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Sample records for bulk crustal shortening

  1. Crustal shortening and Eocene extension in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera: Some thermal and rheological considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mian; Furlong, Kevin P.

    1993-06-01

    Metamorphic core complexes in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera were formed during Eocene crustal extension, shortly (within a few millions of years) after Late Jurassic-Paleocene crustal shortening. Thermal-rheological modeling, constrained by geological and geochronological studies of the Valhalla core complex and other core complexes in this region, is used to investigate two major problems concerning the formation of these core complexes: (1) the dynamic links between crustal shortening and extension and (2) the cooling history and unroofing rates during extension. Thermal-rheological effects associated with crustal shortening are integrated through the history of crustal compression, since crustal shortening in this region was a long and slow process and cannot be treated as an instantaneous event. Our results suggest that crustal shortening may have played an important role in Eocene extension in the southeastern Canadian Cordillera by (1) producing a thickened and therefore unstable crust and (2) thermally weakening the lithosphere. However, heat generated by crustal shortening is not enough to account for the thermal state of the Valhalla complex, and additional heat sources at depth may be necessary. We then investigate thermal evolution during extension in both a simple shear model and a progressive pure stretching model. We show that the geotherm in an extensional region is time-and space-dependent and is affected by many variables including the preextensional thermal history and the mode of extension. Thus caution needs to be exercised when inferring unroofing rates from thermochronologic data. The cooling history of the Valhalla core complex may be explained by unroofing at rates of 1-2 mm/yr.

  2. Foreland shortening and crustal balancing in the Andes at 30°S latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, R. W.; Figueroa, D.; Synder, D.; Beer, J.; Mpodozis, C.; Isaacks, B. L.

    1990-08-01

    Excellent surface exposures, known Benioff zone geometry, a dynamic morphology, and the availability of industry seismic reflection data all make the Andes at 30°S an excellent transect for investigating crustal-scale balanced sections. 150-170 km of horizontal shortening has occurred in three major belts located between the trench and the foreland. The thin-skinned, east-verging Precordillera of western Argentina accounts for 60-75% of the total shortening and formed mostly since major volcanism ceased at ˜10 Ma. Industry seismic reflection data show that the décollement of the Precordillera belt is located anomalously deep at ˜15 km. The belt is dominated by fault propagation folds and contains several prominent out-of-sequence thrust faults. Seismic stratigraphie analysis shows that Miocene strata in the Iglesia Valley, located between the Precordillera and the crest of the Andes, accumulated in a piggy-back basin. Onlap relations on the western side indicate that the High Cordillera was uplifted as a major fault bend fold over a buried ramp. Thrusting in the two western belts, both in the High Cordillera of Chile, formed during the waning stages of arc volcanism, 11-16 Ma. and account for 25-40% of the shortening. The observed shortening is probably greater than can be accounted for with reasonable crustal thicknesses, indicating the possibility of continental truncation or erosion along the plate margin or an anomalously thick root held down by the nearly flat subducted Nazca Plate. Our preferred crustal geometry puts the ramp between upper and lower crustal deformation west of the high topography, requiring crustal scale tectonic wedging to thicken the crust beneath the crest of the Andes. This non-unique model provides a simple explanation of the first order morphology of the Andes at this latitude.

  3. Bulk arc strain, crustal thickening, magma emplacement, and mass balances in the Mesozoic Sierra Nevada arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenrong; Paterson, Scott; Saleeby, Jason; Zalunardo, Sean

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying crustal deformation is important for evaluating mass balance, material transfer, and the interplay between tectonism and magmatism in continental arcs. We present a dataset of >650 finite strain analyses compiled from published works and our own studies with associated structural, geochronologic, and geobarometric information in central and southern Sierra Nevada, California, to quantify the arc crust deformation. Our results show that Mesozoic tectonism results in 65% arc-perpendicular bulk crust shortening under a more or less plane strain condition. Mesozoic arc magmatism replaced ∼80% of this actively deforming arc crust with plutons requiring significantly greater crustal thickening. We suggest that by ∼85 Ma, the arc crust thickness was ∼80 km with a 30-km-thick arc root, resulting in a ∼5 km elevation. Most tectonic shortening and magma emplacement must be accommodated by downward displacements of crustal materials into growing crustal roots at the estimated downward transfer rate of 2-13 km/Myr. The downward transfer of crustal materials must occur in active magma channels, or in "escape channels" in between solidified plutons that decrease in size with time and depth resulting in an increase in the intensity of constrictional strain with depth. We argue that both tectonism and magmatism control the thickness of the crust and surface elevation with slight modification by surface erosion. The downward transported crustal materials initially fertilize the MASH zone thus enhancing to the generation of additional magmas. As the crustal root grows it may potentially pinch out and cool the mantle wedge and thus cause reduction of arc magmatism.

  4. Crustal structure of the Bighorn Mountains region: Precambrian influence on Laramide shortening and uplift in north-central Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Lindsay L.; Miller, Kate C.; Erslev, Eric A.; Anderson, Megan L.; Chamberlain, Kevin R.; Sheehan, Anne F.; Yeck, William L.; Harder, Steven H.; Siddoway, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    The crustal structure of north-central Wyoming records a history of complex lithospheric evolution from Precambrian accretion to Cretaceous-Paleogene Laramide shortening. We present two active source P wave velocity model profiles collected as part of the Bighorn Arch Seismic Experiment in 2010. Analyses of these velocity models and single-fold reflection data, together with potential field modeling of regional gravity and magnetic signals, constrain crustal structure and thickness of the Bighorn region. We image a west dipping reflection boundary and model a sharp magnetic contact east of the Bighorn Arch that together may delineate a previously undetected Precambrian suture zone. Localized patches of a high-velocity, high-density lower crustal layer (the "7.× layer") occur across the study area but are largely absent beneath the Bighorn Arch culmination. Moho topography is relatively smooth with no large-scale offsets, with depths ranging from ~50 to 37 km, and is largely decoupled from Laramide basement topography. These observations suggest that (1) the edge of the Archean Wyoming craton lies just east of the Bighorn Mountains, approximately 300 km west of previous interpretations, and (2) Laramide deformation localized in an area with thin or absent 7.× layer, due to its relatively weak lower crust, leading to detachment faulting. Our findings show that Precambrian tectonics in northern Wyoming may be more complicated than previously determined and subsequent Laramide deformation may have been critically dependent on laterally heterogeneous crustal structure that can be linked to Precambrian origins.

  5. Measurement of terrace deformation and crustal shortening of some renascent fold zones within Kalpin nappe structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XiaoPing; RAN YongKang; CHENG JianWu; CHEN LiChun; XU XiWei

    2007-01-01

    The Kalpin nappe structure is a strongest thrust and fold deformation belt in front of the Tianshan Mountains since the Cenozoic time. The tectonic deformation occurred in 5-6 striking Mesozoic-Cenozoic fold zones, and some renascent folds formed on the recent alluvial-proluvial fans in front of the folded mountains. We used the total station to measure gully terraces along the longitudinal topographic profile in the renascent fold zones and collected samples from terrace deposits for age determination. Using the obtained formation time and shortening amount of the deformed terraces, we calculated the shortening rate of 4 renascent folds to be 0.1±0.03 mm/a, 0.12±0.04 mm/a, 0.59±0.18 mm/a, and 0.26±0.08 mm/a, respectively. The formation time of the renascent folds is some later than the major tectonic uplift event of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau 0.14 Ma ago. It may be the long-distance effect of this tectonic event on the Tianshan piedmont fold belt.

  6. Evidence of miocene crustal shortening in the North Qilian Shan from cenozoic stratigraphy of the Western Hexi Corridor, Gansu Province, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovet, P.M.; Ritts, B.D.; Gehrels, G.; Abbink, A.O.; Darby, B.; Hourigan, J.

    2009-01-01

    New sedimentologic, stratigraphie, and compositional data from the Paleogene-Neogene stratigraphie succession exposed in the northwest Hexi Corridor and within the North Qilian Shan, provide evidence to suggest that crustal shortening in the North Qilian Shan fold-thrust belt initiated during die Mi

  7. Estimation of the Crustal Bulk Properties Beneath Mainland Portugal from P-Wave Teleseismic Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Süleyman; Dias, Nuno A.; Silveira, Graça; Kind, Rainer; Vinnik, Lev; Matias, Luís; Bianchi, Marcelo

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present results from teleseismic P-wave receiver functions (PRFs) obtained in Portugal, Western Iberia. A dense seismic station deployment conducted between 2010 and 2012, in the scope of the WILAS project and covering the entire country, allowed the most spatially extensive probing on the bulk crustal seismic properties of Portugal up to date. The application of the H- κ stacking algorithm to the PRFs enabled us to estimate the crustal thickness ( H) and the average crustal ratio of the P- and S-waves velocities V p/ V s ( κ) for the region. Observations of Moho conversions indicate that this interface is relatively smooth with the crustal thickness ranging between 24 and 34 km, with an average of 30 km. The highest V p/ V s values are found on the Mesozoic-Cenozoic crust beneath the western and southern coastal domain of Portugal, whereas the lowest values correspond to Palaeozoic crust underlying the remaining part of the subject area. An average V p/ V s is found to be 1.72, ranging 1.63-1.86 across the study area, indicating a predominantly felsic composition. Overall, we systematically observe a decrease of V p/ V s with increasing crustal thickness. Taken as a whole, our results indicate a clear distinction between the geological zones of the Variscan Iberian Massif in Portugal, the overall shape of the anomalies conditioned by the shape of the Ibero-Armorican Arc, and associated Late Paleozoic suture zones, and the Meso-Cenozoic basin associated with Atlantic rifting stages. Thickened crust (30-34 km) across the studied region may be inherited from continental collision during the Paleozoic Variscan orogeny. An anomalous crustal thinning to around 28 km is observed beneath the central part of the Central Iberian Zone and the eastern part of South Portuguese Zone.

  8. Crustal shortening and structural architecture of the Interandean and Subandean zones of southern Bolivia (21°S): Constraints from a new balanced cross section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. B.; Long, S. P.; Horton, B. K.; Calle, A.; Ramirez, V.

    2015-12-01

    Structural insights obtained from balanced cross sections, including thrust belt geometry, location of footwall ramps, and crustal shortening estimates, provide key information for testing model predictions of orogen dynamics (e.g., Cordilleran cyclicity, critical taper theory). New results from geologic mapping along an east-west transect in the central Andes are integrated with existing geophysical data to construct a balanced cross section across the Interandean (IAZ) and Subandean (SAZ) zones of southern Bolivia at 21°S, in order to define thrust belt geometry and estimate crustal shortening. The IAZ consists of a doubly vergent zone of 2-4 km-thick thrust sheets of mainly Silurian-Devonian rocks, which are structurally elevated ~10 km relative to equivalent SAZ levels to the east. Notably, our proposed IAZ geometry differs from published geometries that lack significant west-directed backthrusts. The SAZ is defined by regional-scale, fault-bend folds (10-20 km wavelength, 4-6 km amplitude) that exhume rocks as deep as Carboniferous above a 10-12 km-deep regional décollement in Silurian rocks. Previous studies have interpreted IAZ and SAZ shortening to be balanced by slip on two separate basement megathrust sheets at depth. We estimate 151 km (44%) of total east-west shortening in the IAZ (71 km) and SAZ (80 km), which is similar to a previous estimate (144 km, 42%). Importantly, our estimate of SAZ shortening restores the leading edge of the basement thrust sheet feeding displacement into the SAZ back to a corresponding footwall ramp that is constrained by a seismic reflection profile 90 km along strike to the south. Our shortening magnitudes are similar to nearby estimates to the north and south, which range between 60-86 km for the SAZ and 43-96 km for the IAZ. Future work will continue the cross section westward into the Eastern Cordillera hinterland, and explore potential variations in the geometry and style of basement deformation.

  9. Crustal shortening, exhumation, and strain localization in a collisional orogen: The Bajo Pequeño Shear Zone, Sierra de Pie de Palo, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Joshua M.; Roeske, Sarah M.; Warren, Jessica; Mulcahy, Sean R.; McClelland, William C.; Austin, Lauren J.; Renne, Paul R.; Vujovich, Graciela I.

    2014-07-01

    The Bajo Pequeño Shear Zone (BPSZ) is a lower-crustal shear zone that records shortening and exhumation associated with the establishment of a new plate boundary, and its placement in a regional structural context suggests that local- to regional-scale strain localization occurred with progressive deformation. A kilometer-scale field and analytical cross section through the ~80 m thick BPSZ and its adjacent rocks indicates an early Devonian (405-400 Ma) phase of deformation on the western margin of Gondwanan continental crust. The earliest stages of the BPSZ, recorded by metamorphic and microstructural data, involved thrusting of a hotter orthogneiss over a relatively cool pelitic unit, which resulted in footwall garnet growth and reset footwall white mica 40Ar/39Ar ages in proximity to the shear zone. Later stages of BPSZ activity, as recorded by additional microstructures and quartz c-axis opening angles, were characterized by strain localization to the center of the shear zone coincident with cooling and exhumation. These and other data suggest that significant regional tectonism persisted in the Famatinian orogenic system for 60-70 million years after one microplate collision (the Precordillera) but ceased 5-10 million years prior to another (Chilenia). A survey of other synchronous structures shows that strain was accommodated on progressively narrower structures with time, indicating a regional pattern of strain localization and broad thermal relaxation as the Precordillera collision evolved.

  10. Co-seismic ruptures of the 12 May 2008, Ms 8.0 Wenchuan earthquake, Sichuan: East-west crustal shortening on oblique, parallel thrusts along the eastern edge of Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Zeng, J.; Zhang, Z.; Wen, L.; Tapponnier, P.; Sun, Jielun; Xing, X.; Hu, G.; Xu, Q.; Zeng, L.; Ding, L.; Ji, C.; Hudnut, K.W.; van der Woerd, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Ms 8.0, Wenchuan earthquake, which devastated the mountainous western rim of the Sichuan basin in central China, produced a surface rupture over 200??km-long with oblique thrust/dextral slip and maximum scarp heights of ~ 10??m. It thus ranks as one of the world's largest continental mega-thrust events in the last 150??yrs. Field investigation shows clear surface breaks along two of the main branches of the NE-trending Longmen Shan thrust fault system. The principal rupture, on the NW-dipping Beichuan fault, displays nearly equal amounts of thrust and right-lateral slip. Basin-ward of this rupture, another continuous surface break is observed for over 70??km on the parallel, more shallowly NW-dipping Pengguan fault. Slip on this latter fault was pure thrusting, with a maximum scarp height of ~ 3.5??m. This is one of the very few reported instances of crustal-scale co-seismic slip partitioning on parallel thrusts. This out-of-sequence event, with distributed surface breaks on crustal mega-thrusts, highlights regional, ~ EW-directed, present day crustal shortening oblique to the Longmen Shan margin of Tibet. The long rupture and large offsets with strong horizontal shortening that characterize the Wenchuan earthquake herald a re-evaluation of tectonic models anticipating little or no active shortening of the upper crust along this edge of the plateau, and require a re-assessment of seismic hazard along potentially under-rated active faults across the densely populated western Sichuan basin and mountains. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Plate convergence, crustal delamination, extrusion tectonics and minimization of shortening work as main controlling factors of the recent Mediterranean deformation pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Babbucci

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available It is argued that the time-space distribution of major post middle Miocene deformation events in the Central-Eastern Mediterranean region, deduced from the relevant literature, can be coherently explained as a consequence of the convergence between the Africa/Arabia and Eurasia blocks. This plate convergence has mainly been accommodated by the consumption of the thinnest parts of the Northern African (Ionian and Levantine basins and peri-Adriatic margins. During each evolutionary phase the space distribution of trench zones is controlled by the basic physical requirement of minimizing the work of horizontal forces, induced by plate convergence, against the resisting forces, i.e., the cohesion of the upper brittle crustal layer and the buoyancy forces at the consuming boundaries. The significant changes of tectonic styles which determined the transition from one phase to the next, like those which occurred around the Messinian and the late Pliocene-early Pleistocene, were determined by the suture of consuming boundaries. When such an event occurs, the system must activate alternative consuming processes to accommodate the convergence of the major confining blocks. The observed deformations in the study area suggest that this tectonic reorganization mostly developed by the lateral extrusion of crustal wedges away from the sutured borders. This mechanism allowed the translation of maximum horizontal stresses from the locked collisional fronts to the zones where consumable lithosphere was still present, in order to activate the next consuming processes. The extensional episodes which led to the formation of basins and troughs in the Tyrrhenian and Aegean zones are interpreted as secondary effects of the outward escape of crustal wedges, like those which occurred in response to longitudinal compressional regimes in the Apennines and Aegean regions.

  12. Crustal shortening followed by extensional collapse of the Cordilleran orogenic belt in northwestern Montana: Evidence from vintage seismic reflection profiles acquired in the Swan Range and Swan Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, B. S.; Speece, M. A.; Stickney, M. C.; Mosolf, J. G.

    2013-12-01

    Reprocessing of one 24-fold (96 channel) and four 30-fold (120 channel) 2D seismic reflection profiles have revealed crustal scale reflections in the Swan Range and adjacent Swan River Valley of northwestern Montana. The five reprocessed profiles constitute 142.6 of the 303.3 linear km acquired in 1983-84 by Techo of Denver, Colorado. The four 30-fold profiles used helicopter-assisted dynamite shooting (Poulter method) and the 24-fold profile used the Vibroseis method. Acquisition parameters were state of the art for the time. The Swan Range lies east of the Rocky Mountain Trench and is part of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt where the Lewis thrust system emplaced a thick slab of Proterozoic Belt Supergroup strata eastward and over Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks during the Late Cretaceous to early Paleocene Laramide orogeny. Deeply drilled borehole data are absent within the study area; however, we generated a synthetic seismogram from the Arco-Marathon 1 Paul Gibbs well (total depth=5418 m), located approximately 70 km west of the reprocessed profiles, and correlated the well data to surface seismic profiles. Large impedance contrasts in the log data are interpreted to be tholeiitic Moyie sills within the Prichard Formation argillite (Lower Belt), which produce strong reflection events in regional seismic sections and result in highly reflective, east-dipping events in the reprocessed profiles. We estimate a depth of 10 km (3 to 3.5 seconds) to the basal detachment of the Lewis thrust sheet. The décollement lies within Belt Supergroup strata to the west of the Swan River Valley before contacting unreflective, west-dipping crystalline basement beneath the Swan Range--a geometry that results in a wedge of eastward-thinning, autochthonous Belt rocks. Distinct fault-plane signatures from the west-dipping, range-bounding Swan fault--produced by extensional collapse of the over-thickened Cordillera--are not successfully imaged. However, reflections from Cenozoic

  13. On ultrahigh temperature crustal metamorphism: Phase equilibria, trace element thermometry, bulk composition, heat sources, timescales and tectonic settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Kelsey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh temperature (UHT metamorphism is the most thermally extreme form of regional crustal metamorphism, with temperatures exceeding 900 °C. UHT crustal metamorphism is recognised in more than 50 localities globally in the metamorphic rock record and is accepted as ‘normal’ in the spectrum of regional crustal processes. UHT metamorphism is typically identified on the basis of diagnostic mineral assemblages such as sapphirine + quartz, orthopyroxene + sillimanite ± quartz and osumilite in Mg–Al-rich rock compositions, now usually coupled with pseudosection-based thermobarometry using internally-consistent thermodynamic data sets and/or Al-in-Orthopyroxene and ternary feldspar thermobarometry. Significant progress in the understanding of regional UHT metamorphism in recent years includes: (1 development of a ferric iron activity–composition thermodynamic model for sapphirine, allowing phase diagram calculations for oxidised rock compositions; (2 quantification of UHT conditions via trace element thermometry, with Zr-in-rutile more commonly recording higher temperatures than Ti-in-zircon. Rutile is likely to be stable at peak UHT conditions whereas zircon may only grow as UHT rocks are cooling. In addition, the extent to which Zr diffuses out of rutile is controlled by chemical communication with zircon; (3 more fully recognising and utilising temperature-dependent thermal properties of the crust, and the possible range of heat sources causing metamorphism in geodynamic modelling studies; (4 recognising that crust partially melted either in a previous event or earlier in a long-duration event has greater capacity than fertile, unmelted crust to achieve UHT conditions due to the heat energy consumed by partial melting reactions; (5 more strongly linking U–Pb geochronological data from zircon and monazite to P–T points or path segments through using Y + REE partitioning between accessory and major phases, as well as phase

  14. On ultrahigh temperature crustal metamorphism:Phase equilibria, trace element thermometry, bulk composition, heat sources, timescales and tectonic settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David E. Kelsey; Martin Hand

    2015-01-01

    Ultrahigh temperature (UHT) metamorphism is the most thermally extreme form of regional crustal metamorphism, with temperatures exceeding 900 ?C. UHT crustal metamorphism is recognised in more than 50 localities globally in the metamorphic rock record and is accepted as‘normal’ in the spectrum of regional crustal processes. UHT metamorphism is typically identified on the basis of diagnostic mineral assemblages such as sapphirine þ quartz, orthopyroxene þ sillimanite ? quartz and osumilite in MgeAl-rich rock compositions, now usually coupled with pseudosection-based thermobarometry using internally-consistent thermodynamic data sets and/or Al-in-Orthopyroxene and ternary feldspar ther-mobarometry. Significant progress in the understanding of regional UHT metamorphism in recent years includes: (1) development of a ferric iron activityecomposition thermodynamic model for sapphirine, allowing phase diagram calculations for oxidised rock compositions;(2) quantification of UHT conditions via trace element thermometry, with Zr-in-rutile more commonly recording higher temperatures than Ti-in-zircon. Rutile is likely to be stable at peak UHT conditions whereas zircon may only grow as UHT rocks are cooling. In addition, the extent to which Zr diffuses out of rutile is controlled by chemical communication with zircon; (3) more fully recognising and utilising temperature-dependent thermal properties of the crust, and the possible range of heat sources causing metamorphism in geodynamic modelling studies; (4) recognising that crust partially melted either in a previous event or earlier in a long-duration event has greater capacity than fertile, unmelted crust to achieve UHT conditions due to the heat energy consumed by partial melting reactions;(5) more strongly linking UePb geochronological data from zircon and monazite to PeT points or path segments through using Y þ REE partitioning between accessory and major phases, as well as phase diagrams incorporating Zr and REE

  15. The curve shortening problem

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Kai-Seng

    2001-01-01

    Although research in curve shortening flow has been very active for nearly 20 years, the results of those efforts have remained scattered throughout the literature. For the first time, The Curve Shortening Problem collects and illuminates those results in a comprehensive, rigorous, and self-contained account of the fundamental results.The authors present a complete treatment of the Gage-Hamilton theorem, a clear, detailed exposition of Grayson''s convexity theorem, a systematic discussion of invariant solutions, applications to the existence of simple closed geodesics on a surface, and a new, almost convexity theorem for the generalized curve shortening problem.Many questions regarding curve shortening remain outstanding. With its careful exposition and complete guide to the literature, The Curve Shortening Problem provides not only an outstanding starting point for graduate students and new investigations, but a superb reference that presents intriguing new results for those already active in the field.

  16. Broadband regional waveform modeling to investigate crustal structure and tectonics of the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer Lyn

    We use broadband regional waveform modeling of earthquakes in the central Andes to determine seismic properties of the Altiplano crust. Properties of the shear-coupled P-wavetrain (SPL ) from intermediate-depth events provide particularly important information about the structure of the crust. We utilize broadband seismic data recorded at the BANJO and SEDA stations, and synthetic seismograms computed with a reflectivity technique to study the sensitivity of SPL to crustal and upper mantle parameters at regional distances. We find that the long-period SPL-wavetrain is most sensitive to crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios, average crustal velocity, and crustal thickness. A comprehensive grid search method developed to investigate these four parameters suggests that although trade-offs exist between model parameters, models of the Altiplano which provide the best fit between the data and synthetic seismograms are characterized by low Poisson's ratios, low average crustal velocity and thick crust. We apply our grid search technique and sensitivity analysis results to model the full waveforms from 6 intermediate-depth and 2 shallow-focus earthquakes recorded at regional distances by BANJO and SEDA stations. Results suggest that the Altiplano crust is much thicker (55--65 km) and slower (5.75--6.25 km/s) than global average values. Low crustal and mantle Poisson's ratios together with the lack of evidence for a high-velocity lower crust suggests a bulk felsic crustal composition, resulting in an overall weak crust. Our results favor a model of crustal thickening involving large-scale tectonic shortening of a predominantly felsic crust. To better understand the mechanics of earthquake rupture along the South American subduction zone, we have analyzed broadband teleseismic P-waves and utilize single- and multi-station inversion techniques to constrain source characteristics for the 12 November 1996 Peru subduction zone earthquake. Aftershock locations, intensity reports

  17. The Precambrian crustal structure of East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugume, Fred Alex

    In this thesis, the Precambrian crustal structure of East African is investigated along with the crustal structures of three Cenozoic rift basins located in the western branch of the East African Rift System (EARS). In the first part of the thesis, P-wave receiver functions are modeled using the H-k method to obtain new insights about the bulk composition and thickness of the crust for Precambrian terrains throughout East Africa. The average crustal thickness for all but one of the terrains is between 37 and 39 km. An exception is the Ubendian terrain, which has an average crustal thickness 42 km. In all terrains, the average Poisson's ratio is similar, ranging from 0.25 to 0.26, indicating a bulk crustal composition that is felsic to intermediate. The main finding of this study is that crustal structure is similar across all terrains, which span more than 4.0 Ga of earth history. There is no discernable difference in the crustal thicknesses and Poisson's ratios between the Archean and Proterozoic terrains, or between the Proterozoic terrains, unlike the variability in Precambrian crustal structure found in many other continents. In the second part of the thesis, a joint inversion of Rayleigh wave phase and group velocities and receiver functions was used to investigate the shear wave velocity structure of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Precambrian terrains of East Africa. In comparison with other areas of similar age in southern and western Africa where the same joint inversion method has been applied, I find that while there is little difference in the mean shear wave velocities for the entire crust across all of the Precambrian terrains, and also few differences in the thickness of the crust, there exists substantial variability in lower crustal structure. This variability is reflected primarily in the thickness of the lower crustal layers with shear wave velocities ≥ 4.0 km/s. This variability is found both within terrains of the same age (i

  18. Missing shortening in the thick-skinned retroarc thrust belt of the central Andes, northwestern Argentina, ~25°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D. M.; Kapp, P. A.; Decelles, P. G.; Reiners, P. W.

    2010-12-01

    A very large discrepancy exists among estimated retroarc shortening magnitudes in the thin-skinned thrust belt of Bolivia and the thick-skinned thrust belt of northwestern Argentina. Fieldwork and structural analysis from this study at ~25°S latitude in northwestern Argentina confirm the presence of a mainly west verging, thick-skinned style of shortening in the region which, taken together with thermochronological data ((U-Th)/He in zircon and apatite and published apatite fission track results), imply up to 10 km of rapid, Miocene exhumation. Although these results suggest that significant exhumation occurred in the region, displacements on mapped, discrete faults are insufficient in magnitude (by ~15-20%) to generate the observed ~58 km thick crust (Yuan et al., 2002). We suggest that additional, unrecognized shortening or crustal addition is required in the region to explain the thick crust and occurred by 1) crustal flow from neighboring regions of thickened crust; 2) passive roof thrusting whereby major, likely mid-crustal shortening was fed to higher structural levels; 3) tectonic underplating of trench or forearc rocks; and/or 4) significant penetrative strain not accommodated by through going faults. We do not discard other mechanisms of crustal thickening and/or addition in the region, but magnitudes of upper crustal shortening required by excess area calculations are best explained by penetrative deformation within rheologically weak metaturbidites of the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian Puncoviscana Formation. Although penetrative strain was generally not considered in cross section restorations in the retroarc of Bolivia, a relative lack of these rheologically weak rocks there probably precludes penetrative deformation as a significant mode of deformation and may partially reconcile the discrepancy in along-strike shortening magnitudes. Significant shortening has been accommodated by penetrative strain in other orogens worldwide, including western North

  19. Shortening Anomalies in Supersymmetric Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Gomis, Jaume; Ooguri, Hirosi; Seiberg, Nathan; Wang, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    We present new anomalies in two-dimensional ${\\mathcal N} =(2, 2)$ superconformal theories. They obstruct the shortening conditions of chiral and twisted chiral multiplets at coincident points. This implies that marginal couplings cannot be promoted to background super-fields in short representations. Therefore, standard results that follow from ${\\mathcal N} =(2, 2)$ spurion analysis are invalidated. These anomalies appear only if supersymmetry is enhanced beyond ${\\mathcal N} =(2, 2)$. These anomalies explain why the conformal manifolds of the K3 and $T^4$ sigma models are not K\\"ahler and do not factorize into chiral and twisted chiral moduli spaces and why there are no ${\\mathcal N} =(2, 2)$ gauged linear sigma models that cover these conformal manifolds. We also present these results from the point of view of the Riemann curvature of conformal manifolds.

  20. T2 shortening in childhood moyamoya disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, J. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260 (Japan); Sugita, K. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260 (Japan); Tanabe, Y. [Division of Neurology, Chiba Children`s Hospital, 579-1 Heta, Midori-ku, Chiba-shi 266 (Japan); Ito, C. [Division of Neurosurgery, Chiba Children`s Hospital, 579-1 Heta, Midori-ku, Chiba-shi 266 (Japan); Date, H. [Division of Neurosurgery, Chiba Children`s Hospital, 579-1 Heta, Midori-ku, Chiba-shi 266 (Japan); Niimi, H. [Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi 260 (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    We examined T2 shortening in six children with infarcts due to moyamoya disease to clarify whether there are characteristic patterns of T2 shortening in the deep grey and white matter. Profound T2 shortening in the deep grey and white matter was observed in the acute stage of infarct in two cases, which changed to high intensity in the chronic stage; in this stage no T2 shortening was demonstrated in any case. Neither haemorrhagic infarction nor calcification was seen on CT or MRI. There could be longitudinally different T2 shortening patterns between infarcts due to moyamoya disease and other disorders. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Variability in New Shortening Estimates from Southern Peru (12-14S); Implications for Mass Balance of the Andean Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotberg, N.; McQuarrie, N.

    2008-12-01

    One of the fundamental questions of interest with regards to the Andean Plateau is the mass balance of material needed to create and sustain a 3-4 km high plateau. Is crustal shortening sufficient to support an isostatically compensated crust of 60-70km? We present new estimates of shortening across the northern margin of the Andean Plateau. The cross section extent, from the eastern edge of the volcanic arc to foreland basin, is approximately one half of the physiographic width of the Andean Plateau in Peru. Cross sectional shortening estimates in southern Peru (12-14°S) provide a best estimate of 123 km or 40% shortening with an absolute minimum estimate of 86 km or 30% and absolute maximum estimate of 275 km or 60%. We determined the maximum and minimum shortening estimates using the cross sectional area and possible variations in assumptions made about the amount of erosion, detachment dip, involvement of basement thrusts and displacement along faults. The best estimate of shortening is well short of the required 240-300km of shortening needed in order to account for a 60-70km thick crust under the entire plateau. This suggests that for an isostatically equilibrated crust either 1) there is a significant amount of shortening (~150km) in the western half of the plateau which, is hidden by the volcanic arc or 2) crustal material is being added to the Peruvian section of the Andean Plateau either through lower crustal flow or a process of magmatic underplating followed by differentiation and delamination.

  2. 10 CFR 590.316 - Shortened proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shortened proceedings. 590.316 Section 590.316 Energy... WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Procedures § 590.316 Shortened proceedings. In any proceeding where, in response to a notice of application or notice of procedures, if applicable, no...

  3. Crustal-thickness variations in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George; Myers, Stephen C.; Wallace, Terry C.; Silver, Paul G.; Drake, Lawrence

    1996-05-01

    We estimated the crustal thickness along an east-west transect across the Andes at lat 20°S and along a north-south transect along the eastern edge of the Altiplano from data recorded on two arrays of portable broadband seismic stations (BANJO and SEDA). Waveforms of deep regional events in the downgoing Nazca slab and teleseismic earthquakes were processed to isolate the P-to-S converted phases from the Moho in order to compute the crustal thickness. We found crustal-thickness variations of nearly 40 km across the Andes. Maximum crustal thicknesses of 70 74 km under the Western Cordillera and the Eastern Cordillera thin to 32 38 km 200 km east of the Andes in the Chaco Plain. The central Altiplano at 20°S has crustal thicknesses of 60 to 65 km. The crust also appears to thicken from north (16°S, 55 60 km) to south (20°S, 70 74 km) along the Eastern Cordillera. The Subandean zone crust has intermediate thicknesses of 43 to 47 km. Crustal-thickness predictions for the Andes based on Airy-type isostatic behavior show remarkable overall correlation with observed crustal thickness in the regions of high elevation. In contrast, at the boundary between the Eastern Cordillera and the Subandean zone and in the Chaco Plain, the crust is thinner than predicted, suggesting that the crust in these regions is supported in part by the flexural rigidity of a strong lithosphere. With additional constraints, we conclude that the observation of Airy-type isostasy is consistent with thickening associated with compressional shortening of a weak lithosphere squeezed between the stronger lithosphere of the subducting Nazca plate and the cratonic lithosphere of the Brazilian craton.

  4. Child Abuse May Shorten Some Women's Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160478.html Child Abuse May Shorten Some Women's Lives Extreme stress may ... 300 middle-aged U.S. adults, female survivors of child abuse were more likely to die over the next ...

  5. Occlusal stability in shortened dental arches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, D J; Creugers, N H; Kreulen, C M; de Haan, A F

    2001-02-01

    Shortened dental arches consisting of anterior and premolar teeth have been shown to meet oral functional demands. However, the occlusal stability may be at risk as a result of tooth migration. The aim of this nine-year study was to investigate occlusal stability in shortened dental arches as a function over time. Occlusal stability indicators were: 'interdental spacing', 'occlusal contacts of anterior teeth in Intercuspal Position', 'overbite', 'occlusal tooth wear', and 'alveolar bone support'. Subjects with shortened dental arches (n = 74) were compared with subjects with complete dental arches (controls, n = 72). Repeated-measurement regression analyses were applied to assess age-dependent variables in the controls and to relate the occlusal changes to the period of time since the treatment that led to the shortened dental arches. Compared with complete dental arches, shortened dental arches had similar overbite and occlusal tooth wear. They showed more interdental spacing in the premolar regions, more anterior teeth in occlusal contact, and lower alveolar bone scores. Since the differences remained constant over time, we conclude that shortened dental arches can provide long-term occlusal stability. Occlusal changes were self-limiting, indicating a new occlusal equilibrium.

