear industry. It is concluded that basic shielding calculations are possible to handle and analyze by using our current technology, but more advanced technology is still needed and has to be learned for the degree of accuracy in two-dimensional shielding calculation. (Author)

  6. Shielding requirements for particle bed propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, S. J.

    1991-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems present unique challenges in reliability and safety. Due to the radiation incident upon all components of the propulsion system, shielding must be used to keep nuclear heating in the materials within limits; in addition, electronic control systems must be protected. This report analyzes the nuclear heating due to the radiation and the shielding required to meet the established criteria while also minimizing the shield mass. Heating rates were determined in a 2000 MWt Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) system for all materials in the interstage region, between the reactor vessel and the propellant tank, with special emphasis on meeting the silicon dose criteria. Using a Lithium Hydride/Tungsten shield, the optimum shield design was found to be: 50 cm LiH/2 cm W on the axial reflector in the reactor vessel and 50 cm LiH/2 cm W in a collar extension of the inside shield outside of the pressure vessel. Within these parameters, the radiation doses in all of the components in the interstage and lower tank regions would be within acceptable limits for mission requirements.

  7. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Ingersoll, J.K.

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone?, a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory

  8. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D T [comp.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ingersoll, J K [comp.; Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  9. About the Scythian Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    About the Scythian Shields

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shields played major role in the armament system of the Scythians. Made from organic materials, they are poorly traced on the materials of archaeological excavations. Besides, scaly surface of shields was often perceived in practice as the remnants of the scaly armor. E. V. Chernenko was able to discern the difference between shields’ scaly plates and armor scales. The top edge of the scales was bent inwards, and shield plates had a wire fixation. These observations let significantly increase the number of shields, found in the burial complexes of the Scythians. The comparison of archaeological materials and the images of Scythian warriors allow distinguishing the main forms of Scythian shields. All shields are divided into fencing shields and cover shields. The fencing shields include round wooden shields, reinforced with bronze sheet, and round moon-shaped shields with a notch at the top, with a metal scaly surface. They came to the Scythians under the Greek influence and are known in the monuments of the 4th century BC. Oval shields with scaly surface (back cover shields were used by the Scythian cavalry. They protected the rider in case of frontal attack, and moved back in case of maneuver or closein fighting. Scythian battle tactics were based on rapid approaching the enemy and throwing spears and further rapid withdrawal. Spears stuck in the shields of enemies, forcing them to drop the shields, uncover, and in this stage of the battle the archers attacked the disorganized ranks of the enemy. That was followed by the stage of close fight. Oval form of a wooden shield with leather covering was used by the Scythian infantry and spearmen. Rectangular shields, including wooden shields and the shields pleached from rods, represented a special category. The top of such shield was made of wood, and a pleached pad on leather basis was attached to it. This shield could be a reliable protection from arrows, but it could not protect against javelins

  10. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  11. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports

  12. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Yamagami, Makoto.

    1996-01-01

    A fixed shielding member made of a radiation shielding material is constituted in perpendicular to an opening formed on radiation shielding walls. The fixed shielding member has one side opened and has other side, the upper portion and the lower portion disposed in close contact with the radiation shielding walls. Movable shielding members made of a radiation shielding material are each disposed openably on both side of the fixed shielding member. The movable shielding member has a shaft as a fulcrum on one side thereof for connecting it to the radiation shielding walls. The other side has a handle attached for opening/closing the movable shielding member. Upon access of an operator, when each one of the movable shielding members is opened/closed on every time, leakage of linear or scattered radiation can be prevented. Even when both of the movable shielding members are opened simultaneously, the fixed shielding member and the movable shielding members form labyrinth to prevent leakage of linear radioactivity. (I.N.)

  13. Shielding design method for LMFBR validation on the Phenix factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillat, J.C.; Crouzet, J.; Misrakis, J.; Salvatores, M.; Rado, V.; Palmiotti, G.

    1983-05-01

    Shielding design methods, developed at CEA for shielding calculations find a global validation by the means of Phenix power reactor (250 MWe) measurements. Particularly, the secondary sodium activation of pool type LMFBR such as Super Phenix (1200 MWe) which is subject to strict safety limitation is well calculated by the adapted scheme, i.e. a two dimension transport calculation of shielding coupled to a Monte-Carlo calculation of secondary sodium activation

  14. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Shojiro; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Takano, Hideki

    1982-09-01

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  15. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1984 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  16. Shielding Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Gomez, Carlos F.; Scharber, Luke L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation shielding analysis and development for the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) effort is currently in progress and preliminary results have enabled consideration for critical interfaces in the reactor and propulsion stage systems. Early analyses have highlighted a number of engineering constraints, challenges, and possible mitigating solutions. Performance constraints include permissible crew dose rates (shared with expected cosmic ray dose), radiation heating flux into cryogenic propellant, and material radiation damage in critical components. Design strategies in staging can serve to reduce radiation scatter and enhance the effectiveness of inherent shielding within the spacecraft while minimizing the required mass of shielding in the reactor system. Within the reactor system, shield design is further constrained by the need for active cooling with minimal radiation streaming through flow channels. Material selection and thermal design must maximize the reliability of the shield to survive the extreme environment through a long duration mission with multiple engine restarts. A discussion of these challenges and relevant design strategies are provided for the mitigation of radiation in nuclear thermal propulsion.

  17. The shielding calculation for the CN guide shielding assembly in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H.

    2006-01-01

    The cold neutron research facility in HANARO is under construction. The area including neutron guides and rotary shutter in the reactor hall should be shielded by the guide shielding assembly which is constructed of heavy concrete blocks and structure. The guide shielding assembly is divided into 2 parts, A and B. Part A is about 6.4 meters apart from the reactor biological shield and it is constructed of heavy concrete blocks whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 . And part B is a fixed heavy concrete structure whose density is above 3.5g/cm 3 . The rotary shutter is also made with heavy concrete whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 and includes 5 neutron guides inside. It can block the neutron beam by rotating when CNS is not operating. The dose criterion outside the guide shielding assembly is established as 12.5 μSv/hr which is also applied to reactor shielding in HANARO

  18. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  19. Shielding concerns at a spallation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.; Robinson, H.; Legate, G.L.; Woods, R.

    1989-01-01

    Neutrons produced by 800-MeV proton reactions at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center spallation neutron source cause a variety of challenging shielding problems. We identify several characteristics distinctly different from reactor shielding and compute the dose attenuation through an infinite slab/shield composed of iron (100 cm) and borated polyethylene (15 cm). Our calculations show that (for an incident spallation spectrum characteristic of neutrons leaking from a tungsten target at 90/degree/) the dose through the shield is a complex mixture of neutrons and gamma rays. High-energy (> 20 MeV) neutron production from the target is ≅5% of the total, yet causes ≅68% of the dose at the shield surface. Primary low-energy (< 20 MeV) neutrons from the target contribute negligibly (≅0.5%) to the dose at the shield surface yet cause gamma rays, which contribute ≅31% to the total dose at the shield surface. Low-energy neutrons from spallation reactions behave similarly to neutrons with a fission spectrum distribution. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  20. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  1. Design of emergency shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacturing of an emergency movable shield in the hot laboratories center is urgently needed for the safety of personnel in case of accidents or spilling of radioactive materials. In this report, a full design for an emergency shield is presented and the corresponding dose rates behind the shield for different activities (from 1 mCi to 5 Ci) was calculated by using micro shield computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  3. NF ISO 15080. Nuclear facilities. Ventilation penetrations for shielded containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-03-01

    This standard document applies to any kind of shielded containment devoted to the handling of gamma-emitting or neutron-emitting radioactive materials that require a remote handling behind a protection screen. It covers all kinds of hot cells used in the nuclear fuel cycle (reprocessing facilities, hot labs, shielded containments, radioactive waste storage facilities etc..). It can eventually apply also to the containments used in accelerators, research reactors and fusion reactors, radiography facilities and neutrons generators. It precises the general and detailed principles that must be respected during the design of ventilation penetrations inside shielded containments (conventional penetration systems and 'helicoidal cast iron screw technique' systems). (J.S.)

  4. Electromagnetically shielded building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs

  5. 14-MeV neutron streaming through shield gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to determine the neutron streaming through straight and single-bend gaps for three different shield thicknesses. A uniform plane source emitting 14-MeV neutrons with a cosine angular distribution was used in the analyses. The results obtained are discussed in terms of how they might be used in the early stages of a shield design to obtain approximate solutions to design questions. These results have direct implications regarding neutron-streaming problems that will be encountered in the shielding analyses of tokamak fusion reactors which are constructed from pie-shaped shield/vacuum chamber segments

  6. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1983 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  7. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Jitsuya; Asaoka, Takumi; Suzuki, Tomoo; Mitani, Hiroshi; Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1977-09-01

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1976 are described. Works of the division concern mainly the development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  8. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  9. Calculation of parameters for an iron shield experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavazza, S.

    1986-01-01

    In this text is carreid out the evaluation of radiation transport methodology, comparying the calculated reactions and dose rates, for neutrons and gama-rays, with the experimental measurements obtained on iron shield, irradiated in YAYOI reactor. Were employed the ENDF/B-IV and VITAMIN-C libraries and the AMPX-II modular system for generation of cross sections, collapsed by the ANISN code. The tranpsort calculations were made by using the DOT 3.5 code, adjusting the spectrum of the iron shield boundary source to the reaction and doses rates, measured at the beginning of shield. The distributions calculated for neutrons and gamma-rays, on iron shield, presented reasonable concordance with the experimental measurements. Finally, is presented a proposal for setting up of an experimental arrangement, using the IEA-R1 reactor, with the purpose of lay down a shielding benchmark. (Author) [pt

  10. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  11. Shielding wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Takaho.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns shielding walls opposing to plasmas of a thermonuclear device and it is an object thereof to conduct reactor operation with no troubles even if a portion of shielding wall tiles should be damaged. That is, the shielding wall tiles are constituted as a dual layer structure in which the lower base tiles are connected by means of bolts to first walls. Further, the upper surface tiles are bolt-connected to the layer base tiles. In this structure, the plasma thermal loads are directly received by the surface layer tiles and heat is conducted by means of conduction and radiation to the underlying base tiles and the first walls. Even upon occurrence of destruction accidents to the surface layer tiles caused by incident heat or electromagnetic force upon elimination of plasmas, since the underlying base tiles remain as they are, the first walls constituted with stainless steels, etc. are not directly exposed to the plasmas. Accordingly, the integrity of the first walls having cooling channels can be maintained and sputtering intrusion of atoms of high atom number into the plasmas can be prevented. (I.S.)

  12. AUTOSECOL: an automatic calculation of the self-shielding of heavy isotope resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandotto-Biettoli, Marc.

    The formalism is based on separating both types of resonance effects: local energy effects creating a fine structure in the flux, and bulk effects resulting in a slow variation in the flux. Effective reaction rates are defined that, used as tables in a multigroup calculation of cells with a large pitch in regard to resonance widths, allow an exact account of the dependence of the effective integral upon fast variations in the flux. These tables are used to introduce this phenomenon of resonance self-shielding in the multigroup Apollo program for solving the neutron transport equation, they are derived from nuclear data with using some parameters relating to the physical state of the resonant isotope inside the fuel medium. The AUTOSECOL system provides a library of effective reaction rates for taking account of the resonance self-shielding effect on the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cells. Its versatility in regard to the methods previously used for solving the same problem allows a rapid testing of the consequences of considering the self-shielding effect of new isotope resonances, a following up of the evolution in nuclear data evaluation, and rapidly studying the interest lying in new data. Results obtained with AUTOSECOL are compared with those obtained when using the SECOL code for computing the effective reaction rates of 235 U, 239 Pu, 107 Ag, 109 Ag, and 241 Pu [fr

  13. Systems for neutronic, thermohydraulic and shielding calculation in personal computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarino, E.A.; Abbate, P.; Lovotti, O.; Santini, M.

    1990-01-01

    The MTR-PC (Materials Testing Reactors-Personal Computers) system has been developed by the Nuclear Engineering Division of INVAP S.E. with the aim of providing working conditions integrated with personal computers for design and neutronic, thermohydraulic and shielding analysis for reactors employing plate type fuel. (Author) [es

  14. Radiation shielding issues on the FMIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Davis, A.A.; Huang, S.; Morford, R.J.

    1981-05-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) is being built to study neutron radiation effects in candidate fusion reactor materials. The FMIT will yield high fluence data in a fusion-like neutron radiation environment produced by the interaction of a 0.1A, 35 MeV deuteron beam with a flowing lithium target. The design of the facility as a whole is driven by a high availability requirement. The variety of radiation environments in the facility requires the use of diverse and extensive shielding. Shielding design throughout the FMIT must accommodate the need for maintenance and operations access while providing adequate personnel and equipment protection

  15. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora

    2017-01-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  16. Radiation shielding activities at IDOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordóñez, César Hueso; Gurpegui, Unai Cano; Valiente, Yelko Chento; Poveda, Imanol Zamora, E-mail: cesar.hueso@idom.com [IDOM, Consulting, Engineering and Architecture, S.A.U, Vizcaya (Spain)

    2017-07-01

    When human activities have to be performed under ionising radiation environments the safety of the workers must be guaranteed. Usually three principles are used to accomplish with ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) requirements: the more distance between the source term and the worker, the better; the less time spent to arrange any task, the better; and, once the previous principles are optimized should the exposure of the workers continues being above the regulatory limits, shielding has to be implemented. Through this paper some different examples of IDOM's shielding design activities are presented. Beginning with the gamma collimators for the Jules Horowitz Reactor, nuclear fuel's behaviour researching facility, where the beam path crosses the reactor's containment walls and is steered up to a gamma detector where the fuel spectrum is analysed and where the beam has to be attenuated several orders of magnitude in a short distance. Later it is shown IDOM’s approach for the shielding of the Emergency Control Management Center of Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs-II NPPs, a bunker designed to withstand severe accident conditions and to support the involved staff during 30 days, considering the outside radioactive cloud and the inside source term that filtering units become as they filter the incoming air. And finally, a general approach to this kind of problems is presented, since the study of the source term considering all the possible contributions, passing through the material selection and the thicknesses calculation until the optimization of the materials. (author)

  17. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    Research activities in fiscal 1974 in Reactor Engineering Division of eight laboratories and computing center are described. Works in the division are closely related with the development of a multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering of thermonuclear fusion reactors. They cover nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and aspects of the computing center. (auth.)

  18. Fusion Engineering Device (FED) first wall/shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, P.H.; Fuller, G.; Cramer, B.; Davisson, J.; Haines, J.; Kirchner, J.

    1981-01-01

    The torus of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) is comprised of the bulk shield and its associated spool lstructure and support system, the first wall water-cooled panel and armor systems, and the pumped limiter. The bulk shielding is provided by ten shield sectors that are installed in the spool structure in such a way as to permit extraction of the sectors through the openings between adjacent toroidal field coils with a direct radial movement. The first wall armor is installed on the inboard and top interior walls of these sectors, and the water-cooled panels are installed on the outboard interior walls and the pumped limiter in the bottom of the sectors. The overall design of the first wall and shield system is described in this paper

  19. Preliminary evaluation of FY98 KALIMER shielding design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Woon; Kang, Chang Mu; Kim, Young Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a preliminary evaluation of the shielding design of FY98 KALIMER. The KALIMER shielding design includes the Inner Fixed Shield of a stainless cylinder located inside the support barrel; the Radial PSDRS Shields which are three B{sub 4}C cylinders located outside the support barrel at core level; the Lower IHX shield of a cylindrical B{sub 4}C plate located above the flow guide; and Inner and Outer IHX shields of B{sub 4}C cylinders located inside and outside of the support barrel, respectively. The DORT3.1 two-dimensional transport code was used to evaluate the KALIMER shielding design. The reactor system was represented by four axial zones, each of which was modeled in the R-Z geometry. The KAFAX-F22 library was used in the analyses, which was generated from the JEF-2.2 of OECD/NEA files for LMR applications by KAERI. The performance of the KALIMER shielding design is compared against the shielding design criteria. The results indicate that the support barrel, upper grid plate, and other reactor structures meet the maximum neutron fluence and DPA limits established in the shielding design criteria. Activities of the air effluent in the PSDRS were also evaluated and are shown to satisfy the maximum permissible concentration (MPC) limits in 10 CFR Part 20. In the future, the validation of the DORT model by a detailed three dimensional calculation such as MCNP and the justification of the current shielding design limits are needed. (author). 13 refs., 23 figs., 31 tabs.

  20. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainslie, M D; Fujishiro, H

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a topical review of the current state of the art in modelling the magnetization of bulk superconductors, including both (RE)BCO (where RE = rare earth or Y) and MgB 2 materials. Such modelling is a powerful tool to understand the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards the commercialization stage of their development in the coming years. In addition to the analytical and numerical techniques currently used by researchers for modelling such materials, the commonly used practical techniques to magnetize bulk superconductors are summarized with a particular focus on pulsed field magnetization (PFM), which is promising as a compact, mobile and relatively inexpensive magnetizing technique. A number of numerical models developed to analyse the issues related to PFM and optimise the technique are described in detail, including understanding the dynamics of the magnetic flux penetration and the influence of material inhomogeneities, thermal properties, pulse duration, magnitude and shape, and the shape of the magnetization coil(s). The effect of externally applied magnetic fields in different configurations on the attenuation of the trapped field is also discussed. A number of novel and hybrid bulk superconductor structures are described, including improved thermal conductivity structures and ferromagnet–superconductor structures, which have been designed to overcome some of the issues related to bulk superconductors and their magnetization and enhance the intrinsic properties of bulk superconductors acting as trapped field magnets. Finally, the use of hollow bulk cylinders/tubes for shielding is analysed. (topical review)

  1. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, M. D.; Fujishiro, H.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a topical review of the current state of the art in modelling the magnetization of bulk superconductors, including both (RE)BCO (where RE = rare earth or Y) and MgB2 materials. Such modelling is a powerful tool to understand the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards the commercialization stage of their development in the coming years. In addition to the analytical and numerical techniques currently used by researchers for modelling such materials, the commonly used practical techniques to magnetize bulk superconductors are summarized with a particular focus on pulsed field magnetization (PFM), which is promising as a compact, mobile and relatively inexpensive magnetizing technique. A number of numerical models developed to analyse the issues related to PFM and optimise the technique are described in detail, including understanding the dynamics of the magnetic flux penetration and the influence of material inhomogeneities, thermal properties, pulse duration, magnitude and shape, and the shape of the magnetization coil(s). The effect of externally applied magnetic fields in different configurations on the attenuation of the trapped field is also discussed. A number of novel and hybrid bulk superconductor structures are described, including improved thermal conductivity structures and ferromagnet-superconductor structures, which have been designed to overcome some of the issues related to bulk superconductors and their magnetization and enhance the intrinsic properties of bulk superconductors acting as trapped field magnets. Finally, the use of hollow bulk cylinders/tubes for shielding is analysed.

  2. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11.

  3. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11

  4. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  5. Monte Carlo methods for shield design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimstone, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    A suite of Monte Carlo codes is being developed for use on a routine basis in commercial reactor shield design. The methods adopted for this purpose include the modular construction of codes, simplified geometries, automatic variance reduction techniques, continuous energy treatment of cross section data, and albedo methods for streaming. Descriptions are given of the implementation of these methods and of their use in practical calculations. 26 references. (U.S.)

  6. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations on resolving the issue are discussed

  7. Secondary gamma-ray data for shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasaka, Sunichi

    1979-01-01

    In deep penetration transport calculations, the integral design parameters is determined mainly by secondary particles which are produced by interactions of the primary radiation with materials. The shield thickness and the biological dose rate at a given point of a bulk shield are determined from the contribution from secondary gamma rays. The heat generation and the radiation damage in the structural and shield materials depend strongly on the secondary gamma rays. In this paper, the status of the secondary gamma ray data and its further problems are described from the viewpoint of shield design. The secondary gamma-ray data in ENDF/B-IV and POPOP4 are also discussed based on the test calculations made for several shield assemblies. (author)

  8. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992-March 31, 1993). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project were also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  9. Reactor engineering department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1989 (April 1, 1989 - March 31, 1990). One of major Department's programs is the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor and the design activities of advanced reactor system. Development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the nuclear engineering including is also TRU incineration promoted. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, on reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  10. RADIATION FACILITY FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1961-12-12

    A radiation facility is designed for irradiating samples in close proximity to the core of a nuclear reactor. The facility comprises essentially a tubular member extending through the biological shield of the reactor and containing a manipulatable rod having the sample carrier at its inner end, the carrier being longitudinally movable from a position in close proximity to the reactor core to a position between the inner and outer faces of the shield. Shield plugs are provided within the tubular member to prevent direct radiation from the core emanating therethrough. In this device, samples may be inserted or removed during normal operation of the reactor without exposing personnel to direct radiation from the reactor core. A storage chamber is also provided within the radiation facility to contain an irradiated sample during the period of time required to reduce the radioactivity enough to permit removal of the sample for external handling. (AEC)

  11. SP-100 GES/NAT radiation shielding systems design and development testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.; Kulikowski, H.D.; McGinnis, C.A.; Reese, J.C.; Thomas, K.; Wiltshire, F.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Energy Systems (AES) of Westinghouse Electric Corporation is under subcontract to the General Electric Company to supply nuclear radiation shielding components for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) Nuclear Assembly Test to be conducted at Westinghouse Hanford Company at Richland, Washington. The radiation shielding components are integral to the Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) assembly and include prototypic and non-prototypic radiation shielding components which provide prototypic test conditions for the SP-100 reactor subsystem and reactor control subsystem components during the GES/NAT operations. W-AES is designing three radiation shield components for the NAT assembly; a prototypic Generic Flight System (GFS) shield, the Lower Internal Facility Shield (LIFS), and the Upper Internal Facility Shield (UIFS). This paper describes the design approach and development testing to support the design, fabrication, and assembly of these three shield components for use within the vacuum vessel of the GES/NAT. The GES/NAT shields must be designed to operate in a high vacuum which simulates space operations. The GFS shield and LIFS must provide prototypic radiation/thermal environments and mechanical interfaces for reactor system components. The NAT shields, in combination with the test facility shielding, must provide adequate radiation attenuation for overall test operations. Special design considerations account for the ground test facility effects on the prototypic GFS shield. Validation of the GFS shield design and performance will be based on detailed Monte Carlo analyses and developmental testing of design features. Full scale prototype testing of the shield subsystems is not planned

  12. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and

  13. Magnetic shielding of a limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevnov, N.N.; Stepanov, S.B.; Khimchenko, L.N.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodal, D.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    Localization of plasma interaction with material surfaces in a separate chamber, from where the escape of impurities is hardly realized, i.e. application of magnetic divertors or pump limiters, is the main technique for reduction of the impurity content in a plasma. In this case, the production of a divertor configuration requires a considerable power consumption and results in a less effective utilization of the magnetic field volume. Utilization of a pump limiter, for example the ICL-type, under tokamak-reactor conditions would result in the extremely high and forbidden local heat loadings onto the limiter surface. Moreover, the magnetically-shielded pump limiter (MSL) was proposed to combine positive properties of the divertor and the pump limiter. The idea of magnetic shielding is to locate the winding with current inside the limiter head so that the field lines of the resultant magnetic field do not intercept the limiter surface. In this case the plasma flows around the limiter leading edges and penetrates into the space under the limiter. The shielding magnetic field can be directed either counter the toroidal field or counter the poloidal one of a tokamak, dependent on the concrete diagram of the device. Such a limiter has a number of advantages: -opportunity to control over the particle and impurity recycling without practical influence upon the plasma column geometry, - perturbation of a plasma column magnetic configuration from the side of such a limiter is less than that from the side of the divertor coils. The main deficiency is the necessity to locate active windings inside the discharge chamber. (author) 5 refs., 3 figs

  14. Shielding high energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Stevenson, Graham Roger

    2001-01-01

    After introducing the subject of shielding high energy accelerators, point source, line-of-sight models, and in particular the Moyer model. are discussed. Their use in the shielding of proton and electron accelerators is demonstrated and their limitations noted. especially in relation to shielding in the forward direction provided by large, flat walls. The limitations of reducing problems to those using it cylindrical geometry description are stressed. Finally the use of different estimators for predicting dose is discussed. It is suggested that dose calculated from track-length estimators will generally give the most satisfactory estimate. (9 refs).

