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Sample records for bulk geochemical features

  1. Geochemical features of the elemental composition of meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria (L).Maxim) in Kemerovo Oblast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, V. A.; Sobolev, I. S.; Baranovskaya, N. V.; Kolesnikova, E. A.; Chernenkaya, E. V.; Yalaltdinova, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    Biogeochemical sampling of the aboveground part of meadowsweet (Fillipendula Ulmaria (L). Maxim) allowed us to study ecological and geochemical features of 10 regions in Kemerovo Oblast, including both natural and man-made landscapes. The content of 55 elements in the plant is determined by ICP-MS. Statistical analysis of the results allowed us to establish the effect of the soil mineral composition and the mining region specificity on the elemental composition of meadowsweet, to reveal significant positive correlations of the elements and to establish a statistically significant difference in the studied areas on the basis of the content of some elements. Sample reference to one of the clusters, followed by an assessment of their geochemical features is determined by the K-average method.

  2. Natural compositional variation of the river Meuse (Maas) suspended load: a 13 ka bulk geochemical record from the upper Kreftenheye and Betuwe Formations in northern Limburg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tebbens, L.A.; Veldkamp, A.; Kroonenberg, S.B.

    2000-01-01

    Unambiguously pristine and largely unpolluted sediments from the Late Weichselian and Holocene infillings of the Meuse residual channels in northern Limburg (the Netherlands) have been sampled to determine the natural compositional variation of the river’s suspended load. Bulk geochemical and

  3. A procedure for partitioning bulk sediments into distinct grain-size fractions for geochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbanti, A.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1993-01-01

    A method to separate sediments into discrete size fractions for geochemical analysis has been tested. The procedures were chosen to minimize the destruction or formation of aggregates and involved gentle sieving and settling of wet samples. Freeze-drying and sonication pretreatments, known to influence aggregates, were used for comparison. Freeze-drying was found to increase the silt/clay ratio by an average of 180 percent compared to analysis of a wet sample that had been wet sieved only. Sonication of a wet sample decreased the silt/clay ratio by 51 percent. The concentrations of metals and organic carbon in the separated fractions changed depending on the pretreatment procedures in a manner consistent with the hypothesis that aggregates consist of fine-grained organic- and metal-rich particles. The coarse silt fraction of a freeze-dried sample contained 20–44 percent higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and organic carbon than the coarse silt fraction of the wet sample. Sonication resulted in concentrations of these analytes that were 18–33 percent lower in the coarse silt fraction than found in the wet sample. Sonication increased the concentration of lead in the clay fraction by an average of 40 percent compared to an unsonicated sample. Understanding the magnitude of change caused by different analysis protocols is an aid in designing future studies that seek to interpret the spatial distribution of contaminated sediments and their transport mechanisms.

  4. Geochemical and isotopic features of geothermal fluids around the Sea of Marmara, NW Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Italiano, Francesco; Woith, Heiko; Seyis, Cemil; Pizzino, Luca; Sciarra, Alessandra

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake processes provoke modifications of the crust affecting the fluid regime with changes in water level in wells, in temperature and/or chemical composition of groundwaters, in the flow-rate of gas discharges and in their chemical and isotopic composition. In the frame of MARsite (MARsite has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement No 308417) the relationship between fluids and seismogenesis has been approached collecting geochemical data of local significance and evaluating them in geochemical interpretative models of fluids circulation and interactions as well as defining their behaviour over a seismic-prone area. During three fluid sampling campaigns in 2013, 2014, and 2015 a suite of 120 gas samples were collected from 72 thermal and mineral water springs/wells in the wider Marmara region along the Northern and Southern branches of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). Bubbling gases were collected if available, in all other cases the gas phase was extracted from water samples collected on that purpose. Gas samples were analyzed for the main chemical composition as well as their isotopic composition (He and C). The results highlight that the vented gases are a binary mixture of two end-members having nitrogen and carbon dioxide as main components. The geochemical features of the gas phase are the result of several processes that have modified their pristine composition. Atmospheric and deep-originated volatiles mix at variable extents and interact with cold and hot groundwaters. CO2 is normally the main gas species. But it's concentration may decrease due to gas-water interactions (GWI) increasing the relative concentration of N2 and other less soluble gases. A high CO2 content indicates minor interactions. Thus, the easier and faster the pathways are from the deep layers toward the Earth's surface, the lower are the interactions. The volatiles keep

  5. Organic petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical features of the Achlada and Mavropigi lignite deposits, NW Macedonia, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukouzas, Nikolaos [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Ave. 357-359, GR-15231 Halandri, Athens (Greece); Kalaitzidis, Stavros P. [Geological Services, BHP Billiton Mitsubishi Alliance, Central Queensland Office, Peak Downs Mine, Moranbah, QLD 4744 (Australia); Ward, Colin R. [School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2010-09-01

    The Achlada and Mavropigi lignite deposits in northern Greece provide the main coal source for the next generation of Greek power plants. A comparative characterization of these two lignite deposits is presented, covering the coal rank and the features of the maceral components, based on detailed coal petrography, and the mineralogical and geochemical features of the coals and their ashes, based on XRF and XRD analyses. The data are used to interpret the palaeoenvironments of the lignite beds, as well as factors that may affect their burnout behavior. Both deposits have a lignite C rank. The Mavropigi lignite is mainly a matrix lignite lithotype, whereas the Achlada deposit consists both of matrix and xylite-rich lithotypes. The Achlada lignite was formed in a fluviatile environment, mainly in the abandoned channels of a meandering river system during flooding periods; hence it is enriched in inorganic matter, with ash values > 30 wt.%. The Mavropigi lignite formed in a reed-marsh environment under limno-telmatic conditions, and displays ash values < 30 wt.%. The inorganic matter of the two deposits is different in composition due to the contrasting environments, and these differences should be taken into account in optimizing their utilization for power production. A preliminary assessment indicates that the Achlada lignite may have more favorable slagging and fouling properties than the Mavropigi lignite, although experimental studies are required for more solid conclusions to be reached. (author)

  6. Geochemical features of the ore-bearing medium in uranium deposits in the Khiagda ore field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkin, B. T.; Solodov, I. N.; Ganina, N. I.; Rekun, M. L.; Tarasov, N. N.; Shugina, G. A.; Shulik, L. S.

    2017-09-01

    The Neogene uranium deposits of the Khiagda ore field (KOF) belong to the paleovalley variety of the hydrogene type and differ from other deposits of this genetic type in the geological and geochemical localization conditions. The contemporary hydrogeochemical setting and microbiological composition of ore-bearing medium are discussed. The redox potential of the medium (Eh is as low as-400 mV) is much lower than those established at other hydrogenic deposits, both ancient Late Mesozoic and young Late Alpine, studied with the same methods in Russia, Uzbekistan, and southern Kazakhstan. The pH of subsurface water (6.86-8.13) differs in significant fluctuations both between neighboring deposits and within individual ore lodes. Hydrogen-forming and denitrifying bacteria are predominant in microbiological populations, whereas sulfate-reducing bacteria are low-active. The consideration of these factors allowed us to describe the mechanism of uranium ore conservation as resulting from the development of the cryolithic zone, which isolates ore lodes from the effect of the external medium. Carbonated water supplied from the basement along fault zones also participates in the formation of the present-day hydrogeochemical setting. Based on the features of the ore-bearing medium, we propose a method of borehole in situ acid leaching to increase the efficiency of mining in the Khiagda ore field.

  7. Palynological and bulk geochemical constraints on the paleoceanographic conditions across the Frasnian-Famennian boundary, New Albany Shale, Indiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, Sarah R. de la [Department of Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803-4101 (United States); Rowe, Harold D.; Rimmer, Susan M. [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Slone Research Building, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY 40506-0053 (United States)

    2007-06-01

    A down-core record of stable isotope and geochemical results is integrated with palynofacies (kerogen) data from the New Albany Shale (Indiana) to reconstruct environmental changes that occurred across the Frasnian-Famennian boundary. Preliminary interpretations are focused on developing several multiproxy linkages that will potentially lead toward a more robust understanding of the occurrence and significance of phytoplankton assemblage variations during the Late Devonian, a time of widespread black shale formation. Development of such linkages will potentially provide a more comprehensive assessment of the various controls on 1) primary production, and 2) carbon sequestration in a large, low-paleolatitude intracratonic basin. An abrupt change in the geochemical and biotic proxies for particulate organic matter across the Frasnian-Famennian boundary coincides with a distinct lithological change, characterized by laminated, brownish-black Famennian mudstones unconformably overlying alternating bioturbated, greenish-gray and non-bioturbated, dark-gray Frasnian mudstones. Elemental and isotopic profiles reflect different patterns of production, degradation, and removal of organic carbon in the two shale facies. A shift from acritarch- to prasinophyte-dominated waters across the boundary indicates the overall importance of bathymetric fluctuations, chemico-physical conditions, and nutrient availability related to eustatic sea-level change. A positive {delta}{sup 13}C{sub V-PDB} shift of 1.1 permille across the boundary is interpreted to be correlative with the global Upper Kellwasser Event. A preliminary model is proposed to explain the sustainable primary production during times of maximum flooding, thereby enhancing organic preservation during black shale formation. (author)

  8. Geochemical features and U-Pb dating of trachyandesites of the Ktuts river basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahakyan, L.H.

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with the results on geochemical (including isotopes) and U-Pb dating on zircon minerals of trachyandesites from the r. Ktuts basin. Shoshonite series trachyandesites normalised by chondrites have mobile elements enrichment (Rb, Ba, and Th) together with negative HFSE (Nb, Ta) anomalies. The (La/Sm)CN ratio is 6.84 value but the (La/Yb)CN ratio is 38.17, suggesting the presence of residual material at the magmatic source from the deep parts. Neodymium and strontium isotopes have low εNd_(14.5Ma) and high 87"Sr/86"Sr(14.5Ma) ratios, respectively –0.4 and 0.7054. The trachyandesites age determined on the zircon minerals by the U-Pb method is 14,50,2 Ma, which coincides with the magmatism reactivation in the middle-upper Miocene after the collision of Arabic and European plates in the upper Eocene-Oligocene

  9. Geochemical features and effects on deep-seated fluids during the May-June 2012 southern Po Valley seismic sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Italiano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A periodic sampling of the groundwaters and dissolved and free gases in selected deep wells located in the area affected by the May-June 2012 southern Po Valley seismic sequence has provided insight into seismogenic-induced changes of the local aquifer systems. The results obtained show progressive changes in the fluid geochemistry, allowing it to be established that deep-seated fluids were mobilized during the seismic sequence and reached surface layers along faults and fractures, which generated significant geochemical anomalies. The May-June 2012 seismic swarm (mainshock on May 29, 2012, M 5.8; 7 shocks M >5, about 200 events 3 > M > 5 induced several modifications in the circulating fluids. This study reports the preliminary results obtained for the geochemical features of the waters and gases collected over the epicentral area from boreholes drilled at different depths, thus intercepting water and gases with different origins and circulation. The aim of the investigations was to improve our knowledge of the fluids circulating over the seismic area (e.g. origin, provenance, interactions, mixing of different components, temporal changes. This was achieved by collecting samples from both shallow and deep-drilled boreholes, and then, after the selection of the relevant sites, we looked for temporal changes with mid-to-long-term monitoring activity following a constant sampling rate. This allowed us to gain better insight into the relationships between the fluid circulation and the faulting activity. The sampling sites are listed in Table 1, along with the analytical results of the gas phase. […

  10. Morphological and geochemical features of crater lakes in Costa Rica: an overview

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    Antonio DELGADO HUERTAS

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the compositional and morphological features of the crater lakes found in the volcanoes of Rincón de La Vieja, Poás, Irazú, Congo and Tenorio volcanoes (Costa Rica. As evidenced by the distribution of the water and dissolved gas chemistry along vertical profiles, the different fluid sources feeding the lakes reflect the present status of each of the volcanic systems. The chemical features of the Caliente (Poás volcano and Rincón crater (Rincón de la Vieja volcano lakes are mainly dependent on i inputs of magmatic fluids from sub-lacustrine fumaroles and ii water-rock interaction processes. Conversely, the Irazú lake is mainly affected by the presence of CO2(H2S-rich fluids discharged from a hydrothermal system, which masked possible magmatic fluid contributions. Rainfall and organic activity are the main factors responsible for the chemical composition of Hule, Botos, Congo and Tenorio lakes. The chemical and isotopic water composition of Botos, Irazú and Hule lakes have displayed no significant variations along the vertical profiles. In contrast, Caliente lake shows a distinctive chemical stratification, mainly involving F-, Cl- and SO4 2-. The behaviour of these compounds seems to be governed by both dissolution of highly acidic species, i.e. HF, HCl and SO2 released from the magmatic environment, and microbial activity. Despite the significant increases with depth of dissolved CO2 at Caliente and Irazú lakes, the hazard for Nyos-type gas eruptions can be considered negligible, since i the water volumes are too small and ii the convective heat transfer limits the CO2 recharge rate. The relatively high concentrations of dissolved CO2 measured at the maximum depth of the Hule lake are likely produced by both degradation of organic material and degassing from a deep source. The sporadic episodes of fish deaths recently observed in this lake can be associated with lake overturn processes that have favoured the rise up

  11. Methodological approaches in estimating anomalous geochemical field structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, R; Rudmin, M

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical statistic methods were applied to analyze the core samples from vertical expendable wells in Chertovo Koryto gold ore field. The following methods were used to analyse gold in samples: assay tests and atomic absorption method (AAS), while emission spectrum semiquantative method was applied to identify traces. The analysis of geochemical association distribution in one central profile demonstrated that bulk metasomatic aureoles are characteristic of concentric zonal structure. The distribution of geochemical associations is correlated to the hydrothermal stages of mineral formation identified in this deposit. It was proved that the processed geochemical data by factor and cluster analyses provided additional information on the anomalous geochemical field structure in gold- bearing black-shale strata. Such methods are effective tools in interpretating specific features of geochemical field structures in analogous potential ore-bearing areas

  12. Transition of microbiological and sedimentological features associated with the geochemical gradient in a travertine mound in northern Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Chiya; Yanagawa, Katsunori; Okumura, Tomoyo; Takashima, Chizuru; Harijoko, Agung; Kano, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    Modern travertines, carbonate deposits in Ca-rich hydrothermal water with high pCO2, often display a changing environment along the water path, with corresponding variability in the microbial communities. We investigated a travertine-bearing hot spring at the Blue Pool in northern Sumatra, Indonesia. The thermal water of 62 °C with high H2S (200 μM) and pCO2 ( 1 atm) developed a travertine mound 70 m wide. The concentrations of the gas components H2S and CO2, decrease immediately after the water is discharged, while the dissolved oxygen, pH, and aragonite saturation increase in the downstream direction. Responding to the geochemical gradient in the water, the surface biofilms change color from white to pink, light-green, dark-green, and brown as the water flows from the vent; this corresponds to microbial communities characterized by chemolithoautotrophs (Halothiobacillaceae), purple sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae), Anaerolineaceae, and co-occurrence of green non-sulfur bacteria (Chloroflexales)-Cyanobacteria, and green sulfur bacteria (Chlorobiales), respectively. In an environment with a certain level of H2S (> 1 μM), sulfur digestion and anoxygenic photosynthesis can be more profitable than oxygenic photosynthesis by Cyanobacteria. The precipitated carbonate mineral consists of aragonite and calcite, with the proportion of aragonite increasing downstream due to the larger Mg2 +/Ca2 + ratio in the water or the development of thicker biofilm. Where the biofilm is well developed, the aragonite travertines often exhibit laminated structures that were likely associated with the daily metabolism of these bacteria. The microbiological and sedimentological features at the Blue Pool may be the modern analogs of geomicrobiological products in the early Earth. Biofilm of anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria had the potential to form ancient stromatolites that existed before the appearance of cyanobacteria.

  13. Secondary biological coalbed gas in the Xinji area, Anhui province, China: Evidence from the geochemical features and secondary changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Mingxin [Key Laboratory of Environmental Change and Natural Disaster of Ministry of Education, College of Resources Sciences and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Key Laboratory of Gas Geochemistry, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Shi, Baoguang; Wang, Wanchun; Li, Xiaobin; Gao, Bo [Key Laboratory of Gas Geochemistry, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Jinying [Material and Environment College, Qindao University of Science and Technology, Qindao 266042 (China)

    2007-07-02

    In order to ascertain the origin of the coalbed gas in the Xinji area, Anhui Province of China, the paper examined the geochemical features and secondary changes of CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} from the coalbed gas. The related gas composition, carbon isotope and tracer geochemical data are as follows: 0.993 to 1.0 for C{sub 1}/C{sub 1-n}, 188.6 to 2993.7 for C{sub 1}/C{sub 2}, < 2% for CO{sub 2}, 0.64 to 3.06% for [CO{sub 2}/(CO{sub 2} + CH{sub 4})]100%, - 50.7 permille to - 61.3 permille for {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} with the average value of - 56.6 permille, - 15.9 permille to - 26.7 permille for {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 2}, - 10.8 permille to - 25.3 permille for {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 3}, - 6.0 permille to - 39.0 permille for {delta}{sup 13}C{sub CO2} with the average value of - 17.9 permille, 30.7 permille to 43.9 permille for {delta}{delta}{sup 13}C{sub C2-C1}, and 17.2 permille to 50 permille for {delta}{delta}{sup 13}C{sub CO2-C1}, - 1 permille to + 1 permille for {delta}{sup 15}N{sub N2}, 1.13 x 10{sup -7} to 3.20 x 10{sup -7} for {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He with R/Ra ratios range from 0.08 to 0.23. The Ro values of the coal range from 0.88% to 0.91%. The trends of the {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} values and {delta}{sup 13}C{sub CO2} values downward in the stratigraphic profile are opposite: the former appears as a slight light-heavy-light trend, but the latter appears as a heavy-light-heavy trend. The {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} values have a negative correlation with the {delta}{sup 13}C{sub CO2} values. However, the {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 2} values have no correlation with the {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} values due to its complicated variation. The thermal evolution of the coal in the Xinji area is in the phase of a lot of wet gas generation, but most of the CO{sub 2} and heavy hydrocarbons have been reduced or degraded by microbes and have changed into biogenic methane. The coalbed gas is comprised of secondary biogenic methane, thermogenic methane, the

  14. Beyond the obvious limits of ore deposits: The use of mineralogical, geochemical, and biological features for the remote detection of mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D.L.; Kelley, K.D.; Coker, W.B.; Caughlin, B.; Doherty, M.E.

    2006-01-01

    Far field features of ore deposits include mineralogical, geochemical, or biological attributes that can be recognized beyond the obvious limits of the deposits. They can be primary, if formed in association with mineralization or alteration processes, or secondary, if formed from the interaction of ore deposits with the hydrosphere and biosphere. This paper examines a variety of far field features of different ore deposit types and considers novel applications to exploration and discovery. Primary far field features include mineral and rock chemistry, isotopic or element halos, fluid pathways and thermal anomalies in host-rock sequences. Examples include the use of apatite chemistry to distinguish intrusive rocks permissive for iron oxide copper gold (IOCG) and porphyry deposits; resistate mineral (e.g., rutile, tourmaline) chemistry in exploration for volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS), orogenic gold, and porphyry deposits; and pyrite chemistry to vector toward sedimentary exhalative (sedex) deposits. Distinctive whole-rock geochemical signatures also can be recognized as a far field feature of porphyry deposits. For example, unique Sr/Y ratios in whole-rock samples, used to distinguish barren versus fertile magmas for Cu mineralization, result from the differentiation of oxidized hydrous melts. Anomalous concentrations of halogen elements (Cl, Br, and I) have been found for distances of up to 200 m away from some mineralized centers. Variations in isotopic composition between ore-bearing and barren intrusions and/or systematic vertical and lateral zonation in sulfur, carbon, or oxygen isotope values have been documented for some deposit types. Owing to the thermal aureole that extends beyond the area of mineralization for some deposits, detection of paleothermal effects through methods such as conodont alteration indices, vitrinite or bitumen reflectance, illite crystallinity, and apatite or zircon thermochronology studies also can be valuable, particularly for

  15. Crack initiation and fracture features of Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb bulk metallic glass during compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lesz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was investigation crack initiation and fracture features developed during compression of Fe-based bulk metallic glass (BMG. These Fe-based BMG has received great attention as a new class of structural material due to an excellent properties (e.g. high strength and high elasticity and low costs. However, the poor ductility and brittle fracture exhibited in BMGs limit their structural application. At room temperature, BMGs fails catastrophically without appreciable plastic deformation under tension and only very limited plastic deformation is observed under compression or bending. Hence a well understanding of the crack initiation and fracture morphology of Fe-based BMGs after compression is of much importance for designing high performance BMGs. The raw materials used in this experiment for the production of BMGs were pure Fe, Co, Nb metals and nonmetallic elements: Si, B. The Fe–Co–B–Si–Nb alloy was cast as rods with three different diameters. The structure of the investigated BMGs rod is amorphous. The measurement of mechanical properties (Young modulus - E, compressive stress - σc, elastic strain - ε, unitary elastic strain energy – Uu were made in compression test. Compression test indicates the rods of Fe-based alloy to exhibit high mechanical strength. The development of crack initiation and fracture morphology after compression of Fe-based BMG were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM. Fracture morphology of rods has been different on the cross section. Two characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphologies of BMGs were observed. One is the smooth region. Another typical feature of the compressive fracture morphology of BMGs is the vein pattern. The veins on the compressive fracture surface have an obvious direction as result of initial displace of sample along shear bands. This direction follows the direction of the displacement of a material. The formation of veins on the

  16. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij site, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  17. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij sit, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  18. Geochemical and mineralogical investigation of domestic archaeological soil features at the Tiel-Passewaaij site, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, S.; Slomp, C.P.; Huisman, D.J.; Vriend, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Archaeological soil features can be defined as areas of staining in ancient cultural soil horizons and are frequently used in surveys to locate sites and activity areas. Visual observation of these features, however, provides only limited information on their origin and the processes leading to

  19. Particle Fluxes and Bulk Geochemical Characterization of the Cabo Frio Upwelling System in Southeastern Brazil: Sediment Trap Experiments between Spring 2010 and Summer 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA LUIZA S. ALBUQUERQUE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical and biogeochemical processes in continental shelves act synergistically in both transporting and transforming suspended material, and ocean dynamics control the dispersion of particles by the coastal zone and their subsequent mixing and dilution within the shelf area constrained by oceanic boundary currents, followed by their gradual settling in a complex sedimentary scenario. One of these regions is the Cabo Frio Upwelling System located in a significantly productive area of Southeastern Brazil, under the control of the nutrient-poor western boundary Brazil Current but also with a wind-driven coastal upwelling zone, inducing cold-water intrusions of South Atlantic Central Water on the shelf. To understand these synergic interactions among physical and biogeochemical processes in the Cabo Frio shelf, a series of four experiments with a total of 98 discrete samples using sediment traps was performed from November 2010 to March 2012, located on the 145 m isobath on the edge of the continental shelf. The results showed that lateral transport might be relevant in some cases, especially in deep layers, although no clear seasonal cycle was detected. Two main physical-geochemical coupling scenarios were identified: singular downwelling events that can enhance particles fluxes and are potentially related to the Brazil Current oscillations; and events of significant fluxes related to the intrusion of the 18°C isotherm in the euphotic zone. The particulate matter settling in the Cabo Frio shelf area seems to belong to multiple marine and terrestrial sources, in which both Paraiba do Sul River and Guanabara Bay could be potential land-sources, although the particulate material might subject intense transformation (diagenesis during its trajectory to the shelf edge.

  20. Particle Fluxes and Bulk Geochemical Characterization of the Cabo Frio Upwelling System in Southeastern Brazil: Sediment Trap Experiments between Spring 2010 and Summer 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Ana Luiza S; Belém, André L; Zuluaga, Francisco J B; Cordeiro, Livia G M; Mendoza, Ursula; Knoppers, Bastiaan A; Gurgel, Marcio H C; Meyers, Philip A; Capilla, Ramsés

    2014-05-14

    Physical and biogeochemical processes in continental shelves act synergistically in both transporting and transforming suspended material, and ocean dynamics control the dispersion of particles by the coastal zone and their subsequent mixing and dilution within the shelf area constrained by oceanic boundary currents, followed by their gradual settling in a complex sedimentary scenario. One of these regions is the Cabo Frio Upwelling System located in a significantly productive area of Southeastern Brazil, under the control of the nutrient-poor western boundary Brazil Current but also with a wind-driven coastal upwelling zone, inducing cold-water intrusions of South Atlantic Central Water on the shelf. To understand these synergic interactions among physical and biogeochemical processes in the Cabo Frio shelf, a series of four experiments with a total of 98 discrete samples using sediment traps was performed from November 2010 to March 2012, located on the 145 m isobath on the edge of the continental shelf. The results showed that lateral transport might be relevant in some cases, especially in deep layers, although no clear seasonal cycle was detected. Two main physical-geochemical coupling scenarios were identified: singular downwelling events that can enhance particles fluxes and are potentially related to the Brazil Current oscillations; and events of significant fluxes related to the intrusion of the 18°C isotherm in the euphotic zone. The particulate matter settling in the Cabo Frio shelf area seems to belong to multiple marine and terrestrial sources, in which both Paraiba do Sul River and Guanabara Bay could be potential land-sources, although the particulate material might subject intense transformation (diagenesis) during its trajectory to the shelf edge.

  1. Geochemical features of the geothermal fluids from the Mapamyum non-volcanic geothermal system (Western Tibet, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Xiaohong; Shen, Licheng; Wu, Kunyu; Huang, Mingzhi; Xiao, Qiong

    2016-06-01

    Mapamyum geothermal field (MGF) in western Tibet is one of largest geothermal areas characterized by the occurrence of hydrothermal explosions on the Tibetan Plateau. The geochemical properties of hydrothermal water in the MGF system were investigated to trace the origin of the solutes and to determine the equilibrium temperatures of the feeding reservoir. The study results show that the geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in the MGF system is mainly of the Na-HCO3 type. The chemical components of hydrothermal waters are mainly derived from the minerals in the host rocks (e.g., K-feldspar, albite, Ca-montmorillonite, and Mg-montmorillonite). The hydrothermal waters are slightly supersaturated or undersaturated with respect to aragonite, calcite, dolomite, chalcedony and quartz (saturation indices close to 0), but are highly undersaturated with respect to gypsum and anhydrite (saturation indices < 0). Mixing models and Na-K-Mg ternary diagrams show that strong mixing between cold meteoric water and deeply-seated thermal fluids occurred during the upward flowing process. δD and δ18O data confirm that the meteoric water acts as the water source of the geothermal waters. An 220 °C equilibrated reservoir temperature of hydrothermal spring waters was calculated via both the Na-K-Mg ternary diagrams and the cationic chemical geothermometers. The logpCO2 of hydrothermal waters in the MGF system ranges from - 2.59 to - 0.57 and δ13C of the total dissolved inorganic carbon ranges from - 5.53‰ to - 0.94‰, suggesting that the carrier CO2 in hydrothermal water are mainly of a magmatic or metamorphic CO2 origin.

  2. Petrological and geochemical features of the early Paleozoic granitic gneisses and iron ores in the Tianhu iron deposit, Eastern Tianshan, NW China: Implications for ore genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiahao; Mao, Jingwen; Yang, Fuquan; Chai, Fengmei; Shen, Ping

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports whole-rock geochemical, zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data for ore-hosted granitic gneisses, mineral compositions of oxides, and sulfur isotopic data for sulfides in iron ores from the Tianhu deposit, central part of the Eastern Tianshan. Our results can provide crucial constraints on the genesis of granitic gneisses and early Paleozoic tectonic setting of the Eastern Tianshan. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating on magmatic zircons yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 463 to 438 Ma, interpreted as the crystallization ages of the granitic protoliths and the formation ages of the Tianhu Group. Zircon U-Pb age of ore-hosted granitic gneiss (ca. 459 Ma) can provide reliable constrains on upper limit for iron mineralization age in the Tianhu deposit. Geochemical characteristics suggest that the protoliths of the Tianhu granitic gneisses are metaluminous to weakly peraluminous high-K calc-alkaline granitic rocks, exhibiting typical subduction-related features such as strong enrichment in LREE and LILE and depletion in HFSE. Zircon Hf isotopic compositions show a positive trend from 463 to 438 Ma, indicating that 460 Ma magmas came from both ancient and juvenile sources, whereas 438 Ma magmas involved more juvenile material. Some early Paleozoic granitoids were recently identified in the Eastern Tianshan with the ages between ca. 475 and ca. 425 Ma. The formation of these early Paleozoic granitoids was in response to subduction processes, suggesting that subduction of Junggar Ocean probably began in the Early Ordovician and lasted until Late Silurian. Pyrite and pyrrhotite in iron ores have δ34SCDT values from + 4.6 to + 15.7‰, which are consistent with the marine source, but inconsistent with the magmatic source or those involved evaporites in skarn iron deposit. Geological, geochemical, and isotopic data suggest that the Tianhu iron ores were formed by volcano-sedimentary processes in a subduction environment during the early Paleozoic time, and Tianhu is a

  3. Mineralogical and geochemical features of the coarse saprolite developed on orthogneiss in the SW of Yaoundé, South Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndjigui, P.-D.; Badinane, M. F. B.; Nyeck, B.; Nandjip, H. P. K.; Bilong, P.

    2013-03-01

    A petrological investigation was performed in the coarse saprolite on orthogneiss in Yaoundé (South Cameroon) using combined whole rock geochemical (XRF, ICP-MS) and mineralogical (XRD, SEM) techniques. The orthogneiss has high contents in SiO2 (61.56 wt.%), Ba (916 ppm) and REE (209 ppm), moderate content in Al2O3 (14.34 wt.%) and negative Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu* = 0.68). The weathering leads to the formation of three main constituents in the coarse saprolite: (i) the loose materials (∼85 vol.%) are basically clayey silty with relic structure. They are composed of kaolinite, quartz and goethite. The loose materials have high contents in SiO2 (56-64.83 wt.%) and Al2O3 (21.48-23.96 wt.%), and moderate contents in V (163-236 ppm), Ba (95-340 ppm) and Zr (160-313 ppm). The REE content is low (∼49-169 ppm) relative to the parent rock with LREE-enrichment (LREE/HREE ∼ 7-17). Positive Ce anomaly (Ce/Ce* ∼ 3.35) is observed in the white veins and slight positive Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* ∼ 1.2-1.4) are noted in all loose samples. The (La/Yb)N ratios (∼0.8-1.5) indicate high REE-fractionation. The mass balance calculation reveals the depletion of several elements except Al, Ti, Sc, Y, Th, Sb and Hf; (ii) the iron duricrust (∼10 vol.%) is located at the bottom and the top of the horizon. The mineral assemblage is dominated by hematite and goethite. The upper iron duricrust has high contents in Fe2O3 (45.60 wt.%) and Cr (1641 ppm), moderate contents in V (459 ppm) and Zn (143 ppm), and low REE content (47 ppm) with low LREE/HREE ratio (4.28). The upper iron duricrust is more enriched in Fe2O3 (53.26 wt.%) than the lower one. Vanadium, Cr and Zr have high contents relative to other trace elements. The REE content is low (39 ppm) as well as the LREE/HREE ratio (2.94). The iron duricrust has negative Ce anomalies (Ce/Ce* ∼ 0.66-0.69) and very low (La/Yb)N ratios (0.1-0.3). Several elements reported in the iron duricrust are highly leached except Fe, Cr, Zn, Sc, V, Pb, Zr

  4. A comparison of geochemical features of extracts from coal-seams source rocks with different polarity solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jianping; Deng, Chunping; Wang, Huitong

    2009-02-15

    There exists a great difference in group-type fractions and biomarker distributions of chloroform extracts from coals and coal-seams oils, which makes the source identification of coal-seams oils in sedimentary basins rather difficult. The experiment, in which four different polarity solvents, n-hexane, benzene, dichloromethane and chloroform, were used to extract 9 coal-seams source rocks and 3 typical lacustrine source rocks, showed that the yield of extracts increased gradually with increasing solvent polarity. The distribution features of their n-alkanes, isoprenoids and sterane and terpane biomarkers remained, in general, similar, showing no distinct enrichment or depletion for a certain fraction by any solvent. The compositional analysis on n-hexane and chloroform extracts showed that the absolute amount (concentration) of biomarkers was relatively low for the n-hexane extract but comparatively high for the chloroform extract, this difference became great among coal-seams source rocks but small among lacustrine mudstones. The statistical analysis on the relative amount of the 18 major biomarkers in n-hexane and chloroform extracts from 10 source rock samples showed that extracts with a proportional error for the same biomarker of less than 5% (including the analytical error) accounted for 84% while those with a proportional error over 10% amounted to below 5%. This suggested that the outcome of oil-source correlation made by these biomarkers will be independent of variations in amounts of saturates and biomarkers arising from solvent polarity. Therefore, biomarkers obtained from organic-rich source rocks including coals by the extraction with the commonly used chloroform solvent can be applied for the oilsource correlation of coal-seams petroliferous basins.

  5. Molybdenum mineralization related to the Yangtze's lower crust and differentiation in the Dabie Orogen: Evidence from the geochemical features of the Yaochong porphyry Mo deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing-Quan; Li, Bin; Shao, Yong-Jun; Lu, An-Huai; Lai, Jian-Qing; Li, Yong-Feng; Luo, Zheng-Zhuan

    2017-06-01

    The Dabie Orogen is a world-class case for large amounts of Mo mineralization in that it contains at least 10 porphyry Mo deposits with Mo metal reserves over 3 Mt from the time period of 156-110 Ma. However, the principal mechanism for the Mo mineralization remains controversial due to the lack of a precise definition of its source and shallow ore-forming process, which is essential to understand these rare large Mo deposits. Detailed geochronology, geochemistry, and isotopic data for ore-related granites and minerals were analyzed in order to place constraints on the massive Mo mineralization in the Dabie Orogen in eastern China. The Yaochong molybdenum orebodies were hosted in the transition belt and alteration zone between the granitic stocks and the Dabie Complex and were characterized as numerous veinlets with potassic, phyllic and propylitic alterations. The buried Yaochong granitic intrusions and associated molybdenum mineralization yield Early Cretaceous ages of magmatic activities at ca. 138 Ma and extremely similar Re-Os isotope ages for the corresponding Mo metallogenic event at ca. 137 Ma. The Yaochong monzogranite and granite porphyry belong to the highly fractionated I-type granites, which are believed to be derived from the dominantly Yangtze's lower crust mixed with the Northern Dabie Complex due to their geochemical and isotope features. The elemental diversity and isotopic homogeneity suggest that the formation of the Yaochong monzogranite involved the fractionation of biotite, garnet and minor feldspar and accessory minerals combined with a weak crustal assimilation process. In contrast, the granite porphyry was possibly generated by the partial melting of the same mixed lower continental crust via the differentiation process involving the fractionation of feldspar, apatite, and/or titanite. Fractional crystallization processes can significantly elevate the molybdenum concentration in the residual melts. The biotite fractional crystallization

  6. SYN-RIFT SANDSTONЕS: THE FEATURES OF BULK CHEMICAL COMPOSITIONS, AND POSITIONS ON PALEOGEODYNAMIC DISCRIMINANT DIAGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Maslov

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available From the early 1980s, the data on the bulk chemical composition of sandstones and mudstones are actively involved for interpretation of the paleogeodynamic settings for sedimentary sequences. Discriminant diagrams such as K2O/Na2O–SiO2/Al2O3 [Maynard et al., 1982], (Fe2O3*+MgO–K2O/Na2O and others [Bhatia, 1983], SiO2–K2O/Na2O [Roser, Korsch, 1986], (K2O+Na2O–SiO2/20–(TiO2+Fe2O3+MgO [Kroonenberg, 1994] etc., are now widely used in regional investigations to classify terrigenous rocks from several paleogeodynamic settings (passive and active continental margins, oceanic and continental volcanic arcs etc. with a certain ‘percentage of consistency’. The first diagrams DF1–DF2 for syn-rift compositions were published in the early 2010s [Verma, Armstrong-Altrin, 2013]. This article analyzes the bulk chemical compositions of syn-rift sandstones from intracratonic rifts and rifts formed during the break-up of the Columbia and Gondwana supercontinents, rifts within volcanic arcs and related to the collapse of collision orogens (for example, Permian sandstones of the Malužiná formation, Western Carpathians, Slovakia. Our database includes the Neoproterozoic Uinta Mountain Group (USA, the Cretaceous Omdurman formation of the Khartoum Basin (Sudan, the siliciclastic deposits of the Kalahari Basin (East African rift zone, the sandstones of the Vindhyan Supergroup (India, the Neoproterozoic Ui Group of the Uchur-Maya region (Southeast Siberia, the Meso-Neoproterozoic Banxi Group (Southern China, the Mesoproterozoic Belt-Purcell Supergroup (USA, the Oronto and Bayfield Groups of the Midcontinent (USA, as well as the sandstones of the Upper Precambrian Ai and Mashak formations, and the metasedimentary rocks of the Arsha Group (Southern Urals. The article examines: (1 the position of the syn-rift sandstone compositions (fields on the log(SiO2/Al2O3–log(Na2O/K2O classification diagram and the F1–F2 diagram, which gives the possible

  7. Geochemical features of sulfides from the Deyin-1 hydrothermal field at the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujie; Li, Huaiming; Zhai, Shikui; Yu, Zenghui; Cai, Zongwei

    2017-12-01

    In this study, geochemical compositions of elements in sulfide samples collected from the Deyin-1 hydrothermal field near the 15°S southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (SMAR) were analyzed by the X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to examine the enrichment regulations of ore-forming elements and hydrothermal mineralization. These sulfide precipitates can be classified macroscopically into three types: Fe-rich sulfide, Fe-Cu-rich sulfide and Fe-Zn-rich sulfide, and are characterized by the enrichment of base metal elements along with a sequence of Fe>Zn>Cu. Compared with sulfides from other hydrothermal fields on MAR, Zn concentrations of sulfides in the research area are significantly high, while Cu concentrations are relatively low. For all major, trace or rare-earth elements (REE), their concentrations and related characteristic parameters exhibit significant variations (up to one or two orders of magnitude), which indicates the sulfides from different hydrothermal vents or even a same station were formed at different stages of hydrothermal mineralization, and suggests the variations of chemical compositions of the hydrothermal fluid with respect to time. The hydrothermal temperatures of sulfides precipitation decreased gradually from station TVG10 (st.TVG10) to st.TVG12, and to st.TVG11, indicating that the precipitation of hydrothermal sulfides is subjected to conditions changed from high temperature to low temperature, and that the hydrothermal activity of study area was at the late stage of a general trend of evolution from strong to weak. The abnormally low concentrations of REE in sulfides and their similar chondrite-normalized REE patterns show that REEs in all sulfides were derived from a same source, but underwent different processes of migration or enrichment, or sulfides were formed at different stages of hydrothermal mineralization. The sulfides collected from the active hydrothermal vent were

  8. Fractal Feature of Particle-Size Distribution in the Rhizospheres and Bulk Soils during Natural Recovery on the Loess Plateau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zilin; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Guobin; Qu, Dong; Xue, Sha

    2015-01-01

    The application of fractal geometry to describe soil structure is an increasingly useful tool for better understanding the performance of soil systems. Only a few studies, however, have focused on the structure of rhizospheric zones, where energy flow and nutrient recycling most frequently occur. We used fractal dimensions to investigate the characteristics of particle-size distribution (PSD) in the rhizospheres and bulk soils of six croplands abandoned for 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 years on the Loess Plateau of China and evaluated the changes over successional time. The PSDs of the rhizospheres and the fractal dimensions between rhizosphere soil and bulk soils during the natural succession differed significantly due to the influence of plant roots. The rhizospheres had higher sand (0.05–1.00 mm) contents, lower silt (soils during the early and intermediate successional stages (1–15 years). The fractal dimensions of the rhizosphere soil and bulk soil ranged from 2.102 to 2.441 and from 2.214 to 2.459, respectively, during the 30-year restoration. Rhizospheric clay and silt contents and fractal dimension tended to be higher and sand content tended to be lower as abandonment age increased, but the bulk soils had the opposite trend. Linear regression analysis indicated that the fractal dimensions of both the rhizospheres and bulk soils were significantly linearly correlated with clay, sand, organic-carbon, and total-nitrogen contents, with R 2 ranging from 0.526 to 0.752 (Psoil and bulk soil. The fractal dimension was a sensitive and useful index for quantifying changes in the properties of the different soil zones. This study will greatly aid the application of the fractal method for describing soil structure and nutrient status and the understanding of the performance of rhizospheric zones during ecological restoration. PMID:26368339

  9. Geochemical Constraints for Mercury's PCA-Derived Geochemical Terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockstill-Cahill, K. R.; Peplowski, P. N.

    2018-05-01

    PCA-derived geochemical terranes provide a robust, analytical means of defining these terranes using strictly geochemical inputs. Using the end members derived in this way, we are able to assess the geochemical implications for Mercury.

  10. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  11. DETERMINATION OF RELEVANT FEATURES OF A SCALE MODEL FOR A 55 000 DWT BULK CARRIER NECESSARY TO STUDY THE SHIP MANEUVERABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALECU TOMA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The study method of a ship behavior based on practical tests on scale models is widely used both leading scientists and engineers, architects and researchers in the naval field. In this paper we propose to determine the parameters of a ship handling characteristics relevant to study the 55,000 dwt bulk carrier using a scale model. Scientific background for practical experimentation of this techniques necessary to built a scale model ship consists in applying the principles of similarity or "similitude". The scale model achieved by applying the laws of similarity must allow, through approximations available in certain circumstances, finding relevant parameters needed to simplify and solve the Navier-Stokes equations. These parameters are necessary for modeling the interaction between hull of the real ship and the fluid motion.

  12. Reconnaissance Geochemical Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    distribution patterns. The geochemical distribution maps of the elements reveal that Cu, Pb, Zn, Co, Sc, Ni, Cr, .... After filtration, the leached solutions were diluted with ultra ...... some other rare earth elements in the study area. The occurrence ...

  13. Methods for geochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baedecker, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratories for analytical chemistry within the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey are administered by the Office of Mineral Resources. The laboratory analysts provide analytical support to those programs of the Geologic Division that require chemical information and conduct basic research in analytical and geochemical areas vital to the furtherance of Division program goals. Laboratories for research and geochemical analysis are maintained at the three major centers in Reston, Virginia, Denver, Colorado, and Menlo Park, California. The Division has an expertise in a broad spectrum of analytical techniques, and the analytical research is designed to advance the state of the art of existing techniques and to develop new methods of analysis in response to special problems in geochemical analysis. The geochemical research and analytical results are applied to the solution of fundamental geochemical problems relating to the origin of mineral deposits and fossil fuels, as well as to studies relating to the distribution of elements in varied geologic systems, the mechanisms by which they are transported, and their impact on the environment.

  14. Geochemical prospecting in Guiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, R.

    1957-01-01

    During the last few years geochemical prospecting techniques have become common usage in the field of mineral deposit prospecting. The real scope of these methods lies in their use in the prospecting of large areas. The most promising use of the geochemistry and hydro-geochemistry of uranium is in heavily forested tropical territories, with few outcrops, where radiometry is strongly handicapped. (author) [fr

  15. Geochemical approach to evaluate deforest of mangroves

    OpenAIRE

    Ishiga, Hiroaki; Diallo, Ibrahima M'bemba; Bah Mamadou Lamine Malick,; Ngulimi. Faustine Miguta,; Magai. Paschal Justin,; Shati Samwel Stanley,

    2016-01-01

    Processes of mangrove deforest related human activities were examined. To evaluate changes of soil feature, multielements geochemical compositions of mangrove muds and soils of deforest were analyzed. To describe present situation of the mangrove, Conakry in Guinea, Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, Sundarbans of Bangladesh and Nago in Okinawa of Japan were selected. Soil samples of the forests were evaluated enrichment of biologically concentrated heavy metals such as Zn, Cu and Fe, and TS (total s...

  16. Geochemical modeling: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted

  17. Geochemical modeling: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted.

  18. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical Data Bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia is being studied to evaluate the processes involved in the geochemical alteration of the ore body and the formation of the uranium dispersion fan. A broad range of research is being undertaken into the geochemistry and hydrology of the site with the aim of understanding the transport of radionuclides through the system. During the project a range of geochemical and hydrogeochemical models have been developed to account for measured data from the site and with which to predict site evolution. The majority of these models are based on the premise of thermodynamic chemical equilibrium and employ fundamental thermodynamic data to characterise the chemistry of the system. From the differences which exist between the thermodynamic data bases (Appendices I and II) it is possible to gain a view of the level of uncertainty associated with thermodynamic data in each set of calculations. This report gives a brief introduction to the geochemical processes underlying the models, and details the equations used to quantify the more common of these processes (e.g. aqueous speciation and mineral solubility). A description is given of the computer codes (EQ3/6, PHREEQE, MINTEQ) most commonly used during the project for geochemical modelling. Their key features are highlighted and comparisons made. It is concluded that the degree of uncertainty in geochemical modelling studies arising as a result of using one code rather than another is relatively insignificant when compared to that related to differences in the underlying data bases. 73 refs., 3 figs

  19. Technical specifications for the bulk shielding reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report provides information concerning the technical specifications for the Bulk Shielding Reactor. Areas covered include: safety limits and limiting safety settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and monitoring of airborne effluents. 10 refs

  20. Geochemical Survey of Pernambuco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, A.; Duarte, P.J.; Almeida, M.G. de; Medeiros, M.O.

    1988-01-01

    The area studied i this work is located in a triangle formed by the Sibiro and Boca da Mata Sugar-Mills and Serinhaem country. In the Cabo Formation the search determinated conglomerates, arcos and clays. Although the highest geochemical activity have been done in the decomposed crystalin, and the values from Cabo Formation don't be encourager, this formation has lithology compatible with uranium mineralization. The Cabo Formation's sediments presents lithologic variations very expressives, with conglomerates, arcoses and clay silts, which determinate the choise of the area. This area presented favorable to uranium prospecting and to others elements interesting to ragional geochemistry. The atomic absorption analysis, fluorimetry and spectrometry were done for the following elements: Zn, V, Ti, Ni, Pb, Mn, Ga, Cu, Co, Bi, Ag, B, Mo, and U. (C.D.G.) [pt

  1. Bulk oil clauses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, N.

    1993-01-01

    The Institute Bulk Oil Clauses produced by the London market and the American SP-13c Clauses are examined in detail in this article. The duration and perils covered are discussed, and exclusions, adjustment clause 15 of the Institute Bulk Oil Clauses, Institute War Clauses (Cargo), and Institute Strikes Clauses (Bulk Oil) are outlined. (UK)

  2. Archean crust-mantle geochemical differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, G. R.

    Isotope measurements on carbonatite complexes and komatiites can provide information on the geochemical character and geochemical evolution of the mantle, including the sub-continental mantle. Measurements on young samples establish the validity of the method. These are based on Sr, Nd and Pb data from the Tertiary-Mesozoic Gorgona komatiite and Sr and Pb data from the Cretaceous Oka carbonatite complex. In both cases the data describe a LIL element-depleted source similar to that observed presently in MORB. Carbonatite data have been used to study the mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield one billion years (1 AE) ago. The framework for this investigation was established by Bell et al., who showed that large areas of the province appear to be underlain by LIL element-depleted mantle (Sr-85/Sr-86=0.7028) at 1 AE ago. Additionally Bell et al. found four complexes to have higher initial Sr ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86=0.7038), which they correlated with less depleted (bulk earth?) mantle sources, or possibly crustal contamination. Pb isotope relationships in four of the complexes have been studied by Bell et al.

  3. Archean crust-mantle geochemical differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Isotope measurements on carbonatite complexes and komatiites can provide information on the geochemical character and geochemical evolution of the mantle, including the sub-continental mantle. Measurements on young samples establish the validity of the method. These are based on Sr, Nd and Pb data from the Tertiary-Mesozoic Gorgona komatiite and Sr and Pb data from the Cretaceous Oka carbonatite complex. In both cases the data describe a LIL element-depleted source similar to that observed presently in MORB. Carbonatite data have been used to study the mantle beneath the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield one billion years (1 AE) ago. The framework for this investigation was established by Bell et al., who showed that large areas of the province appear to be underlain by LIL element-depleted mantle (Sr-85/Sr-86=0.7028) at 1 AE ago. Additionally Bell et al. found four complexes to have higher initial Sr ratios (Sr-87/Sr-86=0.7038), which they correlated with less depleted (bulk earth?) mantle sources, or possibly crustal contamination. Pb isotope relationships in four of the complexes have been studied by Bell et al.

  4. Statistical interpretation of geochemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carambula, M.

    1990-01-01

    Statistical results have been obtained from a geochemical research from the following four aerial photographies Zapican, Carape, Las Canias, Alferez. They have been studied 3020 samples in total, to 22 chemical elements using plasma emission spectrometry methods.

  5. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The processes and types of dispersion that produce anomalies in stream water, stream sediment, and ground water, and the factors that must be considered in planning and interpreting geochemical surveys are reviewed. Examples of surveys near known deposits show the types of results to be expected. Background values depend mainly on the content of U in rocks of the drainage area. In igneous rocks, U tends to increase with potassium from ultramafic rocks (0.01 ppM) to granitic rocks (1 to 5 ppM). Some alkalic rocks have unusually high contents of U (15 to 100 ppM). Uranium-rich provinces marked by igneous rocks unusually rich in U are recognized in several areas and appear to have a deep crustal or mantle origin. In western U.S., many tertiary tuffaceous rocks have a high U content. Sandstones, limestones, and many shales approximate the crustal abundance at 0.5 to 4 ppM, but black shales, phosphates, and some organic materials are notably enriched in U. Uranium is very soluble in most oxidizing waters at the earth's surface, but is precipitated by reducing agents (organic matter, H 2 S) and adsorbed by organic material and some Fe oxides. In most surface and ground waters, U correlates approximately with the total dissolved solids, conductivity, and bicarbonate concentration of the water, and with the U content of rocks it comes into contact with. Most surveys of stream water near known districts show distinct anomalies extending a few km to tens of km downstream. A complication with water is the large variability with time, up to x 50, as a result of changes in the ratio of ground water to direct runoff, and changes in rate of oxidation and leaching. Collection and analysis of water samples also pose some difficulties

  6. Geochemical reversals within the lower 100 m of the Palisades sill, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorring, Matthew L.; Naslund, H. R.

    1995-03-01

    Transects through the lower part of the Palisades sill were made at Fort Lee and Alpine, New Jersey in order to characterize the petrologic signature of previously proposed “reversals” in the normal, tholeiitic differentiation trend. Petrographic and geochemical data include: (1) modal and grain size analyses, (2) bulk rock major and trace element concentrations by DCP-AES, and (3) augite, orthopyroxene, magnetite, and olivine compositions by electron microprobe analysis. Anomalous horizons, defined by increased bulk rock Mg?, Cr, Ni, and Co concentrations and abrupt modal and grain-size changes, occur at 10 m (the well known olivine zone), 27 m, 45 m, and 95 m above the basal contact. Thermal models coupled with estimates of the emplacement rate and total magma volume indicate that the olivine zone (OZ) is an early-stage feature, related to the emplacement of initial magma into the Palisades chamber. Stoke’s Law calculations indicate that the settling velocity of average-sized olivine crystals in a high-titanium, quartz-normative (HTQ) magma is too slow for significant gravity settling to have occurred prior to the solidification of the basal 20 m of the sill. It is suggested that the OZ resulted from the emplacement of a heterogeneous initial magma from a compositionally stratified, sub-Palisades storage chamber located within the upper crust; however, heterogeneity may have been derived directly from the mantle or during rapid ascent. Geochemical models indicate that the OZ contains accumulated olivine that is not in cotectic (or constant) proportions with the other cumulus phases, suggesting a mechanical sorting process. Magma chamber recharge is proposed to have occurred at the 27 m and 45 m levels, when a slightly more-primitive HTQ magma was injected into the Palisades sill cha- mber. Zones of elevated Mg? and Cr, 6 to 10 m thick, at these two horizons may indicate the thickness of the hybrid magma formed by the mixing of these two compositions

  7. Geochemical characteristics of peat from two raised bogs of Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezhibor, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Peat has a wide range of applications in different spheres of human activity, and this is a reason for a comprehensive study. This research represents the results of an ICP-MS study of moss and peat samples from two raised bogs of Germany. Because of the wide use of sphagnum moss and peat, determining their geochemical characteristics is an important issue. According to the results obtained, we can resume that the moss samples from Germany are rich in Cu, As, Y, Zr, Nb, and REE. The geochemical composition of the bogs reflects the regional environmental features and anthropogenic influence.

  8. Geochemical computer codes. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this report a review of available codes is performed and some code intercomparisons are also discussed. The number of codes treating natural waters (groundwater, lake water, sea water) is large. Most geochemical computer codes treat equilibrium conditions, although some codes with kinetic capability are available. A geochemical equilibrium model consists of a computer code, solving a set of equations by some numerical method and a data base, consisting of thermodynamic data required for the calculations. There are some codes which treat coupled geochemical and transport modeling. Some of these codes solve the equilibrium and transport equations simultaneously while other solve the equations separately from each other. The coupled codes require a large computer capacity and have thus as yet limited use. Three code intercomparisons have been found in literature. It may be concluded that there are many codes available for geochemical calculations but most of them require a user that us quite familiar with the code. The user also has to know the geochemical system in order to judge the reliability of the results. A high quality data base is necessary to obtain a reliable result. The best results may be expected for the major species of natural waters. For more complicated problems, including trace elements, precipitation/dissolution, adsorption, etc., the results seem to be less reliable. (With 44 refs.) (author)

  9. Large area bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  10. Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of Lithomargic clay. GEOCHEMICAL AND .... tries, as filling material in the pulp and paper, toothpaste and paint industries as well ..... tions very vital to human health and other ac- tivities of man.

  11. NOAA and MMS Marine Minerals Geochemical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Minerals Geochemical Database was created by NGDC as a part of a project to construct a comprehensive computerized bibliography and geochemical database...

  12. Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, J.W.

    1977-03-01

    The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed

  13. Granite-repository - geochemical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    Some geochemical data of importance for a radioactive waste repository in hard rock are reviewed. The ground water composition at depth is assessed. The ground water chemistry in the vicinity of uranium ores is discussed. The redox system in Swedish bedrock is described. Influences of extreme climatic changes and of repository mining and construction are also evaluated

  14. Polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, RAJ; Hummelen, JC; Saricifti, NS

    Nanostructured phase-separated blends, or bulk heterojunctions, of conjugated Polymers and fullerene derivatives form a very attractive approach to large-area, solid-state organic solar cells.The key feature of these cells is that they combine easy, processing from solution on a variety of

  15. Geochemical studies of potential source minerals of radon: case studies in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnai, G.; Nagy-Balogh, J.; Gal-Solymos, K.; Konc, Z.; Breitner, D.; Barabas, A.; Szabo, C. [Eotvos Univ., Lithosphere Fluid Research Lab, Dept. of Petrology and Geochemistry, Budapest (Hungary); Barabas, A. [Eotvos Univ., Dept. of Geophysics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2006-07-01

    In Hungary, during the past decade five distinct regions have been chosen to find possible explanations of the uncommonly high radon background radiation values. The main aim of the research is to study U- and Th-bearing minerals in petrographic and geochemical characters. Besides the microscopic techniques, whole rock and in situ geochemical analytical methods were applied to determine the bulk U and Th content of the studied geological samples. We assume that some of the radon measured is related to the U and Th contents of the samples. (authors)

  16. Superductile bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, K.F.; Ruan, F.; Yang, Y.Q.; Chen, N.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<2%) at room temperature. We report a newly developed Pd-Si binary bulk metallic glass, which exhibits a uniform plastic deformation and a large plastic engineering strain of 82% and a plastic true strain of 170%, together with initial strain hardening, slight strain softening and final strain hardening characteristics. The uniform shear deformation and the ultrahigh plasticity are mainly attributed to strain hardening, which results from the nanoscale inhomogeneity due to liquid phase separation. The formed nanoscale inhomogeneity will hinder, deflect, and bifurcate the propagation of shear bands

  17. NEW GEOCHEMICAL DATA OF BASALTS IN THE TSOROIDOG AREA, CENTRAL MONGOLIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Oyunchimeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, geochemical data are widely used for reconstructing geodynamic settings, especially, volcanic rocks of mafic composition, i.e., basalts, because they are widespread in many orogenic belts and are indicative of different geodynamic environments. In general, we propose the reconstruction of the tectonic settings of basalts according to their relationships with associated ocean plate stratigraphy (OPS sediments, their petrogenesis and their geochemical features.

  18. Auctioning Bulk Mobile Messages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Meij (Simon); L-F. Pau (Louis-François); H.W.G.M. van Heck (Eric)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe search for enablers of continued growth of SMS traffic, as well as the take-off of the more diversified MMS message contents, open up for enterprises the potential of bulk use of mobile messaging , instead of essentially one-by-one use. In parallel, such enterprises or value added

  19. Diffusion or bulk flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    is currently matter of discussion, called passive symplasmic loading. Based on the limited material available, this review compares the different loading modes and suggests that diffusion is the driving force in apoplasmic loaders, while bulk flow plays an increasing role in plants having a continuous...