  6. Surveying of the deformed terraces and crust shortening rate in the northwestern Tarim Basin: Comment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ The paper of Shen et al., entitled "Surveying of the deformed terraces and crust shortening rate in the northwest Tarim Basin", was published in Chinese Science Bulletin (Vol. 46, No. 12)[1]. Shen et al. found the deformation of Late Pleistocene to Holocene terraces of the Boguzi River across the Artushi Anticline in the northwest Tarim Basin close to the Pamir, and made level survey and differential GPS measurement, which is of great importance to geodynamics for research on the coupling of Tianshan Mountains uplifting and Tarim Basin depression. But their understanding to the deformation mechanics of terraces and the calculation methods of crustal shortening are open to discussion. Therefore, we discuss it with Shen Jun et al.

  7. Crustal response to lithosphere evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Cherepanova, Yulia;

    2012-01-01

    We present a new model for the structure of the crust in an area which stretches from the North Atlantic region in the west to the Verkhoyansk Ridge in the east and encompasses Greenland, Iceland, most of Europe, West Siberian basin, and the Siberian cratons. The model is based on critically...... such as lower crust/lithospheric mantle delamination in the Variscan Europe and large-scale rifting across the entire West Siberian basin. The results are summarized in a series of maps of lateral variations in crustal properties, including the depth to the basement and to the Moho, average crustal velocity......, thicknesses of different crustal layers, and Pn seismic velocities....

  8. Telomere shortening correlates to dysplasia but not to DNA aneuploidy in longstanding ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Ottessen, Mariann; Bendix, Laila; Kølvraa, Steen;

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic, inflammatory bowel disease which may lead to dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in patients when long-lasting. Short telomeres have been reported in mucosal cells of UC patients. Telomeres are repetitive base sequences capping the ends of linear chromosomes......, and protect them from erosion and subsequent wrongful recombination and end-to-end joining during cell division. Short telomeres are associated with the development of chromosomal instability and aneuploidy, the latter being risk factors for development of dysplasia and cancer. Specifically, the abrupt...... shortening of one or more telomeres to a critical length, rather than bulk shortening of telomeres, seems to be associated with chromosomal instability....

  9. Numerical Simulation of Pulse Shortening in RBWOs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Yu-bin; ZHANG Zhang; WANG Wen-xiang; MENG Fan-bao; FAN Zhi-kai; HUANG Min-zhi

    2005-01-01

    Pulse shortening hinders improvement of microwave output energy for high power microwave tubes. So far, it is also an unresolved problem in the field of high power microwave devices. In this paper, relativistic backward wave tube (RBWO) is treated as an example to study the pulse shortening phenomena. The influences of gas existing in the tube and explosive emission in inner surface of RBWO are all investigated by means of the particle-in-cell method. Through the simulation results, it can be predicted that the background gas in the tube is one but not the most important factor resulting in pulse shortening, in order to broaden the pulse width of gas-filled RBWO, the pressure of the filled gas must be controlled in a proper value. The explosive emission in the surface of slow wave structure due to intense electric field is one of the most important factors causing pulse shortening in high power microwave tube.Some methods to overcome this find of explosive emission are also given.

  10. 9 CFR 319.701 - Mixed fat shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixed fat shortening. 319.701 Section... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Fats, Oils, Shortenings § 319.701 Mixed fat shortening. Shortening prepared with a mixture of meat fats and vegetable oils...

  11. Receiver functions and crustal structure of the northwestern Andean region, Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Esteban; Monsalve, Gaspar; Vargas, Carlos Alberto

    2015-04-01

    We used the receiver function technique to deduce crustal thickness beneath the northwestern Andean system, using data from the permanent seismic network of Colombia, combined with some of the IRIS and CTBTO stations in Colombia and Ecuador. The estimation of crustal thickness was made using the primary P to s conversion and crustal reverberations. The bulk crustal VP/VS ratio was constrained using a crustal thickness versus VP/VS stacking method, in addition to estimations using a time to depth conversion technique based on results of a modified Wadati diagram analysis. We observed a wide range of crustal thicknesses, including values around 17 km beneath the Malpelo Island on the Pacific Ocean, 20 to 30 km at the coastal Pacific and Caribbean plains of Colombia, 25 to 40 km beneath the eastern plains and foothills, 35 km beneath the Western Cordillera, 45 km at the Magdalena River intermountain valley, 52 to 58 km under the northern Central Cordillera, and reaching almost 60 km beneath some of the volcanoes of the Southern Cordilleran system of Colombia; crustal thickness can be slightly greater than 60 km beneath the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera. The values of VP/VS are particularly high for some of the stations on the volcanic centers, reaching values above 1.79, probably related to the addition of mafic materials to the lower crust, and in the plateau of the Eastern Cordillera near Bogota, where we speculate about the possibility of crustal seismic anisotropy associated with shear zones.

  12. HULL GIRDER PROGRESSIVE COLLAPSE ANALYSIS USING IACS PRESCRIBED AND NLFEM DERIVED LOAD - END SHORTENING CURVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Kitarović

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the hull girder ultimate strength of a bulk carrier at its midship section, as determined by an incremental-iterative progressive collapse analysis method prescribed by the International Association of Classification Societies Common Structural Rules for Bulk Carriers. In addition to the originally prescribed load – end shortening curves, curves determined by the nonlinear finite element method analysis (considering the influence of the idealized initial geometrical imperfections are also considered. Results obtained by both sets of curves are compared and discussed on both local (structural components load – end shortening curve and global (hull girder ulti-mate bending capacity and collapse sequence level, for both sagging and hogging cases.

  13. Crustal response to lithosphere evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans; Cherepanova, Yulia;

    2012-01-01

    assessed results from various seismic studies, including reflection and refraction profiles and receiver function studies. The region includes a nearly continuous age record for crustal evolution over ca. 3.6-3.8 billion years. We present an analysis of the crustal structure heterogeneity in relation...... to geological and tectono-thermal ages of the crust, and the tectonic setting. The results indicate that the Precambrian crust is as heterogeneous as Phanerozoic, and we do not observe any evidence for thickening from the Archean to Proterozoic crust. If anything, our analysis rather suggests the opposite trend...

  14. Shortening amplitude affects the incomplete force recovery after active shortening in mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2009-12-11

    Compared to isometric contraction, the force producing capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD) after a work producing shortening phase. It has been suggested that FD results from an inhibition of cross-bridge binding. Because the rate constants of the exponential force (re)development are thought to be primarily determined by cross-bridge attachment/detachment rate, we aimed to investigate the components of force redevelopment (REDEV) after 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm shortening, resulting in varying amounts of FD (from about 5% to about 16%), in mouse soleus muscle (n=11). Compared to isometric force development (DEV), the time to reach steady-state during REDEV was about 3 times longer (370 versus 1261ms) increasing with increasing amplitude. Contrary to a single, a double exponential function with one component set equal to the rate constant of DEV (14.3s(-1)), accurately described REDEV (RMSshortening amplitude and was associated with work delivered during shortening (R(2)=0.75) and FD (R(2)=0.77). We concluded that a work related slow exponential component is induced to the trajectory of incomplete force recovery after shortening, causing FD. These results suggest that after shortening, aside from cross-bridges with normal attachment/detachment rate, cross-bridges with reduced cycling rate are active.

  15. Topographic Expression of Deep Crustal and Mantle Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, K. X.; Ouimet, W. B.; Baldwin, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The topography of mountain ranges records much information about the history of tectonic events and climatic conditions. Although this record is not easily read, as there are many imperfectly understood factors that influence landscape morphology, there is much encouraging evidence that the river steepness index (a cousin of the Hack gradient index) exhibits a robust correlation with rock uplift rate. Published, and soon to be published, examples span a wide range of field conditions from sites around the globe (e.g., Western US, Bolivia, Nepal, China, Taiwan). Differences in substrate rock properties can have a pronounced influence on channel steepness for a given rock uplift rate, however, and analyses are best limited to regional studies where climatic conditions and lithology are largely uniform. In such settings, careful analysis of river profiles and the relief structure of the landscape can reveal important information about the history of rock uplift, recording temporal changes in uplift/river incision rates. This potential adds considerably to the value of topographic analyses, especially where uplift is driven by deep crustal or mantle processes and not clearly expressed in upper crustal structures and geodetic shortening data. However, this potential comes at the price of complicating the interpretation of the relationship between topography and the modern snapshot of deep crustal/mantle conditions provided by geophysical imaging techniques. Over what timescales does topography retain a record of past events in earth's interior? Important questions remain unanswered about the age of topography in many landscapes where deep crustal or mantle dynamics have been invoked. We discuss the factors that control landscape response time, both to an increase in rock uplift rate and to the cessation of tectonic activity, and present constraints on the antiquity of topography in several field settings.

  16. Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor - Poster

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor Poster was created at NGDC using the Crustal Ages of the Ocean Floor database draped digitally over a relief of the ocean floor...

  17. Renal failure induces telomere shortening in the rat heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, L. S.; Windt, W. A.; Roks, A. J.; van Dokkum, R. P.; Schoemaker, R. G.; de Zeeuw, D.; Henning, R. H.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Renal failure aggravates pathological cardiac remodelling induced by myocardial infarction (MI). Cardiac remodelling is associated with telomere shortening, a marker for biological ageing. We investigated whether mild and severe renal failure shorten cardiac telomeres and excessively sho

  18. [Shortening arthrodesis of three wrist bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delattre, O; Dupont, P; Reau, A F; Rouvillain, J L; Mousselard, H; Catonné, Y

    1997-01-01

    In advanced cases of wrist osteoarthritis with lesions of the radio-scaphoid and mediocarpal joints, and when a proximal row carpectomy is not possible because of lesions of the head of the capitate, we suggest a new technique: The hamate-capitate-lunate shortening arthrodesis with a scaphoid-triquetral resection. The good results observed with proximal row carpectomies, and particularly their long-term reliability, have encouraged us on this new path. Effectively, this operation takes the concept of proximal row carpectomy one step further by reconstructing the head of the capitate with the lunate whose proximal articular surface is often not deteriorated even in very advanced cases of radio and mediocarpal osteoarthritis. The two theoretical concepts of this operation are the shortening of the carpus and respect of the physiological congruence of the radio-lunate joint, the goal being obtain similar results those with proximal row carpectomy, particularly concerning mobility. We present our first two cases with this technique. This new procedure is an alternative to the four bone arthrodesis, particularly in SLAC wrist sequellae when they have evolved to the stage of radio and mediocarpal osteoarthritis.

  19. Constraints on Crustal Viscosity from Geodetic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Gregory

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory measurements of the ductile deformation of crustal rocks demonstrate a range of crystal deformation mechanisms that may be represented by a viscous deformation law, albeit one in which the effective viscosity may vary by orders of magnitude, depending on temperature, stress, grain size, water content and other factors. In such measurements these factors can be separately controlled and effective viscosities can be estimated more or less accurately, though the measured deformation occurs on much shorter time scales and length scales than are typical of geological deformation. To obtain bulk measures of the in situ crustal viscosity law for actual geological processes, estimated stress differences are balanced against measured surface displacement or strain rates: at the continental scale, surface displacement and strain rates can be effectively measured using GPS, and stress differences can be estimated from the distribution of gravitational potential energy; this method has provided constraints on a depth-averaged effective viscosity for the lithosphere as a whole in regions that are actively deforming. Another technique measures the post-seismic displacements that are interpreted to occur in the aftermath of a large crustal earthquake. Stress-differences here are basically constrained by the co-seismic deformation and the elastic rigidity (obtained from seismic velocity) and the strain rates are again provided by GPS. In this technique the strain is a strong function of position relative to the fault, so in general the interpretation of this type of data depends on a complex calculation in which various simplifying assumptions must be made. The spatial variation of displacement history on the surface in this case contains information about the spatial variation of viscosity within the crust. Recent post-seismic studies have shown the potential for obtaining measurements of both depth variation and lateral variation of viscosity in the crust beneath

  20. Crustal structure of Nigeria and Southern Ghana, West Africa from P-wave receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Ofonime; Nyblade, Andrew; Okereke, Chiedu; Oden, Michael; Emry, Erica; Julià, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    We report new estimates of crustal thickness (Moho depth), Poisson's ratio and shear-wave velocities for eleven broadband seismological stations in Nigeria and Ghana. Data used for this study came from teleseismic earthquakes recorded at epicentral distances between 30° and 95° and with moment magnitudes greater than or equal to 5.5. P-wave receiver functions were modeled using the Moho Ps arrival times, H-k stacking, and joint inversion of receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities. The average crustal thickness of the stations in the Neoproterozoic basement complex of Nigeria is 36 km, and 23 km for the stations in the Cretaceous Benue Trough. The crustal structure of the Paleoproterozoic Birimian Terrain, and Neoproterozoic Dahomeyan Terrain and Togo Structural Unit in southern Ghana is similar, with an average Moho depth of 44 km. Poisson's ratios for all the stations range from 0.24 to 0.26, indicating a bulk felsic to intermediate crustal composition. The crustal structure of the basement complex in Nigeria is similar to the average crustal structure of Neoproterozoic terrains in other parts of Africa, but the two Neoproterozoic terrains in southern Ghana have a thicker crust with a thick mafic lower crust, ranging in thickness from 12 to 17 km. Both the thicker crust and thick mafic lower crustal section are consistent with many Precambrian suture zones, and thus we suggest that both features are relict from the collisional event during the formation of Gondwana.

  1. Crustal structure of the Altiplano from broadband regional waveform modeling: Implications for the composition of thick continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Jennifer L.; Beck, Susan L.; Zandt, George

    2000-01-01

    We have modeled the full waveforms from six intermediate-depth and two shallow earthquakes recorded at regional distances by the BANJO Broadband Andean Joint Experiment (BANJO) and Seismic Exploration of the Deep Altiplano (SEDA) portable seismic networks in the central Andes. In this study we utilize data from those BANJO and SEDA stations located within the Altiplano and Eastern Cordillera. We used reflectivity synthetic seismograms and a grid search to constrain four parameters of the Altiplano-Eastern Cordillera lithosphere: crustal thickness, average crustal velocity (Vp), and crustal and upper mantle Poisson's ratios (σcrust and σmantle). Using our grid search, we investigated the crustal and upper mantle structure along 36 individual event station paths and applied forward modeling to 56 event station paths. Robust models for the Altiplano that provide the best overall fit between the data and synthetic seismograms are characterized by an average Vp of 5.75-6.25 km/s, crustal thicknesses of 60-65 km, σcrust = 0.25, and σmantle = 0.27-0.29. We find a north-south variation in the structure of the Altiplano, with the crust south of the BANJO transect characterized by either lower than average crustal P wave velocities or a slightly higher σcrust relative to crust north of the BANJO transect. These results are consistent with a model of crustal thickening caused predominantly by tectonic shortening of felsic crust, rather than by underplating or magmatic intrusion from the mantle.

  2. Crustal thickness controlled by plate tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina M.; Meissner, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    /gabbro–eclogite phase transition in crustal evolution and the links between lithosphere recycling, mafic magmatism, and crustal underplating. We advocate that plate tectonics processes, togetherwith basalt/gabbro–eclogite transition, limit crustal thickness worldwide by providing effective mechanisms of crustal...... magmatism. While both subduction and delamination recycle crustal material into the mantle, mafic magmatism transports mantle material upward and participates in growth of newoceanic and continental crusts and significant structural and chemicalmodification of the latter. We discuss the role of basalt...... (lithosphere) recycling. The processes of crust–mantle interaction have created very dissimilar crustal styles in Europe, as seen by its seismic structure, crustal thickness, and average seismic velocities in the basement. Our special focus is on processes responsible for the formation of the thin crust...

  3. Crustal composition in southern Norway from active and passive source seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, W. R.; Frassetto, A. M.; Thybo, H.

    2010-12-01

    Crustal composition and structure beneath the Fennoscandian shield are highly variable due to the method of crustal accretion and the long history of extensional and compressional tectonics. In southern Norway, the Moho and crust are inferred to be the youngest of the shield, however, it is likely that a large discrepancy between crustal age and Moho age exists beneath the high southern Scandes where the Caledonian orogeny was in effect and beneath the Oslo Graben where 60 million years of rifting and magmatism has altered the crust. Crustal structure in southern Norway was targeted with a multi-disciplinary seismic study (Magnus-Rex - Mantle investigations of Norwegian uplift Structure). Three ~400 km long active source seismic profiles across the southern Norway and a region wide array of broadband seismometers were deployed. P and S-wave arrivals were recorded in the Magnus-Rex project, from which Poisson ratios for the crust in southern Norway are calculated from both active source profiling and receiver functions. Unusually strong S-wave arrivals allow rare insight into crustal Poisson’s ratio structure, within crustal layers, that is not normally available from active source data and are usually determined by earthquake tomography studies where only bulk crustal values are available. An average Poisson’s ratio of 0.25 is calculated for the crust in southern Norway, suggesting it is predominantly of felsic-intermediate composition and lacks any significant mafic lower crust. This differs significantly from the adjacent crust in the Svecofennian domain of the Fennoscandian shield where Moho depths reach ~50 km and an up to 20 km thick mafic lower crust is present. The vast difference in Moho depths in the Fennoscandian shield are, therefore, mostly due to the variation in thickness of the high Vp lower crust. Estimates of crustal composition and the effect of Magma intrusion within the Oslo Graben, and possible delamination of the lowermost crust beneath

  4. Crustal growth in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Katharina; Castro, Antonio; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    There is a broad interest in understanding the physical principles leading to arc magmatisim at active continental margins and different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the composition and evolution of the continental crust. It is widely accepted that water released from the subducting plate lowers the melting temperature of the overlying mantle allowing for "flux melting" of the hydrated mantle. However, relamination of subducted crustal material to the base of the continental crust has been recently suggested to account for the growth and composition of the continental crust. We use petrological-thermo-mechanical models of active subduction zones to demonstrate that subduction of crustal material to sublithospheric depth may result in the formation of a tectonic rock mélange composed of basalt, sediment and hydrated /serpentinized mantle. This rock mélange may evolve into a partially molten diapir at asthenospheric depth and rise through the mantle because of its intrinsic buoyancy prior to emplacement at crustal levels (relamination). This process can be episodic and long-lived, forming successive diapirs that represent multiple magma pulses. Recent laboratory experiments of Castro et al. (2013) have demonstrated that reactions between these crustal components (i.e. basalt and sediment) produce andesitic melt typical for rocks of the continental crust. However, melt derived from a composite diapir will inherit the geochemical characteristics of its source and show distinct temporal variations of radiogenic isotopes based on the proportions of basalt and sediment in the source (Vogt et al., 2013). Hence, partial melting of a composite diapir is expected to produce melt with a constant major element composition, but substantial changes in terms of radiogenic isotopes. However, crustal growth at active continental margins may also involve accretionary processes by which new material is added to the continental crust. Oceanic plateaus and other

  5. Crustal Structure And Magmatism, Coast Mountains Orogen, Latitude 52-53 degrees North, British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmore, M. E.; Gehrels, G.; Woodsworth, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    New geologic data and U-Pb ages reveal complex history of arc accretion, crustal thickening and migration of magmatic fronts during deformation. Plutonic ages define distinct western and eastern Jurassic - mid Cretaceous arcs that share a common history after ~90 Ma. Juxtaposition of these arcs occurred during mid- Cretaceous crustal shortening in a dominantly SW-vergent crustal-scale thrust belt. Significant crustal thickening buried 151 Ma granitic clasts to pressures > 6 kb, and mid-Cretaceous plutons were emplaced at this depth along the axis of the orogen. Thrusting continued after establishment of the 90 Ma arc; a regional SW-verging thrust emplaced high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Yukon-Tanana terrane and deep-seated plutons over low- grade rocks of the Alexander and Wrangellia terranes. The shear zone is coincident with the western boundary of 82-89 Ma plutons and a regionally extensive, late-kinematic, sill-like pluton. Dextral shear zones preserved on the flanks of the orogen suggest a component of Late Cretaceous transpression. By 75 Ma, metamorphism, deformation, and magmatism had migrated central portions of the orogen and there is no evidence of ductile deformation and syn-kinematic metarmorphism younger than ~70 - 65 along the western flank of the orogen. The Coast shear zone localized 62-58 Ma synkinematic plutons during NE-side up displacement, creating a sharp western magmatic front. Sparse cooling ages suggest plutons and metamorphic rocks adjacent to the CSZ cooled through 500-600 deg between 54-58 Ma during exhumation along the shear zone. Voluminous granitic plutons were emplaced from ~55-50 Ma, but significant crustal extension that affected the eastern side of the orogen farther north is not evident along this transect. This history supports previous models of crustal subcretion and the generation of arc magmas in thickened crust. Definition of two pre-90 Ma arcs negates models calling for simple Andean-style orogen prior to mid

  6. Tectonic shortening and coeval volcanism during the Quaternary, Northeast Japan arc

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koji Umeda; Masao Ban; Shintaro Hayashi; Tomohiro Kusano

    2013-02-01

    The Northeast Japan arc, a mature volcanic arc with a back-arc marginal basin (Japan Sea), is located on a convergent plate boundary along the subducting Pacific plate and the overriding North American plate. From a compilation and analysis of stratigraphy, radiometric age and data on erupted magma volumes, 176 eruptive episodes identified from 69 volcanoes so far, indicate that notable changes in eruption style, magma discharge rates and distribution of eruptive centres occurred around 1.0 Ma. Before ca.1.0 Ma, large-volume felsic eruptions were dominant, forming large calderas in the frontal arc, a region of low crustal strain rate. After ca. 1.0 Ma to the present, the calc-alkaline andesite magma eruptions in the frontal and rear arcs, synchronous with crustal shortening characterized by reverse faulting, resulted in stratovolcano development along narrow uplifted zones. Although, it is widely assumed that magma cannot rise easily in a compressional setting, some of the magma stored within basal sills could be extruded where N–S-trending uplifted mountains bounded by reverse faults formed since about ca.1.0 Ma.

  7. Analysis the 1978–2008 crustal and sub-crustal earthquake catalog of Vrancea region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Telesca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The crustal and sub-crustal seismicity that occurred in the Vrancea area from 1978 to 2008 is investigated. Due to quarry blast contamination, the analysis of the crustal seismicity was restricted to events that occurred between 20 km and 60 km, considering sub-crustal events as all those that occurred at depths larger than 60 km. The completeness magnitude was estimated between 2.3 and 2.5 for the crustal seismicity and between 2.9 and 3.1 for the sub-crustal one. The Gutenberg-Richter b-values show clear differences between crustal and sub-crustal seismicity, with values around 0.9 and 1.3–1.4, respectively. The analysis performed in this study represents a preliminary issue for the seismic hazard assessment of surrounding regions like Moldova, for which the earthquakes generated in Vrancea represent an important threat.

  8. Crustal structure beneath Eastern Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiche, Sönke; Thybo, H.; Kaip, G.

    2011-01-01

    is recorded by 350 Reftek Texan receivers for 10 equidistant shot points along the profile. We use forward ray tracing modelling to construct a two-dimensional velocity model from the observed travel times. These results show the first images of the subsurface velocity structure beneath the Greenland ice...... these mountain belts is needed for assessing the isostatic balance of the crust and to gain insight into possible links between crustal composition, rifting history and present-day topography of the North Atlantic Region. However, the acquisition of geophysical data onshore Greenland is logistically complicated...

  9. Does a detection team shorten duration of untreated psychosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Merete; Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone;

    2008-01-01

    Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) is shown to be associated with poor outcome in many domains. It has been shown that it is possible to shorten DUP when combining a detection team and an information campaign. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether DUP was shortened during the first 3 y...

  10. Shortening of subjective visual intervals followed by repetitive stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Ono

    Full Text Available Our previous research demonstrated that repetitive tone stimulation shortened the perceived duration of the preceding auditory time interval. In this study, we examined whether repetitive visual stimulation influences the perception of preceding visual time intervals. Results showed that a time interval followed by a high-frequency visual flicker was perceived as shorter than that followed by a low-frequency visual flicker. The perceived duration decreased as the frequency of the visual flicker increased. The visual flicker presented in one hemifield shortened the apparent time interval in the other hemifield. A final experiment showed that repetitive tone stimulation also shortened the perceived duration of preceding visual time intervals. We concluded that visual flicker shortened the perceived duration of preceding visual time intervals in the same way as repetitive auditory stimulation shortened the subjective duration of preceding tones.

  11. Recent rapid shortening of crust across the Tianshan Mts. and relative motion of tectonic blocks in the north and south

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the multiple-epoch Global Positioning System observations during a period from 1992 to 1999, we document directly a rapid crustal shortening of ~20 mm/a across the western Tianshan Mts. (76°E), in contrast to a 4 mm/a convergent rate across the eastern Tianshan Mts. (87°E)and the north-south convergence across the mountain belt descends laterally from west to east. The direction of current crustal movement inferred by GPS sites along the southern flank of the Tianshan Mts. is approximately perpendicular to the easterly-trending mountain belt, indicating that the Tarim Basin thrust almost rightly into the Tianshan Mts. The Tarim Basin accommodates nearly no or a minor, if any, crustal deformation and rotates clockwise, as a rigid body in a whole, at a rate of 0.64°/Ma around a Euler pole at 95.7°E, 40.3°N (Anxi, Gansu) with respect to the stable Siberia. The relative motion between the Kazakh platform and the Dzungarian Basin is quite apparent. The Dzungar should be regarded as an independent active block from the view of the Asia tectonic settings.

  12. Crustal thickness controlled by plate tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artemieva, Irina M.; Meissner, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The continental crust on Earth cannot be extracted directly from the mantle, and the primary crust extracted directly from an early magma ocean is not preserved on Earth. We review geophysical and geochemical aspects of global crust–mantle material exchange processes and examine the processes which...... magmatism. While both subduction and delamination recycle crustal material into the mantle, mafic magmatism transports mantle material upward and participates in growth of newoceanic and continental crusts and significant structural and chemicalmodification of the latter. We discuss the role of basalt....../gabbro–eclogite phase transition in crustal evolution and the links between lithosphere recycling, mafic magmatism, and crustal underplating. We advocate that plate tectonics processes, togetherwith basalt/gabbro–eclogite transition, limit crustal thickness worldwide by providing effective mechanisms of crustal...

  13. Crustal rheology of the Himalaya and Southern Tibet inferred from magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, M.J.; Jones, A.G.; Wei, W.; Marquis, G.; Gokarn, S.G.; Spratt, J.E.; Bedrosian, P.; Booker, J.; Leshou, C.; Clarke, G.; Shenghui, L.; Chanhong, L.; Ming, D.; Sheng, J.; Solon, K.; Handong, T.; Ledo, J.; Roberts, B.

    2005-01-01

    The Cenozoic collision between the Indian and Asian continents formed the Tibetan plateau, beginning about 70 million years ago. Since this time, at least 1,400 km of convergence has been accommodated by a combination of underthrusting of Indian and Asian lithosphere, crustal shortening, horizontal extrusion and lithospheric delamination. Rocks exposed in the Himalaya show evidence of crustal melting and are thought to have been exhumed by rapid erosion and climatically forced crustal flow. Magnetotelluric data can be used to image subsurface electrical resistivity, a parameter sensitive to the presence of interconnected fluids in the host rock matrix, even at low volume fractions. Here we present magnetotelluric data from the Tibetan-Himalayan orogen from 77??E to 92??E, which show that low resistivity, interpreted as a partially molten layer, is present along at least 1,000 km of the southern margin of the Tibetan plateau. The inferred low viscosity of this layer is consistent with the development of climatically forced crustal flow in Southern Tibet. ?? 2005 Nature Publishing Group.

  14. Holocene internal shortening within the northwest Sub-Himalaya: Out-of-sequence faulting of the Jwalamukhi Thrust, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Saptarshi; Thiede, Rasmus C.; Schildgen, Taylor F.; Wittmann, Hella; Bookhagen, Bodo; Scherler, Dirk; Strecker, Manfred R.

    2016-11-01

    The southernmost thrust of the Himalayan orogenic wedge that separates the foreland from the orogen, the Main Frontal Thrust, is thought to accommodate most of the ongoing crustal shortening in the Sub-Himalaya. Steepened longitudinal river profile segments, terrace offsets, and back-tilted fluvial terraces within the Kangra reentrant of the NW Sub-Himalaya suggest Holocene activity of the Jwalamukhi Thrust (JMT) and other thrust faults that may be associated with strain partitioning along the toe of the Himalayan wedge. To assess the shortening accommodated by the JMT, we combine morphometric terrain analyses with in situ 10Be-based surface-exposure dating of the deformed terraces. Incision into upper Pleistocene sediments within the Kangra Basin created two late Pleistocene terrace levels (T1 and T2). Subsequent early Holocene aggradation shortly before 10 ka was followed by episodic reincision, which created four cut-and-fill terrace levels, the oldest of which (T3) was formed at 10.1 ± 0.9 ka. A vertical offset of 44 ± 5 m of terrace T3 across the JMT indicates a shortening rate of 5.6 ± 0.8 to 7.5 ± 1.1 mm a-1 over the last 10 ka. This result suggests that thrusting along the JMT accommodates 40-60% of the total Sub-Himalayan shortening in the Kangra reentrant over the Holocene. We speculate that this out-of-sequence shortening may have been triggered or at least enhanced by late Pleistocene and Holocene erosion of sediments from the Kangra Basin.

  15. A linear description of shortening induced changes in isometric length-force characteristics of rat muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Meijer, K; Grootenboer, H.J.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Huijing, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Active muscle shortening reduces the isometric force potential of muscle. This observation indicates that the isometric length-force characteristics are altered during muscle shortening. Post-shortening decrease in isometric force depends on starting length, shortening amplitude and shortening velocity. In the present study, post-shortening decrease in isometric force was determined after isokinetic contractions with various shortening amplitudes initiated from different lengths of rat medial...

  16. Phenomenological models of the dynamics of muscle during isotonic shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sang Hoon; Monroy, Jenna A; Lappin, A Kristopher; Nishikawa, Kiisa C; Pai, Dinesh K

    2013-09-27

    We investigated the effectiveness of simple, Hill-type, phenomenological models of the force-length-velocity relationship for simulating measured length trajectories during muscle shortening, and, if so, what forms of the model are most useful. Using isotonic shortening data from mouse soleus and toad depressor mandibulae muscles, we showed that Hill-type models can indeed simulate the shortening trajectories with sufficiently good accuracy. However, we found that the standard form of the Hill-type muscle model, called the force-scaling model, is not a satisfactory choice. Instead, the results support the use of less frequently used models, the f-max scaling model and force-scaling with parallel spring, to simulate the shortening dynamics of muscle.

  17. Augmentation of deglutitive thyrohyoid muscle shortening by the Shaker Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mepani, Rachel; Antonik, Stephen; Massey, Benson; Kern, Mark; Logemann, Jerilyn; Pauloski, Barbara; Rademaker, Alfred; Easterling, Caryn; Shaker, Reza

    2009-03-01

    Earlier studies of the effect of 6 weeks of the Shaker Exercise have shown significant increase in UES opening and anterior excursion of larynx and hyoid during swallowing in patients with upper esophageal sphincter (UES) dysfunction, resulting in elimination of aspiration and resumption of oral intake. This effect is attributed to strengthening of the suprahyoid muscles, as evidenced by comparison of electromyographic changes in muscle fatigue before and after completion of the exercise regime. The effect of this exercise on thyrohyoid muscle shortening is unknown. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the effect of the exercise on thyrohyoid muscle shortening. We studied 11 dysphagic patients with UES dysfunction. Six were randomized to traditional swallowing therapy and five to the Shaker Exercise. Videofluoroscopy was used to measure deglutitive thyrohyoid shortening before and after completion of assigned therapy regimen. Maximum thyrohyoid muscle shortening occurred at close temporal proximity to the time of maximal thyroid cartilage excursion. The percent change in thyrohyoid distance from initiation of deglutition to maximal anterior/superior hyoid excursion showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups prior to either therapy (p = 0.54). In contrast, after completion of therapy, the percent change in thyrohyoid distance in the Shaker Exercise group was significantly greater compared to the traditional therapy (p = 0.034). The Shaker Exercise augments the thyrohyoid muscle shortening in addition to strengthening the suprahyoid muscles. The combination of increased thyrohyoid shortening and suprahyoid strengthening contributes to the Shaker Exercise outcome of deglutitive UES opening augmentation.

  18. Biochemical response to chronic shortening in unloaded soleus muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    One leg of tail-casted suspended rats was immobilized in a plantar-flexed position to test whether chronic shortening of posterior leg muscles affected the metabolic response to unloading. The immobilized plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles of these animals showed approximately 20 percent loss of muscle mass in contrast to simply a slower growth rate with unloading. Loss of mass of the soleus muscle during suspension was not accentuated by chronic shortening. Although protein degradation in the isolated soleus muscle of the plantar-flexed limb was slightly faster than in the contralateral free limb, this difference was offset by faster synthesis of the myofibrillar protein fraction of the chronically shortened muscle. Total adenine nucleotides were 17 percent lower (P less than 0.005) in the chronically shortened soleus muscle following incubation. Glutamate, glutamine, and alanine metabolism showed little response to chronic shortening. These results suggest that, in the soleus muscle, chronic shortening did not alter significantly the metabolic responses to unloading and reduced activity.

  19. Consequences of crown shortening canine teeth in Greenland sled dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kortegaard, H E; Anthony Knudsen, T; Dahl, S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the consequences of crown shortening, focusing on the prevalence of pulp exposure and periapical pathology in Greenland sled dogs that had had their canine crowns shortened at an early age. METHODS: Five cadaver heads and 54 sled dogs underwent an oral examination for dental...... fractures and pulp exposure of canines. All canines were radiographed and evaluated for periapical pathology. RESULTS: The prevalence of canine pulp exposure in 12 (5 heads and 7 dogs) crown shortened dogs was 91 · 7%, and 21 · 3% in 47 not-crown shortened dogs. A significant (P ... exposure of the canines in the crown shortened group compared to the not-crown shortened group was seen with a relative risk of 4 · 3 on a dog basis and a relative risk of 12 · 2 on a tooth basis. In dogs with pulp exposure of canines (n = 51) the prevalence of periapical pathology was 82 · 4%, but only 0...

  20. Is South-eastward Crustal Flow Possible around East Himalayan Syntax? - New Insights from SINOPROBE Magnetotellurics Array Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H.; Wei, W.; Ye, G.; Jin, S.; Jing, J.; Jones, A. G.; Zhang, L.; Xie, C.; Yin, Y.; Wang, G.