  15. Radiation protection/shield design: a need for a systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation protection/shielding design of a nuclear facility requires a coordinated effort of many engineering disciplines to meet the requirements imposed by regulations. The system approach to Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) radiation protection is described, and the program developed to implement this approach is defined. In addition, the principal shielding design problems for LMFBR nuclear reactor systems are discussed in relation to LWR nuclear reactor system shielding designs. The methodology used to analyze these problems in the U.S. LMFBR program, the resultant design solutions, and the experimental verification of these designs and/or methods are discussed

  16. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Saba, Kazuhisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake resistance as well as reduce the size of a container for a nuclear reactor with no adverse effects on the decrease of impact shock to the container and shortening of construction step. Constitution: Reinforcing profile steel materials are welded longitudinally and transversely to the inner surface of a container, and inner steel plates are secured to the above profile steel materials while keeping a gap between the materials and the container. Reactor shielding wall planted to the base concrete of the container is mounted to the pressure vessel, and main steam pipeways secured by the transverse beams and led to the outside of container is connected. This can improve the rigidity earthquake strength and the safetiness against the increase in the inside pressure upon failures of the container. (Yoshino, Y.)

  17. Scintillation counter, segmented shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  18. Adhesive particle shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott [Dublin, CA; Rader, Daniel John [Albuquerque, NM; Walton, Christopher [Berkeley, CA; Folta, James [Livermore, CA

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  19. Grounding, shielding, and bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catrysse, J.

    1991-06-01

    In the electromagnetic compatibility design (EMC) of systems and circuits, both grounding and shielding are related to the coupling mechanisms of the system with (radiated) electromagnetic fields. Grounding is more related to the source or victim circuit (or system) and determines the characteristic of the coupling mechanism between fields and currents/voltages. Shielding is a way of interacting in the radiation path of an electromagnetic field. The basic principles and practical design rules are discussed.

  20. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuochi, Akira; Narita, Takuya; Omori, Tetsu; Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Kunihiro.

    1997-01-01

    A radiation shielding member comprising a lead plate or a lead fabrication product is covered integrally with a rubber, a synthetic resin or a flame retardant fabric having a thickness greater than that of an oxidation preventive membrane made of a copper material. Radiation rays are shielded by the lead material, and not only oxidation but also failure of the lead material and generation of lead pieces or powder can be prevented by the coating of the rubber, the synthetic resin or the flame retardant fabric. The shape of the radiation shielding member can be conformed to constitutional products, a reinforcing frame or plate is formed integrally with the radiation shielding plate, alternatively, lowering of strength of the structure by fabrication of the shape is reinforced by the reinforcing frame or plate. The radiation shielding member is suspended by hanging a rope on a grommet, or disposed on constitutional products, or adjacent radiation shielding members are combined with each other by fixing metals. The thickness of the coating made of rubber, synthetic rubber or flame retardant fabric is determined to 0.1mm or greater to prevent failures of the lead material or formation of lead powder. (N.H.)

  1. Lateral restraint assembly in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.J.; Gorholt, W.

    1977-01-01

    A lateral restraint assembly is described for a reactor of, for example, the high temperature gas-cooled type which commonly includes a reactor core of relatively complex construction supported within a shell or vessel providing a shielded cavity for containing the reactor core. (U.K.)

  2. Nuclear reactor constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baddley, A.H.

    1981-01-01

    A method of constructing a radiation shielding plug for use in the roof of the coolant containment vault of liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described. The construction allows relative movement of that part of service cables and pipes which are carried by the fixed roof and that part which is carried by the rotatable plug. (U.K.)

  3. Epiboron Neutron Activation Analysis with Nigeria Research Reactor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epiboron neutron activation analysis is optimized using Nigeria Research Reactor-1. Data are given for 6 elements using boron as shielding. Boron shield are of particular practical value for rapid instrumental analysis. Advantage factors for the following elements: I, Br, Cl, K, Mn and Na under boron shield are given.

  4. Study of radiation exposure rate on the measurement points in Kartini reactor hall as based to determine operation safety parameters (KBO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahrus Salam; Elisabeth Supriyatni; Fajar Panuntun

    2016-01-01

    In the operation of nuclear facility there are safety parameters, which is the value of the conservatively maximum limit to ensure that all of the uncertainty in the analysis of facility operations safety have been considered, such as uncertainty of measurement, response time and uncertainty calculation tool, and is get a long to others value of normal operating condition limits, in other words, there are still allowed or permitted. Calculation of the radiation exposure rate on five measurement points (50 cm above the water surface of reactor pool, above interim storage (bulk shielding), reactor deck, thermal column and sub critical facility) and to be compared to the operation safety parameters (KBO) of Kartini reactor. The exposure rate value is obtained by calculating the source term of radioactivity on the core, attenuation resulting from the radiation shielding and measurement distance. From the calculation obtained that the value of gamma exposure rate of 50 cm above the water surface of reactor pool is 96.91 mR/hr (KBO<100 mR/hr), on the deck of Bulk Shielding amounted to 1.70 mR/h (KBO<2.5 mR/hr), on the reactor deck amounted to 5.73 mR/hr (KBO<10 mR/hr), on the Thermal Column amounted to 2.73 mR/hr (KBO<10 mR/hr) and on the sub critical facility amounted to 1.148 mR/hr (KBO<2.5 mR/hr). The value of gamma exposure rate at 5 locations measurements are still less than the operation safety parameters (KBO), it means that the reactor is safe to be operated. (author)

  5. Shielding from cosmic radiation for interplanetary missions Active and passive methods

    CERN Document Server

    Spillantini, P; Durante, M; Müller-Mellin, R; Reitz, G; Rossi, L; Shurshakov, V; Sorbi, M

    2007-01-01

    Shielding is arguably the main countermeasure for the exposure to cosmic radiation during interplanetary exploratory missions. However, shielding of cosmic rays, both of galactic or solar origin, is problematic, because of the high energy of the charged particles involved and the nuclear fragmentation occurring in shielding materials. Although computer codes can predict the shield performance in space, there is a lack of biological and physical measurements to benchmark the codes. An attractive alternative to passive, bulk material shielding is the use of electromagnetic fields to deflect the charged particles from the spacecraft target. Active shielding concepts based on electrostatic fields, plasma, or magnetic fields have been proposed in the past years, and should be revised based on recent technological improvements. To address these issues, the European Space Agency (ESA) established a Topical Team (TT) in 2002 including European experts in the field of space radiation shielding and superconducting magn...

  6. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 4, Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    RA research reactor is thermal heavy water moderated and cooled reactor. Metal uranium 2% enriched fuel elements were used at the beginning of its operation. Since 1976, 80% enriched uranium oxide dispersed in aluminium fuel elements were gradually introduced into the core and are the only ones presently used. Reactor core is cylindrical, having diameter 40 cm and 123 cm high. Reaktor core is made up of 82 fuel elements in aluminium channels, lattice is square, lattice pitch 13 cm. Reactor vessel is cylindrical made of 8 mm thick aluminium, inside diameter 140 cm and 5.5 m high surrounded with neutron reflector and biological shield. There is no containment, the reactor building is playing the shielding role. Three pumps enable circulation of heavy water in the primary cooling circuit. Degradation of heavy water is prevented by helium cover gas. Control rods with cadmium regulate the reactor operation. There are eleven absorption rods, seven are used for long term reactivity compensation, two for automatic power regulation and two for safety shutdown. Total anti reactivity of the rods amounts to 24%. RA reactor is equipped with a number of experimental channels, 45 vertical (9 in the core), 34 in the graphite reflector and two in the water biological shield; and six horizontal channels regularly distributed in the core. This volume include detailed description of systems and components of the RA reactor, reactor core parameters, thermal hydraulics of the core, fuel elements, fuel elements handling equipment, fuel management, and experimental devices [sr

  7. Savannah River Site production reactor safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The process water system (PWS) is designed to remove heat produced in the reactor from the fission process, gamma radiation absorption, and fission product decay. Heat removal is accomplished by circulating heavy water through the reactor. Cooling is provided for fuel assemblies, target assemblies, control rods, bulk moderator, deflector plate, reactor tank, and reactor structural components. Approximately 90% of the heat load is generated in the fuel and target assemblies, 5% in the moderator, and 5% in the shielding. In addition to serving as the-heat transfer medium, the process water moderates neutrons produced by fission in the fuel. D 2 O is used in this application because of its favorable moderating and neutron capture properties, which result in high neutron efficiency and reactor productivity. The PWS piping and components also provide a high-integrity leak barrier against loss of moderator and the radioactive fission and corrosion products. Components of the PWS are located in the reactor building between the -40-foot elevation and the 0-foot elevation. Specific locations include the process room, heat exchanger bay, motor rooms, and pump rooms. The system diagram is shown in Figure 5.1-2. PWS design data are presented in Table 5.1-1. The PWS consists of six parallel heat transfer loops. In each loop, approximately 25,000 gpm of D 2 O is circulated from one of six outlet nozzles in the bottom of the reactor tank through a motor-operated valve (MOV) to the suction side of the process water pump. Each pump is driven by an AC motor and a DC motor through a gear reducer unit. A 3-ton flywheel on the drive shaft of the AC motor provides gradual flow coastdown when power is lost. During reactor operation, the DC motors are operated continuously from the diesel generator sets as backup to the AC motors. Following shutdown, the DC motors are operated to provide adequate circulation and core cooling

  8. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodaka, M.; Iida, T.; Taniuchi, H.; Yosimura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    1993-01-01

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  9. ASOP, Shield Calculation, 1-D, Discrete Ordinates Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: ASOP is a shield optimization calculational system based on the one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport program ANISN. It has been used to design optimum shields for space applications of SNAP zirconium-hydride-uranium- fueled reactors and uranium-oxide fueled thermionic reactors and to design beam stops for the ORELA facility. 2 - Method of solution: ASOP generates coefficients of linear equations describing the logarithm of the dose and dose-weight derivatives as functions of position from data obtained in an automated sequence of ANISN calculations. With the dose constrained to a design value and all dose-weight derivatives required to be equal, the linear equations may be solved for a new set of shield dimensions. Since changes in the shield dimensions may cause the linear functions to change, the entire procedure is repeated until convergence is obtained. The detailed calculations of the radiation transport through shield configurations for every step in the procedure distinguish ASOP from other shield optimization computer code systems which rely on multiple component sources and attenuation coefficients to describe the transport. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Problem size is limited only by machine size

  10. Advanced shield development for a fission surface power system for the lunar surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, A.E.; Silver, I.J.; Clark, C.M.; Howe, S.D.; King, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    A nuclear reactor power system such as the affordable fission surface power system enables a potential outpost on the moon. A radiation shield must be included in the reactor system to reduce the otherwise excessive dose to the astronauts and other vital system components. The radiation shield is typically the most massive component of a space reactor system, and thus must be optimized to reduce mass asmuchas possible while still providing the required protection.Various shield options for an on-lander reactor system are examined for outpost distances of 400m and 1 km from the reactor. Also investigated is the resulting mass savings from the use of a high performance cermet fuel. A thermal analysis is performed to determine the thermal behaviours of radiation shields using borated water. For an outpost located 1000m from the core, a tetramethylammonium borohydride shield is the lightest (5148.4 kg), followed by a trilayer shield (boron carbide-tungsten-borated water; 5832.3 kg), and finally a borated water shield (6020.7 kg). In all of the final design cases, the temperature of the borated water remains below 400 K.

  11. Double-layer neutron shield design as neutron shielding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    The shield design in particle accelerators and other high energy facilities are mainly connected to the high-energy neutrons. The deep penetration of neutrons through massive shield has become a very serious problem. For shielding to be efficient, most of these neutrons should be confined to the shielding volume. If the interior space will become limited, the sufficient thickness of multilayer shield must be used. Concrete and iron are widely used as a multilayer shield material. Two layers shield material was selected to guarantee radiation safety outside of the shield against neutrons generated in the interaction of the different proton energies. One of them was one meter of concrete, the other was iron-contained material (FeB, Fe2B and stainless-steel) to be determined shield thicknesses. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used for shield design geometry and required neutron dose distributions. The resulting two layered shields are shown better performance than single used concrete, thus the shield design could leave more space in the interior shielded areas.

  12. Future directions in shielding methods and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, H.

    1987-01-01

    Over the nearly half century history of shielding against reactor radiation, there has been a see-saw battle between theory and measurement. During that period the capability and accuracy of calculational methods have been enormously improved. The microscopic cross sections needed as input to the theoretical computations are now also known to adequate accuracy (with certain exceptions). Nonetheless, there remain substantial classes of shielding problems not yet accessible to satisfactory computational methods, particularly where three-dimensional geometries are involved. This paper discusses promising avenues to approach such problems, especially in the light of recent and expected advances in supercomputers. In particular, it seems that Monte Carlo methods should be much more advantageous in the new computer environment than they have been in the past

  13. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Isobe, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the shielding capacity of the radiation shielding material having an abundant flexibility. Constitution: A mat consisting of a lead or lead alloy fibrous material is covered with a cloth, and the two are made integral by sewing in a kilted fashion by using a yarn. Thereafter, the system is covered with a gas-tight film or sheet. The shielding material obtained in this way has, in addition to the above merits, advantages in that (1) it is free from restoration due to elasticity so that it can readily seal contaminants, (2) it can be used in a state consisting of a number of overlapped layers, (3) it fits the shoulder well and is readily portable and (4) it permits attachment of fasteners or the like. (Ikeda, J.)

  14. Power reactor design trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Cascade and Pulse Star represent new trends in ICF power reactor design that have emerged in the last few years. The most recent embodiments of these two concepts, and that of the HYLIFE design with which they will compare them, are shown. All three reactors depend upon protecting structural elements from neutrons, x rays and debris by injecting massive amounts of shielding material inside the reaction chamber. However, Cascade and Pulse Star introduce new ideas to improve the economics, safety, and environmental impact of ICF reactors. They also pose different development issues and thus represent technological alternatives to HYLIFE

  15. Radiation shielding properties of high performance concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with natural and enriched boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorla, Eyüp; Ipbüker, Cagatay [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Biland, Alex [US Basalt Corp., Houston (United States); Kiisk, Madis [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Kovaljov, Sergei [OÜ Basaltest, Tartu (Estonia); Tkaczyk, Alan H. [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Gulik, Volodymyr, E-mail: volodymyr.gulik@gmail.com [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, Lysogirska 12, of. 201, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Basalt fiber infused with natural and enriched boron in varying proportions. • Gamma-ray attenuation remains stable with addition of basalt-boron fiber. • Improvement in neutron shielding for nuclear facilities producing fast fission spectrum. • Basalt-boron fiber could decrease the shielding thickness in thermal spectrum reactors. - Abstract: The importance of radiation shielding is increasing in parallel with the expansion of the application areas of nuclear technologies. This study investigates the radiation shielding properties of two types of high strength concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with 12–20% boron oxide, containing varying fractions of natural and enriched boron. The gamma-ray shielding characteristics are analyzed with the help of the WinXCom, whereas the neutron shielding characteristics are modeled and computed by Monte Carlo Serpent code. For gamma-ray shielding, the attenuation coefficients of the studied samples do not display any significant variation due to the addition of basalt-boron fibers at any mixing proportion. For neutron shielding, the addition of basalt-boron fiber has negligible effects in the case of very fast neutrons (14 MeV), but it could considerably improve the neutron shielding of concrete for nuclear facilities producing a fast fission spectrum (e.g. with reactors as BN-800, FBTR) and thermal neutron spectrum (Light Water Reactors (LWR)). It was also found that basalt-boron fiber could decrease the thickness of radiation shielding material in thermal spectrum reactors.

  16. Hybrid Active-Passive Radiation Shielding System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation shielding system is proposed that integrates active magnetic fields with passive shielding materials. The objective is to increase the shielding...

  17. Glove box shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  18. Radiation streaming: the continuing problem of shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, A.F.

    1977-01-01

    The practical problems of shield design are reviewed and the major difficulties are shown to be those associated with streaming problems. The situations in which streaming occurs in various types of reactor are described including LMFBR's and fusion devices, and examples are given of ways in which the problems have been solved

  19. Activation of the concrete in the bio shield of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, S.

    2005-02-01

    Calculations of neutron spectra in different parts of the tokamak building of ITER are performed. A computational geometry model of the tokamak building is prepared using MCNP-4C. The model includes adequate material composition and geometry description of the main parts of the tokamak for PPCS plant model A: toroidal field coils, vacuum vessel, shield, blanket structure, first wall, divertor, 14.1 MeV neutron source. The design and the dimensions of the bio shield are taken from the current ITER design. MCNP calculations of the neutron spectra in the bio shield (concrete) of ITER are performed, using the neutron spectra in TF coils calculated at UKAEA as external neutron source. The neutron spectra in the concrete calculated by MCNP are used as input data in the code EASY99 for estimations of the activation of the concrete in the bio shield around the tokamak. The time evolutions of the maximum (in the bio shield floor) and minimum (in the bio shield side walls) specific activity (Bq/kg) and dose rate (Sv/h.) of the main dominant nuclides in the concrete are evaluated and compared for 3 different concrete types, used as biological shield in the PWR and BR3 reactors. (author)

  20. Shield design for next-generation, low-neutron-fluence, superconducting tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, V.D.; Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A shield design using stainless steel (SST), water, boron carbide, lead, and concrete materials was developed for the next-generation tokamak device with superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and low neutron fluence. A device such as the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) is representative of the tokamak design which could use this shield design. The unique feature of this reference design is that a majority of the bulk steel in the shield is in the form of spherical balls with two small, flat spots. The balls are purchased from ball-bearing manufacturers and are added as bulk shielding to the void areas of builtup, structural steel shells which form the torus cavity of the plasma chamber. This paper describes the design configuration of the shielding components

  1. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  2. Electrostatic shielding of transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon, Francisco

    2017-11-28

    Toroidal transformers are currently used only in low-voltage applications. There is no published experience for toroidal transformer design at distribution-level voltages. Toroidal transformers are provided with electrostatic shielding to make possible high voltage applications and withstand the impulse test.

  3. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  4. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). However, the results of this investigation are believed to be generally applicable to the broad class of the next generation of experimental tokamak facilities such as ETF. The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties are compared to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations are developed on resolving the issue

  5. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  6. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, S.; Nakahara, Y.; Takano, H.

    1983-09-01

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1982 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Since fiscal 1982, Systematic research and development work on safeguards technology has been added to the activities of the Department. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  7. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-06-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  8. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio

    2000-01-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  9. Radiation shielding techniques and applications. 4. Two-Phase Monte Carlo Approach to Photon Streaming Through Three-Legged Penetrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Travis; Hack, Joe; Nathan, Steve; Barnett, Marvin

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions (Westinghouse SMS) has been tasked with providing radiological engineering design support for the new Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) being constructed at the Savannah River Site. The Remote Handling Building (RHB) of the CLWR-TEF will act as the receiving facility for irradiated targets used in the production of tritium for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the high dose rates, approaching 50 000 rads/h (500 Gy/h) from the irradiated target bundles, significant attention has been made to shielding structures within the facility. One aspect of the design that has undergone intense review is the issue of the penetrations through the shield walls of the RHB, which includes heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning ductwork; cylindrical piping penetrations; floor drains; and conduit penetrations. The 'DOE Design Considerations Handbook' suggests that 'straight-line penetration of shield walls should be avoided to prevent radiation streaming', which is a prudent suggestion in this case considering the strength of the source. Therefore, a three-legged penetration approach was adopted for each type of penetration. To incorporate the three-legged penetration approach into the design, certain parameters had to be determined and confirmed as adequate. The main parameter to be determined was a minimum required offset length of the middle leg of the penetration. Additional parameters to be determined were supplemental photon shielding to be added to the interior of the wall to compensate for the void in the concrete created by the penetration, and the minimum necessary overlap dimensions of the supplemental shielding. Further, in cases where the minimum middle-leg offset was not practical, additional shielding requirements were determined for supplemental shielding added to the entrance or exit of the penetration to attenuate radiation scattering down the penetration. Analytical

  10. Final analysis of the GCFR radial blanket and shield integral experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Williams, L.R.

    1981-04-01

    An integral experiment has been performed for verification of radiation transport methods and nuclear data used in the design of the radial shield for the proposed gas-cooled fast breeder reactor demonstration plant. The experiment was conducted at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility and consisted of integral and spectral measurements of the neutron and gamma-ray flux transmitted through slabs of materials which modeled a GCFR-type radial blanket and radial shield. Both UO/sub 2/ and ThO/sub 2/ blankets were investigated as well as several shield designs comprising stainless steel, graphite, and boronated graphite.

  11. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2015-01-01

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm

  12. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80%. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59% and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high re-circulating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)]. By contrast, the fusion-fission reactor design is not penalized by re-circulating power and uses relatively near-term fusion technology being developed for the fusion power program. New results are presented on the Th- 233 U and the U- 239 Pu fuel cycles. The purpose of this hybrid is fuel production, with projected costs at $55/g of Pu or $127/g of 233 U. Blanket and cooling system designs, including an emergency cooling system, by General Atomic Company, lead us to the opinion that the reactor can meet expected safety standards for licensing. The smallest mirror reactor having only a shield between the plasma and the coil is the 4.2-m long fusion engineering research facility (FERF) designed for material irradiation. The smallest mirror reactor having both a blanket and shield is the 7.5-m long experimental power reactor (EPR), which has both a fusion and a fusion-fission version. (author)

  13. Calandria and shield tank assembly replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mottram, R.; Guin, J.; Poxleitner, T.