  20. Ferromagnetic bulk glassy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akihisa; Makino, Akihiro; Mizushima, Takao

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with the review on the formation, thermal stability and magnetic properties of the Fe-based bulk glassy alloys in as-cast bulk and melt-spun ribbon forms. A large supercooled liquid region over 50 K before crystallization was obtained in Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si), Fe-(Cr, Mo, Nb)-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B) and (Fe, Co, Ni)-Zr-M-B (M=Ti, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo and W) systems and bulk glassy alloys were produced in a thickness range below 2 mm for the Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) system and 6 mm for the Fe-Co-(Zr, Nb, Ta)-(Mo, W)-B system by copper-mold casting. The ring-shaped glassy Fe-(Al, Ga)-(P, C, B, Si) alloys exhibit much better soft magnetic properties as compared with the ring-shaped alloy made from the melt-spun ribbon because of the formation of the unique domain structure. The good combination of high glass-forming ability and good soft magnetic properties indicates the possibility of future development as a new bulk glassy magnetic material

  1. Geochemical Investigations of Groundwater Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, Adrian

    2006-05-01

    The report describes geochemical parameters and methods that provide information about the hydrodynamic stability of groundwaters in low permeability fractured rocks that are potential hosts for radioactive waste repositories. Hydrodynamic stability describes the propensity for changes in groundwater flows over long timescales, in terms of flow rates and flow directions. Hydrodynamic changes may also cause changes in water compositions, but the related issue of geochemical stability of a potential repository host rock system is outside the scope of this report. The main approaches to assessing groundwater stability are numerical modelling, measurement and interpretation of geochemical indicators in groundwater compositions, and analyses and interpretations of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in these minerals. This report covers the latter two topics, with emphasis on geochemical indicators. The extent to which palaeohydrogeology and geochemical stability indicators have been used in past safety cases is reviewed. It has been very variable, both in terms of the scenarios considered, the stability indicators considered and the extent to which the information was explicitly or implicitly used in assessing FEPs and scenarios in the safety cases. Geochemical indicators of hydrodynamic stability provide various categories of information that are of hydrogeological relevance. Information about groundwater mixing, flows and water sources is potentially provided by the total salinity of groundwaters, their contents of specific non-reactive solutes (principally chloride) and possibly of other solutes, the stable isotopic ratio of water, and certain characteristics of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions. Information pertaining directly to groundwater ages and the timing of water and solute movements is provided by isotopic systems including tritium, carbon-14, chlorine-36, stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, uranium isotopes and dissolved mobile gases in

  2. Geochemical Investigations of Groundwater Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The report describes geochemical parameters and methods that provide information about the hydrodynamic stability of groundwaters in low permeability fractured rocks that are potential hosts for radioactive waste repositories. Hydrodynamic stability describes the propensity for changes in groundwater flows over long timescales, in terms of flow rates and flow directions. Hydrodynamic changes may also cause changes in water compositions, but the related issue of geochemical stability of a potential repository host rock system is outside the scope of this report. The main approaches to assessing groundwater stability are numerical modelling, measurement and interpretation of geochemical indicators in groundwater compositions, and analyses and interpretations of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in these minerals. This report covers the latter two topics, with emphasis on geochemical indicators. The extent to which palaeohydrogeology and geochemical stability indicators have been used in past safety cases is reviewed. It has been very variable, both in terms of the scenarios considered, the stability indicators considered and the extent to which the information was explicitly or implicitly used in assessing FEPs and scenarios in the safety cases. Geochemical indicators of hydrodynamic stability provide various categories of information that are of hydrogeological relevance. Information about groundwater mixing, flows and water sources is potentially provided by the total salinity of groundwaters, their contents of specific non-reactive solutes (principally chloride) and possibly of other solutes, the stable isotopic ratio of water, and certain characteristics of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions. Information pertaining directly to groundwater ages and the timing of water and solute movements is provided by isotopic systems including tritium, carbon-14, chlorine-36, stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, uranium isotopes and dissolved mobile gases in

  3. Geochemical studies on island arc volcanoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notsu, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes advances in three topics of geochemical studies on island arc volcanoes, which I and my colleagues have been investigating. First one is strontium isotope studies of arc volcanic rocks mainly from Japanese island arcs. We have shown that the precise spatial distribution of the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio reflects natures of the subduction structure and slab-mantle interaction. Based on the 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio of volcanic rocks in the northern Kanto district, where two plates subduct concurrently with different directions, the existence of an aseismic portion of the Philippine Sea plate ahead of the seismic one was suggested. Second one is geochemical monitoring of active arc volcanoes. 3 He/ 4 He ratio of volcanic volatiles was shown to be a good indicator to monitor the behavior of magma: ascent and drain-back of magma result in increase and decrease in the ratio, respectively. In the case of 1986 eruptions of Izu-Oshima volcano, the ratio began to increase two months after big eruptions, reaching the maximum and decreased. Such delayed response is explained in terms of travelling time of magmatic helium from the vent area to the observation site along the underground steam flow. Third one is remote observation of volcanic gas chemistry of arc volcanoes, using an infrared absorption spectroscopy. During Unzen eruptions starting in 1990, absorption features of SO 2 and HCl of volcanic gas were detected from the observation station at 1.3 km distance. This was the first ground-based remote detection of HCl in volcanic gas. In the recent work at Aso volcano, we could identify 5 species (CO, COS, CO 2 , SO 2 and HCl) simultaneously in the volcanic plume spectra. (author)

  4. Characterisation of bulk solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. McGlinchey [Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow (United Kingdom). Centre for Industrial Bulk Solids Handling

    2005-07-01

    Handling of powders and bulk solids is a critical industrial technology across a broad spectrum of industries, including minerals processing. With contributions from leading authors in their respective fields, this book provides the reader with a sound understanding of the techniques, importance and application of particulate materials characterisation. It covers the fundamental characteristics of individual particles and bulk particulate materials, and includes discussion of a wide range of measurement techniques, and the use of material characteristics in design and industrial practice. Contents: Characterising particle properties; Powder mechanics and rheology; Characterisation for hopper and stockpile design; Fluidization behaviour; Characterisation for pneumatic conveyor design; Explosiblility; 'Designer' particle characteristics; Current industrial practice; and Future trends. 130 ills.

  5. Micromegas in a bulk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giomataris, I.; De Oliveira, R.; Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; Charpak, G.; Colas, P.; Fanourakis, G.; Ferrer, E.; Giganon, A.; Rebourgeard, Ph.; Salin, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel way to manufacture the bulk Micromegas detector. A simple process based on the Printed Circuit Board (PCB) technology is employed to produce the entire sensitive detector. Such a fabrication process could be extended to very large area detectors made by the industry. The low cost fabrication together with the robustness of the electrode materials will make it attractive for several applications ranging from particle physics and astrophysics to medicine

  6. Landscape and bio- geochemical strategy for monitoring transformation and reclamation of the soil mining sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena

    2010-05-01

    Sites of active or abandoned mining represent areas of considerable technogenic impact and need scientifically ground organization of their monitoring and reclamation. The strategy of monitoring and reclamation depends on the scale and character of the physical, chemical and biological consequences of the disturbances. The geochemical studies for monitoring and rehabilitation of the career-dump complexes should methodically account of formation of the particular new landforms and the changes in circulation of the remobilized elements of the soil cover. However, the general strategy should account of both the initial and transformed landscape geochemical structure of the area with due regard to the natural and new content of chemical elements in the environmental components. For example the tailings and waste rocks present new geochemical fields with specifically different concentration of chemical elements that cause formation of new geochemical barriers and landscapes. The way of colonization of the newly formed landscapes depends upon the new geochemical features of the technogenic environment and the adaptive ability of local and intrusive flora. The newly formed biogeochemical anomalies need organization of permanent monitoring not only within the anomaly itself but also of its impact zones. Spatial landscape geochemical monitoring combined with bio-geochemical criteria of threshold concentrations seems to be a helpful tool for decision making on reclamation and operation of the soil mining sites to provide a long-term ecologically sustainable development of the impact zone as a whole.

  7. Bulk-memory processor for data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.O.; McMillan, D.E.; Sunier, J.W.; Meier, M.; Poore, R.V.

    1981-01-01

    To meet the diverse needs and data rate requirements at the Van de Graaff and Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facilities, a bulk memory system has been implemented which includes a fast and flexible processor. This bulk memory processor (BMP) utilizes bit slice and microcode techniques and features a 24 bit wide internal architecture allowing direct addressing of up to 16 megawords of memory and histogramming up to 16 million counts per channel without overflow. The BMP is interfaced to the MOSTEK MK 8000 bulk memory system and to the standard MODCOMP computer I/O bus. Coding for the BMP both at the microcode level and with macro instructions is supported. The generalized data acquisition system has been extended to support the BMP in a manner transparent to the user

  8. A molecular organic geochemical study of black shales associated with diatomites from the Oligocene Meinilite Shale (Flysch Carpathians, SE Poland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koster, J.; Rospondek, M.; Zubrzycki, A.; Kolouba, M.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1995-01-01

    Black shales of the Menilite Formation, the source rock for oils in the Carpathian overthrust belt, display a large variability in their bulk and molecular geochemical parameters. Biomarker and stable carbon isotope analyses indicate a variable contribution from different algae (particularly

  9. Status report on geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, D.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the findings of a review undertaken on behalf of the project management group of the programme 'Endlagersicherheit in der Nachbetriebsphase' based at GSF-IfT (Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit - Institut fuer Tieflagerung) to establish the current status of research into the simulation of geochemical processes relevant to radiological assessment. The review is intended to contribute to Stage 1 of a strategy formulated to enhance the use of geochemical models in Germany. Emphasis has been placed on processes deemed to be of greatest relevance to performance assessment for a HLW-repository in a salt dome principally, speciation-solubility in high salinity solutions, complexation by natural organics and generation-transport of colloids. For each of these and other topics covered, a summary is given of fundamental concepts, theoretical representations and their limitations, highlighting, where appropriate, the advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches. The availability of data to quantify any given representation is addressed, taking into account the need for information at elevated temperatures and pressures. Mass transfer is considered in terms of aqueous, particulate and gas-mediated transport, respectively. (orig.) [de

  10. TAPIR--Finnish national geochemical baseline database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarva, Jaana; Tarvainen, Timo; Reinikainen, Jussi; Eklund, Mikael

    2010-09-15

    In Finland, a Government Decree on the Assessment of Soil Contamination and Remediation Needs has generated a need for reliable and readily accessible data on geochemical baseline concentrations in Finnish soils. According to the Decree, baseline concentrations, referring both to the natural geological background concentrations and the diffuse anthropogenic input of substances, shall be taken into account in the soil contamination assessment process. This baseline information is provided in a national geochemical baseline database, TAPIR, that is publicly available via the Internet. Geochemical provinces with elevated baseline concentrations were delineated to provide regional geochemical baseline values. The nationwide geochemical datasets were used to divide Finland into geochemical provinces. Several metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, V, and Zn) showed anomalous concentrations in seven regions that were defined as metal provinces. Arsenic did not follow a similar distribution to any other elements, and four arsenic provinces were separately determined. Nationwide geochemical datasets were not available for some other important elements such as Cd and Pb. Although these elements are included in the TAPIR system, their distribution does not necessarily follow the ones pre-defined for metal and arsenic provinces. Regional geochemical baseline values, presented as upper limit of geochemical variation within the region, can be used as trigger values to assess potential soil contamination. Baseline values have also been used to determine upper and lower guideline values that must be taken into account as a tool in basic risk assessment. If regional geochemical baseline values are available, the national guideline values prescribed in the Decree based on ecological risks can be modified accordingly. The national geochemical baseline database provides scientifically sound, easily accessible and generally accepted information on the baseline values, and it can be used in various

  11. Coupled geochemical and solute transport code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, J.R.; Hostetler, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    A number of coupled geochemical hydrologic codes have been reported in the literature. Some of these codes have directly coupled the source-sink term to the solute transport equation. The current consensus seems to be that directly coupling hydrologic transport and chemical models through a series of interdependent differential equations is not feasible for multicomponent problems with complex geochemical processes (e.g., precipitation/dissolution reactions). A two-step process appears to be the required method of coupling codes for problems where a large suite of chemical reactions must be monitored. Two-step structure requires that the source-sink term in the transport equation is supplied by a geochemical code rather than by an analytical expression. We have developed a one-dimensional two-step coupled model designed to calculate relatively complex geochemical equilibria (CTM1D). Our geochemical module implements a Newton-Raphson algorithm to solve heterogeneous geochemical equilibria, involving up to 40 chemical components and 400 aqueous species. The geochemical module was designed to be efficient and compact. A revised version of the MINTEQ Code is used as a parent geochemical code

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices

  13. Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices.

  14. Geochemical prospecting for uranium and thorium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of analytical geochemical prospecting methods for uranium and thorium is given excluding radiometric techniques, except those utilized in the determination of radon. The indicator (pathfinder) elements useful in geochemical surveys are listed for each of the types of known uranium and thorium deposits; this is followed by sections on analytical geochemical surveys based on rocks (lithochemical surveys), unconsolidated materials (pedochemical surveys), natural waters and sediments (hydrochemical surveys), biological materials (biogeochemical surveys) and gases (atmochemical surveys). All of the analytical geochemical methods are applicable in prospecting for thorium and uranium, particularly where radiometric methods fail due to attenuation by overburden, water, deep leaching and so on. Efficiency in the discovery of uranium and/or thorium orebodies is promoted by an integrated methods approach employing geological pattern recognition in the localization of deposits, analytical geochemical surveys, and radiometric surveys. (author)

  15. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  16. Bulk muscles, loose cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liyanage, Chamari R D G; Kodali, Venkata

    2014-10-17

    The accessibility and usage of body building supplements is on the rise with stronger internet marketing strategies by the industry. The dangers posed by the ingredients in them are underestimated. A healthy young man came to the emergency room with palpitations and feeling unwell. Initial history and clinical examination were non-contributory to find the cause. ECG showed atrial fibrillation. A detailed history for any over the counter or herbal medicine use confirmed that he was taking supplements to bulk muscle. One of the components in these supplements is yohimbine; the onset of symptoms coincided with the ingestion of this product and the patient is symptom free after stopping it. This report highlights the dangers to the public of consuming over the counter products with unknown ingredients and the consequential detrimental impact on health. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. Role of geochemical background at evaluation of investment attractiveness of recreational territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vdovina Ol'ga Konstantinovna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the role of natural geochemical background when estimating investment attractiveness of recreational areas. It is noted, that geochemical background influence on people's sickness rate isn't considered now. Though it's understood, that even insignificant increase of geochemical background in relation to percentage abundance of Earth crest may lead to endemic diseases of people, animals and plants. An indicator of geochemical endemicity areas was proposed for assessing the impact of storage elements and of a lack of geological environment on human health. Thanks to this measure, and taking into account landscape features of the area, the authors allocated lands, dangerous and potentially dangerous in terms of endemicity. The importance of ratings was achieved by the use of those factors that could have a great influence on the cost of land development. This includes, first of all, the factors that affect population health, and economic and geographic factors that minimize the cost of the territory development and the factors that give rise to financial risks and risks of human losses. The main risk factors include: potential ecological and geochemical risk; high absolute heights, development and activity of dangerous geological processes and phenomena. Systemacity of researches was reached by using factors, that characterize the object from different aspects; readiness of area infrastructure to its exploration and possible risks. Objectivity was achieved by the use of figures obtained from the results of geochemical and engineering surveys with their metrological support.

  18. Microfabricated Bulk Piezoelectric Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Oliver M.

    Piezoelectric voltage transformers (PTs) can be used to transform an input voltage into a different, required output voltage needed in electronic and electro- mechanical systems, among other varied uses. On the macro scale, they have been commercialized in electronics powering consumer laptop liquid crystal displays, and compete with an older, more prevalent technology, inductive electromagnetic volt- age transformers (EMTs). The present work investigates PTs on smaller size scales that are currently in the academic research sphere, with an eye towards applications including micro-robotics and other small-scale electronic and electromechanical sys- tems. PTs and EMTs are compared on the basis of power and energy density, with PTs trending towards higher values of power and energy density, comparatively, indicating their suitability for small-scale systems. Among PT topologies, bulk disc-type PTs, operating in their fundamental radial extension mode, and free-free beam PTs, operating in their fundamental length extensional mode, are good can- didates for microfabrication and are considered here. Analytical modeling based on the Extended Hamilton Method is used to predict device performance and integrate mechanical tethering as a boundary condition. This model differs from previous PT models in that the electric enthalpy is used to derive constituent equations of motion with Hamilton's Method, and therefore this approach is also more generally applica- ble to other piezoelectric systems outside of the present work. Prototype devices are microfabricated using a two mask process consisting of traditional photolithography combined with micropowder blasting, and are tested with various output electri- cal loads. 4mm diameter tethered disc PTs on the order of .002cm. 3 , two orders smaller than the bulk PT literature, had the followingperformance: a prototype with electrode area ratio (input area / output area) = 1 had peak gain of 2.3 (+/- 0.1), efficiency of 33 (+/- 0

  19. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  20. Collected radiochemical and geochemical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinberg, J [comp.

    1990-05-01

    This revision of LA-1721, 4th Ed., Collected Radiochemical Procedures, reflects the activities of two groups in the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory: INC-11, Nuclear and radiochemistry; and INC-7, Isotope Geochemistry. The procedures fall into five categories: I. Separation of Radionuclides from Uranium, Fission-Product Solutions, and Nuclear Debris; II. Separation of Products from Irradiated Targets; III. Preparation of Samples for Mass Spectrometric Analysis; IV. Dissolution Procedures; and V. Geochemical Procedures. With one exception, the first category of procedures is ordered by the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table, with separate parts on the Representative Elements (the A groups); the d-Transition Elements (the B groups and the Transition Triads); and the Lanthanides (Rare Earths) and Actinides (the 4f- and 5f-Transition Elements). The members of Group IIIB-- scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum--are included with the lanthanides, elements they resemble closely in chemistry and with which they occur in nature. The procedures dealing with the isolation of products from irradiated targets are arranged by target element.

  1. Proceedings of 2. Brazilian Geochemical Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Some works about geochemistry are presented, including themes about geochemical exploration, lithogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, analytical geochemistry, geochemistry of carbonatites and rare earth elements and organic geochemistry. (C.G.C.) [pt

  2. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report considers mass transport in the far-field of a radioactive waste repository, and detailed geochemical modelling of the ground-water in the near-field. A parallel approach to this problem of coupling transport and geochemical codes is the subject of another CEC report (ref. EUR 10226). Both studies were carried out in the framework of the CEC project MIRAGE. (Migration of radionuclides in the geosphere)

  3. An integrated geophysical and geochemical exploration of critical zone weathering on opposing montane hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, K.; Navarre-Sitchler, A.; Bandler, A.; Pommer, R. E.; Novitsky, C. G.; Holbrook, S.; Moore, J.

    2017-12-01

    Quantifying coupled geochemical and hydrological properties and processes that operate in the critical zone is key to predicting rock weathering and subsequent transmission and storage of water in the shallow subsurface. Geophysical data have the potential to elucidate geochemical and hydrologic processes across landscapes over large spatial scales that are difficult to achieve with point measurements alone. Here, we explore the connections between weathering and fracturing, as measured from integrated geochemical and geophysical borehole data and seismic velocities on north- and south-facing aspects within one watershed in the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory. We drilled eight boreholes up to 13 m deep on north- and south-facing aspects within Upper Gordon Gulch, and surface seismic refraction data were collected near these wells to explore depths of regolith and bedrock, as well as anisotropic characteristics of the subsurface material due to fracturing. Optical televiewer data were collected in these wells to infer the dominant direction of fracturing and fracture density in the near surface to corroborate with the seismic data. Geochemical samples were collected from four of these wells and a series of shallow soil pits for bulk chemistry, clay fraction, and exchangeable cation concentrations to identify depths of chemically altered saprolite. Seismic data show that depth to unweathered bedrock, as defined by p-wave seismic velocity, is slightly thicker on the north-facing slopes. Geochemical data suggest that the depth to the base of saprolite ranges from 3-5 m, consistent with a p-wave velocity value of 1200 m/s. Based on magnitude and anisotropy of p-wave velocities together with optical televiewer data, regolith on north-facing slopes is thought to be more fractured than south-facing slopes, while geochemical data indicate that position on the landscape is another important characteristic in determining depths of weathering. We explore the importance

  4. Characterization of the sedimentary organic matter preserved in Messel oil shale by bulk geochemistry and stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Schouten, S.; Schwark, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated a 150 m thick drill core section of Messel oil shale using bulk geochemical and stable isotope techniques in order to determine the organic matter sources and the environmental conditions that prevailed during the deposition of the lacustrine sequence. High Corg values (on average

  5. Nonlinear AC susceptibility, surface and bulk shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Beek, C. J.; Indenbom, M. V.; D'Anna, G.; Benoit, W.

    1996-02-01

    We calculate the nonlinear AC response of a thin superconducting strip in perpendicular field, shielded by an edge current due to the geometrical barrier. A comparison with the results for infinite samples in parallel field, screened by a surface barrier, and with those for screening by a bulk current in the critical state, shows that the AC response due to a barrier has general features that are independent of geometry, and that are significantly different from those for screening by a bulk current in the critical state. By consequence, the nonlinear (global) AC susceptibility can be used to determine the origin of magnetic irreversibility. A comparison with experiments on a Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+δ crystal shows that in this material, the low-frequency AC screening at high temperature is mainly due to the screening by an edge current, and that this is the unique source of the nonlinear magnetic response at temperatures above 40 K.

  6. Factors that may compromise bulk water distribution reliability

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    D.Ing. This thesis considers water supply and divides the water supply environment into three categories; the macro water supply environment, the water supply scheme and the consumers. Each of the categories is briefly explored in terms of the factors that may influence it. Subsequently, some of the unique features of a bulk water distribution system are dealt with, as well as different approaches related to bulk water distribution system design and assessment. One of these approaches, the...

  7. Factors of the accumulation of heavy metals and metalloids at geochemical barriers in urban soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosheleva, N. E.; Kasimov, N. S.; Vlasov, D. V.

    2015-05-01

    The bulk contents and concentrations of mobile (extracted by an ammonium acetate buffer with EDTA) Cd, Pb, Sb, As, Bi, Zn, and Cu were determined in the surface horizons of urban soils in the Eastern administrative okrug of Moscow. The regression analysis showed that the accumulation of these metals and metalloids in the soils is controlled by the physicochemical soil properties and by number of anthropogenic factors and landscape conditions (geochemical position, type of loose deposits, character of land use, dust load, vehicle emissions, building pattern, percent of green areas, and the extent of sealed soils). The precipitation of studied elements on the geochemical barriers had the following regularities: Cd, Cu, and Zn accumulated on the alkaline barriers; Bi, Sb, As, Cu, Pb, and Zn, on chemisorption barriers; Sb, As, and Pb, on organomineral barriers; and Cd and Cu, on the sorption-sedimentation barriers. Technogenic transformation of the physicochemical properties of urban soils resulted in the increase of the mean bulk contents of heavy metals and metalloids by 33-99%; the portion of elements fixed on the geochemical barriers increased by 26-50%.

  8. Geochemical consequences of the Chernobyl accident.; Geokhimicheskie posledstviya Chernobyl`skoj katastrofy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopejkin, V A [VNIIGEOLNERUD, Kazan` (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    Geochemical features of Cs, Sr, U, Pu behaviour in the zone of their hypergenesis are presented in the article. Necessary conditions for these elements filtration on the natural geochemical barriers are shown. Data of radionuclide composition of water for five years of observation in << Ryzhiy Les >> and dissolved forms of radionuclides are described. Geologic and hydrogeologic conditions of the Chernobyl NPP site are shortly characterized. Radionuclide composition in the ground water of contaminated water pools is analyzed. It is proposed to cover by the law all {alpha}-elements (Pu, Am, Np) and not only plutonium as it currently takes place.

  9. Thulium-based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H. B.; Yu, P.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2008-01-01

    We report the formation and properties of a thulium-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). Compared with other known rare-earth (RE) based BMGs, Tm-based BMGs show features of excellent glass formation ability, considerable higher elastic modulus, smaller Poisson's ratio, high mechanical strength, and intrinsic brittleness. The reasons for the different properties between the Tm-based and other RE-based BMGs are discussed. It is expected that the Tm-based glasses with the unique properties are appropriate candidates for studying some important issues in BMGs

  10. Mining the bulk positron lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aourag, H.; Guittom, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to investigate the bulk positron lifetimes of new systems based on data-mining techniques. Through data mining of bulk positron lifetimes, we demonstrate the ability to predict the positron lifetimes of new semiconductors on the basis of available semiconductor data already studied. Informatics techniques have been applied to bulk positron lifetimes for different tetrahedrally bounded semiconductors in order to discover computational design rules. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. The geochemical atlas of Alaska, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory K.; Yager, Douglas B.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Granitto, Matthew; Denning, Paul; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.

    2016-06-21

    A rich legacy of geochemical data produced since the early 1960s covers the great expanse of Alaska; careful treatment of such data may provide significant and revealing geochemical maps that may be used for landscape geochemistry, mineral resource exploration, and geoenvironmental investigations over large areas. To maximize the spatial density and extent of data coverage for statewide mapping of element distributions, we compiled and integrated analyses of more than 175,000 sediment and soil samples from three major, separate sources: the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys geochemical databases. Various types of heterogeneity and deficiencies in these data presented major challenges to our development of coherently integrated datasets for modeling and mapping of element distributions. Researchers from many different organizations and disparate scientific studies collected samples that were analyzed using highly variable methods throughout a time period of more than 50 years, during which many changes in analytical techniques were developed and applied. Despite these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey has produced a new systematically integrated compilation of sediment and soil geochemical data with an average sample site density of approximately 1 locality per 10 square kilometers (km2) for the entire State of Alaska, although density varies considerably among different areas. From that compilation, we have modeled and mapped the distributions of 68 elements, thus creating an updated geochemical atlas for the State.

  12. Geochemical Constraints on the Size of the Moon-Forming Giant Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piet, Hélène; Badro, James; Gillet, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Recent models involving the Moon-forming giant impact hypothesis have managed to reproduce the striking isotopic similarity between the two bodies, albeit using two extreme models: one involves a high-energy small impactor that makes the Moon out of Earth's proto-mantle; the other supposes a gigantic collision between two half-Earths creating the Earth-Moon system from both bodies. Here we modeled the geochemical influence of the giant impact on Earth's mantle and found that impactors larger than 15% of Earth mass result in mantles always violating the present-day concentrations of four refractory moderately siderophile trace elements (Ni, Co, Cr, and V). In the aftermath of the impact, our models cannot further discriminate between a fully and a partially molten bulk silicate Earth. Then, the preservation of primordial geochemical reservoirs predating the Moon remains the sole argument against a fully molten mantle after the Moon-forming impact.

  13. Geochemical modelling baseline compositions of groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Kjøller, Claus; Andersen, Martin Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    and variations in water chemistry that are caused by large scale geochemical processes taking place at the timescale of thousands of years. The most important geochemical processes are ion exchange (Valreas and Aveiro) where freshwater solutes are displacing marine ions from the sediment surface, and carbonate......Reactive transport models, were developed to explore the evolution in groundwater chemistry along the flow path in three aquifers; the Triassic East Midland aquifer (UK), the Miocene aquifer at Valreas (F) and the Cretaceous aquifer near Aveiro (P). All three aquifers contain very old groundwaters...... dissolution (East Midlands, Valreas and Aveiro). Reactive transport models, employing the code PHREEQC, which included these geochemical processes and one-dimensional solute transport were able to duplicate the observed patterns in water quality. These models may provide a quantitative understanding...

  14. Geochemical prospecting for thorium and uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyle, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The basic purpose of this book is to present an analysis of the various geochemical methods applicable in the search for all types of thorium and uranium deposits. The general chemistry and geochemistry of thorium and uranium are briefly described in the opening chapter, and this is followed by a chapter on the deposits of the two elements with emphasis on their indicator (pathfinder) elements and on the primary and secondary dispersion characteristics of thorium and uranium in the vicinity of their deposits. The next seven chapters form the main part of the book and describe geochemical prospecting for thorium and uranium, stressing selection of areas in which to prospect, radiometric surveys, analytical geochemical surveys based on rocks (lithochemical surveys), unconsolidated materials (pedochemical surveys), natural waters and sediments (hydrochemical surveys), biological materials (biogeochemical surveys), gases (atmochemical surveys), and miscellaneous methods. A final brief chapter reviews radiometric and analytical methods for the detection and estimation of thorium and uranium. (Auth.)

  15. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1983-09-01

    In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), experiments on hydrothermal rock/water interaction, corrosion, thermomechanics, and geochemical modeling calculations are being conducted. All of these activities require characterization of the initial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry of the potential repository host rock. This report summarizes the characterization done on samples of the Bullfrog Member of the Crater Flat Tuff (Tcfb) used for Waste Package experimental programs. 11 references, 17 figures, 3 tables

  16. Robust statistics and geochemical data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Advantages of robust procedures over ordinary least-squares procedures in geochemical data analysis is demonstrated using NURE data from the Hot Springs Quadrangle, South Dakota, USA. Robust principal components analysis with 5% multivariate trimming successfully guarded the analysis against perturbations by outliers and increased the number of interpretable factors. Regression with SINE estimates significantly increased the goodness-of-fit of the regression and improved the correspondence of delineated anomalies with known uranium prospects. Because of the ubiquitous existence of outliers in geochemical data, robust statistical procedures are suggested as routine procedures to replace ordinary least-squares procedures

  17. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    This contract stipulated separate pieces of work to consider mass transport in the far-field of a repository, and more detailed geochemical modelling of the groundwater in the near-field. It was envisaged that the far-field problem would be tackled by numerical solutions to the classical advection-diffusion equation obtained by the finite element method. For the near-field problem the feasibility of coupling existing geochemical equilibrium codes to the three dimensional groundwater flow codes was to be investigated. This report is divided into two sections with one part devoted to each aspect of this contract. (author)

  18. Modelling of bulk superconductor magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainslie, M D; Fujishiro, H

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a topical review of the current state of the art in modelling the magnetization of bulk superconductors, including both (RE)BCO (where RE = rare earth or Y) and MgB 2 materials. Such modelling is a powerful tool to understand the physical mechanisms of their magnetization, to assist in interpretation of experimental results, and to predict the performance of practical bulk superconductor-based devices, which is particularly important as many superconducting applications head towards the commercialization stage of their development in the coming years. In addition to the analytical and numerical techniques currently used by researchers for modelling such materials, the commonly used practical techniques to magnetize bulk superconductors are summarized with a particular focus on pulsed field magnetization (PFM), which is promising as a compact, mobile and relatively inexpensive magnetizing technique. A number of numerical models developed to analyse the issues related to PFM and optimise the technique are described in detail, including understanding the dynamics of the magnetic flux penetration and the influence of material inhomogeneities, thermal properties, pulse duration, magnitude and shape, and the shape of the magnetization coil(s). The effect of externally applied magnetic fields in different configurations on the attenuation of the trapped field is also discussed. A number of novel and hybrid bulk superconductor structures are described, including improved thermal conductivity structures and ferromagnet–superconductor structures, which have been designed to overcome some of the issues related to bulk superconductors and their magnetization and enhance the intrinsic properties of bulk superconductors acting as trapped field magnets. Finally, the use of hollow bulk cylinders/tubes for shielding is analysed. (topical review)

  19. Geochemical factors in borehole-shaft plug longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Geochemical investigations that address factors controlling the longevity of repository sealing materials in a geochemical environment are discussed. Studies are being made of cement-based materials as major candidates for seals for borehole plugging, and shaft and tunnel sealing in certain potential repository environments. Factors controlling the extent of attainment of equilibrium of the plug components with time and the rate of approach to a state of stable equilibrium of the plug component chemical subsystem within the total system are discussed. The effect of these factors on changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radioactive waste species are the dominant features to be determined. Laboratory experiments on the effects of anticipated temperature, pressure, and environmental factors (including chemical composition and specific rock type) are described. Thermodynamic studies are used to determine the potentially stable reaction products under conditions similar to those anticipated for the repository boreholes, shafts, and tunnels during and after the operating stage. Multitemperature reaction series are studied, and reaction kinetics are investigated for the purpose of predicting the course of likely reactions. Detailed studies of permeability, diffusion, and interfacial properties and chemical and microphase characterization of the products of experiments are carried out. Characterization studies of old and ancient cements, mortars, and concretes and prototype man-made seal materials are performed to further assess the factors associated with longevity

  20. Géochimie et cadre géodynamique du volcanisme néoprotérozoïque terminal (vendien) du Haut Atlas occidental, Maroc(Geochemical features and tectonic setting of late Neoproterozoic Vendian volcanism in the western High Atlas, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhari, A.; El-Archi, A.; Aarab, M.; El-Attari, A.; Ennih, N.; Laduron, D.

    2001-05-01

    Late Neoproterozoic Vendian volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks are widely distributed in the western High Atlas. They are located north of the Tizi n'Test Fault, separating the West African Craton from a northerly adjacent craton. These volcanic rocks overlie a semipelitic formation, which represents the equivalent of the Tidilline and Anzi Formations of the Anti-Atlas. The geochemical characteristics of these volcanic rocks suggest a calc-alkaline active margine environment associated with the post Pan-African tectonics. They differ from those of the Anti-Atlas by their lower content of K 2O. The later rock type was generated by a melting process of the crust subducted beneath the northern craton. A carbonate-shale unit, which contains examples of interstratified calc-alkaline dacite, overlies the volcanic succession, demonstrating that the volcanic activity continued sporadically until Early Cambrian times.

  1. Geochemical prospect ion results of Treinta y Tres aerial photo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Bonnefoy, D.; Garau, M.; Spangenberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    This report shows the geochemical prospect ion results carried out within the framework of the multielemental geochemical strategy. The samples were studied by e spectrometry in the laboratories of Orleans.

  2. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 7. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology: Implications for the provenance and tectonic setting of Lower Cretaceous sediments in the Zhucheng Basin (Jiaodong peninsula, North China). Jin-Long Ni Jun-Lai Liu Xiao-Ling Tang ...

  3. Kriging - a challenge in geochemical mapping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štojdl, J.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Popelka, J.; Váchová, T.; Hošek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, APR (2017) ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2017. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : kriging * geochemical mapping Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2017/EGU2017-3615.pdf

  4. Appliance of geochemical engineering in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuang; Zhang Chengjiang; Ni Shijun; Li Kuanliang

    2008-01-01

    The basic foundation of applying geochemical engineering to control environment, common engineering models of disposal radioactive waste and the functions of the engineering barriers are introduced in this paper. The authors take the geochemical engineering barrier materiel research of a radioactive waste repository as an example to explain the appliance of geochemical engineering in the disposal of radioactive waste. And the results show that it can enhance the security of the nuclear waste repository if we use geochemical engineering barrier. (authors)

  5. Proceedings of 13. International Geochemical Exploration Symposium. 2. Brazilian Geochemical Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Some works about geochemistry are presented, including themes about geochemical exploration, lithogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, analyical geochemistry, geochemistry of carbonatites and rare earth elements and organic geochemistry. (C.G.C.) [pt

  6. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This Microsoft Access database serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed in USGS laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects from 1962 to 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the USGS Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the USGS PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate most of the AGDB data set. These data were checked for accuracy regarding sample location, sample media type, and analytical methods used. This arduous process of reviewing, verifying and, where necessary, editing all USGS geochemical data resulted in a significantly improved Alaska geochemical dataset. USGS data that were not previously in the NGDB because the data predate the earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  7. Geochemical modelling: what phenomena are missing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.

    1989-12-01

    In the framework of safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal, retention phenomena are usually taken into account by the Kd concept. It is well recognized that this concept is not enough for safety assessment models, because of the several and strong assumptions which are involved in this kind of representation. One way to have a better representation of the retention phenomena, is to substitute for this Kd concept an explicit description of geochemical phenomena and then couple transport codes with geochemical codes in a fully or a two-step procedure. We use currently such codes, but the scope of this paper is to display the limits today of the geochemical modelling in connection with sites analysis for deep disposal. In this paper, we intend to give an overview of phenomena which are missing in the geochemical models, or which are not completely introduced in the models. We can distinguish, on one hand phenomena for which modelling concepts exist such as adsorption/desorption and, on the other hand, phenomena for which modelling concepts do not exist for the moment such as colloids, and complexation by polyelectrolyte solutions (organics). Moreover we have to take care of very low concentrations of radionuclides, which can be expected from the leaching processes in the repository. Under those conditions, some reactions may not occur. After a critical review of the involved phenomena, we intend to stress the main directions of the wishful evolution of the geochemical modelling. This evolution should improve substantially the quality of the above-mentioned site assessments

  8. Geochemical mapping study of Panjang island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutisna; Sumardjo

    2010-01-01

    Impact of industrial and regional development are not only related to an improvement of socio-economic, but also to an environmental conservation and sustainable. This impact could be observed on a change of geochemical mapping before and after an operational of the industry. In the relation with a regional development and resources utilization, the geochemical mapping have been done in the aim to know a resources and an elemental distribution at Panjang island. In this research, ko-Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (k_0-INAA) have been applied in an elemental quantification on the geochemical mapping. Pencuplikan of geochemical sample have been carried out by using a grid systematic method with a sample density of about 10 sample per square kilometre involved 85 pencuplikan point. The geochemical sample of sediment and soil have been provided as a dry weight of 100 mesh. Internal quality control have done by using a number of Standard Reference Materials obtained from US. Geological Survey. Fifteen elements of Sc, Co, In, Rb, Mo, Ba, Ce, Nd, Eu, La, Yb, Th, U, lr and Hf contained in standard materials have been evaluated. The analysis result show that a relative standard deviation less than 11 %, except for Mo (13 %) and lr (26 %). Fourteen elements of Al, Br, Ca, Co, Eu, Fe, La, U, Na, Ce, Mn, As, Sc and Th have been mapped and presented in this paper. The major elements of Ca, Al and Fe, and minor elements of Mn, U and Sc are distributed at all region. The lanthanide elements of La, Ce and Eu have vary concentration and could be found at the middle to the north of the island. (author)

  9. Geochemical baseline studies of soil in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    The soil element concentrations regionally vary a lot in Finland. Mostly this is caused by the different bedrock types, which are reflected in the soil qualities. Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is carrying out geochemical baseline studies in Finland. In the previous phase, the research is focusing on urban areas and mine environments. The information can, for example, be used to determine the need for soil remediation, to assess environmental impacts or to measure the natural state of soil in industrial areas or mine districts. The field work is done by taking soil samples, typically at depth between 0-10 cm. Sampling sites are chosen to represent the most vulnerable areas when thinking of human impacts by possible toxic soil element contents: playgrounds, day-care centers, schools, parks and residential areas. In the mine districts the samples are taken from the areas locating outside the airborne dust effected areas. Element contents of the soil samples are then analyzed with ICP-AES and ICP-MS, Hg with CV-AAS. The results of the geochemical baseline studies are published in the Finnish national geochemical baseline database (TAPIR). The geochemical baseline map service is free for all users via internet browser. Through this map service it is possible to calculate regional soil baseline values using geochemical data stored in the map service database. Baseline data for 17 elements in total is provided in the map service and it can be viewed on the GTK's web pages (http://gtkdata.gtk.fi/Tapir/indexEN.html).

  10. Bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi-Yim, H.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with a bulk metallic glass matrix were synthesized and characterized. This was made possible by the recent development of bulk metallic glasses that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the undercooled liquid state. In this letter, experimental methods for processing metallic glass composites are introduced. Three different bulk metallic glass forming alloys were used as the matrix materials. Both ceramics and metals were introduced as reinforcement into the metallic glass. The metallic glass matrix remained amorphous after adding up to a 30 vol% fraction of particles or short wires. X-ray diffraction patterns of the composites show only peaks from the second phase particles superimposed on the broad diffuse maxima from the amorphous phase. Optical micrographs reveal uniformly distributed particles in the matrix. The glass transition of the amorphous matrix and the crystallization behavior of the composites were studied by calorimetric methods. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. Bulk viscosity and cosmological evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beesham, A.

    1996-01-01

    In a recent interesting paper, Pimentel and Diaz-Rivera (Nuovo Cimento B, 109(1994) 1317) have derived several solutions with bulk viscosity in homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models. They also discussed the properties of these solutions. In this paper the authors relate the solutions of Pimentel and Diaz-Rivera by simple transformations to previous solutions published in the literature, showing that all the solutions can be derived from the known existing ones. Drawbacks to these approaches of studying bulk viscosity are pointed out, and better approaches indicated

  12. Geochemical record of anthropogenic impacts on Lake Valencia, Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yunping; Jaffe, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    Bulk geochemical parameters and organic matter biomarkers in a short, high resolution gravity core (Lake Valencia, Venezuela) were examined to reconstruct anthropogenic impacts on the lake's conditions. During the period of ca. 1840-1990, sedimentary organic matter was characterized by high contents of total organic C (TOC) and total N (TN), low TOC/TN values as well as relatively enriched δ 13 C and δ 15 N signals, suggesting a primary autochthonous (algae and macrophytes) organic matter origin. The occurrence of large amounts of C 23 and C 25 relative to C 29 and C 31 n-alkanes indicated substantial inputs from submerged/floating macrophytes. The variations of C 32 15-keto-ol, tetrahymanol, diploptene, C 32 bishomohopanol, 2-methylhopane, dinosterol and isoarborinol concentrations over the investigated period record changes in the planktonic community structure, including Botryococcus braunii, bacteriavore ciliates, cyanobacteria, Eustigmatophytes and dinoflagellates. A principal shift occurred in the 1910s when cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates became more abundant at the expense and decline of B. braunii and Eustigmatophytes, likely related to increasing anthropogenic activity around the lake. A second shift (less obvious) occurred in the 1960s when cyanobacteria became the sole predominant planktonic class, coinciding with further deterioration of lake conditions

  13. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applied to bulk sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosanke, K.L.; Koch, C.D.; Wilson, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    A high resolution Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectrometer has been installed and made operational for use in routine bulk sample analysis by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation (BFEC) geochemical analysis department. The Ge(Li) spectrometer provides bulk sample analyses for potassium, uranium, and thorium that are superior to those obtained by the BFEC sodium iodide spectrometer. The near term analysis scheme permits a direct assay for uranium that corrects for bulk sample self-absorption effects and is independent of the uranium/radium disequilibrium condition of the sample. A more complete analysis scheme has been developed that fully utilizes the gamma-ray data provided by the Ge(Li) spectrometer and that more properly accounts for the sample self-absorption effect. This new analysis scheme should be implemented on the BFEC Ge(Li) spectrometer at the earliest date

  14. High temperature superconductor bulk materials. Fundamentals - processing - properties control - application aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krabbes, G.; Fuchs, G.; Canders, W.R.; May, H.; Palka, R.

    2006-01-01

    This book presents all the features of bulk high temperature superconducting materials. Starting from physical and chemical fundamentals, the authors move on to portray methods and problems of materials processing, thoroughly working out the characteristic properties of bulk superconductors in contrast to long conductors and films. The authors provide a wide range of specific materials characteristics with respect to the latest developments and future applications guiding from fundamentals to practical engineering examples. This book contains the following chapters: 1. Fundamentals 2. Growth and melt processing of YBCO 3. Pinning-relevant defects in bulk YBCO 4. Properties of bulk YBCO 5. Trapped fields 6. Improved YBCO based bulk superconductors and functional elements 7. Alternative systems 8. Peak effect 9. Very high trapped fields in YBCO permanent magnets 10. Engineering aspects: Field distribution in bulk HTSC 11. Inherently stable superconducting magnetic bearings 12. Application of bulk HTSCs in electromagnetic energy converters 13. Applications in magnet technologies and power supplies

  15. Stream sediment geochemical surveys for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Stream sediment is more universally available than ground and surface waters and comprises the bulk of NURE samples. Orientation studies conducted by the Savannah River Laboratory indicate that several mesh sizes can offer nearly equivalent information. Sediment is normally sieved in the field to pass a 420-micrometer screen (US Std. 40 mesh) and that portion of the dried sediment passing a 149-micrometer screen (US Std. 100 mesh) is recovered for analysis. Sampling densities usually vary with survey objectives and types of deposits anticipated. Principal geologic features that can be portrayed at a scale of 1:250,000, such as major tectonic units, plutons, and pegmatite districts, are readily defined using a sampling density of 1 site per 5 square miles (13 km 2 ). More detailed studies designed to define individual deposits require greater sampling density. Analyses for elements known to be associated with uranium in a particular mineral host may be used to estimate the relative proportion of uranium in several forms. For example, uranium may be associated with thorium and cerium in monazite, and with zirconium and hafnium in zircon. Readily leachable uranium may be adsorbed to trapped in oxide coatings on mineral particles. Soluble or mobile uranium may indicate an ore source, whereas uranium in monazite or zircon is not likely to be economically attractive. Various schemes may be used to estimate for form of uranium in a sample. Simple elemental ratios are a useful first approach. Multiple ratios and subtractive formulas empirically designed to account for the presence of particular minerals are more useful. Residuals calculated from computer-derived regression equations or factor scores appear to have the greatest potential for locating uranium anomalies

  16. Zirconium based bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.K.; Neogy, S.; Savalia, R.T.; Tewari, R.; Srivastava, D.; Banerjee, S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic glasses have come into prominence in recent times because their nanocrystalline atomic arrangement imparts many useful and unusual properties to these metallic solids. In this study, bulk glasses have been obtained in Zr based multicomponent alloy by induction melting these alloys in silica crucibles and casting these in form of rods 3 and 6 mm in diameter in a copper mould

  17. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise...

  18. Bulk viscosity of molecular fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Frederike; Matar, Omar K.; Müller, Erich A.

    2018-05-01

    The bulk viscosity of molecular models of gases and liquids is determined by molecular simulations as a combination of a dilute gas contribution, arising due to the relaxation of internal degrees of freedom, and a configurational contribution, due to the presence of intermolecular interactions. The dilute gas contribution is evaluated using experimental data for the relaxation times of vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom. The configurational part is calculated using Green-Kubo relations for the fluctuations of the pressure tensor obtained from equilibrium microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. As a benchmark, the Lennard-Jones fluid is studied. Both atomistic and coarse-grained force fields for water, CO2, and n-decane are considered and tested for their accuracy, and where possible, compared to experimental data. The dilute gas contribution to the bulk viscosity is seen to be significant only in the cases when intramolecular relaxation times are in the μs range, and for low vibrational wave numbers (<1000 cm-1); This explains the abnormally high values of bulk viscosity reported for CO2. In all other cases studied, the dilute gas contribution is negligible and the configurational contribution dominates the overall behavior. In particular, the configurational term is responsible for the enhancement of the bulk viscosity near the critical point.

  19. Predictive geochemical mapping using environmental correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilford, John; Caritat, Patrice de; Bui, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of chemical elements at and near the Earth's surface, the so-called critical zone, is complex and reflects the geochemistry and mineralogy of the original substrate modified by environmental factors that include physical, chemical and biological processes over time. Geochemical data typically is illustrated in the form of plan view maps or vertical cross-sections, where the composition of regolith, soil, bedrock or any other material is represented. These are primarily point observations that frequently are interpolated to produce rasters of element distributions. Here we propose the application of environmental or covariate regression modelling to predict and better understand the controls on major and trace element geochemistry within the regolith. Available environmental covariate datasets (raster or vector) representing factors influencing regolith or soil composition are intersected with the geochemical point data in a spatial statistical correlation model to develop a system of multiple linear correlations. The spatial resolution of the environmental covariates, which typically is much finer (e.g. ∼90 m pixel) than that of geochemical surveys (e.g. 1 sample per 10-10,000 km 2 ), carries over to the predictions. Therefore the derived predictive models of element concentrations take the form of continuous geochemical landscape representations that are potentially much more informative than geostatistical interpolations. Environmental correlation is applied to the Sir Samuel 1:250,000 scale map sheet in Western Australia to produce distribution models of individual elements describing the geochemical composition of the regolith and exposed bedrock. As an example we model the distribution of two elements – chromium and sodium. We show that the environmental correlation approach generates high resolution predictive maps that are statistically more accurate and effective than ordinary kriging and inverse distance weighting interpolation

  20. Understanding Legacy Features with Featureous

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olszak, Andrzej; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2011-01-01

    Java programs called Featureous that addresses this issue. Featureous allows a programmer to easily establish feature-code traceability links and to analyze their characteristics using a number of visualizations. Featureous is an extension to the NetBeans IDE, and can itself be extended by third...

  1. Application of cluster analysis to geochemical compositional data for identifying ore-related geochemical anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuguang; Zhou, Kefa; Wang, Jinlin; Yang, Genfang; Wang, Shanshan

    2017-12-01

    Cluster analysis is a well-known technique that is used to analyze various types of data. In this study, cluster analysis is applied to geochemical data that describe 1444 stream sediment samples collected in northwestern Xinjiang with a sample spacing of approximately 2 km. Three algorithms (the hierarchical, k-means, and fuzzy c-means algorithms) and six data transformation methods (the z-score standardization, ZST; the logarithmic transformation, LT; the additive log-ratio transformation, ALT; the centered log-ratio transformation, CLT; the isometric log-ratio transformation, ILT; and no transformation, NT) are compared in terms of their effects on the cluster analysis of the geochemical compositional data. The study shows that, on the one hand, the ZST does not affect the results of column- or variable-based (R-type) cluster analysis, whereas the other methods, including the LT, the ALT, and the CLT, have substantial effects on the results. On the other hand, the results of the row- or observation-based (Q-type) cluster analysis obtained from the geochemical data after applying NT and the ZST are relatively poor. However, we derive some improved results from the geochemical data after applying the CLT, the ILT, the LT, and the ALT. Moreover, the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering algorithms are more reliable than the hierarchical algorithm when they are used to cluster the geochemical data. We apply cluster analysis to the geochemical data to explore for Au deposits within the study area, and we obtain a good correlation between the results retrieved by combining the CLT or the ILT with the k-means or fuzzy c-means algorithms and the potential zones of Au mineralization. Therefore, we suggest that the combination of the CLT or the ILT with the k-means or fuzzy c-means algorithms is an effective tool to identify potential zones of mineralization from geochemical data.

  2. Uranium geochemical exploration in northwestern Luzon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.; Fernandez, L.; Ogena, M.; Tauli, G.

    1980-01-01

    A reconnaissance geochemical stream water and sediment survey which was conducted in northwestern Luzon was able to detect ten (10) uranium anomalous areas. These anomalous areas are located along a north-south trending zone of Miocene marine clastics and sedimentary rocks with tuffaceous sediment intercalations. In general, northwest Luzon has low radioactivity except for two anomalous areas which have 3 to 6 times background radioactivity. Radon anomalies occur in sparsely scattered locations. The anomalous zones appear to be related to major north-south faults and secondary northeast-southwest trending structures. Geochemical correlations between uranium and other elements such as copper, lead, zinc, manganese, silver, cobalt and nickel are generally very poor. (author)

  3. Retention/sorption and geochemical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcos, D.; Grandia, F.; Domenech, C. [Enviros Spain, S.L., Barcelona (Spain); SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium); Sellin, P. [SKB - Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management, SE, Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, F.M.I.; Bate, F.; Heath, T.G.; Hoch, A. [Serco Assurance, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Werme, L.O. [SKB - Svensk Karnbranslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Bruggeman, C.; Maes, I.A.; Breynaert, E.; Vancluysen, J. [Leuven Katholieke Univ., Lab. for Colloid Chemistry (Belgium); Montavon, G.; Guo, Z. [Ecole des Mines, 44 - Nantes (France); Riebe, B.; Bunnenberg, C.; Meleshyn, A. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover, Zentrum fur Strahlenschutz und Radiookologie, Hannover (Germany); Dultz, S. [Leibniz Univ. Hannover, Institut fur Bodenkunde, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This session gathers 4 articles dealing with: the long-term geochemical evolution of the near field of a KBS-3 HLNW repository: insights from reactive transport modelling (D. Arcos, F. Grandia, C. Domenech, P. Sellin); the investigation of iron transport into bentonite from anaerobically corroding steel: a geochemical modelling study (F.M.I. Hunter, F. Bate, T.G. Heath, A. Hoch, L.O. Werme); SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} adsorption on conditioned Na-illite: XAS spectroscopy, kinetics, surface complexation model and influence of compaction (C. Bruggeman, A. Maes, G. Montavon, E. Breynaert, Z. Guo, J. Vancluysen); the influence of temperature and gamma-irradiation on the anion sorption capacity of modified bentonites (B. Riebe, C. Bunnenberg, A. Meleshyn, S. Dultz)

  4. Geochemical indicators of gold ore fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbakov, Yu.G.

    1995-01-01

    The principles of selection of indicators for genetic reconstructions and prognostic valuations of gold mineralization of diverse morphological and geochemical types have been substantiated. The neutron-activation analysis with radiochemical separation and detection limit of 1-10 -8 %, instrumental neutron-activation analysis and atomic-absorption analysis are the main methods of determination of gold low contents in the rocks, as well as diverse elements, including transition, rare earth elements and tellurium, in gold. 50 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs

  5. Synthesizing Earth's geochemical data for hydrogeochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Kubicki, J.; Miller, D.; Richter, D.; Giles, L.; Mitra, P.

    2007-12-01

    For over 200 years, geochemical, microbiological, and chemical data have been collected to describe the evolution of the surface earth. Many of these measurements are data showing variations in time or in space. To forward predict hydrologic response to changing tectonic, climatic, or anthropogenic forcings requires synthesis of these data and utilization in hydrogeochemical models. Increasingly, scientists are attempting to synthesize such data in order to make predictions for new regions or for future time periods. However, to make such complex geochemical data accessible requires development of sophisticated cyberinfrastructures that both invite uploading as well as usage of data. Two such cyberinfrastructure (CI) initiatives are currently developing, one to invite and promote the use of environmental kinetics data (laboratory time course data) through ChemxSeer, and the other to invite and promote the use of spatially indexed geochemical data for the Earth's Critical Zone through CZEN.org. The vision of these CI initiatives is to provide cyber-enhanced portals that encourage domain scientists to upload their data before publication (in private cyberspace), and to make these data eventually publicly accessible (after an embargo period). If the CI can be made to provide services to the domain specialist - e.g. to provide data analysis services or data comparison services - we envision that scientists will upload data. In addition, the CI can promote the use and comparison of datasets across disciplines. For example, the CI can facilitate the use of spatially indexed geochemical data by scientists more accustomed to dealing with time-course data for hydrologic flow, and can provide user-friendly interfaces with CI established to facilitate the use of hydrologic data. Examples of the usage of synthesized data to predict soil development over the last 13ky and its effects on active hydrological flow boundaries in surficial systems will be discussed for i) a N

  6. Summary report on geochemical barrier special study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    Long-term management of uranium mill tailings must provide assurance that soluble contaminants will not migrate beyond the Point of Compliance. Conventional management alternatives provide containment through the use of physical barriers which are designed to prevent migration of water through the tailings pile. An alternative is to geochemically modify the tailings to immobilize the contaminants. This investigation examined three potential geochemical modifiers to determine their ability to immobilize inorganic groundwater contaminants found in uranium mill tailings. These modifiers were hydrated lime (Ca(OH) 2 ), limestone (CaCO 3 ), and a sphaegnum peat moss. This investigation focused on both the geochemical interactions between the tailings and the modifiers, and the effects the modifiers had on the physical strength of the tailings. The geochemical investigations began with characterization of the tailings by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. This was followed by batch leaching experiments in which various concentrations of each modifier were added to tailings in shaker flasks and allowed to come to equilibrium. Finally, column experiments were conducted to simulate flow through a tailings pile. The results show that all of the modifiers were at least moderately effective at immobilizing most of the groundwater contaminants of concern at uranium mill tailings sites. Hydrated lime was able to achieve 90 percent concentration reduction of arsenic, cadmium, selenium, uranium, and sulfate when added at a two percent concentration. Limestone was somewhat less effective and peat removed greater than 90 percent of arsenic, lead, uranium, and sulfate at a one percent concentration. The column tests showed that kinetic and/or mass transfer limitations are important and that sufficient time must be allowed for the immobilization reactions to occur

  7. Bulk nanoscale materials in steel products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chehab, B; Wang, X; Masse, J-P; Zurob, H; Embury, D; Bouaziz, O

    2010-01-01

    Although a number of nanoscale metallic materials exhibit interesting mechanical properties the fabrication paths are often complex and difficult to apply to bulk structural materials. However a number of steels which exhibit combinations of plasticity and phase transitions can be deformed to produce ultra high strength levels in the range 1 to 3 GPa. The resultant high stored energy and complex microstructures allow new nanoscale structures to be produced by combinations of recovery and recrystallisation. The resultant structures exhibit totally new combinations of strength and ductility to be achieved. In specific cases this also enables both the nature of the grain boundary structure and the spatial variation in structure to be controlled. In this presentation both the detailed microstructural features and their relation to the strength, work-hardening capacity and ductility will be discussed for a number of martensitic and austenitic steels.

  8. A route to transparent bulk metals

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2012-07-23

    Hypothetical compounds based on a sapphire host are investigated with respect to their structural as well as electronic features. The results are obtained by electronic structure calculations within density functional theory and the generalized gradient approximation. A quarter of the Al atoms in Al 2O 3 is replaced by a 4d transition metal M ion, with d 0 to d 9 electronic configuration. We perform structure optimizations for all the compounds and analyze the electronic states. Due to the sizeable band gap of the Al 2O 3 host, we can identify promising candidates for transparent bulk metals. We explain the mechanisms leading to this combination of materials properties. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Sharp fronts within geochemical transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, P.

    1995-01-01

    The authors consider some reactive geochemical transport problems in groundwater systems. When incoming fluid is in disequilibrium with the mineralogy sharp transition fronts may develop. They show that this is a generic property for a class of systems where the timescales associated with reaction and diffusion phenomena are much shorter than those associated with advective transport. Such multiple timescale problems are relevant to a variety of processes in natural systems: mathematically methods of singular perturbation theory reduce the dimension of the problems to be solved locally. Furthermore, they consider how spatial heterogeneous mineralogy can impact upon the propagation of sharp geochemical fronts. The authors developed an asymptotic approach in which they solve equations for the evolving geometry of the front and indicate how the non-smooth perturbations due to natural heterogeneity of the mineralogy on underlying ground water flow field are balanced against the smoothing effect of diffusion/dispersive processes. Fronts are curvature damped, and the results here indicate the generic nature of separate front propagation within both model (idealized) and natural (heterogeneous) geochemical systems

  10. Monitoring active volcanoes: The geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The geochemical surveillance of an active volcano aims to recognize possible signals that are related to changes in volcanic activity. Indeed, as a consequence of the magma rising inside the volcanic "plumbing system" and/or the refilling with new batches of magma, the dissolved volatiles in the magma are progressively released as a function of their relative solubilities. When approaching the surface, these fluids that are discharged during magma degassing can interact with shallow aquifers and/or can be released along the main volcano-tectonic structures. Under these conditions, the following main degassing processes represent strategic sites to be monitored.

    The main purpose of this special volume is to collect papers that cover a wide range of topics in volcanic fluid geochemistry, which include geochemical characterization and geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes using different techniques and at different sites. Moreover, part of this volume has been dedicated to the new geochemistry tools.

  11. Geochemical sensitivity analysis: Identification of important geochemical parameters for performance assessment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegel, M.; Guzowski, R.; Rechard, R.; Erickson, K.

    1986-01-01

    The EPA Standard for geologic disposal of high level waste requires demonstration that the cumulative discharge of individual radioisotopes over a 10,000 year period at points 5 kilometers from the engineered barrier system will not exceed the limits prescribed in 40 CFR Part 191. The roles of the waste package, engineered facility, hydrogeology and geochemical processes in limiting radionuclide releases all must be considered in calculations designed to assess compliance of candidate repositories with the EPA Standard. In this talk, they will discuss the geochemical requirements of calculations used in these compliance assessments. In addition, they will describe the complementary roles of (1) simple models designed to bound the radionuclide discharge over the widest reasonable range of geochemical conditions and scenarios and (2) detailed geochemical models which can provide insights into the actual behavior of the radionuclides in the ground water. Finally, they will discuss development of sensitivity/uncertainty techniques designed to identify important site-specific geochemical parameters and processes using data from a basalt formation

  12. Feature Article

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Feature Article. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 80-85 Feature Article. What's New in Computers Windows 95 · Vijnan Shastri · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 86-89 Feature ...

  13. Petrological mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in Ratones Mines (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil Gutierrez, B.