    2015-12-01

    The south-eastward expansion of Tibet plateau in eastern Tibet is considered a key process for understanding the large scale uplift and crustal thickening without significant concomitant crustal shortening. However, the geodynamic processes creating this iconic process is still unclear and hotly debated. Two popular geodynamic models, namely crustal flow at mid-to-lower crustal depths and coherent deformation between the crust and lithospheric mantle, are commonly appealed to as the expansion's driving mechanism. However, neither of these mechanisms is able to reconcile all of the abundant geological and geophysical data. In this study we present a three-dimensional (3D) geo-electrical model, derived from SINOPROBE magnetotelluric (MT) array data, which reveals the geo-electrical and rheological structure in southeast Tibet that brings new insights into the region. Instead of continuous NW-SE conductive channels proposed in previous two-dimensional (2D) MT studies, a large-scale N-S directed resistive structure is revealed to disconnect the conductors from the crust to the upper mantle, arguing against the model of south-eastward (downslope) channel flow. Furthermore, distinct NNE directed conductive anomalies, which are perpendicular to the surface structures, are identified in the mid-to-lower crust. We interpret these anomalies as distributed NNE oriented crustal flow channels, which might cause the azimuthal clockwise extension around East Himalayan Syntax and partly contributed to the south-eastward expansion of eastern Tibet.

  1. Continental crust composition constrained by measurements of crustal Poisson's ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandt, George; Ammon, Charles J.

    1995-03-01

    DECIPHERING the geological evolution of the Earth's continental crust requires knowledge of its bulk composition and global variability. The main uncertainties are associated with the composition of the lower crust. Seismic measurements probe the elastic properties of the crust at depth, from which composition can be inferred. Of particular note is Poisson's ratio,Σ ; this elastic parameter can be determined uniquely from the ratio of P- to S-wave seismic velocity, and provides a better diagnostic of crustal composition than either P- or S-wave velocity alone1. Previous attempts to measure Σ have been limited by difficulties in obtaining coincident P- and S-wave data sampling the entire crust2. Here we report 76 new estimates of crustal Σ spanning all of the continents except Antarctica. We find that, on average, Σ increases with the age of the crust. Our results strongly support the presence of a mafic lower crust beneath cratons, and suggest either a uniformitarian craton formation process involving delamination of the lower crust during continental collisions, followed by magmatic underplating, or a model in which crust formation processes have changed since the Precambrian era.

  2. Lower crustal mush generation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Ozge; Bachmann, Olivier; Dufek, Josef; Wright, Heather; Mangan, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    Recent seismic, field, and petrologic studies on several active and fossil volcanic settings provide important constraints on the time, volume, and melt fraction of their lower crustal magma bodies. However, these studies provide an incomplete picture of the time and length scales involved during their thermal and compositional evolution. What has been lacking is a thermal model that explains the temporal evolution and state of the lower crustal magma bodies during their growth. Here we use a two-dimensional thermal model and quantify the time and length scales involved in the long-term thermal and compositional evolution of the lower crustal mush regions underlying the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (USA), Mt St Helens (USA), and the Ivrea-Verbano Zone (North Italy). Although a number of seismic, tectonic, petrologic, and field studies explained the tectonic and magmatic evolution of these regions, controversy remains on their lower crustal heat sources, melt fraction, and origin of erupted magmas. Our thermal modeling results suggest that given a geologically reasonable range of basalt fluxes (~10^-3 to 10^-4 km3/yr), a long-lived (>105 yr) crystalline mush is formed in the lower crust. The state of the lower crustal mush is strongly influenced by the magma flux, crustal thickness, and water content of intruded basalt, giving an average melt fraction of mush is mainly evolving through fractional crystallization of basalt with minor crustal assimilation in all regions, in agreement with isotopic studies. Quantification of the lower crustal mush regions is key to understanding the mass and heat balance in the crust, evolution of magma plumbing systems, and geothermal energy exploration.

  3. Slab detachment during continental collision: Influence of crustal rheology and interaction with lithospheric delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T. V.

    2013-08-01

    Collision between continents can lead to the subduction of continental material. If the crust remains coupled to the downgoing slab, a large buoyancy force is generated. This force slows down convergence and promotes slab detachment. If the crust resists to subduction, it may decouple from the downgoing slab and be subjected to buoyant extrusion. We employ two-dimensional thermo-mechanical modelling to study the importance of crustal rheology on the evolution of subduction-collision systems. We propose simple quantifications of the mechanical decoupling between lithospheric levels (σ*) and the potential for buoyant extrusion of the crust (ξ*). The modelling results indicate that a variable crustal rheological structure results in slab detachment, delamination, or the combination of both mechanisms. A strong crust provides coupling at the Moho (low σ*) and remains coherent during subduction (low ξ). It promotes deep subduction of the crust (180 km) and slab detachment. Exhumation occurs in coherent manners via eduction and thrusting. Slab detachment triggers the development of topography (> 4.5 km) close to the suture. A contrasting style of collision occurs using a weak crustal rheology. Mechanical decoupling at the Moho (high σ*) promotes the extrusion of the crust (high ξ), disabling slab detachment. Ongoing shortening leads to buckling of the crust and development of topography on the lower plate. Collisions involving rheologically layered crust allow decoupling at mid-crustal depths. This structure favours both the extrusion of upper crust and the subduction of the lower crust. Such collisions are successively affected by delamination and slab detachment. Topography develops together with the buoyant extrusion of crust onto the foreland and is further amplified by slab detachment. Our results suggest that the occurrence of both delamination (Apennines) and slab detachment (Himalayas) in orogens may indicate differences in the initial crustal structure of

  4. A linear description of shortening induced changes in isometric length-force characteristics of rat muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, K.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Huijing, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Active muscle shortening reduces the isometric force potential of muscle. This observation indicates that the isometric length-force characteristics are altered during muscle shortening. Post-shortening decrease in isometric force depends on starting length, shortening amplitude and shortening veloc

  5. The mechanics of mouse skeletal muscle when shortening during relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, C J; Lichtwark, G A

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic properties of relaxing skeletal muscle have not been well characterised but are important for understanding muscle function during terrestrial locomotion, during which a considerable fraction of muscle work output can be produced during relaxation. The purpose of this study was to characterise the force-velocity properties of mouse skeletal muscle during relaxation. Experiments were performed in vitro (21 degrees C) using bundles of fibres from mouse soleus and EDL muscles. Isovelocity shortening was applied to muscles during relaxation following short tetanic contractions. Using data from different contractions with different shortening velocities, curves relating force output to shortening velocity were constructed at intervals during relaxation. The velocity component included contributions from shortening of both series elastic component (SEC) and contractile component (CC) because force output was not constant. Early in relaxation force-velocity relationships were linear but became progressively more curved as relaxation progressed. Force-velocity curves late in relaxation had the same curvature as those for the CC in fully activated muscles but V(max) was reduced to approximately 50% of the value in fully activated muscles. These results were the same for slow- and fast-twitch muscles and for relaxation following maximal tetani and brief, sub-maximal tetani. The measured series elastic compliance was used to partition shortening velocity between SEC and CC. The curvature of the CC force-velocity relationship was constant during relaxation. The SEC accounted for most of the shortening and work output during relaxation and its power output during relaxation exceeded the maximum CC power output. It is proposed that unloading the CC, without any change in its overall length, accelerated cross-bridge detachment when shortening was applied during relaxation.

  6. A Disequilibrium Melting Spectrum: Partially Melted Crustal Xenoliths from the Wudalianchi Volcanic Field, NE China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, C. L.; McGee, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Disequilibrium melting has been established as a common process occurring during crustal anatexis and thus demonstrates that crustal assimilation by ascending mantle-derived magmas is likley not a closed system. Observations of extreme compositional heterogeneity within partial melts derived from crustal xenoliths have been documented in several recent examples, however, the retention or transfer of elements to and from residues and glasses, and their relative contributions to potential crustal contaminants warrants further investigation. Sampled lavas from the Huoshaoshan volcano in the Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field of Northeast China contain crustal xenoliths which preserve a spectrum of partial melting both petrographically and geochemically, thus providing an excellent, natural example of crustal anatexis. Correlations exist between the volume of silicic glass preserved within the xenoliths and bulk rock SiO2 (70-83 wt%), Al2O3 (16-8 wt%), glass 87Sr/86Sr (0.715-0.908), abundances of elements common in feldspars and micas (Sr, Ba, Rb) and elements common in accessory minerals (Y, Zr, Nb). These correlations are likely associated with the consumption of feldspars and micas and the varying retention of accessory phases during partial melting. The xenoliths which contain the greater volumes of silicic glass and residual quartz (interpreted as being the most melted) were found within pahoehoe lava, whilst the least melted xenoliths were found within scoria of the summit cone of Huoshaoshan; thus it is interpreted that the extent of melting is linked to the immersion time in the lava. Small-scale (mm) mingling and transfer of material from the enclosing lava to the xenolith is observed, however, modelling of potential contaminant compositions is inconsistent with crustal contamination during lava petrogenesis. It is inferred that crustal contamination in sampled lavas is localized within the open magmatic system and most likely occurs at the contact zone

  7. Frying performance of palm-based solid frying shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, M N; Nor-Nazuha, M N; Nor-Dalilah, M N; Sahri, M M

    2010-03-15

    In order to evaluate the frying performance of palm-based solid frying shortening against standard olein, the fresh potato chips were fried in both frying media using an open fryer. After frying the chips for 40 h in an open batch fryer, it was found that the frying quality of palm-based solid frying shortening was better than standard palm olein in terms of Free Fatty Acid (FFA) values, Total Polar Content (TPC) and Total Polymeric Material (TPM). Solid shortening gave FFA, TPC and TPM values of 0.7, 15.3 and 2.67%, respectively, whilst standard palm olein gave values for FFA, TPC and TPM of 1.2, 19.6 and 3.10%, respectively. In terms of sensory mean scores, sensory panelists preferred the color of potato chips fried in solid shortening on the first day of frying, while on the third and fifth day of frying there were no significant differences (p palm olein when used for deep fat frying in terms of FFA values, total polar content and total polymeric material, especially for starch-based products such as potato chips. The result also shows that, in terms of sensory mean scores, after frying for 40 h, the sensory panelists gave higher scores in terms of taste, flavor and crispiness for potato chips fried in palm-based solid shortening.

  8. Lack of Young Subsidence in the East Tibetan Foreland: Implications for Crustal Thickening Processes at Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royden, L. H.; Burchfiel, B. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Wenchuan earthquake of May 12, 2008 occurred on a west-dipping reverse fault (with a pronounced right-slip component) located along the steep eastern edge of the Tibetan plateau. It has been suggested that thrust faulting here may not be indicative of large-scale shortening and thickening of the upper crust, but may rather be an expression of vertical uplift of the upper crust, with minor shortening. This interpretation is compatible with the lack of young flexural subsidence in the Sichuan foreland provided that the flexurally competent layers of the Sichuan foreland lithosphere are loaded from below, or internally, by thickening crustal domains deep within the mid or lower crust of the eastern plateau, rather than from above, by emplacement of thrust sheets at shallow crustal levels onto the flexurally competent layer of the foreland. This interpretation reconciles gravity anomalies across the plateau margin, the young age of the high topography of eastern Tibet, and the old age of the Sichuan basin with the lack of Cenozoic flexural subsidence in the Sichuan foreland. A similar lack of asymmetric foreland subsidence is also present along the northeastern margin of the Tibetan plateau where it abuts the (southeastern) Tarim Basin, suggesting that a similar mechanism may operate here.

  9. Shortening induced effects on force (re)development in pig urinary smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    van Asselt, Els; Pel, Johan; van Mastrigt, Ron

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: When muscle is allowed to shorten during an active contraction, the maximum force that redevelops after shortening is smaller than the isometric force at the same muscle length without prior shortening. We studied the course of force redevelopment after shortening in smooth muscle to unravel the mechanism responsible for this deactivation. Method: In a first series of measurements the shortening velocity was varied resulting in different shortening amplitudes. In a s...

  10. Trans Fatty Acid content in Danish margarines and shortenings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Torben; Bysted, Anette; Hansen, Kirsten

    2003-01-01

    in shortenings, averaging about 6-7%. Long-chain TFA from hydrogenated,fish oil, although present in 13 brands in 1995, were not found at all in the 1999 samples. Trans-linoleic acids or CLA were not found. The reduction in TFA content in margarines has not resulted in a systematic change over the years......Margarines and shortenings have been major contributors to the intake by humans of the probably atherogenic trans FA (TFA). In 1999, all 73 brands of margarines and shortenings on the Danish market were analyzed by GLC on a 50-m highly polar capillary column, and the results were compared...... in the content of saturated FA, monounsaturated FA, or PUFA. Calculated from sales figures, the intake of TFA decreased from 2.2 g per capita per year in 1992, to 1.5 g in 1995, and to 0.4 g in, 1999....

  11. Magmatic underplating and crustal growth in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province, SW China, revealed by a passive seismic experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Yigang; Xu, Tao; Si, Shaokun; Liang, Xiaofeng; Tian, Xiaobo; Deng, Yangfan; Chen, Lin; Wang, Peng; Xu, Yihe; Lan, Haiqiang; Xiao, Fuhui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xi; Yuan, Xiaohui; Badal, José; Teng, Jiwen

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to characterize the subsurface structure that is related to fossil mantle plume activity, a comprehensive geophysical investigation was conducted in the Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP). The nature and geometry of the crust were examined within the scheme of the domal structure of ELIP, which comprises the Inner, Intermediate and Outer zones, which are defined on the basis of the biostratigraphy of pre-volcanic sediments. The bulk crustal properties within the Inner Zone are characterized by high density, high P-wave velocity, high Vp/Vs ratios and large crustal thickness. A visible continuous seismic converter is present in the upper part of the crust in the whole Intermediate Zone and the eastern part of the Inner Zone, but it is absent in the Inner Zone, where another seismic converter is observed in the lower part of the crust. The geometric configuration of these converters is attributable to the addition of mantle-derived melts to the pre-existing crust and subsequent interaction between them. The crustal geometry, which is delineated by the migrated image of receiver functions from the passive seismic experiment, and the crustal properties collectively suggest that a mafic layer of 15-20 km thickness and 150-180 km width exists at the base of the crust in the Inner Zone. Such a mafic layer reflects a vertical crustal growth through magmatic underplating at the base of the crust and intraplating within the upper crust. The salient spatial correlation between the deep crustal structure and the dome strongly supports a genetic link between crustal thickening and plume activity, if the pre-volcanic domal uplift is generated by the Permian Emeishan mantle plume. This arrangement is further supported by the consistency of the extent of crustal uplift estimated by isostatic equilibrium modeling and sedimentary data. This study therefore characterizes and provides evidence for a plume-modified crust in a large igneous province.

  12. On crustal movement in Mt. Qomolangma area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈俊勇; 王泽民; 庞尚益; 张骥; 张全德

    2002-01-01

    Mt. Qomolangma lies in the collision zone between the fringe of Eurasia plate and Indian plate. The crustal movement there is still very active so far. In the past three decades China carried out five geodetic campaigns in Mt. Qomolangma and its north vicinal area, independently or cooperatively with other countries, including triangulation, leveling, GPS positioning, atmospheric, astronomical and gravity measurements. On the basis of the observation results achieved in the campaigns the crustal movements in the area were studied and explored. A non-stationary phenomenon both in time and space of the crustal vertical movement in the area is found. There seems to be some relevance between the phenomenon of non-stationary in time and seismic episode in China. The phenomenon of non-stationary in space is possibly relevant to the no-homo- geneity of crustal medium and non-uniform absorption of terrestrial stress. The horizontal crustal movement in the area is in the direction of NEE at a speed of 6—7 cm per year, and the trend of strike slip movement is manifested evidently in the collision fringe of Indian plate and Qinghai-Xizang block.

  13. Revised Thickness of the Lunar Crust from GRAIL Data: Implications for Lunar Bulk Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Wieczorek, Mark A.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Nimmo, Francis; Kiefer, Walter S.; Melosh, H. Jay; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Andrews-Hanna, Jeffrey C.; Asmar, Sami W.; Konopliv, Alexander S.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Smith, David E.; Watkins, Michael W.; Williams, James G.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution gravity data from GRAIL have yielded new estimates of the bulk density and thickness of the lunar crust. The bulk density of the highlands crust is 2550 kg m-3. From a comparison with crustal composition measured remotely, this density implies a mean porosity of 12%. With this bulk density and constraints from the Apollo seismic experiment, the average global crustal thickness is found to lie between 34 and 43 km, a value 10 to 20 km less than several previous estimates. Crustal thickness is a central parameter in estimating bulk lunar composition. Estimates of the concentrations of refractory elements in the Moon from heat flow, remote sensing and sample data, and geophysical data fall into two categories: those with refractory element abundances enriched by 50% or more relative to Earth, and those with abundances the same as Earth. Settling this issue has implications for processes operating during lunar formation. The crustal thickness resulting from analysis of GRAIL data is less than several previous estimates. We show here that a refractory-enriched Moon is not required

  14. Large area bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dean J.; Field, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    A bulk superconductor having a thickness of not less than about 100 microns is carried by a polycrystalline textured substrate having misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.; the bulk superconductor may have a thickness of not less than about 100 microns and a surface area of not less than about 50 cm.sup.2. The textured substrate may have a thickness not less than about 10 microns and misorientation angles at the surface thereof not greater than about 15.degree.. Also disclosed is a process of manufacturing the bulk superconductor and the polycrystalline biaxially textured substrate material.

  15. Challenges in Shortening New Product Introduction in the Pharmaceutical Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Reinholdt Nyhuus; Grunow, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Drug developing companies are forced to utilize the effective protection of the patent by focusing on shortening the new product introduction [NPI] process measured as Time-to-Market [TTM]. Here the NPI process is considered and the trade-offs, which have to be address in the future are identified...

  16. Cellular Consequences of Telomere Shortening in Histologically Normal Breast Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    in Figure 1, telomere shortening occurs specifically in luminal epithelial cells, but not in myoepithelial cells, in histologically normal terminal...the adjacent myoepithelial cells (panel A). In contrast, some TDLUs demonstrate dim telomere signals in the luminal cells when compared to the...adjacent myoepithelial cells (panel B). Through digital image analysis, quantitative determination of the telomere FISH signals confirms this moderated

  17. A technique for nailing severely shortened and displaced tibia fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Peter C; Whatley, Adam N; Mautner, James F

    2008-02-01

    Previously described techniques using external fixators or large distractors can simplify the closed nailing of tibia fractures and nonunions. However, delayed intramedullary nailing can be especially challenging when significant shortening or translation has occurred. We present a modification of an old technique for external fixator-assisted closed tibial nailing in these difficult cases.

  18. Residual force enhancement following shortening is speed-dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Rafael; Power, Geoffrey A.; Mende, Esther; Seiberl, Wolfgang; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The steady-state isometric force following active muscle shortening or lengthening is smaller (force depression; FD) or greater (residual force enhancement; RFE) than a purely isometric contraction at the corresponding length. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not explained within the context of the cross-bridge theory and are rarely studied in concert. Previous studies have shown RFE to be speed-independent. In the present study, we investigated if RFE preceded by active shortening is time-dependent by electrically evoking RFE in the human adductor pollicis muscle. The results shown that a slow stretch following FD fully re-established RFE compared to higher speeds of stretch. The mechanism(s) responsible for the recovery of RFE following a preceding shortening contraction (FD) might be associated with the recovery of cross-bridge based force and/or the re-engagement of a passive structural element (titin). Voluntary interaction with one’s environment involves highly coordinated shortening and lengthening muscle contractions. Therefore comprehending these history-dependent muscle properties in the context of movement control is paramount in understanding the behavior of in vivo motor control. PMID:26869508

  19. Telomere shortening reduces Alzheimer's disease amyloid pathology in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolyan, Harshvardhan; Scheffold, Annika; Heinrich, Annette; Begus-Nahrmann, Yvonne; Langkopf, Britta Heike; Hoelter, Sabine M.; Vogt-Weisenhorn, Daniela M.; Liss, Birgit; Wurst, Wolfgang; Lie, Dieter Chichung; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Biber, Knut; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of the elderly and advancing age is the major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease development. Telomere shortening represents one of the molecular causes of ageing that limits the proliferative capacity of cells, including neural stem cells. Studie

  20. Trace element differences between Archean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic crustal components: Implications for crustal growth processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarney, J.; Wyborn, L. E. A.; Sheraton, J. W.; Wyborn, D.

    1988-01-01

    Critical to models for continental crust growth and recycling are the processes through which crustal growth takes place. In particular, it is important to know whether these processes have changed fundamentally with time in response to the earth's thermal evolution, and whether the crustal compositions generated are compatible with crustal remobilization, crustal recycling, or represent primary additions. There are some significant and consistent differences in the major and trace element compositions of crustal components with time which have important implications for crustal growth processes. These will be illustrated with reference to Archean rocks from a number of shield areas, Proterozoic granitoids from Australia and elsewhere, Palaeozoic granitoids from Australia and Scotland, and Mesozoic - recent granitoids from present continental margin belts. Surprisingly some rather simple and consistent patterns energy using this technique. There are then significant differences in compositions of granitoid crustal additions throughout geological time, with a particular type of granitoid apparently dominating a particular time period. This implies that the tectonic processes giving rise to granite generation have changed in response to the earth's thermal evolution.

  1. Reports on crustal movements and deformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of tectonic plate motions, regional crustal deformations, strain accumulation and release, deformations associated with earthquakes and fault motion, and micro-plate motion, were collected and are summarized. To a limited extent, papers dealing with global models of current plate motions and crustal stress are included. The data base is restricted to articles appearing in reveiwed technical journals during the years 1970-1980. The major journals searched include: Journal of Geophysical Research (solid earth), Tectonophysics, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Geological Society of America Bulletin, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, and the Journal of Geology.

  2. Telomere shortening may be associated with human keloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Robert R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Keloids are benign skin tumors that are the effect of a dysregulated wound-healing process in genetically predisposed patients. They are inherited with an autosomal dominant mode with incomplete clinical penetrance and variable expression. Keloids are characterized by formation of excess scar tissue beyond the boundaries of the wound. The exact etiology is still unknown and there is currently no appropriate treatment for keloid disease. Methods We analyzed sample tissues were obtained from 20 patients with keloid skin lesions and normal skin was obtained from 20 healthy donors. The telomeres were measured by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF analysis and Real-Time PCR assay. Quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR analysis of hTERT gene expression was performed and intracellular ROS generation was measured. Results In this study, we determined whether telomeric shortening and the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT occurs in keloid patients. Using Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF analysis and Real-Time PCR assay, we detected a significant telomere shortening of 30% in keloid specimens compared to normal skin. Using quantitative Real-Time RT-PCR, telomerase activity was found absent in the keloid tissues. Moreover, an increase in ROS generation was detected in fibroblasts cell cultures from keloid specimens as more time elapsed compared to fibroblasts from normal skin. Conclusion Telomere shortening has been reported in several metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. We found that telomere shortening can also be associated with human keloids. Chronic oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathophysiology of several chronic inflammatory diseases. Here we found increased ROS generation in fibroblasts from keloid fibroblasts cell cultures when compared to normal skin fibroblasts. Hence we conclude that oxidative stress might be an important modulator of telomere loss in keloid because of the absence of active

  3. Shortening induced effects on force (re)development in pig urinary smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Asselt (Els); J.J.M. Pel (Johan); R. van Mastrigt (Ron)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: When muscle is allowed to shorten during an active contraction, the maximum force that redevelops after shortening is smaller than the isometric force at the same muscle length without prior shortening. We studied the course of force redevelopment after shortening in smooth

  4. Crustal Movement Patterns of China Continent Measured by GPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yibin

    2003-01-01

    This paper uses multi-quadric equations interpolation to es-tablish a widely covered and valuablespeed field model of China, withwhich the horizontal crustal movementpatterns are obtained. The present-dayvertical crustal movement velocity im-age of China is also expressed by GPSobservations, from which we canknow the vertical crustal movementpatterns.

  5. Methods for Shortening and Extending the Carbon Chain in Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Rune Nygaard

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a central role in a variety of physiological and pathological processes such as HIV, cancer and diabetes. The understanding of these processes and the development of specific therapeutic agents is relying on the ability to chemically synthesize unnatural sugars, glycoconjugates...... and carbohydrate mimetics. Such polyhydroxylated compounds are conveniently synthesized from carbohydrates, however, due to the scarcity of many sugars from nature, efficient methods for transformation of readily available carbohydrates into valuable chiral building blocks are required. The work presented...... in this thesis focuses on the development and application of transition metal mediated methods for shortening and extending the carbon chain in carbohydrates thereby providing access to lower and higher sugars.A new catalytic procedure for shortening unprotected sugars by one carbon atom has been developed...

  6. Estimation of circumferential fiber shortening velocity by echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschhaupt, D G; Sodt, P C; Hutcheon, N A; Arcilla, R A

    1983-07-01

    The M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms of 40 young patients were analyzed to compare the mean circumferential fiber shortening velocity (Vcf) of the left ventricle calculated separately by two methods. The mean circumferential fiber shortening velocity was derived from the M-mode echocardiogram as minor axis shortening/ejection time and derived from the two-dimensional echocardiogram as actual circumference change/ejection time. With computer assistance, circumference was determined from the short-axis two-dimensional echocardiographic images during end-diastole and end-systole. Good correlations were obtained between the left ventricular diameter derived by M-mode echocardiography and the vertical axis during end-diastole (r = 0.79) and end-systole (r = 0.88) derived by two-dimensional echocardiography. Likewise, high correlations were noted between diameter and circumference in end-diastole (r = 0.89) and end-systole (r = 0.88). However, comparison of Vcf obtained by M-mode echocardiography with that obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography showed only fair correlation (r = 0.68). Moreover, the diameter/circumference ratio determined in end-diastole and end-systole differed significantly (p less than 0.001), possibly owing to the change in geometry of the ventricular sector image during systole. Although Vcf derived by M-mode echocardiography is a useful index of left ventricular performance, it does not truly reflect the circumference change during systole.

  7. Meat toughening does not occur when rigor shortening is prevented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohmaraie, M; Doumit, M E; Wheeler, T L

    1996-12-01

    The objective of this experiment was to test the hypothesis that meat toughening during the first 24 h postmortem results from sarcomere shortening during rigor mortis development. Eleven market-weight lambs were used to measure changes in shear force of clamped longissimus during rigor development. Within 15 min of exsanguination, while attached at both ends, each longissimus was separated from the vertebrae body and clamped between three sets of metal plates to prevent muscle shortening (six clamped sections per lamb). Five of the clamped sections were placed at -1.1 degrees C for 0, 3, 6, 12, or 24 h. After storage at their respective times at -1.1 degrees C, the samples were placed at -30 degrees C for 90 min and then at -5 degrees C for 8 d. The sixth section (168-h section) was stored at -1.1 degrees C for the first 24 h, at 4 degrees C for 144 h, and then treated the same as other sampling times. Sections were sampled for pH, sarcomere length, shear force, and Western blot analyses before and after storage at -5 degrees C. Shear force values were the same (P > .05) from 0 to 24 h (4.5 kg at 0 h to 4.9 kg at 24 h) then declined (P slaughter is most likely due to sarcomere shortening.

  8. New results and implications for lunar crustal iron distribution using sensor data fusion techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; McFadden, L. A.

    2000-02-01

    Remote measurements of the Moon have provided iron maps, and thus essential constraints for models of lunar crustal formation and mare basalt petrogenesis. A bulk crustal iron map was produced for the equatorial region from Apollo gamma-ray (AGR) spectrometer measurements, and a global iron variation map from recent Clementine spectral reflectance (CSR) measurements. Both iron maps show bimodal distribution, but have significantly different peak values and variations. In this paper, CSR data have been recalibrated to pyroxene in lunar landing site soils. A residual iron map is derived from the difference between AGR (bulk) and recalibrated CSR (pyroxene) iron abundances. The most likely interpretation is that the residual represents ferrous iron in olivine. This residual iron is anticorrelated to basin age, with older basins containing less olivine, suggesting segregation of basin basalt sources from a progressively fractionating underlying source region at the time of basin formation. Results presented here provide a quantitative basis for (1) establishing the relationship between direct geochemical (gamma-ray, X-ray) and mineralogical (near-IR) remote sensing data sets using sensor data fusion techniques to allow (2) simultaneous determination of elemental and mineralogical component distribution on remote targets and (3) meaningful interpretation of orbital and ground-based spectral reflectance measurements. When calibrated data from the Lunar Prospector mission are available, mapping of bulk crustal iron and iron-bearing soil components will be possible for the entire Moon. Similar analyses for data from the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission to asteroid 433 Eros will constrain models of asteroid formation.

  9. Metamorphic fluid flow - a question of scale, crustal depth and bulk rock composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tracy, R.J.; Rye, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that certain metamorphic rocks interacted with significant volumes of aqueous fluid during their time-integrated mineral reaction history. Rather than demonstrating that pervasive fluid flow is general in metamorphic rocks, these documented cases instead suggest the likelihood of pronounced to extreme channelization of through-going in fluids in deep-seated metamorphic terranes (P>3 kbar). In rocks more shallowly buried, and therefore under low lithostatic stress, pervasive flow along grain boundaries and open microfractures probably occurred, as at Skye and the Skaergaard Complex. In higher pressure metamorphic environments, documented cases of high fluid/rock ratio make a strong case for flow channelized in veins or in impure marble aquifers where pore space and permeability were created by decarbonation reactions driven by infiltration of aqueous fluid. The source of this fluid may commonly be traced to a nearby wet granitic intrusion or quartz vein. As long as the pressurized source of aqueous fluid continued, outward flow was possible as fluid held open the intergranular pore space which was created only at the infiltration/reaction front where a reduction in solid volume accompanied reaction. Cessation or interruption of fluid flow would allow the pore space to close due to porous-rock strength being exceeded by lithostatic stress. Pervasive flow or aqueous fluid in deepseated metamorphic terranes is therefore probably limited to carbonate-bearing lithologies adjacent to sources of major volumes of fluid; otherwise, fluid flow is likely to be localized in fractures or veins.

  10. The effect of shortening history on isometric and dynamic muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, John; Elmer, Steven J; Martin, James C

    2010-03-03

    Despite numerous reports on isometric force depression, few reports have quantified force depression during active muscle shortening (dynamic force depression). The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of shortening history on isometric force following active shortening, force during isokinetic shortening, and velocity during isotonic shortening. The soleus muscles of four cats were subjected to a series of isokinetic contractions at three shortening velocities and isotonic contractions under three loads. Muscle excursions initiated from three different muscle lengths but terminated at a constant length. Isometric force produced subsequent to active shortening, and force or shortening velocity produced at a specific muscle length during shortening, were compared across all three conditions. Results indicated that shortening history altered isometric force by up to 5%, force during isokinetic shortening up to 30% and shortening velocity during isotonic contractions by up to 63%. Furthermore, there was a load by excursion interaction during isotonic contractions such that excursion had the most influence on shortening velocity when the loads were the greatest. There was not a velocity by excursion interaction during isokinetic contractions. Isokinetic and isotonic power-velocity relationships displayed a downward shift in power as excursions increased. Thus, to discuss force depression based on differences in isometric force subsequent to active shortening may underestimate its importance during dynamic contractions. The presence of dynamic force depression should be realized in sport performance, motor control modeling and when controlling paralyzed limbs through artificial stimulation.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF CRUSTAL MOTION IN THE TIEN SHAN USING INSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellors, R J

    2011-02-25

    The northern Tien Shan of Central Asia is an area of active mid-continent deformation. Although far from a plate boundary, this region has experienced 5 earthquakes larger than magnitude 7 in the past century and includes one event that may as be as large as Mw 8.0. Previous studies based on GPS measurements indicate on the order of 23 mm/yr of shortening across the entire Tien Shan and up to 15 mm/year in the northern Tien Shan (Figure 1). The seismic moment release rate appears comparable with the geodetic measured slip, at least to first order, suggesting that geodetic rates can be considered a proxy for accumulation rates of stress for seismic hazard estimation. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar may provide a means to make detailed spatial measurements and hence in identifying block boundaries and assisting in seismic hazard. Therefore, we hoped to define block boundaries by direct measurement and by identifying and resolving earthquake slip. Due to political instability in Kyrgzystan, the existing seismic network has not performed as well as required to precisely determine earthquake hypocenters in remote areas and hence InSAR is highly useful. In this paper we present the result of three earthquake studies and show that InSAR is useful for refining locations of teleseismically located earthquakes. ALOS PALSAR data is used to investigate crustal motion in the Tien Shan mountains of Central Asia. As part of the work, considerable software development was undertaken to process PALSAR data. This software has been made freely available. Two damaging earthquakes have been imaged in the Tien Shan and the locations provided by ALOS InSAR have helped to refine seismological velocity models. A third earthquake south of Kyrgyzstan was also imaged. The use of InSAR data and especially L band is therefore very useful in providing groundtruth for earthquake locations.

  12. Bulk chemicals from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the current robust forces driving sustainable production, and available biomass conversion technologies, biomass-based routes are expected to make a significant impact on the production of bulk chemicals within 10 years, and a huge impact within 20-30 years. In the Port of Rotterdam there is a

  13. Neogene shortening and exhumation of the Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshnaw, Renas I.; Horton, Brian K.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Barber, Douglas E.; Tamar-Agha, Mazin Y.; Kendall, Jerome J.

    2017-01-01

    The Zagros fold-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq encroached southward toward a rapidly subsiding Neogene foreland basin and was later partitioned by out-of-sequence shortening focused along the Mountain Front Flexure (MFF), as defined by new low-temperature thermochronologic, stratigraphic, and provenance results. Apatite (U-Th)/He ages document rapid deformation advance from the Main Zagros Fault to southern frontal structures (Kirkuk, Shakal, and Qamar thrusts) at 10-8 Ma, followed by potential basement-involved out-of-sequence development of the MFF (Qaradagh anticline) by 5 Ma. Distinct shifts in detrital zircon U-Pb provenance signatures for Neogene foreland basin fill provide evidence for drainage reorganization during fold-thrust belt advance. U-Pb age spectra and petrologic data from the Injana (Upper Fars) Formation indicate derivation from a variety of Eurasian, Pan-African, ophiolitic and Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic terranes, whereas the Mukdadiya (Lower Bakhtiari) and Bai-Hasan (Upper Bakhtiari) Formations show nearly exclusive derivation from the Paleogene Walash-Naopurdan volcanic complex near the Iraq-Iran border. Such a sharp cutoff in Eurasian, Pan-African, and ophiolitic sources is likely associated with drainage reorganization and tectonic development of the geomorphic barrier formed by the MFF. As a result of Zagros crustal shortening, thickening and loading, the Neogene foreland basin developed and accommodated an abrupt influx of fluvial clastic sediment that contains growth stratal evidence of synkinematic accumulation. The apparent out-of-sequence pattern of upper crustal shortening in the hinterland to foreland zone of Iraqi Kurdistan suggests that structural inheritance and the effects of synorogenic erosion and accumulation are important factors influencing the irregular and episodic nature of orogenic growth in the Zagros.