    2011-01-01

    In late 2008, Bruce Powers Refurbishment of Bruce A Units 1 and 2 began to experience delays which led to a question of whether there was an alternative approach to future reactor refurbishments. A proposed alternative was to remove and replace the entire Calandria and Shield Tank Assembly (CSTA) as a modular component. In early 2009, a team of expert contractors was brought together, led by Bruce Power personnel, to establish the feasibility of the removal and replacement approach as an alternative to conventional in-situ fuel channel assembly replacement. The accepted option of removing the entire CSTA was vertically up through the vault roof without end fittings. The study findings suggest that modular replacement of the entire CSTA is a viable option for future reactor refurbishments at Bruce Power. The project itself is an example of the successful integration of contractors and Bruce Power personnel solving complex multi-disciplinary issues. (author)

  14. Reactor container and method of constructing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Muramatsu, Yutaka.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the construction term when constructing a reactor container and also alleviate the temperature requirements for the shielding wall by concurrently forwarding the work of constructing the reactor container and the shielding wall. Constitution: When constructing a reactor container, a shielding wall is constructed from lower layers on the outer side of the reactor container via a gap therefrom concurrently with the work of building the steel container. After the construction of the reactor container is completed, the reactor container is subjected to a pressure resistance test, leakage test, welding inspection and so forth. After the various tests and inspections are completed, concrete blocks as a protective material are stacked on the inner side of a steel frame mounted on the inner wall of the shielding wall, and they are secured to each other and also to the steel frame by concrete block holding members. (Moriyama, K.)

  15. Shielding container for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Tosa, Masayoshi; Hatogai, Tatsuaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effect opening and closing bidirectional radiation used particularly for a gamma densimeter or the like by one operation. Structure: This device comprises a rotatable shielding body for receiving radioactive isotope in the central portion thereof and having at least two radiation openings through which radiation is taken out of the isotope, and a shielding container having openings corresponding to the first mentioned radiation openings, respectively. The radioactive isotope is secured to a rotational shaft of the shielding body, and the shielding body is rotated to register the openings of the shielding container with the openings of the shielding body or to shield the openings, thereby effecting radiation and cut off of gamma ray in the bidirection by one operation. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Light shielding apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Richard Dean; Thom, Robert Anthony

    2017-10-10

    A light shielding apparatus for blocking light from reaching an electronic device, the light shielding apparatus including left and right support assemblies, a cross member, and an opaque shroud. The support assemblies each include primary support structure, a mounting element for removably connecting the apparatus to the electronic device, and a support member depending from the primary support structure for retaining the apparatus in an upright orientation. The cross member couples the left and right support assemblies together and spaces them apart according to the size and shape of the electronic device. The shroud may be removably and adjustably connectable to the left and right support assemblies and configured to take a cylindrical dome shape so as to form a central space covered from above. The opaque shroud prevents light from entering the central space and contacting sensitive elements of the electronic device.

  17. Neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoshige, Toru; Fujii, Yasumasa; Nifuku, Masataka.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain shielding materials excellent in heat and radiation resistance, as well as having mechanical strength in a reduced weight. Constitution: A mixture comprising from 30 to 80 % by weight of epoxy resin, from 5 to 50 % by weight of polyethylene and from 1 to 50 % by weight of inorganic boron compound is cured to prepare a neutron shielding material. The epoxy resin used herein is a compound having more than 18 epoxy groups per one molecule. Polyethylene is a polyethylene homopolymer or a copolymer of ethylene and less than 10 % of other copolymerizable monomer which is preferably powdery and in the grain size of from 10 to 200 μm. The inorganic boric compound can include, for example, boron carbide, boron nitride and anhydrous boric acid. As the curing agent, all sorts of compounds known as the curing agent for epoxy resins can be used. The shielding material is excellent in heat resistance, particularly, in the strength, thermal deformation temperature and the bondability at high temperature and also satisfactory in compression strength and bondability. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  19. Reactor design concepts for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berejka, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    During the formative years of irradiation processing, the 1950s and 1960s, there was laboratory and academic interest in the use of this form of energy transfer to initiate polymerization for the manufacture of plastics and in other chemical processes. Studies were often based on low-dose-rate Cobalt-60 systems. The electron beam (EB) accelerator technology of the time was not as yet at the robust and industrially reliable state that it is now at the beginning of the twenty-first century. A series of reactor designs illustrate how an electron beam can be incorporated into reactor vessels for initiating gas and liquid phase polymerizations on a continuous basis. Development of such approaches, which would rely upon contemporary, high current electron beams to initiate polymerization, would help the chemical processing industry alleviate its problems of catalyst disposal and its related environmental concerns. Systems for treating materials in bulk at low doses, such as those typically used for grain disinfection, at high through-put rates, are also illustrated. Simplified shielding is envisioned in each proposed process system

  20. Bulk oil clauses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, N.

    1993-01-01

    The Institute Bulk Oil Clauses produced by the London market and the American SP-13c Clauses are examined in detail in this article. The duration and perils covered are discussed, and exclusions, adjustment clause 15 of the Institute Bulk Oil Clauses, Institute War Clauses (Cargo), and Institute Strikes Clauses (Bulk Oil) are outlined. (UK)

  1. 19 CFR 149.4 - Bulk and break bulk cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk and break bulk cargo. 149.4 Section 149.4... TREASURY (CONTINUED) IMPORTER SECURITY FILING § 149.4 Bulk and break bulk cargo. (a) Bulk cargo exempted.... (b) Break bulk cargo exempted from time requirement. For break bulk cargo that is exempt from the...

  2. Boron filled siloxane polymers for radiation shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouriau, Andrea; Robison, Tom; Shonrock, Clinton; Simmonds, Steve; Cox, Brad; Pacheco, Adam; Cady, Carl

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of the present work was to evaluate changes to structure-property relationships of 10B filled siloxane-based polymers when exposed to nuclear reactor radiation. Highly filled polysiloxanes were synthesized with the intent of fabricating materials that could shield high neutron fluences. The newly formulated materials consisted of cross-linked poly-diphenyl-methylsiloxane filled with natural boron and carbon nanofibers. This polymer was chosen because of its good thermal and chemical stabilities, as well as resistance to ionizing radiation thanks to the presence of aromatic groups in the siloxane backbone. Highly isotopically enriched 10B filler was used to provide an efficient neutron radiation shield, and carbon nanofibers were added to improve mechanical strength. This novel polymeric material was exposed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Labs to five different neutron/gamma fluxes consisting of very high neutron fluences within very short time periods. Thermocouples placed on the specimens recorded in-situ temperature changes during radiation exposure, which agreed well with those obtained from our MCNP simulations. Changes in the microstructural, thermal, chemical, and mechanical properties were evaluated by SEM, DSC, TGA, FT-IR NMR, solvent swelling, and uniaxial compressive load measurements. Our results demonstrate that these newly formulated materials are well-suitable to be used in applications that require exposure to different types of ionizing conditions that take place simultaneously.

  3. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    This report summarizes main research achievements in the 48th fiscal year which were made by Reactor Engineering Division consisted of eight laboratories and Computing Center. The major research and development projects, with which the research programmes in the Division are associated, are development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor for multi-purpose use, development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor conducted by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and Engineering Research Programme for Thermonuclear Fusion Reactor. Many achievements are reported in various research items such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of Computing Center. (auth.)

  4. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, J.; Norton, J.L.; Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    MDS Nordion has been supplying cobalt-60 sources to industry for industrial and medical purposes since 1946. These cobalt-60 sources are used in many market and product segments. The major application is in the health care industry where irradiators are used to sterilize single use medical products. These irradiators are designed and built by MDS Nordion and are used by manufacturers of surgical kits, gloves, gowns, drapes and other medical products. The irradiator is a large shielded room with a storage pool for the cobalt-60 sources. The medical products are circulated through the shielded room and exposed to the cobalt-60 sources. This treatment sterilizes the medical products which can then be shipped to hospitals for immediate use. Other applications for this irradiation technology include sanitisation of cosmetics, microbial reduction of pharmaceutical raw materials and food irradiation. The cobalt-60 sources are manufactured by MDS Nordion in their Cobalt Operations Facility in Kanata. More than 75,000 cobalt-60 sources for use in irradiators have been manufactured by MDS Nordion. The cobalt-60 sources are double encapsulated in stainless steel capsules, seal welded and helium leak tested. Each source may contain up to 14,000 curies. These sources are shipped to over 170 industrial irradiators around the world. This paper will focus on the MDS Nordion proprietary technology used to produce the cobalt-60 isotope in CANDU reactors. Almost 55 years ago MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada developed the process for manufacturing cobalt-60 at the Chalk River Labs, in Ontario, Canada. A cobalt-59 target was introduced into a research reactor where the cobalt-59 atom absorbed one neutron to become cobalt-60. Once the cobalt-60 material was removed from the research reactor it was encapsulated in stainless steel and seal welded using a Tungsten Inert Gas weld. The first cobalt-60 sources manufactured using material from the Chalk River Labs were used in cancer

  5. A contribution to shielding effectiveness analysis of shielded tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Zoran M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of shielding effectiveness (SE of the shielded tents made of the metallised fabrics is given. First, two electromagnetic characteristic fundamental for coupling through electrically thin shield, the skin depth break frequency and the surface resistance or transfer impedance, is defined and analyzed. Then, the transfer function and the SE are analyzed regarding to the frequency range of interest to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC Community.

  6. Shielding considerations and design concepts for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of shielding considerations and design concepts that have been under investigation at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Lewis Research Center for the application of space reactor power systems to a wide range of future NASA missions. The missions are based on the NASA Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) and Mission from Plant Earth programs currently under study. They include both instrument and human-rated applications in cislunar and outer space as well as planet surface locations. The SRPS configurations under consideration are based on advanced reactor and power-generation technologies being developed jointly by the US Department of Energy/NASA/US Department of Defense SP-100 space reactor power system program and the NASA Civil Space Technology Initiative programs. The SP-100 reactor technology employs a UN-fueled, niobium-alloy-clad, pin-type core with high-temperature lithium coolant. Electrical power generation technologies include both direct or static and dynamic thermal-to-electrical conversion techniques, with selection dependent on mission power-level requirements. Shield designs are also highly mission dependent and can range from shadow-shield configurations employing tungsten and lithium hydride (LiH) materials manufactured and assembled on Earth, to the use of indigenous planet surface materials that could be utilized on the moon and Mars

  7. Development of superconductor bulk for superconductor bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Joong; Jun, Byung Hyuk; Park, Soon Dong (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Current carrying capacity is one of the most important issues in the consideration of superconductor bulk materials for engineering applications. There are numerous applications of Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors e.g. magnetic levitation train, flywheel energy storage system, levitation transportation, lunar telescope, centrifugal device, magnetic shielding materials, bulk magnets etc. Accordingly, to obtain YBCO materials in the form of large, single crystals without weak-link problem is necessary. A top seeded melt growth (TSMG) process was used to fabricate single crystal YBCO bulk superconductors. The seeded and infiltration growth (IG) technique was also very promising method for the synthesis of large, single-grain YBCO bulk superconductors with good superconducting properties. 5 wt.% Ag doped Y211 green compacts were sintered at 900 .deg. C {approx} 1200 .deg.C and then a single crystal YBCO was fabricated by an infiltration method. A refinement and uniform distribution of the Y211 particles in the Y123 matrix were achieved by sintering the Ag-doped samples. This enhancement of the critical current density was ascribable to a fine dispersion of the Y211 particles, a low porosity and the presence of Ag particles. In addition, we have designed and manufactured large YBCO single domain with levitation force of 10-13 kg/cm{sup 2} using TSMG processing technique.

  8. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herlemann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005. Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  9. Tough graphene-polymer microcellular foams for electromagnetic interference shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-Bin; Yan, Qing; Zheng, Wen-Ge; He, Zhixian; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2011-03-01

    Functional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)/graphene nanocomposite microcellular foams were prepared by blending of PMMA with graphene sheets followed by foaming with subcritical CO(2) as an environmentally benign foaming agent. The addition of graphene sheets endows the insulating PMMA foams with high electrical conductivity and improved electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency with microwave absorption as the dominant EMI shielding mechanism. Interestingly, because of the presence of the numerous microcellular cells, the graphene-PMMA foam exhibits greatly improved ductility and tensile toughness compared to its bulk counterpart. This work provides a promising methodology to fabricate tough and lightweight graphene-PMMA nanocomposite microcellular foams with superior electrical and EMI shielding properties by simultaneously combining the functionality and reinforcement of the graphene sheets and the toughening effect of the microcellular cells.

  10. Neutron Shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Kiiro; Okuda, Hisashi; Harada, Yoshihisa.

    1994-01-01

    1, 3-bis (N, N-diglycidyl aminomethyl) cyclohexane as a specific epoxy resin is used together with a usual epoxy resin. A polyamine mixture and an imidazole type compound are used as a hardening agent. Further, a boron compound and an inorganic filler are added. Such a neutron shielding composition is hardened at a normal temperature without requiring heating, and mechanical strength, especially, compression strength can be kept over a wide range from low temperature to high temperature after the hardening. (T.M.)

  11. A shield against distraction

    OpenAIRE

    Halin, N.; Marsh, J.E.; Hellman, A.; Hellstrom, I.; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the basic idea of a trade-off between the level of concentration and distractibility to test whether a manipulation of task difficulty can shield against distraction. Participants read, either in quiet or with a speech noise background, texts that were displayed either in an easy-to-read or a hard-to-read font. Background speech impaired prose recall, but only when the text was displayed in the easy-to-read font. Most importantly, recall was better in the background sp...

  12. Selective shielding device for scintiphotography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.W.; Kay, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    A selective shielding device to be used in combination with a scintillation camera is described. The shielding device is a substantially oval-shaped configuration removably secured to the scintillation camera. As a result of this combination scanning of preselected areas of a patient can be rapidly and accurately performed without the requirement of mounting any type of shielding paraphernalia on the patient. 1 claim, 2 drawing figures

  13. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadori Amir; Semones Edward; Ewert Michael; Broyan James; Walker Steven

    2017-01-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles ...

  14. Proceedings of the 10. Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Bastos, W. dos

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings presents all the Meeting papers emphasizing specific aspects on reactor physics method, criticality, fuel management, nuclear data, safety analysis, simulation and shielding, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, reactor operation and computational methods

  15. Shielding Factor Method for producing effective cross sections: MINX/SPHINX and the CCCC interface system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.; Weisbin, C.R.; Paik, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    The Shielding Factor Method (SFM) is an economical designer-oriented method for producing the coarse-group space and energy self-shielded cross sections needed for reactor-core analysis. Extensive experience with the ETOX/1DX and ENDRUN/TDOWN systems has made the SFM the method of choice for most US fast-reactor design activities. The MINX/SPHINX system was designed to expand upon the capabilities of the older SFM codes and to incorporate the new standard interfaces for fast-reactor cross sections specified by the Committee for Computer Code Coordination (CCCC). MINX is the cross-section processor. It generates multigroup cross sections, shielding factors, and group-to-group transfer matriccs from ENDF/B-IV and writes them out as CCCC ISOTXS and BRKOXS files. It features detailed pointwise resonance reconstruction, accurate Doppler broadening, and an efficient treatment of anisotropic scattering. SPHINX is the space-and-energy shielding code. It uses specific mixture and geometry information together with equivalence principles to construct shielded macroscopic multigroup cross sections in as many as 240 groups. It then makes a flux calculation by diffusion or transport methods and collapses to an appropriate set of cell-averaged coarse-group effective cross sections. The integration of MINX and SPHINX with the CCCC interface system provides an efficient, accurate, and convenient system for producing effective cross sections for use in fast-reactor problems. The system has also proved useful in shielding and CTR applications. 3 figures, 4 tables

  16. Multifunctional Hot Structure Heat Shield

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project is performing preliminary development of a Multifunctional Hot Structure (HOST) heat shield for planetary entry. Results of this development will...

  17. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1978 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committees on Reactor Physics and in Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities. (author)

  18. SHIELDS Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordanova, Vania Koleva [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-03

    Predicting variations in the near-Earth space environment that can lead to spacecraft damage and failure, i.e. “space weather”, remains a big space physics challenge. A new capability was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to understand, model, and predict Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large Dynamic Storms, the SHIELDS framework. This framework simulates the dynamics of the Surface Charging Environment (SCE), the hot (keV) electrons representing the source and seed populations for the radiation belts, on both macro- and micro-scale. In addition to using physics-based models (like RAM-SCB, BATS-R-US, and iPIC3D), new data assimilation techniques employing data from LANL instruments on the Van Allen Probes and geosynchronous satellites were developed. An order of magnitude improvement in the accuracy in the simulation of the spacecraft surface charging environment was thus obtained. SHIELDS also includes a post-processing tool designed to calculate the surface charging for specific spacecraft geometry using the Curvilinear Particle-In-Cell (CPIC) code and to evaluate anomalies' relation to SCE dynamics. Such diagnostics is critically important when performing forensic analyses of space-system failures.

  19. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  20. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-01-01

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  1. Research on Primary Shielding Calculation Source Generation Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Mei, Qiliang; Li, Hui; Shangguan, Danhua; Zhang, Guangchun

    2017-09-01

    Primary Shielding Calculation (PSC) plays an important role in reactor shielding design and analysis. In order to facilitate PSC, a source generation code is developed to generate cumulative distribution functions (CDF) for the source particle sample code of the J Monte Carlo Transport (JMCT) code, and a source particle sample code is deveoped to sample source particle directions, types, coordinates, energy and weights from the CDFs. A source generation code is developed to transform three dimensional (3D) power distributions in xyz geometry to source distributions in r θ z geometry for the J Discrete Ordinate Transport (JSNT) code. Validation on PSC model of Qinshan No.1 nuclear power plant (NPP), CAP1400 and CAP1700 reactors are performed. Numerical results show that the theoretical model and the codes are both correct.

  2. Effectiveness of the neutron-shield nanocomposites for a dual-purpose cask of Bushehr's Water–Water Energetic Reactor (VVER 1000 nuclear-power-plant spent fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Rezaeian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to perform dry interim storage and transportation of the spent-fuel assemblies of the Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant, dual-purpose casks can be utilized. The effectiveness of different neutron-shield materials for the dual-purpose cask was analyzed through a set of calculations carried out using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP code. The dose rate for the dual-purpose cask utilizing the recently developed materials of epoxy/clay/B4C and epoxy/clay/B4C/carbon fiber was less than the allowable radiation level of 2 mSv/h at any point and 0.1 mSv/h at 2 m from the external surface of the cask. By utilization of epoxy/clay/B4C instead of an ethylene glycol/water mixture, the dose rates on the side surface of the cask due to neutron sources and consequent secondary gamma rays will be reduced by 17.5% and 10%, respectively. The overall dose rate in this case will be reduced by 11%.

  3. Measurement of TFTR D-T radiation shielding efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ascione G.; Elwood, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    High power D-T fusion reactor designs presently exhibit complex geometric and material density configurations. Simulations of the radiation shielding required for safe operation and full compliance with all regulatory requirements must include sufficient margin to accommodate uncertainties in material properties and distributions, uncertainties in the final configurations, and uncertainties in approximations employing the homogenization of complex geometries. Measurements of radiation shielding efficiency performed in a realistic D-T tokamak environment can provide empirical guidance for simulating safe, efficient, and cost effective shielding systems for future high power fusion reactors. In this work, the authors present the results of initial measurements of the TFTR radiation shielding efficiency during high power D-T operations with record neutron yields. The TFTR design objective is to limit the total dose-equivalent at the nearest PPPL property lines from all radiation pathways to 10 mrem per calendar year. Compliance with this design objective over a calendar year requires measurements in the presence of typical site backgrounds of about 80 mrem per year.

  4. Design and construction of reactor containment systems of the prototype fast breeder reactor MONJU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Makinori; Kawata, Koji; Sato, Masaki; Ito, Masashi; Hayashi, Kazutoshi; Kunishima, Shigeru.

    1991-01-01

    The MONJU reactor containment systems consist of a reactor containment vessel, reactor cavity walls and cell liners. The reactor containment vessel is strengthened by ring stiffeners for earthquake stresses. To verify its earthquake-resistant strength, vibration and buckling tests were carried out by using 1/19 scale models. The reactor cavity walls, which form biological shield and support the reactor vessel, are constructed of steel plate frames filled with concrete. The cell liner consists of liner plates and thermal insulation to moderate the effects of sodium spills, and forms a gastight cell to maintain a nitrogen atmosphere. (author)

  5. Graphite materials for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oku, Tatsuo

    1991-01-01

    Graphite materials have been used in the nuclear fission reactors from the beginning of the reactor development for the speed reduction and reflection of neutron. Graphite materials are used both as a moderator and as a reflector in the core of high temperature gas-cooled reactors, and both as a radiation shielding material and as a reflector in the surrounding of the core for the fast breeder reactor. On the other hand, graphite materials are being positively used as a first wall of plasma as it is known that low Z materials are useful for holding high temperature plasma in the nuclear fusion devices. In this paper the present status of the application of graphite materials to the nuclear fission reactors and fusion devices (reactors) is presented. In addition, a part of results on the related properties to the structural design and safety evaluation and results examined on the subjects that should be done in the future are also described. (author)

  6. Safety analysis code 'COOLTMP' for assessment of PHT cooling under reactor shutdown conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna Kumar, P.; Hajela, S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P.K.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal energy generated by the reactor core is removed by the Primary Heat Transport (PHT) System when the reactor is under normal operation, by operation of the primary circulation pumps and steam generators. However, when the reactor is shutdown, the decay heat removal is done by the Shut Down (S/D) Cooling heat exchangers and pumps of lower capacity. In the event of loss/stoppage of circulation of PHT under such a situation, the bulk of the decay heat generated will be distributed to the moderator system, end shield system and through the feeders to the feeder cabinet/FM vault environment. However, the PHT inventory in the channel will be heated up because of loss of flow in the channel. The code COOLTMP has been developed to estimate the temperature of PHT following a loss/stoppage of circulation, when the reactor is under shutdown condition. It predicts the increase in the PHT temperature with time for hot channel, average channel or a specific channel under such a condition. It also calculates the apportionment of the decay heat to different heat sinks, viz. moderator, end shield and FM Vault. This computation is required when the plant is required to be under shutdown for doing some maintenance job on the PHT system, feeders or channels where the S/D cooling system has to be stopped and in some cases the headers have to be drained. At that time such a calculation gives whether the peak PHT temperature, or the time available to reach such a temperature, as obtained, is acceptable to carry out such a job. Hence, the schedule of the maintenance job can be decided. This code has been validated for RAPS and MAPS and used extensively for predicting PHT temperature after reactor shutdown to obtain regulatory clearances to stop forced circulation with and without header filled. (author)

  7. Analysis, design, and constrution of a sacrificial shield wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialkow; Shah, S.B.