    2002-01-01

    The petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in the Ratones Mine (Caceres, Spain) has been done in order to understand rock-water interaction processes which control water geochemical parameters. Special interest has been devoted to the analysis and interpretation of REE patterns in the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) because they constitute geochemical tracers in water-rock interaction process. Moreover, REE are considered as actinide analogues. In order to characterise the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) several investigation scales (system, outcrop, whole rock, mineral and geochemical components) have been considered and different types of samples have been analysed. These factors control the methodological approach used in this investigation. The analytical methods we have used in this investigation are microscope, qualitative and semi-quantitative methods (XRD, SEM,EDAX) and quantitative methods (ICP-MS, XRF, EM, LAM-IC-MS). The bulk of the granitoids located around the Ratones Mine Belongs to the alkaline feldspar granite-sienogranite lihotype and they show a peraluminous and subalkaline pattern. From the mineralogical point of view, they are composed by quartz, K-feldspar (Or>90%), showing sericitation, moscovitization and turmolinization altherations, alkaline plagioclase (An-=-3%), usually altered to sericite, saussirite and less frequently affected by moscovitization processes, Fe-Al biotite, frequently affected by chloritization processes and sometimes replaced by muscovite, and finally muscovite (>2% celadonite and <4% paragonite) both of primary and secondary origin. The differences observed between the different lithotypes are related with the modal proportion of the principal minerals,with the presence or absence of certain accessory minerals ( turmaline, cordierite), with specific textural patterns, grain size and also with the richness in specific

  14. Coulombic Fluids Bulk and Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Freyland, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Ionic liquids have attracted considerable interest in recent years. In this book the bulk and interfacial physico-chemical characteristics of various fluid systems dominated by Coulomb interactions are treated which includes molten salts, ionic liquids as well as metal-molten salt mixtures and expanded fluid metals. Of particular interest is the comparison of the different systems. Topics in the bulk phase concern the microscopic structure, the phase behaviour and critical phenomena, and the metal-nonmetal transition. Interfacial phenomena include wetting transitions, electrowetting, surface freezing, and the electrified ionic liquid/ electrode interface. With regard to the latter 2D and 3D electrochemical phase formation of metals and semi-conductors on the nanometer scale is described for a number of selected examples. The basic concepts and various experimental methods are introduced making the book suitable for both graduate students and researchers interested in Coulombic fluids.

  15. Comparison of Geochemical, Grain-Size, and Magnetic Proxies for Rock Flour and Ice- Rafted Debris in the Late Pleistocene Mono Basin, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, S. H.; Hemming, S. R.; Kent, D. V.

    2008-12-01

    Advance and retreat of mountain glaciers are important indicators of climate variability, but the most direct proxy record, mapping and dating of moraines, is by nature discontinous. The Sierra Nevada form the western boundary of the Mono Lake basin, and the proximity of the large Pleistocene lake to the glacial canyons of the Sierra presents a rare opportunity to examine glacial variability in a continuous, well-dated lacustrine sequence. We have applied a geochemical proxy for rock flour to the glacial silts of the late Pleistocene Wilson Creek Formation, but because it is time- and sample-intensive, another method is required for a high-resolution record. Previous microscopic examination, thermomagnetic measurements, XRD analysis, and new isothermal remnant magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves show that the magnetic mineralogy is dominated by fine-grained, unaltered magnetite. Bulk measurements show strong susceptibility (mean ~ 16 x 10- 6 m3/kg) and remanent magnetization (mean IRM ~ 10-2 Am2/kg) compared to diluting components (carbonate, smectite, rhyolitic ash). The Wilson Creek type section sediments also contain a coarse lithic fraction, quantified by counting the >2cm clasts in outcrop and the >425 μm fraction in the bulk sediment. Susceptibility, IRM, and ARM (anhysteretic remnant magnetization) are quite similar throughout the type section, with the abundance of coarse lithic fraction correlative to the ratio k/IRM. Because the magnetic fraction of the rock flour is fine-grained magnetite, IRM should capture the changes in concentration of flour through time, and the major features of the (low-resolution) geochemical flour proxy record are identifiable in the IRM record. Flux-correction of the IRM results in a rock flour proxy record with major peaks between 36 and 48 ka, similar to a rock flour record from neighboring Owens Lake. This regional glacial signal contrasts with peaks in coarse lithics between 58 and 68 ka in the Wilson Creek record

  16. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  17. Geochemical characteristics of oil sands fluid petroleum coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesbitt, Jake A.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Chen, Ning

    2017-01-01

    The geochemical characteristics of fluid petroleum coke from the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR) of northern Alberta, Canada were investigated. Continuous core samples were collected to 8 m below surface at several locations (n = 12) from three coke deposits at an active oil sands mine. Bulk elemental analyses revealed the coke composition was dominated by C (84.2 ± 2.3 wt%) and S (6.99 ± 0.26 wt%). Silicon (9210 ± 3000 mg kg"−"1), Al (5980 ± 1200 mg kg"−"1), Fe (4760 ± 1200 mg kg"−"1), and Ti (1380 ± 430 mg kg"−"1) were present in lesser amounts. Vanadium (1280 ± 120 mg kg"−"1) and Ni (230 ± 80 mg kg"−"1) exhibited the highest concentrations among potentially-hazardous minor and trace elements. Sequential extractions revealed potential for release of these metals under field-relevant conditions. Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of Si and Ti oxides, organically-complexed V and hydrated Ni sulfate, and provided information about the asphaltenic carbon matrix. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the V and Ni K-edges revealed that these metals were largely hosted in porphyrins and similar organic complexes throughout coke grains. Minor differences among measured V and Ni K-edge spectra were largely attributed to slight variations in local coordination of V(IV) and Ni(II) within these organic compounds. However, linear combination fits were improved by including reference spectra for inorganic phases with octahedrally-coordinated V(III) and Ni(II). Sulfur and Fe K-edge XANES confirmed that thiophenic coordination and pyritic-ilmenitic coordination are predominant, respectively. These results provide new information on the geochemical and mineralogical composition of oil sands fluid petroleum coke and improve understanding of potential controls on associated water chemistry. - Highlights: • Oil sands fluid petroleum coke contains wide range of major, minor and

  18. The effect of scale on the interpretation of geochemical anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, P.K.; Eppinger, R.G.; Turner, R.L.; Shiquan, S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of geochemical surveys changes with scale. Regional surveys identify areas where mineral deposits are most likely to occur, whereas intermediate surveys identify and prioritize specific targets. At detailed scales specific deposit models may be applied and deposits delineated. The interpretation of regional geochemical surveys must take into account scale-dependent difference in the nature and objectives of this type of survey. Overinterpretation of regional data should be resisted, as should recommendations to restrict intermediate or detailed follow-up surveys to the search for specific deposit types or to a too limited suite of elements. Regional surveys identify metallogenic provinces within which a variety of deposit types and metals are most likely to be found. At intermediate scale, these regional provinces often dissipate into discrete clusters of anomalous areas. At detailed scale, individual anomalous areas reflect local conditions of mineralization and may seem unrelated to each other. Four examples from arid environments illustrate the dramatic change in patterns of anomalies between regional and more detailed surveys. On the Arabian Shield, a broad regional anomaly reflects the distribution of highly differentiated anorogenic granites. A particularly prominent part of the regional anomaly includes, in addition to the usual elements related to the granites, the assemblage of Mo, W and Sn. Initial interpretation suggested potential for granite-related, stockwork Mo deposits. Detailed work identified three separate sources for the anomaly: a metal-rich granite, a silicified and stockwork-veined area with scheelite and molybdenite, and scheelite/powellite concentrations in skarn deposits adjacent to a ring-dike complex. Regional geochemical, geophysical and remote-sensing data in the Sonoran Desert, Mexico, define a series of linear features interpreted to reflect fundamental, northeast-trending fractures in the crust that served as the prime

  19. Large-scale HTS bulks for magnetic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Frank N.; Floegel-Delor, Uta; Riedel, Thomas; Goebel, Bernd; Rothfeld, Rolf; Schirrmeister, Peter; Wippich, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    ATZ Company has constructed about 130 HTS magnet systems using high-Tc bulk magnets. A key feature in scaling-up is the fabrication of YBCO melts textured multi-seeded large bulks with three to eight seeds. Except of levitation, magnetization, trapped field and hysteresis, we review system engineering parameters of HTS magnetic linear and rotational bearings like compactness, cryogenics, power density, efficiency and robust construction. We examine mobile compact YBCO bulk magnet platforms cooled with LN2 and Stirling cryo-cooler for demonstrator use. Compact cryostats for Maglev train operation contain 24 pieces of 3-seed bulks and can levitate 2500-3000 N at 10 mm above a permanent magnet (PM) track. The effective magnetic distance of the thermally insulated bulks is 2 mm only; the stored 2.5 l LN2 allows more than 24 h operation without refilling. 34 HTS Maglev vacuum cryostats are manufactured tested and operate in Germany, China and Brazil. The magnetic levitation load to weight ratio is more than 15, and by group assembling the HTS cryostats under vehicles up to 5 t total loads levitated above a magnetic track is achieved.

  20. Mass production of bulk artificial nacre with excellent mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huai-Ling; Chen, Si-Ming; Mao, Li-Bo; Song, Zhao-Qiang; Yao, Hong-Bin; Cölfen, Helmut; Luo, Xi-Sheng; Zhang, Fu; Pan, Zhao; Meng, Yu-Feng; Ni, Yong; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2017-08-18

    Various methods have been exploited to replicate nacre features into artificial structural materials with impressive structural and mechanical similarity. However, it is still very challenging to produce nacre-mimetics in three-dimensional bulk form, especially for further scale-up. Herein, we demonstrate that large-sized, three-dimensional bulk artificial nacre with comprehensive mimicry of the hierarchical structures and the toughening mechanisms of natural nacre can be facilely fabricated via a bottom-up assembly process based on laminating pre-fabricated two-dimensional nacre-mimetic films. By optimizing the hierarchical architecture from molecular level to macroscopic level, the mechanical performance of the artificial nacre is superior to that of natural nacre and many engineering materials. This bottom-up strategy has no size restriction or fundamental barrier for further scale-up, and can be easily extended to other material systems, opening an avenue for mass production of high-performance bulk nacre-mimetic structural materials in an efficient and cost-effective way for practical applications.Artificial materials that replicate the mechanical properties of nacre represent important structural materials, but are difficult to produce in bulk. Here, the authors exploit the bottom-up assembly of 2D nacre-mimetic films to fabricate 3D bulk artificial nacre with an optimized architecture and excellent mechanical properties.

  1. Geochemical evidence for mixing of three components in martian orthopyroxenite ALH 84001. [Abstract only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Lindstrom, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    ALH 84001, a ferroan martian orthopyroxenite, originally consisted of three petrographically defined components: a cumulus assemblage of orthopyroxene + chromite, a trapped melt assemblage of orthopyroxene(?) + chromite + maskelynite + apatite + augite +/- pyrite, and a metasomatic assemblage of carbonate +/- pyrite. We present the results of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) study of five bulk samples of ALH 84001, combined with Scanning Ion Mass Spectrometer (SIMS) data on the orthopyroxene, in order to attempt to set limits on the geochemical characteristics of the latter two components, and therefore on the petrogenesis of ALH 84001. The INAA data support the petrographic observations, suggesting that there are at least three components in ALH 84001. We will assume that each of the three geochemically required components can be equated with one of the petrographically observed components. Both trapped melt and metasomatic components in ALH 84001 have higher Na than orthopyroxene based on compositions of maskelynite, apatite, and carbonate. For the metasomatic component, we will assume its Na content is that of carbonate, while for a trapped melt component, we will use a typical Na content inferred for martian meteorite parent melts, approximately 1 wt% Na2O. Under these assumptions, we can set limits on the Light Rare Earth Elements/Heavy Rare Earth Elements (LREE/HREE) ratios of the components, and use this information to compare the petrogenesis of ALH 84001 with other martian meteorites. The above calculations assume that the bulk samples are representative of different portions of ALH 84001. We will also evaluate the possible heterogeneous distribution of mineral phases in the bulk samples as the cause of compositional heterogeneity in our samples.

  2. Some results of NURE uranium geochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some technical developments of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program which are of general application in geochemical exploration are being studied. Results of stream water and suspended and bottom sediment analyses are compared for an area near Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Variations of uranium content of water samples with time in the North Carolina Piedmont are seen to correlate with rainfall. Ground water samples from coastal and piedmont areas were analyzed for helium. All media sampled provide useful information when properly analyzed and interpreted as part of a total geological analysis of an area

  3. Panay carborne radiometric and geochemical surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.

    1981-09-01

    A carborne radiometric survey and stream sediments collection were conducted in Panay and Guimaras Islands. An area in Nabas, Aklan, situated in the northwestern tip of Panay (Buruanga Peninsula) which indicated 2 to 3 times above background radioactivity was delineated. Uranium content in the stream sediment samples collected from Buruanga Peninsula was generally higher than those obtained in other parts of the island. Radioactivity measurements and uranium content in stream sediments were found to be within background levels. It is recommended that follow-up radiometric and geochemical surveys be undertaken in Buruanga Peninsula and additional stream sediments samples be collected in Panay to achieve better sampling density and coverage. (author)

  4. Landscape-geochemical factors of deposit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batulin, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    Effect of landscape-geochemical factors on hydrogenic formation of uranium ores is considered. The primary attention is paid to finding reasons for hydrogeochemical background increase in the regions of arid climate. Problems of uranium distribution in alluvial landscapes, hydrogeochemical regime of ground waters, reflecting the effect of waters of the zone of aeration are revealed. Chemical composition of porous solutions in the zone of aeration, as well as historical geochemindstry of landscape a its role from the view point of uranium solution formation in the arid zone are considered [ru

  5. DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Matthew [Mill Valley, CA

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  6. Geochemical modelling. Pt.1, Pt.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skytte Jensen, B.; Jensen, H.; Pearson, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    This work is carried out under cost-sharing contract with the European Atomic Energy Community in the framework of its fourth research programme on radioactive waste management and radioactive waste storage. This final report is subdivided into two parts. In the first part, JENSEN, a computer code for the computation of chemical equilibria in aqueous systems, describes the structure, function and use of a new geochemical computer program intended for PC's. The program, which is written in Turbo Pascal, version 4, is fundamentally similar to most other geochemical programs, but combines in one program several of the merits these programs have. The intention has been to make an advanced program, which also should be user friendly and fast, and to attain this several new algorithms have been developed and implemented. The program has a built-in database mainly based on the CHEMVAL compilation containing data for 395 soluble species and 149 minerals. The program can find equilibria in the presence of all or some of these soluble species, under conditions or fixed or floating pH and / or Redox potential. The program by itself eliminates a bad guess of a candidate for precipitation. In the present version, the program can identify which minerals and how much of them there will be formed when equilibrium is established. In the second part, LITTLE JOE, an expert system to support geochemical modelling, describes the construction of a minor expert system for use in the evaluation of analytical data for the composition of ground waters from limestone formation. Although the example given is rather limited in scope, the application of the expert system for the evaluation of the analytical data clearly demonstrates the mature expert knowledge imbedded in the system which is contrasted with the uncritical acceptance of analytical or theoretical data. With the overall neglect of ion-exchange and the formation of solid solutions in geochemical calculations, geochemistry is

  7. Ordered bulk degradation via autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Jörn; Kristensen, Anders Riis; Andersen, Jens S

    2008-01-01

    During amino acid starvation, cells undergo macroautophagy which is regarded as an unspecific bulk degradation process. Lately, more and more organelle-specific autophagy subtypes such as reticulophagy, mitophagy and ribophagy have been described and it could be shown, depending on the experimental...... at proteasomal and lysosomal degradation ample cross-talk between the two degradation pathways became evident. Degradation via autophagy appeared to be ordered and regulated at the protein complex/organelle level. This raises several important questions such as: can macroautophagy itself be specific and what...

  8. Nanoscale Pore Features and Associated Fluid Behavior in Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, D. R.; Striolo, A.

    2017-12-01

    Unconventional hydrocarbons occurring in economic abundance require greater than industry-standard levels of technology or investment to exploit. Geological formations that host unconventional oil and gas are extraordinarily heterogeneous and exhibit a wide range of physical and chemical features that can vary over many orders of magnitude in length scale. The size, distribution and connectivity of these confined geometries, the chemistry of the solid, the chemistry of the fluids and their physical properties collectively dictate how fluids migrate into and through these micro- and nano-environments, wet and ultimately react with the solid surfaces. Our current understanding of the rates and mechanisms of fluid and mass transport and interaction within these multiporosity systems at the molecular scale is far less robust than we would like. This presentation will take a two-fold approach to this topic area. First, a brief overview is provided that highlights the use of advanced electron microscopy and neutrons scattering methods to quantify the nature of the nanopore system that hosts hydrocarbons in representative gas shale formations such as the Utica, Marcellus and Eagle Ford. Second, results will be presented that leverage the application of state-of-the-art experimental, analytical and computational tools to assess key features of the fluid-matrix interaction relevant to shale settings. The multidisciplinary approaches highlighted will include neutron scattering and NMR experiments, thermodynamic measurements and molecular-level simulations to quantitatively assess molecular properties of C-O-H fluids confined to well-characterized porous media, subjected to temperatures and pressures relevant to subsurface energy systems. These studies conducted in concert are beginning to provide a fundamental understanding at the molecular level of how intrinsically different hydrocarbon-bearing fluids behave in confined geometries compared to bulk systems, and shed light

  9. Geochemical Modeling Of F Area Seepage Basin Composition And Variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-01-01

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin

  10. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of a neutral, low-sulfide/high-carbonate tailings impoundment, Markušovce, eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Edgar; Petrák, Marián; Tóth, Roman; Lalinská-Voleková, Bronislava; Jurkovič, L'ubomír; Kučerová, Gabriela; Radková, Anežka; Sottník, Peter; Vozár, Jaroslav

    2013-11-01

    Tailings deposits generated from mining activities represent a potential risk for the aquatic environment through the release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids occurring in a variety of minerals present in the tailings. Physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings such as total concentrations of chemical elements, pH, ratio of acid-producing to acid-neutralizing minerals, and primary and secondary mineral phases are very important factors that control the actual release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids from the tailings to the environment. The aims of this study are the determination of geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings deposited in voluminous impoundment situated near the village of Markušovce (eastern Slovakia) and identification of the processes controlling the mobility of selected toxic metals (Cu, Hg) and metalloids (As, Sb). The studied tailings have unique features in comparison with the other tailings investigated previously because of the specific mineral assemblage primarily consisting of barite, siderite, quartz, and minor sulfides. To meet the aims, samples of the tailings were collected from 3 boreholes and 15 excavated pits and subjected to bulk geochemical analyses (i.e., determination of chemical composition, pH, Eh, acid generation, and neutralization potentials) combined with detailed mineralogical characterization using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). Additionally, the geochemical and mineralogical factors controlling the transfer of potentially toxic elements from tailings to waters were also determined using short-term batch test (European norm EN 12457), sampling of drainage waters and speciation-equilibrium calculations performed with PHREEQC. The tailings mineral assemblage consists of siderite, barite, quartz, and dolomite. Sulfide minerals constitute only a minor proportion of the tailings

  11. Bulk Materials Analysis Using High-Energy Positron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glade, S C; Asoka-Kumar, P; Nieh, T G; Sterne, P A; Wirth, B D; Dauskardt, R H; Flores, K M; Suh, D; Odette, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews some recent materials analysis results using high-energy positron beams at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We are combining positron lifetime and orbital electron momentum spectroscopic methods to provide electron number densities and electron momentum distributions around positron annihilation sites. Topics covered include: correlation of positron annihilation characteristics with structural and mechanical properties of bulk metallic glasses, compositional studies of embrittling features in nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel, pore characterization in Zeolites, and positron annihilation characteristics in alkali halides

  12. Research on geochemical exploration in geotherm development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirowatari, Kazuo; Imaizumi, Yukio; Koga, Akito; Iwanaga, Tatsuto.

    1987-01-01

    The decisive factor of geotherm development is to improve the exploration techniques. By effectively carrying out the selection of promising development spots and the decision of well drilling positions, the geotherm development exceeding existing energy sources becomes feasible. There have been many problems in conventional geotherm exploration such as the high cost and long work period, therefore, it was decided to advance the research on geochemical exploration techniques which are relatively simple and can be carried out with low cost. When the techniques of geochemistry are used, for example, in the case that there are hot springs or fumaroles, the temperature, origin, properties and so on of underground hot water reservoirs can be estimated from their chemical composition. The method of examining the mercury concentration in soil and soil air has been in practical use in the geothermal districts where the ground surface symptom lacks. This time, the method of investigation using radon, thoron and gamma ray as the exploration indices was newly studied. The index compositions for geochemical exploration, new exploration index compositions, the method of measurement, the basic investigation and on-the-spot investigation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Geochemical signature of radioactive waste: oil NORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Gilberto T. de Paula; Costa-de-Moura, Jorge; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida; Sampaio, Emidio A. Lopes, E-mail: gilberto.costa@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jcmoura@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cgomes@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Controle de Rejeitos e Transporte de Materiais Radioativos

    2017-07-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Agency (CNEN) rules all nuclear activity in Brazil as demanded by the Federal Constitution, articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, and by the Federal Acts 4.118/62 and 10.308/2001. Therefore, the CNEN is responsible for any radioactive waste disposal in the country. Oil Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Oil NORM) in this paper refers to waste coming from oil exploration. Oil NORM has called much attention during the last decades, mostly because it is not possible to determine its primary source due to the actual absence of regulatory control mechanism. There is no efficient regulatory tool which allows determining the origin of such NORM wastes even among those facilities under regulatory control. This fact may encourage non-authorized radioactive material transportation, smuggling and terrorism. The aim of this project is to provide a geochemical signature for each oil NORM waste using its naturally occurring isotopic composition to identify its origin. The here proposed method is a specific geochemical modeling of oil sludge NORM samples which are analyzed for radioisotopes normally present in oil pipes, such as {sup 228}Ac, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Pb. The activity ratios are plotted in scatter diagrams. This method was successfully tested with data of different sources obtained from analysis reports from the Campos Basin/Brazil and from literature. (author)

  14. Neutron activation analysis of geochemical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.; Zilliacus, R.; Kaistila, M.

    1983-06-01

    The present paper will describe the work done at the Technical Research Centre of Finland in developing methods for the large-scale activation analysis of samples for the geochemical prospecting of metals. The geochemical prospecting for uranium started in Finland in 1974 and consequently a manually operated device for the delayed neutron activation analysis of uranium was taken into use. During 1974 9000 samples were analyzed. The small capacity of the analyzer made it necessary to develop a completely automated analyzer which was taken into use in August 1975. Since then 20000-30000 samples have been analyzed annually the annual capacity being about 60000 samples when running seven hours per day. Multielemental instrumental neutron activation analysis is used for the analysis of more than 40 elements. Using instrumental epithermal neutron activation analysis 25-27 elements can be analyzed using one irradiation and 20 min measurement. During 1982 12000 samples were analyzed for mining companies and Geological Survey of Finland. The capacity is 600 samples per week. Besides these two analytical methods the analysis of lanthanoids is an important part of the work. 11 lanthanoids have been analyzed using instrumental neutron activation analysis. Radiochemical separation methods have been developed for several elements to improve the sensitivity of the analysis

  15. Geochemical signature of radioactive waste: oil NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Gilberto T. de Paula; Costa-de-Moura, Jorge; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida; Sampaio, Emidio A. Lopes

    2017-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Agency (CNEN) rules all nuclear activity in Brazil as demanded by the Federal Constitution, articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, and by the Federal Acts 4.118/62 and 10.308/2001. Therefore, the CNEN is responsible for any radioactive waste disposal in the country. Oil Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Oil NORM) in this paper refers to waste coming from oil exploration. Oil NORM has called much attention during the last decades, mostly because it is not possible to determine its primary source due to the actual absence of regulatory control mechanism. There is no efficient regulatory tool which allows determining the origin of such NORM wastes even among those facilities under regulatory control. This fact may encourage non-authorized radioactive material transportation, smuggling and terrorism. The aim of this project is to provide a geochemical signature for each oil NORM waste using its naturally occurring isotopic composition to identify its origin. The here proposed method is a specific geochemical modeling of oil sludge NORM samples which are analyzed for radioisotopes normally present in oil pipes, such as 228 Ac, 214 Bi and 214 Pb. The activity ratios are plotted in scatter diagrams. This method was successfully tested with data of different sources obtained from analysis reports from the Campos Basin/Brazil and from literature. (author)

  16. Investigation of a natural geochemical barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Groundwater data from lysimeters and monitor wells in the vicinity of the Bowman, North Dakota, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site indicated that there is a mechanism in the subsurface which cleans up downward-percolating fluids. It was hypothesized that clays and organic materials in the sediments sequestered hazardous constituents from infiltrating fluids. A program was designed to collect sediment cores from various locations on and around the site and to analyze the sediments to determine whether there has been a build up of hazardous constituents in any specific type of sedimentary material. Materials that concentrate the hazardous constituents would be potential candidates to be used in constructed geochemical barriers. The water quality of the groundwater contained within the sedimentary section indicates that there is a transport of contaminants down through the sediments and that these contaminants are removed from solution by the iron-bearing minerals in the organic-rich lignite beds. The data gathered during the course of this investigation indicate that the lignite ashing operations have added very little of the hazardous constituents of concern--arsenic, chromium, molybdenum, selenium, or uranium--to the sediments beneath the UMTRA Project site. At both locations, the hazardous constituents are concentrated in the upper most lignite bed. These data offer a natural analog for laboratory tests in which sphagnum peat was used to sequester hazardous constituents. Constructed geochemical barriers are a viable mechanism for the clean-up of the majority of hazardous constituents from uranium mill tailings in groundwater

  17. Geochemical controls on groundwater chemistry in shales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Damm, K.L.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of groundwaters is one of the most important parameters in determining the mobility of species within a rock formation. A three pronged approach was used to determine the composition of, and geochemical controls, on groundwaters specifically within shale formations: (1) available data were collected from the literature, the US Geological Survey WATSTORE data base, and field sampling, (2) the geochemical modeling code EQ3/6 was used to simulate interaction of various shales and groundwaters, and (3) several types of shale were reacted with synthetic groundwaters in the laboratory. The comparison of model results to field and laboratory data provide a means of validating the models, as well as a means of deconvoluting complex field interactions. Results suggest that groundwaters in shales have a wide range in composition and are primarily of the Na-Cl-HCO 3 - type. The constancy of the Na:Cl (molar) ratio at 1:1 and the Ca:Mg ratio from 3:1 to 1:1 suggests the importance of halite and carbonates in controlling groundwater compositions. In agreement with the reaction path modeling, most of the groundwaters are neutral to slightly alkaline at low temperatures. Model and experimental results suggest that reaction (1) at elevated temperatures, or (2) in the presence of oxygen will lead to more acidic conditions. Some acetate was found to be produced in the experiments; depending on the constraints applied, large amounts of acetate were produced in the model results. 13 refs., 1 tab

  18. Microhardness of bulk-fill composite materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kelić, Katarina; Matić, Sanja; Marović, Danijela; Klarić, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine microhardness of high- and low-viscosity bulk-fill composite resins and compare it with conventional composite materials. Four materials of high-viscosity were tested, including three bulk-fills: QuiXfi l (QF), x-tra fil (XTF) and Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEBCF), while nanohybrid composite GrandioSO (GSO) served as control. The other four were low-viscosity composites, three bulk-fill materials: Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR), Venus Bulk Fill (VBF) and ...

  19. Handling of bulk solids theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Shamlou, P A

    1990-01-01

    Handling of Bulk Solids provides a comprehensive discussion of the field of solids flow and handling in the process industries. Presentation of the subject follows classical lines of separate discussions for each topic, so each chapter is self-contained and can be read on its own. Topics discussed include bulk solids flow and handling properties; pressure profiles in bulk solids storage vessels; the design of storage silos for reliable discharge of bulk materials; gravity flow of particulate materials from storage vessels; pneumatic transportation of bulk solids; and the hazards of solid-mater

  20. A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, U.S.A., was prepared using National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) stream-sediment data. Before termination of the NURE program, sampling of nearly the entire state (48,666 square miles of land area) was completed and geochemical analyses were obtained. The NURE data are applicable to mineral exploration, agriculture, waste disposal siting issues, health, and environmental studies. Applications in state government include resource surveys to assist mineral exploration by identifying geochemical anomalies and areas of mineralization. Agriculture seeks to identify areas with favorable (or unfavorable) conditions for plant growth, disease, and crop productivity. Trace elements such as cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, manganese, zinc, and molybdenum must be present within narrow ranges in soils for optimum growth and productivity. Trace elements as a contributing factor to disease are of concern to health professionals. Industry can use pH and conductivity data for water samples to site facilities which require specific water quality. The North Carolina NURE database consists of stream-sediment samples, groundwater samples, and stream-water analyses. The statewide database consists of 6,744 stream-sediment sites, 5,778 groundwater sample sites, and 295 stream-water sites. Neutron activation analyses were provided for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, Dy in groundwater and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in stream sediments. Supplemental analyses by other techniques were reported on U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn for 4,619 stream-sediment samples. A small subset of 334 stream samples was analyzed for gold. The goal of the atlas was to make available the statewide NURE data with minimal interpretation to enable prospective users to modify and manipulate the data for their end use. The atlas provides only

  1. Geochemical soil sampling for deeply-buried mineralized breccia pipes, northwestern Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenrich, K.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    Thousands of solution-collapse breccia pipes crop out in the canyons and on the plateaus of northwestern Arizona; some host high-grade uranium deposits. The mineralized pipes are enriched in Ag, As, Ba, Co, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, V and Zn. These breccia pipes formed as sedimentary strata collapsed into solution caverns within the underlying Mississippian Redwall Limestone. A typical pipe is approximately 100 m (300 ft) in diameter and extends upward from the Redwall Limestone as much as 1000 m (3000 ft). Unmineralized gypsum and limestone collapses rooted in the Lower Permian Kaibab Limestone or Toroweap Formation also occur throughout this area. Hence, development of geochemical tools that can distinguish these unmineralized collapse structures, as well as unmineralized breccia pipes, from mineralized breccia pipes could significantly reduce drilling costs for these orebodies commonly buried 300-360 m (1000-1200 ft) below the plateau surface. Design and interpretation of soil sampling surveys over breccia pipes are plagued with several complications. (1) The plateau-capping Kaibab Limestone and Moenkopi Formation are made up of diverse lithologies. Thus, because different breccia pipes are capped by different lithologies, each pipe needs to be treated as a separate geochemical survey with its own background samples. (2) Ascertaining true background is difficult because of uncertainties in locations of poorly-exposed collapse cones and ring fracture zones that surround the pipes. Soil geochemical surveys were completed on 50 collapse structures, three of which are known mineralized breccia pipes. Each collapse structure was treated as an independent geochemical survey. Geochemical data from each collapse feature were plotted on single-element geochemical maps and processed by multivariate factor analysis. To contrast the results between geochemical surveys (collapse structures), a means of quantifying the anomalousness of elements at each site was developed. This

  2. Feature Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Feature selection and reduction are key to robust multivariate analyses. In this talk I will focus on pros and cons of various variable selection methods and focus on those that are most relevant in the context of HEP.

  3. Solar Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of solar feature datasets contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide.

  4. Site Features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of various site features from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different times...

  5. Comparison of bulk Micromegas with different amplification gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Purba, E-mail: purba.bhattacharya@saha.ac.in [Applied Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharya, Sudeb [Emeritus Scientist (CSIR), Applied Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Majumdar, Nayana; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Sarkar, Sandip [Applied Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Colas, Paul; Attie, David [DSM/IRFU, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France)

    2013-12-21

    The bulk Micromegas detector is considered to be a promising candidate for building TPCs for several future experiments including the projected linear collider. The standard bulk with a spacing of 128μm has already established itself as a good choice for its performances in terms of gas gain uniformity, energy and space point resolution, and its capability to efficiently pave large readout surfaces with minimum dead zone. The present work involves the comparison of this standard bulk with a relatively less used bulk Micromegas detector having a larger amplification gap of 192μm. Detector gain, energy resolution and electron transparency of these Micromegas have been measured under different conditions in various Argon-based gas mixtures to evaluate their performance. These measured characteristics have also been compared in detail to numerical simulations using the Garfield framework that combines packages such as neBEM, Magboltz and Heed. Further, we have carried out another numerical study to determine the effect of dielectric spacers on different detector features. A comprehensive comparison of the two detectors has been presented and analyzed in this work. -- Highlights: •We present a comparative study between bulk Micromegas having different amplification gaps. •Various detector characteristics such as gain, electron transparency, energy resolution have been measured experimentally. •Successful comparisons of these measured data with the simulation results indicate that the device physics is quite well understood. •A numerical study to determine the effect of dielectric spacers on different detect or features has been carried out.

  6. Large-scale HTS bulks for magnetic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werfel, Frank N.; Floegel-Delor, Uta; Riedel, Thomas; Goebel, Bernd; Rothfeld, Rolf; Schirrmeister, Peter; Wippich, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► ATZ Company has constructed about 130 HTS magnet systems. ► Multi-seeded YBCO bulks joint the way for large-scale application. ► Levitation platforms demonstrate “superconductivity” to a great public audience (100 years anniversary). ► HTS magnetic bearings show forces up to 1 t. ► Modular HTS maglev vacuum cryostats are tested for train demonstrators in Brazil, China and Germany. -- Abstract: ATZ Company has constructed about 130 HTS magnet systems using high-Tc bulk magnets. A key feature in scaling-up is the fabrication of YBCO melts textured multi-seeded large bulks with three to eight seeds. Except of levitation, magnetization, trapped field and hysteresis, we review system engineering parameters of HTS magnetic linear and rotational bearings like compactness, cryogenics, power density, efficiency and robust construction. We examine mobile compact YBCO bulk magnet platforms cooled with LN 2 and Stirling cryo-cooler for demonstrator use. Compact cryostats for Maglev train operation contain 24 pieces of 3-seed bulks and can levitate 2500–3000 N at 10 mm above a permanent magnet (PM) track. The effective magnetic distance of the thermally insulated bulks is 2 mm only; the stored 2.5 l LN 2 allows more than 24 h operation without refilling. 34 HTS Maglev vacuum cryostats are manufactured tested and operate in Germany, China and Brazil. The magnetic levitation load to weight ratio is more than 15, and by group assembling the HTS cryostats under vehicles up to 5 t total loads levitated above a magnetic track is achieved

  7. Large-scale HTS bulks for magnetic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werfel, Frank N., E-mail: werfel@t-online.de [Adelwitz Technologiezentrum GmbH (ATZ), Rittergut Adelwitz 16, 04886 Arzberg-Adelwitz (Germany); Floegel-Delor, Uta; Riedel, Thomas; Goebel, Bernd; Rothfeld, Rolf; Schirrmeister, Peter; Wippich, Dieter [Adelwitz Technologiezentrum GmbH (ATZ), Rittergut Adelwitz 16, 04886 Arzberg-Adelwitz (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: ► ATZ Company has constructed about 130 HTS magnet systems. ► Multi-seeded YBCO bulks joint the way for large-scale application. ► Levitation platforms demonstrate “superconductivity” to a great public audience (100 years anniversary). ► HTS magnetic bearings show forces up to 1 t. ► Modular HTS maglev vacuum cryostats are tested for train demonstrators in Brazil, China and Germany. -- Abstract: ATZ Company has constructed about 130 HTS magnet systems using high-Tc bulk magnets. A key feature in scaling-up is the fabrication of YBCO melts textured multi-seeded large bulks with three to eight seeds. Except of levitation, magnetization, trapped field and hysteresis, we review system engineering parameters of HTS magnetic linear and rotational bearings like compactness, cryogenics, power density, efficiency and robust construction. We examine mobile compact YBCO bulk magnet platforms cooled with LN{sub 2} and Stirling cryo-cooler for demonstrator use. Compact cryostats for Maglev train operation contain 24 pieces of 3-seed bulks and can levitate 2500–3000 N at 10 mm above a permanent magnet (PM) track. The effective magnetic distance of the thermally insulated bulks is 2 mm only; the stored 2.5 l LN{sub 2} allows more than 24 h operation without refilling. 34 HTS Maglev vacuum cryostats are manufactured tested and operate in Germany, China and Brazil. The magnetic levitation load to weight ratio is more than 15, and by group assembling the HTS cryostats under vehicles up to 5 t total loads levitated above a magnetic track is achieved.

  8. Bulk handling benefits from ICT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-11-15

    The efficiency and accuracy of bulk handling is being improved by the range of management information systems and services available today. As part of the program to extend Richards Bay Coal Terminal, Siemens is installing a manufacturing execution system which coordinates and monitors all movements of raw materials. The article also reports recent developments by AXSMarine, SunGuard Energy, Fuelworx and Railworx in providing integrated tools for tracking, managing and optimising solid/liquid fuels and rail car maintenance activities. QMASTOR Ltd. has secured a contract with Anglo Coal Australia to provide its Pit to Port.net{reg_sign} and iFuse{reg_sign} software systems across all their Australians sites, to include pit-to-product stockpile management. 2 figs.

  9. Bulk analysis using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borsaru, M.; Holmes, R.J.; Mathew, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    Bulk analysis techniques developed for the mining industry are reviewed. Using penetrating neutron and #betta#-radiations, measurements are obtained directly from a large volume of sample (3-30 kg) #betta#-techniques were used to determine the grade of iron ore and to detect shale on conveyor belts. Thermal neutron irradiation was developed for the simultaneous determination of iron and aluminium in iron ore on a conveyor belt. Thermal-neutron activation analysis includes the determination of alumina in bauxite, and manganese and alumina in manganese ore. Fast neutron activation analysis is used to determine silicon in iron ores, and alumina and silica in bauxite. Fast and thermal neutron activation has been used to determine the soil in shredded sugar cane. (U.K.)

  10. Behaviour of nature and technogenic radioisotopes in buried geochemical barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.A.; Onoshko, M.P.; Generalova, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Behaviour of potassium 40, radium 226, thorium 232, strontium 90 and cesium 137 on geochemical barriers connected with buried soils and cut-off meander sediments of the Holocene age of the Sozh river valley are examined. Some sides of the barrier geochemical structure caused by syngeneic and epigenetic processes have been taken into consideration

  11. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1984-06-01

    This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables

  12. Petrologic and geochemical characterization of the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff: outcrop samples used in waste package experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauss, K.G.

    1984-06-01

    This report summarizes characterization studies conducted with outcrop samples of Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff (Tpt). In support of the Waste Package Task within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI), Tpt is being studied both as a primary object and as a constituent used to condition water that will be reacted with waste form, canister, or packing material. These studies directly or indirectly support NNWSI subtasks concerned with waste package design and geochemical modeling. To interpret the results of subtask experiments, it is necessary to know the exact nature of the starting material in terms of the intial bulk composition, mineralogy, and individual phase geochemistry. 31 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Use of partial dissolution techniques in geochemical exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.

    1984-01-01

    Application of partial dissolution techniques to geochemical exploration has advanced from an early empirical approach to an approach based on sound geochemical principles. This advance assures a prominent future position for the use of these techniques in geochemical exploration for concealed mineral deposits. Partial dissolution techniques are classified as single dissolution or sequential multiple dissolution depending on the number of steps taken in the procedure, or as "nonselective" extraction and as "selective" extraction in terms of the relative specificity of the extraction. The choice of dissolution techniques for use in geochemical exploration is dictated by the geology of the area, the type and degree of weathering, and the expected chemical forms of the ore and of the pathfinding elements. Case histories have illustrated many instances where partial dissolution techniques exhibit advantages over conventional methods of chemical analysis used in geochemical exploration. ?? 1984.

  14. GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

  15. Uranium(VI) transport modeling: geochemical data and submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding the geochemical mobility of U(VI) and modeling its transport is important in several contexts including ore genesis, uranium exploration, nuclear and mill-tailings waste management, and solution mining of uranium ores. Adsorption is a major control on partitioning of solutes at the mineral/solution interface. The effect of carbonate, fluoride, and phosphate complexing on adsorption of uranium was investigated. A critical compilation of stability constants of inorganic complexes and solid compounds of U(VI) necessary for proper design of experiment and for modeling transport of uranium was prepared. The general features of U(VI) adsorption in ligand-free systems are similar to those characteristic of other hydrolyzable metal ions. The adsorption processes studied were found to be reversible. The adsorption model developed in ligand-free systems, when solution complexing is taken into account, proved remarkably successful in describing adsorption of uranium in the presence of carbonate and fluoride. The presence of phosphate caused a much smaller decrease in the extent of adsorption than expected; however, a critical reassessment of the stability of UO 2 2+ .HPO 4 2- complexes, showed that phosphato complexes, if any, are extremely weak under experimental conditions. Removal of uranium may have occurred due to precipitation of sodium uranyl phosphates in addition to adsorption

  16. Using geochemical indicators to distinguish high biogeochemical activity in floodplain soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenwell, Amy [Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis, E-mail: asitchle@mines.edu [Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Prugue, Rodrigo [Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Spear, John R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Hering, Amanda S. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Maxwell, Reed M. [Hydrologic Sciences and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St., Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Carroll, Rosemary W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Division of Hydrologic Sciences, 2215 Raggio Parkway, Reno, NV 89512 (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of how microbial communities interact with their surroundings in physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface environments will lead to improved quantification of biogeochemical reactions and associated nutrient cycling. This study develops a methodology to predict potential elevated rates of biogeochemical activity (microbial “hotspots”) in subsurface environments by correlating microbial DNA and aspects of the community structure with the spatial distribution of geochemical indicators in subsurface sediments. Multiple linear regression models of simulated precipitation leachate, HCl and hydroxylamine extractable iron and manganese, total organic carbon (TOC), and microbial community structure were used to identify sample characteristics indicative of biogeochemical hotspots within fluvially-derived aquifer sediments and overlying soils. The method has been applied to (a) alluvial materials collected at a former uranium mill site near Rifle, Colorado and (b) relatively undisturbed floodplain deposits (soils and sediments) collected along the East River near Crested Butte, Colorado. At Rifle, 16 alluvial samples were taken from 8 sediment cores, and at the East River, 46 soil/sediment samples were collected across and perpendicular to 3 active meanders and an oxbow meander. Regression models using TOC and TOC combined with extractable iron and manganese results were determined to be the best fitting statistical models of microbial DNA (via 16S rRNA gene analysis). Fitting these models to observations in both contaminated and natural floodplain deposits, and their associated alluvial aquifers, demonstrates the broad applicability of the geochemical indicator based approach. - Highlights: • Biogeochemical characterization of alluvial floodplain soils and sediments was performed to investigate parameters that may indicate microbial hot spot formation. • A correlation between geochemical parameters (total organic carbon and

  17. Using geochemical indicators to distinguish high biogeochemical activity in floodplain soils and sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenwell, Amy; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis; Prugue, Rodrigo; Spear, John R.; Hering, Amanda S.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Carroll, Rosemary W.H.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of how microbial communities interact with their surroundings in physically and chemically heterogeneous subsurface environments will lead to improved quantification of biogeochemical reactions and associated nutrient cycling. This study develops a methodology to predict potential elevated rates of biogeochemical activity (microbial “hotspots”) in subsurface environments by correlating microbial DNA and aspects of the community structure with the spatial distribution of geochemical indicators in subsurface sediments. Multiple linear regression models of simulated precipitation leachate, HCl and hydroxylamine extractable iron and manganese, total organic carbon (TOC), and microbial community structure were used to identify sample characteristics indicative of biogeochemical hotspots within fluvially-derived aquifer sediments and overlying soils. The method has been applied to (a) alluvial materials collected at a former uranium mill site near Rifle, Colorado and (b) relatively undisturbed floodplain deposits (soils and sediments) collected along the East River near Crested Butte, Colorado. At Rifle, 16 alluvial samples were taken from 8 sediment cores, and at the East River, 46 soil/sediment samples were collected across and perpendicular to 3 active meanders and an oxbow meander. Regression models using TOC and TOC combined with extractable iron and manganese results were determined to be the best fitting statistical models of microbial DNA (via 16S rRNA gene analysis). Fitting these models to observations in both contaminated and natural floodplain deposits, and their associated alluvial aquifers, demonstrates the broad applicability of the geochemical indicator based approach. - Highlights: • Biogeochemical characterization of alluvial floodplain soils and sediments was performed to investigate parameters that may indicate microbial hot spot formation. • A correlation between geochemical parameters (total organic carbon and

  18. Studies of bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossel, Raquel; McIntyre, Max; Tzolov, Marian

    We are studying bulk heterojunction solar cells that were fabricated using a mixture of PCPDTBT and PCBM­C60. The impedance data of the cells in dark responded like a simple RC circuit. The value of the dielectric constant derived from these results is consistent with the values reported in the literature for these materials. We are showing that the parallel resistance in the equivalent circuit of linear lump elements can be interpreted using the DC current­voltage measurements. The impedance spectra under light illumination indicated the existence of additional polarization. This extra feature can be described by a model that includes a series RC circuit in parallel with the equivalent circuit for a device in dark. The physical interpretation of the additional polarization is based on photo­generated charges getting trapped in wells, which have a characteristic relaxation time corresponding to the observed break frequency in the impedance spectra. We have studied the influence of the anode and cathode interface on this phenomena, either by using different interface materials, or by depositing the metal electrode while the substate is heated.

  19. Bulk water freezing dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, S.; Carpenter, J.; Nallapaneni, M.; Chen, J. Y.; Miljkovic, N.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we elucidate the mechanisms governing the heat-transfer mediated, non-thermodynamic limited, freezing delay on non-wetting surfaces for a variety of characteristic length scales, Lc (volume/surface area, 3 mm commercial superhydrophobic spray coatings, showing a monotonic increase in freezing time with coating thickness. The added thermal resistance of thicker coatings was much larger than that of the nanoscale superhydrophobic features, which reduced the droplet heat transfer and increased the total freezing time. Transient finite element method heat transfer simulations of the water slab freezing process were performed to calculate the overall heat transfer coefficient at the substrate-water/ice interface during freezing, and shown to be in the range of 1-2.5 kW/m2K for these experiments. The results shown here suggest that in order to exploit the heat-transfer mediated freezing delay, thicker superhydrophobic coatings must be deposited on the surface, where the coating resistance is comparable to the bulk water/ice conduction resistance.

  20. Estimation of geochemical parameters for assessing subsurface transport at the Savannah River Plant: Environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, B.B.; Grant, M.W.; King, C.M.

    1987-03-01

    Geochemical parameter estimates to be used in assessing the subsurface transport of chemicals from Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste sites are presented. Specifically, reference values for soil-solution distribution coefficients, solubility, leach rates, and retardation coefficients are estimated for 31 inorganic chemicals (assuming speciation is governed by reasonable assumptions about controlling variables such as Eh and pH) and 36 organic compounds. Additionally, facilitated transport (the association of chemicals with inorganic and organic ligands or colloids resulting in relatively high mobility) was estimated using field data to derive a fraction of the disposal mass which was assumed to be mobile. Hydrologic parameters such as dispersion coefficient, average moisture content in vadose zone, bulk density, and effective porosity are also presented. The estimates are based on site-specific studies when available, combined with technical literature

  1. Coupling brane fields to bulk supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parameswaran, Susha L. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Theoretical Physics; Schmidt, Jonas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    In this note we present a simple, general prescription for coupling brane localized fields to bulk supergravity. We illustrate the procedure by considering 6D N=2 bulk supergravity on a 2D orbifold, with brane fields localized at the fixed points. The resulting action enjoys the full 6D N=2 symmetries in the bulk, and those of 4D N=1 supergravity at the brane positions. (orig.)

  2. Longitudinal and bulk viscosities of expanded rubidium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaheri, Ali Hossein Mohammad; Srivastava, Sunita; Tankeshwar, K

    2003-01-01

    First three non-vanishing sum rules for the bulk and longitudinal stress auto-correlation functions have been evaluated for liquid Rb at six thermodynamic states along the liquid-vapour coexistence curve. The Mori memory function formalism and the frequency sum rules have been used to calculate bulk and longitudinal viscosities. The results thus obtained for the ratio of bulk viscosity to shear viscosity have been compared with experimental and other theoretical predictions wherever available. The values of the bulk viscosity have been found to be more than the corresponding values of the shear viscosity for all six thermodynamic states investigated here

  3. Nanopatterned Bulk Metallic Glass Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinser, Emily R; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Yu, Roy; Corona, Sydney L; Li, Jinyang; Vaddiraju, Sagar; Legassey, Allen; Loye, Ayomiposi; Balestrini, Jenna; Solly, Dawson A; Schroers, Jan; Taylor, André D; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Herzog, Raimund I; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2017-12-22

    Nanopatterning as a surface area enhancement method has the potential to increase signal and sensitivity of biosensors. Platinum-based bulk metallic glass (Pt-BMG) is a biocompatible material with electrical properties conducive for biosensor electrode applications, which can be processed in air at comparably low temperatures to produce nonrandom topography at the nanoscale. Work presented here employs nanopatterned Pt-BMG electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase enzyme to explore the impact of nonrandom and highly reproducible nanoscale surface area enhancement on glucose biosensor performance. Electrochemical measurements including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and amperometric voltammetry (AV) were completed to compare the performance of 200 nm Pt-BMG electrodes vs Flat Pt-BMG control electrodes. Glucose dosing response was studied in a range of 2 mM to 10 mM. Effective current density dynamic range for the 200 nm Pt-BMG was 10-12 times greater than that of the Flat BMG control. Nanopatterned electrode sensitivity was measured to be 3.28 μA/cm 2 /mM, which was also an order of magnitude greater than the flat electrode. These results suggest that nonrandom nanotopography is a scalable and customizable engineering tool which can be integrated with Pt-BMGs to produce biocompatible biosensors with enhanced signal and sensitivity.

  4. Aspects of silicon bulk lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, P. T.

    1985-01-01

    The best lifetimes attained for bulk crytalline silicon as a function of doping concentrations are analyzed. It is assumed that the dopants which set the Fermi level do not contribute to the recombination traffic which is due to the unknown defect. This defect is assumed to have two charge states: neutral and negative, the neutral defect concentration is frozen-in at some temperature T sub f. The higher doping concentrations should include the band-band Auger effect by using a generalization of the Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) mechanism. The generalization of the SRH mechanism is discussed. This formulation gives a straightforward procedure for incorporating both band-band and band-trap Auger effects in the SRH procedure. Two related questions arise in this context: (1) it may sometimes be useful to write the steady-state occupation probability of the traps implied by SRH procedure in a form which approximates to the Fermi-Dirac distribution; and (2) the effect on the SRH mechanism of spreading N sub t levels at one energy uniformly over a range of energies is discussed.

  5. Bond-diluted interface between semi-infinite Potts bulks: criticality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcanti, S.B.; Tsallis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Within a real space renormalisation group framework, we discuss the criticality of a system constituted by two (not necessarily equal) semi-infinite ferromagnetic q-state Potts bulks separated by an interface. This interface is a bond-diluted Potts ferromagnet with a coupling constant which is in general different from those of both bulks. The phase diagram presents four physically different phases, namely the paramagnetic one, and the surface, single bulk and double bulk ferromagnetic ones. These various phases determine a multicritical surface which contains a higher order multicritical line. The critical concentration P c that is the concentration of the interface bonds which surface magnetic ordering is possible even if the bulks are disordered. An interesting feature comes out which is that P c varies continuously with J 1 /J s and J 2 /J s . The standard two-dimensional percolation concentration is recovered for J 1 =J 2 =0. (author) [pt

  6. The IUGS/IAGC Task Group on Global Geochemical Baselines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Wang, Xueqiu; Reeder, Shaun; Demetriades, Alecos

    2012-01-01

    The Task Group on Global Geochemical Baselines, operating under the auspices of both the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) and the International Association of Geochemistry (IAGC), has the long-term goal of establishing a global geochemical database to document the concentration and distribution of chemical elements in the Earth’s surface or near-surface environment. The database and accompanying element distribution maps represent a geochemical baseline against which future human-induced or natural changes to the chemistry of the land surface may be recognized and quantified. In order to accomplish this long-term goal, the activities of the Task Group include: (1) developing partnerships with countries conducting broad-scale geochemical mapping studies; (2) providing consultation and training in the form of workshops and short courses; (3) organizing periodic international symposia to foster communication among the geochemical mapping community; (4) developing criteria for certifying those projects whose data are acceptable in a global geochemical database; (5) acting as a repository for data collected by those projects meeting the criteria for standardization; (6) preparing complete metadata for the certified projects; and (7) preparing, ultimately, a global geochemical database. This paper summarizes the history and accomplishments of the Task Group since its first predecessor project was established in 1988.

  7. MOSAIC: An organic geochemical and sedimentological database for marine surface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagna, Maria Luisa; Usman, Muhammed; De Avelar, Silvania; Eglinton, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Modern ocean sediments serve as the interface between the biosphere and the geosphere, play a key role in biogeochemical cycles and provide a window on how contemporary processes are written into the sedimentary record. Research over past decades has resulted in a wealth of information on the content and composition of organic matter in marine sediments, with ever-more sophisticated techniques continuing to yield information of greater detail and as an accelerating pace. However, there has been no attempt to synthesize this wealth of information. We are establishing a new database that incorporates information relevant to local, regional and global-scale assessment of the content, source and fate of organic materials accumulating in contemporary marine sediments. In the MOSAIC (Modern Ocean Sediment Archive and Inventory of Carbon) database, particular emphasis is placed on molecular and isotopic information, coupled with relevant contextual information (e.g., sedimentological properties) relevant to elucidating factors that influence the efficiency and nature of organic matter burial. The main features of MOSAIC include: (i) Emphasis on continental margin sediments as major loci of carbon burial, and as the interface between terrestrial and oceanic realms; (ii) Bulk to molecular-level organic geochemical properties and parameters, including concentration and isotopic compositions; (iii) Inclusion of extensive contextual data regarding the depositional setting, in particular with respect to sedimentological and redox characteristics. The ultimate goal is to create an open-access instrument, available on the web, to be utilized for research and education by the international community who can both contribute to, and interrogate the database. The submission will be accomplished by means of a pre-configured table available on the MOSAIC webpage. The information on the filled tables will be checked and eventually imported, via the Structural Query Language (SQL), into

  8. Bulk locality and entanglement swapping in AdS/CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, William R. [Center for Quantum Mathematics and Physics (QMAP),Department of Physics, University of California,Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2017-03-29

    Localized bulk excitations in AdS/CFT are produced by operators which modify the pattern of entanglement in the boundary state. We show that simple models — consisting of entanglement swapping operators acting on a qubit system or a free field theory — capture qualitative features of gravitational backreaction and reproduce predictions of the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. These entanglement swapping operators naturally admit multiple representations associated with different degrees of freedom, thereby reproducing the code subspace structure emphasized by Almheiri, Dong, and Harlow. We also show that the boundary Reeh-Schlieder theorem implies that equivalence of certain operators on a code subspace necessarily breaks down when non-perturbative effects are taken into account (as is expected based on bulk arguments).

  9. MINTEQ, Geochemical Equilibria in Ground Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: MINTEQ is a geochemical program to model aqueous solutions and the interactions of aqueous solutions with hypothesized assemblages of solid phases. It was developed for the Environmental Protection Agency to perform the calculations necessary to simulate the contact of waste solutions with heterogeneous sediments or the interaction of ground water with solidified wastes. MINTEQ can calculate ion speciation/solubility, adsorption, oxidation-reduction, gas phase equilibria, and precipitation/dissolution of solid phases. MINTEQ can accept a finite mass for any solid considered for dissolution and will dissolve the specified solid phase only until its initial mass is exhausted. This ability enables MINTEQ to model flow-through systems. In these systems the masses of solid phases that precipitate at earlier pore volumes can be dissolved at later pore volumes according to thermodynamic constraints imposed by the solution composition and solid phases present. The ability to model these systems permits evaluation of the geochemistry of dissolved traced metals, such as low-level waste in shallow land burial sites. MINTEQ was designed to solve geochemical equilibria for systems composed of one kilogram of water, various amounts of material dissolved in solution, and any solid materials that are present. Systems modeled using MINTEQ can exchange energy and material (open systems) or just energy (closed systems) with the surrounding environment. Each system is composed of a number of phases. Every phase is a region with distinct composition and physically definable boundaries. All of the material in the aqueous solution forms one phase. The gas phase is composed of any gaseous material present, and structurally distinct solid forms a separate phase. 2 - Method of solution: MINTEQ applies the fundamental principles of thermodynamics to solve geochemical equilibria from a set of mass balance equations, one for each component. Because the

  10. Concepts for using trapped-flux bulk high-temperature superconductor in motors and generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, John R; Strasik, Michael

    2010-01-01

    We review previous concepts for using bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTSs) in motors and generators and discuss methods for using trapped-flux (TF) HTSs in motors and generators that have been recently investigated in our laboratory. We examine the expected performance of a brushless motor/generator that uses TF bulk HTSs to provide magnetomotive force, where the stator windings are used to create the TF. A key feature is the use of dysprosium for the stator and rotor cores.

  11. Quantitative study of Portland cement hydration by X-Ray diffraction/Rietveld analysis and geochemical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutelot, F.; Seaman, J. C.; Simner, S.

    2017-12-01

    In this study the hydration of Portland cements containing blast-furnace slag and type V fly ash were investigated during cement curing using X-ray diffraction, with geochemical modeling used to calculate the total volume of hydrates. The goal was to evaluate the relationship between the starting component levels and the hydrate assemblages that develop during the curing process. Blast furnace-slag levels of 60, 45 and 30 wt.% were studied in blends containing fly ash and Portland cement. Geochemical modelling described the dissolution of the clinker, and predicted quantitatively the amount of hydrates. In all cases the experiments showed the presence of C-S-H, portlandite and ettringite. The quantities of ettringite, portlandite and the amorphous phases as determined by XRD agreed well with the calculated amounts of these phases after different periods of time. These findings show that changes in the bulk composition of hydrating cements can be described by geochemical models. Such a comparison between experimental and modelled data helps to understand in more detail the active processes occurring during cement hydration.

  12. Geochemical surveys in the Lusi mud eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Mazzini, Adriano; Etiope, Giuseppe; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Hussein, Alwi; Hadi J., Soffian

    2016-04-01

    The Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake striking the Java Island. In the framework of the Lusi Lab project (ERC grant n° 308126) we carried out geochemical surveys in the Sidoarjo district (Eastern Java Island, Indonesia) to investigate the gas bearing properties of the Watukosek fault system that crosses the Lusi mud eruption area. Soil gas (222Rn, CO2, CH4) concentration and flux measurements were performed 1) along two detailed profiles (~ 1km long), trending almost W-E direction, and 2) inside the Lusi embankment (about 7 km2) built to contain the erupted mud. Higher gas concentrations and fluxes were detected at the intersection with the Watukosek fault and the antithetic fault system. These zones characterized by the association of higher soil gas values constitute preferential migration pathways for fluids towards surface. The fractures release mainly CO2 (with peaks up to 400 g/m2day) and display higher temperatures (up to 41°C). The main shear zones are populated by numerous seeps that expel mostly CH4. Flux measurements in the seeping pools reveal that φCO2 is an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the fractures, and two orders of magnitude higher for φCH4. An additional geochemical profile was completed perpendicularly to the Watukosek fault escarpement (W-E direction) at the foots of the Penanngungang volcano. Results reveal CO2 and CH4 flux values significantly lower than those measured in the embankment, however an increase of radon and flux measurements is observed approaching the foots of the escarpment. These measurements are complemented with a database of ~350 CH4 and CO2 flux measurements and some soil gas concentrations (He, H2, CO2, CH4 and C2H6) and their isotopic analyses (δ13C-CH4, δD-CH4 and δ13C-CO2). Results show that the whole area is characterized by diffused gas release through seeps, fractures, microfractures and soil degassing. The collected results shed light on the origin of the

  13. Geochemical water signature in the Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Hammed, Mohammed S.

    2017-04-01

    The Bahariya Oasis is located about 200 km SW of Cairo in the central part of the Western Desert of Egypt. It occupies a sub-elliptic 40 km wide depression stretching NE-SW for approximately 90 km. The Bahariya Oasis has been targeted for numerous geological studies on structural geology, stratigraphy, and iron ore deposits. The oasis was characterized since the Roman times by the presence of natural hydrothermal springs venting water from the relatively shallow Nubia Sandstone formation. Inside the depression are visible numerous circular concentric features that morphologically resemble the hydrothermal vent complexes observed at igneous provinces in other localities of the planet. In order to investigate the origin and the mechanisms of formation of these features, we conducted a fieldwork survey as well as fluids sampling from the available well sites. The aim was to constrain the origin of the fluids that potentially triggered or facilitated the formation of the concentric structures observed on the field. This study presents the geochemical results of groundwaters and soil gas samples. Ten samples were collected from deep wells present in the area. In particular, 8 warm waters were collected by wells between 800 m and 1200 m deep. The measured temperatures at these sites range from 36.5 °C to 52.3°C, while the coldest wells have temperatures ranging from 27.9 °C to 36.5°C. For each sample collected from the wells we analyzed the major, minor and trace elements, dissolved gases (He, Ne, H2, O2, N2, CH4, CO2, Rn), and relative isotopic values. In the areas around the wells we measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes as well as radon activity. Overall, the water showed a high value of dissolved Rn, ranging from 9 to 43 Bq/l, and dissolved CO2 ranging from 5.9 to 17.4 cc/l. The waters show a radiogenic signature of isotopic helium, highlighting very prolonged interaction with local crust enriched in radiogenic elements. The isotopic values of δ18O and δD show a clear

  14. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of this...