  14. Magnetar Field Evolution and Crustal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    The activity of magnetars is believed to be powered by colossal magnetic energy reservoirs. We sketch an evolutionary picture in which internal field evolution in magnetars generates a twisted corona, from which energy may be released suddenly in a single giant flare, or more gradually through smaller outbursts and persistent emission. Given the ages of magnetars and the energy of their giant flares, we suggest that their evolution is driven by a novel mechanism: magnetic flux transport/decay due to persistent plastic flow in the crust, which would invalidate the common assumption that the crustal lattice is static and evolves only under Hall drift and Ohmic decay. We estimate the field strength required to induce plastic flow as a function of crustal depth, and the viscosity of the plastic phase. The star’s superconducting core may also play a role in magnetar field evolution, depending on the star’s spindown history and how rotational vortices and magnetic fluxtubes interact.

  15. Continent-scale strike-slip on a low-angle fault beneath New Zealand's Southern Alps: Implications for crustal thickening in oblique collision zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Simon; Smith, Euan; Stern, Tim; Warren-Smith, Emily

    2015-09-01

    New Zealand's Southern Alps lie adjacent to the continent-scale dextral strike-slip Alpine Fault, on the boundary between the Pacific and Australian plates. We show with a simple 2-D model of crustal balancing that the observed crustal root and erosion (expressed as equivalent crustal shortening) is up to twice that predicted by the orthogonal plate convergence since ˜11 Ma, and even since ˜23 Ma when the Alpine Fault formed. We consider two explanations for this, involving a strong component of motion along the length of the plate-boundary zone. Geophysical data indicate that the Alpine Fault has a listric geometry, flattening at mid crustal levels, and has accommodated sideways underthrusting of Australian plate crust beneath Pacific plate crust. The geometry of the crustal root, together with plate reconstructions, requires the underthrust crust to be the hyperextended part of an asymmetric rift system which formed over 500 km farther south during the Eocene—the narrow remnant part today forms the western margin of the Campbell Plateau. At ˜10 Ma, the hyperextended margin underwent shallow subduction in the Puysegur subduction zone, and then was dragged over 300 km along the length of the Southern Alps beneath a low-angle (plate boundary zone, providing a mechanism for clockwise rotation of the Hikurangi margin.

  16. Reports on crustal movements and deformations. [bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. C.; Peck, T.

    1983-01-01

    This Catalog of Reports on Crustal Movements and Deformation is a structured bibliography of scientific papers on the movements of the Earth crust. The catalog summarizes by various subjects papers containing data on the movement of the Earth's surface due to tectonic processes. In preparing the catalog we have included studies of tectonic plate motions, spreading and convergence, microplate rotation, regional crustal deformation strain accumulation and deformations associated with the earthquake cycle, and fault motion. We have also included several papers dealing with models of tectonic plate motion and with crustal stress. Papers which discuss tectonic and geologic history but which do not present rates of movements or deformations and papers which are primarily theoretical analyses have been excluded from the catalog. An index of authors cross-referenced to their publications also appears in the catalog. The catalog covers articles appearing in reviewed technical journals during the years 1970-1981. Although there are citations from about twenty journals most of the items come from the following publications: Journal of Geophysical Research, Tectonophysics, Geological Society of America Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Nature, Science, Geophysical Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and Geology.

  17. Structural limits on force production and shortening of smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegman, Marion J; Davidheiser, Sandra; Mooers, Susan U; Butler, Thomas M

    2013-02-01

    This study determined the factors that limit force production and shortening in two smooth muscles having very different relationships between active and passive force as a function of muscle length. The rat anococcygeus muscle develops active force over the range of lengths 0.2-2.0× the optimum length for force production (Lo). Passive tension due to extension of the resting muscle occurs only at lengths exceeding Lo. In contrast, the rabbit taenia coli develops force in the range of lengths 0.4-1.1 Lo, and passive force which is detectable at 0.56 Lo, increases to ~0.45 maximum active force at Lo, and increases sharply with further extension. The anococcygeus muscle can shorten to 0.2 Lo and the taenia coli to 0.4 Lo. Dynamic stiffness and energy usage at short muscle lengths suggest that the limit of shortening in the taenia coli, in contrast to the anococcygeus muscle, is not due to a failure of cross bridge interaction. Phosphorylation of the regulatory myosin light chains in intact muscles decreased to a small extent at short lengths compared to the decrease in force production. The differences in force production and the extent of shortening in the two muscles was maintained even when, following permeabilization, the myosin light chains were irreversibly phosphorylated with ATPγS, indicating that differences in activation played little, if any role. Ultrastructural studies on resting and activated muscles show that the taenia coli, which is rich in connective tissue (unlike the anococcygeus muscle) undergoes marked cellular twisting and contractile filament misalignment at short lengths with compression of the extracellular matrix. As a result, force is not transmitted in the longitudinal axis of the muscle, but is dissipated against an internal load provided by the compressed extracellular matrix. These observations on two very different normal smooth muscles reveal how differences in the relative contribution of active and passive structural elements

  18. Shortening Tuberculosis Treatment With Fluoroquinolones: Lost in Translation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Chaisson, Richard E; Nuermberger, Eric L

    2016-02-15

    The disappointing recent failure of fluoroquinolone-containing regimens to shorten the duration of tuberculosis treatment in costly phase 3 trials has raised serious questions about the reliability of preclinical tuberculosis models, especially mice, and the current paradigm of regimen development. Therefore we re-examined data from murine models and early-stage clinical trials on which the pivotal trials were based, concluding that phase 3 trial results were in line with preceding studies. Finally, we offer suggestions for a more efficient and integrated preclinical and clinical regimen development program where quantitative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models more predictive of curative treatment durations are set forth.

  19. Radiative Bulk Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, X

    2001-01-01

    Viscous resistance to changes in the volume of a gas arises when different degrees of freedom have different relaxation times. Collisions tend to oppose the resulting departures from equilibrium and, in so doing, generate entropy. Even for a classical gas of hard spheres, when the mean free paths or mean flight times of constituent particles are long, we find a nonvanishing bulk viscosity. Here we apply a method recently used to uncover this result for a classical rarefied gas to radiative transfer theory and derive an expression for the radiative stress tensor for a gray medium with absorption and Thomson scattering. We determine the transport coefficients through the calculation of the comoving entropy generation. When scattering dominates absorption, the bulk viscosity becomes much larger than either the shear viscosity or the thermal conductivity.

  20. Antarctic Crustal Thickness from Gravity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Ferraccioli, F.; Jordan, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Using gravity anomaly inversion, we have produced the first comprehensive regional maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning (1-1/β) and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction. The continental lithosphere thinning distribution, used to define the initial thermal model temperature perturbation is derived from the gravity inversion and uses no a priori isochron information; as a consequence the gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition location, which is independent of ocean isochron information. The gravity anomaly contribution from ice thickness is included in the gravity inversion, as is the contribution from sediments which assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. Data used in the gravity inversion are elevation and bathymetry, free-air gravity anomaly, the most recent Bedmap2 ice thickness and bedrock topography compilation south of 60 degrees south (Fretwell et al., 2013) and relatively sparse constraints on sediment thickness. Our gravity inversion study predicts thick crust (> 45 km) under interior East Antarctica penetrated by narrow continental rifts that feature relatively thinner crust. The East Antarctic Rift System (EARS) is a major Permian to Cretaceous age rift system that appears to extend from the continental margin at the Lambert Rift to the South Pole region, a distance of 2500 km. This is comparable in scale to the well-studied East African rift system. Intermediate crustal thickness with an inferred linear rift fabric is predicted under Coates Land. An extensive region of either thick oceanic crust or highly thinned continental crust is predicted offshore Oates Land and north Victoria Land, and also off West Antarctica

  1. Crustal thickness and composition beneath the High Lava Plains of Eastern Oregon from teleseismic receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagar, K. C.; Fouch, M. J.; James, D. E.; Carlson, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    The nature of the crust beneath the High Lava Plains of eastern Oregon is fundamental for understanding the origins of widespread Cenozoic volcanism in the region. Eruptions of flood basalts in the southern Cascadian back arc peaked ~17-15 Ma, and were followed by distributed bimodal volcanism along two perpendicular migrating tracks; the Snake River Plain and the High Lava Plains. The orientations of eruptive centers have led to several competing hypotheses about their cause, including a deep mantle plume, slab retreat and asthenospheric inflow, lithospheric delamination, and lithospheric extension. The goal of this project is to constrain the nature, geometry, and depth of the Moho across the High Lava Plains, which will shed light on questions regarding crustal influence on melt generation and differentiation and the degree of magmatic underplating. In this study, we analyze teleseismic receiver functions from 118 stations of the High Lava Plains temporary broadband array, 34 nearby EarthScope/USArray stations, and 5 other regional broadband stations to determine bulk crustal features of thickness (H) and Vp/Vs ratio (κ). Applying the H-κ stacking method, we search for the best-fitting solution of timing predictions for direct and multiple P-to-S conversions from the Moho interface. Converting Vp/Vs to Poisson ratio, which is dependent primarily upon rock composition, allows for comparison with other direct geological observations. Preliminary results show that the crust of the High Lava Plains is relatively thin (~31 km) with a very sharp gradient to thicker crust (~42 km) at the western edge of the Owyhee Plateau in southwestern Idaho. This gradient is co-located with the western margin of Precambrian North America and is in the vicinity of the Jordan Craters volcanic center. The sharp topography of the Moho might have been a factor in melt migration beneath this area. West of the High Lava Plains, the crust thickens to ~40 km into the Cascade volcanic arc

  2. Simulation studies of circular muscle contraction, longitudinal muscle shortening, and their coordination in esophageal transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Wenjun; Pandolfino, John E; Kahrilas, Peter J; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2015-08-15

    On the basis of a fully coupled active musculomechanical model for esophageal transport, we aimed to find the roles of circular muscle (CM) contraction and longitudinal muscle (LM) shortening in esophageal transport, and the influence of their coordination. Two groups of studies were conducted using a computational model. In the first group, bolus transport with only CM contraction, only LM shortening, or both was simulated. Overall features and detailed information on pressure and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of mucosal and the two muscle layers were analyzed. In the second group, bolus transport with varying delay in CM contraction or LM shortening was simulated. The effect of delay on esophageal transport was studied. For cases showing abnormal transport, pressure and CSA were further analyzed. CM contraction by itself was sufficient to transport bolus, but LM shortening by itself was not. CM contraction decreased the CSA and the radius of the muscle layer locally, but LM shortening increased the CSA. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening led to overlapping of muscle CSA and pressure peaks. Advancing LM shortening adversely influenced bolus transport, whereas lagging LM shortening was irrelevant to bolus transport. In conclusion, CM contraction generates high squeezing pressure, which plays a primary role in esophageal transport. LM shortening increases muscle CSA, which helps to strengthen CM contraction. Advancing LM shortening decreases esophageal distensibility in the bolus region. Lagging LM shortening no longer helps esophageal transport. Synchronized CM contraction and LM shortening seems to be most effective for esophageal transport.

  3. Modes of continental extension in a crustal wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.; Choi, Eunseo

    2015-07-01

    We ran numerical experiments of the extension of a crustal wedge as an approximation to extension in an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We study the effects of the strength of the lower crust and of a weak mid-crustal shear zone on the resulting extension styles. A weak mid-crustal shear zone effectively decouples upper crustal extension from lower crustal flow. Without the mid-crustal shear zone, the degree of coupling between the upper and the lower crust increases and extension of the whole crust tends to focus on the thickest part of the wedge. We identify three distinct modes of extension determined by the strength of the lower crust, which are characterized by 1) localized, asymmetric crustal exhumation in a single massif when the lower crust is weak, 2) the formation of rolling-hinge normal faults and the exhumation of lower crust in multiple core complexes with an intermediate strength lower crust, and 3) distributed domino faulting over the weak mid-crustal shear zone when the lower crust is strong. A frictionally stronger mid-crustal shear zone does not change the overall model behaviors but extension occurred over multiple rolling-hinges. The 3 modes of extension share characteristics similar to geological models proposed to explain the formation of metamorphic core complexes: 1) the crustal flow model for the weak lower crust, 2) the rolling-hinge and crustal flow models when the lower crust is intermediate and 3) the flexural uplift model when the lower crust is strong. Finally we show that the intensity of decoupling between the far field extension and lower crustal flow driven by the regional pressure gradient in the wedge control the overall style of extension in the models.

  4. Modes of continental extension in a crustal wedge

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Guangliang

    2015-07-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. We ran numerical experiments of the extension of a crustal wedge as an approximation to extension in an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We study the effects of the strength of the lower crust and of a weak mid-crustal shear zone on the resulting extension styles. A weak mid-crustal shear zone effectively decouples upper crustal extension from lower crustal flow. Without the mid-crustal shear zone, the degree of coupling between the upper and the lower crust increases and extension of the whole crust tends to focus on the thickest part of the wedge. We identify three distinct modes of extension determined by the strength of the lower crust, which are characterized by 1) localized, asymmetric crustal exhumation in a single massif when the lower crust is weak, 2) the formation of rolling-hinge normal faults and the exhumation of lower crust in multiple core complexes with an intermediate strength lower crust, and 3) distributed domino faulting over the weak mid-crustal shear zone when the lower crust is strong. A frictionally stronger mid-crustal shear zone does not change the overall model behaviors but extension occurred over multiple rolling-hinges. The 3 modes of extension share characteristics similar to geological models proposed to explain the formation of metamorphic core complexes: 1) the crustal flow model for the weak lower crust, 2) the rolling-hinge and crustal flow models when the lower crust is intermediate and 3) the flexural uplift model when the lower crust is strong. Finally we show that the intensity of decoupling between the far field extension and lower crustal flow driven by the regional pressure gradient in the wedge control the overall style of extension in the models.

  5. Limitations of H- κ stacking: ambiguous results caused by crustal layering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölbern, I.; Rümpker, G.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the H- κ stacking technique of Zhu and Kanamori (J Geophys Res 105:2969-2980, 2000) has become a standard tool to determine the crustal thickness H and the bulk crustal vP/vS ratio κ from teleseismic receiver functions. It is obvious that unfavorable noise conditions as well as a complex 3D velocity structure can severely hamper the interpretation of receiver-function data. However, we observe that ambiguities can even arise from a simple 1D layered velocity structure which raises a high potential for misinterpretations. To analyze the feasibility and basic limitations of the H- κ stacking method, we conduct a series of tests based on synthetic data. The impact of different given elementary parameters, related either to the velocity structure or to the data processing, is evaluated in a series of eight individual tests. We deliberately exclude complications such as 3D structural variations and/or noise to show that even a simple 1D velocity structure, involving, e.g., an additional inter-crustal discontinuity, can have significant consequences for the interpretation of the results. However, our modeling suggests that more complex crustal structures may lead to even less reliable results. Additionally, our tests illustrate that time shifts of the maxima in the H- κ domain due to the superposition and merging of individual phases can lead to significantly overestimated vP/vS ratios. In general, the depth to the Moho (or other discontinuities of interest) is less significantly affected. Our tests indicate the necessity to accurately check delay times derived from the maxima of the H- κ stacks against corresponding phases in the receiver functions. Repeating the stacking with varied weighting factors and filter ranges can help to reduce the ambiguities and to avoid possible misinterpretation.

  6. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  7. Contrasted terrace systems of the lower Moulouya valley as indicator of crustal deformation in NE Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; Bartz, Melanie; El Ouahabi, Meriam; Szemkus, Nina; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    The Moulouya river has the largest catchment in Morocco and drains an area which is characterized by active crustal deformation during the Late Cenozoic due to the convergence between the African and Eurasian plates. As yet, its Pleistocene terrace sequence remains poorly documented. Our study focuses on the lowermost reach of the river in NE Morocco, which drains the Triffa sedimentary basin directly upstream of the estuary. New field observations, measurements and sedimentological data reveal contrasted fluvial environments on either side of a newly identified thrust zone, which disrupts the whole sedimentary basin and is associated with N-S compressive shortening in this region (Barcos et al., 2014). Long-lasting fluvial aggradation, materialized by ≥37 m-thick stacked fill terraces, and the development of a well-preserved terrace staircase, with (at least) three Pleistocene terrace levels, occur in the footwall and the hanging wall of the thrust, respectively. Same as for the Pleistocene terrace sediments of the middle Moulouya, a recurrent sedimentary pattern, characterized by fining-upward sequences was observed in the studied terrace profiles. Assessing the rates of crustal deformation along this main thrust zone requires age estimations for these Pleistocene terrace deposits of the lower Moulouya on each side of the thrust. Samples for luminescence (OSL/IRSL), electron spin resonance (ESR, on quartz) and cosmogenic nuclide dating (26Al/10Be, burial dating) were collected in terrace deposits located both in the foot- and hanging walls. Sample preparation and analysis as well as age determination are in progress. The preliminary data mentioned above, soon to be completed by chronological data, agree well with morphometric indicators stating that the whole Moulouya catchment is at disequilibrium state (Barcos et al., 2014). This is confirmed by several knickpoints in its longitudinal profile. Late Cenozoic uplift associated with crustal shortening, which

  8. [A shortened scale for overall, emotional and social loneliness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong Gierveld, J; van Tilburg, T

    2008-02-01

    Loneliness is an indicator of social well-being and pertains to the feeling of missing an intimate relationship (emotional loneliness) or missing a wider social network (social loneliness). The 11-item De Jong Gierveld scale has proved to be a valid and reliable measuring instrument for overall, emotional and social loneliness, although its length has sometimes rendered it difficult to use the scale in large surveys. In this study, we empirically tested a shortened version of the scale on data from two surveys (N=9448). Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the specification of two latent factors. Congruent validity and the relationship with determinants (partner status, health) proved to be optimal. The 6-item De Jong Gierveld scale is a reliable and valid measuring instrument for overall, emotional and social loneliness, which is suitable for large surveys.

  9. AN IMPROVED OPTIMAL CHANNEL SHORTENING ALGORITHM FOR DMT MODULATION SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In Discrete Multi-Tone (DMT) modulation systems, the well-known technique to overcome the Inter-Carrier Interference (ICI)/Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI) caused by the inadequate Cyclic Prefix (CP) length is to use a Time-Domain Equalizer (TDE) at the receiver front-end. An algorithm used to calculate the coefficients of the optimal shortening Time Domain Equalizer (TDE) was given by Melsa. However, this al gorithm requires that the length of the TDE must be smaller than or equal to the memory length of the target impulse response. This paper modifies this algorithm and makes it not only fit for calculating the coefficients of the TDE with arbitrary length, but also have a much less computational time.

  10. Force depression decays during shortening in the medial gastrocnemius of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Olaf; Siebert, Tobias; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-03-21

    Force depression due to shortening of activated skeletal muscles has previously been described to be long lasting during isometric contractions following the shortening. In the present study, using the medial gastrocnemius of the rat, effects of force depression have been made apparent during shortening by computationally partially compensating for the direct effect of shortening velocity due to the tension-velocity relation. Evidence was found for the decay and complete disappearance of force depression already during continuation of the shortening contraction to short muscle lengths.

  11. Highly explosive 2010 Merapi eruption: Evidence for shallow-level crustal assimilation and hybrid fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Anastassia Y.; Martel, Caroline; Gouy, Sophie; Pratomo, Indyo; Sumarti, Sri; Toutain, Jean-Paul; Bindeman, Ilya N.; de Parseval, Philippe; Metaxian, Jean-Philippe; Surono

    2013-07-01

    The processes responsible for the highly explosive events at Merapi, Central Java, Indonesia have been investigated through a petrological, mineralogical and geochemical study of the first-stage tephra and pyroclastic flows sampled in October and November 2010, and second-stage ash sampled shortly after the 5-6th November 2010 paroxysmal subplinian eruption. Several chemical and physical parameters suggest that the magma assimilated calc-silicate xenoliths derived from the surrounding carbonate-bearing crust (Javanese limestone). The bulk volcanic samples have highly radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr (0.70571-0.70598) ratios that approach the compositional field of material similar to the calc-silicate xenoliths. The 2010 plagioclase phenocrysts from the pyroclastic flow and tephra reveal anorthite cores (up to An94-97) with low FeO contents (≤ 0.8 wt.%), and 18O enrichment (6.5‰ δ18O). The major and trace elements of the silicic glasses and phenocrysts (plagioclase, low-Al augite and titanomagnetite), the Sr-isotopic compositions of the bulk samples and plagioclases erupted in 2010 can be explained by complete digestion of the 1998 and 2006 calc-silicate xenoliths. The bulk assimilation proceeded through binary mixing between a calcic melt (representing Crustal Assimilant, CaO up to 10.5 wt.% and CaO/Al2O3 up to 1.2) and the deep source hydrous K-rich melt. Similarly to the 1998 and 2006 calc-silicate xenolith composition, the 2010 Crustal Assimilant is enriched in Mn (MnO up to 0.5 wt.%), Zn, V, and Sc contents. In contrast, the hydrous K-rich melt is enriched in volatiles (Cl up to 0.37 wt.% and bulk H2O + CO2 up to 5 ± 1 wt.%), Al2O3, TiO2 and REE contents, consistent with its derivation from deep source. This hydrous K-rich melt may have been saturated with an aqueous Cl-rich fluid at about 200 MPa, a pressure consistent with the level of the crustal assimilation. We estimated that the pre-eruptive basaltic andesite magma assimilated from 15 to 40 wt.% of the calc

  12. Cortical T2 signal shortening in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is not due to iron deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, M.J.; Neundoerfer, B. [University of Erlangen-Nurenberg, Department of Neurology, Erlangen (Germany); Fellner, C.; Fellner, F.A. [University of Erlangen-Nurenberg, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Landes-Nervenklinik Wagner-Jauregg, Institute of Radiology, Linz (Austria); Schmid, A. [University of Erlangen-Nurenberg, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    Signal shortening of the motor cortex in T2-weighted MR images is a frequent finding in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The cause of signal shortening in ALS is unknown, although iron deposits have been suggested. To test this hypothesis, we acquired T2*-weighted gradient-echo (GRE) MR images in addition to T2-weighted turbo spin-echo in 69 patients with ALS. Signal shortening in T2-weighted images was found in 31 patients. In T2*-weighted GRE images, only three patients had signal shortening. One patient with additional bifrontal haemorrhage had frontal but no motor cortex signal shortening. Iron deposits do not cause cortical signal shortening in patients with ALS predominantly. Other factors are presumably more important in the generation of cortical T2 shortening in ALS. (orig.)

  13. Seismic evidence of crustal heterogeneity beneath the northwestern Deccan volcanic province of India from joint inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion measurements and P receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, A. A.; Mohan, G.

    2016-10-01

    The northwestern Deccan volcanic province (NWDVP) of India, encompassing the Saurashtra peninsula and the adjoining Gulf of Cambay, is investigated through joint inversion of surface wave dispersion measurements and teleseismic P receiver functions, to estimate the crustal and shallow upper mantle shear wave velocity (Vs) structure. The Mw ∼ 7.7 Bhuj earthquake and the post Bhuj regional events, recorded during the period 2001-2010 at 7 stations along 37 source-receiver paths were used along with 35 teleseismic events. A joint curve fitting inversion technique is applied to obtain a best fit for the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves for time periods 5-50 s and high quality crustal P wave receiver functions obtained at each station. Significant crustal heterogeneity is observed within the study region with the average crustal Vs ranging from 3.5 km/s to 3.8 km/s with the paths cutting across the Gulf of Cambay exhibiting large reduction in shear wave velocities. Utilizing the average crustal Vs ≈ 3.66 km/s estimated for Saurashtra, together with the average crustal P wave velocity (Vp) ≈ 6.54 km/s derived independently through deep seismic sounding studies, yields a bulk Vp/Vs ratio of 1.786 or an equivalent crustal Poisson's ratio of 0.271. A major contribution to the high Poisson's ratio comes from the 12 to 16 km thick lower crustal layers with shear velocities ranging from 3.8 km/s to 4.19 km/s suggesting widespread magmatic underplating due to emplacement of mafic cumulates in the lower crust. The shallow uppermost mantle shear velocities are in the range 4.2-4.5 km/s averaging 4.36 km/s, which is less than that observed for the Indian shield, indicating the effects of residual thermal anomaly. The variation in the crustal Vs, high Poisson's ratios and low upper mantle shear velocities reflect the thermal and compositional effects of the Deccan volcanism which are manifested in terms of pervasive presence of mafic dykes

  14. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  15. The Incredible Bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, Keita; Kumar, Jason; Sandick, Pearl; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental results from the LHC have placed strong constraints on the masses of colored superpartners. The MSSM parameter space is also constrained by the measurement of the Higgs boson mass, and the requirement that the relic density of lightest neutralinos be consistent with observations. Although large regions of the MSSM parameter space can be excluded by these combined bounds, leptophilic versions of the MSSM can survive these constraints. In this paper we consider a scenario in which the requirements of minimal flavor violation, vanishing $CP$-violation, and mass universality are relaxed, specifically focusing on scenarios with light sleptons. We find a large region of parameter space, analogous to the original bulk region, for which the lightest neutralino is a thermal relic with an abundance consistent with that of dark matter. We find that these leptophilic models are constrained by measurements of the magnetic and electric dipole moments of the electron and muon, and that these models have ...

  16. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  17. Explosive bulk charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Jacob Lee

    2015-04-21

    An explosive bulk charge, including: a first contact surface configured to be selectively disposed substantially adjacent to a structure or material; a second end surface configured to selectively receive a detonator; and a curvilinear side surface joining the first contact surface and the second end surface. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface form a bi-truncated hemispherical structure. The first contact surface, the second end surface, and the curvilinear side surface are formed from an explosive material. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface each have a substantially circular shape. Optionally, the first contact surface and the second end surface consist of planar structures that are aligned substantially parallel or slightly tilted with respect to one another. The curvilinear side surface has one of a smooth curved geometry, an elliptical geometry, and a parabolic geometry.

  18. THE CRUSTAL STRUCTURE OF ELLESMERE ISLAND FROM RECEIVER FUNCTION MODELLING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Stephenson, Randell Alexander; Oakey, Gordon

    . Preliminary results give estimates of Moho depths and crustal velocity structure and these are discussed with a focus on the relationship to topography, regional geological units and fault zones. The receiver functions reveal crustal roots underneath the Victoria and Albert Mountains (45km) and the Grantland...

  19. Reports on block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, Amos

    1990-01-01

    Studies of block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation in the western United States, Israel, and China are discussed. Topics include a three-dimensional model of crustal fracture by distributed fault sets, distributed deformation and block rotation in 3D, stress field rotation, and multiple strike slip fault sets.

  20. Control of pre-Cenozoic extensional heterogeneities on the kinematics of Cenozoic shortening: Northwestern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D. M.; Kapp, P. A.; Reiners, P. W.; Gehrels, G. E.

    2012-12-01

    Results from regional-scale mapping and structural analysis, (U-Th)/He and U-Pb age dating of apatite and zircon, and a regional balanced cross section allow us to build upon the pre-existing geological framework for the retroarc of northwestern Argentina. Coupled with previous work in the region, our results suggest that the style, distribution, and kinematics of shortening in the Eastern Cordillera and Santa Bárbara tectonomorphic provinces of the thrust belt at this latitude (24-25°S) were strongly influenced by the architecture of a Mesozoic rift system. In contrast to the thin-skinned Subandean fold-thrust belt of southern Bolivia where structures are primarily W-dipping and propagated progressively eastward through time, reverse faults in northwestern Argentina are more variably oriented, steeply E-dipping, locally inverted structures that propagated in an overall eastward direction in a much more sporadic manner. The first major eastward propagation event at this latitude occurred at ~40 Ma and is expressed as Eocene (U-Th)/He apatite and zircon ages coincident with the western arm of the Cretaceous Salta rift system. Other workers also documented angular unconformities of this age in the western and eastern arms of the rift system. Up until ~10 Ma, deformation and exhumation were restricted to the western margin of the Cretaceous rift in the western Eastern Cordillera and eastern margin of the Puna plateau. This was followed by an ~75 km jump in the location of the thrust front toward the east to bypass the central portion of a horst block of the Cretaceous rift system, followed by subsequent initiation of new E-dipping reverse faults in a subsystem that propagated toward the west into this pre-existing structural high. During Pliocene time, deformation again migrated >100 km eastward to a Cretaceous syn-rift depocenter in the Santa Bárbara Ranges and was likely followed by additional westward propagation to the current location of deformation with the

  1. Contraction-specific differences in maximal muscle power during stretch-shortening cycle movements in elderly males and females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caserotti, Paolo; Aagaard, Per; Simonsen, Erik Bruun;

    2001-01-01

    Aging, muscle power, stretch-shortening cycle, eccentric muscle actions, concentric contractions......Aging, muscle power, stretch-shortening cycle, eccentric muscle actions, concentric contractions...

  2. Horizontal crustal movement in Chinese mainland from 1999 to 2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾国华; 符养; 王武星

    2004-01-01

    The paper introduces the horizontal crustal movement obtained from GPS observations in the regional networks(including the basic network and the fiducial network) of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China(CMONOC) carried out in 1999 and 2001. This paper is characterized by the acquisition of the horizontal dis-placement velocities during the period from 1999 to 2001 at the observation stations in the regional networks withdatum definition of a group of stable stations with small mutual displacements in east China. Based on the mostdetailed map of horizontal crustal movement in Chinese mainland, the division of blocks, their displacements anddeformations are studied. An approach to analysis of the intensity of the horizontal crustal deformation is proposed.The general characteristics of the recent horizontal crustal movement in Chinese mainland and that before theKunlunshan earthquake of M=8.1 on November 14, 2001 are analyzed.

  3. The crustal composition of the Falkland Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemt, Claudia; Jokat, Wilfried

    2015-04-01

    The Falkland Islands are situated in the South Atlantic Ocean 500 km east of Patagonia, South America. The islands are part of the Falkland Plateau, which stretches eastward for more than 1500 km. A bathymetric high, the Maurice Ewing Bank, terminates the plateau in the east. Until Late Jurassic the Falkland Islands were part of Gondwana and were located adjacent to the east coast of South Africa. While the Falkland Islands and Maurice Ewing Bank are proved to be of continental composition, the nature and structure of the Falkland Plateau's basement in between is debatable. The first crustal model derived from sonobuoy data contradicts an only recently published 3D-gravity model. To enhance the understanding of Gondwana break-up considering timing, geometry and amount of volcanism, further knowledge about the structure and thickness of the crust is inevitable. During the ANT-XXIX/5 Polarstern cruise seismic refraction measurements were conducted using Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) and Reftek land stations onshore of East Falkland. The OBS were deployed at 78 locations along an approximately 1500 km east-west stretching profile. For the western transect a P-wave velocity model is calculated using 2D-raytracing techniques. The results are presented in combination with potential field data showing the extension of the Falkland Islands basement, the continent-ocean transition zone and the crustal structure of the plateau. On the Falkland Plateau Basin sediment thickness is about 6 km with velocities ranging from 1.7 to 4.1 km/s in the upper part and about 4.7 km/s above basement. The crust is of oceanic composition with an igneous section that is considerably thicker than average oceanic crust (up to 17 km). The velocity structure in the upper crustal part is typical for layer 2 with a velocity gradient ranging from 5.4 km/s to 6.5 km/s and thicknesses between 1.5 km and 4 km. Layer 3 is about 14 km thick with a velocity gradient from 6.6 km/s to 7.6 km/s, which is

  4. Visualization and dissemination of global crustal models on virtual globes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang-feng; Pan, Xin; Sun, Jian-zhong

    2016-05-01

    Global crustal models, such as CRUST 5.1 and its descendants, are very useful in a broad range of geoscience applications. The current method for representing the existing global crustal models relies heavily on dedicated computer programs to read and work with those models. Therefore, it is not suited to visualize and disseminate global crustal information to non-geological users. This shortcoming is becoming obvious as more and more people from both academic and non-academic institutions are interested in understanding the structure and composition of the crust. There is a pressing need to provide a modern, universal and user-friendly method to represent and visualize the existing global crustal models. In this paper, we present a systematic framework to easily visualize and disseminate the global crustal structure on virtual globes. Based on crustal information exported from the existing global crustal models, we first create a variety of KML-formatted crustal models with different levels of detail (LODs). And then the KML-formatted models can be loaded into a virtual globe for 3D visualization and model dissemination. A Keyhole Markup Language (KML) generator (Crust2KML) is developed to automatically convert crustal information obtained from the CRUST 1.0 model into KML-formatted global crustal models, and a web application (VisualCrust) is designed to disseminate and visualize those models over the Internet. The presented framework and associated implementations can be conveniently exported to other applications to support visualizing and analyzing the Earth's internal structure on both regional and global scales in a 3D virtual-globe environment.