    1978-01-01

    The sacrificial shield wall, a cylindrical enclosure around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), is a major component of nuclear power plants of the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) type. A method developed for the analysis and design of such walls is described which eliminates shortcomings in methods used in current practice. The method treats the wall as a space frame of ring beams and columns and includes the skin plates as finite elements. Design loadings, load combinations, and acceptance criteria are presented. Results by this method are furnished and compared with results by an alternate method. Significant design features are described and a narrative of construction procedures is included. (Author)

  8. New trends in shielding designs for PWRs in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, G.; Forestier, J.; Arbelot, E.

    1985-01-01

    Various engineering solutions to confinement of the stray neutron fields will be incorporated into the design of the 1450 MWe Chooz B-1 (Ardennes B-1) PWR, the first unit of the new N4 program in France. The reactor is in the early stages of construction. These engineering solutions are the results of many shielding configuration studies performed prior to actual design. The solutions and the calculation methodologies are discussed

  9. Heat-pipe thermionic reactor concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm Pedersen, E.

    1967-01-01

    Main components are reactor core, heat pipe, thermionic converter, secondary cooling system, and waste heat radiator; thermal power generated in reactor core is transported by heat pipes to thermionic converters located outside reactor core behind radiation shield; thermionic emitters are in direct...... contact with outside envelope of heat pipes and collectors are in contact with liquid metal secondary cooling system that transfers waste heat to radiator....

  10. Progress in Research on Lightweight Graphene-based EMI Shielding Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chan-yuan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With rapid progresses on the advanced electronic science and technology, electromagnetic irradiations have led to considerable issues, including electromagnetic pollutions, electromagnetic interference and security concerns, in electronics, aeronautics, astronautics, information technology, communication systems and etc. Based on the fundamentals of the electromagnetic interference shielding and general methods for preparing graphene nanosheets, this review involves the recent advances in the electromagnetic interference shielding materials of various applications in four morphologies, which include bulk, lightweight foams, flexible films and those for operation at high temperature. Meanwhile, the major strategical methods and general concept for designing and fabricating graphene-based electromagnetic interference shielding materials have been overviewed, and fundamental issues of electromagnetic interference technology have been further discussed. The perspectives for fabricating novel electromagnetic interference shielding materials, including ultrathin and transparent configuration, and future development have been proposed based on the practical applications, which suggest significant conception for designing next generation lightweight EMI shielding materials.

  11. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  12. Shield calculations, optimization vs. paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo D, N.; Hernandez S, A.; Martinez G, A.

    2006-01-01

    Many shieldings have been designed under the criteria of 'Maximum dose rates of project'. It has created the paradigm of those 'low dose rates', for the one which not few specialists would consider unacceptable levels of dose rate superior to the units of μSv.h -1 , independently of the exposure times. At the present time numerous shieldings are being designed considering dose restrictions in real times of exposure. After these new shieldings, the dose rates could be notably superior to those after traditional shieldings, without it implies inadequate designs or constructive errors. In the work significant differences in levels of dose rates and thickness of shieldings estimated by both methods for some typical facilities. It was concluded that the use of real times of exposure is more adequate for the optimization of the Radiological Protection, although this method demands bigger care in its application. (Author)

  13. Socket Shield Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, João Eduardo Freitas

    2017-01-01

    Nos dias atuais, é cada vez mais comum a realização de extrações de dentes que estejam severamente comprometidos e substituí-los por implantes dentários. Após extração, existe uma reabsorção de osso alveolar que vai resultar numa perda de osso vertical e horizontal, tornando-se um dos fatores que subsequentemente se vai colocar como uma das maiores dificuldades na colocação de implantes. A técnica Socket Shield é uma técnica de preservação de osso alveolar em situações de implantes imediatos,...

  14. Shielded Canister Transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB

  15. Computational shielding benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Nuclear Society Standards Committee 6.2.1 is engaged in the documentation of radiation transport problems and their solutions. The primary objective of this effort is to test computational methods used within the international shielding community. Dissemination of benchmarks will, it is hoped, accomplish several goals: (1) Focus attention on problems whose solutions represent state-of-the-art methodology for representative transport problems of generic interest; (2) Specification of standard problems makes comparisons of alternate computational methods, including use of approximate vs. ''exact'' computer codes, more meaningful; (3) Comparison with experimental data may suggest improvements in computer codes and/or associated data sets; (4) Test reliability of new methods as they are introduced for the solution of specific problems; (5) Verify user ability to apply a given computational method; and (6) Verify status of a computer program being converted for use on a different computer (e.g., CDC vs IBM) or facility

  16. Water cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to reduce any loss of primary water coolant from around a reactor core of a water cooled nuclear reactor caused by any failure of a pressure vessel, an inner vessel is positioned within and spaced from the pressure vessel. The reactor core and main portion of the primary water coolant circuit and a heat exchanger are positioned within the inner vessel to maintain some primary water coolant around the reactor core and to allow residual decay heat to be removed from the reactor core by the heat exchanger. In the embodiment shown an aperture at the upper region of the inner vessel is dimensioned configured and arranged to prevent steam from a steam space of an integral pressurised water cooled nuclear reactor for a ship entering the main portion of the primary water coolant circuit in the inner vessel if the longitudinal axis of the nuclear reactor is displaced from its normal substantially vertical position to an abnormal position at an angle to the vertical direction. Shields are integral with the inner vessel. (author)

  17. System for imaging plutonium through heavy shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuckertz, T.H.; Cannon, T.M.; Fenimore, E.E.; Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.

    1984-04-01

    A single pinhole can be used to image strong self-luminescent gamma-ray sources such as plutonium on gamma scintillation (Anger) cameras. However, if the source is weak or heavily shielded, a poor signal to noise ratio can prevent acquisition of the image. An imaging system designed and built at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a coded aperture to image heavily shielded sources. The paper summarizes the mathematical techniques, based on the Fast Delta Hadamard transform, used to decode raw images. Practical design considerations such as the phase of the uniformly redundant aperture and the encoded image sampling are discussed. The imaging system consists of a custom designed m-sequence coded aperture, a Picker International Corporation gamma scintillation camera, a LeCroy 3500 data acquisition system, and custom imaging software. The paper considers two sources - 1.5 mCi 57 Co unshielded at a distance of 27 m and 220 g of bulk plutonium (11.8% 240 Pu) with 0.3 cm lead, 2.5 cm steel, and 10 cm of dense plastic material at a distance of 77.5 cm. Results show that the location and geometry of a source hidden in a large sealed package can be determined without having to open the package. 6 references, 4 figures

  18. ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] reactor building design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.L.; Blevins, J.D.; Delisle, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is at the midpoint of a two-year conceptual design. The ITER reactor building is a reinforced concrete structure that houses the tokamak and associated equipment and systems and forms a barrier between the tokamak and the external environment. It provides radiation shielding and controls the release of radioactive materials to the environment during both routine operations and accidents. The building protects the tokamak from external events, such as earthquakes or aircraft strikes. The reactor building requirements have been developed from the component designs and the preliminary safety analysis. The equipment requirements, tritium confinement, and biological shielding have been studied. The building design in progress requires continuous iteraction with the component and system designs and with the safety analysis. 8 figs

  19. On the research activities in reactor and neutron physics using the first egyptian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A review on the most important research activities in reactor and neutron physics using the first Egyptian Research Reactor (ET-RR-1) is given. An out look on: neutron cross-sections, neutron flux, neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, neutron diffraction and radiation shielding experiments, is presented

  20. Shielding benchmark tests of JENDL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Hasegawa, Akira; Ueki, Kohtaro; Yamano, Naoki; Sasaki, Kenji; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Morio; Ohtani, Nobuo; Sakurai, Kiyoshi.

    1994-03-01

    The integral test of neutron cross sections for major shielding materials in JENDL-3 has been performed by analyzing various shielding benchmark experiments. For the fission-like neutron source problem, the following experiments are analyzed: (1) ORNL Broomstick experiments for oxygen, iron and sodium, (2) ASPIS deep penetration experiments for iron, (3) ORNL neutron transmission experiments for iron, stainless steel, sodium and graphite, (4) KfK leakage spectrum measurements from iron spheres, (5) RPI angular neutron spectrum measurements in a graphite block. For D-T neutron source problem, the following two experiments are analyzed: (6) LLNL leakage spectrum measurements from spheres of iron and graphite, and (7) JAERI-FNS angular neutron spectrum measurements on beryllium and graphite slabs. Analyses have been performed using the radiation transport codes: ANISN(1D Sn), DIAC(1D Sn), DOT3.5(2D Sn) and MCNP(3D point Monte Carlo). The group cross sections for Sn transport calculations are generated with the code systems PROF-GROUCH-G/B and RADHEAT-V4. The point-wise cross sections for MCNP are produced with NJOY. For comparison, the analyses with JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV have been also carried out. The calculations using JENDL-3 show overall agreement with the experimental data as well as those with ENDF/B-IV. Particularly, JENDL-3 gives better results than JENDL-2 and ENDF/B-IV for sodium. It has been concluded that JENDL-3 is very applicable for fission and fusion reactor shielding analyses. (author)

  1. Multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MW t h, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co 60 ) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200 Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N 16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  2. Reactor Engineering Department annual report (April 1, 1986 - March 31, 1987)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in the fiscal year 1986 are described. The major activities of the Department are closely related to the reactor physics of very high temperature gas-cooled reactor, high conversion light water reactor and liquid metal fast breeder reactor and to blanket neutronics of fusion reactor. Contents of this report are divided into the activities on nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control, diagnosis and robotics. The activity of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics is also included. (author)

  3. Radioactivity, shielding, radiation damage, and remote handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.T.

    1975-01-01

    Proton beams of a few hundred million electron volts of energy are capable of inducing hundreds of curies of activity per microampere of beam intensity into the materials they intercept. This adds a new dimension to the parameters that must be considered when designing and operating a high-intensity accelerator facility. Large investments must be made in shielding. The shielding itself may become activated and require special considerations as to its composition, location, and method of handling. Equipment must be designed to withstand large radiation dosages. Items such as vacuum seals, water tubing, and electrical insulation must be fabricated from radiation-resistant materials. Methods of maintaining and replacing equipment are required that limit the radiation dosages to workers.The high-intensity facilities of LAMPF, SIN, and TRIUMF and the high-energy facility of FERMILAB have each evolved a philosophy of radiation handling that matches their particular machine and physical plant layouts. Special tooling, commercial manipulator systems, remote viewing, and other techniques of the hot cell and fission reactor realms are finding application within accelerator facilities. (U.S.)

  4. Discussion on variance reduction technique for shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Fujio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    As the task of the engineering design activity of the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER), on 316 type stainless steel (SS316) and the compound system of SS316 and water, the shielding experiment using the D-T neutron source of FNS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been carried out. However, in these analyses, enormous working time and computing time were required for determining the Weight Window parameter. Limitation or complication was felt when the variance reduction by Weight Window method of MCNP code was carried out. For the purpose of avoiding this difficulty, investigation was performed on the effectiveness of the variance reduction by cell importance method. The conditions of calculation in all cases are shown. As the results, the distribution of fractional standard deviation (FSD) related to neutrons and gamma-ray flux in the direction of shield depth is reported. There is the optimal importance change, and when importance was increased at the same rate as that of the attenuation of neutron or gamma-ray flux, the optimal variance reduction can be done. (K.I.)

  5. Radiation shielding techniques and applications. 3. Analysis of Photon Streaming Through and Around Shield Doors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, Marvin; Hack, Joe; Nathan, Steve; White, Travis

    2001-01-01

    Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions (Westinghouse SMS) has been tasked with providing radiological engineering design support for the new Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) being constructed at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Remote Handling Building (RHB) of the CLWR-TEF will act as the receiving facility for irradiated targets used in the production of tritium for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Because of the high dose rates, approaching 50 000 rads/h (500 Gy/h) from the irradiated target bundles, significant attention has been made to shielding structures within the facility. One aspect of the design that has undergone intense review is the shield doors. The RHB has six shield doors that needed to be studied with respect to photon streaming. Several aspects had to be examined to ensure that the design meets the radiation dose levels. Both the thickness and streaming issues around the door edges were designed and examined. Photon streaming through and around a shield door is a complicated problem, creating a reliance on computer modeling to perform the analyses. The computer code typically used by the Westinghouse SMS in the evaluation of photon transport through complex geometries is the MCNP Monte Carlo computer code. The complexity of the geometry within the problem can cause problems even with the Monte Carlo codes. Striking a balance between how the code handles transport through the shield door with transport through the streaming paths, particularly with the use of typical variance reduction methods, is difficult when trying to ensure that all important regions of the model are sampled appropriately. The thickness determination used a simple variance reduction technique. In construction, the shield door will not be flush against the wall, so a solid rectangular slab leaves streaming paths around the edges. Administrative controls could be used to control dose to workers; however, 10 CFR 835.1001 states

  6. Shielding factors for vehicles to gamma radiation from activity deposited on structures and ground surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauridsen, B.; Hedemann Jensen, P.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes a measuring procedure for the determination of shielding factors for vehicles passing through areas that have been contaminated by activity released to the atmosphere from a reactor accident. A simulated radiation field from fallout has been approximated by a point source that has been placed in a matrix around and above the vehicle. Modifying factors are discussed such as mutual shielding by nearby buildings and passengers. From measurements on different vehicles with and without passengers shielding factors are recommended for ordinary cars and busses in both urban and open areas, and areas with single family houses. (author)

  7. Radiation shielding in dental radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenström, B; Rehnmark-Larsson, S; Julin, P; Richter, S

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shielding at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shielding tested were the different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure times corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shielding reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 microGy compared with 18 microGy (parallelling) and 31 microGy (bisecting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained, but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 microGy per single intraoral exposure.

  8. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1983-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey (20 exposures). In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 ..mu..Gy compared with 18 ..mu..Gy (parallelling) and 31 ..mu..Gy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 ..mu..Gy per single intraoral exposure.

  9. Radiation shielding in dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, B.; Rehnmark-Larsson, S.; Julin, P.; Richter, S.

    1984-01-01

    The protective effect in the thyroid region from different types of radiation shieldings at intraoral radiography has been studied as well as the reduction of the absorbed dose to the sternal and the gonadal regions. The shieldings tested were five different types of leaded aprons, of which three had an attached leaded collar and the other two were used in combination with separate soft leaded collars. Furthermore one of the soft leaded collars and an unflexible horizontal leaded shield were tested separately. Two dental x-ray machines of 60 and 65 kVp with rectangular and circular tube collimators were used. The exposure time corresponded to speed group E film. The absorbed doses were measured with two ionization chambers. No significant difference in the protective effect in the thyroid gland could be found between the different types of radiation shieldings. There was a dose reduction by approximately a factor of 2 to the thyroid region down to 0.08 mGy per full survey using parallelling technique, and below 0.001 mGy per single bitewing exposure. The shieldings reduced the thyroid dose using bisecting-angle technique by a factor of 5 down to 0.15 mGy per full survey. In the sternal region the combinations of apron and collar reduced the absorbed dose from a full survey to below 2 ..mu..Gy compared with 18 ..mu..Gy (parallelling) and 31 ..mu..Gy (biscting-angle) without any shielding. With the horizontal leaded shield a reduction by a factor of 6 was obtained but no significant sternal dose reduction could be detected from the soft collar alone. The gonadal dose could be reduced by a factor of 10 with the horizontal leaded shield, parallelling technique and circular collimator. Using leaded aprons the gonadal dose was approximately one per cent of the dose without any shielding, i.e. below 0.01 ..mu..Gy per single intraoral exposure.

  10. Morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2018-03-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low-angle edifices built primarily by the accumulation of successive lava flows. This generic view of shield volcano morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galápagos). Here, the morphometry of 158 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes is analyzed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution SRTM DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 24 lava-dominated 'shield-like' volcanoes, considered so far as stratovolcanoes, are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes from 0.1 to > 1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width (H/WB) ratios mostly from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients (average slopes mostly from 1° to 15°), elongation and summit truncation. Although there is no clear-cut morphometric difference between shield volcanoes and stratovolcanoes, an approximate threshold can be drawn at 12° average slope and 0.10 H/WB ratio. Principal component analysis of the obtained database enables to identify four key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Hierarchical cluster analysis of these descriptors results in 12 end-member shield types, with intermediate cases defining a continuum of morphologies. The shield types can be linked in terms of growth stages and shape evolution, related to (1) magma composition and rheology, effusion rate and lava/pyroclast ratio, which will condition edifice steepness; (2) spatial distribution of vents, in turn related to the magmatic feeding system and the tectonic framework, which will control edifice plan shape; and (3) caldera formation, which will condition edifice truncation.

  11. A practical neutron shielding design based on data-base interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.H.; Sheu, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron shielding design is an important part of the construction of nuclear reactors and high-energy accelerators. Neutron shielding design is also indispensable in the packaging and storage of isotopic neutron sources. Most efforts in the development of neutron shielding design have been concentrated on nuclear reactor shielding because of its huge mass and strict requirement of accuracy. Sophisticated computational tools, such as transport and Monte Carlo codes and detailed data libraries have been developed. In principle, now, neutron shielding, in spite of its complexity, can be designed in any detail and with fine accuracy. However, in most practical cases, neutron shielding design is accomplished with simplified methods. Unlike practical gamma-ray shielding design, where exponential attenuation coupled with buildup factors has been applied effectively and accurately, simplified neutron shielding design, either by using removal cross sections or by applying charts or tables of transmission factors such as the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 38 (Ref. 1) for general neutron protection or to NCRP 51 (Ref. 2) for accelerator neutron shielding, is still very primitive and not well established. The available data are limited in energy range, materials, and thicknesses, and the estimated results are only roughly accurate. It is the purpose of this work to establish a simple, convenient, and user-friendly general-purpose computational tool for practical preliminary neutron shielding design that is reasonably accurate. A wide-range (energy, material, and thickness) data base of dose transmission factors has been generated by applying one-dimensional transport calculations in slab geometry

  12. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevins, J.D.; Stasko, R.R.

    1989-09-01

    An international design team comprised of members from Canada, Europe, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States of America, are designing an experimental fusion test reactor. The engineering and testing objectives of this International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are to validate the design and to demonstrate controlled ignition, extended burn of a deuterium and tritium plasma, and achieve steady state using technology expected to be available by 1990. The concept maximizes flexibility while allowing for a variety of plasma configurations and operating scenarios. During physics phase operation, the machine produces a 22 MA plasma current. In the technology phase, the machine can be reconfigured with a thicker shield and a breeding blanket to operate with an 18 MA plasma current at a major radius of 5.5 meters. Canada's involvement in the areas of safety, facility design, reactor configuration and maintenance builds on our internationally recognized design and operational expertise in developing tritium processes and CANDU related technologies

  13. Nuclear characteristics of D-D fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hideki; Ohta, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Fusion reactors operating on deuterium (D-D) cycle are considered to be of long range interest for their freedom from tritium breeding in the blanket. The present paper discusses the various possibilities of D-D fusion reactor blanket designs mainly from the standpoint of the nuclear characteristics. Neutronic and photonic calculations are based on presently available data to provide a basis of the optimal blanket design in D-D fusion reactors. It is found that it appears desirable to design a blanket with blanket/shield (BS) concept in D-D fusion reactors. The BS concept is designed to obtain reasonable shielding characteristics for superconducting magnet (SCM) by using shielding materials in the compact blanket. This concept will open the possibility of compact radiation shield design based on assured technology, and offer the advantage from the system economics point of view. (auth.)

  14. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique

  15. Survivor shielding. Part C. Improvements in terrain shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.; Kaul, Dean C.; Roberts, James A.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    A number of atomic-bomb survivors were affected by shielding provided by terrain features. These terrain features can be a small hill, affecting one or two houses, or a high mountain that shields large neighborhoods. In the survivor dosimetry system, terrain shielding can be described by a transmission factor (TF), which is the ratio between the dose with and without the terrain present. The terrain TF typically ranges between 0.1 and 1.0. After DS86 was implemented at RERF, the terrain shielding categories were examined and found to either have a bias or an excessive uncertainty that could readily be removed. In 1989, an improvement in the terrain model was implemented at RERF in the revised DS86 code, but the documentation was not published. It is now presented in this section. The solution to the terrain shielding in front of a house is described in this section. The problem of terrain shielding of survivors behind Hijiyama mountain at Hiroshima and Konpirasan mountain at Nagasaki has also been recognized, and a solution to this problem has been included in DS02. (author)

  16. Self-shielding factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    Throughout the last two decades many efforts have been made to estimate the effect of body self-shielding on organ doses from externally incident neutrons and gamma rays. These began with the use of simple geometry phantoms and have culminated in the use of detailed anthropomorphic phantoms. In a recent effort, adjoint Monte Carlo analysis techniques have been used to determine dose and dose equivalent to the active marrow as a function of energy and angle of neutron fluence externally incident on an anthropomorphic phantom. When combined with fluences from actual nuclear devices, these dose-to-fluence factors result in marrow dose values that demonstrate great sensitivity to variations in device type, range, and body orientation. Under a state-of-the-art radiation transport analysis demonstration program for the Japanese cities, sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency at the request of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the marrow dose study referred to above is being repeated to obtain spectral distributions within the marrow for externally incident neutrons and gamma rays of arbitrary energy and angle. This is intended to allow radiobiologists and epidemiologists to select and to modify numbers of merit for correlation with health effects and to permit a greater understanding of the relationship between human and laboratory subject dosimetry

  17. Radiation shielding member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemezawa, Isao; Kimura, Tadahiro; Mizuochi, Akira; Omori, Tetsu

    1998-01-01

    A single body of a radiation shield comprises a bag prepared by welding or bonding a polyurethane sheet which is made flat while interposing metal plates at the upper and the lower portion of the bag. Eyelet fittings are disposed to the upper and the lower portions of the bag passing through the metal plates and the flat portion of the bag. Water supplying/draining ports are disposed to two upper and lower places of the bag at a height where the metal plates are disposed. Reinforcing walls welded or bonded to the inner wall surface of the bag are elongated in vertical direction to divide the inside of the bag to a plurality of cells. The bag is suspended and supported from a frame with S-shaped hooks inserted into the eyelet fittings as connecting means. A plurality of bags are suspended and supported from the frame at a required height by way of the eyelets at the lower portion of the suspended and supported bag and the eyelet fittings at the upper portion of the bag below the intermediate connection means. (I.N.)

  18. Shielding analysis of the LMR in-vessel fuel storage experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this paper were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present paper describes the 2- and 3-D calculations and results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program had a particular interest

  19. Multidimensional shielding analysis of the JASPER in-vessel fuel storage experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1993-03-01

    The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this report were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present report describes the 2-D and 3-D models, analyses, and calculated results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program has a particular interest.

  20. Active Radiation Shield, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DEC-Shield technology offers the means to generate electric power from cosmic radiation sources and fuse dissimilar systems and functionality into a structural...