  15. On the bulk viscosity of relativistic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.-H.

    1978-01-01

    An expression for the bulk viscosity coefficient in terms of the trace of the hydrodynamic energy-stress tensor is derived from the Kubo formula. This, along with a field-theoretic model of an interacting system of scalar particles, suggests that at high temperatures the bulk viscosity tends to zero, contrary to the often quoted resuls of Iso, Mori and Namiki. (author)

  16. Bulk-viscosity-driven asymmetric inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waga, I.; Lima, J.A.S.; Portugal, R.

    1987-01-01

    A primordial net bosinic charge is introduced in the context of the bulk-viscosity-driven inflationary models. The analysis is carried through a macroscopic point of view in the framework of the causal thermodynamic theory. The conditions for having exponetial and generalized inflation are obtained. A phenomenological expression for the bulk viscosity coefficient is also derived. (author) [pt

  17. Geochemical characteristics of sandstones from Cretaceous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Babu K

    Field/outcrops features, such as bed geometry, texture, sedimentary ... of the geometry of features (description, photos, ..... K2O/Na2O plots show diffused patterns (figure 7). 4.3 Trace ..... tonic setting constraints; In: The precambrain continen-.

  18. Similarity in Evolutionary Histories of Eocene Sediments from Subathu and Cambay Basins: Geochemical and Palaeontological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, S.; Halder, K.; Sarkar, S.

    2017-12-01

    A systematic comparative study of microfaunal assemblage and representative geochemical elements from two Cenozoic basins of India, Mangrol-Valia Lignite Mine section (21°30'52''N:73°12'20.5''E) of Cambay Shale Formation, western India and Jigni section (33°14'45"N:74°22'0"E) from Subathu Formation in northern India was undertaken to infer the paleoenvironment, palaeobathymetry and paleoclimate of these successions. Despite a gamut of work already carried out in these two basins, the sedimentary successions still await a correlative-detailed process-based facies, geochemical characterization and paleoenvironmental analysis. With a view to fulfill this gap, the present work was carried out by studying bulk rock XRD, XRF, clay mineralogy and analyzing calcareous microfossil foraminifera from samples at equivalent depth of these two basins which are situated thousands of kilometers apart and in different tectonic settings. The faunal assemblage of Eocene sediments of Mangrol-Valia section is indicative of shallow marine and inner shelf deposition with medium oxygen supply, while that of the Jigni section suggests primarily a shallow marine condition, which gradually changes to open marine condition with time. It is pertinent to note that the two basins of Cenozoic India started their lithosuccession with coal bearing strata. Well preserved pectin aragonite shells also indicate that primarily these two basins experienced low energy lagoonal environment. The fossil assemblage in both basins also suggests a tropical moist to terrestrial lowland environment. Geochemical analysis shows that the Mangrol-Valia section mineralogically comprises of kaolinite, siderite, quartz, smectite and kaolinite with higher abundance throughout the succession indicating chemical weathering of Deccan basement and high erosional environment. Calcite is the main constituent of Jigni section that indicates intracratonic rift settings. Medium to high quartz content and other detrital

  19. Geochemical behavior of disposed radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Navratil, J.D.; Schulz, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The papers in this book are organized to cover the chemical aspects that are important to understanding the behavior of disposed radioactive wastes. These aspects include radionuclide sorption and desorption, solubility of radionuclide compounds, chemical species of radionuclides in natural waters, hydrothermal geochemical reactions, measurements of radionuclide migration, solid state chemistry of wastes, and waste-form leaching behavior. The information in each of the papers is necessary to predict the transport of radionuclides from wastes via natural waters and thus to predict the safety of the disposed waste. Radionuclide transport in natural waters is strongly dependent on sorption, desorption, dissolution, and precipitation processes. The first two papers discuss laboratory investigations of these processes. Descriptions of sorption and desorption behavior of important radionuclides under a wide range of environmental conditions are presented in the first section. Among the sorbents studied are basalt interbed solids, granites, clays, sediments, hydrous oxides, and pure minerals. Effects of redox conditions, groundwater composition and pH on sorption reactions are described

  20. LASL approach to uranium geochemical reconnaissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The US ERDA, as part of the NURE program, has initiated a nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The aims of the NURE program are to provide data on which to base more accurate estimates of US uranium reserves for long-range planning and to aid in meeting the nation's projected uranium demands into the next century. The HSSR objective is to complete, by 1980, a reconnaissance of the nation's surface waters, ground waters, and stream and lake sediments, to aid in assessment of uranium reserves and identification of areas of interest for exploration. Patterned after extensive uranium reconnaissance done in many other countries, the LASL project is comprised of the following five components: (1) organization and planning, which includes management, design, and execution; (2) field sampling, which includes orientation studies, generation of specifications, and contracting and inspection of field work; (3) sample receiving and analysis, which includes development of methods and hardware, quality assurance, and archival storage; (4) data handling and presentation, including verification, storage, output, and plotting; and (5) data evaluation and publication, which incorporates geochemical, geological, statistical, and empirical evaluation and report writing. The LASL approach to each component and the current status in each state are described.

  1. LASL approach to uranium geochemical reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The US ERDA, as part of the NURE program, has initiated a nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The aims of the NURE program are to provide data on which to base more accurate estimates of US uranium reserves for long-range planning and to aid in meeting the nation's projected uranium demands into the next century. The HSSR objective is to complete, by 1980, a reconnaissance of the nation's surface waters, ground waters, and stream and lake sediments, to aid in assessment of uranium reserves and identification of areas of interest for exploration. Patterned after extensive uranium reconnaissance done in many other countries, the LASL project is comprised of the following five components: (1) organization and planning, which includes management, design, and execution; (2) field sampling, which includes orientation studies, generation of specifications, and contracting and inspection of field work; (3) sample receiving and analysis, which includes development of methods and hardware, quality assurance, and archival storage; (4) data handling and presentation, including verification, storage, output, and plotting; and (5) data evaluation and publication, which incorporates geochemical, geological, statistical, and empirical evaluation and report writing. The LASL approach to each component and the current status in each state are described

  2. Regional geochemical baselines for Portuguese shelf sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mil-Homens, M.; Stevens, R.L.; Cato, I.; Abrantes, F.

    2007-01-01

    Metal concentrations (Al, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) from the DGM-INETI archive data set have been examined for sediments collected during the 1970s from 267 sites on the Portuguese shelf. Due to the differences in the oceanographic and sedimentological settings between western and Algarve coasts, the archive data set is split in two segments. For both shelf segments, regional geochemical baselines (RGB) are defined using aluminium as a reference element. Seabed samples recovered in 2002 from four distinct areas of the Portuguese shelf are superimposed on these models to identify and compare possible metal enrichments relative to the natural distribution. Metal enrichments associated with anthropogenic influences are identified in three samples collected nearby the Tejo River and are characterised by the highest enrichment factors (EF; EF Pb Zn < 4). EF values close to 1 suggest a largely natural origin for metal distributions in sediments from the other areas included in the study. - Background metal concentrations and their natural variability must be established before assessing anthropogenic impacts

  3. Geochemical modeling of magmatic gas scrubbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gambardella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The EQ3/6 software package, version 7.2 was successfully used to model scrubbing of magmatic gas by pure water at 0.1 MPa, in the liquid and liquid-plus-gas regions. Some post-calculations were necessary to account for gas separation effects. In these post-calculations, redox potential was considered to be fixed by precipitation of crystalline a-sulfur, a ubiquitous and precocious process. As geochemical modeling is constrained by conservation of enthalpy upon water-gas mixing, the enthalpies of the gas species of interest were reviewed, adopting as reference state the liquid phase at the triple point. Our results confirm that significant emissions of highly acidic gas species (SO2(g, HCl(g, and HF(g are prevented by scrubbing, until dry conditions are established, at least locally. Nevertheless important outgassing of HCl(g can take place from acid, HCl-rich brines. Moreover, these findings support the rule of thumb which is generally used to distinguish SO2-, HCl-, and HF-bearing magmatic gases from SO2-, HCl-, and HF-free hydrothermal gases.

  4. Podoconiosis: non-infectious geochemical elephantiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Gail; Tekola, Fasil; Newport, Melanie J

    2007-12-01

    This article reviews peer-reviewed publications and book chapters on the history, epidemiology, genetics, ecology, pathogenesis, pathology and management of podoconiosis (endemic non-filarial elephantiasis). Podoconiosis is a non-infectious geochemical elephantiasis caused by exposure of bare feet to irritant alkalic clay soils. It is found in at least 10 countries in tropical Africa, Central America and northwest India, where such soils coexist with high altitude, high seasonal rainfall and low income. Podoconiosis develops in men and women working barefoot on irritant soils, with signs becoming apparent in most patients by the third decade of life. Colloid-sized silicate particles appear to enter through the skin, are taken up into macrophages in the lower limb lymphatics and cause endolymphangitis and obliteration of the lymphatic lumen. Genetic studies provide evidence for high heritability of susceptibility to podoconiosis. The economic burden is significant in affected areas dependent on subsistence farming. Podoconiosis is unique in being an entirely preventable non-communicable disease. Primary prevention entails promoting use of footwear in areas of irritant soil; early stages are reversible given good foot hygiene, but late stages result in considerable economic and social difficulties, and require extended periods of elevation and occasionally nodulectomy.

  5. Petroleum geochemical responses to reservoir rock properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, B.; Larter, S.R. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Reservoir geochemistry is used to study petroleum basin development, petroleum mixing, and alterations. In this study, polar non-hydrocarbons were used as proxies for describing reservoir properties sensitive to fluid-rock interactions. A core flood experiment was conducted on a Carboniferous siltstone core obtained from a site in the United Kingdom. Core samples were then obtained from a typical upper shoreface in a North Sea oilfield. The samples were extracted with a dichloromethane and methanol mixture. Alkylcarbazoles and alkylfluorenones were then isolated from the samples. Compositional changes along the core were also investigated. Polar non hydrocarbons were studied using a wireline gamma ray log. The strongest deflections were observed in the basal coarsening upwards unit. The study demonstrated the correlations between molecular markers, and indicated that molecular parameters can be used to differentiate between clean sand units and adjacent coarsening upward muddy sand sequences. It was concluded that reservoir geochemical parameters can provide an independent response to properties defined by petrophysical methods. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Geochemical prospect ion results of Mariscala aerial photo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippini, J.

    1989-01-01

    This report shows the geochemical prospect ion results carried out within the framework of the metalical mining prospect ion in Mariscala aerial photo. Lavalleja district belong to the Mining inventory programme of Uruguay.

  7. Geochemical methodology for gold prospect ion in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangenber, J.

    1987-01-01

    This work is about the history of gold prospection in Uruguay. In this study there are considered the geochemical aspects, the gold performance, the applicability to mining prospection and the gold prospection aluvionar

  8. Drift pumice in the central Indian Ocean Basin: Geochemical evidence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Mudholkar, A.V.; JaiSankar, S.; Ilangovan, D.

    Abundant white to light grey-coloured pumice without ferromanganese oxide coating occurs within the Quaternary sediments of the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB). Two distinct groups of pumice are identified from their geochemical composition, which...

  9. National Geochemical Survey Locations and Results for Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The United States Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with other state and federal agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting a National Geochemical...

  10. Uruguay mining Inventory: Geochemical prospecting results of Valentines mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangenberg, J.; Filippini, J.

    1985-01-01

    This work is about geochemical prospecting carried out into the Uruguay mining inventory framework. In this case the survey was in Valentines mapping. Florida, Durazno and Treinta y Tres provinces of Uruguay .

  11. Chlorine isotopes potential as geo-chemical tracers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Pradhan, U.K.; Banerjee, R.

    The potential of chlorine isotopes as tracers of geo-chemical processes of earth and the oceans is highlighted based on systematic studies carried out in understanding the chlorine isotope fractionation mechanism, its constancy in seawater and its...

  12. The geochemical chararateristics of the marble deposits east of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), marbles were investigated with the view to establishing marble occurrences and their geochemical characteristics. Crystalline rocks of the Nigerian Basement Complex (migmatite – gneiss complex) underlie the area. Ten marble bodies were ...

  13. Ambipolar Organic Phototransistors with p-Type/n-Type Conjugated Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Light-Sensing Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Sungho; Han, Hyemi; Seo, Jooyeok; Song, Myeonghun; Kim, Hwajeong; Anthopoulos, Thomas D.; McCulloch, Iain; Bradley, Donal D C; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2016-01-01

    Ambipolar organic phototransistors with sensing channel layers, featuring p-type and n-type conjugated polymer bulk heterojunctions, exhibit outstanding light-sensing characteristics in both p-channel and n-channel sensing operation modes.

  14. Ambipolar Organic Phototransistors with p-Type/n-Type Conjugated Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Light-Sensing Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Sungho

    2016-11-18

    Ambipolar organic phototransistors with sensing channel layers, featuring p-type and n-type conjugated polymer bulk heterojunctions, exhibit outstanding light-sensing characteristics in both p-channel and n-channel sensing operation modes.

  15. Geochemical, hydrological, and biological cycling of energy residual. Research plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobber, F.J.

    1983-03-01

    Proposed research goals and specific research areas designed to provide a base of fundamental scientific information so that the geochemical, hydrological, and biophysical mechanisms that contribute to the transport and long term fate of energy residuals in natural systems can be understood are described. Energy development and production have resulted in a need for advanced scientific information on the geochemical transformations, transport rates, and potential for bioaccumulation of contaminants in subsurface environments

  16. Integrated geophysical-geochemical methods for archaeological prospecting

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Kjell

    2005-01-01

    A great number of field measurements with different methods and instruments were conducted in attempts to develop a method for an optimal combination of various geochemical and geophysical methods in archaeological prospecting. The research presented in this thesis focuses on a study of how different anthropogenic changes in the ground can be detected by geochemical and geophysical mapping and how the results can be presented. A six-year pilot project, Svealand in Vendel and Viking periods (S...

  17. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution using chemical equilibrium codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Pirhonen, V.

    1991-01-01

    Geochemical equilibrium codes are a modern tool in studying interaction between groundwater and solid phases. The most common used programs and application subjects are shortly presented in this article. The main emphasis is laid on the approach method of using calculated results in evaluating groundwater evolution in hydrogeological system. At present in geochemical equilibrium modelling also kinetic as well as hydrologic constrains along a flow path are taken into consideration

  18. Cavitation instability in bulk metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments have shown that fracture surfaces of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs usually exhibit an intriguing nanoscale corrugation like fractographic feature mediated by nanoscale void formation. We attribute the onset of this nanoscale corrugation to TTZs (tension transformation zones mediated cavitation. In our recent study, the spall experiments of Zr-based BMG using a single-stage light gas gun were performed. To uncover the mechanisms of the spallation damage nucleation and evolution, the samples were designed to be subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude but with different durations by making use of the multi-stress pulse and the double-flyer techniques. It is clearly revealed that the macroscopic spall fracture in BMGs originates from the nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids. Then, a microvoid nucleation model of BMGs based on free volume theory is proposed, which indicates that the nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in BMGs is resulted from diffusion and coalescence of free volume. Furthermore, a theoretical model of void growth in BMGs undergoing remote dynamic hydrostatic tension is developed. The critical condition of cavitation instability is obtained. It is found that dynamic void growth in BMGs can be well controlled by a dimensionless inertial number characterizing the competition between intrinsic and extrinsic time scales. To unveil the atomic-level mechanism of cavitation, a systematic molecular dynamics (MD simulation of spallation behaviour of a binary metallic glass with different impact velocities was performed. It is found that micro-void nucleation is determined TTZs while the growth is controlled by shear transformation zones (STZs at atomic scale.

  19. Identification of source of a marine oil-spill using geochemical and chemometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobao, Marcio M.; Cardoso, Jari N.; Mello, Marcio R.; Brooks, Paul W.; Lopes, Claudio C.; Lopes, Rosangela S.C.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → San Marcos bay (Maranhao, Brazil) contains small levels of petroleum hydrocarbons. → Oil pollution in San Marcos bay is low-level but chronic. → Aliphatic biomarkers were more useful for spill-oil source correlation in the area. - Abstract: The current work aimed to identify the source of an oil spill off the coast of Maranhao, Brazil, in September 2005 and effect a preliminary geochemical survey of this environment. A combination of bulk analytical parameters, such as carbon isotope (δ 13 C) and Ni/V ratios, and conventional fingerprinting methods (High Resolution Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry) were used. The use of bulk methods greatly speeded source identification for this relatively unaltered spill: identification of the likely source was possible at this stage. Subsequent fingerprinting of biomarker distributions supported source assignment, pointing to a non-Brazilian oil. Steranes proved the most useful biomarkers for sample correlation in this work. Distribution patterns of environmentally more resilient compound types, such as certain aromatic structures, proved inconclusive for correlation, probably in view of their presence in the background.

  20. Geological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of the Archaean Kaap Valley pluton, Barberton mountain land, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robb, L.J.; Barton, J.M. Jr.; Kable, E.J.D.; Wallace, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Kaap Valley pluton consists predominantly of a homogeneous weakly foliated, hornblende-bearing tonalite. It is among the oldest granitoid bodies yet recognized in the environs of the Barberton greenstone belt, yielding 207 Pb/ 206 Pb mineral ages of about 3300 Ma and a Rb-Sr whole rock isochron age of about 3500 Ma. The Kaap Valley pluton is distinctive in many respects. Whereas all other gneiss plutons in the area are characterized by a trondhjemitic bulk composition with mafic mineralogies dominated by biotite, the Kaap Valley pluton is tonalitic in bulk composition with hornblende (plus minus minor biotite) as its major mafic phase. In this paper, the results of a detailed geological, geochemical and Pb-isotopic study of the Kaap Valley pluton are presented. Questions relating to the origin of the body are considered, with an emphasis on the formation of a tonalitic magma which is more mafic than those typically encountered in the region. Although exposure does not permit a detailed structural study of the gneiss pluton consideration is given to its mode of emplacement

  1. Concerning evaluation of eco-geochemical background in remediation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The geochemical concept of biosphere developed by V.I. Vernadsky states the geological role of the living organisms in the course of their active chemical interaction with the inert matter (Vernadsky, 1926, 1960). Basing on this theory it is reasonable to suggest that coevolution of living organisms and their environment led to development of the dynamically stable biogeocenoses precisely adequate to their geochemical environment. Soil cover was treated by V.I. Vernadsky as a balanced bio-inert matter resulting from this interaction. Appearance of human mind and then a civilization led to global expansion of human beings, first able to survive in unfavorable geochemical conditions and then starting chemical transformation of the environment to satisfy the growing demands of mankind in food and energy. The residence in unfavorable environment and local contamination was followed by appearance of endemic diseases of plants, animals and man. Therefore zonal, regional and local chemical composition of the soil cover formed in natural conditions may be used for estimation of the optimum geochemical background, most adequate for the corresponding zonal biogeocenoses and species. Moreover, the natural geochemical background and technogenic fields have unequal spatial structure and this facilitates their identification that may be relatively easy realized in remediation strategy. On the assumption of the foregoing, the adequate methodical approach to remediation of technogenically affected areas should account of the interaction of the existing natural and the newly formed technogenic geochemical fields and include the following steps: 1) the study and mapping of geochemical structure of the natural geochemical background basing on soil maps; 2) the study of contaminants and mapping spatial distribution of technogenic releases; 3) construction of risk maps for the target risk groups with due regard to natural ecological threshold concentration in context of risk degree for

  2. Featuring animacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ritter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Algonquian languages are famous for their animacy-based grammatical properties—an animacy based noun classification system and direct/inverse system which gives rise to animacy hierarchy effects in the determination of verb agreement. In this paper I provide new evidence for the proposal that the distinctive properties of these languages is due to the use of participant-based features, rather than spatio-temporal ones, for both nominal and verbal functional categories (Ritter & Wiltschko 2009, 2014. Building on Wiltschko (2012, I develop a formal treatment of the Blackfoot aspectual system that assumes a category Inner Aspect (cf. MacDonald 2008, Travis 1991, 2010. Focusing on lexical aspect in Blackfoot, I demonstrate that the classification of both nouns (Seinsarten and verbs (Aktionsarten is based on animacy, rather than boundedness, resulting in a strikingly different aspectual system for both categories. 

  3. Bulk viscosity in holographic Lifshitz hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Kim, Bom Soo; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We compute the bulk viscosity in holographic models dual to theories with Lifshitz scaling and/or hyperscaling violation, using a generalization of the bulk viscosity formula derived in arXiv:1103.1657 from the null focusing equation. We find that only a class of models with massive vector fields are truly Lifshitz scale invariant, and have a vanishing bulk viscosity. For other holographic models with scalars and/or massless vector fields we find a universal formula in terms of the dynamical exponent and the hyperscaling violation exponent

  4. A geochemical and geochronological section through the Eastern Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Katharina; Kuiper, Klaudia; Vroon, Pieter; Wijbrans, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The convergence of Africa and Eurasia and the subduction of a oceanic lithosphere of narrow basins between Gondwana terranes has controlled the geological evolution of the Eastern Mediterranean region since the Cretaceous. This resulted in back-arc extension and lithospheric thinning caused by slab roll-back together with the westward extrusion of Anatolia, in the southwards retreat and stepwise development of the subduction system and also in a low velocity seismic anomaly gap between the Cyprus and Hellenic slab and other slab segments. However, the exact timing of all these events in the Eastern Mediterranean region is still a matter of debate, and the purpose of this study is therefore to disentangle when terrains collided and slab detached in the last 30Ma. In a N-S transect magmatic rocks of the Aegean plate are studied, including volcanics from the islands Nisyros, Kos, Patmos, Chios, Lesbos and Samothraki. Major- and trace elements as well as Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-O isotopes are used to interpret the different features of the Aegean subduction zone. With this geochemical approach the extend of upwelling hot asthenospheric material from the slab tear can be traced in the recent to Eocene volcanic rocks. The volcanic rocks give a wide scatter in classification diagrams and pose for example the question how the sodium rich volcanic products of Patmos can be explained. On the other hand Chios seems to play a key role around 15 Ma years in a phase of relatively low volcanic activity. To get a reliable timeline of the subduction in the Aegean since the Eocene we are aiming to tie our chemical and isotopic data to parallel obtained geochronological ages. New 40Ar/39Ar data will allow us to get the needed resolution for this time span and material.

  5. Compilation of kinetic data for geochemical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.; Savage, D.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic data, including rate constants, reaction orders and activation energies, are compiled for 34 hydrolysis reactions involving feldspars, sheet silicates, zeolites, oxides, pyroxenes and amphiboles, and for similar reactions involving calcite and pyrite. The data are compatible with a rate law consistent with surface reaction control and transition-state theory, which is incorporated in the geochemical software package EQ3/6 and GWB. Kinetic data for the reactions noted above are strictly compatible with the transition-state rate law only under far-from-equilibrium conditions. It is possible that the data are conceptually consistent with this rate law under both far-from-equilibrium and near-to-equilibrium conditions, but this should be confirmed whenever possible through analysis of original experimental results. Due to limitations in the availability of kinetic data for mine-water reactions, and in order to simplify evaluations of geochemical models of groundwater evolution, it is convenient to assume local-equilibrium in such models whenever possible. To assess whether this assumption is reasonable, a modeling approach accounting for couple fluid flow and water-rock interaction is described that can be use to estimate spatial and temporal scale of local equilibrium. The approach is demonstrated for conditions involving groundwater flow in fractures at JNC's Kamaishi in-situ tests site, and is also used to estimate the travel time necessary for oxidizing surface waters to migrate to the level of a HLW repository in crystalline rock. The question of whether local equilibrium is a reasonable assumption must be addressed using an appropriate modeling approach. To be appropriate for conditions at the Kamaishi site using the modeling approach noted above, the fracture fill must closely approximate a porous mine, groundwater flow must be purely advective and diffusion of solutes across the fracture-host rock boundary must not occur. Moreover, the mineralogical and

  6. Development of thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu; Neyama, Atsushi

    1999-09-01

    Two thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations supporting research and development on geological disposal concepts for high level radioactive waste are described in this report. One, SPRONS.JNC, is compatible with thermodynamic relations comprising the SUPCRT model and software, which permits calculation of the standard molal and partial molal thermodynamic properties of minerals, gases, aqueous species and reactions from 1 to 5000 bars and 0 to 1000degC. This database includes standard molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard molal entropies and volumes, and Maier-Kelly heat capacity coefficients at the reference pressure (1 bar) and temperature (25degC) for 195 minerals and 16 gases. It also includes standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard partial molal entropies, and Helgeson, Kirkham and Flowers (HKF) equation-of-state coefficients at the reference pressure and temperature for 1147 inorganic and organic aqueous ions and complexes. SPRONS.JNC extends similar databases described elsewhere by incorporating new and revised data published in the peer-reviewed literature since 1991. The other database, PHREEQE.JNC, is compatible with the PHREEQE series of geochemical modeling codes. It includes equilibrium constants at 25degC and l bar for mineral-dissolution, gas-solubility, aqueous-association and oxidation-reduction reactions. Reaction enthalpies, or coefficients in an empirical log K(T) function, are also included in this database, which permits calculation of equilibrium constants between 0 and 100degC at 1 bar. All equilibrium constants, reaction enthalpies, and log K(T) coefficients in PHREEQE.JNC are calculated using SUPCRT and SPRONS.JNC, which ensures that these two databases are mutually consistent. They are also internally consistent insofar as all the data are compatible with basic thermodynamic definitions and functional relations in the SUPCRT model, and because primary

  7. Development of thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.C. [Monitor Scientific, L.L.C., Denver, Colorado (United States); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Neyama, Atsushi [Computer Software Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Two thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations supporting research and development on geological disposal concepts for high level radioactive waste are described in this report. One, SPRONS.JNC, is compatible with thermodynamic relations comprising the SUPCRT model and software, which permits calculation of the standard molal and partial molal thermodynamic properties of minerals, gases, aqueous species and reactions from 1 to 5000 bars and 0 to 1000degC. This database includes standard molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard molal entropies and volumes, and Maier-Kelly heat capacity coefficients at the reference pressure (1 bar) and temperature (25degC) for 195 minerals and 16 gases. It also includes standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard partial molal entropies, and Helgeson, Kirkham and Flowers (HKF) equation-of-state coefficients at the reference pressure and temperature for 1147 inorganic and organic aqueous ions and complexes. SPRONS.JNC extends similar databases described elsewhere by incorporating new and revised data published in the peer-reviewed literature since 1991. The other database, PHREEQE.JNC, is compatible with the PHREEQE series of geochemical modeling codes. It includes equilibrium constants at 25degC and l bar for mineral-dissolution, gas-solubility, aqueous-association and oxidation-reduction reactions. Reaction enthalpies, or coefficients in an empirical log K(T) function, are also included in this database, which permits calculation of equilibrium constants between 0 and 100degC at 1 bar. All equilibrium constants, reaction enthalpies, and log K(T) coefficients in PHREEQE.JNC are calculated using SUPCRT and SPRONS.JNC, which ensures that these two databases are mutually consistent. They are also internally consistent insofar as all the data are compatible with basic thermodynamic definitions and functional relations in the SUPCRT model, and because primary

  8. Uncertainty in reactive transport geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedegaard-Jensen, A.; Ekberg, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Geochemical modelling is one way of predicting the transport of i.e. radionuclides in a rock formation. In a rock formation there will be fractures in which water and dissolved species can be transported. The composition of the water and the rock can either increase or decrease the mobility of the transported entities. When doing simulations on the mobility or transport of different species one has to know the exact water composition, the exact flow rates in the fracture and in the surrounding rock, the porosity and which minerals the rock is composed of. The problem with simulations on rocks is that the rock itself it not uniform i.e. larger fractures in some areas and smaller in other areas which can give different water flows. The rock composition can be different in different areas. In additions to this variance in the rock there are also problems with measuring the physical parameters used in a simulation. All measurements will perturb the rock and this perturbation will results in more or less correct values of the interesting parameters. The analytical methods used are also encumbered with uncertainties which in this case are added to the uncertainty from the perturbation of the analysed parameters. When doing simulation the effect of the uncertainties must be taken into account. As the computers are getting faster and faster the complexity of simulated systems are increased which also increase the uncertainty in the results from the simulations. In this paper we will show how the uncertainty in the different parameters will effect the solubility and mobility of different species. Small uncertainties in the input parameters can result in large uncertainties in the end. (authors)

  9. Geochemical factors influencing vault design and layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Sargent, F.P.

    1995-01-01

    The design and construction of a vault for used nuclear fuel in crystalline rock may be influenced by a number of geochemical factors. During the siting stage, information is needed regarding the rock type, heterogeneities in its composition and the mineralogy of permeable zones because these will cause variations in thermal conductivity, strength and radionuclide sorptive properties of the rock. These factors may affect decisions regarding depth of vault construction, tunnel dimensions and spacing of panels and waste containers. The decision on whether groundwaters are allowed to flow freely into a planned excavation may depend on measurements of their chemical compositions, microbiological contents and presence of hazardous or corrosive constituents. During site characterization, borehole drilling from the surface and subsequent hydraulic testing will introduce both chemical and microbiological contaminants that may further influence this decision. During vault construction, the geochemistry of the rock may cause changes to the characterization, design and construction of the vault. For example, high salinity fluids in micropores in the rock could prevent the use of radar surveys to detect fractures in the surrounding rock. High rock salinity may also cause unacceptably high total dissolved solids loadings in water discharged from the facility. Again, the presence of toxic, corrosive or radioactive constituents in inflowing groundwater may require grouting or, if inflow is needed for service operations, development of treatment facilities both above and below ground. In addition, the use of explosives will cause high organic and nitrate loadings in service water as well as the possible impregnation of these chemicals in the damaged wall-rock surrounding an excavation. These chemicals may remain despite cleaning efforts and act as nutrients to promote microbial activity in the post-closure phase. In the operational phase, further design and construction, changes

  10. Predictive geophysics: geochemical simulations to geophysical targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopping, R. G.; Cleverley, J.

    2017-12-01

    With an increasing focus on deep exploration for covered targets, new methods are required to target mineral systems under cover. Geophysical responses are driven by physical property contrasts; for example, density contrasts provide a gravity signal, acoustic impedance contrasts provide a seismic reflection signal. In turn, the physical properties for basement, crystalline rocks which host the vast majority of mineral systems are determined almost wholly by the mineralogy of the rocks in question. Mineral systems, through the transport of heat and reactive fluids, will serve to modify the physical properties of country rock as they chemically alter the hosting strata. To understand these changes, we have performed 2D reactive transport modelling that simulates the formation of Archean gold deposits of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. From this, we derive a model of mineralogy that we can use to predict the density, magnetic susceptibility and seismic reflection changes associated with ore formation. It is then possible to predict the gravity, magnetic and seismic reflection responses associated with these deposits. Scenario mapping, such as testing the ability to resolve buried ore bodies or the geophysical survey spacing required to resolve the mineral system, can be performed to produce geophysical targets from these geochemical simulations. We find that there is a gravity response of around 9% of the unaltered response for deposits even buried by 1km of cover, and there is a magnetic spike associated with proximal alteration of the ore system. Finally, seismic reflection response is mostly characterised by additional reflections along faults that plumb the alteration system.

  11. The Stypsi-Megala Therma porphyry-epithermal mineralization, Lesvos Island, Greece: new mineralogical and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periferakis, Argyrios; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Melfos, Vasilios; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos; Alfieris, Dimitrios

    2017-04-01

    Lesvos Island is located at the NE part of the Aegean Sea and mostly comprises post-collisional Miocene volcanic rocks of shoshonitic to calc-alkaline geochemical affinities. In the northern part of the Island, the Stypsi Cu-Mo±Au porphyry prospect, part of the Stypsi caldera, is hosted within hydrothermally altered intrusives and volcanics [1]. Porphyry-style mineralization is developed in a microgranite porphyry that has intruded basaltic trachyandesitic lavas. Propylitic alteration occurs distal to the mineralization, whereas sodic-calcic alteration related to quartz-actinolite veinlets, and a phyllic overprint associated with a dense stockwork of banded black quartz±carbonate veinlets, characterizes the core of the system. Alunite-kaolinite advanced argillic alteration occurs at higher topographic levels and represents a barren lithocap to the porphyry mineralization. Intermediate-sulfidation (IS) milky quartz-carbonate veins overprint the porphyry mineralization along a NNE-trending fault that extends further northwards to Megala Therma, where it hosts IS base metal-rich Ag-Au mineralization [2]. New mineralogical data from the Megala Therma deposit suggest Ag-famatinite, Te-polybasite and Ag-tetrahedrite as the main carriers of Ag in the mineralization. Porphyry-style ores at Stypsi consist of magnetite postdated by pyrite and then by chalcopyrite, molybdenite, sphalerite, galena and bismuthinite within the black quartz stockworks or disseminated in the wallrock [1]. The dark coloration of quartz in the veinlets is due to abundant vapor-rich fluid inclusions. Quartz is granular and fine-grained and locally elongated perpendicular to the vein walls. Botryoidal textures are continuous through quartz grains, suggesting quartz recrystallization from a silica gel, a feature already described by [3] from banded quartz veinlets in porphyry Au deposits at Maricunga, Chile. Bulk ore analyses from porphyry-style mineralization at Stypsi displayed similar geochemical

  12. Reactivity of the calcite–water-interface, from molecular scale processes to geochemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heberling, Frank; Bosbach, Dirk; Eckhardt, Jörg-Detlef; Fischer, Uwe; Glowacky, Jens; Haist, Michael; Kramar, Utz; Loos, Steffen; Müller, Harald S.; Neumann, Thomas; Pust, Christopher; Schäfer, Thorsten; Stelling, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The current state of some aspects of calcite–water-interface chemistry is reviewed. • The interface structure is characterized at a molecular scale. • Experimental and theoretical studies on contaminant sorption at calcite are presented. • The influence of phosphonates on calcite growth is investigated. • The effect of limestone on the workability of cement suspensions is addressed. - Abstract: Surface reactions on calcite play an important role in geochemical and environmental systems, as well as many areas of industry. In this review, we present investigations of calcite that were performed in the frame of the joint research project “RECAWA” (reactivity of calcite–water-interfaces: molecular process understanding for technical applications). As indicated by the project title, work within the project comprised a large range of length scales. The molecular scale structure of the calcite (1 0 4)–water-interface is refined based on surface diffraction data. Structural details are related to surface charging phenomena, and a simplified basic stern surface complexation model is proposed. As an example for trace metal interactions with calcite surfaces we review and present new spectroscopic and macroscopic experimental results on Selenium interactions with calcite. Results demonstrate that selenate (SeO 4 2− ) shows no significant interaction with calcite at our experimental conditions, while selenite (SeO 3 2− ) adsorbs at the calcite surface and can be incorporated into the calcite structure. Atomistic calculations are used to assess the thermodynamics of sulfate (SO 4 2− ), selenate (SeO 4 2− ), and selenite (SeO 3 2− ) partitioning in calcite and aragonite. The results show that incorporation of these oxo-anions into the calcite structure is so highly endothermic that incorporation is practically impossible at bulk equilibrium and standard conditions. This indicates that entrapment processes are involved when

  13. Bulk Leisure--Problem or Blessing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beland, Robert M.

    1983-01-01

    With an increasing number of the nation's work force experiencing "bulk leisure" time because of new work scheduling procedures, parks and recreation offices are encouraged to examine their program scheduling and content. (JM)

  14. Significance of geochemical characterization to performance at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. concept for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste resembles those of other countries in that it relies upon burial in a deep geologic medium. This concept relies upon multiple barriers to retard transport of radionuclides to the accessible environment; those barriers consist of the waste form, waste container, engineered barrier system (including possible backfill) and retardant properties of the host rock. Because mobilization of radionuclides is fundamentally a geochemical problem, an understanding of past, present, and future geochemical processes is a requisite part of site characterization studies conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Geochemical information is needed for evaluating three favorable conditions (the rates of geochemical processes, conditions that promote precipitation or sorption of radionuclides or prohibit formation of colloids, and stable mineral assemblages) and four potentially adverse conditions of the site (groundwater conditions that could increase the chemical reactivity of the engineered barried system or reduce sorption, potential for gaseous radionuclide movement, and oxidizing groundwaters) for key issues of radionuclide release, groundwater quality, and stability of the geochemical environment. Preliminary results of long-term heating experiments indicate that although zeolites can be modified by long-term, low temperature reactions, their beneficial sorptive properties will not be adversely affected. Mineral reactions will be controlled by the aqueous activity of silica in groundwater with which the minerals are in contact. Geochemical barriers alone may satisfy release requirements to the accessible environment for many radionuclides; however, additional site specific geochemical and mineralogical data are needed to test existing and future radionuclide transport models

  15. Force measurements for levitated bulk superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachi, Y.; Sawa, K.; Iwasa, Y.; Nagashima, K.; Otani, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tomita, M.; Murakami, M.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a force measurement system which enables us to directly measure the levitation force of levitated bulk superconductors. Experimental data of the levitation forces were compared with the results of numerical simulation based on the levitation model that we deduced in our previous paper. They were in fairly good agreement, which confirms that our levitation model can be applied to the force analyses for levitated bulk superconductors. (author)

  16. Force measurements for levitated bulk superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachi, Y. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan); ISTEC, Superconductivity Research Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan). E-mail: tachi at istec.or.jp; Uemura, N. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan); ISTEC, Superconductivity Research Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sawa, K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan); Iwasa, Y. [Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Nagashima, K. [Railway Technical Research Institute, Hikari-cho, Kokubunji-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Otani, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tomita, M.; Murakami, M. [ISTEC, Superconductivity Research Laboratory, 1-16-25 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    We have developed a force measurement system which enables us to directly measure the levitation force of levitated bulk superconductors. Experimental data of the levitation forces were compared with the results of numerical simulation based on the levitation model that we deduced in our previous paper. They were in fairly good agreement, which confirms that our levitation model can be applied to the force analyses for levitated bulk superconductors. (author)

  17. ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizul Khakim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI. Bulk shielding merupakan fasilitas yang terintegrasi dengan reaktor Kartini yang berfungsi sebagai penyimpanan sementara bahan bakar bekas. Fasilitas ini merupakan fasilitas yang termasuk dalam struktur, sistem dan komponen (SSK yang penting bagi keselamatan. Salah satu fungsi keselamatan dari sistem penanganan dan penyimpanan bahan bakar adalah mencegah kecelakaan kekritisan yang tak terkendali dan membatasi naiknya temperatur bahan bakar. Analisis keselamatan paling kurang harus mencakup analisis keselamatan dari sisi neutronik dan termo hidrolik Bulk shielding. Analisis termo hidrolik ditujukan untuk memastikan perpindahan panas dan proses pendinginan bahan bakar bekas berjalan baik dan tidak terjadi akumulasi panas yang mengancam integritas bahan bakar. Code tervalidasi PARET/ANL digunakan untuk analisis pendinginan dengan mode konveksi alam. Hasil perhitungan menunjukkan bahwa mode pendinginan konvekasi alam cukup memadai dalam mendinginkan panas sisa tanpa mengakibatkan kenaikan temperatur bahan bakar yang signifikan. Kata kunci: Bulk shielding, bahan bakar bekas, konveksi alam, PARET.   ABSTRACT THERMAL HYDRAULIC SAFETY ANALYSIS OF BULK SHIELDING KARTINI REACTOR. Bulk shielding is an integrated facility to Kartini reactor which is used for temporary spent fuels storage. The facility is one of the structures, systems and components (SSCs important to safety. Among the safety functions of fuel handling and storage are to prevent any uncontrolable criticality accidents and to limit the fuel temperature increase. Safety analyses should, at least, cover neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations of the bulk shielding. Thermal hydraulic analyses were intended to ensure that heat removal and the process of the spent fuels cooling takes place adequately and no heat accumulation that challenges the fuel integrity. Validated code, PARET/ANL was used for analysing the

  18. Textural and geochemical features of freshwater microbialites from Laguna Bacalar, Quintana Roo, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Castro-Contreras, Set I.; Gingras, Murray K.; Pecoits, Ernesto; Aubet, Natalie R.; Petrash, Daniel; Castro-Contreras, Saulo M.; Dick, Gregory; Planavsky, Noah J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-01-01

    Microbialites provide some of the oldest direct evidence of life on Earth. They reached their peak during the Proterozoic and declined afterward. Their decline has been attributed to grazing and/or burrowing by metazoans, to changes in ocean chemistry, or to competition with other calcifying organisms. The freshwater microbialites at Laguna Bacalar (Mexico) provide an opportunity to better understand microbialite growth in terms of interaction between grazing organisms versus calcium carb...

  19. Geochemical and Isotopic Features of Çaykara (Trabzon, NE Turkey) Intrusive Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Cuneyt; Aydınçakır, Emre; Aydin, Faruk; Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Karslı, Orhan; Yılmazer, Sinan; Dündar, Buket

    2017-04-01

    Çaykara (Trabzon) Intrusive Complex is located at the eastern part of the Kaçkar Batholith. In the complex, Gündoǧdu-Boǧalı Plutons is Upper Cretaceous in aged, and Uzundere and Eǧerler Plutons are Eocene in aged. Gündoǧdu-Boǧa Plutons crop out around Araklı-Bahçecik villages, and are represented by the granitic to granodioritic rocks in composition showing porphyritic-granular texture. These rocks contain dark coloured, semi-rounded to rounded, wedged, fine-grained diorite and monzodiorite anclaves. Uzuntarla Pluton extends at E-W from Köknar-Karaçam-Uzuntarla sub-districs to south of Çaykara towards Bahçecik sub-district of Araklı. The rocks of the Uzuntarla Pluton are generally diorite to granodiorite in composition with porphyritic in texture. Eǧerler Pluton exposes at southern of the Çaykara Intrusive Complex. It's mineralogical composition is changing from diorite to granite with medium-coarse grain granular texture. The Upper Cretaceous plutonic rocks are characterized by ɛNd(i) values range from -1.5 to -9.7, whereas 87Sr/86Sr(i) values range from 0.7052 to 0.7119. Nd model ages are between 0.94 and 1.52 Ga. 206Pb/204Pb(i), 207Pb/204Pb(i) and 208Pb/204Pb(i) contents of samples change from 18.24 to 18.72, 15.59 to 15.66 and 37.93-38.64, respectively. The δ18O values in the investigated samples range from 4.0 ‰ to 6.7 ‰ and have similar ratios to I-type granitoides.The Eocene plutonic rocks are characterized by ɛNd(i) values range from -0.4 to -6.0, whereas 87Sr/86Sr(i) values range from 0.7050 to 0.7143. Nd model ages are between 0.81 and 1.32 Ga. 206Pb/204Pb(i), 207Pb/204Pb(i) and 208Pb/204Pb(i) contents of samples change from 18.241to 18.57, 15.58 to 15.63 and 38.22-38.92, respectively. The δ18O values in the investigated samples range from 5.8 ‰ to 7.1 ‰ and have similar ratios to I-type granitoides. Upper Cretaceous and Eocene aged Plutons in the study area are high-K calc-alkaline in composition and display metaluminous to peraluminous characteristics. The primitive mantle normalized multi-element variation diagrams of the studied samples show enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and also negative Nb, Ta, P, Ti and positive Pb anomalies. Chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE) patterns are [(La/Lu)N=8-10] and display negative Eu anomalies. When obtained initial data is plotted on tectonic discrimination diagram, as expected the tectonic setting of the plutons in subject was observed representing island arc environment. This work was supported by the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, grant 114Y219).

  20. Bulk renormalization and particle spectrum in codimension-two brane worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    We study the Casimir energy due to bulk loops of matter fields in codimension-two brane worlds and discuss how effective field theory methods allow us to use this result to renormalize the bulk and brane operators. In the calculation we explicitly sum over the Kaluza-Klein (KK) states with a new convenient method, which is based on a combined use of zeta function and dimensional regularization. Among the general class of models we consider we include a supersymmetric example, 6D gauged chiral supergravity. Although much of our discussion is more general, we treat in some detail a class of compactifications, where the extra dimensions parametrize a rugby ball shaped space with size stabilized by a bulk magnetic flux. The rugby ball geometry requires two branes, which can host the Standard Model fields and carry both tension and magnetic flux (of the bulk gauge field), the leading terms in a derivative expansion. The brane properties have an impact on the KK spectrum and therefore on the Casimir energy as well as on the renormalization of the brane operators. A very interesting feature is that when the two branes carry exactly the same amount of flux, one half of the bulk supersymmetries survives after the compactification, even if the brane tensions are large. We also discuss the implications of these calculations for the natural value of the cosmological constant when the bulk has two large extra dimensions and the bulk supersymmetry is partially preserved (or completely broken).

  1. Geochemical Evolution of the Louisville Seamount Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Mahoney, J. J.; Koppers, A. A.; Lonsdale, P. F.

    2007-12-01

    The Louisville seamount chain is a 4300 km long chain of submarine volcanoes in the southwestern Pacific that is commonly thought to represent a hotspot track. It spans an ~80 Myr age range, comparable to that of the Hawaiian-Emperor chain (Koppers et al., G-cubed, 5 (6), 2004). The few previously dredged igneous samples are dominantly basaltic and alkalic, and have been inferred to represent post-shield volcanism (Hawkins et al., AGU Monograph, 43, 235, 1987). Their isotope and trace element signatures suggest an unusually homogenous mantle source (Cheng et al., AGU Monograph, 43, 283, 1987). Dredging in 2006, during the AMAT02RR cruise of the R.V. Revelle, was carried out in the hope of recovering both shield and post-shield samples and of exploring the geochemical evolution of the chain. Igneous rocks were recovered from 33 stations on 23 seamounts covering some 47 Myr of the chain's history. Our study, focusing on the major and trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic characteristics of these samples, shows that all are alkalic basalts, basanites and tephrites containing normative nepheline. Variations in major and trace elements appear to be controlled predominantly by variable extents of melting and fractional crystallization, with little influence from mantle source heterogeneity. Indeed, age-corrected isotopic values define only a narrow range, in agreement with long-term source homogeneity relative to the scale of melting; e.g., ɛNd varies from +4.1 to +5.7, 206Pb/204Pb from 19.048 to 19.281, and 87Sr/86Sr from 0.70362 to 0.70398. These values broadly fall within the fields of the proposed "C" or "FOZO" mantle end-members. However, small variations are present, with less radiogenic Nd and Pb isotope ratios at the older, western end of the chain, defining a trend toward a broadly EM2-like composition. Although some workers have postulated that the Louisville hotspot was the source of the ~120 Myr Ontong Java Plateau, our samples are isotopically distinct

  2. Geochemical Exploration Techniques Applicable in the Search for Copper Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Maurice A.

    1975-01-01

    Geochemical exploration is an important part of copper-resource evaluation. A large number of geochemical exploration techniques, both proved and untried, are available to the geochemist to use in the search for new copper deposits. Analyses of whole-rock samples have been used in both regional and local geochemical exploration surveys in the search for copper. Analyses of mineral separates, such as biotite, magnetite, and sulfides, have also been used. Analyses of soil samples are widely used in geochemical exploration, especially for localized surveys. It is important to distinguish between residual and transported soil types. Orientation studies should always be conducted prior to a geochemical investigation in a given area in order to determine the best soil horizon and the best size of soil material for sampling in that area. Silty frost boils, caliche, and desert varnish are specialized types of soil samples that might be useful sampling media. Soil gas is a new and potentially valuable geochemical sampling medium, especially in exploring for buried mineral deposits in arid regions. Gaseous products in samples of soil may be related to base-metal deposits and include mercury vapor, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, carbon oxysulfide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, the noble gases, the halogens, and many hydrocarbon compounds. Transported materials that have been used in geochemical sampling programs include glacial float boulders, glacial till, esker gravels, stream sediments, stream-sediment concentrates, and lake sediments. Stream-sediment sampling is probably the most widely used and most successful geochemical exploration technique. Hydrogeochemical exploration programs have utilized hot- and cold-spring waters and their precipitates as well as waters from lakes, streams, and wells. Organic gel found in lakes and at stream mouths is an unproved sampling medium. Suspended material and dissolved gases in any type of water may also be useful

  3. Adjustment of geochemical background by robust multivariate statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, D.

    1985-01-01

    Conventional analyses of exploration geochemical data assume that the background is a constant or slowly changing value, equivalent to a plane or a smoothly curved surface. However, it is better to regard the geochemical background as a rugged surface, varying with changes in geology and environment. This rugged surface can be estimated from observed geological, geochemical and environmental properties by using multivariate statistics. A method of background adjustment was developed and applied to groundwater and stream sediment reconnaissance data collected from the Hot Springs Quadrangle, South Dakota, as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Source-rock lithology appears to be a dominant factor controlling the chemical composition of groundwater or stream sediments. The most efficacious adjustment procedure is to regress uranium concentration on selected geochemical and environmental variables for each lithologic unit, and then to delineate anomalies by a common threshold set as a multiple of the standard deviation of the combined residuals. Robust versions of regression and RQ-mode principal components analysis techniques were used rather than ordinary techniques to guard against distortion caused by outliers Anomalies delineated by this background adjustment procedure correspond with uranium prospects much better than do anomalies delineated by conventional procedures. The procedure should be applicable to geochemical exploration at different scales for other metals. ?? 1985.

  4. Orientation geochemical survey for uranium exploration using 230Th

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Dingliang.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of 230 Th in soils, rocks and ores and its relationship with respect to uranium ore formation are discussed for its possible use in geochemical exploration for U. 230 Th, U and Ra, being members of the same decay series, are different in their geochemical behavior upon which the study is orientated. Twenty uranium deposits and occurrences located in western and southern Hunan province are tested. Geochemical data obtained are comprehensively correlated. It is suggested that 230 Th is useful not only in U-Ra disequilibrium study but also in understanding the geochemical evolution of U ores. The data aid to interpret the genesis of uranium deposits and to assess the radioactive anomalies and uranium-bearing zones. Therefore, it can be adopted as a tool for searching in deep-buried uranium ores. The field procedure is rather simple and flexible to meet any geological environment. It is easy to read out and is less influnced by any kind of interference. In case of disequilibrium caused by oxidation and reduction during the period of ore formation it still gives good indication compared with that of radiometry, radonmetry and geochemical sampling for U

  5. Geochemical record of Holocene to Recent sedimentation on the Western Indus continental shelf, Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David R.; BöNing, Philipp; Giosan, Liviu; Ponton, Camilo; KöHler, Cornelia M.; Cooper, Matthew J.; Tabrez, Ali R.; Clift, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    We present a multiproxy geochemical analysis of two cores recovered from the Indus Shelf spanning the Early Holocene to Recent (<14 ka). Indus-23 is located close to the modern Indus River, while Indus-10 is positioned ˜100 km further west. The Holocene transgression at Indus-10 was over a surface that was strongly weathered during the last glacial sea level lowstand. Lower Holocene sediments at Indus-10 have higherɛNdvalues compared to those at the river mouth indicating some sediment supply from the Makran coast, either during the deposition or via reworking of older sediments outcropping on the shelf. Sediment transport from Makran occurred during transgressive intervals when sea level crossed the mid shelf. The sediment flux from non-Indus sources to Indus-10 peaked between 11 ka and 8 ka. A hiatus at Indus-23 from 8 ka until 1.3 ka indicates non-deposition or erosion of existing Indus Shelf sequences. HigherɛNdvalues seen on the shelf compared to the delta imply reworking of older delta sediments in building Holocene clinoforms. Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA), Mg/Al and Sr isotopes are all affected by erosion of detrital carbonate, which reduced through the Holocene. K/Al data suggest that silicate weathering peaked ca. 4-6 ka and was higher at Indus-10 compared to Indus-23. Fine-grained sediments that make up the shelf have geochemical signatures that are different from the coarser grained bulk sediments measured in the delta plain. The Indus Shelf data highlight the complexity of reconstructing records of continental erosion and provenance in marine settings.

  6. Geophysical and geochemical techniques for exploration of hydrocarbons and minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sittig, M.

    1980-01-01

    The detailed descriptive information in this book is based on 389 US patents that deal with geophysical and geochemical techniques useful for the exploration of hydrocarbons and minerals. Where it was necessary to round out the complete technological picture, a few paragraphs from cited government reports have been included. These techniques are used in prospecting for oil, coal, oil shale, tar sand and minerals. The patents are grouped under the following chapters: geochemical prospecting; geobiological prospecting; geophysical exploration; magnetic geophysical prospecting; gravitational geophysical prospecting; electrical geophysical prospecting; nuclear geophysical prospecting; seismic geophysical prospecting; and exploratory well drilling. This book serves a double purpose in that it supplies detailed technical information and can be used as a guide to the US patent literature in this field. By indicating all the information that is significant, and eliminating legal jargon and juristic phraseology, this book presents an advanced, industrially oriented review of modern methods of geophysical and geochemical exploration techniques

  7. Geochemical methods for identification of formations being prospective for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukova, A.M.; Komarova, N.I.; Spiridonov, A.A.; Shor, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    Geochemical methods of uranium content evaluation in metamorphic, ultrametamorphic and sedimentary formations are considered. At that, the following four factors are of the highest importance: 1) average uranium content-geochemical background; 2) character of uranium distribution; 3) forms of uranium presence; 4) the value of thorium-uranium ratio. A complex of radiogeochemical criteria, favourable for uranium presence is formulated: high average background content of total and '' mobile''uranium and high value of variation coefficient (80-100% and above); low (approximately one or lower) thorium-uranium ratio; sharp increase in uranium concentration in accessory minerals. Radiogeochemical peculiarities of metamorphic and ultrametamorphic formations prospective for uranium are enumerated. The peculiarities condition specificity of geochemical prospecting methods. Prospecting methods first of all must be directed at the evaluation of radioelement distribution parameters and specification of the forms of their presence

  8. Development of superconductor bulk for superconductor bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Joong; Jun, Byung Hyuk; Park, Soon Dong (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Current carrying capacity is one of the most important issues in the consideration of superconductor bulk materials for engineering applications. There are numerous applications of Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors e.g. magnetic levitation train, flywheel energy storage system, levitation transportation, lunar telescope, centrifugal device, magnetic shielding materials, bulk magnets etc. Accordingly, to obtain YBCO materials in the form of large, single crystals without weak-link problem is necessary. A top seeded melt growth (TSMG) process was used to fabricate single crystal YBCO bulk superconductors. The seeded and infiltration growth (IG) technique was also very promising method for the synthesis of large, single-grain YBCO bulk superconductors with good superconducting properties. 5 wt.% Ag doped Y211 green compacts were sintered at 900 .deg. C {approx} 1200 .deg.C and then a single crystal YBCO was fabricated by an infiltration method. A refinement and uniform distribution of the Y211 particles in the Y123 matrix were achieved by sintering the Ag-doped samples. This enhancement of the critical current density was ascribable to a fine dispersion of the Y211 particles, a low porosity and the presence of Ag particles. In addition, we have designed and manufactured large YBCO single domain with levitation force of 10-13 kg/cm{sup 2} using TSMG processing technique.