  5. Crustal deformation evidences for viscous coupling and fragmented lithosphere at the Nubia-Iberia plate boundary (Western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palano, Mimmo; González, Pablo J.; Fernández, José

    2016-04-01

    A spatially dense crustal velocity field, based on up to 15 years of GNSS observations at more than 380 sites and extensively covering the Iberian Peninsula and Northern Africa, allow us to provide new insights into two main tectonic processes currently occurring in this area. We detected a slow large-scale clockwise rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to a local pole located closely to the northwestern sector of the Pyrenean mountain range (Palano et al., 2015). Although this crustal deformation pattern could suggest a rigid rotating lithosphere block, this model would predict significant shortening along the Western (off-shore Lisbon) and North Iberian margin which cannot totally ruled out but currently is not clearly observed. Conversely, we favour the interpretation that this pattern reflects the quasi-continuous straining of the ductile lithosphere in some sectors of South and Western Iberia in response to viscous coupling of the NW Nubia and Iberian plate boundary in the Gulf of Cádiz. Furthermore, the western Mediterranean basin appears fragmented into independent crustal tectonic blocks, which delimited by inherited lithospheric shear structures and trapped within the Nubia-Eurasia collision, are currently accommodating most of the plate convergence rate. Among these blocks, an (oceanic-like western) Algerian one is currently transferring a significant fraction of the Nubia-Eurasia convergence rate into the Eastern Betics (SE Iberia) and likely causing the eastward motion of the Baleares Promontory. Most of the observed crustal ground deformation can be attributed to processes driven by spatially variable lithospheric plate forces imposed along the Nubia-Eurasia convergence boundary. Nevertheless, the observed deformation field infers a very low convergence rates as observed also at the eastern side of the western Mediterranean, along the Calabro Peloritan Arc, by space geodesy (e.g. Palano, 2015). References Palano M. (2015). On the present

  6. Pb isotopes during crustal melting and magma mingling - A cautionary tale from the Miki Fjord macrodike, central east Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waight, Tod Earle; Lesher, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Pb isotopic data are presented for hybrid rocks formed by mingling between mantle-derived tholeiitic magma of the Eocene Miki Fjord macrodike (East Greenland) and melt derived from the adjacent Precambrian basement. Bulk mixing and AFC processes between end-members readily identified in the field...... fail to model the Pb isotope systematics. Selective contamination during diffusional exchange, which can explain the complex Sr and Nd isotope compositions of the hybrid rocks (Blichert-Toft et al., 1992), cannot fully account for the variability of the Pb isotopic data using the identified crustal end......-members. The crustal anatectic end-member, although similar in Sr and Nd isotope composition, has a markedly different Pb isotopic composition than its source gneiss. The differences are consistent with preferential incorporation of radiogenic Pb from accessory phases such as metamict zircon or loosely-bound Pb from...

  7. Shortening a Patient Experiences Survey for Medical Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy H. Ng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems—Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS PCMH Survey assesses patient experiences reflecting domains of care related to general patient experience (access to care, communication with providers, office staff interaction, provider rating and PCMH-specific aspects of patient care (comprehensiveness of care, self-management support, shared decision making. The current work compares psychometric properties of the current survey and a proposed shortened version of the survey (from 52 to 26 adult survey items, from 66 to 31 child survey items. The revisions were based on initial psychometric analysis and stakeholder input regarding survey length concerns. A total of 268 practices voluntarily submitted adult surveys and 58 submitted child survey data to the National Committee for Quality Assurance in 2013. Mean unadjusted scores, practice-level item and composite reliability, and item-to-scale correlations were calculated. Results show that the shorter adult survey has lower reliability, but still it still meets general definitions of a sound survey for the adult version, and resulted in few changes to mean scores. The impact was more problematic for the pediatric version. Further testing is needed to investigate approaches to improving survey response and the relevance of survey items in informing quality improvement.

  8. The different muscle-energetics during shortening and stretch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The helical shape of the thin filaments causes their passive counterclockwise rotation during muscle stretch that increases tensile stress and torque at first by unwinding and then by winding up the four anchoring Z-filaments. This means storage of energy in the series elastic Z-filaments and a considerable decrease of the liberated energy of heat and work to (h-w(ap)), where h is the heat energy and w(ap) the stretch energy induced from outside by an apparatus. The steep thin filament helix with an inclination angle of 70° promotes the passive rotation during stretch, but impedes the smooth sliding of shortening by increased friction and production of frictional heat. The frictional heat may be produced by the contact with the myosin cross-bridges: (1) when they passively snap on drilling thin filaments from cleft to cleft over a distance 2 × 2.7 nm = 5.4 nm between the globular actin monomers in one groove, causing stepwise motion; or (2) when they passively cycle from one helical groove to the next (distance 36 nm). The latter causes more heat and may take place on rotating thin filaments without an effective forward drilling ("idle rotation"), e.g., when they produce "unexplained heat" at the beginning of an isometric tetanus. In an Appendix to this paper the different states of muscle are defined. The function of its most important components is described and rotation model and power-stroke model of muscular contraction is compared.

  9. Chemical Sharpening, Shortening, and Unzipping of Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yunlong; Chen, Zhongfang; Connell, John W.; Fay, Catharine C.; Park, Cheol; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), the one-dimensional member of the boron nitride nanostructure family, are generally accepted to be highly inert to oxidative treatments and can only be covalently modifi ed by highly reactive species. Conversely, it is discovered that the BNNTs can be chemically dispersed and their morphology modifi ed by a relatively mild method: simply sonicating the nanotubes in aqueous ammonia solution. The dispersed nanotubes are significantly corroded, with end-caps removed, tips sharpened, and walls thinned. The sonication treatment in aqueous ammonia solution also removes amorphous BN impurities and shortened BNNTs, resembling various oxidative treatments of carbon nanotubes. Importantly, the majority of BNNTs are at least partially longitudinally cut, or "unzipped". Entangled and freestanding BN nanoribbons (BNNRs), resulting from the unzipping, are found to be approximately 5-20 nm in width and up to a few hundred nanometers in length. This is the fi rst chemical method to obtain BNNRs from BNNT unzipping. This method is not derived from known carbon nanotube unzipping strategies, but is unique to BNNTs because the use of aqueous ammonia solutions specifi cally targets the B-N bond network. This study may pave the way for convenient processing of BNNTs, previously thought to be highly inert, toward controlling their dispersion, purity, lengths, and electronic properties.

  10. Leg stiffness modulation during exhaustive stretch-shortening cycle exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitunen, S; Kyröläinen, H; Avela, J; Komi, P V

    2007-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of muscle activity modulation on leg stiffness during an exhaustive stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise in eight male subjects. Reaction force, electromyography (EMG) of the soleus (Sol), gastrocnemius (Ga) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscles and sledge seat position were recorded during the SSC exercise, consisting of 100 maximal intermittent drop jumps followed by a continuous submaximal jumping until exhaustion, on a sledge apparatus. Metabolic loading was determined by measuring blood lactate (La). No change was found in leg stiffness during the maximal jumps, whereas the subsequent submaximal jumping induced a significant reduction by 27+/-12% (PEMG ratio between the braking and push-off phases in Sol (r=0.81, PEMG ratio at the end of the submaximal jumping in Sol (r=-0.88, Pmodulation between the braking and push-off phases in the triceps surae muscle, particularly in Ga, plays an important role in leg stiffness adjustments during fatiguing SSC exercise. It is suggested that efficient activity modulation (i.e. high EMG ratio) of the triceps surae muscle during an intensive fatiguing SSC exercise may postpone the exhaustion and development of metabolic fatigue.

  11. Moroccan crustal response to continental drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanes, W H; Saadi, M; Ehrlich, E; Alem, A

    1973-06-01

    The formation and development of a zone of spreading beneath the continental crust resulted in the breakup of Pangea and formation of the Atlantic Ocean. The crust of Morocco bears an extremely complete record of the crustal response to this episode of mantle dynamics. Structural and related depositional patterns indicate that the African margin had stabilized by the Middle Jurassic as a marine carbonate environment; that it was dominated by tensile stresses in the early Mesozoic, resulting in two fault systems paralleling the Atlantic and Mediterranean margins and a basin and range structural-depositional style; and that it was affected by late Paleozoic metamorphism and intrusion. Mesozoic events record the latter portion of African involvement in the spreading episode; late Paleozoic thermal orogenesis might reflect the earlier events in the initiation of the spreading center and its development beneath significant continental crust. In that case, more than 100 million years were required for mantle dynamics to break up Pangea.

  12. Current crustal movement in Chinese mainland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琪

    2003-01-01

    The quantification of tectonic deformation in the Eastern and Central Asia is of great significance for the study on global plate motion and lithospheric dynamics. In the past four years, the velocity field of horizontal crustal movement for the Chinese mainland has been established for the first time thanks to the intensified GPS measurements and its improved accuracy. The velocity field derived from GPS measurements delineates the patterns of tectonic deformation in the Chinese mainland in the unprecedented detail, and thus reveals the new features of the ongoing tectonic process resulted from the collision of Indian plate to Eurasian plate. Meanwhile, the surface offset induced by two strong earthquakes occurred in Chinese mainland was sampled precisely using InSAR technique.

  13. Tectonic implications of Mars crustal magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J E P; Acuña, M H; Ness, N F; Kletetschka, G; Mitchell, D L; Lin, R P; Reme, H

    2005-10-18

    Mars currently has no global magnetic field of internal origin but must have had one in the past, when the crust acquired intense magnetization, presumably by cooling in the presence of an Earth-like magnetic field (thermoremanent magnetization). A new map of the magnetic field of Mars, compiled by using measurements acquired at an approximately 400-km mapping altitude by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, is presented here. The increased spatial resolution and sensitivity of this map provide new insight into the origin and evolution of the Mars crust. Variations in the crustal magnetic field appear in association with major faults, some previously identified in imagery and topography (Cerberus Rupes and Valles Marineris). Two parallel great faults are identified in Terra Meridiani by offset magnetic field contours. They appear similar to transform faults that occur in oceanic crust on Earth, and support the notion that the Mars crust formed during an early era of plate tectonics.

  14. Crustal evolution in Asia: Correlations and connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunogae, Toshiaki; Kwon, Sanghoon; Santosh, M.

    2016-11-01

    The Asian region records multiple subduction, accretion and collision processes related to the breakup of Gondwana and Pangea, and the ongoing formation of the future supercontinent Amasia. The oldest geological record of Asia is preserved in Archean crustal fragments which were welded together by later collisional events related to the assembly of several supercontinents. The Asian region also records recent geological events such as volcanic activities and mega-earthquakes related to subduction of oceanic plates along active continental margins and collision of microplates. This region is thus regarded as an excellent field laboratory for examining the evolution of continental crust and cratons, formation and destruction of continents and supercontinents, and related metallogenic and surface environmental processes.

  15. Crustal recycling by subduction erosion in the central Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Susanne M.; Gómez-Tuena, Arturo; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Bolge, Louise L.; Brandl, Philipp A.; Espinasa-Perena, Ramón; Solari, Luigi; Stuart, Finlay M.; Vannucchi, Paola; Zellmer, Georg F.

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of upper plate crust in subduction zones, or 'subduction erosion', is a major mechanism of crustal destruction at convergent margins. However, assessing the impact of eroded crust on arc magmas is difficult owing to the compositional similarity between the eroded crust, trench sediment and arc crustal basement that may all contribute to arc magma formation. Here we compare Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf and trace element data of crustal input material to Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-He-O isotope chemistry of a well-characterized series of olivine-phyric, high-Mg# basalts to dacites in the central Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). Basaltic to andesitic magmas crystallize high-Ni olivines that have high mantle-like 3He/4He = 7-8 Ra and high crustal δ18Omelt = +6.3-8.5‰ implying their host magmas to be near-primary melts from a mantle infiltrated by slab-derived crustal components. Remarkably, their Hf-Nd isotope and Nd/Hf trace element systematics rule out the trench sediment as the recycled crust end member, and imply that the coastal and offshore granodiorites are the dominant recycled crust component. Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotope modeling shows that the granodiorites control the highly to moderately incompatible elements in the calc-alkaline arc magmas, together with lesser additions of Pb- and Sr-rich fluids from subducted mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB)-type altered oceanic crust (AOC). Nd-Hf mass balance suggests that the granodiorite exceeds the flux of the trench sediment by at least 9-10 times, corresponding to a flux of ⩾79-88 km3/km/Myr into the subduction zone. At an estimated thickness of 1500-1700 m, the granodiorite may buoyantly rise as bulk 'slab diapirs' into the mantle melt region and impose its trace element signature (e.g., Th/La, Nb/Ta) on the prevalent calc-alkaline arc magmas. Deep slab melting and local recycling of other slab components such as oceanic seamounts further diversify the MVB magmas by producing rare, strongly fractionated high-La magmas and a minor population of

  16. Fractal behavior in continental crustal heat production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vedanti

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of crustal heat production, which is the most important component in the elucidation of continental thermal structure, still remains a theoretical assumption. In general the heat production values must decrease with depth, but the form of decrease of heat production in the crust is not well understood. The commonly used heat production models are: "block model", in which heat production is constant from the surface to a given depth and the "exponential model", in which heat production diminishes as an exponential function of depth. The exponential model is more widely used wherein sources of the errors are heterogeneity of rock and long wavelength changes due to changes in lithology and tectonic elements, and as such exponential distribution does not work satisfactorily for the entire crust. In the present study, we analyze for the first time, deep crustal heat production data of six global areas namely Dharwar craton (India, Kaapvaal craton (South Africa, Baltic shield (Kola, Russia, Hidaka metamorphic belt (Japan, Nissho pluton (Japan and Continental Deep Drilling site (KTB, Germany. The power spectrum of all the studied data sets exhibits power law behaviour. This would mean slower decay of heat production with depth, which conforms to the known geologic composition of the crust. Minimum value of the scaling exponent has been found for the KTB borehole, which is apparently related to higher heat production of gneisses, however for other study areas, scaling exponent is almost similar. We also found that the lower values of scaling exponents are related to higher heat production in the crust as is the case in KTB. Present finding has a direct relevance in computation of temperature-depth profiles in continental regions.

  17. Does the speed of shortening affect steady-state force depression in cat soleus muscle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, T R; Herzog, W

    2005-11-01

    It has been stated repeatedly for the past 50 years that the steady-state force depression following shortening of an activated muscle depends on the speed of shortening. However, these statements were based on results from experiments in which muscles were shortened at different speeds but identical activation levels. Therefore, the force during shortening was changed in accordance with the force-velocity relationship of muscles: that is, increasing speeds of shortening were associated with decreasing forces, and vice versa. Consequently, it is not possible at present to distinguish whether force depression is caused by the changes in speed, as frequently stated, or the associated changes in force, or both. The purpose of this study was to test if force depression depends on the speed of shortening. We hypothesized that force depression was dependent on the force but not the speed of contraction. Our prediction is that the amount of force depression after shortening contractions at different speeds could be similar if the force during contraction was controlled at a similar level. Cat soleus muscles (n=7) were shortened by 9 or 12 mm at speeds of 3, 9, and 27 mm/s, first with a constant activation during shortening (30Hz), then with activation levels that were reduced (shortening forces of the fast speed contractions (27 mm/s). If done properly, force depression could be precisely matched at the three different speeds, indicating that force depression was related to the force during the shortening contraction but not to the speed. However, in order to match force depression, the forces during shortening had to be systematically greater for the slow compared to the fast speeds of shortening, suggesting that force depression also depends on the level of activation, as force depression at constant activation levels can only be matched if the force during shortening, evaluated by the mechanical work, is identical. Therefore, we conclude that force depression depends

  18. The Glacial BuzzSaw, Isostasy, and Global Crustal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Oncken, O.; Niu, F.

    2015-12-01

    The glacial buzzsaw hypothesis predicts that maximum elevations in orogens at high latitudes are depressed relative to temperate latitudes, as maximum elevation and hypsography of glaciated orogens are functions of the glacial equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and the modern and last glacial maximum (LGM) snowlines. As a consequence crustal thickness, density, or both must change with increasing latitude to maintain isostatic balance. For Airy compensation crustal thickness should decrease toward polar latitudes, whereas for Pratt compensation crustal densities should increase. For similar convergence rates, higher latitude orogens should have higher grade, and presumably higher density rocks in the crustal column due to more efficient glacial erosion. We have examined a number of global and regional crustal models to see if these predictions appear in the models. Crustal thickness is straightforward to examine, crustal density less so. The different crustal models generally agree with one another, but do show some major differences. We used a standard tectonic classification scheme of the crust for data selection. The globally averaged orogens show crustal thicknesses that decrease toward high latitudes, almost reflecting topography, in both the individual crustal models and the models averaged together. The most convincing is the western hemisphere cordillera, where elevations and crustal thicknesses decrease toward the poles, and also toward lower latitudes (the equatorial minimum is at ~12oN). The elevation differences and Airy prediction of crustal thickness changes are in reasonable agreement in the North American Cordillera, but in South America the observed crustal thickness change is larger than the Airy prediction. The Alpine-Himalayan chain shows similar trends, however the strike of the chain makes interpretation ambiguous. We also examined cratons with ice sheets during the last glacial period to see if continental glaciation also thins the crust toward

  19. Evolution of crustal thickening in the central Andes, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Nathan; McQuarrie, Nadine; Ryan, Jamie; Karimi, Bobak; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George

    2015-09-01

    Paleoelevation histories from the central Andes in Bolivia have suggested that the geodynamic evolution of the region has been punctuated by periods of large-scale lithospheric removal that drive rapid increases in elevation at the surface. Here, we evaluate viable times and locations of material loss using a map-view reconstruction of the Bolivian orocline displacement field to forward-model predicted crustal thicknesses. Two volumetric models are presented that test assumed pre-deformation crustal thicknesses of 35 km and 40 km. Both models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved first in the northern Eastern Cordillera (EC) by 30-20 Ma but remained below modern in the southern EC until ≤10 Ma. The Altiplano is predicted to have achieved modern crustal thickness after 10 Ma but only with a pre-deformation thickness of 50 km, including 10 km of sediment. At the final stage, the models predict 8-25% regional excess crustal volume compared to modern thickness, largely concentrated in the northern EC. The excess predicted volume from 20 to 0 Ma can be accounted for by: 1) crustal flow to the WC and/or Peru, 2) localized removal of the lower crust, or 3) a combination of the two. Only models with initial crustal thicknesses >35 km predict excess volumes sufficient to account for potential crustal thickness deficits in Peru and allow for lower crustal loss. However, both initial thickness models predict that modern crustal thicknesses were achieved over the same time periods that paleoelevation histories indicate the development of modern elevations. Localized removal of lower crust is only necessary in the northern EC where crustal thickness exceeds modern by 20 Ma, prior to paleoelevation estimates of modern elevations by 15 Ma. In the Altiplano, crustal thicknesses match modern values at 10 Ma and can only exceed modern values by 5 Ma, post-dating when modern elevations were thought to have been established. Collectively, these models predict that

  20. Circular smooth muscle contributes to esophageal shortening during peristalsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil K Vegesna; Keng-Yu Chuang; Ramashesai Besetty; Steven J Phillips; Alan S Braverman; Mary F Barbe; Michael R Ruggieri

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To study the angle between the circular smooth muscle (CSM) and longitudinal smooth muscle (LSM) fibers in the distal esophagus.METHODS:In order to identify possible mechanisms for greater shortening in the distal compared to proximal esophagus during peristalsis,the angles between the LSM and CSM layers were measured in 9 cadavers.The outer longitudinal layer of the muscularis propria was exposed after stripping the outer serosa.The inner circular layer of the muscularis propria was then revealed after dissection of the esophageal mucosa and the underlying muscularis mucosa.Photographs of each specimen were taken with half of the open esophagus folded back showing both the outer longitudinal and inner circular muscle layers.Angles were measured every one cm for 10 cm proximal to the squamocolumnar junction (SCJ) by two independent investigators.Two human esophagi were obtained from organ transplant donors and the angles between the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle layers were measured using micro-computed tomography (micro CT) and Image J software.RESULTS:All data are presented as mean ± SE.The CSM to LSM angle at the SCJ and 1 cm proximal to SCJ on the autopsy specimens was 69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 74.9 ± 3.09 degrees,P =0.32.The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ were statistically significantly lower than at 2,3,4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ,69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 82.58 ± 1.34 degrees,84.04 ± 1.64 degrees,84.87 ± 1.04 degrees and 83.72 ± 1.42 degrees,P =0.013,P =0.008,P =0.004,P =0.009 respectively.The CSM to LSM angle at SCJ was also statistically significantly lower than the angles at 6,7 and 8 cm proximal to the SCJ,69.3 ± 4.62 degrees vs 80.18 ± 2.09 degrees,81.81 ± 1.75 degrees and 80.96 ± 2.04 degrees,P =0.05,P =0.02,P =0.03 respectively.The CSM to LSM angle at 1 cm proximal to SCJ was statistically significantly lower than at 3,4 and 5 cm proximal to the SCJ,74.94 ± 3.09 degrees vs 84.04 ± 1.64 degrees,84.87± 1.04 degrees and 83.72 ± 1

  1. GPS computer navigators to shorten EMS response and transport times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, F S; Muramatsu, R S; Yoshida, B H; Yamamoto, L G

    2001-05-01

    GPS (global positioning satellite system to determine one's position on earth) units have become inexpensive and compact. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of a GPS enhanced computer street map navigator to improve the ability of EMS drivers in an urban setting to locate their destination and shorten response times. For part I, residential addresses in the city were randomly selected from a telephone directory. Two driver/navigator teams were assigned to drive to the address adhering to speed limits. One team used a standard street map, whereas the other team used a GPS computer navigator. The travel time and distance of the runs were compared. For part II, the computer GPS navigator was placed on an ambulance to supplement their normal methods of navigation to find the address requesting EMS. After the run was completed, EMS providers were interviewed to determine their opinion of whether the GPS navigator was helpful. For part I the results showed that in the 29 initial test runs, comparing the GPS team versus the standard map team, the mean distances traveled were 8.7 versus 9.0 kilometers (not significant) and the mean travel times were 13.5 versus 14.6 minutes (P=.02), respectively. The GPS team arrived faster in 72% runs. For part II the results showed that most EMS providers surveyed noted that the GPS computer navigator enhanced their ability to find the destination and all EMS providers acknowledged that it would enhance their ability to find a destination in an area in which they were unfamiliar. These results suggest that a portable GPS computer navigator system is helpful and can enhance the ability of prehospital care providers to locate their destination. Because these units are accurate and inexpensive, GPS computer navigators may be a valuable tool in reducing pre-hospital transport times.

  2. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  3. Can bulk viscosity drive inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacher, T.; Stein-Schabes, J.A.; Turner, M.S.

    1987-09-15

    Contrary to other claims, we argue that bulk viscosity associated with the interactions of non- relativistic particles with relativistic particles around the time of the grand unified theory (GUT) phase transition cannot lead to inflation. Simply put, the key ingredient for inflation, negative pressure, cannot arise due to the bulk-viscosity effects of a weakly interacting mixture of relativistic and nonrelativistic particles.

  4. Brane Couplings from Bulk Loops

    OpenAIRE

    Georgi, Howard; Grant, Aaron K.; Hailu, Girma

    2000-01-01

    We compute loop corrections to the effective action of a field theory on a five-dimensional $S_1/Z_2$ orbifold. We find that the quantum loop effects of interactions in the bulk produce infinite contributions that require renormalization by four-dimensional couplings on the orbifold fixed planes. Thus bulk couplings give rise to renormalization group running of brane couplings.

  5. Shortening-induced torque depression in old men: implications for age-related power loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Geoffrey A; Makrakos, Demetri P; Stevens, Daniel E; Herzog, Walter; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2014-09-01

    Following active muscle shortening, the steady-state isometric torque at the final muscle length is lower than the steady-state torque obtained for a purely isometric contraction at that same final muscle length. This well-documented property of skeletal muscle is termed shortening-induced torque depression (TD). Despite many investigations into the mechanisms of weakness and power loss in old age, the influence of muscle shortening on the history dependence of isometric torque production remains to be elucidated. Thus, it is unclear whether older adults are disadvantaged for torque and power production following a dynamic shortening contraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shortening-induced TD in older adults, and to determine whether shortening-induced TD is related to power loss. Maximal voluntary isometric dorsiflexion contractions (MVC; 10s) in 8 young (25.5±3.7years) and 9 old (76.1±5.4years) men were performed on a HUMAC NORM dynamometer as a reference, and then again following an active shortening of 40° joint excursion (40°PF-0°PF) at angular velocities of 15°/s and 120°/s. Work and instantaneous power were derived during shortening. Shortening-induced TD was calculated and expressed as a percentage by determining the mean torque value over 1s during the isometric steady state of the MVC following shortening, divided by the mean torque value for the same 1s time period during the isometric reference MVC. To assess muscle activation, electromyography (root mean square; EMGRMS) of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) was calculated at identical time points used in assessing shortening-induced TD, and voluntary activation (VA) was assessed using the interpolated twitch technique. Old were 18% weaker than young for MVC, and ~40% less powerful for 15°/s and 120°/s of shortening. Old produced 37% and 21% less work for 15°/s and 120°/s than young, respectively. Furthermore, old experienced 60% and 70% greater shortening-induced TD

  6. Crustal seismicity of the Black Sea areal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconescu, Mihail; Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Petruta Constantin, Angela

    2014-05-01

    The main target of the study is to decipher the seismicity of the Black Sea areal from the tsunami-genetic potential. From the seismotectonical point of view the earthquakes which are responsible for tsunami are those associated with thrust faults (subduction zones), normal and inverse faults and less strike slip faults (only if the oblique-slip and deep slip components are predominant), with magnitude higher than 6.5 (even the USGS cited tsunami at 5.1 magnitude) and depth, a shallow one, less than 20 km depth. In order to delimit the seismic sources from Black Sea and to discrimate among them the tsunamigenic ones, the following elements have been taken into account: - depth of the earthquakes foci, that allow separation of two major categories: deeper than 40 km depth and crustal, normal, (less than 40 km deep); - development of the earthquakes epicenters in the orogen zone or in zones with active tectonics (fault systems); - establishment of the areas of active faults along which the earthquakes epicenters are aligned; - the absence of a recent or actual tectonic activity; the epicenters recorded in these tectonically stable zones are considered as the result of a diffuse, accidental seismicity. The studies on active tectonics have clearly shown the position of the seismic sources (connected to well define active fault) which do not interfere and do not result in alternatives of other seismotectonic model constructions. According to the distribution map of earthquakes and as well as to the map of the areas with active tectonics, ten seismic sources were established: Central Dobrogea(S1), Shabla(S2), Istanbul(S3), North Anatolian Fault(S4), Georgia(S5), Novorossjsk(S6), Crimea(S7), West Black Sea Fault(S8) and Mid Black Sea Ridge(S9). The maximum possible magnitude of each seismic source was obtained through three aproaches: (i) using seismotectonics and geological database (the length of the faults, possible apparition on surface, geomorphology, etc

  7. Crustal Thickness and Lower Crustal Velocity Structure Beneath the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R.; Soule, D. C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Toomey, D. R.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Weekly, R. T.

    2014-12-01

    In 2009, a multi-scale seismic tomography experiment was conducted on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge aboard the R/V Marcus G. Langseth. Ocean bottom seismometers were deployed at 64 sites and recorded 5567 shots of a 36-element, 6600 in.3 airgun array. The experiment extended 100 km along-axis and 60 km cross-axis. Two crustal tomographic analyses have previously been completed using data from the experiment. First, 93,000 manually picked crustal refraction arrivals (Pg) were used to develop a three-dimensional model of crustal velocity and thickness in the upper crust (Weekly et al. 2014). Second, this model was used as the starting model in an analysis that incorporated ~19,000 Moho reflection arrivals (PmP) for non-ridge crossing paths to image lower crustal velocity structure and crustal thickness off-axis. A key feature of this model is a ~0.5-1 km increase in crustal thickness beneath a bathymetric plateau that extends to either side of the central portion of the Endeavour segment. We present a tomographic inversions that incorporates ridge-crossing paths to examine spatial variations in lower crustal velocity and crustal thickness beneath the ridge axis. The preliminary results from an inversion that incorporates ~8700 manually picked ridge-crossing PmP arrival times reveals a ~10-km-wide low velocity zone extending throughout the lower crust with a velocity anomaly of -0.3 to -0.5 km/s at ≥4 km depth. This low velocity zone extends both to the north and south of the axial magma chamber reflector imaged previously beneath the central Endeavour. The inversion also shows significant variations in apparent crustal thickness along axis but additional analysis is required to understand whether these variations are well resolved.

  8. Low crustal velocities and mantle lithospheric variations in southern Tibet from regional Pnl waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Arthur J.; Schwartz, Susan Y.

    We report low average crustal P-wave velocities (5.9-6.1 km/s, Poisson's ratio 0.23-0.27, thickness 68-76 km) in southern Tibet from modelling regional Pnl waveforms recorded by the 1991-1992 Tibetan Plateau Experiment. We also find that the mantle lithosphere beneath the Indus-Tsangpo Suture and the Lhasa Terrane is shield-like (Pn velocity 8.20-8.25 km/s, lid thickness 80-140 km, positive velocity gradient 0.0015-0.0025 s-1). Analysis of relative Pn travel time residuals requires a decrease in the mantle velocities beneath the northern Lhasa Terrane, the Banggong-Nujiang Suture and the southern Qiangtang Terrane. Tectonic and petrologic considerations suggest that low bulk crustal velocities could result from a thick (50-60 km) felsic upper crust with vertically limited and laterally pervasive partial melt. These results are consistent with underthrusting of Indian Shield lithosphere beneath the Tibetan Plateau to at least the central Lhasa Terrane.

  9. Oligocene crustal anatexis in the Tethyan Himalaya, southern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-E.; Zeng, Lingsen; Gao, Jiahao; Shang, Zhen; Hou, Kejun; Wang, Qian

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies in the Xiaru and Malashan gneiss dome of the Tethyan Himalaya, southern Tibet identify that Xiaru and Paiku tourmaline-bearing leucogranite dike formed at 28-29 Ma. Together with 28 Ma Kuday garnet-bearing leucogranites, it is demonstrated that the Himalayan orogenic belt experienced a major episode of crustal melting in the Mid-Oligocene. Geochemical data indicate that three suites of leucogranite are characterized by large variations in the major and trace element compositions as well as Sr-Nd isotope systematics, which could be explained by combined fractional crystallization and relative contributions of micas and accessory phases dissolved into a crustal melt during decompressional melting of metapelitic rocks. Documentation of Oligocene partial melting of crustal rocks could indicate that the exhumation of deep crustal rocks in the Himalayan orogenic belt could have started as early as Oligocene.

  10. Rates, Mechanisms, and Implications of Crustal Assimilation in Continental Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, M.; Davidson, J.

    2002-12-01

    Contrary to the limiting constraints postulated by Bowen for the coupled thermal and mass balance implicated in assimilation, many studies [1-6] suggest that multi-stage and multi-component assimilation, abetted by magma mixing, may be volumetrically important and have profound consequences for the chemistry of basaltic and evolved magmas in long-lived continental magmatic systems. The probability of a primitive or evolved basalt arriving at the Earth's surface having undergone perfectly closed-system evolution during passage through 25-60 km of continental crust is vanishingly low. A case-by-case demonstration that the intra-crustal chemical overprint is trivial, or that it can be quantified and subtracted, is an essential step in any evaluation of mantle source-region chemistry and processes based on inversion of continental basalt compositions. In magmatic systems characterized by mafic magma recharge the thermal energy and physical dynamism needed for assimilation are not constrained to come uniquely from one magma batch [7, 8]. Equally important is that assimilation is rarely equivalent to bulk melting of ingested blocks followed by reservoir-wide homogenization. The mechanics of crustal assimilation are governed by grain boundary melting, disaggregation, and dispersal of refractory solids (including xenocryst settling) wherein liberated low-density, incompatible element-enriched partial melts have the capacity to render primitive arc magma batches variably modified, as well as heterogeneous on short length-scales. Evidence that basalts thermally erode surface channels and conduit walls, and new observations constraining the maximum time that some extensively melted xenoliths have resided in their host magmas, indicate that the time required to impose an open-system overprint on a hot basaltic magma (days to yrs) is far shorter than typical repose periods at most arc volcanoes (50-500 yrs). Assimilative recycling of broadly gabbroic arc cumulates has had large

  11. Effects of stretch and shortening on gene expression in intact myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggart, Charles R; Ames, Elizabeth G; Lee, Jae K; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-15

    Multiple cues have been suggested as the mechanical stimulus for the heart's hypertrophic response. Our work has previously suggested that the amount of cyclic shortening in cardiomyocytes controls myocyte shape and the amount of stretch controls myocyte size. To identify gene expression changes that occur in response to these mechanical perturbations, we used microarray analysis of papillary muscles cultured for 12 h at physiological or reduced levels of cyclic shortening and physiological or reduced mean stretch. Overall, genes related to extracellular matrix (ECM) were surprisingly prominent in our analysis. Connective tissue growth factor was among a small group of genes regulated by the amount of cyclic shortening regardless of the level of mean stretch, and many more ECM genes were regulated by shortening with reduced amounts of stretch. When we compared our results to gene expression data from an in vivo model of pressure overload (PO), which also decreases myocyte shortening, we found the genes that were commonly regulated in PO and our decreased shortening groups were most significantly enriched for ontology terms related to the ECM, followed by genes associated with mechanosensing and the cytoskeleton. The list of genes regulated in PO and our decreased shortening groups also includes genes known to change early in hypertrophy, such as myosin heavy chain 7, brain natriuretic peptide, and myosin binding protein C. We conclude that in intact myocardium, the amount of cyclic shortening may be an important regulator not only of myocyte genes classically associated with hypertrophy but also of ECM genes.

  12. Accumulating evidence for increased velocity of airway smooth muscle shortening in asthmatic airway hyperresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijpma, Gijs; Matusovsky, Oleg; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    It remains unclear whether airway smooth muscle (ASM) mechanics is altered in asthma. While efforts have originally focussed on contractile force, some evidence points to an increased velocity of shortening. A greater rate of airway renarrowing after a deep inspiration has been reported in asthmatics compared to controls, which could result from a shortening velocity increase. In addition, we have recently shown in rats that increased shortening velocity correlates with increased muscle shortening, without increasing muscle force. Nonetheless, establishing whether or not asthmatic ASM shortens faster than that of normal subjects remains problematic. Endobronchial biopsies provide excellent tissue samples because the patients are well characterized, but the size of the samples allows only cell level experiments. Whole human lungs from transplant programs suffer primarily from poor patient characterization, leading to high variability. ASM from several animal models of asthma has shown increased shortening velocity, but it is unclear whether this is representative of human asthma. Several candidates have been suggested as responsible for increased shortening velocity in asthma, such as alterations in contractile protein expression or changes in the contractile apparatus structure. There is no doubt that more remains to be learned about the role of shortening velocity in asthma.

  13. Compatibility of selected plant-based shortening as lard substitute: microstructure, polymorphic forms and textural properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A.M. Yanty

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to determine the compatibility of three plant-based shortening mixtures to lard shortening (LD in terms of microstructure, polymorphic forms, and textural properties. The shortenings of binary, ternary, and quaternary fat mixtures were prepared according to a standard procedure by blending mee fat (MF with palm stearin (PS in a 99:1 (w/w ratio; avocado fat (Avo with PS and cocoa butter (CB in a 84:7:9 (w/w ratio; palm oil (PO with PS, soybean oil (SBO and CB in a 38:5:52:5 (w/w ratio, respectively. The triacylglycerol composition, polymorphic forms, crystal morphology, and textural properties of the shortening were evaluated. This study found that all three plant-based shortenings and LD shortening were similar with respect to their consistency, hardness and compression and adhesiveness values. However, all plant-based shortening was found to be dissimilar to LD shortening with respect to microstructure.