  1. Shielding calculations. Optimization vs. Paradigms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo Diaz, Nestor; Hernandez Saiz, Alejandro; Martinez Gonzalez, Alina

    2005-01-01

    Many radiation shielding barriers in Cuba have been designed according to the criterion of Maxi-mum Projected Dose Rates. This fact has created the paradigm of low dose rates. Because of this, dose rate levels greater than units of Sv.h-1 would be considered unacceptable by many specialists, regardless of the real exposure times. Nowadays many shielding barriers are being designed using dose constraints in real exposure times. Behind the new barriers, dose rates could be notably greater than those behind the traditional ones, and it does not imply inadequate designs or constructive errors. In this work were obtained significant differences in dose rate levels and shield-ing thicknesses calculated by both methods for some typical installations. The work concludes that real exposure time approach is more adequate in order to optimise Radiation Protection, although this method should be carefully applied

  2. Use of multiple radiographic techniques for nuclear shielding development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S., E-mail: dayse@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., McMaster Nuclear Reactor, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    The McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) is a medium-sized research reactor located on the campus of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. The largest nuclear reactor on a Canadian university campus, MNR is an open-pool, light water research reactor, Equipped with both in-core and ex-core irradiation facilities, MNR serves research, education, and industrial needs while producing radioisotopes for medical applications. Presently the University is preparing for the installation of a positron beam line facility at one of the MNR beam ports. One of five such facilities worldwide, the McMaster Intense Positron Beam Facility (MIPBF) will provide orders of magnitude more positrons than a standard bench-top arrangement, making possible experiments not previously feasible. Funded by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation and the Ontario Research Foundation, the MIPBF project is a collaborative effort between positron groups at McMaster, Western, and York universities and researchers and staff at MNR, The project has involved design and fabrication of both the positron production and transport system and custom biological shielding. The MIPBF shielding fabrication is scheduled to be complete by fall 2015 followed shortly by installation and commissioning testing at MNR. Positron beam availability is planned for later in 2016. Applications include defect characterization and surface analysis of advanced engineering materials and fundamental science experiments on antimatter properties, The MIPBF will be the latest addition to the extensive array of materials-related facilities at McMaster University. (author)

  3. Nuclear data needs for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear design of fusion components (e.g., first wall, blanket, shield, magnet, limiter, divertor, etc.) requires an accurate prediction of the radiation field, the radiation damage parameters, and the activation analysis. The fusion nucleonics for these tasks are reviewed with special attention to point out nuclear data needs and deficiencies which effect the design process. The main areas included in this review are tritium breeding analyses, nuclear heating calculations, radiation damage in reactor components, shield designs, and results of uncertainty analyses as applied to fusion reactor studies. Design choices and reactor parameters that impact the neutronics performance of the blanket are discussed with emphasis on the tritium breeding ratio. Nuclear data required for kerma factors, shielding analysis, and radiation damage are discussed. Improvements in the evaluated data libraries are described to overcome the existing problems. 84 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs

  4. Design considerations in inertially-confined fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.

    1976-08-01

    This paper discusses the effects of short time pulses of energetic particles and waves typical of inertially-confined thermonuclear reactions on the first wall, blanket and shield of conceptual reactors. Several reactor designs are presented which attempt to cope with the various problems from the microexplosion debris. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on the first-wall problems of laser-initiated, inertially confined fusion reactors using the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle

  5. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadori Amir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  6. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Amir; Semones, Edward; Ewert, Michael; Broyan, James; Walker, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles is described. Using accelerated alpha particles at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the method is applied to sample tiles from the Heat Melt Compactor, which were created by melting material from a simulated astronaut waste stream, consisting of materials such as trash and unconsumed food. The shielding effectiveness calculated from measurements of the Heat Melt Compactor sample tiles is about 10% less than the shielding effectiveness of polyethylene. Shielding material produced from the astronaut waste stream in the form of Heat Melt Compactor tiles is therefore found to be an attractive solution for protection against space radiation.

  7. Shielding proposal to reduce cross-talk from ITER lower port to equatorial port

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juarez, Rafael, E-mail: rjuarez@ind.uned.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Pampin, Raul [F4E, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, Barcelona 08019 (Spain); Levesy, Bruno [ITER Organization, 13115 Route de Vinon sur Verdon, St Paul Lez Durance (France); Moro, Fabio [ENEA, Via Enrico Fermi 45, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Suarez, Alejandro [ITER Organization, 13115 Route de Vinon sur Verdon, St Paul Lez Durance (France); Catalan, J.P.; Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingeniería Energética, ETSII-UNED, Calle Juan del Rosal 12, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Radiation cross-talk from Torus Cryopump LP to EP was found to be a phenomenon driving Shutdown Dose Rates at EP Port Interspace after 12 days of cooling time, as relevant as neutron permeation through EP itself. In this work three different shields are proposed to mitigate the radiation cross-talk: two neutron shields placed inside LP, and a temporary gamma shield placed at EP PI during maintenance activities. Contributions from different reactor regions to Shutdown Dose Rates are computed, for the unshielded design, as long as the different shielded cases. The Rigorous-Two-Steps (R2S) method was used. The neutron shields inside TCP-LP are found to reduce SDR at EP PI 43 μSv/h and 99 μSv/h, while the gamma shield inside EP PI offers a reduction of 157 μSv/h in its heaviest configuration. Among these relevant reductions, the gamma shield inside the EP PI offers the best shielding option, as it reduces gamma cross-talk from TCP-LP and also protects EP PI from Port Duct and EP bellows activation, while it does not interfere with TCP performance.

  8. Conceptual study of fusion-driven transmutation reactor with ITER physics and engineering constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bong

    2011-10-01

    A conceptual study of fusion-driven transmutation reactor was performed based on ITER physics and engineering constraints. A compact reactor concept is desirable from an economic viewpoint. For the optimal design of a reactor, a radial build of reactor components has to be determined by considering the plasma physics and engineering constraints which inter-relate various reactor components. In a transmutation reactor, design of blanket and shield play a key role in determining the size of a reactor; the blanket should produce enough tritium for tritium self-sufficiency, the transmutation rate of waste has to be maximized, and the shield should provide sufficient protection for the superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil. To determine the radial build of the blanket and the shield, not only a radiation transport analysis but also a burnup calculation were coupled with the system analysis and it allowed the self-consistent determination of the design parameters of a transmutation reactor.

  9. Nuclear reactor building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Nobuaki.

    1991-08-09

    The secondary container in a nuclear reactor building is made of a transparent structure having a shielding performance such as lead glass, by which the inside of the secondary container can be seen without undergoing radiation exposure. In addition, an operator transportation facility capable of carrying about 5 to 10 operators at one time is disposed, and the side of the facility on the secondary container is constituted with a transparent material such as glass, to provide a structure capable of observing the inside of the secondary container. The ventilation and air conditioning in the operator's transportation facility is in communication with the atmosphere of a not-controlled area. Accordingly, operators at the outside of the reactor building can reach the operator's transportation facility without taking and procedures for entering the controlled area and without undergoing radiation exposure. The inside of the secondary container in the reactor building can be seen from various directions through the transparent structure having the shielding performance. (N.H.).

  10. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  11. Application of invariant embedding to reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, Akinao; Parsegian, V L

    1972-01-01

    Application of Invariant Embedding to Reactor Physics describes the application of the method of invariant embedding to radiation shielding and to criticality calculations of atomic reactors. The authors intend to show how this method has been applied to realistic problems, together with the results of applications which will be useful to shielding design. The book is organized into two parts. Part A deals with the reflection and transmission of gamma rays by slabs. The chapters in this section cover topics such as the reflection and transmission problem of gamma rays; formulation of the probl

  12. Analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, C.O.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the analysis of the JASPER Program Radial Shield Attenuation Experiment are presented. The experiment was performed in 1986 at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. It is the first of six experiments in this cooperative Japanese and American program in support of shielding designs for advanced sodium-cooled reactors. Six different shielding configurations and subconfigurations thereof were studied. The configurations were calculated with the DOT-IV two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport computer code using the R-Z geometry option, a symmetric S{sub 12} quadrature (96 directions), and cross sections from ENDF/B versions IV and V in either a 51- or 61-group structure. Auxiliary codes were used to compute detector responses and prepare cross sections and source input for the DOT-IV calculations. Calculated detector responses were compared with measured responses and the agreement was good to excellent in many cases. However, the agreement for configurations having thick steel or B{sub 4}C regions or for some very large configurations was fair to poor. The disagreement was attributed to cross-section data, broad-group structure, or high background in the measurements. In particular, it is shown that two cross-section sets for ``B give very different results for neutron transmission through the thick B{sub 4}C regions used in one set of experimental configurations. Implications for design calculations are given.

  13. Nuclear radiation problems, unmanned thermionic reactor ion propulsion spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondt, J. F.; Sawyer, C. D.; Nakashima, A.

    1972-01-01

    A nuclear thermionic reactor as the electric power source for an electric propulsion spacecraft introduces a nuclear radiation environment that affects the spacecraft configuration, the use and location of electrical insulators and the science experiments. The spacecraft is conceptually configured to minimize the nuclear shield weight by: (1) a large length to diameter spacecraft; (2) eliminating piping penetrations through the shield; and (3) using the mercury propellant as gamma shield. Since the alumina material is damaged by the high nuclear radiation environment in the reactor it is desirable to locate the alumina insulator outside the reflector or develop a more radiation resistant insulator.

  14. Reactor cavity streaming: the problem and engineered solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iotti, R.C.; Yang, T.L.; Rogers, W.H.

    1979-01-01

    Experience at operating pressurized water reactors has revealed that air gaps between the reactor vessel and the biological shield wall can provide paths for radiation streaming, which may prohibitively limit the accessibility required to areas in the containment during power operation, increase personnel exposure during shutdown, and cause radiation damage to equipment and cables located above the vessel. Several concepts of shield are discussed together with their predicted effectiveness. The analytical methods employed to determine the streaming magnitude and the shield effectiveness are also discussed and their accuracy is measured by comparison with actual measurement at an operating plant

  15. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion reactors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  16. Safety studies concerning nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailly, Jean; Pelce, Jacques

    1980-01-01

    The safety of nuclear installations poses different technical problems, whether concerning pressurized water reactors or fast reactors. But investigating methods are closely related and concern, on the one hand, the behavior of shields placed between fuel and outside and, on the other, analysis of accidents. The article is therefore in two parts based on the same plan. Concerning light water reactors, the programme of studies undertaken in France accounts for the research carried out in countries where collaboration agreements exist. Concerning fast reactors, France has the initiative of their studies owing to her technical advance, which explains the great importance of the programmes under way [fr

  17. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the engineering conceptual design of Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) which is to be built as a next generation tokamak machine. This design covers overall reactor systems including MHD equilibrium analysis, mechanical configuration of reactor, divertor, pumped limiter, first wall/breeding blanket/shield, toroidal field magnet, poloidal field magnet, cryostat, electromagnetic analysis, vacuum system, power handling and conversion, NBI, RF heating device, tritium system, neutronics, maintenance, cooling system and layout of facilities. The engineering comparison of a divertor with pumped limiters and safety analysis of reactor systems are also conducted. (author)

  18. On solid bulk liquefaction

    OpenAIRE

    Fkhir, Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    Solid bulk cargoes, such as nickel ore and iron ore, have a tendency to liquefy. Such goods can transform from hard to liquid state very rapidly leaving no time for the master or crew to do anything but face their imminent fate. The liquefaction of solid bulk cargoes has claimed many seafarers’ lives and dozens of ships. The moisture content present in these cargoes can be dramatically increased to unsafe limits by the mere reason of the vessel’s rolling on waves. In response to the alarming ...

  19. The Dalkon Shield in perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, P; Hirsh, H L

    1986-01-01

    When the Dalkon Shield IUD became clinically available in the early 1970s, it appeared that an ideal contraceptive had been developed, with essentially no adverse effects (very safe) and a very high degree of efficacy. Within a few years, however, it became apparent that the Dalkon Shield had not lived up to expectations. In fact, it caused very severe complications, not infrequently resulting in the loss of reproductive ability and in 17 cases, death. In addition, the pregnancy rate among women using this IUD was significantly high, with many resulting in mid-trimester abortion when the IUD remained in-place. The authors trace the legal consequences of this medical disaster, which has resulted in both the development of new and the extension of old legal theories and doctrines involving negligence and product liability. Dalkon Shield litigation is most likely to continue. Many women are assumed to wear the shield still, and neither the FDA or A.H. Robins, manufacturer of the shield, has issued a formal recall.

  20. Self-shielding models of MICROX-2 code: Review and updates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, J.; Choi, H.; Ivanov, K.N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The MICROX-2 code has been improved to expand its application to advanced reactors. • New fine-group cross section libraries based on ENDF/B-VII have been generated. • Resonance self-shielding and spatial self-shielding models have been improved. • The improvements were assessed by a series of benchmark calculations against MCNPX. - Abstract: The MICROX-2 is a transport theory code that solves for the neutron slowing-down and thermalization equations of a two-region lattice cell. The MICROX-2 code has been updated to expand its application to advanced reactor concepts and fuel cycle simulations, including generation of new fine-group cross section libraries based on ENDF/B-VII. In continuation of previous work, the MICROX-2 methods are reviewed and updated in this study, focusing on its resonance self-shielding and spatial self-shielding models for neutron spectrum calculations. The improvement of self-shielding method was assessed by a series of benchmark calculations against the Monte Carlo code, using homogeneous and heterogeneous pin cell models. The results have shown that the implementation of the updated self-shielding models is correct and the accuracy of physics calculation is improved. Compared to the existing models, the updates reduced the prediction error of the infinite multiplication factor by ∼0.1% and ∼0.2% for the homogeneous and heterogeneous pin cell models, respectively, considered in this study

  1. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  2. Shielding calculations in support of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) proton beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey O.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Popova, Irina

    2002-01-01

    Determining the bulk shielding requirements for accelerator environments is generally an easy task compared to analyzing the radiation transport through the complex shield configurations and penetrations typically associated with the detailed Title II design efforts of a facility. Shielding calculations for penetrations in the SNS accelerator environment are presented based on hybrid Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates particle transport methods. This methodology relies on coupling tools that map boundary surface leakage information from the Monte Carlo calculations to boundary sources for one-, two-, and three-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations. The paper will briefly introduce the coupling tools for coupling MCNPX to the one-, two-, and three-dimensional discrete ordinates codes in the DOORS code suite. The paper will briefly present typical applications of these tools in the design of complex shield configurations and penetrations in the SNS proton beam transport system

  3. Use of Lagrange Multipliers to Provide an Approximate Method for the Optimisation of a Shield Radius and Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Paul

    2017-09-01

    For any appreciable radiation source, such as a nuclear reactor core or radiation physics accelerator, there will be the safety requirement to shield operators from the effects of the radiation from the source. Both the size and weight of the shield need to be minimised to reduce costs (and to increase the space available for the maintenance envelope on a plant). This needs to be balanced against legal radiation dose safety limits and the requirement to reduce the dose to operators As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP). This paper describes a method that can be used, early in a shield design, to scope the design and provide a practical estimation of the size of the shield by optimising the shield internals. In particular, a theoretical model representative of a small reactor is used to demonstrate that the primary shielding radius, thickness of the primary shielding inner wall and the thicknesses of two steel inner walls, can be set using the Lagrange multiplier method with a constraint on the total flux on the outside of the shielding. The results from the optimisation are presented and an RZ finite element transport theory calculation is used to demonstrate that, using the optimised geometry, the constraint is achieved.

  4. Use of Lagrange Multipliers to Provide an Approximate Method for the Optimisation of a Shield Radius and Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warner Paul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For any appreciable radiation source, such as a nuclear reactor core or radiation physics accelerator, there will be the safety requirement to shield operators from the effects of the radiation from the source. Both the size and weight of the shield need to be minimised to reduce costs (and to increase the space available for the maintenance envelope on a plant. This needs to be balanced against legal radiation dose safety limits and the requirement to reduce the dose to operators As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP. This paper describes a method that can be used, early in a shield design, to scope the design and provide a practical estimation of the size of the shield by optimising the shield internals. In particular, a theoretical model representative of a small reactor is used to demonstrate that the primary shielding radius, thickness of the primary shielding inner wall and the thicknesses of two steel inner walls, can be set using the Lagrange multiplier method with a constraint on the total flux on the outside of the shielding. The results from the optimisation are presented and an RZ finite element transport theory calculation is used to demonstrate that, using the optimised geometry, the constraint is achieved.

  5. Reactor physics computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, A.

    1977-01-01

    Those reactor-core calculations which provide the effective multiplication factor (or eigenvalue) and the stationary (or fundamental mode) neutron-flux distribution at selected times during the lifetime of the core are considered. The multiplication factor is required to establish the nuclear composition and configuration which satisfy criticality and control requirements. The steady-state flux distribution must be known to calculate reaction rates and power distributions which are needed for the thermal, mechanical and shielding design of the reactor, as well as for evaluating refueling requirements. The calculational methods and techniques used for evaluating the nuclear design information vary with the type of reactor and with the preferences and prejudices of the reactor-physics group responsible for the calculation. Additionally, new methods and techniques are continually being developed and made operational. This results in a rather large conglomeration of methods and computer codes which are available for reactor analysis. The author provides the basic calculational framework and discusses the more prominent techniques which have evolved. (Auth.)

  6. Thermo-mechanical design and structural analysis of the first wall for ARIES-III, A 1000 MWeD-3He power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I.; Blanchard, J.P.; Mogahed, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on ARIES III, a conceptual design study of a 1000 MWe D- 3 He tokamak fusion power reactor in which most of the energy comes from charged particle transport, bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, and only a small fraction (∼ 4%) comes form neutrons. This form of energy is deposited as surface heating on the chamber first wall (FW) and divertor elements, while the neutron energy is deposited as bulk nuclear heating within the shield. Since this reactor does not use tritium, there is no breeding blanket. Instead a shield is provided to protect the magnets from neutrons. The Fw is very unique in a D- 3 He reactor, it must be capable of absorbing the high surface heat in a mode suitable for efficient power cycle conversion, it must be able to reflect synchrotron radiation, and it must be able to withstand high current plasma disruptions. The FW is made of a low activation ferritic steel (MHT-9) and is cooled with an organic coolant (HB-40) at a pressure of 2 MPa. The FW has a coating of 0.01 cm tungsten on the MHT-9, followed by 0.15 cm of Be on the plasma side. This is needed for synchrotron radiation reflection and as a melt layer to guard against the thermal effects of a plasma disruption

  7. "Understanding" cosmological bulk viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Zimdahl, Winfried

    1996-01-01

    A universe consisting of two interacting perfect fluids with the same 4-velocity is considered. A heuristic mean free time argument is used to show that the system as a whole cannot be perfect as well but neccessarily implies a nonvanishing bulk viscosity. A new formula for the latter is derived and compared with corresponding results of radiative hydrodynamics.

  8. Special concrete shield selection using the analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulfaraj, W.H.

    1994-01-01

    Special types of concrete radiation shields that depend on locally available materials and have improved properties for both neutron and gamma-ray attenuation were developed by using plastic materials and heavy ores. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is implemented to evaluate these types for selecting the best biological radiation shield for nuclear reactors. Factors affecting the selection decision are degree of protection against neutrons, degree of protection against gamma rays, suitability of the concrete as building material, and economic considerations. The seven concrete alternatives are barite-polyethylene concrete, barite-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) concrete, barite-portland cement concrete, pyrite-polyethylene concrete, pyrite-PVC concrete, pyrite-portland cement concrete, and ordinary concrete. The AHP analysis shows the superiority of pyrite-polyethylene concrete over the others

  9. Unresolved resonance self shielding calculation: causes and importance of discrepancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribon, P.; Tellier, H.

    1986-09-01

    To compute the self shielding coefficient, it is necessary to know the point-wise cross-sections. In the unresolved resonance region, we do not know the parameters of each level but only the average parameters. Therefore we simulate the point-wise cross-section by random sampling of the energy levels and resonance parameters with respect to the Wigner law and the X 2 distributions, and by computing the cross-section in the same way as in the resolved regions. The result of this statistical calculation obviously depends on the initial parameters but also on the method of sampling, on the formalism which is used to compute the cross-section or on the weighting neutron flux. In this paper, we will survey the main phenomena which can induce discrepancies in self shielding computations. Results are given for typical dilutions which occur in nuclear reactors. 8 refs

  10. Degradation of Non-Diffusible Organic Matter in Biofilm Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohold, Lars Erik; Harremoës, Poul

    1993-01-01

    A simple laboratory test has been developed in order to demonstrate qualitatively, that the removal of non-diffusible organics in a biofilm reactor requires hydrolysis by extracellular enzymes in the bulk water of the reactor. The results demonstrate the effect of changing volume of bulk water...

  11. Fractionation of plutonium in environmental and bio-shielding concrete samples using dynamic sequential extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Fractionation of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239,240Pu) in environmental samples (i.e. soil and sediment) and bio-shielding concrete from decommissioning of nuclear reactor were carried out by dynamic sequential extraction using an on-line sequential injection (SI) system combined with a specially...... to the treatment and disposal of nuclear waste from decommissioning....

  12. Structural and Shielding Safety of a Transport Package for Radioisotope Sealed Source Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Kiseog; Cho, Ilje; Kim, Donghak

    2006-01-01

    As some kinds of radioisotope (RI) sealed source are produced by HANARO research reactor, a demand of RI transport package is increasing gradually. Foreign countries, which produce the various RIs, have the intrinsic model of the RI transport package. It is necessary to develop a RI and its transport package simultaneously. It is difficult to design a shielding part for this transport package because the passage for this source assembly should be provided from the center of shielding part to the outside of the package. In order to endure the accident conditions such as a 9 m drop and puncture, this transport package consists of the guide tubes, a gamma shield and a shock absorber. This paper describe that a shielding and structural safety of RI sealed source transport package are evaluated under the accident conditions

  13. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  14. Diagnosis of electric equipment at the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Truong Sinh

    1999-01-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type of its kind in the world: Soviet-designed core and control system harmoniously integrated into the left-over infrastructure of the former American-made TRIGA MARK II reactor, which includes the reactor tank and shielding, graphite reflector, beam tubes and thermal column. The reactor is mainly used for radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production, elemental analysis using neutron activation techniques, neutron beam exploitation, silicon doping, and reactor physics experimentation. For safe operation of the reactor maintenance work has been carried out for the reactor control and instrumentation, reactor cooling, ventilation, radiomonitoring, mechanical, normal electric supply systems as well as emergency electric diesel generators and the water treatment station. Technical management of the reactor includes periodical maintenance as required by technical specifications, training, re-training and control of knowledge for reactor staff. During recent years, periodic preventive maintenance (PPM) has been carried out for the electric machines of the technological systems. (author)

  15. Economic analysis of EBT reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, J.T.; Uckan, N.A.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to establish the economic potential of the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor, two independent system-costing models have been developed. Both models predict capital costs of approximately $400/kW(th). These relatively low costs reflect the simplicity of the EBTR design. In particular, the modular nature of the individual blanket-shield segments, the low costs ''accelerator style'' containment building, high beta, and steady-state operation lead to relatively low reactor costs. A detailed cost breakdown for subsystems is analyzed. High cost and high uncertainty subsystems are identified to direct further emphasis into those areas. The calculated capital costs for the EBT reactor are compared with those costs quoted for tokamak reactors

  16. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization.