  9. Module 13: Bulk Packaging Shipments by Highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przybylski, J.L.

    1994-07-01

    The Hazardous Materials Modular Training Program provides participating United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites with a basic, yet comprehensive, hazardous materials transportation training program for use onsite. This program may be used to assist individual program entities to satisfy the general awareness, safety training, and function specific training requirements addressed in Code of Federal Regulation (CFR), Title 49, Part 172, Subpart H -- ''Training.'' Module 13 -- Bulk Packaging Shipments by Highway is a supplement to the Basic Hazardous Materials Workshop. Module 13 -- Bulk Packaging Shipments by Highway focuses on bulk shipments of hazardous materials by highway mode, which have additional or unique requirements beyond those addressed in the ten module core program. Attendance in this course of instruction should be limited to those individuals with work experience in transporting hazardous materials utilizing bulk packagings and who have completed the Basic Hazardous Materials Workshop or an equivalent. Participants will become familiar with the rules and regulations governing the transportation by highway of hazardous materials in bulk packagings and will demonstrate the application of these requirements through work projects and examination

  10. Initial geochemical characteristics of fluid fine tailings in an oil sands end pit lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A9 (Canada); Lindsay, Matthew B.J., E-mail: matt.lindsay@usask.ca [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Cruz-Hernández, Pablo [Department of Geology, University of Huelva, Campus ‘El Carmen’, E-21071 Huelva (Spain); Halferdahl, Geoffrey M. [Environmental Research and Development, Syncrude Canada Limited, Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1H4 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Geochemical characteristics of fluid fine tailings (FFT) were examined in Base Mine Lake (BML), which is the first full-scale demonstration oil sands end pit lake (EPL) in northern Alberta, Canada. Approximately 186 Mm{sup 3} of FFT was deposited between 1994 and 2012, before BML was established on December 31, 2012. Bulk FFT samples (n = 588) were collected in July and August 2013 at various depths at 15 sampling sites. Temperature, solid content, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, Eh and alkalinity were measured for all samples. Detailed geochemical analyses were performed on a subset of samples (n = 284). Pore-water pH decreased with depth by approximately 0.5 within the upper 10 m of the FFT. Major pore-water constituents included Na (880 ± 96 mg L{sup −1}) and Cl (560 ± 95 mg L{sup −1}); Ca (19 ± 4.1 mg L{sup −1}), Mg (11 ± 2.0 mg L{sup −1}), K (16 ± 2.3 mg L{sup −1}) and NH{sub 3} (9.9 ± 4.7 mg L{sup −1}) were consistently observed. Iron and Mn concentrations were low within FFT pore water, whereas SO{sub 4} concentrations decreased sharply across the FFT–water interface. Geochemical modeling indicated that FeS{sub (s)} precipitation was favoured under SO{sub 4}-reducing conditions. Pore water was also under-saturated with respect to gypsum [CaSO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O], and near saturation with respect to calcite [CaCO{sub 3}], dolomite [CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}] and siderite [FeCO{sub 3}]. X-ray diffraction (XRD) suggested that carbonate-mineral dissolution largely depleted calcite and dolomite. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed the presence of FeS{sub (s)}, pyrite [FeS{sub 2}], and siderite. Carbonate-mineral dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation have likely contributed to FFT dewatering and settlement. However, the long-term importance of these processes within EPLs remains unknown. These results provide a reference for assessing the long-term geochemical evolution of oil sands EPLs, and offer

  11. Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network

  12. Effect of source integration on the geochemical fluxes from springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisbee, Marty D.; Phillips, Fred M.; White, Art F.; Campbell, Andrew R.; Liu, Fengjing

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical fluxes from watersheds are typically defined using mass-balance methods that essentially lump all weathering processes operative in a watershed into a single flux of solute mass measured in streamflow at the watershed outlet. However, it is important that we understand how weathering processes in different hydrological zones of a watershed (i.e., surface, unsaturated, and saturated zones) contribute to the total geochemical flux from the watershed. This capability will improve understanding of how geochemical fluxes from these different zones may change in response to climate change. Here, the geochemical flux from weathering processes occurring solely in the saturated zone is investigated. This task, however, remains exceedingly difficult due to the sparsity of subsurface sampling points, especially in large, remote, and/or undeveloped watersheds. In such cases, springflow is often assumed to be a proxy for groundwater (defined as water residing in fully saturated geologic formations). However, springflow generation may integrate different sources of water including, but not limited to, groundwater. The authors’ hypothesis is that long-term estimates of geochemical fluxes from groundwater using springflow proxies will be too large due to the integrative nature of springflow generation. Two conceptual models of springflow generation are tested using endmember mixing analyses (EMMA) on observations of spring chemistries and stable isotopic compositions in a large alpine watershed in the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. In the “total springflow” conceptual model, springflow is assumed to be 100% groundwater. In the “fractional springflow” conceptual model, springflow is assumed to be an integration of different sources of water (e.g., groundwater, unsaturated flow, preferential flow in the soil, etc.) and groundwater is only a fractional component. The results indicate that groundwater contributions in springflow range from 2% to 100

  13. Geochemical studies of backfill aggregates, lake sediment cores and the Hueco Bolson Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapalia, Anita

    This dissertation comprises of three different researches that focuses on the application of geochemistry from aggregates, lake sediment cores and Hueco Bolson Aquifer. Each study is independent and presented in the publication format. The first chapter is already published and the second chapter is in revision phase. Overall, three studies measure the large scale (field) as well as bench scale (lab) water-rock interactions influenced by the climatic and anthropogenic factors spans from the field of environmental geology to civil engineering. The first chapter of this dissertation addresses the chemical evaluation of coarse aggregates from six different quarries in Texas. The goal of this work is to find out the best geochemical methods for assessing the corrosion potential of coarse aggregates prior to their use in mechanically stabilized earth walls. Electrochemical parameters help to define the corrosion potential of aggregates following two different leaching protocols. Testing the coarse and fine aggregates demonstrate the chemical difference due to size-related kinetic leaching effects. Field fines also show different chemistry than the bulk rock indicating the weathering impact on carbonate rocks. The second chapter investigates zinc (Zn) isotopic signatures from eight lake sediment cores collected both from pristine lakes and those impacted by urban anthropogenic contamination. Zinc from the natural weathering of rocks and anthropogenic atmospheric pollutants are transported to these lakes and the signatures are recorded in the sediments. Isotopic analysis of core samples provides the signature of anthropogenic contamination sources. Dated sediment core and isotopic analysis can identify Zn inputs that are correlated to the landuse and population change of the watersheds. Comparison of isotopic data from both pristine and urban lake sediment core also serves as an analog in other lake sediment cores in the world. The third chapter studies on Hueco Bolson

  14. Organic geochemical study of domanik deposits, Tatarstan Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosova, F. F.; Pronin, N. V.

    2010-05-01

    High-bituminous argillo-siliceous carbonate deposits of domanik formation (DF) occurring within pale depressions and down warps in the east of the Russian platform are treated by many investigators as a main source of oil and gas in the Volga-Ural province. In this study a special attention was turned to organic-rich rocks DF witch outcrop in the central part (Uratminskaya area 792, 806 boreholes) and in the west part (Sviyagskaya, 423) of the Tatarstan Republic. The aim of the present paper is to characterize the organic matter: origin, depositional environments, thermal maturity and biodegradation-weathering effects. Nowadays the most informative geochemical parameters are some biomarkers which qualitatively and are quantitatively defined from distributions of n-alkanes and branched alkanes. Biomarkers - it's original fingerprints of biomass of organic matter, that reflect molecular hydrocarbonic structure. The bulk, molecular composition of oil is initially a function of the type and maturity of the source rock from which it has been expelled, while the source rock type reflects both the nature of precursor organisms and the conditions of its deposition. Methodology used in this study included sampling, bitumen extraction, liquid-column chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. The bitumen was fractionated by column chromatography on silica gel. Non-aromatic or alifatics, aromatics and polar compounds were obtained. Alifatic were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry Percin Elmer. The hydrocarbons present in the sediments of DF and have a carbon numbers ranging from 12 through 38. The samples contain variably inputs from both terrigenous and non-terrigenous (probably marine algal) organic matter as evident in bimodal GC fingerprints of some samples. Pristane and phytane, also, occur in very high concentration in sample extracts. The relatively low Pr/Ph ratios, CPI and OEP<1 imply that the domanik organic matter was deposited

  15. Micro benchtop optics by bulk silicon micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Abraham P.; Pocha, Michael D.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Deri, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics of bulk silicon and integrating the parallel etch planes of silicon with silicon wafer bonding and impurity doping, enables the fabrication of on-chip optics with in situ aligned etched grooves for optical fibers, micro-lenses, photodiodes, and laser diodes. Other optical components that can be microfabricated and integrated include semi-transparent beam splitters, micro-optical scanners, pinholes, optical gratings, micro-optical filters, etc. Micromachining of bulk silicon utilizing the parallel etching characteristics thereof can be utilized to develop miniaturization of bio-instrumentation such as wavelength monitoring by fluorescence spectrometers, and other miniaturized optical systems such as Fabry-Perot interferometry for filtering of wavelengths, tunable cavity lasers, micro-holography modules, and wavelength splitters for optical communication systems.

  16. Holographic bulk reconstruction with α' corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shubho R.; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2017-10-01

    We outline a holographic recipe to reconstruct α' corrections to anti-de Sitter (AdS) (quantum) gravity from an underlying CFT in the strictly planar limit (N →∞ ). Assuming that the boundary CFT can be solved in principle to all orders of the 't Hooft coupling λ , for scalar primary operators, the λ-1 expansion of the conformal dimensions can be mapped to higher curvature corrections of the dual bulk scalar field action. Furthermore, for the metric perturbations in the bulk, the AdS /CFT operator-field isomorphism forces these corrections to be of the Lovelock type. We demonstrate this by reconstructing the coefficient of the leading Lovelock correction, also known as the Gauss-Bonnet term in a bulk AdS gravity action using the expression of stress-tensor two-point function up to subleading order in λ-1.

  17. Geochemical investigation of iron transport into bentonite as steel corrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, Fiona; Bate, Fiona; Heath, Tim; Hoch, Andrew

    2007-09-01

    some experiments. Using the experimental data as a guide, a modelling investigation has been carried out. The objectives of the modelling investigation were: To develop a geochemical model of the transport of iron into bentonite based on the clear experimental evidence of the penetration of iron into bentonite. To improve our understanding of the desaturation of the bentonite as water is consumed during the corrosion process and the resultant gas(es) escapes. The production of iron from the corroding source was modelled using a rate of gas evolution that had been fitted. It was shown that ion exchange and surface complexation processes do not provide sufficient sorption to predict the high amount of iron observed in the solid phase. Therefore alternative processes, such as iron-containing mineral formation or mineral transformations, were also suggested to account for the amount of iron observed within the bentonite phase. Magnetite was identified as the most thermodynamically stable solubility limiting phase under the experimental conditions. A one-dimensional transport model was constructed to include all relevant processes. The simulations considered the diffusive transport of Fe 2+ ions away from a corroding source, using the rate of gas evolution resulting from the corrosion process. Ion exchange and surface complexation processes were allowed within the bentonite which would provide sorption of iron onto and within the bentonite solid. The pH was buffered by allowing protonation and deprotonation of the surface sites of the bentonite solid. In addition, saturation of iron-containing minerals was permitted. The base case model suggests that about 4.4 wt % of iron could form in the bentonite if the formation of magnetite was allowed. However, the maximum theoretical amount of iron available from the source term is limited to 4.5 wt % of iron by the cumulative gas evolution rate, which is lower than the observed amount of iron in the bulk bentonite (6.6 wt %). A

  18. Geochemical investigation of iron transport into bentonite as steel corrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, Fiona; Bate, Fiona; Heath, Tim; Hoch, Andrew [Serco Assurance, Harwe ll (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    some experiments. Using the experimental data as a guide, a modelling investigation has been carried out. The objectives of the modelling investigation were: To develop a geochemical model of the transport of iron into bentonite based on the clear experimental evidence of the penetration of iron into bentonite. To improve our understanding of the desaturation of the bentonite as water is consumed during the corrosion process and the resultant gas(es) escapes. The production of iron from the corroding source was modelled using a rate of gas evolution that had been fitted. It was shown that ion exchange and surface complexation processes do not provide sufficient sorption to predict the high amount of iron observed in the solid phase. Therefore alternative processes, such as iron-containing mineral formation or mineral transformations, were also suggested to account for the amount of iron observed within the bentonite phase. Magnetite was identified as the most thermodynamically stable solubility limiting phase under the experimental conditions. A one-dimensional transport model was constructed to include all relevant processes. The simulations considered the diffusive transport of Fe{sup 2+} ions away from a corroding source, using the rate of gas evolution resulting from the corrosion process. Ion exchange and surface complexation processes were allowed within the bentonite which would provide sorption of iron onto and within the bentonite solid. The pH was buffered by allowing protonation and deprotonation of the surface sites of the bentonite solid. In addition, saturation of iron-containing minerals was permitted. The base case model suggests that about 4.4 wt % of iron could form in the bentonite if the formation of magnetite was allowed. However, the maximum theoretical amount of iron available from the source term is limited to 4.5 wt % of iron by the cumulative gas evolution rate, which is lower than the observed amount of iron in the bulk bentonite (6.6 wt

  19. Big bang nucleosynthesis constraints on bulk neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, H.S.; Mohapatra, R.N.

    2002-01-01

    We examine the constraints imposed by the requirement of successful nucleosynthesis on models with one large extra hidden space dimension and a single bulk neutrino residing in this dimension. We solve the Boltzmann kinetic equation for the thermal distribution of the Kaluza-Klein modes and evaluate their contribution to the energy density at the big bang nucleosynthesis epoch to constrain the size of the extra dimension R -1 ≡μ and the parameter sin 2 2θ which characterizes the mixing between the active and bulk neutrinos

  20. Synthesis of Bulk Superconducting Magnesium Diboride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie Olbinado

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Bulk polycrystalline superconducting magnesium diboride, MgB2, samples were successfully prepared via a one-step sintering program at 750°C, in pre Argon with a pressure of 1atm. Both electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the superconductivity of the material at 39K, with a transition width of 5K. The polycrystalline nature, granular morphology, and composition of the sintered bulk material were confirmed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX.

  1. Radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawes, W.R. Jr.; Habing, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    The evolutionary development of a radiation-hardened bulk CMOS technology is reviewed. The metal gate hardened CMOS status is summarized, including both radiation and reliability data. The development of a radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate process which was successfully implemented to a commercial microprocessor family and applied to a new, radiation-hardened, LSI standard cell family is also discussed. The cell family is reviewed and preliminary characterization data is presented. Finally, a brief comparison of the various radiation-hardened technologies with regard to performance, reliability, and availability is made

  2. Geochemical markers of soil anthropogenic contaminants in polar scientific stations nearby (Antarctica, King George Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prus, Wojciech; Fabiańska, Monika J; Łabno, Radosław

    2015-06-15

    The organic contamination of Antarctic soils and terrestrial sediments from nearby of five polar scientific stations on King George Island (Antarctica) was investigated. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was applied to find composition of dichloromethane extracts of soil and terrestrial sediments. The presence of geochemical markers, such as n-alkanes, steranes, pentacyclic triterpenoids, and alkyl PAHs, their distribution types, and values of their ratios indicates the predominating source of organic fossil fuels and products of their refining rather than from the natural Antarctic environment. Fossil fuel-originated compounds well survived in conditions of Antarctic climate over long times thus enabling to characterize geochemical features of source fossil fuel identified as petroleum expelled from kerogen II of algal/bacterial origins deposited in sub-oxic conditions and being in the middle of catagenesis. Both microbial activity and water leaching play an important role in degradation of terrestrial oil spills in the Antarctica climate, and petroleum alteration occurs lowly over long periods of time. Synthetic anthropogenic compounds found in terrestrial Antarctica sediments included diisopropylnaphthalenes, products of their sulfonates degradation in paper combustion, and organophosporus compounds used as retardants and plasticizers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The relation between geochemical characteristics and landslide in Hungtsaiping area, Nantou, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Tsai, L.

    2009-12-01

    Hungtsaiping is located at the south bank of the Yonglu stream, Chungliao Village of Nantou County, central Taiwan. Hungtsaiping landslide was triggered by the Chi-Chi earthquake (Mw=7.6) occurring on September 20, 1999 UTC near the town of Chi-Chi in Nantou County, central Taiwan. Coping with the geological and geomorphologic investigations, this study makes an attempt to find the relation between geochemical characteristics and landslide in Hungtsaiping area. Water samples were collected from spring waters, creeks, ponds, groundwater and the Yonglu stream once every month from May 2008 to May 2009. Oxygen and hydrogen stable isotopic, ionic concentrations, as well as electrical conductivity and pH value were analyzed. The results indicate that calcium and magnesium bicarbonate-rich water was found on the top and the middle part of the slope. On the other hand, sodium bicarbonate-rich water as well as exceptionally high sulfate concentration was found on the foot of the slope, the sulfate content decreased with increasing elevations until the middle part of slope. A conceptual model of flow process and water origin in Hungtsaiping landslide was established by summarizing the features of hydrogeochemical analyses and the profiles in this study. Keywords: landslide, geochemical characteristics, isotope, hydrochemistry. Fig. 1 The sampling locations of Hungtsaiping landslide. Fig. 2 Isogram: the concentration of sulfate in May 2008 in Hungtsaiping area.

  4. Geochemical characteristics of Proterozoic granite magmatism from Southern Granulite Terrain, India: Implications for Gondwana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellappa, T.; Rao, J. Mallikharjuna

    2018-03-01

    Granitoid intrusions occur widely in the Southern Granulite Terrain (SGT) of India, particularly within the Cauvery Suture Zone (CSZ), which is considered as the trace of the Neoproterozoic Mozambique ocean closure. Here we present the petrological and geochemical features of 19 granite plutons across the three major tectonic blocks of the terrain. Our data show a wide variation in the compositions of these intrusions from alkali feldspathic syenite to granite. The whole rock geochemistry of these intrusions displays higher concentrations of SiO2, FeO*, K2O, Ba, Zr, Th, LREE and low MgO, Na2O, Ti, P, Nb, Y and HREE's. The granitoids are metaluminous to slightly peraluminous in nature revealing both I-type and A-type origin. In tectonic discrimination plots, the plutons dominantly show volcanic arc and syn-collisional as well as post-collisional affinity. Based on the available age data together with geochemical constrains, we demonstrate that the granitic magmatism in the centre and south of the terrain is mostly associated with the Neoproterozoic subduction-collision-accretion-orogeny, followed by extensional mechanism of Gondwana tectonics events. Similar widespread granitic activity has also been documented in the Arabian Nubian shield, Madagascar, Sri Lanka and Antarctica, providing similarities for the reconstruction of the crustal fragments of Gondwana supercontinent followed by Pan-African orogeny.

  5. Geochemical evidences of magma dynamics at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliro, S.; Chiodini, G.; Paonita, A.

    2014-05-01

    Campi Flegrei caldera, within the Neapolitan area of Italy, is potentially one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world, and during the last decade it has shown clear signs of reactivation, marked by the onset of uplift and changes in the geochemistry of gas emissions. We describe a 30-year-long data set of the CO2-He-Ar-N2 compositions of fumarolic emissions from La Solfatara crater, which is located in the center of the caldera. The data display continuous decreases in both the N2/He and N2/CO2 ratios since 1985, paralleled by an increase in He/CO2. These variations cannot be explained by either processes of boiling/condensation in the local hydrothermal system or with changes in the mixing proportions between a magmatic vapor and hydrothermal fluids. We applied the magma degassing model of Nuccio and Paonita (2001, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 193, 467-481) using the most recent inert-gas solubilities in order to interpret these peculiar features in accordance with petrologic constraints derived from the ranges of the melt compositions and reservoir pressures at Campi Flegrei. The model simulations for mafic melts (trachybasalt and shoshonite) show a remarkably good agreement with the measured data. Both decompressive degassing of an ascending magma and mixing between magmatic fluids exsolved at various levels along the ascent path can explain the long-term geochemical changes. Recalling that (i) a sill-like reservoir of gases at a depth of 3-4 km seems to be the main source of ground inflation and (ii) there is petrologic and geophysical evidence for a reservoir of magma at about 8 km below Campi Flegrei, we suggest that the most-intense episodes of inflation occur when the gas supply to the sill-like reservoir comes from the 8 km-deep magma, although fluids exsolved by magma bodies at shallower depths also contribute to the gas budget. Our work highlights that, in caldera systems where the presence of hydrothermal aquifers commonly masks the magmatic signature

  6. Lunar Meteorites: A Global Geochemical Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Joy, K. H.; Arai, T.; Gross, J.; Korotev, R. L.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    bulk of the chapter will use examples from the lunar meteorite suite to examine important recent advances in lunar science, including (but not limited to the following: (1) Understanding the global compositional diversity of the lunar surface; (2) Understanding the formation of the ancient lunar primary crust; (3) Understanding the diversity and timing of mantle melting, and secondary crust formation; (4) Comparing KREEPy lunar meteorites to KREEPy Apollo samples as evidence of variability within the PKT; and (5) A better understanding of the South Pole Aitken Basin through lunar meteorites whose provenance are within that Terrane.

  7. Comments on geochemical aspects of SR 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.; Wei Zhou

    2000-01-01

    The Swedish Government has asked SKB to carry out a safety assessment of the KBS-3 disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel 'to demonstrate that the KBS-3 method has good prospects of being able to meet the safety and radiation protection requirements which SKI and SSI have specified in recent years.' The results of that assessment, referred to as SR 97, have recently been published. The present report summarizes the results of a review of selected geochemical aspects of SR 97. These subjects include the hydrochemical evolution of a defective canister, thermodynamic data supporting estimates of radioelement solubilities, modeling of near-field chemistry and analyses of the effects of ice melting on propagation of an oxidizing front to repository depths. The primary focus of the review is on the canister-defect scenario, and, more specifically, on supporting analyses of the hydromechanical evolution of a defective canister. The results of these analyses figure prominently in the safety assessment because they suggest that even a defective canister will, in effect, remain dry for as long as 200,000 years. This is an important constraint because it is taken in SR 97 as the period of time required for a continuous water pathway to form in the near field. The transport of most radionuclides (i.e., those that do not exist as a gas) cannot occur until this pathway is formed. It is concluded that although SKBs hydromechanical models are sound, they may suffer from an over-simplification of the chemical processes involved. Analyses using the models do not acknowledge that the chemical system within the canister is open in all respects to the chemical system in the buffer. Instead, mass transfer across the defect at the canister-buffer interface is limited to liquid H 2 O and water vapor. Consideration of mass transfer of other gases [e.g., CO 2 and H 2 S] dissolved in buffer porewaters suggests that associated reactions involving the iron insert and inner surfaces of the

  8. 46 CFR 148.04-23 - Unslaked lime in bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unslaked lime in bulk. 148.04-23 Section 148.04-23... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN BULK Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-23 Unslaked lime in bulk. (a) Unslaked lime in bulk must be transported in unmanned, all steel, double-hulled barges...

  9. Geochemical and hydrodynamic phosphorus retention mechanisms in lowland catchments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, B.

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphorus (P) to surface water from heavily fertilised agricultural fields is of major importance for surface water quality. The research reported in this thesis examined the role of geochemical and hydrodynamic processes controlling P speciation and transport in lowland catchments

  10. Geothermal investigations with isotope and geochemical techniques in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) for Latin America on the Use of Isotope and Geochemical Techniques in Geothermal Exploration started in 1984. The first activity carried out was a Seminar on isotope and geochemical techniques in geothermal exploration, which took place in June 1984 in Morelia, Mexico. During the seminar, which was attended by representatives of the institutions which later took part in the programme, the objectives, main research lines, and geothermal fields to be studied during the CRP were discussed. The first research contracts were awarded towards the end of 1984. The field work started in 1985 and continued through 1990. During the implementation of the CRP a considerable number of geothermal fields were studied in the nine participating countries. The investigations carried out were geochemically quite comprehensive in most cases, but in some others they were still in a reconnaissance stage when the CRP ended: the latter studies are not reported in these proceedings, but the data obtained are in principle available from the relevant national institutions. While investigations with conventional geochemical techniques had already started in several fields before 1985, isotope methods were applied for the first time in all cases during this CRP. Due to the remoteness and high elevation of many of the fields studied and the adverse meteorological conditions during long periods of the year, the investigations could not proceed rapidly: this is the main reason for the unusually long duration of the CRP, which could be concluded only after more than five years after its inception

  11. Comparison of thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandratillake, M.R.; Newton, G.W.A.; Robinson, V.J.

    1988-05-01

    Four thermodynamic databases used by European groups for geochemical modelling have been compared. Thermodynamic data for both aqueous species and solid species have been listed. When the values are directly comparable any differences between them have been highlighted at two levels of significance. (author)

  12. Overview of geochemical modeling needs for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.J.; Wolery, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    Geochemical modeling needs for nuclear waste management are discussed with an emphasis on data base development and computer code. Other areas for future research include: precipitation kinetics, fixed fugacity, sorption, glasslt. slashwater interactions, redox disequilibrium and kinetics, radiolysis, solid solutions, and isotopic fractionation. 15 references

  13. Geochemical reactivity of rocks of the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chuman, T.; Gürtlerová, P.; Hruška, Jakub; Adamová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2014), s. 341-349 ISSN 1744-5647 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : geochemical reactivity * Czech Republic * susceptibility to weathering Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.193, year: 2014

  14. Geochemical trends in the weathered profiles above granite gneiss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geochemical trends in the weathered profiles above granite gneiss and schist of Abeokuta area, southwestern Nigeria. Anthony T Bolarinwa, Anthony A Elueze. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Mining and Geology 2005, Vol. 41(1): 19-31. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  15. Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in the Dange Formation Sokoto Basin, Northwestern Niveria. OA Adekeye, SO Akande. Abstract. No Abstract Available Journal of Mining and Geology Vol.40(2) 2004: 101-106. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  16. Geochemical characterization of the siliciclastic rocks of Chitravati ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Somasekhar

    2018-05-23

    May 23, 2018 ... Chitravati Group of Cuddapah Supergroup to decipher the provenance and depositional environment. Both the units ... Based on major element geochemical classification diagram, Pulivendla Quartzite .... The youngest age limit of the Nallamalai ...... eastern Oregon and western Idaho, USA: Implications for.

  17. Uruguay Mining inventory. Florida fotoplano geochemical prospecting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Artignan, D.; Vairon, P.

    1982-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out in Florida fotoplano within the framework of Uruguay Mining inventory. In this work were covered 660 km2 obtaining 752 samples for study which were analyzed by Plasma Emission Spectrometry in Orleans BRGM laboratories

  18. Geochemical assessment of light gaseous hydrocarbons in near ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Light hydrocarbons in soil have been used as direct indicators in geochemical hydrocarbon exploration, which remains an unconventional path in the petroleum industry. The occurrence of adsorbed soil ... Kalpana1 D J Patil1 A M Dayal1. National Geophysical Research Institute, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500606, India.

  19. Uruguay Mining inventory. Las Animas fotoplano geochemical prospecting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Spangenberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out in Las Animas fotoplano within the framework of Uruguay Mining inventory. In this work were covered 660 km2 obtaining 738 samples for study which were analyzed by Plasma Emission Spectrometry in Orleans BRGM laboratories.

  20. Uruguay Mining inventory. Minas fotoplano geochemical prospecting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Artignan, D.; Vairon, P.

    1982-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out in Minas fotoplano within the framework of Uruguay Mining inventory. In this work were covered 380 km2 obtaining with 433 samples for study which were analized by Plasma Emission Spectrometry in Orleans BRGM laboratories

  1. Mining inventory of Uruguay. Polanco fotoplano geochemical prospecting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H; Artignan, D; Vairon, P

    1982-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out in Polanco fotoplano within the framework of Uruguay Mining inventory . In this work were covered 660 km2 obtaining 685 samples for study which were analyzed by Plasma Emission Spectrometry in Orleans BRGM laboratories

  2. The geochemical behavior of protactinium 231 and its chosen geochemical analogue thorium in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillberg-Wickman, M.

    1983-03-01

    To be able to judge whether protactinium 231 might represent a major contribution to the human radiation risk from high level radioactive waste a literature study of the geochemical behavior of protactinium has been made. The interest in protactinium determinations has, as far, been in the field of marine geochemistry and geochronology. These investigations show that thorium may be used as a chemical analogue. The content of protactinium 231 is determined by the 235 U content and consequently the occurrence of protactinium in nature is directly associated to the geochemistry of uranium. The pronounced hydrolytic tendency of protactinium and its great sorption and coprecipitation capacity ought to prevent or at least appreciably delay its transport from a back-filled nuclear waste vault to the uppermost surface of the earth. It also has a tendency to form colloids or particulates which may be strongly fixed on a rock surface. In adsorption and desorption processes kinetics must play an important role. Our knowledge in this field is quite limited. Under the physico-chemical conditions in the sea, protactinium is rapidly scavenged from the water column by particulates. It accumulates in the sediments. (author)

  3. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The operator...: (1) LNG. (2) LPG. (3) Vessel fuel. (4) Oily waste from vessels. (5) Solvents, lubricants, paints, and...

  4. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    are discussed in this paper. On the basis of these measurements phase diagrams of the different systems were constructed. Finally, it is demonstrated that when pressing the bulk amorphous alloy onto a metallic dies at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region, the alloy faithfully replicates the surface...

  5. Longitudinal bulk a coustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    Design, fabrication and characterization, in terms of mass sensitivity, is presented for a polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever. The device is operated in air at 51 MHz, resulting in a mass sensitivity of 100 HZ/fg (1 fg = 10{su−15 g). The initial characterization is cond...

  6. Bulk viscosity in 2SC quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark G; Schmitt, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The bulk viscosity of three-flavour colour-superconducting quark matter originating from the nonleptonic process u + s ↔ u + d is computed. It is assumed that up and down quarks form Cooper pairs while the strange quark remains unpaired (2SC phase). A general derivation of the rate of strangeness production is presented, involving contributions from a multitude of different subprocesses, including subprocesses that involve different numbers of gapped quarks as well as creation and annihilation of particles in the condensate. The rate is then used to compute the bulk viscosity as a function of the temperature, for an external oscillation frequency typical of a compact star r-mode. We find that, for temperatures far below the critical temperature T c for 2SC pairing, the bulk viscosity of colour-superconducting quark matter is suppressed relative to that of unpaired quark matter, but for T ∼> T c /30 the colour-superconducting quark matter has a higher bulk viscosity. This is potentially relevant for the suppression of r-mode instabilities early in the life of a compact star

  7. Combating wear in bulk solids handling plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    A total of five papers presented at a seminar on problems of wear caused by abrasive effects of materials in bulk handling. Topics of papers cover the designer viewpoint, practical experience from the steel, coal, cement and quarry industries to create an awareness of possible solutions.

  8. THE OPTIMIZATION OF PLUSH YARNS BULKING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VINEREANU Adam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experiments that were conducted on the installation of continuous bulking and thermofixing “SUPERBA” type TVP-2S for optimization of the plush yarns bulking process. There were considered plush yarns Nm 6.5/2, made of the fibrous blend of 50% indigenous wool sort 41 and 50% PES. In the first stage, it performs a thermal treatment with a turboprevaporizer at a temperature lower than thermofixing temperature, at atmospheric pressure, such that the plush yarns - deposed in a freely state on a belt conveyor - are uniformly bulking and contracting. It was followed the mathematical modeling procedure, working with a factorial program, rotatable central composite type, and two independent variables. After analyzing the parameters that have a direct influence on the bulking degree, there were selected the pre-vaporization temperature (coded x1,oC and the velocity of belt inside pre-vaporizer (coded x 2, m/min. As for the dependent variable, it was chosen the plush yarn diameter (coded y, mm. There were found the coordinates of the optimal point, and then this pair of values was verified in practice. These coordinates are: x1optim= 90oC and x 2optim= 6.5 m/min. The conclusion is that the goal was accomplished: it was obtained a good cover degree f or double-plush carpets by reducing the number of tufts per unit surface.

  9. Characteristics of bulk liquid undercooling and crystallization ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Characteristics of bulk liquid undercooling and crystallization behaviors ... cooling rate is fixed, the change of undercooling depends on the melt processing tem- ... solidification and a deep knowledge of undercooling of ... evolution, to obtain the information for the nucleation and ..... When cooling rate is fixed, the change.

  10. A stereoscopic look into the bulk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czech, Bartłomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Mosk, Benjamin [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Sully, James [Theory Group, SLAC National Accelerator LaboratoryMenlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2016-07-26

    We present the foundation for a holographic dictionary with depth perception. The dictionary consists of natural CFT operators whose duals are simple, diffeomorphism-invariant bulk operators. The CFT operators of interest are the “OPE blocks,” contributions to the OPE from a single conformal family. In holographic theories, we show that the OPE blocks are dual at leading order in 1/N to integrals of effective bulk fields along geodesics or homogeneous minimal surfaces in anti-de Sitter space. One widely studied example of an OPE block is the modular Hamiltonian, which is dual to the fluctuation in the area of a minimal surface. Thus, our operators pave the way for generalizing the Ryu-Takayanagi relation to other bulk fields. Although the OPE blocks are non-local operators in the CFT, they admit a simple geometric description as fields in kinematic space — the space of pairs of CFT points. We develop the tools for constructing local bulk operators in terms of these non-local objects. The OPE blocks also allow for conceptually clean and technically simple derivations of many results known in the literature, including linearized Einstein’s equations and the relation between conformal blocks and geodesic Witten diagrams.

  11. Bulk viscous cosmology in early Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of bulk viscosity on the early evolution of Universe for a spatially homogeneous and isotropic Robertson-Walker model is considered. Einstein's field equations are solved by using `gamma-law' equation of state = ( - 1)ρ, where the adiabatic parameter gamma () depends on the scale factor of the model.

  12. Failure by fracture in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, C.M.A.; Alves, Luis M.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits formability in bulk metal forming in the light of fundamental concepts of plasticity,ductile damage and crack opening modes. It proposes a new test to appraise the accuracy, reliability and validity of fracture loci associated with crack opening by tension and out-of-plane shear...

  13. Hexaferrite multiferroics: from bulk to thick films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutzarova, T.; Ghelev, Ch; Peneva, P.; Georgieva, B.; Kolev, S.; Vertruyen, B.; Closset, R.

    2018-03-01

    We report studies of the structural and microstructural properties of Sr3Co2Fe24O41 in bulk form and as thick films. The precursor powders for the bulk form were prepared following the sol-gel auto-combustion method. The prepared pellets were synthesized at 1200 °C to produce Sr3Co2Fe24O41. The XRD spectra of the bulks showed the characteristic peaks corresponding to the Z-type hexaferrite structure as a main phase and second phases of CoFe2O4 and Sr3Fe2O7-x. The microstructure analysis of the cross-section of the bulk pellets revealed a hexagonal sheet structure. Large areas were observed of packages of hexagonal sheets where the separate hexagonal particles were ordered along the c axis. Sr3Co2Fe24O41 thick films were deposited from a suspension containing the Sr3Co2Fe24O41 powder. The microstructural analysis of the thick films showed that the particles had the perfect hexagonal shape typical for hexaferrites.

  14. Integration of bulk piezoelectric materials into microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    Bulk piezoelectric ceramics, compared to deposited piezoelectric thin-films, provide greater electromechanical coupling and charge capacity, which are highly desirable in many MEMS applications. In this thesis, a technology platform is developed for wafer-level integration of bulk piezoelectric substrates on silicon, with a final film thickness of 5-100microm. The characterized processes include reliable low-temperature (200°C) AuIn diffusion bonding and parylene bonding of bulk-PZT on silicon, wafer-level lapping of bulk-PZT with high-uniformity (+/-0.5microm), and low-damage micro-machining of PZT films via dicing-saw patterning, laser ablation, and wet-etching. Preservation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties is confirmed with hysteresis and piezo-response measurements. The introduced technology offers higher material quality and unique advantages in fabrication flexibility over existing piezoelectric film deposition methods. In order to confirm the preserved bulk properties in the final film, diaphragm and cantilever beam actuators operating in the transverse-mode are designed, fabricated and tested. The diaphragm structure and electrode shapes/sizes are optimized for maximum deflection through finite-element simulations. During tests of fabricated devices, greater than 12microm PP displacement is obtained by actuation of a 1mm2 diaphragm at 111kHz with integration of a 50-80% efficient power management IC, which incorporates a supply-independent bias circuitry, an active diode for low-dropout rectification, a bias-flip system for higher efficiency, and a trickle battery charger. The overall system does not require a pre-charged battery, and has power consumption of <1microW in active-mode (measured) and <5pA in sleep-mode (simulated). Under lg vibration at 155Hz, a 70mF ultra-capacitor is charged from OV to 1.85V in 50 minutes.

  15. Regional geochemical maps of uranium in Northern Scotland. Environmental and economic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant, J.

    1978-01-01

    The Institute of Geological Studies geochemical mapping programme is outlined. The natural levels of uranium in rocks, soils and waters are discussed. Some practical details of geochemical mapping are given. Applications of geochemical maps of uranium in Scotland are considered: economic applications and medical geography and agriculture. A list of 38 references is appended. (U.K.)

  16. Well sediments: a medium for geochemical prospecting, an example from the Nisa region, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, S.P.; Dekkers, M.J.; Janssen, M.A.; Commandeur, J.

    1991-01-01

    Vriend, S.P., Dekkers, M.J.. Janssen, M.A. and Commandeur, J., 1991. Well sediments: a medium for geochemical prospecting, an example from the Nisa region. Portugal. In: A.W. Rose and P.M. Taufen I Editors). Geochemical Exploration ! 989. J. Geochem. Expior., 4 ! : ! 5 I- 167. Tile potential of

  17. GEOBASI: The geochemical Database of Tuscany Region (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunella Raco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the new Regional Geochemical Database (RGDB, called GEOBASI, is presented and illustrated in the framework of a joint collaboration among the three Tuscan universities (Florence, Pisa and Siena, CNR-IGG (Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources of Pisa, ARPAT (Regional Agency for the Environmental Protection, LAMMA (Environmental Modelling and Monitoring Laboratory for Sustainable Development Consortium and S.I.R.A. (Territorial and Environmental Informative System of Tuscany. The database has permitted the construction of a repository where the geochemical information (compositional and isotopic has been stored in a structured way so that it can be available for different groups of users (e.g. institutional, public and private companies. The information contained in the database can in fact be downloaded freely and queried to correlate geochemistry to other non compositional variables. The first phase of the project was aimed at promoting the use of the geochemical data already available from previous investigations through a powerful Web-GIS interface to implement the exploratory statistics graphical-numerical tools used to: 1 analyse the spatial variability of the investigated context, 2 highlight the geographic location of data pertaining to classes of values or single cases, 3 compare the results of different analytical methodologies applied to the determination of the same element and/or chemical species, 4 extract the geochemical data related to specific monitoring plans and/or geographical areas, and finally 5 recover information about data below the detection limit to understand their impact on the behaviour of the investigated variable. Developments of this project will be focused on the definition of rules and standardized methods in a way that external users could also interactively pursue the RGDB. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of the Scarlino-Follonica plain will permit the improvement and test of

  18. Geochemical Anomalies in the Sediments of Lake Druksiai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinas, A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on natural processes in Lake Druksiai and accumulation of pollutants, in 19931997, carrying on the state scientific program, the Marine Geochemistry Division of the Institute of Geography performed lithological geochemical mapping of lake bottom sediments on a scale of 1 .50 000. The results obtained enabled to distinguish zones of higher anthropogenous geochemical load, where geochemical anomalies of pollutants, including oil hydrocarbons and heavy metals, had been taken into account. Applying concentration coefficients for oil hydrocarbons and heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and their natural background, the attempt was made to differentiate natural and technogenous components in the geochemical anomalies As expected, the finer sediments -aleurite-pelite mud - showed amounts of oil hydrocarbons and heavy metals being 12.1 times higher than in fine sand - the most coarse of the sediments studied Sediments with organic mater exceeding 20% contained 11.7 times more pollutants than those with organic matter below 1 .5%. Calculations of concentration coefficients (CC) showed no elements in no stations exceeded 10 - the sediments did not reach the category of high pollution However, in many sites, the coefficients exceeded values of 1-2, thus, showing sediments attributable to the categories of weakly polluted or just polluted. Mapping model done by GIS methods (by superimposing schemes of pollutant CCs distribution in the lake and summing them) for geochemical anomalies two derivative map-schemes were obtained for oil hydrocarbons and heavy metals. They showed that clean sediments cover just 24.75% (according to the pollutant background for soil types) and 12.35% (according to the organic matter background for its amount intervals) lake bottom area. Zones slightly polluted by an element at least cover 69.7 and 80.29% of lake area, correspondingly; whereas zones slightly polluted by all

  19. Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite [UO 2 (OH) 2 . H 2 O], UO 2 (OH) 2 , and rutherfordine ((UO 2 CO 3 ) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions

  20. Geochemical Identification of Windblown Dust Deposits in the Upper Permian Brushy Canyon Formation, Southern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, M. M.; Motanated, K.; Weiss, R.

    2009-12-01

    Windblown dust is a potentially important but difficult-to-quantify source of siliciclastics for sedimentary basins worldwide. Positively identifying windblown deposits requires distinguishing them from other low density suspension transport deposits. For instance, laminated very fine grained sandstones and siltstones of the Upper Permian Brushy Canyon Formation have been variously interpreted as 1) the deposits of slow-moving, low-density turbidity currents, 2) distal overbank deposits of turbidity currents, 3) the deposits of turbulent suspensions transported across a pycnocline (interflows), and 4) windblown dust. This facies forms the bulk of Brushy Canyon Formation slope deposits, so understanding its origin is critical to understanding the evolution of the basin as a whole. We use a geochemical mapping technique (x-ray fluorescence microscopy) to show that these rocks are up to two times enriched in very fine sand sized zircon and rutile grains relative to Bouma A divisions of interbedded turbidites, suggesting substantial turbulence during transport. However, in contrast with the A divisions, the laminated sandstones and siltstones never show evidence of scour or amalgamation, implying that flow turbulence did not interact with underlying beds. Moreover, proximal loess deposits are often characterized by elevated Zr/Al2O3. These observations are most consistent with windblown interpretations for Brushy Canyon Formation slope sediments, and suggest that evolution of this early deepwater slope system was controlled largely by short-distance aeolian transport of very fine sand and silt from the coast. Heavy mineral incorporation into Brushy Canyon Formation slope deposits as reflected in laminae-scale bulk Zr and Ti abundances may preserve a long-term record of local wind intensity during the Upper Permian.

  1. Interlayer excitons in a bulk van der Waals semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ashish; Drüppel, Matthias; Schmidt, Robert; Deilmann, Thorsten; Schneider, Robert; Molas, Maciej R; Marauhn, Philipp; Michaelis de Vasconcellos, Steffen; Potemski, Marek; Rohlfing, Michael; Bratschitsch, Rudolf

    2017-09-21

    Bound electron-hole pairs called excitons govern the electronic and optical response of many organic and inorganic semiconductors. Excitons with spatially displaced wave functions of electrons and holes (interlayer excitons) are important for Bose-Einstein condensation, superfluidity, dissipationless current flow, and the light-induced exciton spin Hall effect. Here we report on the discovery of interlayer excitons in a bulk van der Waals semiconductor. They form due to strong localization and spin-valley coupling of charge carriers. By combining high-field magneto-reflectance experiments and ab initio calculations for 2H-MoTe 2 , we explain their salient features: the positive sign of the g-factor and the large diamagnetic shift. Our investigations solve the long-standing puzzle of positive g-factors in transition metal dichalcogenides, and pave the way for studying collective phenomena in these materials at elevated temperatures.Excitons, quasi-particles of bound electron-hole pairs, are at the core of the optoelectronic properties of layered transition metal dichalcogenides. Here, the authors unveil the presence of interlayer excitons in bulk van der Waals semiconductors, arising from strong localization and spin-valley coupling of charge carriers.

  2. Application of Handheld Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) to Geochemical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Brendan; Somers, Andrew; Day, David

    2016-05-01

    While laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been in use for decades, only within the last two years has technology progressed to the point of enabling true handheld, self-contained instruments. Several instruments are now commercially available with a range of capabilities and features. In this paper, the SciAps Z-500 handheld LIBS instrument functionality and sub-systems are reviewed. Several assayed geochemical sample sets, including igneous rocks and soils, are investigated. Calibration data are presented for multiple elements of interest along with examples of elemental mapping in heterogeneous samples. Sample preparation and the data collection method from multiple locations and data analysis are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Arsenic in groundwater of the Red River floodplain, Vietnam: Controlling geochemical processes and reactive transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Larsen, Flemming; Hue, N.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The mobilization of arsenic (As) to the groundwater was studied in a shallow Holocene aquifer on the Red River flood plain near Hanoi, Vietnam. The groundwater chemistry was investigated in a transect of 100 piezometers. Results show an anoxic aquifer featuring organic carbon decomposition......(III) but some As(V) is always found. Arsenic correlates well with NH4, relating its release to organic matter decomposition and the source of As appears to be the Fe-oxides being reduced. Part of the produced Fe(II) is apparently reprecipitated as siderite containing less As. Results from sediment extraction...... chemistry over depth is homogeneous and a reactive transport model was constructed to quantify the geochemical processes along the vertical groundwater flow component. A redox zonation model was constructed using the partial equilibrium approach with organic carbon degradation in the sediment as the only...

  4. Bulk solitary waves in elastic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonov, A. M.; Dreiden, G. V.; Semenova, I. V.; Shvartz, A. G.

    2015-10-01

    A short and object oriented conspectus of bulk solitary wave theory, numerical simulations and real experiments in condensed matter is given. Upon a brief description of the soliton history and development we focus on bulk solitary waves of strain, also known as waves of density and, sometimes, as elastic and/or acoustic solitons. We consider the problem of nonlinear bulk wave generation and detection in basic structural elements, rods, plates and shells, that are exhaustively studied and widely used in physics and engineering. However, it is mostly valid for linear elasticity, whereas dynamic nonlinear theory of these elements is still far from being completed. In order to show how the nonlinear waves can be used in various applications, we studied the solitary elastic wave propagation along lengthy wave guides, and remarkably small attenuation of elastic solitons was proven in physical experiments. Both theory and generation for strain soliton in a shell, however, remained unsolved problems until recently, and we consider in more details the nonlinear bulk wave propagation in a shell. We studied an axially symmetric deformation of an infinite nonlinearly elastic cylindrical shell without torsion. The problem for bulk longitudinal waves is shown to be reducible to the one equation, if a relation between transversal displacement and the longitudinal strain is found. It is found that both the 1+1D and even the 1+2D problems for long travelling waves in nonlinear solids can be reduced to the Weierstrass equation for elliptic functions, which provide the solitary wave solutions as appropriate limits. We show that the accuracy in the boundary conditions on free lateral surfaces is of crucial importance for solution, derive the only equation for longitudinal nonlinear strain wave and show, that the equation has, amongst others, a bidirectional solitary wave solution, which lead us to successful physical experiments. We observed first the compression solitary wave in the

  5. Memory phenomenon in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ye; Huang, Wei Min; Zhao, Yong; Ding, Zhen; Li, Yan; Tor, Shu Beng; Liu, Erjia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate two memory phenomena in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass (BMG). While the temperature memory effect (TME) is not found by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) test, shape recovery is observed in samples indented at both low and high temperatures. In terms of shape memory related characteristics, this BMG shares some features of shape memory alloys (SMAs) due to its metal nature, and some other features of shape memory polymers (SMPs) owing to its glassy–rubbery transition. The formation of protrusion in the polished sample after heating to super-cooled liquid region (SCLR) indicates that surface tension is not a necessarily positive contributor for shape recovery. Release of internal elastic stress is concluded as the major player. Although the amorphous nature of BMGs enables for storing appreciable amount of internal elastic stress upon deformation, without the presence of cross-linker as in typical SMPs, the shape recovery in BMGs is rather limited. - Highlights: • Experimental investigation of shape recovery in BMG. • Surface tension is not the major reason for shape recovery in BMG. • Release of internal stress is the major contributor for shape recovery. • Comparison of shape memory features of BMG with other shape memory materials.

  6. Memory phenomenon in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Ye [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Wei Min, E-mail: mwmhuang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Zhao, Yong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, 301 Xuefu Road, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Ding, Zhen [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore); Li, Yan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Tor, Shu Beng; Liu, Erjia [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-07-05

    In this paper, we experimentally investigate two memory phenomena in a lanthanum based bulk metallic glass (BMG). While the temperature memory effect (TME) is not found by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) test, shape recovery is observed in samples indented at both low and high temperatures. In terms of shape memory related characteristics, this BMG shares some features of shape memory alloys (SMAs) due to its metal nature, and some other features of shape memory polymers (SMPs) owing to its glassy–rubbery transition. The formation of protrusion in the polished sample after heating to super-cooled liquid region (SCLR) indicates that surface tension is not a necessarily positive contributor for shape recovery. Release of internal elastic stress is concluded as the major player. Although the amorphous nature of BMGs enables for storing appreciable amount of internal elastic stress upon deformation, without the presence of cross-linker as in typical SMPs, the shape recovery in BMGs is rather limited. - Highlights: • Experimental investigation of shape recovery in BMG. • Surface tension is not the major reason for shape recovery in BMG. • Release of internal stress is the major contributor for shape recovery. • Comparison of shape memory features of BMG with other shape memory materials.

  7. Online feature selection with streaming features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xindong; Yu, Kui; Ding, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xingquan

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new online feature selection framework for applications with streaming features where the knowledge of the full feature space is unknown in advance. We define streaming features as features that flow in one by one over time whereas the number of training examples remains fixed. This is in contrast with traditional online learning methods that only deal with sequentially added observations, with little attention being paid to streaming features. The critical challenges for Online Streaming Feature Selection (OSFS) include 1) the continuous growth of feature volumes over time, 2) a large feature space, possibly of unknown or infinite size, and 3) the unavailability of the entire feature set before learning starts. In the paper, we present a novel Online Streaming Feature Selection method to select strongly relevant and nonredundant features on the fly. An efficient Fast-OSFS algorithm is proposed to improve feature selection performance. The proposed algorithms are evaluated extensively on high-dimensional datasets and also with a real-world case study on impact crater detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithms achieve better compactness and higher prediction accuracy than existing streaming feature selection algorithms.

  8. Geochemical behaviour of rare earths in Vitis vinifera grafted onto different rootstocks and growing on several soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Censi, P.; Saiano, F.; Pisciotta, A.; Tuzzolino, N.

    2014-01-01

    The geochemical behaviour of lanthanides and yttrium (Rare Earth Elements, REEs) has been investigated mainly in geological systems where these elements represent the best proxies of processes involving the occurrence of an interface between different media. This behaviour is assessed according to features recorded in sequences of REE concentrations along the REE series normalised with respect to a reference material. In this study, the geochemical behaviour of REE was investigated in different parts of Vitis vinifera specimens grown off-soil, on soils of different nature and grafted onto several rootstocks in order to evaluate effects induced by these changes. The results indicated that roots are the plant organs where REEs are preferentially concentrated, in particular elements from Sm to Ho (middle REE, MREE) whereas Eu enrichments occur in aerial parts. The geochemical behaviour of REE suggests that MREE enrichments in roots are due to preferential MREE interactions with biological membranes or to surface complexation with newly formed phosphates. Eu-positive anomalies suggest that Eu 3+ can form stable organic complexes in place of Ca 2+ in several biological processes in xylem fluids. The possibility that Eu mobility in these fluids can be enhanced by its reductive speciation as Eu 2+ cannot be ruled out. The assessment of the geochemical behaviour of REE according to the theory of the Tetrad Effect carried out confirms that REEs coming from soil are scavenged onto root tissues or mineral surfaces whereas their behaviour in aerial parts of V. vinifera is driven by dissolved complexation. - Highlights: • REE behaviour is driven by scavenging onto authigenic solids or membranes in roots. • REE behaviour is driven by dissolved complexation in aerial plant parts. • Positive Eu anomalies are a consequence of the REE translocation by xylem fluids. • Significant REE tetrad effects are observed in Vitis vinifera plants

  9. Uranium-bearing and associated minerals in their geochemical and sedimentological context, Elliot Lake, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    The depositional energy environment of the Rio Algom-Denison ore reef was investigated on a regional scale using several parameters including pebble size. Regional trends of decreasing pebble size coincide with the regional direction of sediment transport. Pebble size was also used to characterize the depositional energy environment at the sample level. Quartz-pebble size and pyrite-grain size as determined from the same samples have a correlation coefficient of 0.93 which indicates that the coarse granular pyrite is detrital. Bulk chemical analyses of selected elements (U, Th, Pb, Ti, Ce, La, Y and Zr) which were chosen to reflect specific minerals (uraninite, brannerite, monazite and zircon), showed strong correlation with quartz-pebble size of the respective samples. Electron microprobe analyses of uraninite and brannerite are reported. The uraninites have typical pegmatitic compositions. Several types of brannerite are described; the conclusion reached is that although some brannerite may be detrital, most of it formed by adsorption of uranium onto titania collectors. Redistribution of some of the uranium has not changed the placer nature of the ore reef. Genesis of individual minerals (pyrite, uraninite, brannerite, zircon and monazite) is discussed. It is concluded that the mineralogy and its geochemical expression have been controlled by processes of fluvial deposition. As a result of the regional patterns in depositional environment, the ore reef shows a broad mineralogical zoning. Fluctuations in depositional energy have also produced lithologically related mineral zoning on a smaller scale. (author)

  10. Experimental Investigation and Simplistic Geochemical Modeling of CO2 Mineral Carbonation Using the Mount Tawai Peridotite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omeid Rahmani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the potential of CO2 mineral carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH2 derived from the Mount Tawai peridotite (forsterite based (Mg2SiO4 to produce thermodynamically stable magnesium carbonate (MgCO3 was evaluated. The effect of three main factors (reaction temperature, particle size, and water vapor were investigated in a sequence of experiments consisting of aqueous acid leaching, evaporation to dryness of the slurry mass, and then gas-solid carbonation under pressurized CO2. The maximum amount of Mg converted to MgCO3 is ~99%, which occurred at temperatures between 150 and 175 °C. It was also found that the reduction of particle size range from >200 to <75 µm enhanced the leaching rate significantly. In addition, the results showed the essential role of water vapor in promoting effective carbonation. By increasing water vapor concentration from 5 to 10 vol %, the mineral carbonation rate increased by 30%. This work has also numerically modeled the process by which CO2 gas may be sequestered, by reaction with forsterite in the presence of moisture. In both experimental analysis and geochemical modeling, the results showed that the reaction is favored and of high yield; going almost to completion (within about one year with the bulk of the carbon partitioning into magnesite and that very little remains in solution.

  11. Holocene geochemical footprint from Semi-arid alpine wetlands in southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alix, Antonio; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Toney, Jaime L.; Ramos-Román, María J.; Camuera, Jon; Anderson, R. Scott; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca; Queralt, Ignasi

    2018-02-01

    Here we provide the geochemical dataset that our research group has collected after 10 years of investigation in the Sierra Nevada National Park in southern Spain. These data come from Holocene sedimentary records from four alpine sites (ranging from ˜2500 to ˜3000 masl): two peatlands and two shallow lakes. Different kinds of organic and inorganic analyses have been conducted. The organic matter in the bulk sediment was characterised using elemental measurements and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). Leaf waxes in the sediment were investigated by means of chromatography with flame-ionization detection and mass spectrometry (GC-FID, GC-MS). Major, minor and trace elements of the sediments were analysed with atomic absorption (AAS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), as well as X-ray scanning fluorescence. These data can be reused by environmental researchers and soil and land managers of the Sierra Nevada National Park and similar regions to identify the effect of natural climate change, overprinted by human impact, as well as to project new management policies in similar protected areas.

  12. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Haestholmen site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino- Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    2001-01-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the geological final disposal of radioactive waste. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on the geochemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions that control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors that control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the crystalline bedrock at Haestholmen has been created and the significance of geochemical reactions and groundwater mixing along different flow paths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on water samples (64 altogether) obtained from precipitation, the Baltic Sea, the soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and 14 deep boreholes in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Haestholmen to a depth of 1000 m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used to evaluate evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 34}S) and mixing of palaeo-water types were approached by mass-balance calculations (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The interpretation and calculation of hydrochemical data from Haestholmen suggest that changes in external conditions, such as glaciation

  13. Geochemical Parameters Required from the SKB Site Characterisation Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    SKB has described its approach to site characterisation in a number of Technical Reports. One of the scientific topics in which specific information requirements and priorities are set out is geochemistry. This report for SKI examines critically whether the geochemical parameters identified in the SKB programme documents will be adequate for safety and regulatory requirements. It also examines some of the details of parameter requirements and interpretation tools that will be necessary to convert site investigation data into knowledge about chemical conditions and groundwater movements. The SKB strategy for geochemical data focuses on a small number of 'suitability indicators', primarily dissolved oxygen, pH and salinity. Their parameter requirements aim to assess those primary characteristics, as well as to acquire a wider range of data that will support those assessments and provide a broader understanding of candidate areas. An initial observation in this review that, though it is a primary suitability indicator, dissolved oxygen apparently will not be measured and instead will be inferred from other redox indicators. This raises a number of issues about sampling and monitoring measures, analytical data reliability and sensitivity, and the degree of confidence in geochemical understanding. A geochemical programme involves reconnaissance by desk study and acquisition of new data at levels of details that are appropriate to the stage of site investigations. As early as possible, a conceptual model of a candidate area should help to define the objectives of geochemical measurements on both rock and groundwater samples. It is recommended that parameters requirements should be defined and considered not only in terms of isolated measurements but more in terms of addressing broader objectives that relate to safety and also to geoscientific understanding. The safety priorities remain (e.g. dissolved oxygen) but will then be supported by an understanding of processes

  14. Geochemical Parameters Required from the SKB Site Characterisation Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2002-01-01

    SKB has described its approach to site characterisation in a number of Technical Reports. One of the scientific topics in which specific information requirements and priorities are set out is geochemistry. This report for SKI examines critically whether the geochemical parameters identified in the SKB programme documents will be adequate for safety and regulatory requirements. It also examines some of the details of parameter requirements and interpretation tools that will be necessary to convert site investigation data into knowledge about chemical conditions and groundwater movements. The SKB strategy for geochemical data focuses on a small number of 'suitability indicators', primarily dissolved oxygen, pH and salinity. Their parameter requirements aim to assess those primary characteristics, as well as to acquire a wider range of data that will support those assessments and provide a broader understanding of candidate areas. An initial observation in this review that, though it is a primary suitability indicator, dissolved oxygen apparently will not be measured and instead will be inferred from other redox indicators. This raises a number of issues about sampling and monitoring measures, analytical data reliability and sensitivity, and the degree of confidence in geochemical understanding. A geochemical programme involves reconnaissance by desk study and acquisition of new data at levels of details that are appropriate to the stage of site investigations. As early as possible, a conceptual model of a candidate area should help to define the objectives of geochemical measurements on both rock and groundwater samples. It is recommended that parameters requirements should be defined and considered not only in terms of isolated measurements but more in terms of addressing broader objectives that relate to safety and also to geoscientific understanding. The safety priorities remain (e.g. dissolved oxygen) but will then be supported by an understanding of

  15. Fluctuation effects in bulk polymer phase behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, F.S.; Rosedale, J.H.; Stepanek, P.; Lodge, T.P.; Wiltzius, P.; Hjelm R, Jr.; Fredrickson, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    Bulk polymer-polymer, and block copolymer, phase behaviors have traditionally been interpreted using mean-field theories. Recent small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of critical phenomena in model binary polymer mixtures confirm that non-mean-field behavior is restricted to a narrow range of temperatures near the critical point, in close agreement with the Ginzburg criterion. In contrast, strong derivations from mean-field behavior are evident in SANS and rheological measurements on model block copolymers more than 50C above the order-disorder transition (ODT), which can be attributed to sizeable composition fluctuations. Such fluctuation effects undermine the mean-field assumption, conventionally applied to bulk polymers, and result in qualitative changes in phase behavior, such as the elimination of a thermodynamic stability limit in these materials. The influence of fluctuation effects on block copolymer and binary mixture phase behavior is compared and contrasted in this presentation

  16. Nuclear Matter Bulk Parameter Scales and Correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, B. M.; Delfino, A.; Dutra, M.; Lourenço, O.

    2015-01-01

    We study the arising of correlations among some isovector bulk parameters in nonrelativistic and relativistic hadronic mean-field models. For the former, we investigate correlations in the nonrelativistic (NR) limit of relativistic point-coupling models. We provide analytical correlations, for the NR limit model, between the symmetry energy and its derivatives, namely, the symmetry energy slope, curvature, skewness and fourth order derivative, discussing the conditions in which they are linear ones. We also show that some correlations presented in the NR limit model are reproduced for relativistic models presenting cubic and quartic self-interactions in its scalar field. As a direct application of such linear correlations, we remark its association with possible crossing points in the density dependence of the linearly correlated bulk parameter. (author)

  17. Structural determinants in the bulk heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, Angela; Höfinger, Siegfried; Haunschmid, Ernst; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Yasui, Masato; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2018-02-21

    Photovoltaics is one of the key areas in renewable energy research with remarkable progress made every year. Here we consider the case of a photoactive material and study its structural composition and the resulting consequences for the fundamental processes driving solar energy conversion. A multiscale approach is used to characterize essential molecular properties of the light-absorbing layer. A selection of bulk-representative pairs of donor/acceptor molecules is extracted from the molecular dynamics simulation of the bulk heterojunction and analyzed at increasing levels of detail. Significantly increased ground state energies together with an array of additional structural characteristics are identified that all point towards an auxiliary role of the material's structural organization in mediating charge-transfer and -separation. Mechanistic studies of the type presented here can provide important insights into fundamental principles governing solar energy conversion in next-generation photovoltaic devices.