  14. Limb shortening in the course of solitary bone cyst treatment - a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, Maciej [Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedics, Poznan (Poland); Ignys-O' Byrne, Anna [J. Strus City Hospital, Department of Radiology, Poznan (Poland); Ignys, Iwona [Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Metabolic Diseases, Poznan (Poland); Wroblewska, Katarzyna [Karol Marcinkowski University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Poznan (Poland)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the frequency of limb shortening in the course of solitary bone cyst treatment. The correlation between the mode of treatment as well as the occurrence of pathological fracture, cyst location, volume, and locularity were examined. A retrospective analysis was carried out on 135 patients where 80 underwent curettage and bone grafting and 55 were administered methylprednisolone injection with a mean time to follow-up of 12 years. Based on clinical and radiological evaluation, limb shortening was found in ten patients when the data before and after treatment was compared. Limb shortening ranging from 1 to 5 cm during the course of the treatment was observed: six in humerus, two in femur, two in tibia. Those with epiphyseal changes, magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate the degree of growth plate damage was performed. Patients with and without limb shortening did not differ statistically regarding the applied method of treatment. The cyst volume was significantly larger in the group of patients with limb shortening when compared to the group of patients with no limb shortening. In patients treated with curettage and bone grafting, the mode of treatment does not increase the frequency of occurrence of iatrogenic limb shortening. In patients with limb shortening, a statistically significant larger volume of the cyst was observed. (orig.)

  15. Assisting High School Students with Career Indecision Using a Shortened Form of the Career Construction Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfuss, Mark C.; Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2015-01-01

    A shortened form of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) was used to help high school students struggling with the career decision making process. The shortened instrument is described, as well as, its use with eleventh grade high school students who had low levels of career concern and career curiosity. Students who completed the exercise…

  16. Ionospheric precursors for crustal earthquakes in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perrone

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Crustal earthquakes with magnitude 6.0>M≥5.5 observed in Italy for the period 1979–2009 including the last one at L'Aquila on 6 April 2009 were considered to check if the earlier obtained relationships for ionospheric precursors for strong Japanese earthquakes are valid for the Italian moderate earthquakes. The ionospheric precursors are based on the observed variations of the sporadic E-layer parameters (h'Es, fbEs and foF2 at the ionospheric station Rome. Empirical dependencies for the seismo-ionospheric disturbances relating the earthquake magnitude and the epicenter distance are obtained and they have been shown to be similar to those obtained earlier for Japanese earthquakes. The dependences indicate the process of spreading the disturbance from the epicenter towards periphery during the earthquake preparation process. Large lead times for the precursor occurrence (up to 34 days for M=5.8–5.9 tells about a prolong preparation period. A possibility of using the obtained relationships for the earthquakes prediction is discussed.

  17. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  18. Accommodation of collisional shortening along the Alpine plate boundary : plate kinematics vs rheological controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Claudio; Bellahsen, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The style of collision in the Alps varies along strike, reflecting different amounts and different modes of accommodation of collisional shortening. These differences control the patterns of exhumation during collision. Whereas the western Alps largely consist of a metamorphic complex formed during subduction and largely exhumed before the initiation of collision, the subduction nappe-stack of the Central and the Eastern Alps is strongly overprinted by collisional shortening and by Barrovian metamorphism. Based on compiled and new data we estimate amounts of collisional shortening along the strike of the chain and set it in relationship to the geometry of the collisional prism. The western Alpine collisional structures form a very large (in map view), but moderately shortened wedge, terminating in front of a poorly developed Molasse basin. Shortening of this wedge was mainly localized along its external parts, resulting in accretion of basement and cover units thrusted towards the foreland. Back-folding and back-thrusting are barely developed and no shortening takes place in the upper, Adriatic plate. In the Central Alps, the amount of collisional shortening is larger and it is distributed both in the lower and in the upper plate. The collisional prism is bivergent and partitioning of the amount of shortening between the upper and lower plates varies along strike, being most probably controlled by rheological, heterogeneities. The thickened accreted lower plate is strongly affected by Barrovian metamorphism where shortening is largest and localized within a confined area. A deep Molasse basin developed in front of the prism. In the Eastern Alps collisional kinematics vary from east to west, with orogen-parallel displacements dominating in the east and orogen-perpendicular ones in the West, where they culminate in the structural and metamorphic dome of the Tauern Window. Nowhere else in the Alps collisional shortening is so strongly localized in one and the same

  19. InSAR Observations Of Crustal Deformation Mechanics In The Interior Of The Puna Plateau Of The Southern Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckelmann, Felix; Motagh, Mahdi; Bokhagen, Bodo; Strecker, Manfred

    2013-12-01

    Crustal deformation evidences in the orogenic interior of the Southern Central Andes at different time scales are observed by applying ENVISAT InSAR time series from 2005 - 2009 and differential GPS data taken in the study area of the palaeo-lake Salar de Pocitos (24.5°S, 67°W, 3650 m asl). Ongoing shortening in the region from the Tertiary to the present-day is indicated by an uplift of Quaternary palaeo-lake terraces of about 4 to 5m within the last 44ka as well as by the growth of an anticline in Tertiary sediments and the reactivation of the reverse-fault bounded Sierra de Macón, both with uplift rates of 2 - 5mm/a. In summary, this study emphasizes the diachronous and spatially disparate character of the tectonic regime at the Puna Plateau.

  20. Evaluation of canola oil oleogels with candelilla wax as an alternative to shortening in baked goods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Areum; Bae, Woosung; Hwang, Hong-Sik; Lee, Hyeon Gyu; Lee, Suyong

    2015-11-15

    The oleogels of canola oil with candelilla wax were prepared and utilized as a shortening replacer to produce cookies with a high level of unsaturated fatty acids. The incorporation of candelilla wax (3% and 6% by weight) to canola oil produced the oleogels with solid-like properties. The firmness of the oleogels was lower than that of the shortening at room temperature. A more rapid change in the viscosity with temperature was observed with increasing levels of candelilla wax in the steady shear measurements. The replacement of shortening with oleogels in the cookie formulation reduced both viscoelastic parameters (G' and G") of the cookie doughs. The level of unsaturated fatty acids in the oleogel cookies was distinctly increased up to around 92%, compared to the shortening cookies (47.2%). The cookies with the oleogels showed desirable spreadable property and the replacement of shortening with the oleogels produced cookies with soft eating characteristics.

  1. CRUSTAL THICKNESS VARIATIONS AND SEISMICITY OF NORTHWESTERN SOUTH AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Kim Jeong

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Any uncompensated mass of the northern Andes Mountains is presumably under pressure to adjust within the Earth to its ideal state of isostatic equilibrium. Isostasy is the ideal state that any
    uncompensated mass seeks to achieve in time. These pressures interact with the relative motions between adjacent plates that give rise to earthquakes along the plate boundaries. By combining the
    gravity MOHO estimates and crustal discontinuities with historical and instrumental seismological catalogs the correlation between isostatically disturbed terrains and seismicity has been established.
    The thinner and thicker crustal regions were mapped from the zero horizontal curvature of the crustal thickness estimates. These boundaries or edges of crustal thickness variations were compared to
    crustal discontinuities inferred from gravity and magnetic anomalies and the patterns of seismicity that have been catalogued for the last 363 years. The seismicity is very intense along the Nazca-North
    Andes, Caribbean-North American and North Andes-South American collision zones and associated with regional tectonic compressional stresses that have locally increased and/or diminished by
    compressional and tensional stress, respectively, due to crustal thickness variations. High seismicity is also associated with the Nazca-Cocos diverging plate boundary whereas low seismicity is associated with the Panama-Nazca Transform Fault and the South American Plate.

  2. Pb isotopic geochemical study on the crustal structure of Tongbaishan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Pb isotopic composition of the Tongbai complex, distributed in the Tongbaishan to the west of the Dabieshan, ranges between the Dabie core complex and the Dabie ultral-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic complex, the latter having more radiogenic Pb isotopic composition than the former. Granites from the Jigongshan pluton, which intruded mainly into the Tongbai complex, are distinct from the Tongbai complex but similar to the Dabie core complex in Pb isotopic composition, showing that the magma of the Jigongshan granites was derived from the partial melting of the Dabie core complex. According to Pb isotopic compositional variation model in the vertical crustal section and magma source from the Jigongshan pluton, it is suggested that the Tongbai complex was an upper rock serial of the Dabie core complex, which is beneath the Dabie UHP metamorphic complex in the crustal structure of the Tongbai-Dabie orogenic belt. The Tongbai complex was not well preserved in the Dabie area due to the high exhumed crustal section. However, the crustal section in the Tongbai area was exhumed less than that in the Dabie area, and the deep crust in the Tongbai area still contains the basement composition similar to the Dabie core complex. Therefore, the crustal basements from the Dabie to Tongbai areas are united. The present distribution of the basement blocks in different locations of the Tongbai-Dabie orogenic belt reflects different exposure of the crustal section.

  3. The Sub-Crustal Stress Field in the Taiwan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Mehdi Eshagh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the sub-crustal stress in the Taiwan region. A tectonic configuration in this region is dominated by a collision between the Philippine oceanic plate and the Eurasian continental margin. The horizontal components of the sub-crustal stress are computed based on the modified _ formulae in terms of the stress function with a subsequent numerical differentiation. This modification increases the (degree-dependent convergence domain of the asymptotically-convergent series and consequently allows evaluating the stress components to a spectral resolution, which is compatible with currently available global crustal models. Moreover, the solution to the Vening _ (VMM inverse isostasy problem is explicitly incorporated in the stress function definition. The sub-crustal stress is then computed for a variable Moho geometry, instead of assuming only a constant Moho depth. The regional results reveal that the Philippine plate subduction underneath the Eurasian continental margin generates the shear sub-crustal stress along the Ryukyu Trench. Some stress anomalies associated with this subduction are also detected along both sides of the Okinawa Trough. A tensional stress along this divergent tectonic plate boundary is attributed to a back-arc rifting. The sub-crustal stress, which is generated by a (reverse subduction of the Eurasian plate under the Philippine plate, propagates along both sides of the Luzon (volcanic Arc. This stress field has a prevailing compressional pattern.

  4. Crustal construction along arc-backarc transition zone in the Japan Sea and implications for seismogenic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodaira, S.; No, T.; Sato, T.; Sato, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Japan Sea, which is a backarc basin between Japanese island arc and the Asian continent, has a unique setting in terms of a formation process as well as a seismogenic process. The opening of the Japan Sea was initiated by crustal rifting and the separation of Japan Island Arcs from the Asian continent in the early Oligocene (~ 32 Ma), with subsequent ocean floor spreading in the late Oligocene (~ 28 Ma). Then, the opening stopped, between 10 and 3.5 Ma, and at 3.5 Ma, the crustal shortening occurred under a strong compressional stress regime in the eastern margin of the Japan Sea. Several seismic surveys had been conducted in this region since the last more than two decades, however, a conclusive discussion concerning a crustal construction in the arc-backarc transition zone had not been made, due to lack of resolution of structural models and sparse distribution of profiles. Moreover, magnitude-7 class earthquakes repeatedly occurred along this margin, such as, the 1964 Niigata earthquake (M7.5), 1983 Nihonkai-Chubu earthquake (M7.7), 1993 Hokkaido Nansei-oki earthquake (M7.8), and those events are recognized to have compressional fault mechanisms by reflecting a present-day stress regime. However, structural factor controlling the distribution and mechanism of those compressional events has not been well studied. In order to understand a crustal formation process in this margin and its relation to the seismogenic process at the present, we have been carrying our series of active-source seismic survey to cover the eastern margin of the central to northern Japan Sea. Results from those surveys successfully mapped a distribution of the arc crust, the oceanic crust and the amorously thick oceanic crust in the transition zone. From a comparison the rupture zones of the magnitude-7 class earthquake with the detailed crustal structure, we conclude that the large compressional events, more than M>7.5, occurred in a seismogenic zone fault which used to be formed a

  5. Lunar Crustal Properties: Insights from the GRAIL Gravity Signatures of Lunar Impact Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, J. M.; Andrews-Hanna, J. C.; Evans, A. J.; Johnson, B. C.; Melosh, J., IV; Milbury, C.; Miljkovic, K.; Nimmo, F.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, D. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Wieczorek, M. A.; Zuber, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Impact cratering is a violent process, shattering and melting rock and excavating deep-seated material. The resulting scars are apparent on every planetary surface across our Solar System. Subsurface density variations associated with the resulting impact structures contain clues to aid in unlocking the details of this process. High-resolution gravity fields, such as those derived from the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission, are ideal for investigating these density variations. With gravity measurements from GRAIL and topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA), we derived high-resolution Bouguer gravity fields (i.e., the gravity field after the contribution from topography is removed) that we correlated with craters mapped from LOLA data. We found that the mass deficit beneath lunar impact craters relates directly to crater size, up to diameter ~130 km, whereas craters larger than this diameter display no further systematic change. This observation, coupled with the greater depth of impact damage expected beneath larger craters, indicates that some process is affecting the production and/or preservation of porosity at depth or otherwise altering the mean density beneath the larger craters (note, measurable mantle uplift is observed for craters larger than ~184-km diameter). The observed crater gravity anomalies, however, exhibit considerable variation about these mean trends, suggesting that other factors are also important in determining the bulk density of impact crater structures. Milbury et al. (this conference) have demonstrated that pre-impact crustal porosity strongly influences the resulting density contrast between the impact damage zone beneath a crater and its surroundings. Herein, we extend these studies using the same GRAIL- and LOLA-derived maps to further investigate the effects that crustal properties have on the bulk density of the rock beneath lunar impact features. We focus, in particular, on the processes that

  6. Monitoring Crustal Movement of the Coastal Zone in Eastern China with GPS Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, various dominating factors affecting crustal movement of the coastal zone in eastern China are analyzed, and major characteristics of crustal movement are summarized. Subduction of the pacific plate and Philippine plate and southeastward "escape" of Qinghai-Tibet plateau are believed to be dominating factors affecting crustal movement of that zone. Undoubtedly, it is a best way to monitor this kind of large-scale crustal movement with GPS technique. The feasibility of monitoring crustal m...

  7. Can bulk viscosity drive inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacher, T.; Stein-Schabes, J.A.; Turner, M.S.

    1987-04-01

    Contrary to other claims, we argue that, bulk viscosity associated with the interactions of nonrelativistic particles with relativistic particles around the time of the grand unified theory (GUT) phase transition cannot lead to inflation. Simply put, the key ingredient for inflation, negative pressure, cannot arise due to the bulk viscosity effects of a weakly-interacting mixture of relativistic and nonrelativistic particles. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Nitrogen speciation in mantle and crustal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Keppler, Hans

    2014-03-01

    Seventy-nine experiments have been carried out at 600-1400 °C, 2-35 kbar, and oxygen fugacities ranging from the Fe-FeO to the Re-ReO2 buffer to investigate the nitrogen speciation in mantle and crustal N-H-O fluids. Laser Raman analyses of fluid inclusions trapped in situ in quartz and olivine crystals show that N2 and/or NH3 are the only detectable nitrogen species in the fluids at the conditions of the present study. The results further show that in the fluids of the oxidized shallow upper mantle, nitrogen is mostly present as N2, while in the deep reduced upper mantle, NH3 is the dominant nitrogen species. Nitrogen speciation in subduction zone fluids is also calculated from the experimental data to constrain the efficiency of nitrogen recycling. The data show that a hot, oxidized slab is an efficient barrier for deep nitrogen subduction, while a cold, reduced slab would favor recycling nitrogen into the deep mantle. The nitrogen species in magmatic fluids of mid-ocean ridge basalt and arc magmas are predominantly N2, but a significant fraction of nitrogen can be NH3 at certain conditions. The nitrogen species in fluids released from the solidifying magma ocean and the reduced young mantle may have been mostly NH3. The release of such fluids may have created a reduced atmosphere on the every early Earth, with an elevated concentration of NH3. This may not only resolve the faint young Sun paradox but may also have created favorable conditions for the formation of biomolecules through Miller-Urey type reactions.

  9. 3D Geometry of Active Shortening, Uplift and Subsidence West of the Alpine Fault (South Island, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisetti, F.; Sibson, R. H.; Hamling, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Alpine Fault is the principal component of the transform boundary between the Australian and Pacific plates across the South Island of New Zealand, linking the opposite dipping Hikurangi and Puysegur subduction zones. In the northern South Island, the transition from the subducted W-dipping Pacific slab of the Hikurangi margin to the intra-continental transform margin is defined by earthquake foci from 350 to 100 km deep. West of the Alpine Fault the Australian crust above the slab has been incorporated into the collisional plate boundary and uplifted in a compressional belt up to 100 km wide. Retro-deformation and back-stripping of 10 regional transects utilising surface geology, seismic reflection lines and exploration wells define the progressive deformation of the Australian crust since 35 Ma along the collisional margin. The reconstructed geometry of faulted basement blocks is tied to localisation and evolution of overlying sedimentary basins, coeval with displacement on the Alpine Fault. Amounts of shortening, uplift and subsidence and fault activity are heterogeneous in space and time across the margin, and are controlled by compressional reactivation of inherited high-angle, N-S Paleogene normal faults oblique to the margin. However, significant differences also occur along the strike of the collisional margin, with major contrasts in uplift and subsidence north and south of lat. 41°.7, i.e. the region overlying the southern termination of the Hikurangi slab. These differences are highlighted by present day hydrographic anomalies in the Buller region, and by the pattern of filtered topography at > 75 km wavelength. Our data show that the 3D geometry of the Australian plate cannot be entirely attributed to inherited crustal heterogeneity of a flexured "retro-foreland" domain in the footwall of the Alpine Fault, and suggest the need of deeper dynamic interaction between the Pacific and Australian lithosphere along the subduction-collision margin.

  10. New geological evidence of crustal thickening in the Gangdese block prior to the Indo-Asian collision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Lin; LAI Qingzhou

    2003-01-01

    Recent mapping in the Gangdese block has revealed many leucogranites that are similar to those in the High Himalaya. These leucogranites formed at ~140 Ma as indicated by monazite Th-Pb ion-microprobe dating and cooled at ~130 Ma as indicated by muscovite 40Ar/39Ar dating. In conjunction with previous structural and paleogeographic studies, the new data indicate that the Gangdese block underwent crustal thickening and associated exhumation during ~140-130 Ma. In this regard, the southern margin of Eurasia continent was comparable to the modern South American Altiplano-Puna plateau, the prime example of active ocean-continent subduction and associated thickened crust. Specifically, the early stages of crustal thickening and uplifting of the Gangdese block may result from subduction of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean. If the Tibetan Plateau would form by accretion of a series of blocks with thickened crust, an elevated topographic plateau similar to the Altiplano- Puna plateau had formed before collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates. Then the Tibetan Plateau would have quickly thickened, uplifted, and begun to extend soon after onset of the collision. Thus, the deformational mechanism of the Tibetan Plateau is not distributed shortening, but rather concentrating deformation within regions of thin crust between the accreted blocks.

  11. Effects of muscle fibre shortening on the characteristics of surface motor unit potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Falces, Javier; Place, Nicolas

    2014-02-01

    Traditionally, studies dealing with muscle shortening have concentrated on assessing its impact on conduction velocity, and to this end, electrodes have been located between the end-plate and tendon regions. Possible morphologic changes in surface motor unit potentials (MUPs) as a result of muscle shortening have not, as yet, been evaluated or characterized. Using a convolutional MUP model, we investigated the effects of muscle shortening on the shape, amplitude, and duration characteristics of MUPs for different electrode positions relative to the fibre-tendon junction and for different depths of the MU in the muscle (MU-to-electrode distance). It was found that the effects of muscle shortening on MUP morphology depended not only on whether the electrodes were between the end-plate and the tendon junction or beyond the tendon junction, but also on the specific distance to this junction. When the electrodes lie between the end-plate and tendon junction, it was found that (1) the muscle shortening effect is not important for superficial MUs, (2) the sensitivity of MUP amplitude to muscle shortening increases with MU-to-electrode distance, and (3) the amplitude of the MUP negative phase is not affected by muscle shortening. This study provides a basis for the interpretation of the changes in MUP characteristics in experiments where both physiological and geometrical aspects of the muscle are varied.

  12. Multiple causes of fatigue during shortening contractions in rat slow twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortemo, Kristin Halvorsen; Munkvik, Morten; Lunde, Per Kristian; Sejersted, Ole M

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue in muscles that shorten might have other causes than fatigue during isometric contractions, since both cross-bridge cycling and energy demand are different in the two exercise modes. While isometric contractions are extensively studied, the causes of fatigue in shortening contractions are poorly mapped. Here, we investigate fatigue mechanisms during shortening contractions in slow twitch skeletal muscle in near physiological conditions. Fatigue was induced in rat soleus muscles with maintained blood supply by in situ shortening contractions at 37°C. Muscles were stimulated repeatedly (1 s on/off at 30 Hz) for 15 min against a constant load, allowing the muscle to shorten and perform work. Fatigue and subsequent recovery was examined at 20 s, 100 s and 15 min exercise. The effects of prior exercise were investigated in a second exercise bout. Fatigue developed in three distinct phases. During the first 20 s the regulatory protein Myosin Light Chain-2 (slow isoform, MLC-2s) was rapidly dephosphorylated in parallel with reduced rate of force development and reduced shortening. In the second phase there was degradation of high-energy phosphates and accumulation of lactate, and these changes were related to slowing of muscle relengthening and relaxation, culminating at 100 s exercise. Slowing of relaxation was also associated with increased leak of calcium from the SR. During the third phase of exercise there was restoration of high-energy phosphates and elimination of lactate, and the slowing of relaxation disappeared, whereas dephosphorylation of MLC-2s and reduced shortening prevailed. Prior exercise improved relaxation parameters in a subsequent exercise bout, and we propose that this effect is a result of less accumulation of lactate due to more rapid onset of oxidative metabolism. The correlation between dephosphorylation of MLC-2s and reduced shortening was confirmed in various experimental settings, and we suggest MLC-2s as an important regulator of

  13. Multiple causes of fatigue during shortening contractions in rat slow twitch skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Halvorsen Hortemo

    Full Text Available Fatigue in muscles that shorten might have other causes than fatigue during isometric contractions, since both cross-bridge cycling and energy demand are different in the two exercise modes. While isometric contractions are extensively studied, the causes of fatigue in shortening contractions are poorly mapped. Here, we investigate fatigue mechanisms during shortening contractions in slow twitch skeletal muscle in near physiological conditions. Fatigue was induced in rat soleus muscles with maintained blood supply by in situ shortening contractions at 37°C. Muscles were stimulated repeatedly (1 s on/off at 30 Hz for 15 min against a constant load, allowing the muscle to shorten and perform work. Fatigue and subsequent recovery was examined at 20 s, 100 s and 15 min exercise. The effects of prior exercise were investigated in a second exercise bout. Fatigue developed in three distinct phases. During the first 20 s the regulatory protein Myosin Light Chain-2 (slow isoform, MLC-2s was rapidly dephosphorylated in parallel with reduced rate of force development and reduced shortening. In the second phase there was degradation of high-energy phosphates and accumulation of lactate, and these changes were related to slowing of muscle relengthening and relaxation, culminating at 100 s exercise. Slowing of relaxation was also associated with increased leak of calcium from the SR. During the third phase of exercise there was restoration of high-energy phosphates and elimination of lactate, and the slowing of relaxation disappeared, whereas dephosphorylation of MLC-2s and reduced shortening prevailed. Prior exercise improved relaxation parameters in a subsequent exercise bout, and we propose that this effect is a result of less accumulation of lactate due to more rapid onset of oxidative metabolism. The correlation between dephosphorylation of MLC-2s and reduced shortening was confirmed in various experimental settings, and we suggest MLC-2s as an

  14. Migrating Ignimbrite Flares in the Central Andes, Implications for Crustal Evolution Based on Chemical, Isotopic, Geochronological, and GIS-Based Volumetric Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worner, G.; Brandmeier, M.; Freymuth, H.; Heistek, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Temporal and compositional patterns of Neogene ignimbrites in the Central Andes were analysed using GIS and geostatistical modelling based on 203 digitized ignimbrite sheets for which geochronological, geochemical, and Sr-Nd-Pb-isotopic data on pumices as well as Sr-O isotopes on minerals from selected samples were compiled and compared to compositional and isotopic data from andesite lavas. Composition, timing, volumes and sources of erupted ignimbrite deposits are thus constrained and magma volumes through space and time are calculated. The total erupted ignimbrite magma volume of 31,000 km3 (minimum value) in the past 30 Ma indicate an average magmatic addition of 20-30 km3*Ma/km, similar to the basaltic "base"-flux for arc magmatism. Ignimbrite flare-ups are, however, rather punctuated, short-lived events well separated in space and time. There is a clear N-S "younging" of ignimbrite pulses from N to S at 19-24 Ma, 13-14 Ma, 6-10 Ma and 3-6 Ma. Ignimbrite eruptions occurred in the wake of subduction of the Juan-Fernandez ridge on the Nazca Plate passing below the Central Andes from N to S. Low angle subduction caused compression and fluid release is followed by massive inflow and melting of asthenospheric mantle when the slab steepened again after the passing of the ridge. This in turn caused massive melting within the crust aided by advective heat transport. Differences in chemical and isotopic composition of the large-volume ignimbrites are related to changes in crustal thickness, and different "preconditioning" during the Andean orogeny at a given space in time. Isotope data and whole rock compositional data suggest a higher degree of crustal assimilation for the younger Altiplano ignimbrites in the S (c. 50%) compared to the older (22-19 Ma) ignimbrites in the N were the crustal component is significantly less (20%). REE compositions reflect changes in crustal thickness with a "transition" at c. 13-9 Ma that can be related to accelerated crustal shortening

  15. LINE-1-derived poly(A) microsatellites undergo rapid shortening and create somatic and germline mosaicism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandi, Fiorella C; Rosser, James M; An, Wenfeng

    2013-03-01

    Interspersed and tandem repeat sequences comprise the bulk of mammalian genomes. Interspersed repeats result from successive replication by transposable elements, such as Alu and long interspersed element type 1 (L1). Microsatellites are tandem repeats of 1-6 base pairs, among which poly(A) microsatellites are the most abundant in the human genome. The rise and fall of a microsatellite has been depicted as a life cycle. Previous studies have demonstrated that Alu and L1 insertions are a major source of A-rich microsatellites owing to the concurrent formation of a poly(A) DNA tract at the 3'-end of each insertion. The fate of such poly(A) tracts has been studied by surveying the length distribution of genomic resident Alu and L1 insertions. However, these cross-sectional studies provide no information about the tempo of mutation immediately after birth. In this study, de novo L1 insertions were created using a transgenic L1 mouse model and traced through generations to investigate the early life of poly(A) microsatellites. High frequencies of intra-individual and intergenerational shortening were observed for long poly(A) tracts, creating somatic and germline mosaicism at the insertion site, whereas little variation was observed for short poly(A) alleles. As poly(A) microsatellites are the major intrinsic signal for nucleosome positioning, their remarkable abundance and variability make them a significant source of epigenetic variation. Thus, the birth of poly(A) microsatellites from retrotransposons and the subsequent rapid and variable shortening represent a new way with which retrotransposons can modify the genetic and epigenetic architecture of our genome.

  16. Shortening rates across the foothills of the Western Kunlun (Xinjiang, China) inferred from geomorphic measurements and cosmogenic 10Be dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudroy, T.; van der Woerd, J.; Li, H.; Barrier, L.; Tapponnier, P.; Simoes, M.; Thuizat, R.; Pan, J.; Si, J.; Xu, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Western Kunlun, which bounds north-western Tibetan Plateau, is one of the largest mountain range of Asia, with altitudes peaking at 6500-7500 m asl, and crustal thicknesses of up to ~70 km. North of the plateau, in the foreland of the range, an active fold-and-thrust belt extends 200 km into the Tarim basin, but remains poorly documented regarding amounts of shortening or deformation rates. We discuss the distribution of deformation on the basis of a study of specific foreland folds and faults using high resolution satellite imagery, digital elevation models, seismic reflection data, on-site topographic measurements and cosmogenic isotope dating. South of Hotan city, the 250 km-long Tekelike Fault - the mountain-front thrust that dips beneath the 45 km-wide, 5400m-high Tekelike Range, a basement ramp-anticline - cuts and offsets terraces abandoned by the Karakash River. 10Be concentrations of surface and sub-surface samples from these terraces upper-most deposits yield an exposure age of about 100 kyr for the upper terrace that lies 140 m above the present river bed, implying an incision rate of 1.4 mm/yr. Assuming a dip of 45 +/-15° and neglecting changes in river dynamics over this time period, this age would imply a minimum, average shortening rate of 1.4 +/- 0.7 mm/yr across the thrust. Farther North, 100 to 200 km-long WNW-ESE trending anticlines deform the thick Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary series lying in the foreland of the range. The 150 km-long, 35 km-wide Yecheng-Pishan anticline folds Plio-Quaternary molasses. Drainages crossing this growing anticline have abandoned flights of inset terraces on the sides of wind-gaps. The maximum elevation of the highest terrace above local drainage is about 350m. Near Pishan city, flat, well-preserved terrace surfaces are covered by thin loess, in turn capped by loose gravel pavement. On the uppermost two terraces of this valley, 70 and 120 meters-high, cosmogenic 10Be concentrations in surface and sub

  17. Telomere shortening in diaphragm and tibialis anterior muscles of aged mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Troy C; Grange, Robert W; Lowe, Dawn A

    2007-09-01

    The progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is, in part, due to satellite cell senescence driven by high replicative pressure as these muscle stem cells repeatedly divide and fuse to damaged muscle fibers. We hypothesize that telomere shortening in satellite cells underlies their senescence. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the diaphragm and a leg muscle from dystrophic mice of various ages for telomere dynamics. We found 30% telomere shortening in tibialis anterior muscles from 600-day-old mdx mice relative to age-matched wildtype mice. We also found a more severe shortening of telomere length in diaphragm muscles of old mdx mice. In those muscles, telomeres were shortened by approximately 15% and 40% in 100- and 600-day-old mdx mice, respectively. These findings indicate that satellite cells undergo telomere erosion, which may contribute to the inability of these cells to perpetually repair DMD muscle.

  18. Looking for a bulk point

    CERN Document Server

    Maldacena, Juan; Zhiboedov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We consider Lorentzian correlators of local operators. In perturbation theory, singularities occur when we can draw a position-space Landau diagram with null lines. In theories with gravity duals, we can also draw Landau diagrams in the bulk. We argue that certain singularities can arise only from bulk diagrams, not from boundary diagrams. As has been previously observed, these singularities are a clear diagnostic of bulk locality. We analyze some properties of these perturbative singularities and discuss their relation to the OPE and the dimensions of double-trace operators. In the exact nonperturbative theory, we expect no singularity at these locations. We prove this statement in 1+1 dimensions by CFT methods.

  19. Measuring crustal convergence using rock exhumation along the complex glaciated Chugach Mountains, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotila, J. A.; Buscher, J.

    2002-12-01

    Rates of rock uplift often constrain magnitudes of convergent plate motion in collisional settings. In complex orogenic belts, however, these rates can be difficult to measure. In southeast Alaska, a rapidly-evolving mountain system is centered at a syntaxial bend in the Pacific-North American plate boundary. Rugged topography of the Chugach Mountains stretches for more than 500 km along the hanging wall of the Aleutian Trench, above a colliding microplate, and as coast ranges along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather transform fault. At each segment of the plate boundary, crustal convergence within North America should vary according to the obliquity of plate motion and the degree of underthrusting. Geodetic and neotectonic studies of rapidly-eroding structures have yet to define rates of horizontal plate motion partitioning. Surface uplift studies, based on short term geodesy or Holocene motion of coastal landforms, are also complicated by megathrust elastic strain accumulation cycles and the viscoelastic response to recent glacial ice thinning. It is thus important to measure exhumation and the erosional transfer of mass as a proxy for the degree of upper crustal convergence accommodated by rock uplift. We have attempted to determine exhumation pattern where the highly-deformed, oceanic and continental rocks of the Yakutat microplate collide with North America. Although the total shortening rate between this microplate and North America is of the order ~3-5 cm/yr, an unconstrained magnitude of shortening is absorbed by imbricate thrust faults within it, the suture between it and North America, and within the previously accreted terranes that form the edge of the continent. We have constrained rock cooling histories as a proxy for exhumation on samples along a dense grid that spans major structural elements, including the Pamplona and Chugach-St. Elias fault systems. Apatite and zircon radiogenic helium ages provide a range in temperature sensitivity that can be used

  20. Effects of fiber type on force depression after active shortening in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joumaa, V; Power, G A; Hisey, B; Caicedo, A; Stutz, J; Herzog, W

    2015-07-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate force depression in Type I and Type II muscle fibers. Experiments were performed using skinned fibers from rabbit soleus and psoas muscles. Force depression was quantified after active fiber shortening from an average sarcomere length (SL) of 3.2µ m to an average SL of 2.6 µm at an absolute speed of 0.115f iber length/s and at a relative speed corresponding to 17% of the unloaded shortening velocity (V0) in each type of fibers. Force decay and mechanical work during shortening were also compared between fiber types. After mechanical testing, each fiber was subjected to myosin heavy chain (MHC) analysis in order to confirm its type (Type I expressing MHC I, and Type II expressing MHC IId). Type II fibers showed greater steady-state force depression after active shortening at a speed of 0.115 fiber length/s than Type I fibers (14.5±1.5% versus 7.8±1.7%). Moreover, at this absolute shortening speed, Type I fibers showed a significantly greater rate of force decay during shortening and produced less mechanical work than Type II fibers. When active shortening was performed at the same relative speed (17% V0), the difference in force depression between fiber types was abolished. These results suggest that no intrinsic differences were at the origin of the disparate force depressions observed in Type I and Type II fibers when actively shortened at the same absolute speed, but rather their distinct force-velocity relationships.

  1. Bulk nano-crystalline alloys

    OpenAIRE

    T.-S. Chin; Lin, C. Y.; Lee, M.C.; R.T. Huang; S. M. Huang

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Fe–B–Y–Nb–Cu, 2 mm in diameter, were successfully annealed to become bulk nano-crystalline alloys (BNCAs) with α-Fe crystallite 11–13 nm in size. A ‘crystallization-and-stop’ model was proposed to explain this behavior. Following this model, alloy-design criteria were elucidated and confirmed successful on another Fe-based BMG Fe–B–Si–Nb–Cu, 1 mm in diameter, with crystallite sizes 10–40 nm. It was concluded that BNCAs can be designed in general by the proposed cr...