  17. Shielding structure analysis for LSDS facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hong Yeop; Kim, Jeong Dong; Lee, Yong Deok; Kim, Ho Dong

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear material (Pyro, Spent nuclear fuel) itself and the target material to generate neutrons is the LSDS system for isotopic fissile assay release of high intensity neutron and gamma rays. This research was performed to shield from various strong radiation. A shielding evaluation was carried out with a facilities model of LSDS system. The MCNPX 2.5 code was used and a shielding evaluation was performed for the shielding structure and location. The radiation dose based on the hole structure and location of the wall was evaluated. The shielding evaluation was performed to satisfy the safety standard for a normal person (1 μSv/h) and to use enough interior space. The MCNPX2.5 code was used and a dose evaluation was performed for the location of the shielding material, shielding structure, and hole structure. The evaluation result differs according to the shielding material location. The dose rate was small when the shielding material was positioned at the center. The dose evaluation result regarding the location of the shielding material was applied to the facility and the shielding thickness was determined (In 50 cm + Borax 5 cm + Out 45cm). In the existing hole structure, the radiation leak is higher than the standard. A hole structure model to prevent leakage of radiation was proposed. The general public dose limit was satisfied when using the concrete reinforcement and a zigzag structure. The shielding result will be of help to the facility shielding optimization

  18. ATFSR: a small torsatron reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Lacatski, J.T.; Uckan, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    A small (average minor radius anti a approx. = 1 m), moderate-aspect-ratio torsatron reactor based on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is proposed as a starting point for improved stellarator reactor designs. The major limitation of the compact size is the lack of space under the helical coils for the blanket and shield. Neoclassical confinement models for helically trapped particles show that a large electric potential (radial electric field) is necessary to achieve ignition in a device of this size, although high-Q operation is still attainable with more modest potentials

  19. Fast reactor physics at CEA: present studies and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, P.

    1980-09-01

    This paper aims at giving a general survey of the fast reactor core physics and shielding studies wich are in progress at CEA (1979-1983) in order to solve the neutronic problems related to: - core design optimization, - reactor operation and fuel management, - safety, for the development of fast commercial breeders in France after the SUPER-PHENIX 1 construction is achieved

  20. Irradiation routine in the IPR-R1 Triga reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maretti Junior, F.

    1980-01-01

    Information about irradiations in the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor and procedures necessary for radioisotope solicitation are presented All procedures necessary for asking irradiation in the reactor, shielding types, norms of terrestrial and aerial expeditions, payment conditions, and catalogue of disposable isotopes with their respective saturation activities are described. (M.C.K.)

  1. Self-shielding characteristics of aqueous self-cooled blankets for next generation fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelloni, S.; Cheng, E.T.; Embrechts, M.J.

    1987-11-01

    The present study examines self-shielding characteristics for two aqueous self-cooled tritium producing driver blankets for next generation fusion devices. The aqueous Self-Cooled Blanket concept (ASCB) is a very simple blanket concept that relies on just structural material and coolant. Lithium compounds are dissolved in water to provide for tritium production. An ASCB driver blanket would provide a low technology and low temperature environment for blanket test modules in a next generation fusion reactor. The primary functions of such a blanket would be shielding, energy removal and tritium production. One driver blanket considered in this study concept relates to the one proposed for the Next European Torus (NET), while the second concept is indicative for the inboard shield design for the Engineering Test Reactor proposed by the USA (TIBER II/ETR). The driver blanket for NET is based on stainless steel for the structural material and aqueous solution, while the inboard shielding blanket for TIBER II/ETR is based on a tungsten/aqueous solution combination. The purpose of this study is to investigate self-shielding and heterogeneity effects in aqueous self-cooled blankets. It is found that no significant gains in tritium breeding can be achieved in the stainless steel blanket if spatial and energy self-shielding effects are considered, and the heterogeneity effects are also insignificant. The tungsten blanket shows a 5 percent increase in tritium production in the shielding blanket when energy and spatial self-shielding effects are accounted for. However, the tungsten blanket shows a drastic increase in the tritium breeding ratio due to heterogeneity effects. (author) 17 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  2. A Novel Radiation Shielding Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation shielding simulations showed that epoxy loaded with 10-70% polyethylene would be an excellent shielding material against GCRs and SEPs. Milling produced an...

  3. Simulation of a Shielded Thermocouple

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    performance of shielded thermocouple designs. A mathematical model of the thermocouple is obtained by derivation of the heat propagation equation in cylindrical coordinates and by considering the ... Here k is the thermal conductivity, p c is the specific heat capacity, ρ is the density,. ∞. T is the ambient temperature, and μ ...

  4. Micromegas in a bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giomataris, I.; De Oliveira, R.; Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; Charpak, G.; Colas, P.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer, E.; Giganon, A.; Rebourgeard, Ph.; Salin, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel way to manufacture the bulk Micromegas detector. A simple process based on the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology is employed to produce the entire sensitive detector. Such a fabrication process could be extended to very large area detectors made by the industry. The low cost fabrication together with the robustness of the electrode materials will make it attractive for several applications ranging from particle physics and astrophysics to medicine

  5. Shielding evaluation of neutron generator hall by Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujala, U.; Selvakumaran, T.S.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B. [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Thilagam, L.; Mohapatra, D.K., E-mail: swathythila2@yahoo.com [Safety Research Institute, Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-04-01

    A shielded hall was constructed for accommodating a D-D, D-T or D-Be based pulsed neutron generator (NG) with 4π yield of 10{sup 9} n/s. The neutron shield design of the facility was optimized using NCRP-51 methodology such that the total dose rates outside the hall areas are well below the regulatory limit for full occupancy criterion (1 μSv/h). However, the total dose rates at roof top, cooling room trench exit and labyrinth exit were found to be above this limit for the optimized design. Hence, additional neutron shielding arrangements were proposed for cooling room trench and labyrinth exits. The roof top was made inaccessible. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the neutron and associated capture gamma transport through the bulk shields for the complete geometry and materials of the NG-Hall using Monte Carlo (MC) codes MCNP and FLUKA. The neutron source terms of D-D, D-T and D-Be reactions are considered in the simulations. The effect of additional shielding proposed has been demonstrated through the simulations carried out with the consideration of the additional shielding for D-Be neutron source term. The results MC simulations using two different codes are found to be consistent with each other for neutron dose rate estimates. However, deviation up to 28% is noted between these two codes at few locations for capture gamma dose rate estimates. Overall, the dose rates estimated by MC simulations including additional shields shows that all the locations surrounding the hall satisfy the full occupancy criteria for all three types of sources. Additionally, the dose rates due to direct transmission of primary neutrons estimated by FLUKA are compared with the values calculated using the formula given in NCRP-51 which shows deviations up to 50% with each other. The details of MC simulations and NCRP-51 methodology for the estimation of primary neutron dose rate along with the results are presented in this paper. (author)

  6. A comparative study of two digestion methods employed for the determination boron in ferroboron used as an advanced shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Manisha, V.; Venkatesh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Shielding of nuclear reactor core is an important requirement of fast reactors. An important objective of future Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) is to reduce the volume of shields. A large number of materials have been considered for use to reduce the neutron flux to acceptable levels. A shield material which brings down the energy of neutrons by elastic and inelastic scattering along with absorption will be more effective. Ferro boron is identified as one of the advanced shielding materials considered for use in future FBRs, planned to be constructed in India. Ferroboron is an economical and indigenously available material which qualifies as a promising shield material through literature survey and scoping calculations. Experiments have been conducted in KAMINI reactor to understand the effectiveness of prospective shield material Ferro-boron as an in-core shield material for future FBRs. The Ferro boron used in these experiments contained 11.8% and 15% of boron. Precise determination of boron content in these ferro boron samples is very important to determine its effectiveness as a shield material. In this work a comparative study was carried out to determine the boron content in ferro boron samples. In the first method the sample was treated with incremental amounts of nitric acid under reflux (to prevent rigorous reaction and volatalisation of boron). The solution was gradually heated and the solution was filtered through a Whatman Filter paper no. 41. The undissolved ferro boron residue collected in the filter paper after filtration, is transferred to a platinum crucible; mixed with sodium carbonate and is ashed. The crucible is placed over a burner for 1 h to fuse the contents. The fused mass is leached in dilute hydrochloric acid, added to the nitric acid filtrate and made up to pre-determined volume

  7. Large packages for reactor decommissioning waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, M.S.T.

    1991-01-01

    This study was carried out jointly by the Atomic Energy Establishment at Winfrith (now called the Winfrith Technology Centre), Windscale Laboratory and Ove Arup and Partners. The work involved the investigation of the design of large transport containers for intermediate level reactor decommissioning waste, ie waste which requires shielding, and is aimed at European requirements (ie for both LWR and gas cooled reactors). It proposes a design methodology for such containers covering the whole lifetime of a waste disposal package. The design methodology presented takes account of various relevant constraints. Both large self shielded and returnable shielded concepts were developed. The work was generic, rather than specific; the results obtained, and the lessons learned, remain to be applied in practice

  8. Decommissioning of the Northrop TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozens, George B.; Woo, Harry; Benveniste, Jack; Candall, Walter E.; Adams-Chalmers, Jeanne

    1986-01-01

    An overview of the administrative and operational aspects of decommissioning and dismantling the Northrop Mark F TRIGA Reactor, including: planning and preparation, personnel requirements, government interfacing, costs, contractor negotiations, fuel shipments, demolition, disposal of low level waste, final survey and disposition of the concrete biological shielding. (author)

  9. Safety of research reactors (Design and Operation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirar, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to conduct a comprehensive up-to-date literature review on the current status of safety of research reactor both in design and operation providing the future trends in safety of research reactors. Data and technical information of variety selected historical research reactors were thoroughly reviewed and evaluated, furthermore illustrations of the material of fuel, control rods, shielding, moderators and coolants used were discussed. Insight study of some historical research reactors was carried with considering sample cases such as Chicago Pile-1, F-1 reactor, Chalk River Laboratories,. The National Research Experimental Reactor and others. The current status of research reactors and their geographical distribution, reactor category and utilization is also covered. Examples of some recent advanced reactors were studied like safety barriers of HANARO of Korea including safety doors of the hall and building entrance and finger print identification which prevent the reactor from sabotage. On the basis of the results of this research, it is apparent that a high quality of safety of nuclear reactors can be attained by achieving enough robust construction, designing components of high levels of efficiency, replacing the compounds of the reactor in order to avoid corrosion and degradation with age, coupled with experienced scientists and technical staffs to operate nuclear research facilities.(Author)

  10. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample

  11. Survivor shielding. Part A. Nagasaki factory worker shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, Robert T.; Barnes, John M.; Azmy, Yousry Y.; Kerr, George D.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Cullings, Harry M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent investigations based on conventional chromosome aberration data by the RERF suggest that the DS86 doses received by many Nagasaki factory workers may have been overestimated by as much as 40% relative to those for other survivors in Japanese-type houses and other shielding configurations (Kodama et al. 2001). Since the factory workers represent about 25% of the Nagasaki survivors with DS86 doses in excess of 0.5 Gy (50 rad), systematic errors in their dose estimates can have a major impact on the risk coefficients from RERF studies. The factory worker doses may have been overestimated for a number of reasons. The calculation techniques, including the factory building modeling, weapon source spectra and cross-section data used in the DS86 shielding calculations were not detailed enough to replicate actual conditions. The models used did not take into account local shielding provided by machinery, tools, and the internal structure in the buildings. In addition, changes in the disposition of shielding following collapse of the building by the blast wave were not considered. The location of large factory complexes may be uncertain, causing large numbers of factory survivors, correctly located relative to each other, to be uniformly too close to the hypocenter. Any or all of these reasons are sufficient to result in an overestimate of the factory worker doses. During the DS02 studies, factory worker doses have been reassessed by more carefully modeling the factory buildings, incorporating improved radiation transport methods and cross-section data and using the most recent bomb leakage spectra (Chapter 2). Two-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations were carried out initially to estimate the effects of workbenches and tools on worker doses to determine if the inclusion of these components would, in fact, reduce the dose by amounts consistent with the RERF observations (Kodama et al. 2001). (author)

  12. First wall-shield design considerations for ETF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, P.H.; Fuller, G.M.; Engholm, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    ETF reactor designs have been developed for both the bundle divertor (Design 1) and single-null poloidal divertor (Design 2) impurity control concepts. The first wall-shield designs presented for these two reactors are basically the same. Access for repair and replacement is provided by dividing the torus into ten sectors that can be radially removed between adjacent toroidal field (TF) coils. Stainless steel, cooled by borated water, forms the basic structure of these sectors. Water-cooled tube panels, radiation-cooled graphite disruption armor, and water-cooled grraphite runaway electron armor are attached to the inside walls of these sectors to form the plasma chamber. The torus sectors are mounted to and form a vacuum seal with a torus support spool

  13. Dynamic Analysis of AP1000 Shield Building Considering Fluid and Structure Interaction Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Xu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The shield building of AP1000 was designed to protect the steel containment vessel of the nuclear reactor. Therefore, the safety and integrity must be ensured during the plant life in any conditions such as an earthquake. The aim of this paper is to study the effect of water in the water tank on the response of the AP1000 shield building when subjected to three-dimensional seismic ground acceleration. The smoothed particle hydrodynamics method (SPH and finite element method (FEM coupling method is used to numerically simulate the fluid and structure interaction (FSI between water in the water tank and the AP1000 shield building. Then the grid convergence of FEM and SPH for the AP1000 shield building is analyzed. Next the modal analysis of the AP1000 shield building with various water levels (WLs in the water tank is taken. Meanwhile, the pressure due to sloshing and oscillation of the water in the gravity drain water tank is studied. The influences of the height of water in the water tank on the time history of acceleration of the AP1000 shield building are discussed, as well as the distributions of amplification, acceleration, displacement, and stresses of the AP1000 shield building. Research on the relationship between the WLs in the water tank and the response spectrums of the structure are also taken. The results show that the high WL in the water tank can limit the vibration of the AP1000 shield building and can more efficiently dissipate the kinetic energy of the AP1000 shield building by fluid-structure interaction.

  14. Diffusion or bulk flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    assimilate movement includes an apoplasmic step, this mode is called apoplasmic loading. Well established is also the polymer-trap loading mode, where the phloem-transport sugars are raffinose-family oligomers in herbaceous plants. Also this mode depends on the investment of energy, here for sugar...... is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous...

  15. Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and Thermal Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, A.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the in 8 meter depth of water and for cutting through super alloyed moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR stainless steel up to 130 mm wall thickness. Depending on the research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the MZFR reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m 3 . Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (author)

  16. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  17. High ionization radiation field remote visualization device - shielding requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, Antonio P. Rodrigues; Omi, Nelson M.; Silveira, Carlos Gaia da; Calvo, Wilson A. Pajero

    2011-01-01

    The high activity sources manipulation hot-cells use special and very thick leaded glass windows. This window provides a single sight of what is being manipulated inside the hot-cell. The use of surveillance cameras would replace the leaded glass window, provide other sights and show more details of the manipulated pieces, using the zoom capacity. Online distant manipulation may be implemented, too. The limitation is their low ionizing radiation resistance. This low resistance also limited the useful time of robots made to explore or even fix problematic nuclear reactor core, industrial gamma irradiators and high radioactive leaks. This work is a part of the development of a high gamma field remote visualization device using commercial surveillance cameras. These cameras are cheap enough to be discarded after the use for some hours of use in an emergency application, some days or some months in routine applications. A radiation shield can be used but it cannot block the camera sight which is the shield weakness. Estimates of the camera and its electronics resistance may be made knowing each component behavior. This knowledge is also used to determine the optical sensor type and the lens material, too. A better approach will be obtained with the commercial cameras working inside a high gamma field, like the one inside of the IPEN Multipurpose Irradiator. The goal of this work is to establish the radiation shielding needed to extend the camera's useful time to hours, days or months, depending on the application needs. (author)

  18. Radiation shield vest and skirt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maine, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    A two-piece garment is described which provides shielding for female workers exposed to radiation. The upper part is a vest, overlapping and secured in the front by adjustable closures. The bottom part is a wraparound skirt, also secured by adjustable closures. The two parts overlap, thus providing continuous protection from shoulder to knee and ensuring that the back part of the body is protected as well as the front

  19. Handbook of radiation shielding data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, J.C.

    1976-07-01

    This handbook is a compilation of data on units, conversion factors, geometric considerations, sources of radiation, and the attenuation of photons, neutrons, and charged particles. It also includes related topics in health physics. Data are presented in tabular and graphical form with sufficient narrative for a least first-approximation solutions to a variety of problems in nuclear radiation protection. Members of the radiation shielding community contributed the information in this document from unclassified and uncopyrighted sources, as referenced

  20. Shielding Idiosyncrasy from Isomorphic Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, José Luis; Mazza, Carmelo; Strandgaard Pedersen, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    with legitimacyin the field. Our theory of creative actionfor optimal distinctiveness suggests thatfilm directors increase their control bypersonally consolidating artistic andproduction roles, by forming closepartnership with committed producer, andby establishing own production company.Ironically, to escape......Abstract. This paper advances a microtheory of creative action by examining howdistinctive artists shield their idiosyncraticstyles from the isomorphic pressures of afield. It draws on the cases of threeinternationally recognized, distinctiveEuropean film directors - Pedro Almodóvar(Spain), Nanni...

  1. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  2. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  3. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion ractors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  4. An innovative method for on-power radiometry of end-shields of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Gaurav; Gupta, Pankaj; Nawal, Shriram; Gautam, Mahesh; Kakkar, Aman Deep; Yadav, Umed

    2012-01-01

    Every lndian PHWR reactor calandria is sandwiched within a pair of shield on either side. These shields are perpendicular to the coaxial axis of calandria and are called end-shields. These provide shielding from leakage radiation from reactor core in escaping out to Fuelling Machine vault, thereby significantly reducing the dose rates in the vaults. This has got a direct impact on radiation field in accessible areas. By maintaining low dose rates in accessible areas, the individual and collective doses of radiation workers can be effectively controlled well within the stipulated limits. Thus, it is of utmost importance to ensure adequacy of shielding provided by end-shields. In this context, a limited radiometry exercise is executed after filling of end-shields with steel balls and prior to their installation at designated place. This exercise provides limited inputs along the periphery of end-shield due to limited strength of radiation source, its handling provisions and dose constraints to the individual. In order to ascertain an in-depth analysis of shielding adequacy on-power, different methodologies have been adopted and have certain limitation in precisely pinpointing the affected area/location besides limitation on number of locations that can be monitored at a single stretch. To overcome these important anomalies, a computer based setup has been indigenously designed. The setup essentially comprises of a radiation monitor with wide energy, measuring, temperature and humidity range; a custom designed 25 m long compatible cable with suitable connectors; a laptop with additional cooling arrangement; a configurable interfacing software; thermal shielding for the detector and tying/fixing provisions. The radiation monitor after being properly shielded for thermal impacts is installed on the head of Fuelling Machine. It is connected through long cable to a laptop kept at Fuelling Machine service area with due cooling provisions (as temperature in the area will

  5. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  6. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  7. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  8. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  9. TFTR radiation contour and shielding efficiency measurements during D-D operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Elwood, S.; Gilbert, J.; Hwang, D.; Lewis, M.; Levine, J.; Ku, L.P.; Rule, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Hajnal, F. [Department of Energy, New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    Extensive neutron and gamma radiation contour, shielding efficiency, and spectral measurements were performed during high power TFTR D-D operations at the tokamak Test Cell inner walls, ceiling, roof, and outer walls, in nearby control rooms, work areas, and personnel pathways, outdoors along the site fence at 125 m, and out to the nearest property lines at 180 m. The results confirmed that the efficiency of the basic radiation shielding was sufficient to allow the TFTR D-T experimental plan, and provide empirical guidance for simulating the radiation fields of future fusion reactors.

  10. SUBGR: A Program to Generate Subgroup Data for the Subgroup Resonance Self-Shielding Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kang Seog [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-06-06

    The Subgroup Data Generation (SUBGR) program generates subgroup data, including levels and weights from the resonance self-shielded cross section table as a function of background cross section. Depending on the nuclide and the energy range, these subgroup data can be generated by (a) narrow resonance approximation, (b) pointwise flux calculations for homogeneous media; and (c) pointwise flux calculations for heterogeneous lattice cells. The latter two options are performed by the AMPX module IRFFACTOR. These subgroup data are to be used in the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) neutronic simulator MPACT, for which the primary resonance self-shielding method is the subgroup method.

  11. The Modified Socket Shield Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang-Hun; Park, Kwang-Bum; Mangano, Francesco Guido

    2018-03-20

    In the anterior regions, the resorption of the buccal bone after tooth extraction leads to a contraction of the overlying soft tissues, resulting in an esthetic problem, particularly with immediate implant placement. In the socket shield technique, the buccal root section of the tooth is maintained, to preserve the buccal bone for immediate implant placement. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the survival, stability, and complication rates of implants placed using a "modified" socket shield technique. Over a 2-year period, all patients referred to a dental clinic for treatment with oral implants were considered for inclusion in this study. Inclusion criteria were healthy adult patients who presented nonrestorable single teeth with intact buccal periodontal tissues in the anterior regions of both jaws. Exclusion criteria were teeth with present/past periodontal disease, vertical root fractures on the buccal aspect, horizontal fractures below bone level, and external/internal resorptions. The buccal portion of the root was retained to prevent the resorption of the buccal bone; the shield was 1.5 mm thick with the most coronal portion at the bone crest level. All patients then underwent immediate implants. In the patient with a gap between the implant and shield, no graft material was placed. All implants were immediately restored with single crowns and followed for 1 year. The main outcomes were implant survival, stability, and complications. Thirty patients (15 males, 15 females; mean age was 48.2 ± 15.0 years) were enrolled in the study and installed with 40 immediate implants. After 1 year, all implants were functioning, for a survival rate of 100%; excellent implant stability was reported (mean implant stability quotient at placement: 72.9 ± 5.9; after 1 year: 74.6 ± 2.7). No biologic complications were reported, and the incidence of prosthetic complications was low (2.5%). The "modified" socket shield technique seems to be a

  12. HYLIFE-II reactor chamber design refinements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, P.A.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanical design features of the reactor chamber for the HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion power plant are presented. A combination of oscillating and steady, molten salt streams (Li 2 BeF 4 ) are used for shielding and blast protection of the chamber walls. The system is designed for a 6 Hz repetition rate. Beam path clearing, between shots, is accomplished with the oscillating flow. The mechanism for generating the oscillating streams is described. A design configuration of the vessel wall allows adequate cooling and provides extra shielding to reduce thermal stresses to tolerable levels. The bottom portion of the reactor chamber is designed to minimize splash back of the high velocity (>12 m/s) salt streams and also recover up to half of the dynamic head. Cost estimates for a 1 GWe and 2 GWe reactor chamber are presented

  13. Shield design of concrete wall between decay tank room and primary pump room in TRIGA facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M. J. H.; Rahman, M.; Haque, A.; Zulquarnain, A.; Ahmed, F. U.; Bhuiyan, S. I.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to recommend the radiation protection design parameters from the shielding point of view for concrete wall between the decay tank room and the primary pump room in TRIGA Mark-II research reactor facility. The shield design for this concrete wall has been performed with the help of Point-kernel Shielding Code Micro-Shield 5.05 and this design was also validated based on the measured dose rate values with Radiation Survey Meter (G-M Counter) considering the ICRP-60 (1990) recommendations for occupational dose rate limit (10 μSv/hr). The recommended shield design parameters are: (i) thickness of 114.3 cm Ilmenite-Magnetite Concrete (IMC) or 129.54 cm Ordinary Reinforced Concrete (ORC) for concrete wall A (ii) thickness of 66.04 cm Ilmenite-Magnetite Concrete (IMC) or 78.74 cm Ordinary Reinforced Concrete (ORC) for concrete wall B and (iii) door thickness of 3.175 cm Mild Steel (MS) on the entrance of decay tank room. In shielding efficiency analysis, the use of I-M concrete in the design of this concrete wall shows that it reduced the dose rate by a factor of at least 3.52 times approximately compared to ordinary reinforced concrete

  14. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  15. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  16. Bulk material handling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleysteuber, William K.; Mayercheck, William D.