  18. ANFO bulk loading in coal mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajjar, A.

    1987-08-01

    With India's total coal production projected to increase from 152 to 237 million tons by 1990, net additional production from new mines must be more because of substantial depletion in existing mines. This article discusses the best possible application of explosive techniques in open-cast coal mines to economize production cost. The most energy-efficient and safest explosive is ANFO (ammonium nitrate, fuel oil); however, manual charging by INFO is not possible. Therefore, the solution is the application of bulk-loading systems of ANFO for giant mining operations. Cost of blasting per ton of coal production in India is in the range of Rs 25. Thus, the author suggests it will be the responsibility of mining engineers to see that the ANFO based bulk-loading system is implemented and the cost of production per ton reduced to Rs 19.50.

  19. Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yafei

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer Integrated Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators mainly introduces the theory, design, fabrication technology and application of a recently developed new type of device, multilayer integrated film bulk acoustic resonators, at the micro and nano scale involving microelectronic devices, integrated circuits, optical devices, sensors and actuators, acoustic resonators, micro-nano manufacturing, multilayer integration, device theory and design principles, etc. These devices can work at very high frequencies by using the newly developed theory, design, and fabrication technology of nano and micro devices. Readers in fields of IC, electronic devices, sensors, materials, and films etc. will benefit from this book by learning the detailed fundamentals and potential applications of these advanced devices. Prof. Yafei Zhang is the director of the Ministry of Education’s Key Laboratory for Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology, PRC; Dr. Da Chen was a PhD student in Prof. Yafei Zhang’s research group.

  20. Internal shear cracking in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an uncoupled ductile damage criterion for modelling the opening and propagation of internal shear cracks in bulk metal forming. The criterion is built upon the original work on the motion of a hole subjected to shear with superimposed tensile stress triaxiality and its overall...... performance is evaluated by means of side-pressing formability tests in Aluminium AA2007-T6 subjected to different levels of pre-strain. Results show that the new proposed criterionis able to combine simplicity with efficiency for predicting the onset of fracture and the crack propagation path for the entire...... cracking to internal cracks formed undert hree-dimensional states of stress that are typical of bulk metal forming....

  1. Induction detection of concealed bulk banknotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Christopher; Chen, Antao

    2011-01-01

    Bulk cash smuggling is a serious issue that has grown in volume in recent years. By building on the magnetic characteristics of paper currency, induction sensing is found to be capable of quickly detecting large masses of banknotes. The results show that this method is effective in detecting bulk cash through concealing materials such as plastics, cardboards, fabrics and aluminum foil. The significant difference in the observed phase between the received signals caused by conducting materials and ferrite compounds, found in banknotes, provides a good indication that this process can overcome the interference by metal objects in a real sensing application. This identification strategy has the potential to not only detect the presence of banknotes, but also the number, while still eliminating false positives caused by metal objects

  2. Induction detection of concealed bulk banknotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Christopher; Chen, Antao

    2012-06-01

    The smuggling of bulk cash across borders is a serious issue that has increased in recent years. In an effort to curb the illegal transport of large numbers of paper bills, a detection scheme has been developed, based on the magnetic characteristics of bank notes. The results show that volumes of paper currency can be detected through common concealing materials such as plastics, cardboard, and fabrics making it a possible potential addition to border security methods. The detection scheme holds the potential of also reducing or eliminating false positives caused by metallic materials found in the vicinity, by observing the stark difference in received signals caused by metal and currency. The detection scheme holds the potential to detect for both the presence and number of concealed bulk notes, while maintaining the ability to reduce false positives caused by metal objects.

  3. Bulk viscous cosmology with causal transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piattella, Oliver F.; Fabris, Júlio C.; Zimdahl, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    We consider cosmological scenarios originating from a single imperfect fluid with bulk viscosity and apply Eckart's and both the full and the truncated Müller-Israel-Stewart's theories as descriptions of the non-equilibrium processes. Our principal objective is to investigate if the dynamical properties of Dark Matter and Dark Energy can be described by a single viscous fluid and how such description changes when a causal theory (Müller-Israel-Stewart's, both in its full and truncated forms) is taken into account instead of Eckart's non-causal one. To this purpose, we find numerical solutions for the gravitational potential and compare its behaviour with the corresponding ΛCDM case. Eckart's and the full causal theory seem to be disfavoured, whereas the truncated theory leads to results similar to those of the ΛCDM model for a bulk viscous speed in the interval 10 −11 || cb 2 ∼ −8

  4. Raman characterization of bulk ferromagnetic nanostructured graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, Helena; Divine Khan, Ngwashi; Faccio, Ricardo; Araújo-Moreira, F.M.; Fernández-Werner, Luciana

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize bulk ferromagnetic graphite samples prepared by controlled oxidation of commercial pristine graphite powder. The G:D band intensity ratio, the shape and position of the 2D band and the presence of a band around 2950 cm -1 showed a high degree of disorder in the modified graphite sample, with a significant presence of exposed edges of graphitic planes as well as a high degree of attached hydrogen atoms.

  5. Depositing bulk or micro-scale electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kedar G.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Tolosa, Vanessa; Tooker, Angela C.; Sheth, Heeral J.; Felix, Sarah H.; Delima, Terri L.

    2016-11-01

    Thicker electrodes are provided on microelectronic device using thermo-compression bonding. A thin-film electrical conducting layer forms electrical conduits and bulk depositing provides an electrode layer on the thin-film electrical conducting layer. An insulating polymer layer encapsulates the electrically thin-film electrical conducting layer and the electrode layer. Some of the insulating layer is removed to expose the electrode layer.

  6. Theory of thermal expansivity and bulk modulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Munish

    2005-01-01

    The expression for thermal expansivity and bulk modulus, claimed by Shanker et al. to be new [Physica B 233 (1977) 78; 245 (1998) 190; J. Phys. Chem. Solids 59 (1998) 197] are compared with the theory of high pressure-high temperature reported by Kumar and coworkers. It is concluded that the Shanker formulation and the relations based on this are equal to the approach of Kumar et al. up to second order

  7. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A bulk viscosity driven inflationary model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waga, I.; Falcao, R.C.; Chanda, R.

    1985-01-01

    Bulk viscosity associated with the production of heavy particles during the GUT phase transition can lead to exponential or 'generalized' inflation. The condition of inflation proposed is independent of the details of the phase transition and remains unaltered in presence of a cosmological constant. Such mechanism avoids the extreme supercooling and reheating needed in the usual inflationary models. The standard baryongenesis mechanism can be maintained. (Author) [pt

  9. Identifying significant environmental features using feature recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Environmental Analysis at the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has expressed an interest in feature-recognition capability because it may help analysts identify environmentally sensitive features in the landscape, : including those r...

  10. Identification and characterization of tsunami deposits off southeast coast of India from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: Rock magnetic and geochemical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Basavaiah, N.; Ramkumar, T.; Venkatramanan, S.; Deenadayalan, K.

    2014-06-01

    The December 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT) had a major impact on the geomorphology and sedimentology of the east coast of India. Estimation of the magnitude of the tsunami from its deposits is a challenging topic to be developed in studies on tsunami hazard assessment. Two core sediments (C1 and C2) from Nagapattinam, southeast coast of India were subjected to textural, mineral, geochemical and rock-magnetic measurements. In both cores, three zones (zone I, II and III) have been distinguished based on mineralogical, geochemical and magnetic data. Zone II is featured by peculiar rock-magnetic, textural, mineralogical and geochemical signatures in both sediment cores that we interpret to correspond to the 2004 IOT deposit. Textural, mineralogical, geochemical and rock-magnetic investigations showed that the tsunami deposit is featured by relative enrichment in sand, quartz, feldspar, carbonate, SiO 2, TiO 2, K 2O and CaO and by a depletion in clay and iron oxides. These results point to a dilution of reworked ferromagnetic particles into a huge volume of paramagnetic materials, similar to what has been described in other nearshore tsunami deposits (Font et al. 2010). Correlation analysis elucidated the relationships among the textural, mineral, geochemical and magnetic parameters, and suggests that most of the quartz-rich coarse sediments have been transported offshore by the tsunami wave. These results agreed well with the previously published numerical model of tsunami induced sediment transport off southeast coast of India and can be used for future comparative studies on tsunami deposits.

  11. Evidence for Bulk Ripplocations in Layered Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Jacob; Lang, Andrew C.; Griggs, Justin; Taheri, Mitra L.; Tucker, Garritt J.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-09-01

    Plastically anisotropic/layered solids are ubiquitous in nature and understanding how they deform is crucial in geology, nuclear engineering, microelectronics, among other fields. Recently, a new defect termed a ripplocation-best described as an atomic scale ripple-was proposed to explain deformation in two-dimensional solids. Herein, we leverage atomistic simulations of graphite to extend the ripplocation idea to bulk layered solids, and confirm that it is essentially a buckling phenomenon. In contrast to dislocations, bulk ripplocations have no Burgers vector and no polarity. In graphite, ripplocations are attracted to other ripplocations, both within the same, and on adjacent layers, the latter resulting in kink boundaries. Furthermore, we present transmission electron microscopy evidence consistent with the existence of bulk ripplocations in Ti3SiC2. Ripplocations are a topological imperative, as they allow atomic layers to glide relative to each other without breaking the in-plane bonds. A more complete understanding of their mechanics and behavior is critically important, and could profoundly influence our current understanding of how graphite, layered silicates, the MAX phases, and many other plastically anisotropic/layered solids, deform and accommodate strain.

  12. Accelerating universes driven by bulk particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, F.A.; Cruz, F.F.; Oliveira, J.F.N.

    2005-01-01

    We consider our universe as a 3d domain wall embedded in a 5d dimensional Minkowski space-time. We address the problem of inflation and late time acceleration driven by bulk particles colliding with the 3d domain wall. The expansion of our universe is mainly related to these bulk particles. Since our universe tends to be permeated by a large number of isolated structures, as temperature diminishes with the expansion, we model our universe with a 3d domain wall with increasing internal structures. These structures could be unstable 2d domain walls evolving to fermi-balls which are candidates to cold dark matter. The momentum transfer of bulk particles colliding with the 3d domain wall is related to the reflection coefficient. We show a nontrivial dependence of the reflection coefficient with the number of internal dark matter structures inside the 3d domain wall. As the population of such structures increases the velocity of the domain wall expansion also increases. The expansion is exponential at early times and polynomial at late times. We connect this picture with string/M-theory by considering BPS 3d domain walls with structures which can appear through the bosonic sector of a five-dimensional supergravity theory

  13. Geochemical and isotopic evidences for a severe anthropogenic boron contamination: A case study from Castelluccio (Arezzo, central Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturi, Stefania; Vaselli, Orlando; Tassi, Franco; Nisi, Barbara; Pennisi, Maddalena; Cabassi, Jacopo; Bicocchi, Gabriele; Rossato, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In 2009 a deterioration of garden plants watered with domestic wells was related to high boron concentrations (up to 57 mg/L) measured in the shallow aquifer from the industrial area of Castelluccio (Tuscany, Italy), where several factories are or were using boron compounds for their industrial processes. Since 2012 a geochemical and isotopic survey of stream, ground and waste waters, and sediment samples was performed. In addition, monthly geochemical surveys were carried out from January to September 2013, during which concentrations of boron up to 139 mg/L were measured. The geochemical dataset also included raw (borax and sodium boron-hydride) and anthropogenic materials (B-rich slags and muds stored in one of the local factories), the latter being, to the best of our knowledge, analyzed for the first time in this work for bulk and leachate boron concentration and isotopic ratios. The results highlighted that the high concentrations of boron found in the local shallow aquifer had unequivocally an anthropogenic source. It was suggested that prolonged interaction between industrial (presently stored at ground level or buried) by-products and waste and meteoric waters was likely the main process responsible of the groundwater contamination as supported by the analysis of the major solutes. The dispersion of the contaminant could not clearly be observed downward the shallow hydrogeological circuit. Consequently, the presence of other sources of boron in the industrial area of Castelluccio cannot be excluded. This would also explain the reason why no univocal results were obtained by the "1"1B/"1"0B isotopic ratios measured in water, sediment and (bulk and leachate) anthropogenic samples. To minimize the boron contamination a hydraulic barrier should be constructed where the highest concentrations of boron were measured. - Highlights: • High boron concentrations were measured in a groundwater system near Arezzo (Italy). • Several factories in the local

  14. Feasibility study on diagnosis of material damage using bulk wave mixing technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jeong Seok; Cho, Youn Ho [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Ultrasonic nonlinear evaluation is generally utilized for detection of not only defects but also microdamage such as corrosion and plastic deformation. Nonlinearity is determined by the amplitude ratio of primary wave second harmonic wave, and the results of its comparison are used for evaluation. Owing to the experimental features, the experimental nonlinearity result contains system nonlinearity and material nonlinearity. System nonlinearity is that which is unwanted by the user; hence, it acts as an error and interrupts analysis. In this study, a bulk wave mixing technique is implemented in order to minimize the system nonlinearity and obtain the reliable analysis results. The biggest advantage of this technique is that experimental nonlinearity contains less system nonlinearity than that for the conventional nonlinear ultrasonic technique. Theoretical and experimental verifications are performed in this study. By comparing the results of the bulk wave mixing technique with those of the conventional technique, the strengths, weaknesses, and application validity of the bulk wave mixing technique are determined.

  15. Geochemical behaviour study of radionuclides and their radiogenic daughters in the vicinity of Oklo 10 and 13 natural nuclear reactors (Gabon) - Application to high-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menet-Dressayre, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    Since 1981, the discovery of new and almost unaltered natural nuclear reactors in the uranium mine of Oklo (Gabon) renewed the interest of scientific community. Indeed, due to their specific features, these reactors could be extensively investigated as natural analogues to better understand the geochemical processes which may occur in a high level nuclear waste repository. The aim of this PhD thesis is to determine the present distribution of a few radionuclides or their radiogenic daughters initially formed within the reaction zones and to infer their geochemical behaviour, subsequently to the stopping of nuclear reactions. Our study was focused on reactors 10 and 13 and their immediate sandstone surroundings in order to decipher the fate of U, Y and light rare earth elements which are assumed to be chemical analogues of actinides and fission products. Mineralogical observations, chemical and isotopic analyses on bulk rocks, led us to conclude that a part of radionuclides, as well as their daughters, remained confined within the reactions zones, in association with secondary mineral phases, whereas another part migrated towards tbe reactor rims. The radionuclides were concentrated at the reactor border or migrated within the first few metres of the surrounding sandstone, according to the intensity of nuclear reactors and the presence of the so-called 'facies argile de pile' which constitutes an intermediate facies between that of reactor cores and that of the surrounding sandstone. In the latter, long range elemental transfers occurred via fissures. Some of them, contemporaneous to the nuclear reactions drained radionuclides-rich fluids at temperatures of about 150-170 deg. C. More recent fissures, observed only in the environment of reactor 13, have allowed the transport of hotter hydrothermal fluids (about 310 deg. C), likely related to the nearby intrusion of dolerite dyke. The principal implications of this work for the disposal of nuclear wastes

  16. Version 4. 00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

    1992-09-01

    The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

  17. Version 4.00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

    1992-09-01

    The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

  18. A preliminary report of geochemical investigations in the Blackbird District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canney, F.C.; Hawkes, H.E.; Richmond, G.M.; Vhay, J. S.

    1953-01-01

    This paper reviews an experimental geochemical prospecting survey in the Blackbird cobalt-copper mining district. The district is in east-central Idaho, about 20 miles west-southwest of Salmon. The area is one of deeply weathered nearly flat-topped upland surfaces cut by steep-walled valleys which are tributary to the canyon of Panther Creek. Most of the area has a relatively heavy vegetative cover, and outcrops are scarce except on the sides of the steeper valleys* Because of the importance of the surficial deposits and soils and the physiographic history of the region on the interpretation of the geochemical data, a separate chapter on this subject by Gerald H. Richmond follows the following brief description of the geology of the district.

  19. Status report on geochemical field results from Atlantic study sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.R.S.; Thomson, J.; Hydes, D.J.; Colley, S.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarises the results of preliminary geochemical investigations at three North Atlantic study areas. The two eastern sites, on the Cape Verde abyssal plain (CV2) and east of Great Meteor Seamount (GME) were visited during 1982. The results presented are preliminary. Studies in the western Atlantic, close to the Nares Abyssal Plain study site are more detailed and are presented in a separate paper. The report shows for the first time the relative redox status of the three sites. The differences are unexpectedly large, the most reduced cores being recovered at GME and the most oxidised at CV2. The sporadic nature of Recent sediment accumulation at these sites is also emphasised. In order to place these preliminary results in context their relevance to the production of mathematical system models is discussed in a closing section. The necessity for such models to rest on sound foundations of geochemical understanding is noted. Suggestions on future research priorities are offered for discussion. (author)

  20. Sodium Flux Growth of Bulk Gallium Nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Dollen, Paul Martin

    This dissertation focused on development of a novel apparatus and techniques for crystal growth of bulk gallium nitride (GaN) using the sodium flux method. Though several methods exist to produce bulk GaN, none have been commercialized on an industrial scale. The sodium flux method offers potentially lower cost production due to relatively mild process conditions while maintaining high crystal quality. But the current equipment and methods for sodium flux growth of bulk GaN are generally not amenable to large-scale crystal growth or in situ investigation of growth processes, which has hampered progress. A key task was to prevent sodium loss or migration from the sodium-gallium growth melt while permitting N2 gas to access the growing crystal, which was accomplished by implementing a reflux condensing stem along with a reusable sealed capsule. The reflux condensing stem also enabled direct monitoring and control of the melt temperature, which has not been previously reported for the sodium flux method. Molybdenum-based materials were identified from a corrosion study as candidates for direct containment of the corrosive sodium-gallium melt. Successful introduction of these materials allowed implementation of a crucible-free containment system, which improved process control and can potentially reduce crystal impurity levels. Using the new growth system, the (0001) Ga face (+c plane) growth rate was >50 mum/hr, which is the highest bulk GaN growth rate reported for the sodium flux method. Omega X-ray rocking curve (?-XRC) measurements indicated the presence of multiple grains, though full width at half maximum (FWHM) values for individual peaks were 1020 atoms/cm3, possibly due to reactor cleaning and handling procedures. This dissertation also introduced an in situ technique to correlate changes in N2 pressure with dissolution of nitrogen and precipitation of GaN from the sodium-gallium melt. Different stages of N2 pressure decay were identified and linked to

  1. Geochemical Weathering in Glacial and Proglacial Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranter, M.

    2003-12-01

    solution, typically monitored by electrical conductivity, is often inverse with discharge on both a diurnal and a seasonal basis at lower latitudes, but ismore complex at higher latitudes (Figure 1, Figure 2 and Figure 3). Figure 1, Figure 2 and Figure 3 also show that the total flux of glacial solutes is usually dominated by fluxes associated with high discharge, dilute waters. The chemical weathering reactions that are inferred to occur from the field studies have been supported, in part, by controlled laboratory studies (e.g., Brown et al., 1993a). Recent stable-isotope studies have reported the key involvement of microbial processes in certain regions of the glacier bed ( Bottrell and Tranter, 2002), and these processes are yet to be incorporated in lab-based chemical weathering studies. (14K)Figure 1. (a) The temporal variation of discharge and in non-sea-salt calcium (*Ca2+) concentration in runoff from Haut Glacier d'Arolla, a small, warm-based, valley glacier in the Swiss Alps, during 1989 (Brown et al., 1993a). (b) The temporal variation in *Ca2+ flux from Haut Glacier d'Arolla during 1989. Maximum fluxes are associated with higher discharge waters. (9K)Figure 2. (a) The temporal variation of discharge (Q) and non-sea-salt *Ca2+ concentration in runoff from Manitsoq Glacier, a small outlet glacier on the SW margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet, during 1999. The glacier is warm based, but has a cold-based margin during the winter and early ablation season, so displays polythermal-based hydrological features (Skidmore et al., in preparation). (b) The temporal variation in *Ca2+ flux from Manitsoq Glacier during 1999. Maximum flux is associated with an early season "outburst" event, where longer stored subglacial water first exits the glacier. Otherwise, maximum fluxes are associated with higher discharge waters. (10K)Figure 3. (a) The temporal variation of discharge and *Ca2+ concentration in runoff from Scott Turnerbreen, a small, cold-based, valley glacier on

  2. Geochemical signatures of tephras from Quaternary Antarctic Peninsula volcanoes

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus,Stefan; Kurbatov,Andrei; Yates,Martin

    2013-01-01

    In the northern Antarctic Peninsula area, at least 12 Late Plelstocene-Holocene volcanic centers could be potential sources of tephra layers in the region. We present unique geochemical fingerprints for ten of these volcanoes using major, trace, rare earth element, and isotope data from 95 samples of tephra and other eruption products. The volcanoes have predominantly basaltic and basaltic andesitic compositions. The Nb/Y ratio proves useful to distinguish between volcanic centers located on ...

  3. Geochemical of clay formations : study of Spanish clay REFERENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrero, M. J.; Pena, J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay rocks are investigated in different international research programs in order to assess its feasibility for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. This is because different sepcific aspects: they have low hydraulic conductivity (10''-11-10''-15 m/s), a high sorption capacity, self-sealing capacity of facults and discontinuities and mechanical resistance. Several research programs on clay formations are aimed to study the chemistry of the groundwater and the water-rock reactions that control it: e. g. Boom Clay (Mol, Belgium), Oxford Clay /Harwell, United Kingdom), Toarcian Clay (Tournemire, France), Palfris formation (Wellenberg, Switzerland), Opalinus Clay (Bure, France). Based on these studies, considerable progress in the development of techniques for hydrologic, geochemical and hydrogeochemical characterization of mudstones has been accomplished (e. g. Beaufais et al. 1994, De Windt el al. 1998. Thury and Bossart 1999, Sacchi and Michelot 2000) with important advances in the knowledge of geochemical process in these materials (e. g. Reeder et al. 1993, Baeyens and Brandbury 1994, Beaucaire et al. 2000, Pearson et al., 2003).Furtermore, geochemical modeling is commonly used to simulate the evolution of water chemistry and to understand quantitatively the processes controlling the groundwater chemistry (e. g. Pearson et al. 1998, Tempel and Harrison 2000, Arcos et al., 2001). The work presented here is part of a research program funded by Enresa in the context of its R and D program. It is focused on the characterization of a clay formation (reference Argillaceous Formation, RAF) located within the Duero Basin (north-centralSpain). The characterisation of th ephysical properties,, fluid composition, mineralogy, water-rock reaction processes, geochemical modelling and sorption properties of the clays from the mentioned wells is the main purpose of this work. (Author)

  4. Geochemical prospecting for rare earth elements using termite mound materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Yu; Ohno, Tetsuji; Hoshino, Mihoko; Shin, Ki-Cheol; Murakami, Hiroyasu; Tsunematsu, Maiko; Watanabe, Yasushi

    2014-12-01

    The Blockspruit fluorite prospect, located in North West State of the Republic of South Africa, occurs within an actinolite rock zone that was emplaced into the Kenkelbos-type granite of Proterozoic age. There are a large number of termite mounds in the prospect. For geochemical prospecting for rare earth elements (REEs), in total, 200 samples of termite mound material were collected from actinolite rock and granite zones in the prospect. Geochemical analyses of these termite mound materials were conducted by two methods: portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Comparison of the two methods broadly indicates positive correlations of REEs (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and Y), in particular Y and La having a strong correlation. As the result of modal abundance analyses, the actinolite rock at surface mainly consists of ferro-actinolite (89.89 wt%) and includes xenotime (0.26 wt%) and monazite (0.21 wt%) grains as REE minerals. Termite mound materials from actinolite rock also contain xenotime (0.27 wt%) and monazite (0.41 wt%) grains. In addition, termite mound materials from the actinolite rock zone have high hematite and Fe silicate contents compared to those from granite zone. These relationships suggest that REE minerals in termite mound materials originate form actinolite rock. Geochemical anomaly maps of Y, La, and Fe concentrations drawn based on the result of the portable XRF analyses show that high concentrations of these elements trend from SW to NE which broadly correspond to occurrences of actinolite body. These results indicate that termite mounds are an effective tool for REE geochemical prospection in the study area for both light REEs and Y, but a more detailed survey is required to establish the distribution of the actinolite rock body.

  5. Geochemical normalization of magnetic susceptibility for investigation of floodplain sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faměra, Martin; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Grison, Hana

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2018), č. článku 189. ISSN 1866-6280 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00340S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : Background functions * Geochemical normalization * Mass-specific magnetic susceptibility * Post-depositional processes * Provenance Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7); Geology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.569, year: 2016

  6. Regional geochemical prospecting of uranium in the Amazon region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenker, A.O.; Hohn, H.

    1982-01-01

    A regional geochemical prospecting program for uranium in the Serra dos Carajas area, south of Para, was performed by NUCLEBRAS using stream sediment samples obtained from other companies acting in this area. The results of the survey are presented compared to regional geology and an aerial total count map. The different data showed a good correlation, particularly in areas mapped regionally as granitic rocks. (Author) [pt

  7. Use of natural geochemical tracers to improve reservoir simulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseby, O.; Chatzichristos, C.; Sagen, J.; Muller, J.; Kleven, R.; Bennett, B.; Larter, S.; Stubos, A.K.; Adler, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    This article introduces a methodology for integrating geochemical data in reservoir simulations to improve hydrocarbon reservoir models. The method exploits routine measurements of naturally existing inorganic ion concentration in hydrocarbon reservoir production wells, and uses the ions as non-partitioning water tracers. The methodology is demonstrated on a North Sea field case, using the field's reservoir model, together with geochemical information (SO{sub 4}{sup 2}, Mg{sup 2+} K{sup +}, Ba{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cl{sup -} concentrations) from the field's producers. From the data-set we show that some of the ions behave almost as ideal sea-water tracers, i.e. without sorption to the matrix, ion-exchange with the matrix or scale-formation with other ions in the formation water. Moreover, the dataset shows that ion concentrations in pure formation-water vary according to formation. This information can be used to allocate produced water to specific water-producing zones in commingled production. Based on an evaluation of the applicability of the available data, one inorganic component, SO{sub 4}{sup 2}, is used as a natural seawater tracer. Introducing SO{sub 4}{sup 2} as a natural tracer in a tracer simulation has revealed a potential for improvements of the reservoir model. By tracking the injected seawater it was possible to identify underestimated fault lengths in the reservoir model. The demonstration confirms that geochemical data are valuable additional information for reservoir characterization, and shows that integration of geochemical data into reservoir simulation procedures can improve reservoir simulation models. (author)

  8. Geochemical characterization of Parana Basin volcanic rocks: petrogenetic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study of the geochemical characteristics of Parana Basin volcanic rocks is presented. The results are based on the analyses of major and trace elements of 158 samples. Ninety three of these volcanic samples belong to 8 flow sequences from Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina States. The remaining sixty five samples are distributed over the entire basin. In order to study the influence of crustal contamination processes in changing chemical characteristics of the volcanic rocks, 47 samples representative of the crystalline basement of the southern and southeastern Parana Basin were also analysed. Several petrogenetic models were tested to explain the compocional variability of the volcanic rocks, in particular those of southern region. The results obtained sugest an assimilation-fractional crystallization process as viable to explain the differences of both the chemical characteristics and Sr isotope initial ratios observed in basic and intermediate rocks. A model involving melting processes of basic material, trapped at the base of the crust, with composition similar to low and high TiO 2 basalts appears to be a possibility to originate the Palmas and Chapeco acid melts, respectively. The study of ''uncontaminated'' or poorly contaminated low TiO 2 basic rocks from the southern, central and northern regions shows the existence of significant differences in the geochemical charactetistics according to their geographical occurrence. A similar geochemical diversity is also observed in high TiO 2 basalts and Chapeco volcanics. Differences in incompatible element ratios between low and high TiO 2 ''uncontaminated'' or poorly contaminated basalts suggest that they could have been produced by different degrees of melting in a garnet peridotite source. Geochemical and isotopic (Sr and Nd) data also support the view that basalts from northern and southern regions of Parana Basin originated from mantle source with different composition. (author) [pt

  9. The geochemical environment of nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.

    1995-01-01

    The concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste in a geologic environment on the Canadian Shield has recently been presented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to governments, scientists, and the public, for review. An important part of this concept concerns the geochemical environment of a disposal vault and includes consideration of rock and groundwater compositions, geochemical interactions between rocks, groundwaters, and emplaced vault materials, and the influences and significance of anthropogenic and microbiological effects following closure of the vault. This paper summarizes the disposal concept and examines aspects of the geochemical environment. The presence of saline groundwaters and reducing conditions at proposed vault depths (500-1000 m) in the Canadian Shield has an important bearing on the stability of the used nuclear fuel, its container, and buffer and backfill materials. The potential for introduction of anthropogenic contaminants and microbes during site investigations and vault excavation, operation, and sealing is described with examples from AECL's research areas on the Shield and in their underground research laboratory in southeastern Manitoba. (author)

  10. Evaluation of disposal site geochemical performance using a containment factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, A.; Domenico, P.A.; Bartlett, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The containment factor is a measure of retention by geologic setting of wastes released from a repository. The factor is alternatively defined either in terms of several measurable hydrological and geochemical parameters, or in terms of amounts of waste components that may be released to the geologic setting and, subsequently, to the environment. Containment factors for individual waste components in a given geologic setting are functions of groundwater to rock volume ratios, sorption or exchange characteristics of the rocks, and containment time to groundwater travel time ratios. For high-level radioactive wastes, containment factors based on the NRC and EPA limit values for cumulative releases from waste and to the environment provide a measure of the geochemical performance of the geologic setting in tuff, basalt, and salt. The containment factor values for individual nuclides from high-level wastes indicate that for some of the nuclides containment may be achieved by groundwater travel time along. For other nuclides, additional performance functions need to be allocated to geochemical retention by such processes as sorption, ion-exchange or precipitation

  11. In situ geochemical properties of clays subject to thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, N.A.

    1980-01-01

    Compositional variation and geochemical environment in an argillaceous unit are a function of age, depth of burial and mode of origin. This paper considers the variation limits likely to be encountered in potential repository host rocks and examines the significance of factors such as porosity, pore-fluid pressure, total fluid content, and major and accessory mineral component behaviors in controlling the geochemical environment in the neighbourhood of a thermally active waste canister. Particular attention is paid to the use of Eh-pH diagrams in assessing corrosion environments and nuclide speciation. The paper outlines the variables which must be considered when endeavouring to interpret such plots (e.g. temperature, concentration, concurrent reactions and probabilities) and uses the behavior of various iron minerals found in clay deposits under specific conditions to illustrate the complexities. The overall thermal stability of various clay and accessory minerals is discussed and extended to attempt to predict behavior under deep repository conditions, using available data on the diagenetic characteristics of clay-rich sediments. The physical behavior of fluids in plastic clays is considered and methods evaluated for deriving induced geochemical conditions in a thermally active repository. The latter section is particularly related to canister corrosion studies, in situ experiments, and waste dissolution parameters

  12. The role of atomic absorption spectrometry in geochemical exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the principles of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and the basic hardware components necessary to make measurements of analyte concentrations. Then we discuss a variety of methods that have been developed for the introduction of analyte atoms into the light path of the spectrophotometer. This section deals with sample digestion, elimination of interferences, and optimum production of ground-state atoms, all critical considerations when choosing an AAS method. Other critical considerations are cost, speed, simplicity, precision, and applicability of the method to the wide range of materials sampled in geochemical exploration. We cannot attempt to review all of the AAS methods developed for geological materials but instead will restrict our discussion to some of those appropriate for geochemical exploration. Our background and familiarity are reflected in the methods we discuss, and we have no doubt overlooked many good methods. Our discussion should therefore be considered a starting point in finding the right method for the problem, rather than the end of the search. Finally, we discuss the future of AAS relative to other instrumental techniques and the promising new directions for AAS in geochemical exploration. ?? 1992.

  13. Geochemical signature of columbite-tantalite and environmental impact of radioactive pegmatite mining in the Parelhas region, Rio Grande do Norte, Northeast Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Jorge Costa de; Cruz, Paulo R.; Pereira, Valmir, E-mail: jcmoura@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: pcruz@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: vpereira@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Ludka, Isabel P.; Mendes, Julio C., E-mail: ludka@geologia.ufrj.br, E-mail: julio@geologia.ufrj.br [Universidade Federal de Rio do Janeiro (CCMN/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Matematicas e da Natureza. Dept. de Geologia

    2013-07-01

    This article comprises geochemical, structural and radiometric investigations on radioactive pegmatites of the Borborema Pegmatitic Province in Northeast Brazil. The studied area is located in the surroundings of the city of Parelhas, in the geotectonic Province of Borborema. It is well known for its thousands of pegmatitic bodies exploited in primitive mines called garimpos. The main goal was to find an efficient, cheap and routine inspection procedure to identify the origin of commercialized radioactive columbite-tantalite (coltan) ore. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Agency (CNEN) controls uranium commerce and nuclear activity in Brazil. Without an effective method to characterize coltan ores from different localities it is impossible to control the trade. The here presented new method was developed by correlating structural features of these pegmatites with the geochemical behavior of their coltan samples. It was found that the variation of U/Th vs. Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} provides geochemical signatures (analytical fingerprints) for the source location of such ore. The new method was tested with coltan samples of commercial batches from the Brazilian states of Amapa and Rondonia and also generated distinct geochemical signatures. A radiometric survey (CPS) to study the environmental impact of gamma radiation was also carried out in several mines and pegmatites. It included in situ measurements of pegmatite walls, enclosing rocks, soil, and accumulated water and revealed that gamma emitters are hardly solubilized and therefore environmental gamma radiation generally is not enhanced to a dangerous level. (author)

  14. Geochemical signature of columbite-tantalite and environmental impact of radioactive pegmatite mining in the Parelhas region, Rio Grande do Norte, Northeast Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Jorge Costa de; Cruz, Paulo R.; Pereira, Valmir; Ludka, Isabel P.; Mendes, Julio C.

    2013-01-01

    This article comprises geochemical, structural and radiometric investigations on radioactive pegmatites of the Borborema Pegmatitic Province in Northeast Brazil. The studied area is located in the surroundings of the city of Parelhas, in the geotectonic Province of Borborema. It is well known for its thousands of pegmatitic bodies exploited in primitive mines called garimpos. The main goal was to find an efficient, cheap and routine inspection procedure to identify the origin of commercialized radioactive columbite-tantalite (coltan) ore. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Agency (CNEN) controls uranium commerce and nuclear activity in Brazil. Without an effective method to characterize coltan ores from different localities it is impossible to control the trade. The here presented new method was developed by correlating structural features of these pegmatites with the geochemical behavior of their coltan samples. It was found that the variation of U/Th vs. Nb 2 O 5 /Ta 2 O 5 provides geochemical signatures (analytical fingerprints) for the source location of such ore. The new method was tested with coltan samples of commercial batches from the Brazilian states of Amapa and Rondonia and also generated distinct geochemical signatures. A radiometric survey (CPS) to study the environmental impact of gamma radiation was also carried out in several mines and pegmatites. It included in situ measurements of pegmatite walls, enclosing rocks, soil, and accumulated water and revealed that gamma emitters are hardly solubilized and therefore environmental gamma radiation generally is not enhanced to a dangerous level. (author)

  15. Geochemical signature of columbite-tantalite and radiometric survey of radioactive pegmatites in the region of Parelhas, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Jorge Costa de

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is the result of geochemical, structural and radiometric investigations on radioactive pegmatites of the Borborema Pegmatitic Province in Northeast Brazil. The studied area, located in the surroundings of the city of Parelhas in the region of the Serra da Borborema, is well known for its thousands of pegmatitic bodies exploited in primitive mines called 'garimpos'. The main goal was to find an efficient, cheap and routine inspection procedure to identify the origin of commercialized radioactive columbite-tantalite (coltan) ore. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Agency (CNEN) controls uranium commerce and nuclear activity in Brazil. Without an effective method to characterize coltan ores from different localities it is impossible to control the trade. The here presented new method was developed by correlating structural features of these pegmatites with the geochemical behavior of their coltan samples. It was found that the variation of the ratio U/Th versus Nb 2 O 5 /Ta 2 O 5 provides geochemical signatures (analytical fingerprints) for the source location of such ore. A test of the new method with coltan samples of commercial batches from the Brazilian states Amapa and Rondonia also generated distinct geochemical signatures. A radiometric survey (CPS) was carried out in several mines and pegmatites to study the environmental impact of gamma radiation. It included in situ measurements of pegmatite walls, host rocks, soil, and accumulated water and revealed that gamma emitters are hardly solubilized and environmental gamma radiation therefore generally is not enhanced to a dangerous level. (author)

  16. Technical specifications for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    Technical specifications are presented concerning the safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls

  17. Transfer points of belt conveyors operating with unfavorable bulk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goehring, H [Technische Universitaet, Dresden (German Democratic Republic)

    1989-06-01

    Describes design of belt conveyor chutes that transfer bulk of surface mines from one conveyor to another. Conveyor belt velocity is a significant parameter. Unfavorable chute design may lead to bulk flow congestion, bulk velocity losses etc. The bulk flow process is analyzed, bulk flow velocities, belt inclinations and bulk feeding from 2 conveyors into one chute are taken into account. Conventional chutes have parabolic belt impact walls. An improved version with divided impact walls is proposed that maintains a relatively high bulk velocity, reduces friction at chute walls and decreases wear and dirt build-up. Design of the improved chute is explained. It is built to adapt to existing structures without major modifications. The angle between 2 belt conveyors can be up to 90 degrees, the best bulk transfer is noted at conveyor angles below 60 degrees. Various graphs and schemes are provided. 6 refs.

  18. Anomalous behavior of the excited state of the A exciton in bulk WS2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jindal, Vishwas; Bhuyan, Sumi; Deilmann, Thorsten

    2018-01-01

    Results of optical spectroscopy studies on bulk 2H-WS2 at energies close to its direct band gap are presented. Reflectance and absorption measurements at low temperature show only one dominant feature due to the A exciton of bulk WS2 at similar to 2.02 eV. However, a laser-modulated photoreflecta......Results of optical spectroscopy studies on bulk 2H-WS2 at energies close to its direct band gap are presented. Reflectance and absorption measurements at low temperature show only one dominant feature due to the A exciton of bulk WS2 at similar to 2.02 eV. However, a laser....... The experimental results are analyzed by comparison with many-body perturbation theory calculations, including the solutions of the Bethe-Salpeter equation. A* is identified as the first excited state of the A exciton, that is, A(n = 2). The anomalous behavior of A* is explained by its distinct wave function...... spread along the c axis, the direction of weak van der Waals bonding, which makes it more susceptible to perturbations. Our ab initio calculations suggest that the A exciton in the ground state has a two-dimensional (2D) nature with a large binding energy E-b, in fair agreement with E-b similar to 90...

  19. Holographic quantum error-correcting codes: toy models for the bulk/boundary correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastawski, Fernando; Yoshida, Beni [Institute for Quantum Information & Matter and Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics,California Institute of Technology,1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena CA 91125 (United States); Harlow, Daniel [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University,400 Jadwin Hall, Princeton NJ 08540 (United States); Preskill, John [Institute for Quantum Information & Matter and Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics,California Institute of Technology,1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-06-23

    We propose a family of exactly solvable toy models for the AdS/CFT correspondence based on a novel construction of quantum error-correcting codes with a tensor network structure. Our building block is a special type of tensor with maximal entanglement along any bipartition, which gives rise to an isometry from the bulk Hilbert space to the boundary Hilbert space. The entire tensor network is an encoder for a quantum error-correcting code, where the bulk and boundary degrees of freedom may be identified as logical and physical degrees of freedom respectively. These models capture key features of entanglement in the AdS/CFT correspondence; in particular, the Ryu-Takayanagi formula and the negativity of tripartite information are obeyed exactly in many cases. That bulk logical operators can be represented on multiple boundary regions mimics the Rindler-wedge reconstruction of boundary operators from bulk operators, realizing explicitly the quantum error-correcting features of AdS/CFT recently proposed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP04(2015)163.

  20. Adaptive Multiscale Modeling of Geochemical Impacts on Fracture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Deng, H.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding fracture evolution is essential for many subsurface energy applications, including subsurface storage, shale gas production, fracking, CO2 sequestration, and geothermal energy extraction. Geochemical processes in particular play a significant role in the evolution of fractures through dissolution-driven widening, fines migration, and/or fracture sealing due to precipitation. One obstacle to understanding and exploiting geochemical fracture evolution is that it is a multiscale process. However, current geochemical modeling of fractures cannot capture this multi-scale nature of geochemical and mechanical impacts on fracture evolution, and is limited to either a continuum or pore-scale representation. Conventional continuum-scale models treat fractures as preferential flow paths, with their permeability evolving as a function (often, a cubic law) of the fracture aperture. This approach has the limitation that it oversimplifies flow within the fracture in its omission of pore scale effects while also assuming well-mixed conditions. More recently, pore-scale models along with advanced characterization techniques have allowed for accurate simulations of flow and reactive transport within the pore space (Molins et al., 2014, 2015). However, these models, even with high performance computing, are currently limited in their ability to treat tractable domain sizes (Steefel et al., 2013). Thus, there is a critical need to develop an adaptive modeling capability that can account for separate properties and processes, emergent and otherwise, in the fracture and the rock matrix at different spatial scales. Here we present an adaptive modeling capability that treats geochemical impacts on fracture evolution within a single multiscale framework. Model development makes use of the high performance simulation capability, Chombo-Crunch, leveraged by high resolution characterization and experiments. The modeling framework is based on the adaptive capability in Chombo

  1. Brane Lorentz symmetry from Lorentz breaking in the bulk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolami, O [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Carvalho, C [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2007-05-15

    We propose the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking of a bulk vector field as a way to generate the selection of bulk dimensions invisible to the standard model confined to the brane. By assigning a nonvanishing vacuum value to the vector field, a direction is singled out in the bulk vacuum, thus breaking the bulk Lorentz symmetry. We present the condition for induced Lorentz symmetry on the brane, as phenomenologically required.

  2. A Spatially Constrained Multi-autoencoder Approach for Multivariate Geochemical Anomaly Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirong, C.; Qingfeng, G.; Renguang, Z.; Yihui, X.

    2017-12-01

    Separating and recognizing geochemical anomalies from the geochemical background is one of the key tasks in geochemical exploration. Many methods have been developed, such as calculating the mean ±2 standard deviation, and fractal/multifractal models. In recent years, deep autoencoder, a deep learning approach, have been used for multivariate geochemical anomaly recognition. While being able to deal with the non-normal distributions of geochemical concentrations and the non-linear relationships among them, this self-supervised learning method does not take into account the spatial heterogeneity of geochemical background and the uncertainty induced by the randomly initialized weights of neurons, leading to ineffective recognition of weak anomalies. In this paper, we introduce a spatially constrained multi-autoencoder (SCMA) approach for multivariate geochemical anomaly recognition, which includes two steps: spatial partitioning and anomaly score computation. The first step divides the study area into multiple sub-regions to segregate the geochemical background, by grouping the geochemical samples through K-means clustering, spatial filtering, and spatial constraining rules. In the second step, for each sub-region, a group of autoencoder neural networks are constructed with an identical structure but different initial weights on neurons. Each autoencoder is trained using the geochemical samples within the corresponding sub-region to learn the sub-regional geochemical background. The best autoencoder of a group is chosen as the final model for the corresponding sub-region. The anomaly score at each location can then be calculated as the euclidean distance between the observed concentrations and reconstructed concentrations of geochemical elements.The experiments using the geochemical data and Fe deposits in the southwestern Fujian province of China showed that our SCMA approach greatly improved the recognition of weak anomalies, achieving the AUC of 0.89, compared

  3. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...... Class II, 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 6 CeramXmono+-only restorations. The main reasons for failurewere tooth fracture (6) and secondary caries (4). The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was for the bulk-filled-1.1% and for the resin composite-only restorations 1...

  4. Characterization and bulk properties of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonder, E.; Connolly, T.F.

    1979-06-01

    The bulk properties of oxides are divided into two classes, intrinsic properties which depend solely on the identity of the material, and extrinsic ones, which differ for different samples of the same compound. Sources of tabulated numerical values of intrinsic properties are given and modern developments in information storage and retrieval are discussed. Extrinsic properties are shown to depend on defects and trace impurities in the samples. Techniques of trace impurity analysis are discussed and realistic limits of detection and accuracies are given for routine analyses

  5. High-temperature bulk acoustic wave sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritze, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric crystals like langasite (La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 , LGS) and gallium orthophosphate (GaPO 4 ) exhibit piezoelectrically excited bulk acoustic waves at temperatures of up to at least 1450 °C and 900 °C, respectively. Consequently, resonant sensors based on those materials enable new sensing approaches. Thereby, resonant high-temperature microbalances are of particular interest. They correlate very small mass changes during film deposition onto resonators or gas composition-dependent stoichiometry changes of thin films already deposited onto the resonators with the resonance frequency shift of such devices. Consequently, the objective of the work is to review the high-temperature properties, the operation limits and the measurement principles of such resonators. The electromechanical properties of high-temperature bulk acoustic wave resonators such as mechanical stiffness, piezoelectric and dielectric constant, effective viscosity and electrical conductivity are described using a one-dimensional physical model and determined accurately up to temperatures as close as possible to their ultimate limit. Insights from defect chemical models are correlated with the electromechanical properties of the resonators. Thereby, crucial properties for stable operation as a sensor under harsh conditions are identified to be the formation of oxygen vacancies and the bulk conductivity. Operation limits concerning temperature, oxygen partial pressure and water vapor pressure are given. Further, application-relevant aspects such as temperature coefficients, temperature compensation and mass sensitivity are evaluated. In addition, approximations are introduced which make the exact model handy for routine data evaluation. An equivalent electrical circuit for high-temperature resonator devices is derived based on the one-dimensional physical model. Low- and high-temperature approximations are introduced. Thereby, the structure of the equivalent circuit corresponds to the

  6. High-temperature bulk acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric crystals like langasite (La3Ga5SiO14, LGS) and gallium orthophosphate (GaPO4) exhibit piezoelectrically excited bulk acoustic waves at temperatures of up to at least 1450 °C and 900 °C, respectively. Consequently, resonant sensors based on those materials enable new sensing approaches. Thereby, resonant high-temperature microbalances are of particular interest. They correlate very small mass changes during film deposition onto resonators or gas composition-dependent stoichiometry changes of thin films already deposited onto the resonators with the resonance frequency shift of such devices. Consequently, the objective of the work is to review the high-temperature properties, the operation limits and the measurement principles of such resonators. The electromechanical properties of high-temperature bulk acoustic wave resonators such as mechanical stiffness, piezoelectric and dielectric constant, effective viscosity and electrical conductivity are described using a one-dimensional physical model and determined accurately up to temperatures as close as possible to their ultimate limit. Insights from defect chemical models are correlated with the electromechanical properties of the resonators. Thereby, crucial properties for stable operation as a sensor under harsh conditions are identified to be the formation of oxygen vacancies and the bulk conductivity. Operation limits concerning temperature, oxygen partial pressure and water vapor pressure are given. Further, application-relevant aspects such as temperature coefficients, temperature compensation and mass sensitivity are evaluated. In addition, approximations are introduced which make the exact model handy for routine data evaluation. An equivalent electrical circuit for high-temperature resonator devices is derived based on the one-dimensional physical model. Low- and high-temperature approximations are introduced. Thereby, the structure of the equivalent circuit corresponds to the Butterworth

  7. Improving the bulk data transfer experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guok, Chin; Guok, Chin; Lee, Jason R.; Berket, Karlo

    2008-05-07

    Scientific computations and collaborations increasingly rely on the network to provide high-speed data transfer, dissemination of results, access to instruments, support for computational steering, etc. The Energy Sciences Network is establishing a science data network to provide user driven bandwidth allocation. In a shared network environment, some reservations may not be granted due to the lack of available bandwidth on any single path. In many cases, the available bandwidth across multiple paths would be sufficient to grant the reservation. In this paper we investigate how to utilize the available bandwidth across multiple paths in the case of bulk data transfer.

  8. Forming of bulk metallic glass microcomponents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wert, John A.; Thomsen, Christian; Jensen, Rune Debel

    2009-01-01

    The present article considers forward extrusion, closed-die forging and backward extrusion processes for fabrication of individual microcomponents from two bulk metallic glass (BMG) compositions: Mg60Cu30Y10 and Zr44Cu40Ag8Al8. Two types of tooling were used in the present work: relatively massive...... die sets characteristic of cold forming operations for crystalline metals and lightweight die sets adapted to the special characteristics of BMGs. In addition to demonstrating that microcomponents of several geometries can be readily fabricated from BMGs, rheological properties are combined...

  9. Bulk monitoring and segregation of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beddow, H.; Adsley, I.; Pearman, I.; Sweeney, A.; Davies, M., E-mail: helen.beddow@nuvia.co.uk [Nuvia Limited, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    Several sites in the UK are contaminated by radioactive legacy wastes. These include; radium luminising sites and more recently the oil, and (potentially) fracking industries; sites contaminated from thorium gas mantle factories; old nuclear research sites; nuclear power sites, and the Sellafield reprocessing site. Nuvia has developed a suite of technologies to map the location of and to recover and process wastes during remedial operations. The main method for delineating contaminated areas in-situ is by use of the Groundhog system, whilst bulk monitoring methods employ the Gamma Excavation Monitor, the High Resolution Assay Monitor, and the Conveyor Active Particle System. (author)

  10. Bulk monitoring and segregation of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddow, H.; Adsley, I.; Pearman, I.; Sweeney, A.; Davies, M.

    2014-01-01

    Several sites in the UK are contaminated by radioactive legacy wastes. These include; radium luminising sites and more recently the oil, and (potentially) fracking industries; sites contaminated from thorium gas mantle factories; old nuclear research sites; nuclear power sites, and the Sellafield reprocessing site. Nuvia has developed a suite of technologies to map the location of and to recover and process wastes during remedial operations. The main method for delineating contaminated areas in-situ is by use of the Groundhog system, whilst bulk monitoring methods employ the Gamma Excavation Monitor, the High Resolution Assay Monitor, and the Conveyor Active Particle System. (author)

  11. Fundamental study of bulk power HVDC transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Study on the HVDC power transmission have been conducted since 1956. Shinshinano-Frequency Changer had been operated at first on 1977, as our home product, and Hokkaido-Honshu DC transmission also realized at 1979. Research and Development of the bulk power HVDC have been promoted by the UHV transmission special committee in our Institute from 1980. This paper is a comprehensive report published in the parts of operating control, insulation of DC line and countermeasure of fault current, and interferences in order to contribute for planning, design and operating of the UHV DC transmission in future. (author)

  12. Calculated Bulk Properties of the Actinide Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Andersen, O. K.; Johansson, B.

    1978-01-01

    Self-consistent relativistic calculations of the electronic properties for seven actinides (Ac-Am) have been performed using the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the atomic-sphere approximation. Exchange and correlation were included in the local spin-density scheme. The theory explains...... the variation of the atomic volume and the bulk modulus through the 5f series in terms of an increasing 5f binding up to plutonium followed by a sudden localisation (through complete spin polarisation) in americium...

  13. Multiphase composites with extremal bulk modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibiansky, L. V.; Sigmund, Ole

    2000-01-01

    are described. Most of our new results are related to the two-dimensional problem. A numerical topology optimization procedure that solves the inverse homogenization problem is adopted and used to look for two-dimensional three-phase composites with a maximal effective bulk modulus. For the combination...... isotropic three-dimensional three-phase composites with cylindrical inclusions of arbitrary cross-sections (plane strain problem) or transversely isotropic thin plates (plane stress or bending of plates problems). (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  14. 7 CFR 58.313 - Print and bulk packaging rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Print and bulk packaging rooms. 58.313 Section 58.313 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....313 Print and bulk packaging rooms. Rooms used for packaging print or bulk butter and related products...

  15. 19 CFR 151.24 - Unlading facilities for bulk sugar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. 151.24 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Sugars, Sirups, and Molasses § 151.24 Unlading facilities for bulk sugar. When dutiable sugar is to be imported in bulk, a full...

  16. Enhancement of surface magnetism due to bulk bond dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.; Sarmento, E.F.; Albuquerque, E.L. de

    1985-01-01

    Within a renormalization group scheme, the phase diagram of a semi-infinite simple cubic Ising ferromagnet is discussed, with arbitrary surface and bulk coupling constants, and including possible dilution of the bulk bonds. It is obtained that dilution makes easier the appearance of surface magnetism in the absence of bulk magnetism. (Author) [pt

  17. Replication of surface features from a master model to an amorphous metallic article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Bakke, Eric; Peker, Atakan

    1999-01-01

    The surface features of an article are replicated by preparing a master model having a preselected surface feature thereon which is to be replicated, and replicating the preselected surface feature of the master model. The replication is accomplished by providing a piece of a bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy, contacting the piece of the bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy to the surface of the master model at an elevated replication temperature to transfer a negative copy of the preselected surface feature of the master model to the piece, and separating the piece having the negative copy of the preselected surface feature from the master model.

  18. Analysis on approach of safeguards implementation at research reactor handling item count and bulk material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jo; Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Byung Doo; Jung, Juang

    2016-01-01

    KiJang research reactor (KJRR) will be constructed to produce the radioisotope such as Mo-99 etc., provide the neutron transmutation doping (NTD) service of silicon, and develop the core technologies of research reactor. In this paper, the features of the process and nuclear material flow are reviewed and the material balance area (MBA) and key measurement point (KMP) are established based on the nuclear material flow. Also, this paper reviews the approach on safeguards and nuclear material accountancy at the facility level for Safeguards-by-Design at research reactor handling item count and bulk material. In this paper, MBA and KMPs are established through the analysis on facility features and major process at KJRR handling item count and bulk material. Also, this paper reviews the IAEA safeguards implementation and nuclear material accountancy at KJRR. It is necessary to discuss the safeguards approach on the fresh FM target assemblies and remaining uranium in the intermediate level liquid wastes

  19. Analysis on approach of safeguards implementation at research reactor handling item count and bulk material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jo; Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Byung Doo; Jung, Juang [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    KiJang research reactor (KJRR) will be constructed to produce the radioisotope such as Mo-99 etc., provide the neutron transmutation doping (NTD) service of silicon, and develop the core technologies of research reactor. In this paper, the features of the process and nuclear material flow are reviewed and the material balance area (MBA) and key measurement point (KMP) are established based on the nuclear material flow. Also, this paper reviews the approach on safeguards and nuclear material accountancy at the facility level for Safeguards-by-Design at research reactor handling item count and bulk material. In this paper, MBA and KMPs are established through the analysis on facility features and major process at KJRR handling item count and bulk material. Also, this paper reviews the IAEA safeguards implementation and nuclear material accountancy at KJRR. It is necessary to discuss the safeguards approach on the fresh FM target assemblies and remaining uranium in the intermediate level liquid wastes.

  20. Use of containers to carry bulk and break bulk commodities and its impact on gulf region ports and international trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The University of New Orleans Transportation Institute was tasked by the Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) in mid-2012 to assess the use of containers to transport bulk and break bulk commodities and to determine what their impact would...

  1. Geology, alteration, mineralization and geochemical study in Kalateh Taimour area, NE Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alaminia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The area is located 20 km northwest of Kashmar and about 4 km of Kalateh Taimour in Khorasan Razavi province. The study area is part of Tertiary volcanic-plutonic belt north of Daruneh fault and its situation in tectonic inliers between two important active faults, Doruneh and Taknar. Volcanic rocks are mainly intermediate to acid pyroclastic type. They formed during early Tertiary. The volcanic rocks of the Kalateh Taimour area are predominantly andesitic basalt, andesite, latite, trachyte, dacite and rhyodacite and are observed as lava, tuff, lapilli tuff and agglomerate. Field evidences and study show several subvolcanic bodies including quartz hornblende biotite monzodiorite porphyry, quartz biotite monzodiorite porphyry, quartz diorite porphyry and microdiorite which are intruded sometime in mid-Tertiary. In this belt, new methods of image processing were used for enhancing the alteration zones to help near infra red and short wavelength infrared and bands example band ratios and principle component method. Propylitic, sericitic and argillic are the main alteration types. Minor silicification is found in some areas. Alteration is extent but mineralization is limited. Mineralization is mainly controlled by fault system. Several mineralized faults are being discovered. Open space filling features are abundant. In the study area, disseminate and stock work mineralization are abundant. The amount of sulfide minerals is very small. Ancient mining is present in the area. Stream sediment geochemical study shows a very broad and high level of gold anomaly. Rock geochemical study show very high levels of Au, Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn and Au value is correlative to Cu, Pb, Zn and Ag values. Due to alteration modeling, non uniformity in mineralization and low abundance of sulfide mineralization suggest study in low sulphidation Au-Cu deposit.

  2. Elastic properties of superconducting bulk metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of this thesis the elastic properties of a superconducting bulk metallic glass between 10 mK and 300 K were first investigated. In order to measure the entire temperature range, in particular the low temperature part, new experimental techniques were developed. Using an inductive readout scheme for a double paddle oscillator it was possible to determine the internal friction and the relative change of sound velocity of bulk metallic glasses with high precision. This allowed for a detailed comparison of the data with different models. The analysis focuses on the low temperature regime where the properties of glassy materials are governed by atomic tunneling systems as described by the tunneling model. The influence of conduction electrons in the normal conducting state and quasiparticles in the superconducting state of the glass were accounted for in the theoretical description, resulting in a good agreement over a large temperature range between measured data and prediction of the tunneling model. This allowed for a direct determination of the coupling constant between electrons and tunneling systems. In the vicinity of the transition temperature Tc the data can only be described if a modified distribution function of the tunneling parameters is applied.

  3. Boundary-bulk relation in topological orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Kong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the relation between an anomaly-free n+1D topological order, which are often called n+1D topological order in physics literature, and its nD gapped boundary phases. We argue that the n+1D bulk anomaly-free topological order for a given nD gapped boundary phase is unique. This uniqueness defines the notion of the “bulk” for a given gapped boundary phase. In this paper, we show that the n+1D “bulk” phase is given by the “center” of the nD boundary phase. In other words, the geometric notion of the “bulk” corresponds precisely to the algebraic notion of the “center”. We achieve this by first introducing the notion of a morphism between two (potentially anomalous topological orders of the same dimension, then proving that the notion of the “bulk” satisfies the same universal property as that of the “center” of an algebra in mathematics, i.e. “bulk = center”. The entire argument does not require us to know the precise mathematical description of a (potentially anomalous topological order. This result leads to concrete physical predictions.

  4. Bulk delivery of explosives offers positive advantages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-01

    The bulk delivery of precisely-formulated explosives directly to the shothole is a safe, secure and cost effective way of bringing rock to the quarry floor. This article describes several of the latest generation of Anfo trucks. The typical Anfo truck carries ammonium nitrate and fuel oil in bulk, together with several other mix constituents, including an emulsifying agent. These are designed to form the basis of a range of emulsion-type explosives. In effect, these are water in oil emulsions where the water phase consists of droplets of a saturated solution of the oxidizing material suspended in oil. The formulations may be further tailored to the shothole requirements by the addition of oils or waxes, which can alter the viscosity of the explosive. The precise and programmable controls which determine the exact quantities of materials delivered to the mixer mean that the explosive mixtures can be tailored exactly to the requirements of the blasting operation, be it the amount of rock to be dislodged, the geological conditions, or the state of the shothole - either wet or dry. 4 systems are described in detail. 3 figs.