  2. Isotopic and chemical studies of early crustal metasedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Stein B.

    1988-01-01

    The aim, within the bounds of the Early Crustal Genesis Project, was the isotopic and chemical study of selected early crustal meta-sedimentary rocks. Western Australia was chosen as the first field area to examine, as the Yilgarn and Pilbara Blocks comprise one of the largest and most varied Precambrian terranes. Furthermore, the Western Gneiss Terrane (on the western flank of the Yilgarn Block) and the Pilbara Block are both non-greenstone in character; these types of terrane were relatively neglected, but are of great significance in the understanding of early crustal meta-sediments. The meta-sediments of aluminous or peraluminous character, commonly also enriched in Mg and/or Fe relative to the more common pelitic meta-sediments, and at many locations, deficient in one or more of the elements Ca, N, and K, were initially chosen.

  3. Crustal Heat Production and Mantle Heat Flow in Southeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡圣标; 汪集旸

    1994-01-01

    The correlation between seismic velocity (vp) and radiogenic heat production (A) en-ables the distribution of crustal heat production to be evaluated,from which the mantle heat flow for 21seismic velocity-depth profiles located along the two continental geotraverses in Southeast China can bededuced.Several approaches have been proposed to special problems connected with the conversion ofseismic velocities into heat production in orogenic areas.The results show that the crustal heat flow inSoutheast China is quite inhomogeneous,varying between 17.8 and 46 mW·m-2,which can be attribut-ed to the complicated crustal structure related to overthrusting and overlapping in the upper crust.The re-markable regional variation in the mantle heat flow,ranging from 23.2 to 41.6 mW·m-2,correspondsto the large-scale tectonothermal evolution of the orogenic belts.

  4. Crustal structure and active tectonics in the Eastern Alps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brückl, E.; Behm, M.; Decker, K.;

    2010-01-01

    fragment (PA), was interpreted and a triple junction was inferred. The goal of this study has been to relate these deep crustal structures to active tectonics. We used elastic plate modeling to reconsider the Moho fragmentation. We interpret subduction of EU below AD and PA from north to south...... and underthusting of AD mantle below PA from southwest to northeast. The Moho fragmentation correlates well with major upper crustal structures and is supported by gravity, seismic, and geodetic data. An analysis of crustal thickening suggests that active convergence is associated with continued thrusting...... and lateral extrusion in the central Eastern Alps and thickening of the Adriatic indenter under the Southern Alps. According to the velocity relations at the triple junction, PA moves relative to EU and AD along ENE and SE striking faults, mainly by strike slip. An eastward directed extensional component...

  5. Could an increase in airway smooth muscle shortening velocity cause airway hyperresponsiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Siddiqui, Sana; Donovan, Graham M; Martin, James G; Sneyd, James; Bates, Jason H T; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is a characteristic feature of asthma. It has been proposed that an increase in the shortening velocity of airway smooth muscle (ASM) could contribute to AHR. To address this possibility, we tested whether an increase in the isotonic shortening velocity of ASM is associated with an increase in the rate and total amount of shortening when ASM is subjected to an oscillating load, as occurs during breathing. Experiments were performed in vitro using 27 rat tracheal ASM strips supramaximally stimulated with methacholine. Isotonic velocity at 20% isometric force (Fiso) was measured, and then the load on the muscle was varied sinusoidally (0.33 ± 0.25 Fiso, 1.2 Hz) for 20 min, while muscle length was measured. A large amplitude oscillation was applied every 4 min to simulate a deep breath. We found that: 1) ASM strips with a higher isotonic velocity shortened more quickly during the force oscillations, both initially (P shortening during the force oscillation protocol (P shortening with increased isotonic velocity could be explained by a change in either the cycling rate of phosphorylated cross bridges or the rate of myosin light chain phosphorylation. We conclude that, if asthma involves an increase in ASM velocity, this could be an important factor in the associated AHR.

  6. Tetanic force potentiation of mouse fast muscle is shortening speed dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittings, William; Huang, Jian; Vandenboom, Rene

    2012-10-01

    The activity dependent potentiation of peak isometric force associated with phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) is generally restricted to low activation frequencies. The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle shortening speed influenced the stimulus frequency domain over which concentric force potentiation was observed. To this end, mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles (in vitro, 25 °C) were activated at a range of test frequencies (10, 25, 45, 70 or 100 Hz) during shortening ramps at 0.10, 0.30 or 0.50 of the maximal velocity of shortening (V(max)). This procedure was performed before and after a standard conditioning stimulus (CS) that elevated RLC phosphorylation from 0.08 ± 0.01 (rest) to 0.55 ± 0.01 (stimulated) moles phosphate per mol RLC, respectively (n = 9-11) (P shortening speed also increased the activation frequency at which concentric force potentiation was maximal, i.e. from 10 Hz at 0.10 V(max) to 10-25 and 25-45 Hz at 0.30 and 0.50 V(max), respectively. These results indicate that both the magnitude of and activation frequency dependence for concentric force potentiation of mouse EDL muscle is shortening speed dependent. Thus, muscle shortening speed may be a critical factor determining the functional utility of the myosin RLC phosphorylation mechanism.

  7. Compression and Combining Based on Channel Shortening and Rank Reduction Technique for Cooperative Wireless Sensor Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ahmed, Qasim Zeeshan

    2013-12-18

    This paper investigates and compares the performance of wireless sensor networks where sensors operate on the principles of cooperative communications. We consider a scenario where the source transmits signals to the destination with the help of L sensors. As the destination has the capacity of processing only U out of these L signals, the strongest U signals are selected while the remaining (L?U) signals are suppressed. A preprocessing block similar to channel-shortening is proposed in this contribution. However, this preprocessing block employs a rank-reduction technique instead of channel-shortening. By employing this preprocessing, we are able to decrease the computational complexity of the system without affecting the bit error rate (BER) performance. From our simulations, it can be shown that these schemes outperform the channel-shortening schemes in terms of computational complexity. In addition, the proposed schemes have a superior BER performance as compared to channel-shortening schemes when sensors employ fixed gain amplification. However, for sensors which employ variable gain amplification, a tradeoff exists in terms of BER performance between the channel-shortening and these schemes. These schemes outperform channel-shortening scheme for lower signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Monitoring Crustal Deformations with Radar Interferometry:A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国祥; 丁晓利; 黄丁发

    2004-01-01

    The crustal movements, probably motivating earthquakes, are considered as one of the main geodynamic sources. The quantitative measurements of ground surface deformations are vital for studying mechanisms of the buried faults or even estimating earthquake potential. A new space-geodetic technology, synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR), can be applied to detect such large-area deformations, and has demonstrated some prominent advantages. This paper reviews the capacity and limitations of InSAR, and summarises the existing applications including some of our results in studying the earthquake-related crustal motions.Finally it gives the outlook for the future development of InSAR.

  9. Geodynamical basis for crustal deformation under the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.-S.

    1985-01-01

    Plate tectonics and satellite-derived gravity data are used to examine crustal deformation under the Tibetan Plateau. A spherical harmonic analysis is given for the global plate boundary system, and the crustal stresses in Tibet are calculated from satellite gravity data. A superimposed stress system is constructed. The stress patterns reveal that the cold downwelling mantle convection flow beneath southern Tibet pulls the Indian plate down but applies a bending moment on the end of the plate to uplift and support the mass of the Himalayas.

  10. Scaling behaviour in temporal fluctuations of crustal seismicity in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Telesca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The crustal seismicity of Taiwan was investigated by means of the Allan Factor analysis and Count-based Periodogram, which allow to identify scaling behaviour in point processes and to quantify their temporal fluctuations by means of the estimate of the scaling exponent. Our findings point out to the presence of two time-scaling regions in the crustal Taiwanese seismicity. The first region, involving the intermediate timescales can be probably linked with aftershock activity, while the second region, involving the large timescales could be related with the background seismicity.

  11. Deep crustal structure between the Selkirk Crest, Idaho and the Whitefish Range, Montana from magnetotelluric imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, P. A.; Box, S. E.; Pellerin, L.

    2006-12-01

    conductive (1-10 Ømega m) sub-Prichard layer (below the lowest Prichard unit mapped at the surface), and moderately to highly resistive (103-104 Ømega m) pre-Belt crystalline basement. The Eocene Purcell trench detachment fault can be traced dipping 25-30° east down to about 20 km depth, flattening along the base of the shallow conductive layer to its eastern end, fully 100 km east of the surface trace of the fault. Realignment of the eastern edges of the shallow and deep conductive layers produces a single west-dipping horizon and suggests about 35 km of Eocene top-to-the-east extension along the northern Purcell trench detachment fault. Reversal of that displacement reveals the crustal structure as it existed at the end of late Mesozoic Cordilleran thrusting. A major thrust decollement at 10-12 km, well-defined below the Sylvanite anticline, occurs below the deepest exposed Prichard units but above the shallow conductive layer. The shallow and deep conductive layers are suggested to be thrust repetitions of a single original layer separated by a thrust imbricate of Archean crystalline basement, 35 km wide and 5-8 km thick, centered below the Sylvanite anticline. The conductive layers are interpreted as sub-Prichard sedimentary strata with disseminated carbonaceous matter or sulfide grains interconnected by shearing. This interpretation is consistent with disseminated sulfides within the lowest exposed Prichard, and emphasizes the dramatic increase in conductivity effected by shearing. Total Cordilleran thrust shortening of 150-200 km is indicated.

  12. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise i...

  13. The Universe With Bulk Viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Exact solutions for a model with variable G, A and bulk viscosity areobtained. Inflationary solutions with constant (de Sitter-type) and variable energydensity are found. An expanding anisotropic universe is found to isotropize duringits expansion but a static universe cannot isotropize. The gravitational constant isfound to increase with time and the cosmological constant decreases with time asAo∝t-2.

  14. A Kinematic Fault Network Model of Crustal Deformation for California and Its Application to the Seismic Hazard Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Y.; Shen, Z.; Harmsen, S.; Petersen, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    We invert GPS observations to determine the slip rates on major faults in California based on a kinematic fault model of crustal deformation with geological slip rate constraints. Assuming an elastic half-space, we interpret secular surface deformation using a kinematic fault network model with each fault segment slipping beneath a locking depth. This model simulates both block-like deformation and elastic strain accumulation within each bounding block. Each fault segment is linked to its adjacent elements with slip continuity imposed at fault nodes or intersections. The GPS observations across California and its neighbors are obtained from the SCEC WGCEP project of California Crustal Motion Map version 1.0 and SCEC Crustal Motion Map 4.0. Our fault models are based on the SCEC UCERF 2.0 fault database, a previous southern California block model by Shen and Jackson, and the San Francisco Bay area block model by d’Alessio et al. Our inversion shows a slip rate ranging from 20 to 26 mm/yr for the northern San Andreas from the Santa Cruz Mountain to the Peninsula segment. Slip rates vary from 8 to 14 mm/yr along the Hayward to the Maacama segment, and from 17 to 6 mm/yr along the central Calaveras to West Napa. For the central California creeping section, we find a depth dependent slip rate with an average slip rate of 23 mm/yr across the upper 5 km and 30 mm/yr underneath. Slip rates range from 30 mm/yr along the Parkfield and central California creeping section of the San Andres to an average of 6 mm/yr on the San Bernardino Mountain segment. On the southern San Andreas, slip rates vary from 21 to 30 mm/yr from the Cochella Valley to the Imperial Valley, and from 7 to 16 mm/yr along the San Jacinto segments. The shortening rate across the greater Los Angeles region is consistent with the regional tectonics and crustal thickening in the area. We are now in the process of applying the result to seismic hazard evaluation. Overall the geodetic and geological derived

  15. Depressant effect of active shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelund, M C

    1983-03-01

    The effect of shortening during activity, previously characterized in vertebrate striated muscle, was investigated in the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of the mollusc Mytilus edulis. This muscle is considered to have an essentially myosin-linked Ca2+-regulatory system. Release steps of different amplitude were performed during isometric phasic contraction, and force redevelopment was recorded at a muscle length L1, defined as 90% of the muscle length at which a slight resting tension, approximately 1 mN, appeared in the presence of 2.5 X 10(-5) M 5-HT. Active shortening caused a graded depression of the contractile force without affecting the total duration of the mechanical response. Peak redeveloped force after muscle shortening of 0.06 L1 and 0.18 L1 was reduced by approximately 1.5% and 7.0%, respectively, of the isometric tension value at L1. The shortening effect was fully reversible, and had a lifetime of approximately 8 to 9 s. The depressant effect of active shortening was augmented at a reduced degree of activation of the muscle. The presence of caffeine and dantrolene and altered tonicity of the extracellular medium (0.9 T-1.2 T) did not significantly affect the shortening induced depression obtained at maximum phasic activation of the preparation. The nature of the shortening effect is compared to that obtained in vertebrate striated muscle and is discussed on the basis of differences in Ca2+-regulation of the contractile system in these two muscles.

  16. Diaphragm curvature modulates the relationship between muscle shortening and volume displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greybeck, Brad J; Wettergreen, Matthew; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Boriek, Aladin M

    2011-07-01

    During physiological spontaneous breathing maneuvers, the diaphragm displaces volume while maintaining curvature. However, with maximal diaphragm activation, curvature decreases sharply. We tested the hypotheses that the relationship between diaphragm muscle shortening and volume displacement (VD) is nonlinear and that curvature is a determinant of such a relationship. Radiopaque markers were surgically placed on three neighboring muscle fibers in the midcostal region of the diaphragm in six dogs. The three-dimensional locations were determined using biplanar fluoroscopy and diaphragm VD, curvature, and muscle shortening were computed in the prone and supine postures during spontaneous breathing (SB), spontaneous inspiration efforts after airway occlusion at lung volumes ranging from functional residual capacity (FRC) to total lung capacity, and during bilateral maximal phrenic nerve stimulation at those same lung volumes. In supine dogs, diaphragm VD was approximately two- to three-fold greater during maximal phrenic nerve stimulation than during SB. The contribution of muscle shortening to VD nonlinearly increases with level of diaphragm activation independent of posture. During submaximal diaphragm activation, the contribution is essentially linear due to constancy of diaphragm curvature in both the prone and supine posture. However, the sudden loss of curvature during maximal bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation at muscle shortening values greater than 40% (ΔL/L(FRC)) causes a nonlinear increase in the contribution of muscle shortening to diaphragm VD, which is concomitant with a nonlinear change in diaphragm curvature. We conclude that the nonlinear relationship between diaphragm muscle shortening and its VD is, in part, due to a loss of its curvature at extreme muscle shortening.

  17. Estimation of the shortening rate since late Pleistocene in the Aksu area on the southern flank of the Tianshan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xin

    2001-01-01

    [1]Molnar, P., Tapponnier, P., Cenozoic tectonics of Asia: Effects on a continental collision, Science, 1975, 189: 419-426.[2]Molnar, P., Deng Qidong, Faulting associated with large earthquakes and the average rate of deformation in central and eastern Asia, J. Geophys. Res., 1984, 89: 6203-6227.[3]Hendrix, M. S., Dumitru, T. A., Graham, S. A., Late Oligocene-early Miocene unroofing in the Chinese Tianshan: An early effect of the India-Asia collision, Geology, 1994, 22: 487-490.[4]Sobel, R. E., Dumitru, T. A., Thrusting and exhumation around the margins of the western Tarim Basin during the India-Asia collision, J. Geophys. Res., 1997, 102: 5043-5063.[5]Ghose, S., Hamburger, M. W., Virieux, J., Three-dimentional velocity structure and earthquake locations beneath the northern Tianshan of Kyrgyzstan, central Asia, J. Geophys. Res., 1998, 103: 2725-2748.[6]Ghose, S., Hamburger, M. W., Ammon, C. J., Source parameters of moderate-sized earthquakes in the Tianshan, central Asia from regional moment tensor inversion, Geophys. Res. lett., 1998, 25: 3181-3184.[7]Abdrakhmatov, K. Ye, Aldazhanov, S. A., Hager, B. H. et al., Relatively recent construction of the Tianshan inferred from GPS measurements of present-day curstal deformation rates, Nature, 1996, 384: 450-452.[8]Wang Qi, Ding Guoyu, Qiao Xuejun et al., Present-day Tianshan's quick shortening and the south-north block's relative movement, Chinese Science Bulletin (in Chinese), 2000, 45(14): 1543-1547.[9]Zhu Wenyao, Wang Xiaoya, Chen Yuyi et al., Crustal motion of Chinese mainland monitored by GPS, Science in China, Ser. D, 2000, 43(2): 394-400.[10]Avouac, J. P., Tapponnier, P., Bai, M. et al., Active thrusting and folding along the northern Tianshan and late cenozoic rotation of the Tarim relative to Dzungaria and Kazakhstan, J. Geopgys. Res., 1993, 98: 6755-6804.[11]Burtman, V. S.,Skobelev, S. F., Molnar, P., Late cenozoic slip on the Talas-Ferghana fault, the Tianshan

  18. Ellipticity and crustal corrections for seismic body wave paths: application to Mars and Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, S.; Garcia, R.; Wieczorek, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Forward modeling of seismic body wave travel times and ray parameters for a given density and seismic velocity model is an important tool to investigate the interior structure of planets. The popular toolbox TauP by Crotwell et al. (1999) facilitates application to planets other than Earth, but does not consider a planet's ellipticity nor its surface topography. Due to their ellipticity, smaller radii and larger relative surface topography, these corrections become more significant in predicting seismic observations for celestial bodies like the Moon and Mars. In preparation for NASA's INSIGHT discovery mission (launch in March 2016), we include ellipticity corrections, geometrical spreading and topography corrections into TauP. The respective TauP extensions, as well as Lunar and Martian applications are presented: Previously, Lunar and Martian seismic velocity models have been proposed based on mass, moment of inertia, Love numbers and estimated bulk composition, and in case of the Moon also based on seismic data acquired during the Apollo Program (1969-1977). Due to the lack of direct seismic evidence, current Martian seismic velocity models vary widely and exhibit large travel time excursions, as well as considerable variations in epicentral distance ranges for which a given body wave is predicted to arrive. We discuss the effects of Lunar and Martian ellipticity and crustal structure on seismic travel times for a set of seismic velocity models and compare these to variations observed between the different 1D models. This comparison demonstrates the relevance of modeling the effects of ellipticity and crustal thickness during interpretation of seismic data acquired on planets like Mars or Moon.

  19. Combined crustal-geological cross-section of Ellesmere Island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephenson, Randell Alexander; Schiffer, Christian; Oakey, Gordon

    (Eurekan “Orogeny”). An almost complete absence of information about the crustal or lithosphere structure of Ellesmere Island has been addressed by the acquisition of teleseismic data between 2010 and 2012 on a passive seismological array called ELLITE (“Ellesmere Island Teleseismic Experiment...

  20. A proposed concept for a crustal dynamics information management network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, G. M.; Renfrow, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    The findings of a requirements and feasibility analysis of the present and potential producers, users, and repositories of space-derived geodetic information are summarized. A proposed concept is presented for a crustal dynamics information management network that would apply state of the art concepts of information management technology to meet the expanding needs of the producers, users, and archivists of this geodetic information.

  1. Crustal structure across the Filchner Ronne Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, U.; Jokat, W.

    2012-04-01

    Crustal structure across the Filchner Ronne Shelf, Antarctica U. Herter, W. Jokat One large gap in understanding the tectonic evolution of Antarctica beside the few rock outcrops on the continent is the missing information on crustal thickness along its margins but also in its interior. E.g., the few marine deep seismic lines are located mainly along the Antarctic Peninsula/Pacific margin, but for most of the East Antarctic margins such information is not available. In this contribution we concentrate on one of the most remote areas in Antarctica, the Filchner Ronne Shelf (FRS). The area is underlain by approximately 12 km of sediments, but its crustal fabric is questionable. Thus, some existing deep seismic sounding data were modeled and reinterpreted. Especially, data gathered in 1995 have been analyzed, and a more detailed 2D P-wave velocity model has been calculated. For the profiles in total 12 RefTek stations each with nine geophone chains were placed on the ice shelf and 3175 airgun shots along a 480 km transect were fired by two 32 l BOLT-Airguns each 60 s. Signals were recorded up to distances of 180 km. Due to the ice coverage it was not possible to acquire the data without gaps or along straight lines, which caused some difficulties in the modeling process. Furthermore, in the new model all data from older experiments of the AWI and Soviet Antarctic expeditions acquired with dynamite sources were incorporated. The model shows a sedimentary basin with a thickness up to 12 km and a large velocity inversion in a deeper sediment unit. The crustal thickness varies from 40 km beneath the Antarctic Peninsula, and 14 km of basement in the center part of the profile. Towards Berkner Island the crust thickens again, but the top of the basement is still 11 km deep. The lower crustal velocities range between 6.8 and 7.2 km/s. We interpret the crustal structure as clear evidence for the presence of a failed rift. The initial stretching of the continental crust

  2. Crustal Seismicity and Recent Faults in Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Comte, D.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Herail, G.

    2004-12-01

    Most seismological studies in southern Peru have been focused on the downgoing slab seismicity in order to constrain the Wadati-Benioff zone. This study deals with the intra-continental seismicity of the southern Peru forearc (17,3° S - 18,5° S) in a post-seismic context (Arequipa thrust earthquake, Mw=8.4, 23 June, 2001). It is difficult to identify historical crustal earthquake from available catalogues, however some crustal events teleseismically recorded can be found since 1976; they exhibit normal focal mechanism solutions in the southern Peru volcanic arc and inverse focal mechanism solutions in the Central Depression. Following a notable increase of shallow crustal seismicity located close to the Western Cordillera after the 23 June 2001, a temporary seismic network was deployed between January and March 2003 in order to study the Wadati-Benioff zone and monitoring the crustal seismicity in southern Peru. From the about 1700 events locally recorded by the local network, 300 crustal earthquakes were identified in the Peruvian forearc between Tacna and Moquegua. This crustal seismicity is distributed along a lineament located at depths between 0 and 60 km, dipping at about 45° from the Western Cordillera towards the coast, almost perpendicular to the subducting slab; this behaviour was previously observed in northern Chile and in southern Peru, north of the study zone (16° S). In the Central Depression, seismic activity is not superficial occurring between 25-60 km depth and it is mostly characterized by inverse focal mechanism solutions. Superficial faults situated in the Central Depression and in the Coastal Cordillera can not be associated with the seismic activity observed in this area. However, in the Pre-Cordillera, crustal seismicity occurs at depths between 0-15 km and can be correlated with shallow fault systems recognized by satellite images and on the field. For examples, the Incapuquio fault system which was a transpressive system in Cretaceous

  3. Strong decrease in ultrasonic Vp in lower crustal rocks at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Y.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakajima, T.; Khan, S. R.; Arima, M.

    2003-12-01

    In order to determine temperature derivatives of P-wave velocities (Vp) at pressure-temperature conditions of island arc lower crust, we measured Vp in various lower crustal rocks from exposed crustal section of Kohistan arc at temperature up to 1000 ° C at pressure 1.0 GPa. The rock sample is embedded in a cylinder of pressure transmitting material (talc). Pt buffer rod is used to isolate the piezo-electric transducer from the high-temperature condition. Travel times of P-wave through the rock sample were determined with the pulse reflection technique. Sample length at experimental conditions was estimated with adiabatic bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficient of rock samples studied. The uncertainties of Vp are +/- 0.3 %. Kohistan arc lower crust is mainly composed of gabbronorite, wehrlite (Chilas complex), amphibolite, tonalite (Kamila amphibolite), pyroxene granulite, garnet granulite, garnet pyroxenite, websterite, and dunite (Jijal complex). Vp measurements were performed for 6 rock samples at 100 ° C intervals up to 1000 ° C. Ultrasonic determinations of Vp in the Kohistan lower crustal rocks show nonlinear temperature dependence. With increasing temperature, Vp values decrease slightly at lower temperature conditions, and decrease rapidly at higher temperature conditions. Cusp on the Vp - temperature profiles was identified for all samples. Cusp locates at various temperatures (300-800 ° C) depending the rock sample measured. The temperature derivative above the cusp temperature is 1.8 - 5.8 times higher than the temperature derivative below the cusp temperature. Vp value is 7.0 km/s at 800 ° C and 1 GPa for the gabbronorite, 7.6 km/s at 800 ° C for the wehrlite, 7.2 km/s at 900 ° C for the garnet granulite, 7.5 km/s at 900 ° C for the garnet pyroxenite, 7.2 km/s at 900 ° C for the websterite, and 8.0 km/s at 900 ° C for the duntie.

  4. Spine biomechanics associated with the shortened, modern one-plane golf swing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, R Barry; Brumitt, Jason

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare kinetic, kinematic, and performance variables associated with full and shortened modern backswings in a skilled group of modern swing (one-plane) golfers. Shortening the modern golf backswing is proposed to reduce vertebral spine stress, but supporting evidence is lacking and performance implications are unknown. Thirteen male golfers performed ten swings of each swing type using their own 7-iron club. Biomechanical-dependent variables included the X-Factor kinematic data and spine kinetics. Performance-related dependent variables included club head velocity (CHV), shot distance, and accuracy (distance from the target line). Data were analysed with repeated measures ANOVA with an a priori alpha of 0.05 (SPSS 22.0, IBM, Armonk, NY, USA). We found significant reductions for the X-Factor (p < 0.05) between the full and shortened swings. The shortened swing condition ameliorated vertebral compression force from 7.6 ± 1.4 to 7.0 ± 1.7 N (normalised to body weight, p = 0.01) and significantly reduced CHV (p < 0.05) by ~2 m/s with concomitant shot distance diminution by ~10 m (p < 0.05). Further research is necessary to examine the applicability of a shortened swing for golfers with low back pain.

  5. The effect of muscle length on force depression after active shortening in soleus muscle of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, Pieter; Van Leemputte, Marc

    2011-07-01

    Isometric muscle force after active shortening is reduced [force depression (FD)]. The mechanism is incompletely understood but work delivered during shortening has been suggested to be the main determinant of FD. However, whether muscle length affects the sensitivity of FD to work is unknown, although this information might add to the understanding of the phenomenon. The aim of this study is to investigate the length dependence of the FD/work ratio (Q). Therefore, isometric force production (ISO) of 10 incubated mouse soleus muscles was compared to isometric force after 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mm shortening (IAS) at different end lengths ranging from L(0) - 3 to L(0) + 1.8 mm in steps of 0.6 mm. FD was calculated as the force difference between an ISO and IAS contraction at the same activation time (6 s) and end length. We confirm the strong relation between FD and work at L(0) (R² = 0.92) and found that FD is length dependent with a maximum of 8.8 ± 0.3% at L(0) + 1.2 mm for 0.6 mm shortening amplitude. Q was only constant for short muscle lengths (muscle length. The observed length dependence of Q indicates that FD is not only determined by work produced during shortening but also by a length-dependent factor, possibly actin compliance, which should be incorporated in any mechanism explaining FD.

  6. Central Andean crustal structure from receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Jamie; Beck, Susan; Zandt, George; Wagner, Lara; Minaya, Estela; Tavera, Hernado

    2016-07-01

    The Central Andean Plateau (15°-27°S) is a high plateau in excess of 3 km elevation, associated with thickened crust along the western edge of the South America plate, in the convergent margin between the subducting Nazca plate and the Brazilian craton. We have calculated receiver functions using seismic data from a recent portable deployment of broadband seismometers in the Bolivian orocline (12°-21°S) region and combined them with waveforms from 38 other stations in the region to investigate crustal thickness and crust and mantle structures. Results from the receiver functions provide a more detailed map of crustal thickness than previously existed, and highlight mid-crustal features that match well with prior studies. The active volcanic arc and Altiplano have thick crust with Moho depths increasing from the central Altiplano (65 km) to the northern Altiplano (75 km). The Eastern Cordillera shows large along strike variations in crustal thickness. Along a densely sampled SW-NE profile through the Bolivian orocline there is a small region of thin crust beneath the high peaks of the Cordillera Real where the average elevations are near 4 km, and the Moho depth varies from 55 to 60 km, implying the crust is undercompensated by 5 km. In comparison, a broader region of high elevations in the Eastern Cordillera to the southeast near 20°S has a deeper Moho at 65-70 km and appears close to isostatic equilibrium at the Moho. Assuming the modern-day pattern of high precipitation on the flanks of the Andean plateau has existed since the late Miocene, we suggest that climate induced exhumation can explain some of the variations in present day crustal structure across the Bolivian orocline. We also suggest that south of the orocline at 20°S, the thicker and isostatically compensated crust is due to the absence of erosional exhumation and the occurrence of lithospheric delamination.

  7. Effects of Martian crustal magnetic field on its ionosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the Martian crustal magnetic field is one of the hot topics of the study of Martian ionosphere.The studies on this topic are summarized in this paper.Main data of the Martian ionosphere were resulted from radio occultation experiments.According to the observations,the electron density scale height and the peak electron density of the Martian ionosphere are influenced by its crustal magnetic field.The strong horizontal magnetic field prevents the vertical diffusion of the plasma and makes the electron density scale height in the topside ionosphere close to that in the photo equilibrium region.In the cusp-like regions with strong vertical magnetic field,the enhanced vertical diffusion leads to a larger electron density scale height in the diffusion equilibrium region.The observation of radio occultation experiment onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) showed that the averaged peak electron density observed in the southern hemisphere with strong crustal magnetic field was slightly larger than that in the northern hemisphere with weak crustal magnetic field.The Mars advanced radar for subsurface and ionosphere sounding (MARSIS) onboard Mars Express (MEX) was the first topside sounder to be used to observe Martian ionosphere.The MARSIS results confirmed that the enhancement of the peak electron density occurred in cusp-like regions with open field lines,and the amount of the enhancement was much larger than that observed by the radio occultation experiment.There are two possible mechanisms for the peak electron density enhancement in the cusp-like crustal magnetic field regions:One is the precipitation of the energetic particles and the other is the heating by the waves excited by plasma instabilities.It’s difficult to determine which one is the key mechanism for the peak electron density enhancement.Based on these studies,several interesting problems on the Martian ionosphere and plasma environment are presented.

  8. Bulk Superconductors in Mobile Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, F. N.; Delor, U. Floegel-; Rothfeld, R.; Riedel, T.; Wippich, D.; Goebel, B.; Schirrmeister, P.

    We investigate and review concepts of multi - seeded REBCO bulk superconductors in mobile application. ATZ's compact HTS bulk magnets can trap routinely 1 T@77 K. Except of magnetization, flux creep and hysteresis, industrial - like properties as compactness, power density, and robustness are of major device interest if mobility and light-weight construction is in focus. For mobile application in levitated trains or demonstrator magnets we examine the performance of on-board cryogenics either by LN2 or cryo-cooler application. The mechanical, electric and thermodynamical requirements of compact vacuum cryostats for Maglev train operation were studied systematically. More than 30 units are manufactured and tested. The attractive load to weight ratio is more than 10 and favours group module device constructions up to 5 t load on permanent magnet (PM) track. A transportable and compact YBCO bulk magnet cooled with in-situ 4 Watt Stirling cryo-cooler for 50 - 80 K operation is investigated. Low cooling power and effective HTS cold mass drives the system construction to a minimum - thermal loss and light-weight design.

  9. [Comparison of force and shortening velocity in fast and slow rabbit muscle fibers at different temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochubeĭ, P V; Bershitskiĭ, S Iu

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of force, maximal shortening velocity and power of maximally activated single permeabilized fibers from fast and slow muscles of the rabbit were recorded in a temperature range from 10 to 35 degrees C with 5 degrees C step. It was found that temperature dependence of force of both types of fibers is identical. Averaged maximal shortening velocity in the slow fibers, unlike the fast fibers, had no statistically significant temperature dependence that is not in agreement with the data obtained on intact rat muscle fibers and in an in vitro motility assay. However maximal shortening velocity in each individual slow fiber did depend on temperature. The temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was lower than that of the fast ones. Because of large data scattering the average temperature dependence of power of the slow fibers was significantly lower than that in individual slow fibers.

  10. Assessment of muscle shortening and static posture in children with persistent asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Erica A; Fanelli-Galvani, Adriana; Prisco, Camilla C V; Gonçalves, Raquel C; Jacob, Cristina M A; Cabral, Anna L B; Martins, Milton A; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2007-07-01

    Asthmatic patients experience an increase in airway resistance that overburdens both respiratory and non-respiratory muscles. The objective of the present study was to determine whether children with persistent asthma present muscle shortening and postural changes. The 60 boys evaluated, aged 7-12 (pubertal ages up to Tanner stage G2) were divided into three age- and BMI-matched groups of equal number: CON (no history of asthma or allergy); MPA (mild persistent asthma); SPA (severe persistent asthma). Pulmonary function, muscle shortening and static posture were evaluated. The SPA group presented higher protraction of the head and shoulder compared with the CON group [9.5 (6.0-12.0) degrees vs 5.5 (0.0-12.0) degrees, P control subjects in five out nine evaluated outcomes. Our data suggest that severe asthmatic children present postural adaptations and muscle shortening that seem to be related to disease severity.

  11. In vivo maximal fascicle-shortening velocity during plantar flexion in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauraix, Hugo; Nordez, Antoine; Guilhem, Gaël; Rabita, Giuseppe; Dorel, Sylvain

    2015-12-01

    Interindividual variability in performance of fast movements is commonly explained by a difference in maximal muscle-shortening velocity due to differences in the proportion of fast-twitch fibers. To provide a better understanding of the capacity to generate fast motion, this study aimed to 1) measure for the first time in vivo the maximal fascicle-shortening velocity of human muscle; 2) evaluate the relationship between angular velocity and fascicle-shortening velocity from low to maximal angular velocities; and 3) investigate the influence of musculo-articular features (moment arm, tendinous tissues stiffness, and muscle architecture) on maximal angular velocity. Ultrafast ultrasound images of the gastrocnemius medialis were obtained from 31 participants during maximal isokinetic and light-loaded plantar flexions. A strong linear relationship between fascicle-shortening velocity and angular velocity was reported for all subjects (mean R(2) = 0.97). The maximal shortening velocity (V(Fmax)) obtained during the no-load condition (NLc) ranged between 18.8 and 43.3 cm/s. V(Fmax) values were very close to those of the maximal shortening velocity (V(max)), which was extrapolated from the F-V curve (the Hill model). Angular velocity reached during the NLc was significantly correlated with this V(Fmax) (r = 0.57; P < 0.001). This finding was in agreement with assumptions about the role of muscle fiber type, whereas interindividual comparisons clearly support the fact that other parameters may also contribute to performance during fast movements. Nevertheless, none of the biomechanical features considered in the present study were found to be directly related to the highest angular velocity, highlighting the complexity of the upstream mechanics that lead to maximal-velocity muscle contraction.