    1979-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a bulk material handling system particularly adapted for underground mining and includes a monorail supported overhead and carrying a plurality of conveyors each having input and output end portions with the output end portion of a first of the conveyors positioned above an input end portion of a second of the conveyors, a device for imparting motion to the conveyors to move the material from the input end portions toward the output end portions thereof, a device for supporting at least one of the input and output end portions of the first and second conveyors from the monorail, and the supporting device including a plurality of trolleys rollingly supported by the monorail whereby the conveyors can be readily moved therealong.

  17. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  18. Bulk muscles, loose cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Chamari R D G; Kodali, Venkata

    2014-10-17

    The accessibility and usage of body building supplements is on the rise with stronger internet marketing strategies by the industry. The dangers posed by the ingredients in them are underestimated. A healthy young man came to the emergency room with palpitations and feeling unwell. Initial history and clinical examination were non-contributory to find the cause. ECG showed atrial fibrillation. A detailed history for any over the counter or herbal medicine use confirmed that he was taking supplements to bulk muscle. One of the components in these supplements is yohimbine; the onset of symptoms coincided with the ingestion of this product and the patient is symptom free after stopping it. This report highlights the dangers to the public of consuming over the counter products with unknown ingredients and the consequential detrimental impact on health. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of neutron streaming through injection ports in a tokamak-type fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Takahiro; Seki, Yasushi; Iida, Hiromasa

    1976-03-01

    The effects of neutron streaming through injection ports in the fusion reactor designed in JAERI have been studied, especially those on tritium breeding ratio and the shielding of the superconducting magnet. In placement of the injection ports in the blanket, the tritium breeding ratio decreases by up to 1.3%, and shielding problem of the superconducting magnet is very important. (auth.)

  20. Operational safety and reactor life improvements of Kyoto University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsuro, M.; Fujita, Y.; Nishihara, H.

    1990-01-01

    Recent important experience in improving the operational safety and life of a reactor are described. The Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) is a 25-year-old 5 MW light water reactor provided with two thermal columns of graphite and heavy water as well as other kinds of experimental facilities. In the graphite thermal column, noticeable amounts of neutron irradiation effects had accumulated in the graphite blocks near the core. Before the possible release of the stored energy, all the graphite blocks in the column were successfully replaced with new blocks using the opportunity provided by the installation of a liquid deuterium cold neutron source in the column. At the same time, special seal mechanisms were provided for essential improvements to the problem of radioactive argon production in the column. In the heavy-water thermal column we have accomplished the successful repair of a slow leak of heavy water through a thin instrumentation tube failure. The repair work included the removal and reconstructions of the lead and graphite shielding layers and welding of the instrumentation tube under radiation fields. Several mechanical components in the reactor cooling system were also exchanged for new components with improved designs and materials. On-line data logging of almost all instrumentation signals is continuously performed with a high speed data analysis system to diagnose operational conditions of the reactor. Furthermore, through detailed investigations on critical components, operational safety during further extended reactor life will be supported by well scheduled maintenance programs

  1. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  2. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  3. Improved Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Properties of MWCNT–PMMA Composites Using Layered Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saini P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding effectiveness (SE of multi-walled carbon nanotubes–polymethyl methacrylate (MWCNT–PMMA composites prepared by two different techniques was measured. EMI SE up to 40 dB in the frequency range 8.2–12.4 GHz (X-band was achieved by stacking seven layers of 0.3-mm thick MWCNT–PMMA composite films compared with 30 dB achieved by stacking two layers of 1.1-mm thick MWCNT–PMMA bulk composite. The characteristic EMI SE graphs of the composites and the mechanism of shielding have been discussed. SE in this frequency range is found to be dominated by absorption. The mechanical properties (tensile, flexural strength and modulus of the composites were found to be comparable or better than the pure polymer. The studies therefore show that the composite can be used as structurally strong EMI shielding material.

  4. Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattinson, A.

    2003-01-01

    The current BNFL reactor decommissioning projects are presented. The projects concern power reactor sites at Berkely, Trawsfynydd, Hunterstone, Bradwell, Hinkley Point; UKAEA Windscale Pile 1; Research reactors within UK Scottish Universities at East Kilbride and ICI (both complete); WAGR. The BNFL environmental role include contract management; effective dismantling strategy development; implementation and operation; sentencing, encapsulation and transportation of waste. In addition for the own sites it includes strategy development; baseline decommissioning planning; site management and regulator interface. The project objectives for the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) are 1) Safe and efficient decommissioning; 2) Building of good relationships with customer; 3) Completion of reactor decommissioning in 2005. The completed WAGR decommissioning campaigns are: Operational Waste; Hot Box; Loop Tubes; Neutron Shield; Graphite Core and Restrain System; Thermal Shield. The current campaign is Lower Structures and the remaining are: Pressure vessel and Insulation; Thermal Columns and Outer Vault Membrane. An overview of each campaign is presented

  5. Slow neutrons and secondary gamma ray distributions in concrete shields followed by reflecting layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarious, A.S.; Swilem, Y.I.; Awwad, Z.; Bayomy, T.

    1993-01-01

    Slow neutrons and secondary gamma ray distributions in concrete shields with and without a reflecting layer behind layer behind the concrete shield have been investigated first in case of using a bare reactor beam and then on using a B-4 C filtered beam. The total and capture secondary gamma ray coefficient (B gamma and B gamma C ), the ratio of the reflected thermal neutron (gamma) the ratio of the secondary gamma rays caused by reflected neutrons to those caused transmitted neutrons (Th I gamma/F I gamma) and the effect of inserting a blocking layer (a B-4 C layer) between the concrete shield and the reflector on the suppression of the produced secondary gamma rays have been investigated. It was found that the presence of the reflector layer behind the concrete shield reflects some thermal neutrons back to the concrete shields and so it increases the number of thermal neutrons at the interface between the concrete shield and the reflector. Also the capture secondary gamma rays was increased at the interface between the two medii due to the capture of the reflected thermal neutrons in the concrete shields. It was shown that B-gamma is higher than and that B g amma B gamma C and I gamma T h/ I gamma i f for the different concrete types is higher in case of using the graphite reflector than that in using either water or paraffin reflectors. Putting a blocking layer (B 4 C layer) between the concrete shield and the reflector decreases the produced secondary gamma rays due to the absorption of the reflected thermal neutrons. 17 figs

  6. Effect of neutrons scattered from boundary of neutron field on shielding experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Abe, Takuya; Kosako, Toshiso; Iimoto, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Neutron shielding experiment with 49 cm-thick ordinary concrete was carried out at the reactor 'Yayoi' The University of Tokyo. System of this experiment is enclosed by heavy concrete where neutrons backscattered from heavy concrete likely affected neutron flux on the back surface of shielding concrete. Reaction rate of 197 Au(n, γ), cadmium covered 197 Au(n, γ) and 115 In(n, n') in the shielding concrete was measured using foil activation method. Neutron transport calculation was carried out in order to simulate reaction rate by calculating neutron spectra and convoluting with neutron capture cross-section in neutron shielding concrete. Comparison was made between calculated reaction rate and experimental one, and almost satisfactory agreement was found except for the back surface of shielding. To compose adequate simulation model, description of heavy concrete behind the shielding was thought to be of importance. For example, disregarding neutrons backscattered from heavy concrete, calculation underestimated reaction rate by the factor of 10. In another example, assuming that chemical composition of heavy concrete is equal to the composition adopted from a literature, the reaction rate was overestimated by factor of 5. By making the composition of heavy concrete equal to that based on facility design, overestimation was found to be the factor of 2. Therefore, adequate description of chemical composition of heavy concrete is found to be of importance in order to simulate neutron induced reaction rate on the back surface of neutron shielding concrete in shielding experiment performed in a system enclosed by heavy concrete. (author)

  7. An overview of activities pertaining to heat and mass transfer in reactor cover gas of FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, G.

    1986-01-01

    FBTR is a 40 MW(t) LMFBR in the final stages of commissioning prior to achieving criticality. The design philosophy of the top shield in the reactor over sodium is similar to the Rapsodie reactor with a few modifications. This paper presents briefly the design of the top shields comprising the rotating plugs, sodium aerosol deposition problem, experimental activities carried out and finally presents the observations made in FBTR during the commissioning stages. (author)

  8. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Soo-Bong; Lasserre, Thierry; Wang, Yifang

    2013-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very ...

  9. BOILING REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  10. SP-100 reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armijo, J.S.; Atwell, J.; Pluta, P.R.; Smith, M.A.; Solorzano, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    The SP-100 space reactor power system is being designed and developed as part of the Ground Engineering System (GES) contract between General Electric Company as the system developer and the Department of Energy. Other key participants in the GES program include Westinghouse Hanford Company (site operator), Los Alamos National Laboratory (fuel development and production), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (materials), and Westinghouse, Advanced Energy Systems Division (shield, HTS equipment). The GES Program includes two major elements. First, the development of a Reference Flight System design at 100 kWe output to the user, and second the validation of the Reference Flight System design by analysis and by testing. Development of key technologies along with component and system testing is an essential part of the validation program. The nuclear subsystem validation includes the design, manufacture, assembly and operational testing of a Ground Reactor Test Assembly. The subject of this paper is the reactor design for the Reference Flight System. The reference flight design is in the preliminary design stage and will evolve over the next year

  11. Shielded room measurements, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanton, J.S.

    1949-02-22

    The attenuation of electro-statically and electro-magnetically shielded rooms in the ``E,`` ``R,`` ``I,`` and ``T`` Buildings was measured so that corrective measure could be taken if the attenuation was found to be low. If remedial measures could not be taken, the shortcomings of the rooms would be known. Also, the men making the measurements should oversee construction and correct errors at the time. The work was performed by measuring the attenuation at spot frequencies over the range of from 150 kilocycles to 1280 megacycles with suitable equipment mounted in small rubber-tried trucks. The attenuation was determined by ``before and after`` shielding and/or ``door open and door closed`` measurements after installation of copper shielding. In general, attenuation in the frequency range of approximately 10 to 150 mc. was good and was of the order expected. At frequencies in the range of 150 mc. to 1280 mc., the attenuation curve was more erratic; that is, at certain frequencies a severe loss of attenuation was noted, while at others, the attenuation was very good. This was mainly due to poor or faulty seals around doors and pass windows. These poor seals existed in the ``T,`` ``E,`` and ``I`` Buildings because the doors were fitted improperly and somewhat inferior material was used. By experience from these difficulties, both causes were corrected in the ``R`` Building, which resulted in the improvement of the very high frequency (v.h.f.) range in this building. In some specific cases, however, the results were about the same. For the range of frequencies below approximately 10 mc., the attenuation, in almost all cases, gradually decreased as the frequency decreased and reached a minimum at .3 to 1.0 mc. This loss of attenuation was attributed to multiple grounding caused by moisture in the insulating timbers and will gradually decrease as the wood dries out.

  12. Microfabricated Bulk Piezoelectric Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Oliver M.

    Piezoelectric voltage transformers (PTs) can be used to transform an input voltage into a different, required output voltage needed in electronic and electro- mechanical systems, among other varied uses. On the macro scale, they have been commercialized in electronics powering consumer laptop liquid crystal displays, and compete with an older, more prevalent technology, inductive electromagnetic volt- age transformers (EMTs). The present work investigates PTs on smaller size scales that are currently in the academic research sphere, with an eye towards applications including micro-robotics and other small-scale electronic and electromechanical sys- tems. PTs and EMTs are compared on the basis of power and energy density, with PTs trending towards higher values of power and energy density, comparatively, indicating their suitability for small-scale systems. Among PT topologies, bulk disc-type PTs, operating in their fundamental radial extension mode, and free-free beam PTs, operating in their fundamental length extensional mode, are good can- didates for microfabrication and are considered here. Analytical modeling based on the Extended Hamilton Method is used to predict device performance and integrate mechanical tethering as a boundary condition. This model differs from previous PT models in that the electric enthalpy is used to derive constituent equations of motion with Hamilton's Method, and therefore this approach is also more generally applica- ble to other piezoelectric systems outside of the present work. Prototype devices are microfabricated using a two mask process consisting of traditional photolithography combined with micropowder blasting, and are tested with various output electri- cal loads. 4mm diameter tethered disc PTs on the order of .002cm. 3 , two orders smaller than the bulk PT literature, had the followingperformance: a prototype with electrode area ratio (input area / output area) = 1 had peak gain of 2.3 (+/- 0.1), efficiency of 33 (+/- 0

  13. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunlong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Yang, Wenjun [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wu, Xiaodong [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Iowa, 4016 Seamans Center, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  14. Assessment of torsatrons as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Painter, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R 0 = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B 0 = 4.8-7.5 T, B max (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions

  15. Reactor vessel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A reactor vessel (1) comprises a reactor body (2) through which channels (3) are provided whose surface comprises longitudinal inwardly directed parts (4) and is provided with a catalyst (6), as well as buffer bodies (8, 12) connected to the channels (3) on both sides of the reactor body (2) and

  16. Irrigoscopy - irrigography method, dosimetry and radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubanov, Z.; Kolarevic, G.

    1999-01-01

    Use of patient's radiation shielding during radiology diagnostic procedures in our country is insufficiently represent, so patients needlessly receive very high entrance skin doses in body areas which are not in direct x-ray beam. During irrigoscopy, patient's radiation shielding is very complex problem, because of the organs position. In the future that problem must be solved. We hope that some of our suggestions about patient's radiation shielding during irrigoscopy, can be a small step in that way. (author)

  17. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  18. Radiation environment of fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Seiji; Seki, Yasushi

    1988-01-01

    Next step device (experimental reactor), which is planned to succeed the large plasma experimental devices such as JT-60, JET and TFTR, generates radiation (neutron + gamma ray) during its operation. Radiation (neutronic) properties of the material are basis for the study on neutron utilization (energy recovery and tritium breeding), material selection (irradiation damage and lifetime evaluation) and radiation safety (personnel exposure and radiation waste). It is necessary, therefore, to predict radiation behaviour in the reactor correctly for the engineering design of the reactor. This report describes the outline of the radiation environment of the reactor based on the information obtained by the neutronic and shielding design calculation of the fusion experimental reactor (FER). (author)

  19. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  20. Isotopic age of enderbites of Ukrainian shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartnitskij, E.N.; Bojko, V.L.; Levkovskaya, N.Yu.; Lesnaya, I.M.; Siroshtan, R.I.; Sharkin, O.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of determining U-Pb isotopic age of accessory zircons from enderbites of Azov, Dniestrovo-Bug and Ingulo-Ingultsk regions of the Ukrainian shield are presented. The isotopic age values obtained make up from 3400 millions of years for enderbites of Novo-Pavlovsk complex of the Ukrainian shield up to 2100 millions of years for enderbites and charnockites of Berdichev complex. So, enderbites of both Archean and Proterozoic age are found in the Ukrainian shield area which points out to diversification of granulites metamorphism manifestation in various blocks of the Ukrainian shield

  1. Problems of the power plant shield optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagyan, A.A.; Dubinin, A.A.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.; Petrov, Eh.E.

    1981-01-01

    General approaches to the solution of problems on the nuclear power plant radiation shield optimization are considered. The requirements to the shield parameters are formulated in a form of restrictions on a number of functionals, determined by the solution of γ quantum and neutron transport equations or dimensional and weight characteristics of shield components. Functional determined by weight-dimensional parameters (shield cost, mass and thickness) and functionals, determined by radiation fields (equivalent dose rate, produced by neutrons and γ quanta, activation functional, radiation functional, heat flux, integral heat flux in a particular part of the shield volume, total energy flux through a particular shield surface are considered. The following methods of numerical solution of simplified optimization problems are discussed: semiempirical methods using radiation transport physical leaks, numerical solution of approximate transport equations, numerical solution of transport equations for the simplest configurations making possible to decrease essentially a number of variables in the problem. The conclusion is drawn that the attained level of investigations on the problem of nuclear power plant shield optimization gives the possibility to pass on at present to the solution of problems with a more detailed account of the real shield operating conditions (shield temperature field account, its strength and other characteristics) [ru

  2. Radiation dose reduction by water shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshed, W.; Ahmad, S.S.

    2007-06-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software W-Shielder, developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The software estimates shielding thickness for photons having their energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. Water is used as a shielding material in this software. The software is helpful in estimating the water thickness for safe handling, storage of gamma emitting radionuclide. (author)

  3. Optimization of the CMS forward shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Huhtinen, Mika

    2000-01-01

    A first realistic version of the CMS forward shielding was presented in the 1999 Engineering Design Review. It was discovered that the background increased by a factor of 2 with respect to the TDR where an idealized shielding had been assumed. This note describes the optimizations implemented in the realistic shielding with the aim to recover the TDR performance. An optimization of the shielding geometry, the beam pipe and a filling of major cracks has allowed to achieve the goal. Although the differences to the TDR are very minor, these new calculations should be understood as an update to those presented in the TDR.

  4. US DOE Idaho national laboratory reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilagyi, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    , asbestos and mercury among others. Each reactor required isolation in order to be removed. Due to activated metal within the reactor vessels, dose rates above the cores ranged from 50 R/hr to 1200 R/hr. Subsequent dose rates outside the vessels varied from 60 mR/hr to greater than 50 R/hr. Due to the elevated dose rates, the project team decided to fill the ETR and MTR reactor vessels with grout to a level above the core region to reduce dose. To remove the ETR reactor, access to the support shoes was required. These shoes were encased in the high density concrete biological shield approximately 8' below grade. The project team used explosives to remove the biological shield. The demolition had to be controlled to prevent damaging the reactor vessel and to limit the seismic impact on a nearby operating reactor. Upon completion of the blast, the concrete was removed exposing the support shoes for the vessel. Two reactor buildings (ETR and PBF) had to be removed to accommodate lifting systems for the reactor vessels. Two reactors (PBF and MTR) were removed via mobile cranes, two reactors were sized and removed in pieces (ZPPR and MTR), and ETR reactor, due to its weight, was removed via a twin gantry lifting system

  5. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Elias, E.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  6. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  7. The development of recycling system of reactor operating scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemura, Akio; Kimura, Kenji; Takahashi, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    The reasonable recycling system of reactor operating metal scrap has been studied and it was concluded that the 200-liter drum inner shielding material is a very promising product for recycling within the nuclear industry. To realize the drum inner shielding material as a recycling product, the demonstration test on manufacturing was performed. It was fundamentally cleared that the proper 200-liter drum inner shielding material as a recycling product could be manufactured from scrap steel mixtures by using a refining technique and a centrifugal casting technique through a cold demonstration test

  8. Conceptual design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor (A-SSTR2) - Compact and safety oriented commercial power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, S.; Ushigusa, K.; Ueda, S.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the last decade JAERI reactor design studies, the advanced commercial reactor concept (A-SSTR2) which meets both economical and environmental requirements has been proposed. The A-SSTR2 is a compact power reactor (R p =6.2m, a p =1.5m, I p =12MA) with a high fusion power (P f =4GW) and a net thermal efficiency of 51%. The machine configuration is simplified by eliminating a center solenoid (CS) coil system. SiC/SiC composite for blanket structure material, helium gas cooling with pressure of 10MPa and outlet temperature of 900 deg. C, and TiH 2 for bulk shield material are introduced. For the toroidal field (TF) coil, a high temperature (T C ) superconducting wire made of bismuth with the maximum field of 23T and the critical current density of 1000A/mm 2 at a temperature of 20K is applied. In spite of the CS-less configuration, a computer simulation gives a satisfactory plasma equilibria, plasma initiation process and current ramp up scenario. (author)

  9. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part]2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singha Roy, P.K.

    1987-01-01

    This article is the second part of the paper entitled 'Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations'. In this part, some of the important properties of heavy density concrete are discussed. They include density, water retentivity, air content, permeability with special reference to concrete mixes used in India's nuclear power reactors. All these properties are affected to various extents by heating. Indian shield concrete is rarely subjected to temperatures above 60degC during its life, because of thermal shield protection. During placement, the maximum anticipated rise in temperature due to heat of hydration is restricted to around 45degC by chilling, if necessary to reduce shrinkage stresses and cracks. (M.G.B.)

  10. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ''hands-on'' procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  11. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  12. Continuous electrodeionization through electrostatic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermentzis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    We report a new continuous electrodeionization cell with electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments or electrochemical Faraday cages formed by porous electronically and ionically conductive media, instead of permselective ion exchange membranes. Due to local elimination of the applied electric field within the compartments, they electrostatically retain the incoming ions and act as 'electrostatic ion pumps' or 'ion traps' and therefore concentrate compartments. The porous media are chemically and thermally stable. Electrodeionization or electrodialysis cells containing such concentrate compartments in place of ion exchange membranes can be used to regenerate ion exchange resins and produce deionized water, to purify industrial effluents and desalinate brackish or seawater. The cells can work by polarity reversal without any negative impact to the deionization process. Because the electronically and ionically active media constituting the electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments are not permselective and coions are not repelled but can be swept by the migrating counterions, the cells are not affected by the known membrane associated limitations, such as concentration polarization or scaling and show an increased current efficiency

  13. Physical experiments. Reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korn, H.; Werle, H.; Bluhm, H.; Fieg, G.; Kappler, F.; Kuhn, D.; Lalovic, M.; Woll, D.; Kuefner, K.; Woznicki, Z.; Buckel, G.; Stehle, B.; Borgwaldt, H.