  5. Perovskite oxides: Oxygen electrocatalysis and bulk structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonio, R. E.; Fierro, C.; Tryk, D.; Scherson, D.; Yeager, Ernest

    1987-01-01

    Perovskite type oxides were considered for use as oxygen reduction and generation electrocatalysts in alkaline electrolytes. Perovskite stability and electrocatalytic activity are studied along with possible relationships of the latter with the bulk solid state properties. A series of compounds of the type LaFe(x)Ni1(-x)O3 was used as a model system to gain information on the possible relationships between surface catalytic activity and bulk structure. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate constants were measured for these compounds. Ex situ Mossbauer effect spectroscopy (MES), and magnetic susceptibility measurements were used to study the solid state properties. X ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to examine the surface. MES has indicated the presence of a paramagnetic to magnetically ordered phase transition for values of x between 0.4 and 0.5. A correlation was found between the values of the MES isomer shift and the catalytic activity for peroxide decomposition. Thus, the catalytic activity can be correlated to the d-electron density for the transition metal cations.

  6. 78 FR 72841 - List of Bulk Drug Substances That May Be Used in Pharmacy Compounding; Bulk Drug Substances That...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    .... FDA-2013-N-1525] List of Bulk Drug Substances That May Be Used in Pharmacy Compounding; Bulk Drug... proposed rule to list bulk drug substances used in pharmacy compounding and preparing to develop a list of... Formulary monograph, if a monograph exists, and the United States Pharmacopoeia chapter on pharmacy...

  7. The effects of forward speed and depth of conservation tillage on soil bulk density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mahmoudi

    2015-09-01

    , besides the importance of tillage depth and speed in different tiller performance. Materials and methods: This investigation was carried out based on random blocks in the form of split plot experimental design. The main factor, tillage depth, (was 10 and 20cm at both levels and the second factor, tillage speed, (was 6, 8, 10, 12 km h-1 in four levels for Bostan-Abad and 8,10,12,14 km h-1 for Hashtrood with four repetitions. It was carried out using complex tillage made in Sazeh Keshte Bukan Company, which is mostly used in Eastern Azerbaijanand using Massey Ferguson 285 and 399 tractors in Bostab-Abad and Hashtrood, respectively. In this investigation, the characteristics of soil bulk density were studied in two sampling depths of 7 and 17 centimeters. Bulk density is an indicator of soil compaction. It is calculated as the dry weight of soil divided by its volume. This volume includes the volume of soil particles and the volume of pores among soil particles. Bulk density is typically expressed in g cm-3. Results and Discussion: In this study, the effect of both factors on the feature of the soil bulk density at the sampling depth of 5-10 and 15-20 cm was examined. In Bostan-Abad, regarding tillage speed effect for studies characteristics at 1% probability level on soil bulk density was effective. The effect of tillage depth on the soil bulk density was significant at 5% probability level . The interaction effect of tillage speed and depth on soil bulk density was significant at probability level of 1%. Regarding sampling depth effect, the soil bulk density was significant at 5% probability level, respectively. In Hashtrood, the effect of tillage speed on soil bulk density at probability level of 1%, and also tillage depth effect on soil bulk density was significant at 5% level of probability. The interaction effect of tillage speed and depth on soil bulk density was significant at 5% level of probability. Regarding the depth of sampling it was significant on soil bulk

  8. A route to transparent bulk metals

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Schuster, Cosima B.; Fré sard, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    Hypothetical compounds based on a sapphire host are investigated with respect to their structural as well as electronic features. The results are obtained by electronic structure calculations within density functional theory and the generalized

  9. Application of isotopic and hydro-geochemical methods in identifying sources of mine inrushing water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dou Huiping; Ma Zhiyuan; Cao Haidong; Liu Feng; Hu Weiwei; Li Ting

    2011-01-01

    Isotopic and hydro-geochemical surveys were carried out to identify the source of mine inrushing water at the #73003 face in the Laohutai Mine.Based on the analysis of isotopes and hydro-chemical features of surface water,groundwater from different levels and the inrushing water,a special relationship between water at the #73003 face and cretaceous water has been found.The results show that the isotopic and hydro-chemical features of the inrushing water are completely different from those of other groundwater bodies,except for the cretaceous water.The isotopic and hydrochemical characteristics of cretaceous water are similar to the inrushing water of the #73003 face,which aided with obtaining the evidence for the possible source of the inrushing water at the #73003 face.The isotope calculations show that the inrushing water at the #73003 face is a mixture of cretaceous water and Quaternary water,water from the cretaceous conglomerate is the main source,accounting for 67% of the inrushing water,while the Quaternary water accounts for 33%.The conclusion is also supported by a study of inrushing-water channels and an active fault near the inrushing-water plot on the #73003 face.

  10. Semi-detailed uranium geochemical survey in Northwestern Samar (27 March 1979 - 4 July 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.; Ogena, M.; Tauli, G.

    1980-04-01

    A uranium geochemical survey was conducted to delineate in detail the uranium prospective area(s) in northwestern Samar. A total of 805 stream sediments and 1.115 water samples were obtained from the target areas from uranium analysis. Geochemical anomalies were indicated in San Isidro and Mauo. Geochemical correlations between uranium and trace elements (Pb, Ag, Ni, Cu, Co, Zn and Mn) were generally poor. (ELC)

  11. Bulk forming of industrial micro components in conventional metals and bulk metallic glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, Mogens; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin; Eriksen, Rasmus Solmer

    2007-01-01

    For production of micro components in large numbers, forging is an interesting and challenging process. The conventional metals like silver, steel and aluminum often require multi-step processes, but high productivity and increased strength justify the investment. As an alternative, bulk metallic...

  12. Geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Durango, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

    1983-09-01

    This report is the result of a geochemical investigation of the former uranium mill and tailings site at Durango, Colorado. This is one in a series of site specific geochemical investigations performed on the inactive uranium mill tailings included in the UMTRA Project. The objectives of the investigation are to characterize the geochemistry, to determine the contaminant distribution resulting from the former milling activities and tailings, and to infer chemical pathways and transport mechanisms from the contaminant distribution. The results will be used to model contaminant migration and to develop criteria for long-term containment media such as a cover system which is impermeable to contaminant migration. This report assumes a familiarity with the hydrologic conditions of the site and the geochemical concepts underlying the investigation. The results reported are based on a one-time sampling of waters and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. The solid samples are water extracted remove easily soluble salts and acids extracted to remove cabonates and hydroxides. The water extracts and solid samples were analyzed for the major and trace elements. A limited number of samples were analyzed for radiological components. The report includes the methods of sampling, sample processing, analysis, and data interpretation. Three major conclusions are: (1) carbonate salts and low TDS characterize the tailings; (2) the adjacent area and raffinate ponds contain contaminants deposited by a single event of fluid permeation of the soils; and (3) the Animas River adjacent to the site has elevated gross alpha activity attributed to 226 Ra in the sediments derived from the tailings or milling activities

  13. Geochemical investigations at Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.

    1984-09-01

    As part of the NRC efforts to develop a data base on source term characteristics for low level wastes, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has produced and analyzed a large amount of data on trench leachate chemistry at existing shallow land burial sites. In this report, we present the results of our investigations at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky disposal site. In particular, data on trench leachate chemistry are reviewed and discussed in terms of mechanisms and processes controlling the composition of trench solutes. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying both intra- and extra-trench factors and processes contributing to source term characteristics, modifications, and uncertainties. BNL research on the Maxey Flats disposal site has provided important information not only on the source term characteristics and the factors contributing to uncertainties in the source term but also some generic insights into such geochemical processes and controls as the mechanics of leachate formation, microbial degradation and development of anoxia, organic complexation and radionuclide mobility, redox inversion and modification of the source term, solubility constraints on solute chemistry, mineral authigenesis, corrosion products and radionuclide scavenging, and the role of organic complexants in geochemical partitioning of radionuclides. A knowledge of such processes and controls affecting the geochemical cycling of radionuclides as well as an understanding of the important factors that contribute to variability and uncertainties in the source term is essential for evaluating the performance of waste package and the site, making valid predictions of release for dose calculations, and for planning site performance monitoring as well as remedial actions. 43 references, 47 figures, 30 tables

  14. Geochemical modeling of uranium mill tailings: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.R.; Felmy, A.R.; Serne, R.J.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-08-01

    Liner failure was not found to be a problem when various acidic tailings solutions leached through liner materials for periods up to 3 y. On the contrary, materials that contained over 30% clay showed a decrease in permeability with time in the laboratory columns. The decreases in permeability noted above are attributed to pore plugging resulting from the precipitation of minerals and solids. This precipitation takes place due to the increase in pH of the tailings solution brought about by the buffering capacity of the soil. Geochemical modeling predicts, and x-ray characterization confirms, that precipitation of solids from solution is occurring in the acidic tailings solution/liner interactions studied. X-ray diffraction identified gypsum and alunite group minerals, such as jarosite, as having precipitated after acidic tailings solutions reacted with clay liners. The geochemical modeling and experimental work described above were used to construct an equilibrium conceptual model consisting of minerals and solid phases. This model was developed to represent a soil column. A computer program was used as a tool to solve the system of mathematical equations imposed by the conceptual chemical model. The combined conceptual model and computer program were used to predict aqueous phase compositions of effluent solutions from permeability cells packed with geologic materials and percolated with uranium mill tailings solutions. An initial conclusion drawn from these studies is that the laboratory experiments and geochemical modeling predictions were capable of simulating field observations. The same mineralogical changes and contaminant reductions observed in the laboratory studies were found at a drained evaporation pond (Lucky Mc in Wyoming) with a 10-year history of acid attack. 24 references, 5 figures 5 tables

  15. Exhaustive Search of Elemental Combinations for Geochemical Discrimination of Tsunami deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwatani, T.; Nagata, K.; Okada, M.; Watanabe, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2013-12-01

    Tsunami deposits are important for assessment of tsunami hazard. Many diagnostic signatures and identification criteria for past tsunami deposits are proposed, including geomorphological, stratigraphical, sedimentological, archaeological, anthropological, macro- and micropalaeontological evidences. However identification is still difficult because their properties depend on local and temporal situations of deposition and its subsequent weathering and diagenesis. Here, we focus geochemical discrimination of tsunami deposits using bulk chemical compositions. Geochemical discrimination is now recognized as an useful proxy, especially in the case that other proxies cannot be used. Precise discrimination is expected if we select appropriate combination of elements, since some of elements might have characteristic patterns distinguishing tsunami deposits from other sediments. In this study, we try to establish the criteria for the discrimination of 2011 Tohoku-oki tsunami deposits and their background marine sedimentary rocks, using two powerful methodologies of information science: one is a support vector machine (SVM) classifier which is used for determining the appropriate decision plane which divides unknown samples into tsunami deposits and non-tsunami sediments in compositional space, where basis vector is composition of each element, and the other is a cross validation (CV) technique which is used for evaluate the discrimination performance of the SVM for each combination of elements use for discrimination. Support Vector Machine (SVM) is a supervised clustering method, which developed in the machine learning and pattern recognition from the 1990s (Vapnik, 1998). It classifies unknown high-dimensional input vector data into several groups by decision function called as maximal margin hyperplane. The maximal margin hyperplane is determined based on training data sets, which are composed of known input vectors and output labels, and it is not only the farthest from

  16. Thermal characterization of semiconducting polymer bulk heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Roddel A.

    Polymer semiconductors are intriguing due to their potential use in flexible electronics. Poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)--a very common polymer in this field--is semicrystalline and it is known that crystalline P3HT has a higher hole mobility than amorphous P3HT. Quantifying each fraction in the bulk and thin film states is therefore crucial to understanding its performance in transistor and other applications. In polymer solar cells, it acts as an electron donor and is typically mixed with the nanoparticle-like molecule, phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)--an electron acceptor--in a thin film morphology termed a bulk heterojunction (BHJ). The structural hierarchy within the bulk heterojunction is complicated and its characterization, with a focus on P3HT morphology, is the topic of this dissertation. Calorimetry can play an important role in the elucidation of P3HT morphology with quantitative analysis of the crystalline and amorphous fractions present in the material. This was demonstrated by employing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to obtain the enthalpy of fusion of 100% crystalline P3HT (42.9 J/g) using oligomeric P3HT measurements. The more sensitive temperature modulated DSC (TMDSC) was then used to examine the glass transition of P3HT and the crystalline, mobile amorphous and rigid amorphous phases were quantified. The presence of these phases can play a large role in understanding the charge transfer process in polymer semiconductors. BHJ thin films of 50 wt.% PCBM were then analyzed and a polymer crystallinity of 30% was found after thermal annealing from initially non-crystalline polymer material. With assistance from previously acquired small angle neutron scattering data, a thorough analysis of the entire BHJ morphology was accomplished. A surprisingly large rigid amorphous polymer phase is present in the BHJ which could be located at the P3HT/PCBM interface, affecting charge transfer. Finally, interlayer diffusion of PCBM was

  17. Radiation effects in bulk and nanostructured silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstrom, E.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding radiation effects in silicon (Si) is of great technological importance. The material, being the basis of modern semiconductor electronics and photonics, is subjected to radiation already at the processing stage, and in many applications throughout the lifetime of the manufactured component. Despite decades of research, many fundamental questions on the subject are still not satisfactorily answered, and new ones arise constantly as device fabrication shifts towards the nanoscale. In this study, methods of computational physics are harnessed to tackle basic questions on the radiation response of bulk and nanostructured Si systems, as well as to explain atomic-scale phenomena underlying existing experimental results. Empirical potentials and quantum mechanical models are coupled with molecular dynamics simulations to model the response of Si to irradiation and to characterize the created crystal damage. The threshold displacement energy, i.e., the smallest recoil energy required to create a lattice defect, is determined in Si bulk and nanowires, in the latter system also as a function of mechanical strain. It is found that commonly used values for this quantity are drastically underestimated. Strain on the nanowire causes the threshold energy to drop, with an effect on defect production that is significantly higher than in an another nanostructure with similar dimensions, the carbon nanotube. Simulating ion irradiation of Si nanowires reveals that the large surface area to volume ratio of the nanostructure causes up to a three-fold enhancement in defect production as compared to bulk Si. Amorphous defect clusters created by energetic neutron bombardment are predicted, on the basis of their electronic structure and abundance, to cause a deleterious phenomenon called type inversion in Si strip detectors in high-energy physics experiments. The thinning of Si lamellae using a focused ion beam is studied in conjunction with experiment to unravel the cause for

  18. The two-layer geochemical structure of modern biogeochemical provinces and its significance for spatially adequate ecological evaluations and decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2014-05-01

    Contamination of the environment has reached such a scale that ecogeochemical situation in any area can be interpreted now as a result of the combined effect of natural and anthropogenic factors. The areas that appear uncomfortable for a long stay can have natural and anthropogenic genesis, but the spatial structure of such biogeochemical provinces is in any case formed of a combination of natural and technogenic fields of chemical elements. Features of structural organization and the difference in factors and specific time of their formation allow their separation on one hand and help in identification of areas with different ecological risks due to overlay of the two structures on the other. Geochemistry of soil cover reflects the long-term result of the naturally balanced biogeochemical cycles, therefore the soil geochemical maps of the undisturbed areas may serve the basis for evaluation of the natural geochemical background with due regard to the main factors of geochemical differentiation in biosphere. Purposeful and incidental technogenic concentrations and dispersions of chemical elements of specific (mainly mono- or polycentric) structure are also fixed in soils that serve as secondary sources of contamination of the vegetation cover and local food chains. Overlay of the two structures forms specific heterogeneity of modern biogeochemical provinces with different risk for particular groups of people, animals and plants adapted to specific natural geochemical background within particular concentration interval. The developed approach is believed to be helpful for biogeochemical regionalizing of modern biosphere (noosphere) and for spatially adequate ecogeochemical evaluation of the environment and landuse decisions. It allows production of a set of applied geochemical maps such as: 1) health risk due to chemical elements deficiency and technogenic contamination accounting of possible additive effects; 2) adequate soil fertilization and melioration with due

  19. Reconnaisance geochemical survey of heavy minerals in Northern Luzon, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.; Seguis, J.E.; Fernandez, L.G.

    1983-07-01

    A reconnaissance sampling was undertaken in northern Luzon to study the distribution of uranium as well as copper, lead, zinc, manganese, silver, cobalt and nickel in heavy minerals. The average background and threshold values of the elements were determined. Uranium content in the heavy mineral was low, in the order of 0.5-0.6 ppm U. Three uranium anomaly zones were delineated in Malanas Rever-Licuan area, Abra, Itogon, Benguet and Bambang, Nueva Viscaya, all within the Central Cordillera. The anomalous zones appeared to be related to copper-gold mineral areas. Geochemical correlations between uranium and the other elements were generally poor. (author)

  20. Neutron activation analysis in reconnaissance geochemical survey of Northwestern Mindoro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.; Fernandez, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique was used to analyze stream sediments collected in Northwestern Mindoro. The concentration levels of 18 elements were determined. It was noted that NAA is suitable for the determination of rare earth, gold, arsenic and cobalt among others because of favorable high neutron cross sections. Samples collected in regional reconnaissance geochemical surveys could be analyzed usng NAA technique to complement other non-nuclear techniques, such as atomic absorption and X-ray fluorescence analysis. (Author). 11 figs.; 2 tabs.; 12 refs

  1. A Low-Li Geochemical Province in the NE Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, J. C.; Gwozdz, R.

    1978-01-01

    Lithium was analysed in 392 basalts and related igneous rocks from the North Atlantic Tertiary-Recent province using activation analysis and Čerenkov counting. Monotonous Li values of 5.5±2 ppm in NE Atlantic basalts define a low-Li geochemical province which has persisted for 60 million years...... basalt series. No whole-rock coherence is observed between Li and Mg, K, Rb or Ca. Mantle phlogopite is considered to play an insignificant rôle in controlling the Li levels of NE Atlantic basalts....

  2. Geochemical association of plutonium in marine sediments from Palomares (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.P.; Gasco, C.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Pujol, L.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical association of plutonium in sediments from the marine ecosystem of Palomares has been studied. A sequential leaching technique using selective extractants has been employed to determine the percentages of Pu in the following forms: (a) readily available, (b) exchangeable and adsorbed to specific sites, (c) associated with organic matter, (d) sesquioxides, (e) residual. Plutonium was found to be associated mainly with phases (c), (d) and (e), and therefore, appears to be relatively immobile and not readily available to bottom feeding biota. The effect of different source terms on Pu distribution is also discussed. (orig.)

  3. Geochemical Interactions and Viral-Prokaryote Relationships in Freshwater Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, J. E.; Ferris, G.

    2009-05-01

    Viral and prokaryotic abundances were surveyed throughout southern Ontario aquatic habitats to determine relationships with geochemical parameters in the natural environment. Surface water samples were collected from acid mine drainage in summer of 2007 and 2008 and from circum-neutral pH environments in October to November 2008. Site determination was based on collecting samples from various aquatic habitats (acid mine drainage, lakes, rivers, tributaries, wetlands) with differing bedrock geology (limestone and shale dominated vs granitic Canadian Shield) to obtain a range of geochemical conditions. At each site, measurements of temperature, pH, and Eh were conducted. Samples collected for microbial counts and electron imaging were preserved to a final concentration of 2.5 % (v/v) glutaraldehyde. Additional sample were filtered into 60 mL nalgene bottles and amber EPA certified 40 mL glass vials to determine chemical constituents and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), respectively. Water was also collected to determine additional physiochemical parameters (dissolved total iron, ferric iron, nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, alkalinity, and turbidity). All samples were stored at 4 °C until analysis. Viral and prokaryotic abundance was determined by staining samples with SYBR Green I and examining with a epifluorescence microscope under blue excitation. Multiple regression analysis using stepwise backwards regression and general linear models revealed that viral abundance was the most influential predictor of prokaryotic abundance. Additional predictors include pH, sulfate, phosphate, and magnesium. The strength of the model was very strong with 90 % of the variability explained (R2 = 0.90, p < 0.007). This is the first report, to our knowledge, of viruses exhibiting such strong controls over prokaryotic abundance in the natural environment. All relationships are positively correlated with the exception of Mg, which is negatively correlated. Iron was also noted as a

  4. The Narssaq-project - a geochemical, ecological environmental research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soerensen, H.; Rose-Hansen, J.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of mineral occurrences near the town of Narssaq in South Greenland are recorded to be worth mining in the near future: the uranium occurrences at Kvanefjeld in the northern part of the Ilimaussaq intrusion and the zirconium occurrences in the southern part on the south coast of the Kangerdluarssuk fjord. Consideration of the environment plays a large part in discussions regarding the exploitation of these minerals. A report is given of the geochemical, ecological environmental investigations carried out at Narssaq since 1974. (BP)

  5. Overview of geochemical modeling needs for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.; Wolery, T.

    1984-01-01

    Research needs include, but are not limited to: measurement of basic thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures for species identified by modelers as potentially important; evaluation of substances which control or limit precipitation and/or nucleation kinetics; sorption studies specifically designed to provide data needed for modeling. This includes the rate of sorption, desorption, and the characterization of the solid and aqueous phases; site-mixing models and thermodynamic data for secondary minerals that form solid solutions; the development of standard techniques for measuring rate laws for precipitation and dissolution kinetics; and measurement of rate laws describing redox kinetics, dissolution, and precipitation involving aqueous species and solid phases of interest to geochemical modelers

  6. Experimental insights into geochemical changes in hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcon, Virginia; Joseph, Craig; Carter, Kimberly E.; Hedges, Sheila W.; Lopano, Christina L.; Guthrie, George D.; Hakala, J. Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing applied to organic-rich shales has significantly increased the recoverable volume of methane available for U.S. energy consumption. Fluid-shale reactions in the reservoir may affect long-term reservoir productivity and waste management needs through changes to fracture mineral composition and produced fluid chemical composition. We performed laboratory experiments with Marcellus Shale and lab-generated hydraulic fracturing fluid at elevated pressures and temperatures to evaluate mineral reactions and the release of trace elements into solution. Results from the experiment containing fracturing chemicals show evidence for clay and carbonate dissolution, secondary clay and anhydrite precipitation, and early-stage (24–48 h) fluid enrichment of certain elements followed by depletion in later stages (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Sc, Zn). Other elements such as As, Fe, Mn, Sr, and Y increased in concentration and remained elevated throughout the duration of the experiment with fracturing fluid. Geochemical modeling of experimental fluid data indicates primary clay dissolution, and secondary formation of smectites and barite, after reaction with fracturing fluid. Changes in aqueous organic composition were observed, indicating organic additives may be chemically transformed or sequestered by the formation after hydraulic fracturing. The NaCl concentrations in our fluids are similar to measured concentrations in Marcellus Shale produced waters, showing that these experiments are representative of reservoir fluid chemistries and can provide insight on geochemical reactions that occur in the field. These results can be applied towards evaluating the evolution of hydraulically-fractured reservoirs, and towards understanding geochemical processes that control the composition of produced water from unconventional shales. - Highlights: • Metal concentrations could be at their peak in produced waters recovered 24–48 after fracturing. • Carbonate

  7. Review of geochemical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauss, K.G.; Steinborn, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    A broad, general review is presented of geochemical measurement techniques that can provide data necessary for site selection and repository effectiveness assessment for a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The available measurement techniques are organized according to the parameter measured. The list of geochemical parameters include all those measurable geochemical properties of a sample whole values determine the geochemical characteristics or behavior of the system. For each technique, remarks are made pertaining to the operating principles of the measurement instrument and the purpose for which the technique is used. Attention is drawn to areas where further research and development are needed

  8. Unsupervised Feature Subset Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndberg-Madsen, Nicolaj; Thomsen, C.; Pena, Jose

    2003-01-01

    This paper studies filter and hybrid filter-wrapper feature subset selection for unsupervised learning (data clustering). We constrain the search for the best feature subset by scoring the dependence of every feature on the rest of the features, conjecturing that these scores discriminate some ir...... irrelevant features. We report experimental results on artificial and real data for unsupervised learning of naive Bayes models. Both the filter and hybrid approaches perform satisfactorily....

  9. Transformation of bulk alloys to oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Danni; Benson, Jim; Magasinski, Alexandre; Berdichevsky, Gene; Yushin, Gleb

    2017-01-01

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer prospects for enhancing the electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of a broad range of functional materials and composites, but their synthesis methods are typically elaborate and expensive. We demonstrate a direct transformation of bulk materials into nanowires under ambient conditions without the use of catalysts or any external stimuli. The nanowires form via minimization of strain energy at the boundary of a chemical reaction front. We show the transformation of multimicrometer-sized particles of aluminum or magnesium alloys into alkoxide nanowires of tunable dimensions, which are converted into oxide nanowires upon heating in air. Fabricated separators based on aluminum oxide nanowires enhanced the safety and rate capabilities of lithium-ion batteries. The reported approach allows ultralow-cost scalable synthesis of 1D materials and membranes.

  10. Organic hybrid planar-nanocrystalline bulk heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R [Ann Arbor, MI; Yang, Fan [Piscataway, NJ

    2011-03-01

    A photosensitive optoelectronic device having an improved hybrid planar bulk heterojunction includes a plurality of photoconductive materials disposed between the anode and the cathode. The photoconductive materials include a first continuous layer of donor material and a second continuous layer of acceptor material. A first network of donor material or materials extends from the first continuous layer toward the second continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of holes to the first continuous layer. A second network of acceptor material or materials extends from the second continuous layer toward the first continuous layer, providing continuous pathways for conduction of electrons to the second continuous layer. The first network and the second network are interlaced with each other. At least one other photoconductive material is interspersed between the interlaced networks. This other photoconductive material or materials has an absorption spectra different from the donor and acceptor materials.

  11. Tuneable film bulk acoustic wave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Gevorgian, Spartak Sh; Vorobiev, Andrei K

    2013-01-01

    To handle many standards and ever increasing bandwidth requirements, large number of filters and switches are used in transceivers of modern wireless communications systems. It makes the cost, performance, form factor, and power consumption of these systems, including cellular phones, critical issues. At present, the fixed frequency filter banks based on Film Bulk Acoustic Resonators (FBAR) are regarded as one of the most promising technologies to address performance -form factor-cost issues. Even though the FBARs improve the overall performances the complexity of these systems remains high.  Attempts are being made to exclude some of the filters by bringing the digital signal processing (including channel selection) as close to the antennas as possible. However handling the increased interference levels is unrealistic for low-cost battery operated radios. Replacing fixed frequency filter banks by one tuneable filter is the most desired and widely considered scenario. As an example, development of the softwa...

  12. Criticality in Bulk Metallic Glass Constituent Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Rodrigo Miguel Ojeda; Graedel, T. E.; Pekarskaya, Evgenia; Schroers, Jan

    2017-11-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), which readily form amorphous phases during solidification, are increasingly being used in first applications of watch components, electronic casings, and sporting goods. The compositions of BMGs typically include four to six elements. Various political and geological factors have recently led to supply disruptions for several metals, including some present in BMG compositions. In this work, we assess the "criticality" of 22 technologically interesting BMG compositions, compare the results with those for three common engineering alloy groups, and derive recommendations for BMG composition choices from a criticality perspective. The criticality of BMGs is found to be generally much higher compared with those for the established engineering alloys. Therefore, criticality concerns should also be considered in the choice between existing and developing novel BMGs.

  13. Solid state properties from bulk to nano

    CERN Document Server

    Dresselhaus, Mildred; Cronin, Stephen; Gomes Souza Filho, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    This book fills a gap between many of the basic solid state physics and materials science books that are currently available. It is written for a mixed audience of electrical engineering and applied physics students who have some knowledge of elementary undergraduate quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics. This book, based on a successful course taught at MIT, is divided pedagogically into three parts: (I) Electronic Structure, (II) Transport Properties, and (III) Optical Properties. Each topic is explained in the context of bulk materials and then extended to low-dimensional materials where applicable. Problem sets review the content of each chapter to help students to understand the material described in each of the chapters more deeply and to prepare them to master the next chapters.

  14. Mechanical reliability of bulk high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiman, S.W.

    1990-01-01

    Most prospective applications for high T c superconductors in bulk form, e.g. magnets, motors, will require appreciable mechanical strength. Work at NIST [National Institute of Standards and Technology] has begun to address issues related to mechanical reliability. For example, recent studies on Ba-Y-Cu-O have shown that the intrinsic crack growth resistance, K IC , of crystals of this material is even smaller than was first reported, less than that of window glass, and is sensitive to moisture. Processing conditions, particularly sintering and annealing atmosphere, have been shown to have a major influence on microstructure and internal stresses in the material. Large internal stresses result from the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transformation as well as the thermal expansion anisotropy in the grains of the ceramic. Because stress relief is absent, microcracks form which have a profound influence on strength

  15. On bulk viscosity and moduli decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    This pedagogically intended lecture, one of four under the header 'Basics of thermal QCD', reviews an interesting relationship, originally pointed out by Boedeker, that exists between the bulk viscosity of Yang-Mills theory (of possible relevance to the hydrodynamics of heavy ion collision experiments) and the decay rate of scalar fields coupled very weakly to a heat bath (appearing in some particle physics inspired cosmological scenarios). This topic serves, furthermore, as a platform on which a number of generic thermal field theory concepts are illustrated. The other three lectures (on the QCD equation of state and the rates of elastic as well as inelastic processes experienced by heavy quarks) are recapitulated in brief encyclopedic form. (author)

  16. Bulk disk resonator based ultrasensitive mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Davis, Zachary James

    2009-01-01

    range. The sensor has been characterized in terms of sensitivity both for distributed mass detection, performing six consecutive depositions of e-beam evaporated Au, and localized mass detection, depositing approximately 7.5 pg of Pt/Ga/C three times consecutively with a Focused Ion Beam system......In the framework of developing an innovative label-free sensor for multiarrayed biodetection applications, we present a novel bulk resonator based mass sensor. The sensor is a polysilicon disk which shows a Q-factor of 6400 in air at 68.8 MHz, resulting in mass resolutions down in the femtogram....... The sensor has an extremely high distributed mass to frequency shift sensitivity of 60104 Hzcm2/¿g and shows a localized mass to frequency sensitivity up to 4405 Hz/pg with a localized mass resolution down to 15 fg. The device has been fabricated with a new microfabrication process that uses only two...

  17. H-point exciton transitions in bulk MoS2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saigal, Nihit; Ghosh, Sandip

    2015-01-01

    Reflectance and photoreflectance spectrum of bulk MoS 2 around its direct bandgap energy have been measured at 12 K. Apart from spectral features due to the A and B ground state exciton transitions at the K-point of the Brillouin zone, one observes additional features at nearby energies. Through lineshape analysis the character of two prominent additional features are shown to be quite different from that of A and B. By comparing with reported electronic band structure calculations, these two additional features are identified as ground state exciton transitions at the H-point of the Brillouin zone involving two spin-orbit split valance bands. The excitonic energy gap at the H-point is 1.965 eV with a valance bands splitting of 185 meV. While at the K-point, the corresponding values are 1.920 eV and 205 meV, respectively

  18. Geochemical databases. Part 1. Pmatch: a program to manage thermochemical data. Part 2. The experimental validation of geochemical computer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D.; Nilsson, K.; Skytte Jensen, B.

    1993-01-01

    This work is carried out under cost-sharing contract with European Atomic Energy Community in the framework of its programme on Management and Storage of Radioactive Wastes. Part 1: PMATCH, A Program to Manage Thermochemical Data, describes the development and use of a computer program, by means of which new thermodynamic data from literature may be referenced to a common frame and thereby become internally consistent with an existing database. The report presents the relevant thermodynamic expressions and their use in the program is discussed. When there is not sufficient thermodynamic data available to describe a species behaviour under all conceivable conditions, the problems arising are thoroughly discussed and the available data is handled by approximating expressions. Part II: The Experimental Validation of Geochemical Computer models are the results of experimental investigations of the equilibria established in aqueous suspensions of mixtures of carbonate minerals (Calcium, magnesium, manganese and europium carbonates) compared with theoretical calculations made by means of the geochemical JENSEN program. The study revealed that the geochemical computer program worked well, and that its database was of sufficient validity. However, it was observed that experimental difficulties could hardly be avoided, when as here a gaseous component took part in the equilibria. Whereas the magnesium and calcium carbonates did not demonstrate mutual solid solubility, this produced abnormal effects when manganese and calcium carbonates were mixed resulting in a diminished solubility of both manganese and calcium. With tracer amounts of europium added to a suspension of calcite in sodium carbonate solutions long term experiments revealed a transition after 1-2 months, whereby the tracer became more strongly adsorbed onto calcite. The transition is interpreted as the nucleation and formation of a surface phase incorporating the 'species' NaEu(Co 3 ) 2

  19. Petrological and geochemical characterization of the plutonic rocks of the Sierra de La Aguada, Province of San Luis, Argentina: Genetic implications with the Famatinian magmatic arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cristofolini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a synthesis on the geology of the crystalline complex that constitute the Sierra de la Aguada, San Luis province, Argentine, from an approach based on field relations, petrologic and structural features and geochemical characteristic. This mountain range exposes a basement dominated by intermediate to mafic calcalkaline igneous rocks and peraluminous felsic granitoids, both emplaced in low to medium grade metamorphic rocks stabilized under low amphibolite facies. All this lithological terrane has been grouped in the El Carrizal-La Aguada Complex. Field relations, petrographic characterization and geochemical comparison of the plutonic rocks from the study area with those belonging to the Ordovician Famatinian suit exposed in the Sierra Grande de San Luis, suggest a genetic and temporal relation linked to the development of the Famatinian magmatic arc.

  20. Locality, bulk equations of motion and the conformal bootstrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabat, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College, City University of New York,250 Bedford Park Blvd. W, Bronx NY 10468 (United States); Lifschytz, Gilad [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Natural Science, University of Haifa,199 Aba Khoushy Ave., Haifa 31905 (Israel)

    2016-10-18

    We develop an approach to construct local bulk operators in a CFT to order 1/N{sup 2}. Since 4-point functions are not fixed by conformal invariance we use the OPE to categorize possible forms for a bulk operator. Using previous results on 3-point functions we construct a local bulk operator in each OPE channel. We then impose the condition that the bulk operators constructed in different channels agree, and hence give rise to a well-defined bulk operator. We refer to this condition as the “bulk bootstrap.” We argue and explicitly show in some examples that the bulk bootstrap leads to some of the same results as the regular conformal bootstrap. In fact the bulk bootstrap provides an easier way to determine some CFT data, since it does not require knowing the form of the conformal blocks. This analysis clarifies previous results on the relation between bulk locality and the bootstrap for theories with a 1/N expansion, and it identifies a simple and direct way in which OPE coefficients and anomalous dimensions determine the bulk equations of motion to order 1/N{sup 2}.

  1. Brent coal typing by combined optical and geochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducazeaux, J.; Le Tran, K.; Nicolas, G. (Societe Nationale des Petroles d' Aquitaine (SNPA), 64 - Pau (France))

    1991-12-01

    Palynological,petrographical and organic geochemical studies show that various kinds of coal occur throughout the Middle Jurassic Brent Group in the Viking Graben. Two types of coal with strong contrast in terms of source rock potential are thoroughly investigated in this study. It is found that they are relevant to two distinct organic facies. Though having the same organic carbon content, they are very different with respect to the petroleum generating potential, one being a conventional gas-prone coal of type III kerogen and the other one of type II-(III) kerogen which should be considered as an oil-generating coal. Explanations are sought for the difference observed, both geochemically and optically. Palynological study shows the occurrence of two distinct communities of land plants in relation with the depositional environment and climatic changes, whilst coal petrographical study shows that the macerals are unevenly and differently distributed in these two coal types. The original organic material and the depositional environment appear to be the main controlling factors. 13 Refs.; 8 Figs.

  2. Geochemical patterns in soils of the karst region, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohic, E.; Hausberger, G.; Davis, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Soil samples were collected at 420 locations in a 5-km grid pattern in the Istria and Gorski Kotar areas of Croatia, and on the Croatian islands of Cres, Rab and Krk, in order to relate geochemical variation in the soils to underlying differences in geology, bedrock lithology, soil type, environment and natural versus anthropogenic influences. Specific objectives included assessment of possible agricultural and industrial sources of contamination, especially from airborne effluent emitted by a local power plant. The study also tested the adequacy of a fixed-depth soil sampling procedure developed for meager karstic soils. Although 40 geochemical variables were analyzed, only 15 elements and 5 radionuclides are common to all the sample locations. These elements can be divided into three groups: (1) those of mostly anthropogenic origin -Pb, V, Cu and Cr; (2) those of mixed origin - radionuclides and Zn; and (3) those of mostly geogene origin -Ba, Sr, Ti, Al, Na, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Ni and Co. Variation in Pb shows a strong correlation with the pattern of road traffic in Istria. The distributions of Ca, Na and Mg in the flysch basins of southern Istria and Slovenia are clearly distinguishable from the distributions of these elements in the surrounding carbonate terrains, a consequence of differences in bedrock permeability, type of drainage and pH. The spatial pattern of Cs from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident reflects almost exclusively the precipitation in Istria during the days immediately after the explosion. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  3. Evolution of geochemical conditions in SFL 3-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Fred; Lindgren, M.; Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M.; Engkvist, I.

    1999-12-01

    The evolution of geochemical conditions in the repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste, SFL 3-5, and in the vicinity of the repository are important when predicting the retention of radionuclides and the long-term stability of engineered barriers. In this study the initial conditions at different repository sites at 300 - 400 m depth, the influence of repository construction and operation, the expected conditions after repository closure and saturation, and the evolution in a long-term perspective are discussed. Groundwaters that are found at these depths have near-neutral pH and are reducing in character, but the composition can vary from saline to non-saline water. The water chemistry in the near-field will mainly be influenced by the composition of the groundwater and by the large amounts of cementitious material that can be found in the repository. Disturbances caused during construction and operation are not expected to be permanent. Studies of old concrete indicate that leaching of concrete is a slow process. The geochemical conditions in the repository are therefore expected to be stable and prevail for hundreds of thousand years. However, the evolution of the surrounding environment may influence the conditions in long-term perspective

  4. Geochemical dispersion of uranium near prospects in Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, A.W.; Schmiermund, R.L.; Mahar, D.L.

    1977-06-01

    The geochemical dispersion of U was investigated near sedimentary uranium prospects in eastern and north-central Pennsylvania. Near Jim Thorpe, known uranium occurrences in the Catskill Fm. are limited to the base of the Duncannon member. At Penn Haven Junction, roll-type U deposits with appreciable Pb and Se are localized adjacent to an oxidized tongue of channel-filling conglomeratic sandstone. The channel and encircling U occurrences furnish a large target for geochemical exploration. Selective extractions show that the organic, Fe-oxide, sand and silt fractions of stream sediments are the major hosts for U in stream sediments. Fe-oxides have a greater affinity for U than organic matter but are less abundant. The U content of organic matter is about 10 5 times the U content of stream water. Stream sediments furnish a representative sample of the average content of U, Zn, Cu, and major elements in soils of a drainage basin in north-central Pennsylvania, so a semiquantitative appraisal of weathering uranium occurrences can be made from stream sediments in climates and topography like Pennsylvania. The flux of uranium leaving the basin in solution is about equal to that leaving as sediment. Uranium is considerably less mobile than Ca and Na. A new method of extracting uranium from water samples, using a liquid ion exchanger (Amberlite LA-1), shows promise for simple field application

  5. Geochemical processes to mobilization of radionuclides from radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragea, M.

    2005-01-01

    On time to alteration the waste by natural weather in isolated area of waste dumps we can notice chemical, biochemical and geochemical modification. Disposability and flow of water are two of the most important parameter which affect the waste chemistry and migration of contamination from wastes. The water behaves like a mechanism of transport for cationic and anionic components and influenced solubility and salt migration from dump. The salt migration towards residue surfaces is affected by short distance between water and surface. The salts are redissolving and moving through the capillary towards the surface when precipitate. The reactions inside of waste are influenced by geochemical point of view mainly by the amount of sulfated salts and chloride, by the disposability of water, pH and by the chemical mineral heterogeneous of waste. Obviously, if the process of alteration by atmospherically agents and those effects about waste can be minimized we could minimize even chemical modification in order to form the salts. This paper examines the mechanism by which 226 Ra and U nat can enter in groundwater and those, which control its concentration. (author)

  6. Geochemical behaviour of uranium in the cycle of alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervet, J.; Coulomb, R.

    1958-01-01

    The investigation of the genesis of secondary mineralized accumulations, and the prospecting of deposits from microchemical anomalies in the surface material, is requiring a well-developed knowledge of the geochemical properties of the uranium during the alteration phase. In the present work, the authors tried to track the uranium history during a part of his natural creeping. a) They describe some most typical mineralogical observations of alteration phenomena and material migration, picked up in place on the deposits. b) They give experimental results concerning the solubilities of the uranium minerals and the factors affecting this solubility. c) They study the water circulation in granitic batholites, and the influence of the occurrence of the uranium deposits on their composition. d) They observe the amplitude of phenomena restricting the dispersions: fixations, precipitations, etc., and the behaviour of growth in uraniferous areas. e) Finally, the opposition chemical alteration-radioactive equilibrium results in an important imbalance in altered materials. The authors tried to use the measurement of this imbalance to explain geochemical processes. (author) [fr

  7. Evolution of geochemical conditions in SFL 3-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Fred [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Lindgren, M.; Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Engkvist, I. [Barsebaeck Kraft AB (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The evolution of geochemical conditions in the repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste, SFL 3-5, and in the vicinity of the repository are important when predicting the retention of radionuclides and the long-term stability of engineered barriers. In this study the initial conditions at different repository sites at 300 - 400 m depth, the influence of repository construction and operation, the expected conditions after repository closure and saturation, and the evolution in a long-term perspective are discussed. Groundwaters that are found at these depths have near-neutral pH and are reducing in character, but the composition can vary from saline to non-saline water. The water chemistry in the near-field will mainly be influenced by the composition of the groundwater and by the large amounts of cementitious material that can be found in the repository. Disturbances caused during construction and operation are not expected to be permanent. Studies of old concrete indicate that leaching of concrete is a slow process. The geochemical conditions in the repository are therefore expected to be stable and prevail for hundreds of thousand years. However, the evolution of the surrounding environment may influence the conditions in long-term perspective.

  8. The Nasca and Palpa geoglyphs: geophysical and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsch, Kerstin; Weller, Andreas; Rosas, Silvia; Reppchen, Gunter

    2009-10-01

    The Nasca geoglyphs in the stone desert in southern Peru are part of our world cultural heritage. These remarkable drawings have roused the interest of scientists from different disciplines. Here we report the results of integrated geophysical, petrophysical, mineralogical, and geochemical investigations of the geoglyphs at six test sites in the stone desert around Nasca and Palpa. The geomagnetic measurements revealed clear indications of subsurface structures that differ from the visible surface geoglyphs. The high-resolution geoelectrical images show unexpected resistivity anomalies underneath the geoglyphs down to a depth of about 2 m. Remarkable structures were revealed in both vertical and lateral directions. No evidence was found of geochemical or mineralogical alterations of the natural geogenic materials (desert pavement environment versus geoglyphs). Neither salts nor other mineral materials were used by the Nasca people to alter or prepare the surfaces of geoglyphs. This supports the hypothesis that the Nasca people simply removed stone material down to the natural hard pan horizon to create the geoglyphs.

  9. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes IV: Geochemical, thermal and mass consequences of energy-constrained recharge, assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-RAFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendy A. Bohrson Department of Geological Sciences, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington, 98926, USA; Frank J. Spera Institute for Crustal Studies and Department of Geological Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, 93106, USA

    2003-01-01

    RAFC events may record a more complete view of the physiochemical history of an open-system magma body. The capability of EC-RAFC to track melts and solids creates a genetic link that can be compared to natural analogues such as layered mafic intrusions and flood basalts, or mafic enclaves and their intermediate-composition volcanic or plutonic hosts. The ability to quantify chemical and volume characteristics of solids and melts also underscores the need for integrated field, petrologic and geochemical studies of igneous systems. While it appears that a number of volcanic events or systems may be characterized by continuous influx or eruption of magma (''steady state systems''), reports describing compositional homogeneity for products that represent eruptions of more than one event are relatively rare. In support of this, EC-RAFC results indicate that very specific combinations of recharge conditions, bulk distribution coefficients, and element concentrations are required to achieve geochemical homogeneity during cooling of a magma body undergoing RAFC. In summary, critical points are that EC-RAFC provides a method to quantitatively investigate complex magmatic systems in a thermodynamic context; it predicts complex, nonmonotonic geochemical trends for which there are natural analogues that have been difficult to model; and finally, EC-RAFC establishes the link between the chemical and physical attributes of a magmatic system. Application of EC-RAFC promises to improve our understanding of specific tectonomagmatic systems as well as enhance our grasp of the essential physiochemical principles that govern magma body evolution

  10. Remagnetization of bulk high-temperature superconductors subjected to crossed and rotating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderbemden, P [SUPRATECS and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science B28, Sart-Tilman, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Hong, Z [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Coombs, T A [Centre for Advanced Photonics and Electronics, Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ausloos, M [SUPRATECS and Department of Physics B5, Sart-Tilman, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Babu, N Hari [IRC in Superconductivity, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cardwell, D A [IRC in Superconductivity, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Campbell, A M [IRC in Superconductivity, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-15

    Bulk melt-processed Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) has significant potential for a variety of high-field permanent-magnet-like applications, such as the rotor of a brushless motor. When used in rotating devices of this kind, however, the YBCO can be subjected to both transient and alternating magnetic fields that are not parallel to the direction of magnetization and which have a detrimental effect on the trapped field. These effects may lead to long-term decay of the magnetization of the bulk sample. In the present work, we analyze both experimentally and numerically the remagnetization process of a melt-processed YBCO single domain that has been partially demagnetized by a magnetic field applied orthogonal to the initial direction of trapped flux. Magnetic torque measurements are used as a tool to probe changes in the remanent magnetization during various sequences of applied field. The application of a small magnetic field between the transverse cycles parallel to the direction of original magnetization results in partial remagnetization of the sample. Rotating the applied field, however, is found to be much more efficient at remagnetizing the bulk material than applying a magnetizing field pulse of the same amplitude. The principal features of the experimental data can be reproduced qualitatively using a two-dimensional finite-element numerical model based on an E-J power law. Finally, the remagnetization process is shown to result from the complex modification of current distribution within the cross-section of the bulk sample.

  11. Remagnetization of bulk high-temperature superconductors subjected to crossed and rotating magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderbemden, P; Hong, Z; Coombs, T A; Ausloos, M; Babu, N Hari; Cardwell, D A; Campbell, A M

    2007-01-01

    Bulk melt-processed Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) has significant potential for a variety of high-field permanent-magnet-like applications, such as the rotor of a brushless motor. When used in rotating devices of this kind, however, the YBCO can be subjected to both transient and alternating magnetic fields that are not parallel to the direction of magnetization and which have a detrimental effect on the trapped field. These effects may lead to long-term decay of the magnetization of the bulk sample. In the present work, we analyze both experimentally and numerically the remagnetization process of a melt-processed YBCO single domain that has been partially demagnetized by a magnetic field applied orthogonal to the initial direction of trapped flux. Magnetic torque measurements are used as a tool to probe changes in the remanent magnetization during various sequences of applied field. The application of a small magnetic field between the transverse cycles parallel to the direction of original magnetization results in partial remagnetization of the sample. Rotating the applied field, however, is found to be much more efficient at remagnetizing the bulk material than applying a magnetizing field pulse of the same amplitude. The principal features of the experimental data can be reproduced qualitatively using a two-dimensional finite-element numerical model based on an E-J power law. Finally, the remagnetization process is shown to result from the complex modification of current distribution within the cross-section of the bulk sample

  12. Interchain interactions in charged diacetylenic oligomers carrying bulk substituents revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottonelli, M.; Izzo, G.M.M.; Comoretto, D.; Musso, G.F.; Dellepiane, G.

    2006-01-01

    We are studying how the electronic properties of an aggregate, built with conjugated oligomers carrying bulk substituents, are affected by intermolecular interactions. In this paper we apply the CEO (Collective Electronic Oscillator) method, on the basis of the semiempirical INDO/S Hamiltonian, to compute the electronic density matrix modifications following the photon absorption in a doubly charged cluster of two units of a fully carbazolyl-substituted oligodiacetylene tetramer, taken as a model system. The picture that had emerged from our previous calculations based on the less sophisticated CIS (Configuration Interaction including Singles) approach is seen to be confirmed. Despite the large separation between the backbones, a through-space charge transfer occurs between the two oligomers due to the fact that the excess charge, contrary to what is generally believed, is not localized on the conjugated backbone, but is spread out over the carbazolyl moieties of the charged molecule. Consideration of this kind of interaction improves the theoretical results obtained for the isolated charged oligomer chain, and aids in better explaining some features of the experimental photoinduced spectra of the corresponding polymer

  13. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique

  14. A CFT perspective on gravitational dressing and bulk locality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewkowycz, Aitor; Turiaci, Gustavo J. [Physics Department, Princeton University,Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Verlinde, Herman [Physics Department, Princeton University,Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University,Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2017-01-02

    We revisit the construction of local bulk operators in AdS/CFT with special focus on gravitational dressing and its consequences for bulk locality. Specializing to 2+1-dimensions, we investigate these issues via the proposed identification between bulk operators and cross-cap boundary states. We obtain explicit expressions for correlation functions of bulk fields with boundary stress tensor insertions, and find that they are free of non-local branch cuts but do have non-local poles. We recover the HKLL recipe for restoring bulk locality for interacting fields as the outcome of a natural CFT crossing condition. We show that, in a suitable gauge, the cross-cap states solve the bulk wave equation for general background geometries, and satisfy a conformal Ward identity analogous to a soft graviton theorem. Virasoro symmetry, the large N conformal bootstrap and the uniformization theorem all play a key role in our derivations.

  15. Bulk glass formation and crystallization in zirconium based bulk metallic glass forming alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savalia, R.T.; Neogy, S.; Dey, G.K.; Banerjee, S.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructures of Zr based metallic glasses produced in bulk form have been described in the as-cast condition and after crystallization. Various microscopic techniques have been used to characterize the microstructures. The microstructure in the as-cast condition was found to contain isolated crystals and crystalline aggregates embedded in the amorphous matrix. Quenched-in nuclei of crystalline phases were found to be present in fully amorphous regions. These glasses after crystallization gave rise to nanocrystalline solids. (author)

  16. 75 FR 34573 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... reduced iron (DRI) as briquettes molded at a temperature of 650 [deg]C or higher that have a density of 5... temperature of 650 [deg]C or higher or had a density of 5.0 g/cm[sup3] or greater. In this proposed rule, we... bulk materials of Hazard Classes 4 through 9. c. One comment recommended that a DCM be required for...

  17. Feature Selection by Reordering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiřina, Marcel; Jiřina jr., M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2005), s. 155-161 ISSN 1738-6438 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : feature selection * data reduction * ordering of features Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  18. Nitrogen isotopes in bulk marine sediment: linking seafloor observations with subseafloor records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-E. Tesdal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The stable isotopes of nitrogen offer a unique perspective on changes in the nitrogen cycle, past and present. However, the presence of multiple forms of nitrogen in marine sediments can complicate the interpretation of bulk nitrogen isotope measurements. Although the large-scale global patterns of seafloor δ15N have been shown to match process-based expectations, small-scale heterogeneity on the seafloor, or alterations of isotopic signals during translation into the subseafloor record, could obscure the primary signals. Here, a public database of nitrogen isotope measurements is described, including both seafloor and subseafloor sediment samples ranging in age from modern to the Pliocene, and used to assess these uncertainties. In general, good agreement is observed between neighbouring seafloor sites within a 100 km radius, with 85% showing differences of < 1‰. There is also a good correlation between the δ15N of the shallowest (< 5 ka subseafloor sediments and neighbouring seafloor sites within a 100 km radius (R2 = 0.83, which suggests a reliable translation of sediments into the buried sediment record. Meanwhile, gradual δ15N decreases over multiple glacial–interglacial cycles appear to reflect post-depositional alteration in records from the deep sea (below 2000 m. We suggest a simple conceptual model to explain these 100-kyr-timescale changes in well-oxygenated, slowly accumulating sediments, which calls on differential loss rates for pools of organic N with different δ15N. We conclude that bulk sedimentary nitrogen isotope records are reliable monitors of past changes in the marine nitrogen cycle at most locations, and could be further improved with a better understanding of systematic post-depositional alteration. Furthermore, geochemical or environmental criteria should be developed in order to effectively identify problematic locations and to account for

  19. Report on the geological-geochemical research carried out within the area of geochemical anomaly P7, Vathyrema, Drama Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavropoulos, Athanasios.

    1982-08-01

    The investigated area covering about 30 km 2 is situated in the crystalline massive of Rhodope (north of Drama deparment, E. Macedonia) where granitoids constitute its main petrological type. The geological-geochemical and radiometric investigations carried out so far in the area have localized a large number of places with high values of γ-radiation (1.000 - 15.000 c/s), as well as high concentrations of uranium (50-500 ppm). The uranium mineralization within the zone of oxidation is expressed by the uranium mineral autunite, accompanied by intensive hematitization-limonitization and chloritization-kaolinization, and additionally by small spots and veinlets of pyrite and galena. It seems that tectonic control exists on the uranium mineralization, since most of the anomalous concentrations of uranium are sitting along mylonite zones rich in chlorite and kaolin. There have been discerned seven more anomalous part areas which will have to be covered by geochemical stream sediment sampling (phase 3), as well as geological mapping (scale 1:5.000). The results from the research conducted within the concerned anomaly lead us to the conclusion that this area is very promising and possibilities of localization of uranium payable concentrations are very high. (N.Ch.)

  20. Coastal Aquifer Contamination and Geochemical Processes Evaluation in Tugela Catchment, South Africa—Geochemical and Statistical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badana Ntanganedzeni

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of groundwater quality, contamination sources and geochemical processes in the coastal aquifer of Tugela Catchment, South Africa were carried out by the geochemical and statistical approach using major ion chemistry of 36 groundwater samples. Results suggest that the spatial distribution pattern of EC, TDS, Na, Mg, Cl and SO4 are homogenous and elevated concentrations are observed in the wells in the coastal region and few wells near the Tugela River. Wells located far from the coast are enriched by Ca, HCO3 and CO3. Durov diagrams, Gibbs plots, ionic ratios, chloro alkaline indices (CAI1 and CAI2 and correlation analysis imply that groundwater chemistry in the coastal aquifer of Tugela Catchment is regulated by the ion exchange, mineral dissolution, saline sources, and wastewater infiltration from domestic sewage; septic tank leakage and irrigation return flow. Principle component analysis also ensured the role of saline and anthropogenic sources and carbonates dissolution on water chemistry. Spatial distributions of factor score also justify the above predictions. Groundwater suitability assessment indicates that around 80% and 90% of wells exceeded the drinking water standards recommended by the WHO and South African drinking water standards (SAWQG, respectively. Based on SAR, RSC, PI, and MH classifications, most of the wells are suitable for irrigation in the study region. USSL classification suggests that groundwater is suitable for coarse-textured soils and salt-tolerant crops. The study recommends that a proper management plan is required to protect this coastal aquifer efficiently.

  1. Curing characteristics of flowable and sculptable bulk-fill composites

    OpenAIRE

    Miletic, Vesna; Pongpruenska, Pong; De Munck, Jan; Brooks, Neil R; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine and correlate the degree of conversion (DC) with Vickers hardness (VH) and translucency parameter (TP) with the depth of cure (DoC) of five bulk-fill composites. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six specimens per group, consisting of Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill ("TEC Bulk," Ivoclar Vivadent), SonicFill (Kerr), SDR Smart Dentin Replacement ("SDR," Dentsply), Xenius base ("Xenius," StickTech; commercialized as EverX Posterior, GC), Filtek Bul...

  2. Theory of bulk-surface coupling in topological insulator films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kush; Garate, Ion

    2014-12-01

    We present a quantitative microscopic theory of the disorder- and phonon-induced coupling between surface and bulk states in doped topological insulator films. We find a simple mathematical structure for the surface-to-bulk scattering matrix elements and confirm the importance of bulk-surface coupling in transport and photoemission experiments, assessing its dependence on temperature, carrier density, film thickness, and particle-hole asymmetry.

  3. Localization of bulk form fields on dilatonic domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youm, Donam

    2001-06-01

    We study the localization properties of bulk form potentials on dilatonic domain walls. We find that bulk form potentials of any ranks can be localized as form potentials of the same ranks or one lower ranks, for any values of the dilaton coupling parameter. For large enough values of the dilaton coupling parameter, bulk form potentials of any ranks can be localized as form potentials of both the same ranks and one lower ranks. (author)

  4. Geochemical Distribution of Lead and Chromium in River Getsi-Kano

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geochemical forms of lead (Pb) and Chromium (Cr) from the sediment of River Getsi Kano-Nigeria were determined using Atomic Absorption spectrometer for eighteen months. Apart from determination of the metals in water, geochemical forms of the metals were also evaluated into five fractions. Exchangeable, bound to ...

  5. Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Benedict, F.C. Jr.; Rose, T.P.; Hershey, R.L.; Paces, J.B.; Peterman, Z.E.; Farnham, I.M.; Johannesson, K.H.; Singh, A.K.; Stetzenbach, K.J.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Eaton, G.F.; Smith, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units

  6. Development of geophysical and geochemical data processing software based on component GIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Dan; Yu Xiang; Wu Qubo; Han Shaoyang; Li Xi

    2013-01-01

    Based on component GIS and mixed programming techniques, a software which combines the basic GIS functions, conventional and unconventional data process methods for the regional geophysical and geochemical data together, is designed and developed. The software has many advantages, such as friendly interface, easy to use and utility functions and provides a useful platform for regional geophysical and geochemical data processing. (authors)

  7. Screening for Plant Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Polder, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, an overview of different plant features is given, from (sub)cellular to canopy level. A myriad of methods is available to measure these features using image analysis, and often, multiple methods can be used to measure the same feature. Several criteria are listed for choosing a

  8. Development of a Model of Geophysical and Geochemical Controls on Abiotic Carbon Cycling on Earth-Like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, M.; Felton, R.; Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Desch, S. J.; Arney, G. N.

    2017-12-01

    About 20 Earth-sized planets (0.6-1.6 Earth masses and radii) have now been discovered beyond our solar system [1]. Although such planets are prime targets in the upcoming search for atmospheric biosignatures, their composition, geology, and climate are essentially unconstrained. Yet, developing an understanding of how these factors influence planetary evolution through time and space is essential to establishing abiotic backgrounds against which any deviations can provide evidence for biological activity. To this end, we are building coupled geophysical-geochemical models of abiotic carbon cycling on such planets. Our models are controlled by atmospheric factors such as temperature and composition, and compute interior inputs to atmospheric species. They account for crustal weathering, ocean-atmosphere equilibria, and exchange with the deep interior as a function of planet composition and size (and, eventually, age).Planets in other solar systems differ from the Earth not only in their bulk physical properties, but also likely in their bulk chemical composition [2], which influences key parameters such as the vigor of mantle convection and the near-surface redox state. Therefore, simulating how variations in such parameters affect carbon cycling requires us to simulate the above processes from first principles, rather than by using arbitrary parameterizations derived from observations as is often done with models of carbon cycling on Earth [3] or extrapolations thereof [4]. As a first step, we have developed a kinetic model of crustal weathering using the PHREEQC code [5] and kinetic data from [6]. We will present the ability of such a model to replicate Earth's carbon cycle using, for the time being, parameterizations for surface-interior-atmosphere exchange processes such as volcanism (e.g., [7]).[1] exoplanet.eu, 7/28/2017.[2] Young et al. (2014) Astrobiology 14, 603-626.[3] Lerman & Wu (2008) Kinetics of Global Geochemical Cycles. In Kinetics of Water

  9. Gamma-ray analysis for U, Th and K on bulk cutting samples from deep wells in the Danish Subbasin and the North German Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovborg, L.

    1987-07-01

    A total of 1329 bulk cutting samples from deep wells in Denmark were analysed for U, Th and K by laboratory gamma-ray analysis. Contamination of the samples by drilling mud additives, mud solids and fall down was studied by means of a wash down experiment and by comparison with the total gamma-ray response from wireline logging. It is concluded that the inorganic geochemistry on bulk cutting samples must be applied with great caution. The data are useful for geochemical characterization of well sections and for regional geochemical correlation. Radioelement abundance logs and radioelement ratio logs are presented from 3 wells in the Danish Subbasin and 2 wells in the North German Basin. The radioelement geochemistry is discussed for the successive lithostratigraphical units and a reference radioelement profile is established for the central part of the Danish Subbasin. Finally, a model describing the relationship between common lithofacies and their U content and Th/U ratio is suggested. The model deliniates the depositional environment and the relative distances to the provenance areas. It is concluded that: (1) Uranium is mobile during deposition, but since then it is fixed by stable mineral phases at depth; (2) Thorium reflects source area characteristics and that any available ions are readily adsorbed by clay minerals. Thorium anomalies may thus serve as lithostratigraphical markers; (3) Potassium occurs in unstable rock forming mineral phases. The present distribution is controlled not only by the clastic mineral assemblage, but also by the diagenetic processes through geologic time

  10. Coupling R and PHREEQC: an interactive and extensible environment for efficient programming of geochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2013-04-01

    PHREEQC [1] is a widely used non-interactive open source software for speciation, batch-reactions, one-dimensional transport, and inverse geochemical caclulations. It represents the tool of choice for many researchers and practicioners for a broad set of geochemical problems, underground CO2 storage among others. Its open source nature, the flexibility to program arbitrary kinetic laws for the chemical reactions, as well as a thorough implementation of the Pitzer formalism explain its success and longevity. However, its non-interactive architecture make it cumbersome to couple PHREEQC to transport programs to achieve reactive transport simulations [2], but also to overcome the limitations of PHREEQC itself regarding the setup of large numbers of simulations - for example exploring wide ranges of conditions - and the graphical evaluation of the results. This has been the main motivation leading to the development of an interface with the high level language and environment for statistical computing and graphics GNU R [3]. The interface consists of minor modifications in PHREEQC's C source code, only affecting data I/O, plus on the R side a bunch of helper functions used to setup the simulations - basically automated manipulation of PHREEQC's input files, which are text files - and to collect and visualize the results. The most relevant subset of PHREEQC's capabilities and features are fully usable through the interface. Illustratory examples for the utility of this programmable interface were given in the framework of the research project this developement originated from: CLEAN [4], a project investigating the feasibility of enhanced gas recovery combined with CO2 storage. This interface allowed us to successfully and easily manipulate, compare and refit chemical databases, perform sensitivity analysis by combinatory variations of parameters, and all that in an environment which is both scriptable and interactive, with all results directly available for further

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  12. Fault current limiter using bulk oxides superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmont, O.; Ferracci, P.; Porcar, L.; Barbut, J.M.; Tixador, P.; Noudem, J.G.; Bourgault, D.; Tournier, R.

    1998-01-01

    We study the limitation possibilities of bulk Bi high T c materials. For this we test these materials with AC or DC currents above their critical currents. We study particularly the evolution of the voltage with time or with current. The material, the value of the current and the time duration play important parts. For sintered Bi samples the voltage depends only on the current even for values much larger than the critical current. With textured samples the V(I) curves shows an hysteretic behaviour due to a warming up. The textured materials are more interesting than sintered ones in terms of required volume for the current limitation. In both cases the superconductors are in a dissipative state but not in the normal state. This state is nevertheless reached if the dissipated energy inside the sample is sufficient. We have tried to apply a magnetic field on the samples in order to trigger a more effective limitation. The voltage increases but with a limited effect for currents much higher (3-4 times) than the critical zero field current. We think that the dissipative state is due mainly to the grain boundaries which become resistive above the critical current. (orig.)

  13. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienza della Terra Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienza della Terra Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino [IPCF-CNR, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T{sub L} ≃ 225 K). The second, T{sup *} ∼ 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K{sub T}(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient α{sub P}(T, P) in the P–T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T{sub L}) and the onset of the unfolding process (T{sup *})

  14. Calcium Isotopic Composition of Bulk Silicate Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J.; Ionov, D. A.; Liu, F.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Huang, F.

    2016-12-01

    Ca isotopes are used to study the accretion history of the Earth and terrestrial planets, but, Ca isotopic composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) remains poorly constrained [1]. To better understand the Ca isotopic composition of BSE, we analyzed 22 well studied peridotite xenoliths from Tariat (Mongolia), Vitim (southern Siberia) and Udachnaya (Siberian Craton). These samples include both fertile and highly depleted garnet and spinel peridotites that show no or only minor post-melting metasomatism or alteration. Ca isotope measurements were done on a Triton-TIMS using double spike method at the Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, CAS. The data are reported as δ44/40Ca (relative to NIST SRM 915a). Results for geostandards are consistent with those from other laboratories. 2 standard deviations of SRM 915a analyses are 0.13‰ (n=48). δ44/40Ca of both and fertile and refractory peridotites range from 0.79 to 1.07‰ producing an average of 0.93±0.12‰ (2SD). This value defines the Ca isotopic composition of the BSE, which is consistent with the average δ44/40Ca of oceanic basalts ( 0.90‰)[2,3]. [1] Huang et al (2010) EPSL 292; [2] Valdes et al (2014) EPSL 394; [3]DePaolo (2004) RMG 55.

  15. Late Cambrian magmatic arc activity in peri-Gondwana: geochemical evidence from the Basal Allochthonous Units of NW Iberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andonaegui, P.; Abati, J.; Díez-Fernández, R.

    2017-07-01

    The North African section of the Gondwana margin was the site of voluminous, arc-related magmatism during the Late Neoproterozoic (Avalonian–Cadomian orogen). The lower (and older) metasedimentary sequence that constitutes the Basal Units of the Allochthonous Complexes of NW Iberia was deposited in that setting. In these units, sedimentation was followed by the intrusion of tonalites and granodiorites in the late Cambrian (ca. 493–489Ma). In the Late Paleozoic, the collision of Gondwana and Laurussia (Variscan orogeny) deformed and metamorphosed the whole ensemble. New whole rock geochemical analysis performed in seven samples of metatonalites and fourteen samples of metagranodiorites are characterized by: i) slight enrichment in incompatible elements (Rb, Ba, Th, U), ii) negative anomalies in Nb, Ta, P, and Ti, and iii) negative anomalies in Eu. These chemical features are in agreement with a subduction-related setting for the genesis of both types of magma, which is also supported by chemical discrimination using tectonic setting diagrams. Positive anomalies of Pb suggest a crustal component. The new geochemical data reveal that the convergent orogen that ruled the paleogeography of the Gondwana periphery during the Neoproterozoic (Cadomian orogen) remained active bey.

  16. Geochemical study of water-rock interaction processes on geothermal systems of alkaline water in granitic massif

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil gutierrez, B.; Garcia Sanz, S.; Lago San Jose, M.; Arranz Yague, E.; Auque Sanz, L.

    2002-01-01

    The study of geothermal systems developed within granitic massifs (with alkaline waters and reducing ORP values) is a topic of increasing scientific interest. These systems are a perfect natural laboratory for studying the water-rock interaction processes as they are defined by three main features: 1) long residence time of water within the system, 2) temperature in the reservoir high enough to favour reaction kinetics and finally, 3) the comparison of the chemistry of the incoming and outgoing waters of the system allows for the evaluation of the processes that have modified the water chemistry and its signature, The four geothermal systems considered in this paper are developed within granitic massifs of the Spanish Central Pyrenes; these systems were studied from a geochemical point of view, defining the major, trace and REE chemistry of both waters and host rocks and then characterizing the composition and geochemical evolution of the different waters. Bicarbonate-chloride-sodic and bicarbonate-sodic compositions are the most representative of the water chemistry in the deep geothermal system, as they are not affected by secondary processes (mixing, conductive cooling, etc). (Author)

  17. Groundwater sources and geochemical processes in a crystalline fault aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Clément; Aquilina, Luc; Bour, Olivier; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Dewandel, Benoît; Pauwels, Hélène; Labasque, Thierry; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Hochreutener, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    The origin of water flowing in faults and fractures at great depth is poorly known in crystalline media. This paper describes a field study designed to characterize the geochemical compartmentalization of a deep aquifer system constituted by a graben structure where a permeable fault zone was identified. Analyses of the major chemical elements, trace elements, dissolved gases and stable water isotopes reveal the origin of dissolved components for each permeable domain and provide information on various water sources involved during different seasonal regimes. The geochemical response induced by performing a pumping test in the fault-zone is examined, in order to quantify mixing processes and contribution of different permeable domains to the flow. Reactive processes enhanced by the pumped fluxes are also identified and discussed. The fault zone presents different geochemical responses related to changes in hydraulic regime. They are interpreted as different water sources related to various permeable structures within the aquifer. During the low water regime, results suggest mixing of recent water with a clear contribution of older water of inter-glacial origin (recharge temperature around 7 °C), suggesting the involvement of water trapped in a local low-permeability matrix domain or the contribution of large scale circulation loops. During the high water level period, due to inversion of the hydraulic gradient between the major permeable fault zone and its surrounding domains, modern water predominantly flows down to the deep bedrock and ensures recharge at a local scale within the graben. Pumping in a permeable fault zone induces hydraulic connections with storage-reservoirs. The overlaid regolith domain ensures part of the flow rate for long term pumping (around 20% in the present case). During late-time pumping, orthogonal fluxes coming from the fractured domains surrounding the major fault zone are dominant. Storage in the connected fracture network within the

  18. Hydrogeological and geochemical studies in the Perch Lake basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, P.J.

    1979-08-01

    The Perch Lake basin is a small drainage system along the Ottawa River about 200 km west of Ottawa on the Canadian Shield. Since 1975, groups of scientists from several Canadian universities and government departments have been studying the hydrological, geological and geochemical properties of the basin. The object of these studies is to develop and test simulation models used to describe the time-dependent mass flow rates of water and dissolved and suspended substances through the basin. To review progress, a symposium/workshop was held at Chalk Rier in 1978 April. This report contains 24 extended summaries of the material presented verbally at the workshop. Subject matters include atmospheric sources and sinks, mass flows through the surface and subsurface regimes in the drainage basins and interactions occurring in the lake. (author)

  19. Isotopic-geochemical investigation of Vitosh pluton (Bulgaria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amelin, Yu.V.; Drubetskoj, E.R.; Monchev, N.B.; Nejmark, L.A.; Ovchinnikova, G.V.; Levskij, L.K.

    1989-01-01

    A set of isotope-geochronological (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, uranium fission tracks) and isotope-geochemical (Sr, Pb, Nd, He) methods was used to establish genesis and age of multi-phase Vitosh pluton. The investigation results have shown that primary magma from which pluton rocks were formed is generated at the level of high mantle - low crust. Insignificant difference in time of implantation and crystallization between variuos pluton phases is established. In the interval 84-79 millions of years the velocity of rock cooling and the velocity of pluton lift to the surface were estimated. In the interval 79-0 millions of years these velocities decrease essentially. After formation the rocks were not subjected to additional heat affects

  20. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Shuixigou group in Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinping; Min Maozhong

    2003-01-01

    The Shuixigou Group, Lower-Middle Jurassic is the uranium-hosting formation of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits in Yili basin. Rocks of the Shuixigou Group were extensively corroded during the diagenesis by the CO 2 -and organic acid-rich water derived from the organic matter existing in the strata. As a result, sandstones became loose and porous. Data of geochemical background such as uranium, organic carbon and major element contents in this paper are the achievement of authors. The results indicate that the distribution of uranium, organic matter and major elements is closely associated with the formation of epigenetic interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits, and with the discrimination of ore-hosting and barren interlayer oxidation zones

  1. Geochemical characterisation of Elbe river high flood sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, F. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Falkenberg (Germany). Sektion Boden-/Gewaesserforschung]|[UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Magdeburg (Germany). Sektion Gewaesserforschung; Rupp, H.; Meissner, R. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Falkenberg (Germany). Sektion Boden-/Gewaesserforschung; Lohse, M.; Buettner, O.; Friese, K. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Magdeburg (Germany). Sektion Gewaesserforschung; Miehlich, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Bodenkunde

    2001-07-01

    Quality aims for land usage in flood plains have to be worked out in the Russian-German research project 'Effects of floods on the pollution of agricultural used flood plain soils of the Oka River and the Elbe River'. It is financed by the Germany Ministry of Education and Research (FKZ 02 WT 9617/0). Beside the characterisation of the present pollution of soils for the middle Elbe, it is necessary to prognosticate the current pollutant input. At the examination site nearby Wittenberge, Elbe River kilometers 435 and 440, natural deposited flood sediments were sampled by artificial lawn mats. By the geochemical characterisation it is possible to record the metal input into the flood plain and to win knowledge about the sedimentation process. The results of sediment investigation of the high flood in spring 1997 are presented. (orig.)

  2. Geochemical exploration for phosphate in the State of Acre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.L. da; Melo Costa, W.A. de; Santos, A.J.M. dos

    1989-01-01

    The geochemical prospecting conducted for phosphates in Acre which could explain the good fertility of the region was charged to discover this material. The phosphates are strictly built of all the bone structures and coprolites of the several fragments of vertebrate fossils, which are widespread in the region. The phosphatic fossils are bedded in the Solimoes Formation, especially its basal to intermediary conglomeratic bed. The fossils are constituted of low crystallinity apatite, and their matrix sediments include quartz, feldspars, smectite, halloysite and calcite. The P 2 O 5 content reaches up to 5% in the sediments and up to 32% in the fragments. The fossils are enriched in U 3 O 8 and rare earth elements. There is no perspect of classic or mineral deposits but the geological knowlwdge will permit the improvement of the use of the soils in Acre. (author) [pt

  3. Application of petroleum markers to geochemical and environmental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-Elgheit, M.A.; El-Gayar, M.S.; Hegazi, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    Application of trace-metal and biological markers to geochemical studies has shown that crude oils could be correlated or differentiated according to their geologic age. The V/Ni, V/Σ Ni, Mg, Fe, and pristine to phytane (Pr/Ph) markers were almost uniform in Gulf of Suez crude oils, revealing their same origin, yet showing marked differences in Western Desert crude oils, reflecting varying degrees of their maturity and migrational history. The significance of petroleum markers was extended to monitoring of oil spill sources. Weathering of spills usually renders their source identification questionable by infrared or gas chromatography profiles. Since evaporative loss light petroleum fractions does not appreciably affect the high-Molecular Weight components with which trace metals, isoprenoids, hopanes, and steranes are associated, V/Ni, Pr/Ph, m/z 191, and m/z 217 mass chromatogram fragments were found reliable in fingerprinting oil spill sources in Mediterranean waters

  4. Lateritinga project: a geochemical orientation study for Amazon lateritic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.L. da

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this project is the development of systematic geochemical orientation survey in lateritic weathered terrain, like those form Amazon Region. The main selected targets (sheets) are: Turiacu, Cajuapara and Serra dos Carajas, with 690 samples collected (soils and lateritic rocks). For the Aurizona-Serra do Pirocaua target (Turiacu sheet), within the purpose of this work, 49 samples were collected in a 100x 200m regular grid. From all samples the fraction minor than 200 mesh was taken to analyses (by XRF, AA, OES, ICP and fire assay) for SiO sub(2), Fe sub(2) O sub(3), TiO sub(2), P sub(2) O sub(5), Sr, Ba, Y, Nb, Zr, Ga, Sc, Ni, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, V, As, Bi, Pt, Pd, Th, Au and REE, as well for their mineralogy by XRD. The chemical results were submitted to statistical treatment with the Geoquant-software for IBM-compatible microcomputer. (author)

  5. Geochemical isotope compartment model of the nitrogen cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, G.; Wetzel, K.; Stiehl, G.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the global cycle of nitrogen and its isotopes is described. It takes into account geochemical reservoirs (nitrogen in magmatic metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks and in the atmosphere) and the nitrogen exchange between magmatic rocks and the outer mantle, the transition of nitrogen exchange between sedimentary rocks and the atmosphere. With the aid of the mathematical formalisms of the compartment theory and on the basis of all available delta 11 N values assumptions regarding the isotope effects in forming these nitrogen fluxes data have been obtained on the degree of the nitrogen exchange between the earth crust and the outer mantle and on other nitrogen fluxes characterizing the global nitrogen cycle. (author)

  6. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis of gold in geochemical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilliacus, R.

    1983-01-01

    A fast method for the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of gold in geochemical samples is described. The method is intended for samples having background concentrations of gold. The method is based on the dissolution of samples with hydrofluoric acid and aqua regia followed by the dissolution of the fluorides with boric acid and hydrochloric acid. Gold is then adsorbed on activated carbon by filtrating the solution through a thin carbon layer. The activity measurements are carried out using a Ge(Li)-detector and a multichannel analyzer. The chemical yields of the separation determined by reirradiation vary between 60 and 90%. The detection limit of the method is 0.2 ng/g gold in rock samples. USGS standard rocks and exploration reference materials are analyzed and the results are presented and compared with literature data. (author)

  7. Podoconiosis - non-filarial geochemical elephantiasis - a neglected tropical disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenoff, Pietro; Simon, Jan Christoph; Muylowa, Grace K; Davey, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Podoconiosis or mossy foot is a form of non-filarial lymphedema. This geochemical elephantiasis is a disabling condition caused by the passage of microparticles of silica and aluminum silicates through the skin of people walking barefoot in areas with a high content of soil of volcanic origin. Podoconiosis is widespread in tropical Africa, Central America and North India, yet it remains a neglected and under-researched condition. The disabling effects of podoconiosis cause great hardship to patients. It adversely affects the economic (reduced productivity and absenteeism), social (marriage, education, etc.) and psychological (social stigma) well-being of those affected. Podoconiosis can be prevented; the main primary preventive measure is protective footwear. Secondary measures include a strict hygiene regimen and compression therapy, which can reverse initial lesions. Tertiary approaches include surgical management, such as shaving operations to reduce hyperplastic and verrucous elephantiasis.

  8. Nuclear probes in physical and geochemical studies of natural diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellschop, J.P.F.

    In this review the emphasis is directed to the use of nuclear particles for the analysis of impurities in diamond from an interest in both the observed physical properties and genesis of diamond and the inter-relation between these two aspects. However (nuclear) radiation can be used more specifically: from the inter-relation of elemental impurities chemical and geochemical information can be deduced, from energy variation depth distributions of selected impurities can be determined, the prospect of lattice location of impurities exists from the use of extremely finely collimated beams of nuclear particles, which are used also for probing the inter-atomic fields, and finally all nuclear probes excite luminescence in diamonds

  9. Feasibility studies of the geochemical Ti-205 solar neutrino experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neumaier, S; Nolte, E; Morinaga, H

    1991-01-01

    New investigations on the signal to background ratio of the geochemical 205Tl( v., e-)205Pb solar neutrino experiment are presented. The neutrino capture rate of 205Tl and a possible reduction of the neutrino signal due to neutrino oscillations in matter are discussed. The contributions of natural radioactivity, stopped negative muons and fast muons to the background of 205Pb are estimated. The production of radioisotopes in the lead region induced by cosmic ray muons was studied at the high energy muon beam (M2) of CERN with 120, 200 and 280 GeV muons. The background contribution of cosmic ray muons is found to be significantly higher than expected by former estimations and restricts the feasibility of the 205Tl solar neutrino experiment.

  10. Geochemical modelling of the sorption of tetravalent radioelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, K.A.; Tweed, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The results of an experimental study of the sorption of a range of tetravalent radioelements, plutonium (IV), tin (IV), thorium(IV) and uranium(IV), onto clay at pH8 and pH11 have been successfully simulated using a triple layer sorption model. The model has been incorporated into HARPHRQ, a geochemical program based on PHREEQE. The model has been parameterised using data for sorption onto ferric oxyhydroxide and goethite. The effects of hydroxycarboxylic acids on the sorption process have also been investigated experimentally. It was generally observed that in the presence of 2x10 -3 M gluconate, sorption was reduced by up two orders of magnitude. The model has satisfactorily simulated these lower sorptivities, through assuming competing sorption and complexation reactions. This work, therefore, further confirms the need to take account of such organic materials in safety assessment modelling. (author)

  11. The 'glass earth' - geochemical frontiers in exploration through cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, G.; Denton, G.; Giblin, A.; Korsch, M.; Andrew, A.; Whitford, D.

    1999-01-01

    'Glass Earth' represents a number of current and planned projects within CSIRO aimed at making 'transparent' the top 1000 m of the Earth's crust It builds upon current technologies developed within a number of CSIRO divisions as well as the Australian Mineral Exploration Technologies CRC (AMET CRC), the Australian Geodynamics CRC (AG CRC) and the CRC for Landscape Evolution and Mineral Exploration (CRC LEME). New geophysical and geochemical technologies will be developed to complement these, together with new capabilities in modelling, data integration and visualisation, including hydrogeochemistry, hydrogeology, surface geochemistry and isotope geochemistry, modelling of chemical, fluid and heat flows in rock and regolith, advanced visualisation and data fusion. This paper describes some recent work in the field of isotope geochemistry, with the principal aim of 'seeing through' cover to understand basement geology and detect hidden ore systems

  12. Geochemical surveys in the United States in relation to health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tourtelot, H A

    1979-12-11

    Geochemical surveys in relation to health may be classified as having one, two or three dimensions. One-dimensional surveys examine relations between concentrations of elements such as Pb in soils and other media and burdens of the same elements in humans, at a given time. The spatial distributions of element concentrations are not investigated. The primary objective of two-dimensional surveys is to map the distributions of element concentrations, commonly according to stratified random sampling designs based on either conceptual landscape units or artificial sampling strata, but systematic sampling intervals have also been used. Political units have defined sample areas that coincide with the units used to accumulate epidemiological data. Element concentrations affected by point sources have also been mapped. Background values, location of natural or technological anomalies and the geographic scale of variation for several elements often are determined. Three-dimensional surveys result when two-dimensional surveys are repeated to detect environmental changes.

  13. Review of the use of magnetic concentrates in geochemical exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, W.C.; Day, G.W.

    1985-01-01

    Magnetic concentrates recovered readily by hand magnet from alluvial sediments or panned concentrates have been used successfully in exploration as a geochemical sample medium for Cu, Zn, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, V, Sn, and Be, particularly in arid environments where alluvial sediments may be contaminated by aeolian debris. Opportunity for this use arose recently as chemical and spectrographic techniques were developed to determine the abundances of a variety of trace elements in Fe-rich media. The use of analytical data from magnetic concentrates was introduced as one of several anomaly-enhancement techniques based on heavy minerals and intended to identify blind ore deposits. An extensive literature, reviewed here, on the relation of the chemical composition of the mineral magnetite, a main component of magnetic concentrates, to geologic conditions of origin, facilitates the interpretation of trace-element data in the context of association with ore deposits.

  14. The Earth's heterogeneous mantle a geophysical, geodynamical, and geochemical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Amir

    2015-01-01

    This book highlights and discusses recent developments that have contributed to an improved understanding of observed mantle heterogeneities and their relation to the thermo-chemical state of Earth's mantle, which ultimately holds the key to unlocking the secrets of the evolution of our planet. This series of topical reviews and original contributions address 4 themes. Theme 1 covers topics in geophysics, including global and regional seismic tomography, electrical conductivity and seismic imaging of mantle discontinuities and heterogeneities in the upper mantle, transition zone and lower mantle. Theme 2 addresses geochemical views of the mantle including lithospheric evolution from analysis of mantle xenoliths, composition of the deep Earth and the effect of water on subduction-zone processes. Theme 3 discusses geodynamical perspectives on the global thermo-chemical structure of the deep mantle. Theme 4 covers application of mineral physics data and phase equilibrium computations to infer the regional-scale ...

  15. Application of the isotopic index in isotope geochemical investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetze, H.

    1982-06-01

    A method is described which allows to calculate approximately isotope exchange equilibria between different crystalline silicates. The algorithm uses a newly introduced isotopic index. It is defined using isotopic increments of the variant types of silicatic bonds. This isotopic index gives a quantitative measure of the ability to enrich 18 O or 30 Si, respectively. The dependence of isotopic fractionations on temperature can be calculated approximately by means of the isotopic index, too. On this theoretical base some problems of magmatism and two varieties of an isotope geochemical model of the evolution of the Earth's crust are treated. Finally, the possibility is demonstrated to give prognostic statements about the likelihood of ore bearing of different granites. (author)

  16. Injectable bulking agents for urinary incontinence after radical prostaectomy, mimicking local recurrence: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Je Hong; Ahn, Sung Eun; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Park, Seong Jin; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Sun Ju [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Periurethral bulking agent injection (or transurethral submucosal injection) is a comparatively less invasive procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in patients who develop incontinence after radical prostatectomy, and who are more frequently being treated with transurethral submucosal injection. However, as the radiologic findings of bulking agents are not very well known, they can be mistaken for local recurrence in prostate cancer patients who have undergone prostatectomy. Unlike some of the literatures, in which the radiologic features of collagen injections have been reported, the radiologic findings of silicone injections are yet to be determined. Thus, it is our intention to report this case along with the literature review as the authors have experienced an actual case of a silicone injection mistaken as local recurrence.

  17. Extreme drought decouples silicon and carbon geochemical linkages in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianyang; Li, Siyue; Bush, Richard T; Liang, Chuan

    2018-09-01

    Silicon and carbon geochemical linkages were usually regulated by chemical weathering and organism activity, but had not been investigated under the drought condition, and the magnitude and extent of drought effects remain poorly understood. We collected a comprehensive data set from a total of 13 sampling sites covering the main water body of the largest freshwater lake system in Australia, the Lower Lakes. Changes to water quality during drought (April 2008-September 2010) and post-drought (October 2010-October 2013) were compared to reveal the effects of drought on dissolved silica (DSi) and bicarbonate (HCO 3 - ) and other environmental factors, including sodium (Na + ), pH, electrical conductivity (EC), chlorophyll a (Chl-a), total dissolved solids (TDS), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP) and water levels. Among the key observations, concentrations of DSi and DIN were markedly lower in drought than in post-drought period while pH, EC and concentrations of HCO 3 - , Na + , Chl-a, TDS, TN, TP and the ratio TN:TP had inverse trends. Stoichiometric ratios of DSi:HCO 3 - , DSi:Na + and HCO 3 - :Na + were significantly lower in the drought period. DSi exhibited significantly negative relationships with HCO 3 - , and DSi:Na + was strongly correlated with HCO 3 - :Na + in both drought and post-drought periods. The backward stepwise regression analysis that could avoid multicollinearity suggested that DSi:HCO 3 - ratio in drought period had significant relationships with fewer variables when compared to the post-drought, and was better predictable using nutrient variables during post-drought. Our results highlight the drought effects on variations of water constituents and point to the decoupling of silicon and carbon geochemical linkages in the Lower Lakes under drought conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Geochemical behavior of uranium mill tailings leachate in the subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1993-01-01

    Leachate generated from surface disposal of acidic uranium mill tailings at Maybell, CO has impacted groundwater quality within the underlying mineralized Browns Park Formation. The extent of groundwater contamination, however, is located directly beneath the tailings impoundment. The milling process consisted of sulfuric acid extraction of uranium from the feed ore by a complex chemical leaching and precipitation process. Tailings leachate at the site contains elevated concentrations of Al, As, Cd, Mo, Ni, NO 3 , Se, U, and other solutes. From column leach tests, the concentrations of contaminants within tailings pore fluid are SO 4 >NH 4 >NO 3 >U>Se>Ni>As>Cd at pH 4.0. The carbonate buffering capacity of the tailings subsoil has decreased because of calcite dissolution in the presence of acidic leachate. Groundwater quality data, mineralogical and microbiological studies, and geochemical modeling suggest that As, NO 3 , Se, U and other solutes are being removed from solution through precipitation, adsorption, and denitrification processes under reducing conditions. Presence of hydrogen sulfide, liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons, dissolved organic, and abundant pyrite within the Browns Park Formations have maintained reducing conditions subjacent to the tailings impoundment. Groundwater is in close equilibrium with coffinite and uraninite, the primary U(IV) minerals extracted from the Browns Parks Formation. Denitrifying bacteria identified in this study catalyze redox reactions involving NO 3 . Subsequently, contaminant distributions of NO 3 decrease 1000 times beneath the tailings impoundment. Applying geochemical and biochemical processes occurring at Maybell provides an excellent model for in situ aquifer restoration programs considered at other uranium tailings and heavy-metal-mixed waste contaminated sites. (author) 4 figs., 4 tabs., 27 refs

  19. Geochemical Processes During Managed Aquifer Recharge With Desalinated Seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganot, Y.; Holtzman, R.; Weisbrod, N.; Russak, A.; Katz, Y.; Kurtzman, D.

    2018-02-01

    We study geochemical processes along the variably-saturated zone during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) with reverse-osmosis desalinated seawater (DSW). The DSW, post-treated at the desalination plant by calcite dissolution (remineralization) to meet the Israeli water quality standards, is recharged into the Israeli Coastal Aquifer through an infiltration pond. Water quality monitoring during two MAR events using suction cups and wells inside the pond indicates that cation exchange is the dominant subsurface reaction, driven by the high Ca2+ concentration in the post-treated DSW. Stable isotope analysis shows that the shallow groundwater composition is similar to the recharged DSW, except for enrichment of Mg2+, Na+, Ca2+, and HCO3-. A calibrated variably-saturated reactive transport model is used to predict the geochemical evolution during 50 years of MAR for two water quality scenarios: (i) post-treated DSW (current practice) and (ii) soft DSW (lacking the remineralization post-treatment process). The latter scenario was aimed to test soil-aquifer-treatment (SAT) as an alternative post-treatment technique. Both scenarios provide an enrichment of ˜2.5 mg L-1 in Mg2+ due to cation exchange, compared to practically zero Mg2+ currently found in the Israeli DSW. Simulations of the alternative SAT scenario provide Ca2+ and HCO3- remineralization due to calcite dissolution at levels that meet the Israeli standard for DSW. The simulated calcite content reduction in the sediments below the infiltration pond after 50 years of MAR was low (<1%). Our findings suggest that remineralization using SAT for DSW is a potentially sustainable practice at MAR sites overlying calcareous sandy aquifers.

  20. Geochemical processes during managed aquifer recharge with desalinated seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganot, Y.; Holtzman, R.; Weisbrod, N.; Russak, A.; Katz, Y.; Kurtzman, D.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we study the geochemical processes along the variably-saturated zone during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) with reverse-osmosis desalinated seawater (DSW) to an infiltration pond at the Menashe site, located above the Israeli coastal aquifer. The DSW is post-treated by calcite dissolution (remineralization) in order to meet the Israeli desalinated water quality criteria. Suction cups and monitoring wells inside the pond were used to monitor water quality during two MAR events on 2015 and 2016. Results show that cation exchange is dominant, driven by the high Ca2+ concentration in the post-treated DSW. Stable isotope analysis shows that the composition of the shallow groundwater is similar to the recharged DSW, but with enrichment of Mg2+, Na+, Ca2+ and HCO3-. A calibrated variably-saturated reactive transport model was used to predict the geochemical evolution during 50 years of MAR with two water quality scenarios: post-treated DSW and soft DSW (without post-treatment). The latter scenario was aimed to test soil-aquifer-treatment as an alternative post-treatment technique. In terms of water quality, the results of the two scenarios were found within the range of the desalinated water criteria. Mg2+ enrichment was stable ( 2.5 mg L-1), higher than the zero concentration found in the Israeli DSW. Calcite content reduction was low (<1%) along the variably-saturated profile, after 50 years of MAR. This suggests that using soil-aquifer-treatment as a remineralization technique for DSW is potentially a sustainable practice, which is limited only by the current hydraulic capacity of the Menashe MAR site.

  1. Geochemical Constraints on Archaeal Diversity in the Vulcano Hydrothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K. L.; Amend, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    The shallow marine hydrothermal system of Vulcano, Italy hosts a wide diversity of cultured thermophilic Archaea, including Palaeococcus helgesonii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyrococcus furiosus, to name a few. However, recent studies have revealed a plethora of uncultured archaeal lineages in the Vulcano system. For example, a 16S rRNA gene survey of an onshore geothermal well identified a diverse archaeal community including deeply-branching uncultured Crenarchaeota, Korarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota. Additionally, culture-independent hybridization techniques suggested that Archaea account for nearly half of the microbial community in the Vulcano system. Furthermore, geochemical characterization of fluids revealed numerous lithotrophic and heterotrophic exergonic reactions that could support as yet uncultured organisms. Archaeal diversity throughout the Vulcano hydrothermal system was investigated using 16S rRNA gene surveys at five submarine vents and an onshore sediment seep. Overall, archaeal diversity was higher (10 groups) at submarine vents with moderate temperatures (59°C) compared with higher temperature (94°C) vents (4 groups). Archaeal communities at the moderately thermal vents were dominated by Thermococcales and also contained Archaeoglobales, Thermoproteales, and uncultured archaea among the Korarchaeota, Marine Group I, and the Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE). Fluid composition also affects the microbial community structure. At two high-temperature sites variations in archaeal diversity can be attributed to differences in iron and hydrogen concentrations, and pH. Comparing sites with similar temperature and pH conditions suggests that the presence of Desulfurococcales is limited to sites at which metabolic energy yields exceed 10 kJ per mole of electrons transferred. The Vulcano hydrothermal system hosts diverse archaeal communities, containing both cultured and uncultured species, whose distribution appears to be constrained by

  2. WATEQ3 geochemical model: thermodynamic data for several additional solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.

    1982-09-01

    Geochemical models such as WATEQ3 can be used to model the concentrations of water-soluble pollutants that may result from the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. However, for a model to competently deal with these water-soluble pollutants, an adequate thermodynamic data base must be provided that includes elements identified as important in modeling these pollutants. To this end, several minerals and related solid phases were identified that were absent from the thermodynamic data base of WATEQ3. In this study, the thermodynamic data for the identified solids were compiled and selected from several published tabulations of thermodynamic data. For these solids, an accepted Gibbs free energy of formation, ΔG 0 /sub f,298/, was selected for each solid phase based on the recentness of the tabulated data and on considerations of internal consistency with respect to both the published tabulations and the existing data in WATEQ3. For those solids not included in these published tabulations, Gibbs free energies of formation were calculated from published solubility data (e.g., lepidocrocite), or were estimated (e.g., nontronite) using a free-energy summation method described by Mattigod and Sposito (1978). The accepted or estimated free energies were then combined with internally consistent, ancillary thermodynamic data to calculate equilibrium constants for the hydrolysis reactions of these minerals and related solid phases. Including these values in the WATEQ3 data base increased the competency of this geochemical model in applications associated with the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. Additional minerals and related solid phases that need to be added to the solubility submodel will be identified as modeling applications continue in these two programs

  3. Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Cypress Creek salt core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Law Engineering Testing Company supervised the drilling of a corehole into the stock of Cypress Creek Dome, located in Perry County, Mississippi. A total of 170 ft of caprock and 501 ft of salt stock was recovered for physical examination and chemical analysis. This report describes the types of analyses performed and summarizes the data developed. The entire caprock and salt core were described and photographed prior to selection of samples for petrologic and geochemical analysis. Transmitted light techniques were used to determine gross structural and compositional variations in the core. The core lithologies are presented graphically, at a scale of 1 in. to 2 ft. In addition to the detailed field descriptions and photographs, petrologic studies performed on selected caprock and salt samples included: thin-section examination, scanning-electron microscope studies, energy-dispersion analysis, and x-ray-diffraction analysis. Geochemical analyses were performed to determine the average elemental composition of the salt core and amounts of methane and carbon dioxide gases contained within the salt grains. Except for two thin (3 and 6 ft thick) gypsum zones in the top 27 ft of the caprock, the core is predominantly anhydrite (generally 80%). Minor amounts of dolomite and calcite are also present. The salt core consists predominantly of crystalline halite, fine- to medium-grained (0.25 to 1 in.) with few megacrysts. Anhydrite occurs in the salt core as disseminated grains, ranging in length from <0.1 in. to 12 in. Discrete zones exist within the salt core, distinguished from one another primarily by the character of the anhydrite inclusions

  4. Geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

    1983-09-01

    This report is the result of a geochemical investigation of the former uranium mill and tailings site at Grand Junction, Colorado. The objectives of the investigation are to characterize the geochemistry, to determine the contaminant distribution resulting from the former milling activities and tailings, and to infer chemical pathways and transport mechanisms from the contaminant distribution. The results should be used to model contaminant migration and to develop criteria for long-term containment media, such as a cover system which is impermeable to contaminant migration. This report assumes a familiarity with the hydrologic conditions of the site and the geochemical concepts underlying the investigation. The results reported are based on a sampling of waters in two seasons and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. The solid samples were water extracted to remove easily soluble salts and acid extracted to remove carbonates and hydroxides. The water extracts and solid samples were analyzed for the major and trace elements. A limited number of samples were analyzed for radiological components. The report includes the methods of sampling, sample processing, analysis, and data interpretation. Four major conclusions are: (1) trace element concentrations in shallow subsurface waters adjacent to the tailings temporally vary up to an order of magnitude; (2) the riverbank soils and borehole waters are contaminated with uranium, radium, and trace elements from discharge of tailings solids and solutions during the active time of the mill; however, the movement of contaminants toward the Colorado River does not appear to be significant; (3) the Colorado River adjacent to the tailings is not contaminated; and (4) trace metals have accumulated at both the tailings/cover and tailings/soil interface because of precipitation reactions caused by chemical differences between the two materials

  5. Geochemical Astro- and Geochronological Constraints on the Early Jurassic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, M.; Condon, D. J.; Ruhl, M.; Jenkyns, H. C.; Hesselbo, S. P.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Percival, L.

    2017-12-01

    The Early Jurassic Hettangian and Sinemurian time scales are poorly defined due to the lack of continuous geochemical records, and the temporal constrain of the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event and associated global carbon cycle perturbation is afflicted by geochemical and biostratigraphical uncertainties of the existing radiometric dates from various volcanic ash bearing sections. Here we present a continuous, orbitally paced Hettangian to Pliensbachian carbon-isotope record of the Mochras drill-core (Cardigan bay Basin, UK). The record generates new insights into the evolution and driving mechanisms of the Early Jurassic carbon cycle, and is contributing to improve the Hettangian and Sinemurian time scale. Furthermore, we introduce a new high-resolution carbon-isotope chemostratigraphy, integrated with ammonite biostratigraphy and new U/Pb single zircon geochronology of the Las Overas section (Neuquén Basin, Argentina). The studied section comprises sediments from the tenuicostatum to Dumortiera Andean Ammonite zone (tenuicostatum to levesqui European standard zones). A stratigraphically expanded negative shift in d13Corg values, from -24‰ down to -32­‰, appears in the tenuicostatum and hoelderi ammonite zone, coeval to the negative excursion in European realm which is associated with the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event. The negative isotope excursion appears concomitant with an increase in sedimentary mercury levels, indicating enhanced volcanic activity. TOC values and elemental data suggest a high sedimentation dilution in the tenuicostatum to pacificum zone. The new geochronological data from several volcanic ash beds throughout the section are further improving the temporal correlation between the Early Toarcian isotope event and causal mechanisms

  6. Experimental study on neptunium migration under in situ geochemical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T. T.

    1998-12-01

    Results are reported for migration experiments performed with Np under in situ geochemical conditions over a range of groundwater flow rates in columns of crushed rock in a specially designed facility at the 240-level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. This laboratory is situated in an intrusive granitic rock formation, the Lac du Bonnet batholith. Highly altered granitic rock and groundwater were obtained from a major subhorizontal fracture zone at a depth of 250 m in the URL. The granite was wet-crushed and wet-sieved with groundwater from this fracture zone. The 180-850-μm size fraction was selected and packed in 20-cm long, 2.54-cm in diameter Teflon™-lined stainless steel columns. Approximately 30-ml vols of groundwater containing 3HHO and 237Np were injected into the columns at flow rates of 0.3, 1, and 3 ml/h, followed by elution with groundwater, obtained from the subhorizontal fracture, at the same flow rates, for a period of 95 days. Elution profiles for 3HHO were obtained, but no 237Np was detected in the eluted groundwater. After terminating the migration experiments, the columns were frozen, the column material was removed and cut into twenty 1-cm thick sections and each section was analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Profiles of 237Np were obtained for the three columns. A one-dimensional transport model was fitted to the 3HHO breakthrough curves to obtain flow parameters for this experiment. These flow parameters were in turn applied to the 237Np concentration profiles in the columns to produce sorption and dispersion coefficients for Np. The results show a strong dependence of retardation factors ( Rf) on flow rate. The decrease in the retarded velocity of the neptunium ( Vn) varied over one order of magnitude under the geochemical conditions for these experiments.

  7. Baseline and premining geochemical characterization of mined sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    A rational goal for environmental restoration of new, active, or inactive mine sites would be ‘natural background’ or the environmental conditions that existed before any mining activities or other related anthropogenic activities. In a strictly technical sense, there is no such thing as natural background (or entirely non-anthropogenic) existing today because there is no part of the planet earth that has not had at least some chemical disturbance from anthropogenic activities. Hence, the terms ‘baseline’ and ‘pre-mining’ are preferred to describe these conditions. Baseline conditions are those that existed at the time of the characterization which could be pre-mining, during mining, or post-mining. Protocols for geochemically characterizing pre-mining conditions are not well-documented for sites already mined but there are two approaches that seem most direct and least ambiguous. One is characterization of analog sites along with judicious application of geochemical modeling. The other is reactive-transport modeling (based on careful synoptic sampling with tracer-injection) and subtracting inputs from known mining and mineral processing. Several examples of acidic drainage are described from around the world documenting the range of water compositions produced from pyrite oxidation in the absence of mining. These analog sites provide insight to the processes forming mineralized waters in areas untouched by mining. Natural analog water-chemistry data is compared with the higher metal concentrations, metal fluxes, and weathering rates found in mined areas in the few places where comparisons are possible. The differences are generally 1–3 orders of magnitude higher for acid mine drainage.

  8. Hydrological and geochemical consequences of river regulation - hyporheic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siergieiev, Dmytro; Lundberg, Angela; Widerlund, Anders

    2014-05-01

    River-aquifer interfaces, essential for ecosystem functioning in terms of nutrient exchange and biological habitat, appear greatly threatened worldwide. Although river regulation is a vast pressure on river-aquifer interaction, influencing entire watersheds, knowledge about hyporheic exchange in regulated rivers is rather limited. In this study, we combine two decades of research on hydrological and geochemical impacts of hydropower regulation on river water and hyporheic zone in two large boreal rivers, unregulated Kalix River and regulated Lule River. Altered river discharge, with reduced spring peaks, daily summer fluctuations and elevated winter base flow severely modified Lule River water geochemistry and thus the transport of solutes to the Bothnian Bay (Baltic Sea). Further, these river modifications changed the river-aquifer exchange on both daily and seasonal scale, which resulted in deteriorated hyporheic conditions with reduced riverbed hydraulic conductivity (formation of a clogging layer) reflected in a declined hyporheic flux. Altered hydrological regime of the hyporheic zone created quasi-stagnant conditions beneath the river-aquifer interface and promoted the formation of geochemically suboxic environment. Taken that hyporheic water is a mixture of river water and groundwater, mixing models for the regulated site demonstrate a considerable addition of Fe, Mn, Al, NH4 and removal of dissolved oxygen and nitrate, which suggests the hyporheic zone in the Lule River to be a source of solutes. This contradicts the observations from the hyporheic zone in the unregulated river, with opposite behaviour functioning as a barrier. These results suggest that the hyporheic zone function is dependent on the river discharge and the state of the river-aquifer connectivity. Improved knowledge about the latter on a watershed scale will substantially increase our understanding about the status and potential pressures of riverine ecosystems and assist management and

  9. Geochemical characteristics of trace and rare earth elements in Xiangyangping uranium deposit of Guangxi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Qi; Xiao Jianjun; Fan Liting; Wen Cheng

    2013-01-01

    The trace and rare earth elements analysis were performed on two kinds ore-hosting rocks (Xiangcaoping granite and Douzhashan granite), alternated cataclastic granite and uranium ores in Xiangyangping uranium deposit of Guangxi. The results show that both of the two kinds granites display similar maturity features of highly evolved crust with the enrichment of Rb, Th, U, Ta and Pb, the depletion of Ba and Sr, high Rb/Sr and low Nb/Ta ratio, moderately rich light rare earth elements, strong negative Eu anomaly. Moreover, Douzhashan granite have higher Rb/Sr ratio and U content, which indicate it experienced more sufficient magma evolution and have higher potential of uranium source. There are almost no change in the content of trace and rare earth elements and distribution patterns during chloritization, hydromicazation and potash feldspathization of granite, but there occurred uranium enrichment and mineralization and REE remobilization while hematitization was superposed. This suggest that hematitization is most closely correlated with uranium mineralization in the working area. Because Most hematitization cataclastic rocks and uranium ore display similar geochemical characteristics to Douzhashan granite with relative high Rb/Sr and low Nb/Ta, Zr/Hf, ΣREE, LREE/HREE ration, and the trace and rare earth elements content and distribution patterns of some Xiangcaoping hematitization cataclastic rocks are between the two kinds of granite, therefore it can be concluded that the mineralization materials were mainly from Douzhashan granite and partly from Xiangcaoping granite. (authors)

  10. Mineralization and geochemical studies in the Kalchouyeh occurrence, southwest of Naein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengameh Hosseini Dinani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kalchouyeh area in southwest of Naein is located in the Urumieh-Dokhtar volcano-plutonic belt. Mineralization occurred mainly as disseminations and veinlets hosted by trachy-andesite and pyroxene andesites. For mineralogy, alteration, fluid inclusion and geochemical studies, the two major mineralized zones: A (larger vein from the north-northwest and B (smaller vein from the east-southeast of the area were sampled. Alteration studies revealed that the main alteration assemblages are silicification and propylitic. The ore minerals are chalcopyrite, galena, pyrite, bornite, chalcocite, covellite, goethite, malachite, azurite, cerussite and cuprite with quartz, calcite and barite as the main gangues. Fluid inclusion studies demonstrated that salinity and homogenization temperatures were 0.38-4.23 and 0.166-9.188 wt% NaCl and 175-252°C and 250-324°C at the A and B veins, respectively. Rare Earth Element (REE plots show negative slopes that is one of the features for calc-alkaline magmas. La/Y is higher than 1 showing that mineralizing fluids were neutral to basic. According to the data, direction of ore-bearing fluids movement was determined to be from east-southeast toward north-northwest (from B to A veins(, approximate site of mineralization center is located adjacent to smaller vein and the mineralization is epithermal in type.

  11. Geochemical pattern of soils in Bobovdol valley, Bulgaria. Assessment of Cd and Co contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Nikova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of soils spread in the Bobov dol valley was studied in order to reveal the natural and anthropogenic patterns of Cd and Co spatial distribution. A sampling procedure based on the irregular grid of points and validated analytical methods were used in the field and laboratory studies. It is found that Cd content varies from 0.21 to 0.90 mg kg-1 in studied soils and the average value of 0.55 mg kg-1 coincides with concentration demarcating soil pollution (0.5 mg kg-1. Co content ranges from 2.22 to 15.76 mg kg-1 and in 70 % of sampled points exceeds the natural background content of 7.8 mg kg-1 found in local rocks. Still, Cd enrichment of studied soils is more significant than Co’s with coefficient of Clarke concentration of 3.67. Hence, the secondary deposition of studied elements as a result of the Bobov dol Thermal power plant air emissions is verified by results obtained. The spatial distribution of Cd and Co is featured with an altitudinal gradient in deposition and a trend of quantitative depletion in the South of Plant. Soil organic matter and pH have no influence on the content and spatial distribution of studied elements. Elements iron affinity governs their geochemical linkage in soils although cobalt occurs allied with aluminum and titanium.

  12. Geochemical haloes as an indication of over oil and gas fields in the Arctic shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmiansky, Mikhail; Anokhin, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Hydrocarbon deposits at the Arctic shelf of Russia are a source of jet dispersion of heavy metals that forms haloes in sediments and in the bottom layer of sea water. The intensity of the haloes and their spatial position are jointly determined by geological structure of their source and the environment, i.e., hydrocarbon deposits in host rocks, seafloor lithodynamics and oceanographic factors. Based on theoretical works of Kholmyansky and Putikov (2000; 2006; 2008), an application of electrochemical modification of electric prospecting for offshore hydrocarbon exploration and detailed survey of the morphology of deposits was developed. Specialized equipment was developed for studies of electrochemical features of bottom water layer. With this equipment one can detect ion anomalies in water and determine the type of deposit as gas, gas hydrate, gas condensate or oil. At operation, the unit with equipment is towed underwater off the stern of research vessel. Type and configuration of deposits are determined based on occurrence of trace heavy metals detected by ion-selective electrodes. The proposed method was applied to study a few hydrocarbon fields in Barents and Kara seas in 2001 -2012 including Shtokman, Medyn, Polyarnoe, Prirazlomnoye and others. The results allowed us to trace the margins of the deposits in more detail, and geochemical data, in addition, showed the type of deposits. In general, the method has proven efficient and applicable to a wide range of hydrocarbon deposits.

  13. Geochemical stratigraphy of two regolith cores from the Central Highlands of the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotev, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution concentration profiles are presented for 20-22 chemical elements in the under 1-mm grain-size fractions of 60001-7 and 60009/10. Emphasis is placed on the stratigraphic features of the cores, and the fresh results are compared with those of previous petrographic and geochemical studies. For elements associated with major mineral phases, the variations in concentration in both cores exceed that observed in some 40 samples of surface and trench soils. Most of the variation in lithophile element concentrations at depths of 18 to 21 cm results from the mixing of two components - oil that is relatively mafic and rich in incompatible trace elements (ITEs), and coarse-grained anorthosite. The linearity of mixing lines on two-element concentration plots argues that the relative abundances of these various subcomponents are sufficiently uniform from sample to sample and from region to region in the core that the mixture behaves effectively as a single component. Soils at depths of 52-55 cm exhibit very low concentrations of ITEs.

  14. Geological and geochemical implications of the genesis of the Qolqoleh orogenic gold mineralisation, Kurdistan Province (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghipour Batoul

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Qolqoleh gold deposit is located in the northwestern part of the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone (SSZ, within the NE-SW trending Qolqoleh shear zone. Oligocene granitoids, Cretaceous meta-limestones, schists and metavolcanics are the main lithological units. Chondrite-normalised REE patterns of the ore-hosting metavolcanics indicate REE enrichment relative to hanging wall (chlorite-sericite schist and footwall (meta-limestone rocks. The pattern also reflects an enrichment in LREE relative to HREE. It seems that the LREE enrichment is related to the circulation of SO42- and CO2-bearing fluids and regional metamorphism in the Qolqoleh shear zone. Both positive and negative Eu anomalies are observed in shear-zone metavolcanics. These anomalies are related to the degree of plagioclase alteration during gold mineralisation and hydrothermal alteration. In progressing from a metavolcanic protomylonite to an ultramylonite, significant changes occurred in the major/trace element and REE concentration. Utilising an Al-Fe-Ti isocon for the ore-hosting metavolcanics shows that Sc, Y, K, U, P, and M-HREE (except Eu are relatively unchanged; S, As, Ag, Au, Ca, LOI, Rb and LREE are enriched, and Sr, Ba, Eu, Cr, Co and Ni decrease with an increasing degree of deformation. Based on geochemical features and comparison with other well-known shear zones in the world, the study area is best classified as an Isovolume-Gain (IVG type shear zone and orogenic type gold mineralisation.

  15. Mineralogical-geochemical specificity of the uranium mineralization superposed on the oxidized rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulatov, S.G.; Shchetochkin, V.N.

    1975-01-01

    Taking as an example a uranium deposit connected with oxidation zones developing along the strata, the author examines the mineralogical and geochemical features of a pitchblende-sooty uraninite mineralization superimposed on limonitized sandstones. The typical relations between ore mineralization with new formations of the infiltration oxidation process and the changes caused by the action of rising thermal solutions on the rocks are given. Based on these relations, two generations of different ages of rich pitchblende-sooty uraninite ores are distinguished, separated by the time of development of the oxidation processes. The typical change around the ore is a reduction of limonitized rocks, accompanied by their pyritization, clarification and hematitization. The ore concentrations were formed as a result of the action of rising thermal solutions that had interacted with oxidized rocks. The development of late oxidation processes caused the redistribution of these ore concentrations and their downward shift along the stratum slope following the limonitization boundary. On the basis of the data presented, comments of a forecasting and prospecting nature are made. (author)

  16. Bulk Vitrification Castable Refractory Block Protection Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Beck, Andrew E.; Brouns, Thomas M.; Caldwell, Dustin D.; Elliott, Michael L.; Matyas, Josef; Minister, Kevin BC; Schweiger, Michael J.; Strachan, Denis M.; Tinsley, Bronnie P.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-05-01

    Bulk vitrification (BV) was selected for a pilot-scale test and demonstration facility for supplemental treatment to accelerate the cleanup of low-activity waste (LAW) at the Hanford U.S. DOE Site. During engineering-scale (ES) tests, a small fraction of radioactive Tc (and Re, its nonradioactive surrogate) were transferred out of the LAW glass feed and molten LAW glass, and deposited on the surface and within the pores of the castable refractory block (CRB). Laboratory experiments were undertaken to understand the mechanisms of the transport Tc/Re into the CRB during vitrification and to evaluate various means of CRB protection against the deposition of leachable Tc/Re. The tests used Re as a chemical surrogate for Tc. The tests with the baseline CRB showed that the molten LAW penetrates into CRB pores before it converts to glass, leaving deposits of sulfates and chlorides when the nitrate components decompose. Na2O from the LAW reacts with the CRB to create a durable glass phase that may contain Tc/Re. Limited data from a single CRB sample taken from an ES experiment indicate that, while a fraction of Tc/Re is present in the CRB in a readily leachable form, most of the Tc/Re deposited in the refractory is retained in the form of a durable glass phase. In addition, the molten salts from the LAW, mainly sulfates, chlorides, and nitrates, begin to evaporate from BV feeds at temperatures below 800 C and condense on solid surfaces at temperatures below 530 C. Three approaches aimed at reducing or preventing the deposition of soluble Tc/Re within the CRB were proposed: metal lining, sealing the CRB surface with a glaze, and lining the CRB with ceramic tiles. Metal liners were deemed unsuitable because evaluations showed that they can cause unacceptable distortions of the electric field in the BV system. Sodium silicate and a low-alkali borosilicate glaze were selected for testing. The glazes slowed down molten salt condensate penetration, but did little to reduce the

  17. Xerophilic mycopopulations of teas in bulk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škrinjar Marija M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available d.o.o., Novi Sad AU Krunić Vesna J. AF EKOLd.o.o., Novi Sad KW teas % mould contamination % thermal treatment KR nema Other the water, tea is the most popular beverage in the world today. They are used for ages, in the beginning as refreshing drinks, and later more for their healing properties. Teas have been demonstrated to show antioxidative, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-microbial properties. Considering that the teas, during the production, are not treated with any temperature, there is high risk for contamination with different type of microorganisms, especially with moulds. Moulds are ubiquitously distributed in nature and their spores can be found in the atmosphere even at high altitudes and under favorable conditions of temperature and humidity, moulds grow on many commodities including cereals, oil seeds, nuts, herbs and spices. Most of them are potential producers of mycotoxins which present a real hazard to human health. The aim of this work was to investigate total mould count and to identify moulds isolated from teas in bulk, than from teas treated with hot, sterile, distilled water and from the tea filtrates. Tested teas were peppermint, sage, yarrow, black tea, bearberry, lemon balm, mixture of teas from Zlatibor. In teas in balk was observed high contamination with different kinds of moulds (1.84-4.55 cfu/g, such as Aspergillus awamori, A. lovaniensis, A niger, A. phoenicus, A. repens, A. restrictus, A. sydowii, A. versicolor, Eurotium amstelodami, E. chevalieri, E. herbariorum, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Scopulariopsis brevicaulis. The most frequent were species from Aspergillus and Eurotium genera. Thermal treatment with hot, sterile, distilled water reduced the number of fungal colonies. Aspergillus awamori was the most resistant and appeared in six samples of filtrates of tea, Aspergillus niger in one sample and Penicillium chrysogenum in one sample.

  18. High trapped fields in bulk YBCO superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Günter; Gruss, Stefan; Krabbes, Gernot; Schätzle, Peter; Verges, Peter; Müller, Karl-Hartmut; Fink, Jörg; Schultz, Ludwig

    The trapped field properties of bulk melt-textured YBCO material were investigated at different temperatures. In the temperature range of liquid nitrogen, maximum trapped fields of 1.1 T were found at 77 K by doping of YBCO with small amounts of zinc. The improved pinning of zinc-doped YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) results in a pronounced peak effect in the field dependence of the critical current density. the trapped field at lower temperatures increases due to the increasing critical current density, however, at temperatures around 50 K cracking of the material is observed which is exposed to considerably tensile stresses due to Lorentz forces. Very high trapped fields up to 14.4 T were achieved at 22.5 K for a YBCO disk pair by the addition of silver improving the tensile strength of YBCO and by using a bandage made of a steel tube. The steel tube produces a compressive stress on YBCO after cooling down from 300 K to the measuring temperature, which is due to the higher coeeficient of thermal expansion of steel compared with that of YBCO in the a,b plane. The application of superconducting permanent magnets with trapped fields of 10 T and more in superconducting bearings would allow to obtain very high levitation pressures up to 2500 N/cm2 which is two orders of magnitude higher than the levitation pressure achievable in superconducting bearings with conventional permanent magnets. The most important problem for the application of superconducting permanent magnets is the magnetizing procedure of the YBCO material. Results of magnetizing YBCO disks by using of pulsed magnetic fields will be presented.

  19. General geochemical properties and abundances of the rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, P.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter reviews some of the fundamental aspects of rare earth elements (REE) geochemistry and gives data on abundances in the solar system, the bulk Earth and the Earth's crust. It describes the state of knowledge on the partitioning of the REE, especially in igneous rock systems, and cites reference works concerned with the REE. Several chemical properties of REE are discussed (oxidation states; redox conditions; element coordination and ionic radii; element substitution). (Auth.)

  20. 7 CFR 58.211 - Packaging room for bulk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packaging room for bulk products. 58.211 Section 58... Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.211 Packaging room for bulk products. A separate room or area shall... dust within the packaging room and where needed, a dust collector shall be provided and properly...