    1975-01-01

    The γ-spectrum in SNEAK 9C-1 and 9C-2 was measured by means of Si(Li) solid state detectors for verification of methods of shielding calculation. The blanket spectra turned out to be slightly harder than the spectra in the fissile zone; the plutonium spectra are slightly harder than the respective uranium spectra. This result is expected to be explained by studies to be carried out on the basis of a γ-transport program. For reactor theoretical calculations two 2-dimensional diffusion programs were compared with each other, and a 3-dimensional diffusion program was compared with a flux synthesis program. An improved source iteration scheme was drafted for the Karlsruhe Monte Carlo code. (orig.) [de

  14. Gamma and X-ray shielding compositions utilizing bauxite - Red Mud regional research laboratory (CSIR), Bhopal, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshul, Avneesh; Amritphale, Sudhir Sitaram; Chandra, Navin; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The application spectrum of X-ray and Gamma radiation is increasing exponentially in the area of diagnostic, nuclear medicine, food preservation, nuclear power plants and strategic utilities. To prevent the harmful effects of these radiations, shielding materials based on lead metal and its compounds are being used historically, which are toxic in nature. To protect environment it has become necessary to develop non-toxic lead free shielding materials. The use of titanium metal and its compounds as synthetic rock i.e. SYNROC are reported to be very effective non-toxic shielding materials for various applications. Red mud waste generated in aluminum producing industries possesses a unique mineralogical compositions containing fairly high quantity of titanium oxide and iron oxide useful for making non toxic shielding compositions and therefore red mud has been utilized for the first time in the world for making radiation shielding materials. The red mud based compositions developed have been characterized for their various physico-mechanical properties namely compressive strength, impact strength, density and X-ray and gamma radiation shielding capacity in terms of shielding thickness i.e. HVT. Based on the characterization results it is found that the red mud based materials can be used for the construction of X-ray diagnostic and CT-Scanner room and as a substitute shielding material for concrete in the nuclear reactors and other radiation based applications. Studies on the identification of shielding phases and their morphology present, in the red mud based shielding compositions has been carried out using X-ray diffraction and SEM technique. The results of these studies are presented in this paper. (authors)

  15. Reactor Engineering Department annual report (April 1, 1987 - March 31, 1988)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1987 (April 1, 1987 - March 31, 1988). The major activities in the Department concerns the programs of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor, the high conversion light water reactor, the advanced fission reactor system and the fusion reactor at JAERI and the fast breeder reactor at PNC. The report contains the latest progress in nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis and robotics, as well as the new topics from this fiscal year on advanced reactors system design studies and technique developments related the facilities in the Department. Also described are the activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  16. Reactor Engineering Department annual report (April 1, 1991-March 31, 1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1991 (April 1, 1991-March 31, 1992). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researchers on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative work to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  17. Reactor Engineering Department annual report (April 1, 1990 - March 31, 1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1990 (April 1, 1990 - March 31, 1991). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  18. Reactor Engineering Department annual report (April 1, 1988 - March 31, 1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1988 (April 1, 1988 - March 31, 1989). The Department has promoted cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and also to PNC's fast reactor project. Other major Department's programs are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor and the design activities of advanced reactor system. Application of a high energy accelerator to the nuclear engineering is also preliminarily assessed. The report also contains the latest progress in various basic researches as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/ diagnosis and technical developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  19. Neutron transmission benchmark problems for iron and concrete shields in low, intermediate and high energy proton accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Sakamoto, Yukio; Hayashi, Katsumi

    1996-09-01

    Benchmark problems were prepared for evaluating the calculation codes and the nuclear data for accelerator shielding design by the Accelerator Shielding Working Group of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics in JAERI. Four benchmark problems: transmission of quasi-monoenergetic neutrons generated by 43 MeV and 68 MeV protons through iron and concrete shields at TIARA of JAERI, neutron fluxes in and around an iron beam stop irradiated by 500 MeV protons at KEK, reaction rate distributions inside a thick concrete shield irradiated by 6.2 GeV protons at LBL, and neutron and hadron fluxes inside an iron beam stop irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN are compiled in this document. Calculational configurations and neutron reaction cross section data up to 500 MeV are provided. (author)

  20. Biofilm carrier migration model describes reactor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Joshua P; Johnson, Bruce R; Takács, Imre; Daigger, Glen T; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Brockmann, Doris; Kovács, Róbert; Calhoun, Jason M; Choubert, Jean-Marc; Derlon, Nicolas

    2017-06-01

    The accuracy of a biofilm reactor model depends on the extent to which physical system conditions (particularly bulk-liquid hydrodynamics and their influence on biofilm dynamics) deviate from the ideal conditions upon which the model is based. It follows that an improved capacity to model a biofilm reactor does not necessarily rely on an improved biofilm model, but does rely on an improved mathematical description of the biofilm reactor and its components. Existing biofilm reactor models typically include a one-dimensional biofilm model, a process (biokinetic and stoichiometric) model, and a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CFSTR) mass balance that [when organizing CFSTRs in series] creates a pseudo two-dimensional (2-D) model of bulk-liquid hydrodynamics approaching plug flow. In such a biofilm reactor model, the user-defined biofilm area is specified for each CFSTR; thereby, X carrier does not exit the boundaries of the CFSTR to which they are assigned or exchange boundaries with other CFSTRs in the series. The error introduced by this pseudo 2-D biofilm reactor modeling approach may adversely affect model results and limit model-user capacity to accurately calibrate a model. This paper presents a new sub-model that describes the migration of X carrier and associated biofilms, and evaluates the impact that X carrier migration and axial dispersion has on simulated system performance. Relevance of the new biofilm reactor model to engineering situations is discussed by applying it to known biofilm reactor types and operational conditions.

  1. Advanced resonance self-shielding method for gray resonance treatment in lattice physics code GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Hiroki; Yamaji, Kazuya; Kirimura, Kazuki; Sato, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Hideki; Yamamoto, Akio

    2012-01-01

    A new resonance self-shielding method based on the equivalence theory is developed for general application to the lattice physics calculations. The present scope includes commercial light water reactor (LWR) design applications which require both calculation accuracy and calculation speed. In order to develop the new method, all the calculation processes from cross-section library preparation to effective cross-section generation are reviewed and reframed by adopting the current enhanced methodologies for lattice calculations. The new method is composed of the following four key methods: (1) cross-section library generation method with a polynomial hyperbolic tangent formulation, (2) resonance self-shielding method based on the multi-term rational approximation for general lattice geometry and gray resonance absorbers, (3) spatially dependent gray resonance self-shielding method for generation of intra-pellet power profile and (4) integrated reaction rate preservation method between the multi-group and the ultra-fine-group calculations. From the various verifications and validations, applicability of the present resonance treatment is totally confirmed. As a result, the new resonance self-shielding method is established, not only by extension of a past concentrated effort in the reactor physics research field, but also by unification of newly developed unique and challenging techniques for practical application to the lattice physics calculations. (author)

  2. Core and shielding analysis of the SCM-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    It is widely accepted that an intense neutron source can be produced in a suitable target by spallation neutrons generated by a high-current high-energy proton beam. Typical beam energy for such an accelerator is 400 to 2000 MeV. A conventional critical reactor can readily be replaced by a ''sub-critical reactor'' driven by this source. A 5 MW proton beam at 600 MeV can drive a sub-critical reactor to 100 MWt. The accelerator and the associated plant support equipment at these design specifications are complex systems, but they are well within recent technology. The purpose of this study was to examine core design and shielding design issues for a 100 MWt sodium-cooled fast-spectrum Sub-Critical Multiplier (SCM-100) based on LMFBR technology, but driven by an intense neutron source created by spallation reactions. SCM-100 is a component of the Accelerator Driven Test Facility. In this report we provide an overview of the SCM-100 concept. Two designs were investigated: (1) a vertical entry for the beam on the axial centerline; and (2) an inclined entry design where the core is ''C'' shaped and the beam enters the side of the target at an angle of 32 degrees. A brief overview of relevant shielding design data from EBR-II is also provided. The key result of this report is that the inclined entry design cannot achieve design objectives for radial power peaking. Consequently it cannot achieve design objectives for peak neutron flux. Axial power peaking factors are controlled by the axial fuel height and the axial reflector properties. These dimensions and compositions are very similar in SCM-100 to those of EBR-II. EBR-II had an axial power peaking factor of 1.093, and a radial power peaking factor of about 1.46. The radial power peaking of SCM-100 with the inclined entry is too extreme at 2.15, and cannot be made acceptable by modifying the size and detailed shape of the ''C'' shaped core and reflector. The axial power peaking of SCM-100 is very close to that of EBR

  3. Damping of reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, N.R.; Bohm, G.J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses the results of a study of internals damping using data obtained from wave analysis of PWR plant flow tests, and shaker tests. The damping values were obtained from vibration data taken during the pre-operational testing of several reactor plants and some in air shaker tests. Parameters available in the data include the presence of the core, the presence and position of the control rod drive line, reactor coolant temperature, and combination of reactor coolant pumps in operation. Modal damping values for the structures reported were obtained from the decay of autocorrellograms or from the modal response half-power bandwidths of frequency spectra. For the lower frequency core barrel-reactor vessel beam modes 2% to 5% damping values were found for minimum damping values. Significantly higher values are found in the data when, for example, intermittent contact occurs at the core barrel level supports. Core barrel and thermal shield shell modes having natural frequencies in the frequency range of interest for seismic response calculations exhibit damping values generally on the order of 1% to 2%. Higher frequency, very low amplitude, shell modes of these structures can have damping values of less than 1%. Damping values for guide tubes were found to have minimum values of 2% to 5% depending on their core location. The cross flow velocity and thus the floor turbulence excited amplitude is higher for guide tubes in core locations near the outlet nozzles. Information on the damping of upper support columns which are similarly excited is also given. Damping values reported are suitable for normal operation design conditions, i.e., for oscillatory behavior and relatively small amplitudes. The extrapolation of the data to obtain realistic values for large seismic events and for loss of coolant accidents is also discussed

  4. Optically-transparent radiation-shielding composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolles, T.F.; Fleming, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    An optically transparent, essentially colorless radiation shielding material for high energy radiation contains a combination of lead or thallium salts of C 1 to C 5 organic acids and may contain lead or thallium salts of mineral acids. Shields of complex shapes are easily constructed

  5. Improvements in or relating to nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, R.J.; Riley, K.; Powell, C.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear radiation shield comprises two pieces of steel held together edge to edge by a weld, the depth of which is less than the thickness of either of the edges. As the radiaion shielding effect of the weld will be less than the steel, an insert is bolted or welded over the weld. (U.K.)

  6. Several problems in accelerator shielding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Hirayama, Hideo; Ban, Shuichi.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, the utilization of accelerators has increased rapidly, and the increase of accelerating energy and beam intensity is also remarkable. The studies on accelerator shielding have become important, because the amount of radiation emitted from accelerators increased, the regulation of the dose of environmental radiation was tightened, and the cost of constructing shielding rose. As the plans of constructing large accelerators have been made successively, the survey on the present state and the problems of the studies on accelerator shielding was carried out. Accelerators are classified into electron accelerators and proton accelerators in view of the studies on shielding. In order to start the studies on accelerator shielding, first, the preparation of the cross section data is indispensable. The cross sections for generating Bremsstrahlung, photonuclear reactions generating neutrons, generation of neutrons by hadrons, nuclear reaction of neutrons and generation of gamma-ray by hadrons are described. The generation of neutrons and gamma-ray as the problems of thick targets is explained. The shielding problems are complex and diversified, but in this paper, the studies on the shielding, by which basic data are obtainable, are taken up, such as beam damping and side wall shielding. As for residual radioactivity, main nuclides and the difference of residual radioactivity according to substances have been studied. (J.P.N.)

  7. Actively shielded low level gamma - spectrometric system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrdja, D.; Bikit, I.; Forkapic, S.; Slivka, J.; Veskovic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The results of the adjusting and testing of the actively shielded low level gamma-spectrometry system are presented. The veto action of the shield reduces the background in the energy region of 50 keV to the 2800 keV for about 3 times. (author) [sr

  8. Fundamental Parameters of the SHIELD II Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John

    2014-10-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" ("SHIELD") is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational campaign that is facilitating the study of both internal and global evolutionary processes in 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in early Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Cycle 19 HST observations of the 12 SHIELD galaxies have allowed us to determine their TRGB distances, thus anchoring the physical scales on which our ongoing analysis is based. Since the inception of SHIELD, the ALFALFA survey has completed data acquisition, thereby populating the faint end of the HI mass function with dozens of SHIELD analogs. In this proposal we request ACS imaging of 18 of these "SHIELD II" galaxies that have already been imaged in the HI spectral line with the WSRT. These data will enable a holistic HST imaging study of the fundamental parameters and characteristics of a statistically robust sample of 30 extremely low-mass galaxies (including 12 SHIELD and 18 SHIELD II systems). The primary science goal is the derivation of TRGB distances; the distance dependence of many fundamental parameters makes HST observations critical for the success of SHIELD II. Additional science goals include an accurate census of the dark matter contents of these galaxies, a spatial and temporal study of star formation within them, and a characterization of the fundamental parameters that change as galaxy masses range from "mini-halo" to star-forming dwarf.

  9. Shielding effectiveness of superconductive particles in plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pienkowski, T.; Kincaid, J.; Lanagan, M.T.; Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.; Shi, D.; Goretta, K.C.

    1988-09-01

    The ability to cool superconductors with liquid nitrogen instead of liquid helium has opened the door to a wide range of research. The well known Meissner effect, which states superconductors are perfectly diamagnetic, suggests shielding applications. One of the drawbacks to the new ceramic superconductors is the brittleness of the finished material. Because of this drawback, any application which required flexibility (e.g., wire and cable) would be impractical. Therefore, this paper presents the results of a preliminary investigation into the shielding effectiveness of YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub 7-x/ both as a composite and as a monolithic material. Shielding effectiveness was measured using two separate test methods. One tested the magnetic (near field) shielding, and the other tested the electromagnetic (far field) shielding. No shielding was seen in the near field measurements on the composite samples, and only one heavily loaded sample showed some shielding in the far field. The monolithic samples showed a large amount of magnetic shielding. 5 refs., 5 figs

  10. Infrared shield facilitates optical pyrometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbrenner, F. F.; Illg, W.

    1965-01-01

    Water-cooled shield facilitates optical pyrometer high temperature measurements of small sheet metal specimens subjected to tensile stress in fatigue tests. The shield excludes direct or reflected radiation from one face of the specimen and permits viewing of the infrared radiation only.

  11. Repairing liner of the reactor; Reparacion del liner del reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-07-15

    Due to the corrosion problems of the aluminum coating of the reactor pool, a periodic inspections program by ultrasound to evaluate the advance grade and the corrosion speed was settled down. This inspections have shown the necessity to repair some areas, in those that the slimming is significant, of not making it can arrive to the water escape of the reactor pool. The objective of the repair is to place patches of plates of 1/4 inch aluminum thickness in the areas of the reactor 'liner', in those that it has been detected by ultrasound a smaller thickness or similar to 3 mm. To carry out this the fuels are move (of the core and those that are decaying) to a temporary storage, the structure of the core is confined in a tank that this placed inside the pool of the reactor, a shield is placed in the thermal column and it is completely extracted the water for to leave uncover the 'liner' of the reactor. (Author)

  12. Effect of eccentric location of the RBMK CPS displacer graphite block in the shielding sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dostov, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Temperature conditions and accumulation of Wigner energy in the graphite block of the RBMK reactor CPS (control power system) displacer is examined. It is shown, that at eccentric location of the block in the shielding sheath average temperature of the block drops sharply. Due to the design demerit quantity of the stored energy in the block may be so great, that its release will result in melting of the displacer tube. (author)

  13. PC based temporary shielding administrative procedure (TSAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.E.; Pederson, G.E. [Sargent & Lundy, Chicago, IL (United States); Hamby, P.N. [Commonwealth Edison Co., Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01

    A completely new Administrative Procedure for temporary shielding was developed for use at Commonwealth Edison`s six nuclear stations. This procedure promotes the use of shielding, and addresses industry requirements for the use and control of temporary shielding. The importance of an effective procedure has increased since more temporary shielding is being used as ALARA goals become more ambitious. To help implement the administrative procedure, a personal computer software program was written to incorporate the procedural requirements. This software incorporates the useability of a Windows graphical user interface with extensive help and database features. This combination of a comprehensive administrative procedure and user friendly software promotes the effective use and management of temporary shielding while ensuring that industry requirements are met.

  14. PC based temporary shielding administrative procedure (TSAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.E.; Pederson, G.E.; Hamby, P.N.

    1995-01-01

    A completely new Administrative Procedure for temporary shielding was developed for use at Commonwealth Edison's six nuclear stations. This procedure promotes the use of shielding, and addresses industry requirements for the use and control of temporary shielding. The importance of an effective procedure has increased since more temporary shielding is being used as ALARA goals become more ambitious. To help implement the administrative procedure, a personal computer software program was written to incorporate the procedural requirements. This software incorporates the useability of a Windows graphical user interface with extensive help and database features. This combination of a comprehensive administrative procedure and user friendly software promotes the effective use and management of temporary shielding while ensuring that industry requirements are met

  15. Practical radiation shielding for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.C.; Reginatto, M.; Party, E.; Gershey, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on calculations which exist for estimating shielding required for radioactivity; however, they are often not applicable for the radionuclides and activities common in biomedical research. A variety of commercially available Lucite shields are being marketed to the biomedical community. Their advertisements may lead laboratory workers to expect better radiation protection than these shields can provide or to assume erroneously that very weak beta emitters require extensive shielding. The authors have conducted a series of shielding experiments designed to simulate exposures from the amounts of 32 P, 51 Cr and 125 I typically used in biomedical laboratories. For most routine work, ≥0.64 cm of Lucite covered with various thicknesses of lead will reduce whole-body occupational exposure rates of < 1mR/hr at the point of contact

  16. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  17. Neutron shielding heat insulation material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Susumu; Asaumi, Hiroshi; Take, Shigeo; Miyakoshi, Jun-ichi; Takemoto, Hiroshi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve decceleration and absorption of neutrons by incorporating neutron moderators and neutron absorbers in asbestos to thereby increase hydrogen concentration. Constitution: A mixture consisting of crysotile asbestos, surface active agent and water is well stirred and compounded to open the crysotile asbestos filaments and prepare a high viscosity slurry. After adding hydroxides such as magnesium hydroxide, hydrated salts such as magnesium borate hydrate or water containing minerals such as alumina cement hydrate, or boron compound to the slurry, the slurry is charged in a predetermined die, and dried and compressed to prepare shielding heat insulation products. The crysotile asbestos has 18 - 15 wt.% of water of crystallinity in the structure and contains a considerably high hydrogen concentration that acts as neutron moderators. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. A User's Manual for the NRN Shield Design Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjaerne, Leif; Aalto, E.; Fraeki, R.; Leimdoerfer, M.; Lindblom, K.; Linde, S.; Malen, K.; Nyman, K.

    1964-06-01

    This report describes a code system for bulk shield design written for a Ferranti Mercury computer and is intended as a manual for those using the programme. The idea of an 'almost direct' flux, as in the removal theory serves as a basis for further development of the theory. An important aspiration has been to minimize the manual work of administering the codes. The codes concerned are: NECO, computing necessary group constants from primary data, REFUSE and REBOX (infinite plane or cylindrical, and box geometry, respectively), computing removal flux, NEDI a one-dimensional (plane, spherical, cylindrical) diffusion multigroup code, and SALOME a Monte Carlo code computing the gamma flux. Output tapes are constructed for direct use as input tapes, when required, for a following code

  19. Summary of Blast Shield and Material Testing for Development of Solid Debris Collection at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaughnessy, D.A.; Gostic, J.M.; Moody, K.J.; Grant, P.M.; Lewis, L.A.; Hutcheon, I.D.

    2011-01-01

    of these pieces were fielded at the equator and one was fielded on the pole. The shields were analyzed using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and chemical leaching followed by mass spectrometry. On each shield, gold debris originating from the gold hohlraum was observed, as well as large quantities of debris that were present in the center of the target chamber at the time of the shot (i.e., stainless steel, indium, copper, etc.) Debris was visible in the SEM as large blobs or splats of material that had encountered the surface of the aluminum and stuck. The aluminum itself had obviously melted and condensed, and some of the large debris splats arrived after the surface had already hardened. Melt depth was determined by cross sectioning the pieces and measuring the melted surface layers via SEM. After the SEM analysis was completed, the pieces were sent for NAA at the USGS reactor and were analyzed by U. Greife at the Colorado School of Mines. The NAA showed that the majority of gold mass present on the shields was not in the form of large blobs and splats, but was present as small particulates that had most likely formed as condensed vapor. Further analysis showed that the gold was entrained in the melted aluminum surface layers and did not extend down into the bulk of the aluminum. Once the gold mass was accounted for from the NAA, it was determined that the aluminum fielded at the equator was collecting a fraction of the total gold hohlraum mass equivalent to 120% ± 10% of the solid angle subtended by the shield. The attached presentation has more information on the results of the aluminum blast shield analysis. In addition to the information given in the presentation, the surfaces of the shields have been chemically leached and submitted for mass spectrometric analysis. The results from that analysis are expected to arrive after the due date of

  20. Summary of Blast Shield and Material Testing for Development of Solid Debris Collection at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Lewis, L A; Hutcheon, I D

    2011-11-21

    . Ten of these pieces were fielded at the equator and one was fielded on the pole. The shields were analyzed using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and chemical leaching followed by mass spectrometry. On each shield, gold debris originating from the gold hohlraum was observed, as well as large quantities of debris that were present in the center of the target chamber at the time of the shot (i.e., stainless steel, indium, copper, etc.) Debris was visible in the SEM as large blobs or splats of material that had encountered the surface of the aluminum and stuck. The aluminum itself had obviously melted and condensed, and some of the large debris splats arrived after the surface had already hardened. Melt depth was determined by cross sectioning the pieces and measuring the melted surface layers via SEM. After the SEM analysis was completed, the pieces were sent for NAA at the USGS reactor and were analyzed by U. Greife at the Colorado School of Mines. The NAA showed that the majority of gold mass present on the shields was not in the form of large blobs and splats, but was present as small particulates that had most likely formed as condensed vapor. Further analysis showed that the gold was entrained in the melted aluminum surface layers and did not extend down into the bulk of the aluminum. Once the gold mass was accounted for from the NAA, it was determined that the aluminum fielded at the equator was collecting a fraction of the total gold hohlraum mass equivalent to 120% {+-} 10% of the solid angle subtended by the shield. The attached presentation has more information on the results of the aluminum blast shield analysis. In addition to the information given in the presentation, the surfaces of the shields have been chemically leached and submitted for mass spectrometric analysis. The results from that analysis are expected to arrive after the due date