  12. Active shortening protects against stretch-induced force deficits in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saripalli, Anjali L; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Mendias, Christopher L; Brooks, Susan V; Claflin, Dennis R

    2017-02-23

    Skeletal muscle contraction results from molecular interactions of myosin "crossbridges" with adjacent actin filament binding sites. The binding of myosin to actin can be "weak" or "strong", and only strong binding states contribute to force production. During active shortening, the number of strongly-bound crossbridges declines with increasing shortening velocity. Forcibly stretching a muscle that is actively shortening at high velocity results in no apparent negative consequences whereas stretch of an isometrically (fixed-length) contracting muscle causes ultrastructural damage and a decline in force-generating capability. Our working hypothesis is that stretch-induced damage is uniquely attributable to the population of crossbridges that are strongly-bound. We tested the hypothesis that stretch-induced force deficits decline as the prevailing shortening velocity is increased. Experiments were performed on permeabilized segments of individual skeletal muscle fibers obtained from human subjects. Fibers were maximally activated and either allowed to generate maximum isometric force (Fo), or to shorten at velocities that resulted in force maintenance of ≈50% Fo or ≈2% Fo. For each test condition, a rapid stretch equivalent to 0.1 x optimal fiber length was applied. Relative to pre-stretch Fo, force deficits resulting from stretches applied during force maintenance of 100%, ≈50%, and ≈2% Fo were 23.2 ± 8.6%, 7.8 ± 4.2% and 0.3 ± 3.3%, respectively (mean ± SD, n=20). We conclude that stretch-induced damage declines with increasing shortening velocity, consistent with the working hypothesis that the fraction of strongly-bound crossbridges is a causative factor in the susceptibility of skeletal muscle to stretch-induced damage.

  13. Force depression following muscle shortening in sub-maximal voluntary contractions of human adductor pollicis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Oskouei, Ali E; Herzog, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical properties of skeletal muscles are often studied for controlled, electrically induced, maximal, or supra-maximal contractions. However, many mechanical properties, such as the force-length relationship and force enhancement following active muscle stretching, are quite different for maximal and sub-maximal, or electrically induced and voluntary contractions. Force depression, the loss of force observed following active muscle shortening, has been observed and is well documented for electrically induced and maximal voluntary contractions. Since sub-maximal voluntary contractions are arguably the most important for everyday movement analysis and for biomechanical models of skeletal muscle function, it is important to study force depression properties under these conditions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine force depression following sub-maximal, voluntary contractions. Sets of isometric reference and isometric-shortening-isometric test contractions at 30% of maximal voluntary effort were performed with the adductor pollicis muscle. All reference and test contractions were executed by controlling force or activation using a feedback system. Test contractions included adductor pollicis shortening over 10 degrees, 20 degrees, and 30 degrees of thumb adduction. Force depression was assessed by comparing the steady-state isometric forces (activation control) or average electromyograms (EMGs) (force control) following active muscle shortening with those obtained in the corresponding isometric reference contractions. Force was decreased by 20% and average EMG was increased by 18% in the shortening test contractions compared to the isometric reference contractions. Furthermore, force depression was increased with increasing shortening amplitudes, and the relative magnitudes of force depression were similar to those found in electrically stimulated and maximal contractions. We conclude from these results that force depression occurs in sub

  14. Edentulism and shortened dental arch in Brazilian elderly from the National Survey of Oral Health 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Túlio Freitas Ribeiro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the distribution of edentulism and estimate the prevalence of functional dentition and shortened dental arch among elderly population. METHODS: A population-based epidemiological study was carried out with a sample of 5,349 respondents aged 65 to 74 years obtained from the 2002 and 2003 Brazilian Ministry of Health/Division of Oral Health survey database. The following variables were studied: gender; macroregion of residence; missing teeth; percentage that met the World Health Organization goal for oral health in the age group 65 to 74 years (50% having at least 20 natural teeth; presence of shortened dental arch; number of posterior occluding pairs of teeth. The Chi-square test assessed the association between categorical variables. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to assess differences of mean between number of posterior occluding pairs teeth, macro-region and gender. RESULTS: The elderly population had an average of 5.49 teeth (SD: 7.93 with a median of 0. The proportion of completely edentulous respondents was 54.7%. Complete edentulism was 18.2% in the upper arch and 1.9% in the lower arch. The World Health Organization goal was achieved in 10% of all respondents studied. However, only 2.7% had acceptable masticatory function and aesthetics (having at least shortened dental arch and a mean number of posterior occluding pairs of 6.94 (SD=2.97. There were significant differences of the percentage of respondents that met the World Health Organization goal and presence of shortened dental arch between men and women. There were differences in shortened dental arch between macroregions. CONCLUSIONS: The Brazilian epidemiological oral health survey showed high rate of edentulism and low rate of shortened dental arch in the elderly population studied, thus suggesting significant functional and aesthetic impairment in all Brazilian macroregions especially among women.

  15. Shortening behavior of the different components of muscle-tendon unit during isokinetic plantar flexions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauraix, Hugo; Nordez, Antoine; Dorel, Sylvain

    2013-10-01

    The torque-velocity relationship has been widely considered as reflecting the mechanical properties of the contractile apparatus, and the influence of tendinous tissues on this relationship obtained during in vivo experiments remains to be determined. This study describes the pattern of shortening of various muscle-tendon unit elements of the triceps surae at different constant angular velocities and quantifies the contributions of fascicles, tendon, and aponeurosis to the global muscle-tendon unit shortening. Ten subjects performed isokinetic plantar flexions at different preset angular velocities (i.e., 30, 90, 150, 210, 270, and 330°/s). Ultrafast ultrasound measurements were performed on the muscle belly and on the myotendinous junction of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. The contributions of fascicles, tendon, and aponeurosis to global muscle-tendon unit shortening velocity were calculated for velocity conditions for four parts of the total range of motion. For both muscles, the fascicles' contribution decreased throughout the motion (73.5 ± 21.5% for 100-90° angular range to 33.7 ± 20.2% for 80-70°), whereas the tendon contribution increased (25.8 ± 15.4 to 55.6 ± 16.8%). In conclusion, the tendon contribution to the global muscle-tendon unit shortening is significant even during a concentric contraction. However, this contribution depends on the range of motion analyzed. The intersubject variability found in the maximal fascicle shortening velocity, for a given angular velocity, suggests that some subjects might possess a more efficient musculoarticular complex to produce the movement velocity. These findings are of great interest for understanding the ability of muscle-tendon shortening velocity.

  16. Superimposed folding and thrusting by two phases of mutually orthogonal or oblique shortening in analogue models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongling; Koyi, Hemin A.; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz

    2016-02-01

    Orogens may suffer more than one phase shortening resulting in superposition of structures of different generations. Superimposition of orthogonal or oblique shortening is studied using sandbox and centrifuge modelling. Results of sand models show that in orthogonal superimposition, the two resulting structural trends are approximately orthogonal to each other. In oblique superimposition, structures trend obliquely to each other in the relatively thin areas of the model (foreland), and mutually orthogonal in areas where the model is thickened during the first phase of shortening (i.e. the hinterland). Thrusts formed during the first shortening phase may be reactivated during the later shortening phase. Spacing of the later phase structures is not as wide as expected, considering they across the pre-existing thickened wedge. Superposition of structures results in formation of type 1 fold interference pattern. Bedding is curved outwards both in the dome and basin structures. Folded layers are dipping and plunging outwards in a dome, while they are dipping and plunging inwards in a basin. In the areas between two adjacent domes or basins (i.e. where an anticline is superimposed by a syncline or a syncline is superimposed by an anticline), bedding is curved inwards, and the anticlines plunge inwards and the synclines outwards. The latter feature could be helpful to determine the age relationship for type 2 fold interference pattern. In tectonic regions where multiple phases of shortening have occurred, the orogenic-scale dome-and-basin and arrowhead-shaped interference patterns are commonly formed, as in the models. However, in some areas, the fold interference pattern might be modified by a later phase of thrusting. Similar to models results, superimposition of two and/or even more deformation phases may not be recorded by structures all over the tectonic area.

  17. Distal femoral shortening in total hip arthroplasty for complex primary hip reconstruction. A new surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulouvaris, Panagiotis; Stafylas, Kosmas; Sculco, Thomas; Xenakis, Theodore

    2008-10-01

    Successful total hip arthroplasty (THA) in congenital dislocated hips demands anatomical reduction in the normal center of rotation without overstretching the sciatic nerve and without excessive compression or abnormal forces across the joint. Proximal femoral and subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy has been described for THA for the treatment of dislocated hips. However, these osteotomies are demanding, associated with deformation of femoral canal and nonunion, and may increase the femoral stem stress. This study reports excellent results in 24 patients with a new surgical technique that combines THA with a distal femoral shortening in severely deformed hips using customized components.

  18. Energy cost of isometric force production after active shortening in skinned muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joumaa, V; Fitzowich, A; Herzog, W

    2017-02-23

    The steady state isometric force after active shortening of a skeletal muscle is lower than the purely isometric force at the corresponding length. This property of skeletal muscle is known as force depression. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the energy cost of force production at the steady state after active shortening was reduced compared to the energy cost of force production for a purely isometric contraction performed at the corresponding length (same length, same activation). Experiments were performed in skinned fibres isolated from rabbit psoas muscle. Skinned fibres were actively shortened from an average sarcomere length of 3.0 µm to an average sarcomere length of 2.4 µm. Purely isometric reference contractions were performed at an average sarcomere length of 2.4 µm. Simultaneously with the force measurements, the ATP cost was measured during the last 30 seconds of isometric contractions using an enzyme-coupled assay. Stiffness was calculated during a quick stretch-release cycle of 0.2% fibre length performed once the steady state had been reached after active shortening and during the purely isometric reference contractions. Force and stiffness following active shortening were decreased by 10.0±1.8% and 11.0±2.2%, respectively compared to the isometric reference contractions. Similarly, ATPase activity per second (not normalized to the force) showed a decrease of 15.6±3.0% in the force depressed state compared to the purely isometric reference state. However, ATPase activity per second per unit of force was similar for the isometric contractions following active shortening (28.7±2.4 mM/mN.s.mm(3)) and the corresponding purely isometric reference contraction (30.9±2.8 mM/mN.s.mm(3)). Furthermore, the reduction in absolute ATPase activity per second was significantly correlated with force depression and stiffness depression. These results are in accordance with the idea that force depression following active shortening is

  19. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data.

  20. Shortening filtrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ENOCHS Edgar E.

    2012-01-01

    Let C be a set of modules.We argue that there is an ordinal κ such that if a module has a filtration by modules in C,then it has a filtration of length κ by direct sums of modules in C.As an application we give another way to prove a result of Saorín and (S)(t)oví(c)ek and of (S)(t)oví(c)ek.

  1. The composition of the modern juvenile arc crust and the nature of crustal delaminates in arcs (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoutz, O. E.; Schmidt, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    The intraoceanic Kohistan arc, northern Pakistan, exposes a complete crustal section encompassing infracrustal cumulates formed at ≥ 55 km depth, a broadly basaltic/gabbroic lower crust, a 26 km thick calc-alkaline batholith, and 4 km of a volcanoclastic/sedimentary sequence. The bulk composition of the Kohistan arc crust has been approximated by estimating the relative volumes of exposed rocks through detailed field observations in combination with geobarometric constrains of the units' thicknesses and satellite images for lateral extension. We separated the arc in 3 major lower, mid-, and mid- to upper crustal units containing 14 subunits which compositions were derived from averaging 562 whole rock analyses. The details of the resulting bulk composition depend slightly on the method of integration, but all models yield andesitic bulk supra MOHO compositions. The Kohistan bulk arc composition results very similar to global continental crust estimates indicating that modern arc activity is the dominant process that formed the (preserved) continental crust. Fitting the bulk Kohistan arc crust and the ultramafic cumulates exposed at base of the arc (dunites, wehrlites, websterites, cpx-bearing garnetites and hornblendites, and garnet gabbros) to primitive arc melts with calc-alkaline/tholeiitic, alkaline, and boninitic affinity from various island arcs demonstrates that delamination of wehrlites + garnet hornblendites ± garnet gabbros perfectly explains the evolution from a tholeiitic/calc-alkaline primitive high-Mg basalt to the continental crust. Mass balance demonstrates that volumes of delaminate similar to the continental crust are required. Compared to depleted mantle, the delaminate is enriched in K, Cs, Ba and Pb and depleted in Zr and Th. It has further a subchondritic Nb/Ta and the high Pb and low U concentrations lead to a very unradiogenic Pb isotopy that may compensate for the depleted mantle Our results document that infra arc processes even in a

  2. The Crustal Deformation Revealed by GPS and InSAR in the Northwest Corner of the Tarim Basin, Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xuejun; Yu, Pengfei; Nie, Zhaosheng; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Kuzikov, Sergey I.; Wang, Qi; Yang, Shaomin

    2017-03-01

    The Northwestern Corner of the Tarim Basin (hereinafter the NOCTB) is surrounded by the Pamir salient, the south Tian Shan Mountains, and the Tarim Basin. The tectonic settings of these three structures dominate the crustal deformation patterns and seismic events in the NOCTB and its adjacent regions. We integrated the GPS and InSAR measurements to derive a large-scale three-dimensional velocity map of the NOCTB. The GPS data obtained during 38 campaigns between 1992 and 2013 were used to derive a horizontal velocity field. 149 Envisat ASAR images observed along four satellite tracks between 2003 and 2011 were processed to get a line of sight rate map based on the small baseline subset time series analysis method and a homogeneous isotropic model. Finally, we modeled the dip angle, slip rate, and locking depth of selected faults. The results indicate that the crustal convergence is not uniformly distributed across the NOCTB: more than 50% of the N-S shortening is absorbed by the Tian Shan Mountains in the southwest, whereas the N-S shortening rates are low and therefore the strain accommodations are smaller in the east of the NOCTB. The vertical displacement rates in the NOCTB range from -2 to 3 mm/year with different magnitudes in different areas. The main uplift areas are located on the junction region between frontal MPT and the southwestern STT including the Kazkeaerte fault, Aikenerte fault, the Southern Artux fault, and part areas in north of the Kalping fault. The main subsident areas are located on central belt of STT including the Totgumbaz-Alpaleh fault, Nothern Artux fault, the southwestern Karatieke fault, and the north of Puchang/Piqiang fault. Compared with the substantial N-S shortening rate of 10 mm/year, the vertical rate across each fault ranges from approximately -1 to 1 mm/year, suggesting that vertical movement in NOCTB area is relatively moderate at present. Both the horizontal and vertical rates show obvious changes across the Kazkeaerte

  3. The Crustal Structure and Seismicity of Eastern Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, M.; Martins, A.; Sobiesiak, M.; Alvarado, L.; Vasquez, R.

    2001-12-01

    Eastern Venezuela is characterized by a moderate to high seismicity, evidenced recently by the 1997 Cariaco earthquake located on the El Pilar Fault, a right lateral strike slip fault which marks the plate boundary between the Caribbean and South-American plates in this region. Recently, the seismic activity seems to migrate towards the zone of subduction of the Lesser Antilles in the northeast, where a mb 6.0 earthquake occurred in October 2000 at 120 km of depth. Periodical changes in the seismic activity are related to the interaction of the stress fields of the strike-slip and the subduction regimes. The seismic activity decreases rapidly towards to the south with some disperse events on the northern edge of the Guayana Shield, related to the Guri fault system. The crustal models used in the region are derived from the information generated by the national seismological network since 1982 and by microseismicity studies in northeastern Venezuela, coinciding in a crustal thickness of about 35 km in depth. Results of seismic refraction measurements for the region were obtained during field campains in 1998 (ECOGUAY) for the Guayana Shield and the Cariaco sedimentary basin and in 2001 (ECCO) for the Oriental Basin. The total crustal thickness decreases from about 45 km on the northern edge of the Guayana Shield to some 36 km close to El Tigre in the center of the Oriental Basin. The average crustal velocity decreases in the same sense from 6.5 to 5.8 km/s. In the Cariaco sedimentary basin a young sedimentary cover of 1 km thickness with a seismic velocity of 2 km/s was derived. Towards the northern limit of the South-American plate, no deep seismic refraction data are available up to now. The improvement of the crustal models used in that region would constitute a step forward in the analysis of the seismic hazard. Seismic refraction studies funded by CONICIT S1-97002996 and S1-2000000685 projects and PDVSA (additional drilling and blasting), recording equipment

  4. Bulk Moisture and Salinity Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Monje, Oscar; Prenger, Jessica; Catechis, John

    2013-01-01

    Measurement and feedback control of nutrient solutions in plant root zones is critical to the development of healthy plants in both terrestrial and reduced-gravity environments. In addition to the water content, the amount of fertilizer in the nutrient solution is important to plant health. This typically requires a separate set of sensors to accomplish. A combination bulk moisture and salinity sensor has been designed, built, and tested with different nutrient solutions in several substrates. The substrates include glass beads, a clay-like substrate, and a nutrient-enriched substrate with the presence of plant roots. By measuring two key parameters, the sensor is able to monitor both the volumetric water content and salinity of the nutrient solution in bulk media. Many commercially available moisture sensors are point sensors, making localized measurements over a small volume at the point of insertion. Consequently, they are more prone to suffer from interferences with air bubbles, contact area of media, and root growth. This makes it difficult to get an accurate representation of true moisture content and distribution in the bulk media. Additionally, a network of point sensors is required, increasing the cabling, data acquisition, and calibration requirements. measure the dielectric properties of a material in the annular space of the vessel. Because the pore water in the media often has high salinity, a method to measure the media moisture content and salinity simultaneously was devised. Characterization of the frequency response for capacitance and conductance across the electrodes was completed for 2-mm glass bead media, 1- to 2-mm Turface (a clay like media), and 1- to 2-mm fertilized Turface with the presence of root mass. These measurements were then used to find empirical relationships among capacitance (C), the dissipation factor (D), the volumetric water content, and the pore water salinity.

  5. Toughness of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu V. Madge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs have desirable properties like high strength and low modulus, but their toughness can show much variation, depending on the kind of test as well as alloy chemistry. This article reviews the type of toughness tests commonly performed and the factors influencing the data obtained. It appears that even the less-tough metallic glasses are tougher than oxide glasses. The current theories describing the links between toughness and material parameters, including elastic constants and alloy chemistry (ordering in the glass, are discussed. Based on the current literature, a few important issues for further work are identified.

  6. Slip Partitioning, Crustal Tectonics and Deformation of the Queen Charlotte Margin and Northern Vancouver Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippchen, Sabine

    Part I of this thesis investigates current deformation in western British Columbia from northern Vancouver Island in the south to Haida Gwaii in the north. The area is characterized by transition from the Cascadia subduction zone to the Queen Charlotte transform fault. The tectonic setting involves interactions between the Pacific, North America, Juan de Fuca, and Explorer plates, and the Winona block, involving a number of plate boundaries: the mainly strike-slip Queen Charlotte, Revere-Dellwood-Wilson and Nootka faults, the Explorer ridge, and the Cascadia subduction zone. Using GPS campaign data from 1993 to 2008 I derive a new crustal velocity field for Northern Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland, and integrate it with previous velocity fields developed for Haida Gwaii, southern Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland. The northern limit of the subduction zone is confirmed to be at Brooks Peninsula, where the direction of the crustal motion changes abruptly from ENE to NNE. I use viscoelastic models to explore what percentage of the observed deformation is transient, related to the earthquake cycle, and how much is permanent ongoing deformation, distributed off the continental margin. Previous authors have developed two competing end-member models that can each explain how the Pacific/North America plate convergence is accommodated off Haida Gwaii. These models assume either internal crustal shortening or underthrusting of the Pacific plate. These new GPS data allow me to conclude that underthrusting does occur, and that a small component (Haida Gwaii the distinction between transient and long-term deformation is not as clear; however, I conclude that transient deformation alone cannot fully explain the observed velocities, and so long-term deformation likely must also occur. Part II of the thesis investigates the updip and downdip limits of the seismogenic zone of the Sumatra megathrust fault. Temperature and downdip changes in formation composition

  7. Crustal displacements in Greenland caused by ice mass variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina

    The climate of the Earth is changing. A consequence of this is observed at the polar regions such as Greenland, where the ice sheet is melting with an increasing rate. The unloading of ice causes the Earth to respond elastically in terms of uplift and an outward horizontal deformation of the crust....... This motion can be measured by permanent Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers. Hence, the rates of crustal displacement are an indirect measure of the occurring mass changes. Currently, 55 GPS sites are located around the margin of the Greenland ice sheet, continuously providing information about...... the state of the ice sheet. However, the Earth is also adjusting viscoelastically to variations in the late Pleistocene ice sheets i.e. glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Observed rates of crustal displacement therefor contain signals from both past and present ice mass variations. Hence, to interpret...

  8. Efficacy of crustal superfluid neutrons in pulsar glitch models

    CERN Document Server

    Hooker, J; Li, Bao-An

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of recent hydrodynamic models of pulsar glitches, we explore systematically the dependence on the stiffness of the nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density $L$, of the fractional moment of inertia of the pinned neutron superfluid in the crust $G$ and the initial post-glitch relative acceleration of the crust $K$, both of which are confronted with observational constraints from the Vela pulsar. We allow for a variable fraction of core superfluid neutrons coupled to the crust on glitch rise timescales, $Y_{\\rm g}$. We assess whether the crustal superfluid neutrons are still a tenable angular momentum source to explain the Vela glitches when crustal entrainment is included. The observed values $G$ and $K$ are found to provide nearly orthogonal constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy, and thus taken together offer potentially tight constraints on the equation of state. However, when entrainment is included at the level suggested by recent microscopic calculations, the model is un...

  9. Crustal structure of the Eastern Alps and their foreland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grad, M.; Brückl, E.; Majdanski, M.

    2009-01-01

    ) and are also characterized by variations in apparent velocity and amplitude. The Moho reflections are usually strong and well correlated, while Pn arrivals are only fragmentarily recorded. Detailed 2-D forward modelling of all refracted, post-critical and reflected phases, identified in the correlation process......) are distinct up to 60-90 km offset and are characterized by large variations in apparent velocity and amplitude. The contact between the Molasse basin and the Eastern Alps represents a barrier for seismic waves. Mid-crustal reflections (Pc) are usually recorded at short distance intervals (20-50 km......The subject of this paper concerns the seismic modelling of the crustal structure in the transition zone from the Bohemian Massif, across the Molasse basin and the Eastern Alps to the Southern Alps, mainly on the territory of Austria. The CEL10/Alp04 profile crosses the triple point of the European...

  10. Vertical Crustal Displacements Due to Surface Fluid Changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shiyu; ZHONG Min

    2007-01-01

    Using the model data for surface mass changes of the atmosphere, ocean, soil moisture and snow depth, the vertical crustal displacements of 25 ficual stations in China were calculated according to the loading theory. From the spectral analysis of the results, we can see that the periods of displacements are 12 months and the semi-periods are 6 months. The results also show that the maximum seasonal displacements can reach 20 mm and even larger. The covariance analyses and significance tests show that the coefficients of 96 percent of the stations are significant at the 0.1 significance level. The results show that one of the reasons of the vertical crustal displacements is the changing surface fluid loads.

  11. Recovery time of motor evoked potentials following lengthening and shortening muscle action in the tibialis anterior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallent, J.; Goodall, S.; Hortobagyi, T.; Gibson, A. St Clair; French, D. N.; Howatson, G.

    2012-01-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEP) at rest remain facilitated following an isometric muscle contraction. Because the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic control of shortening (SHO) and lengthening (LEN) contractions differs, the possibility exists that the recovery of the MEP is also task specific. The time c

  12. Regional myocardial shortening in relation to graft-reactive hyperemia and flow after coronary bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Brower (Ronald); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); E. Bos (Egbert); J. Nauta (Jan)

    1979-01-01

    textabstractExtent of regional shortening of myocardium in areas newly perfused by bypass grafting was determined in 56 patients by a new technique employing four to six radiopaque markers sutured in pairs to the epicardium near the coronary anastomosis. Paradoxical systolic expansion (PSE) was mani

  13. Stochastic modeling of length-dependent telomere shortening in Corvus monedula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Salomons, H. M.; Verhulst, S.

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that, within individuals, longer telomeres shorten at a higher rate. This explorative study deals with a mathematical model of this process. It is a nonlinear differential equation describing length-dependent decrease that can be linked to a Poisson process. The model also take

  14. Stochastic modelling of length-dependent telomere shortening in Corvus monedula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Salomons, H.M.; Verhulst, S.

    2011-01-01

    It was recently shown that, within individuals, longer telomeres shorten at a higher rate. This explorative study deals with a mathematical model of this process. It is a nonlinear differential equation describing length-dependent decrease that can be linked to a Poisson process. The model also take

  15. Crossbridge and non-crossbridge contributions to force in shortening and lengthening muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, K W; Roots, H; Pinniger, G J; Offer, G W

    2010-01-01

    Analysis of tension responses to ramp length changes in muscle can provide important information about the crossbridge cycle. During a ramp length change, the force response of an active muscle shows an early change in slope (the P₁ transition) followed by a later, gradual change in slope (the P₂ transition). Modeling shows that the first transition reflects the tension change associated with the crossbridge power stroke in shortening and with its reversal in lengthening; the reduction in slope at the second transition occurs when most of the crossbridges (myosin heads) that were attached at the start of the ramp become detached; the steady tension during shortening is borne mainly by post-stroke heads whereas tension during lengthening is borne mostly by pre-stroke heads. After the P₂ transition, the tension reaches a steady level in the model whereas in the experiments the tension continues to increase during lengthening or to decrease during shortening; this tension change is seen at a wide range of sarcomere lengths and even when active force is reduced by a myosin inhibitor. It appears that some non-crossbridge components in muscle fibers stiffen upon activation and contribute to the continued tension rise during lengthening; release of such tension leads to tension decline during shortening. Thus, non-crossbridge visco-elasticity in sarcomeres may also contribute to energy storage and release during in situ muscle function.

  16. Fiber type composition and maximum shortening velocity of muscles crossing the human shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R C; Lungren, M P; Langenderfer, J E; Hughes, R E

    2007-03-01

    A study of the fiber type composition of fourteen muscles spanning the human glenohumeral joint was carried out with the purpose of determining the contribution of fiber types to overall muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) and to estimate the maximum shortening velocity (V(max)) of those muscles. Muscle biopsies were procured from 4 male cadavers (mean age 50) within 24 hr of death, snap frozen, mounted, and transversely sectioned (10 microm). Slides were stained for myofibrillar ATPase after alkaline preincubation. Photoimages were taken of defined areas (100 fibers) using the Bioquant system, and fiber type and CSA were measured from these images. Staining for mATPase produced three different fiber types: slow-oxidative (SO), fast-oxidative-glycolytic (FOG), and fast-glycolytic (FG). On average, the muscle fiber type composition ranged from 22 to 40% of FG, from 17 to 51% of FOG, and from 23 to 56% of SO. Twelve out of the 14 muscles had average SO proportions ranging from 35 to 50%. V(max) was calculated from the fiber type contribution relative to CSA and shortening velocity values taken from the literature. The maximum velocities of shortening presented here provide a physiological basis for the development of human shoulder musculoskeletal models suitable for predicting muscle forces for functionally relevant tasks encompassing conditions of muscle shortening and lengthening.

  17. The effect of hypoxia on shortening contractions in rat diaphragm muscle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machiels, H.A.; Heijden, E. van der; Heunks, L.M.A.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.

    2001-01-01

    Hypoxia is known to reduce isometric contractile properties of isolated rat diaphragm bundles. Its effect on isotonic contractile properties (i.e. force-velocity relationship and power output) has not been studied. We hypothesized that hypoxia reduces velocity of shortening and consequently power ou

  18. The Shortened Visuospatial Questionnaire for Children: A Useful Tool to Identify Students with Low Visuospatial Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastame, Maria Chiara; Cherchi, Rossella; Penna, Maria Pietronilla

    2015-01-01

    The current research was aimed mainly at exploring the reliability of a short-screening tool developed to self-evaluate visuospatial abilities in children. We presented 290 Italian third, fourth, and fifth graders with the 16-item Shortened Visuospatial questionnaire and several objective measures of intellectual efficiency, such as Raven's…

  19. Decayed/missing/filled teeth and shortened dental arches in Tanzanian adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarita, P.T.N.; Witter, D.J.; Kreulen, C.M.; Matee, M.I.N.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study assessed decayed/missing/filled teeth (DMFT), presence of occlusal units, and prevalence of shortened dental arches in a Tanzanian adult population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The dental state of samples of the Tanzanian population was studied. Oral examinations were conducted on 5,5

  20. Contribution of NHE-1 to cell length cardiac shortening of normal and failing rabbit myocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.G.J. van Borren; J.G. Zegers; A. Baartscheer; J.H. Ravesloot

    2006-01-01

    At the same intracellular pH (pH(i)) Na+/H+ exchange (NHE-1) fluxes of ventricular myocytes of hypertrophied failing hearts (HFH) are increased. We assessed how NHE-1 affected cell length shortening. pH(i) was measured fluorimetrically in resting and twitching (1 - 3 Hz)normal and HFH rabbit myocyte

  1. Changing Quality Controls: The Effects of Increasing Product Variety and Shortening Product Life Cycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. van Iwaarden (Jos)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn many industries (e.g. cars, electronics, clothing) manufacturing complexity and unpredictability have increased in recent years because of increasing product variety and shortening product life cycles. At the same time, manufacturers in these industries appear to have more problems wi

  2. Common Patterns of Congenital Lower Extremity Shortening: Diagnosis, Classification, and Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Maria A; Chauvin, Nancy A; Jaramillo, Diego; Davidson, Richard; Horn, B David; Ho-Fung, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Congenital lower limb shortening is a group of relatively rare, heterogeneous disorders. Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) and fibular hemimelia (FH) are the most common pathologic entities in this disease spectrum. PFFD is characterized by variable degrees of shortening or absence of the femoral head, with associated dysplasia of the acetabulum and femoral shaft. FH ranges from mild hypoplasia to complete absence of the fibula with variable shortening of the tibia. The development of the lower limb requires complex and precise gene interactions. Although the etiologies of PFFD and FH remain unknown, there is a strong association between the two disorders. Associated congenital defects in the lower extremity are found in more than 50% of patients with PFFD, ipsilateral FH being the most common. FH also has a strong association with shortening and bowing of the tibia and with foot deformities such as absence of the lateral rays of the foot. Early diagnosis and radiologic classification of these abnormalities are imperative for appropriate management and surgical planning. Plain radiography remains the main diagnostic imaging modality for both PFFD and FH, and appropriate description of the osseous abnormalities seen on radiographs allows accurate classification, prognostic evaluation, and surgical planning. Minor malformations may commonly be misdiagnosed.

  3. The addition of lidocaine to bupivacaine does not shorten the duration of spinal anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jon; Husum, Bent; Staffeldt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The duration of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine is often too long for day surgery. A recent study of patients presenting for transurethral surgery suggested that the addition of a small amount of lidocaine to intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine could shorten the duration of the sensory and motor...

  4. [The concentration of growth factors in patients with inherent and acquired shortenings of limbs bones].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strogov, M V; Luneva, S N; Novikov, K I

    2013-04-01

    The article deals with the results of study of level of growth factors in blood serum of patients with inherent and post-traumatic shortenings of limbs' bones. The detection in blood serum the level of epidermal growth factor insulin-like growth factor I and angiopoetins is proposed to monitor in given patients the reparative bone formation.

  5. Differential Telomere Shortening in Blood versus Arteries in an Animal Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Tajbakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular dysfunction is an early feature of diabetic vascular disease, due to increased oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. This can lead to endothelial cell senescence and clinical complications such as stroke. Cells can become senescent by shortened telomeres and oxidative stress is known to accelerate telomere attrition. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 has been linked to vascular health by upregulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, suppressing oxidative stress, and attenuating telomere shortening. Accelerated leukocyte telomere attrition appears to be a feature of clinical type 2 diabetes (T2D and therefore the telomere system may be a potential therapeutic target in preventing vascular complications of T2D. However the effect of T2D on vascular telomere length is currently unknown. We hypothesized that T2D gives rise to shortened leukocyte and vascular telomeres alongside reduced vascular SIRT1 expression and increased oxidative stress. Accelerated telomere attrition was observed in circulating leukocytes, but not arteries, in T2D compared to control rats. T2D rats had blunted arterial SIRT1 and eNOS protein expression levels which were associated with reduced antioxidant defense capacity. Our findings suggest that hyperglycemia and a deficit in vascular SIRT1 per se are not sufficient to prematurely shorten vascular telomeres.

  6. Development of a Shortened Form of the Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitudes Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulhern, Fiona; Rae, Gordon

    1998-01-01

    Data from 196 Irish school children were analyzed and used to develop a shortened version of the Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Attitudes Scales (E. Fennema and J. Sherman, 1976). Internal consistency estimates of the reliability of scores on the whole scale and each of the subscales of the original and short form were favorable. (SLD)

  7. Bringing the School to the Children : Shortening the Path to EFA

    OpenAIRE

    Lehman, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Recent education planning initiatives in West and Central Africa show that the path to EFA may be shortened considerably by reconsidering the way basic education is delivered in isolated rural communities. Since independence, education systems have been expanding rapidly and are now serving most of the easy-to-reach population. For progress to continue, the focus must be shifted toward the...

  8. Mechanisms of crustal deformation in the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The deformation processes in the western United States were studied, considering both deterministic models and random or statistical models. The role of the intracrustal delamination and mechanisms of crustal thinning were also examined. The application of fractal techniques to understand how the crust is deforming was studied in complex regions. Work continued on the development of a fractal based model for deformation in the western United States. Fractal studies were also extended to the study of topography and the geoid.

  9. Spatial variation of crustal coda Q in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, W.S.; Lee, W.H.K.; Newberry, J.T.

    1988-01-01

    Coda wave data from California microearthquakes were studied in order to delineate regional fluctuations of apparent crustal attenuation in the band 1.5 to 24 Hz. Apparent attenuation was estimated using a single back scattering model of coda waves. The coda wave data were restricted to ???30 s following the origin time; this insures that crustal effects dominate the results as the backscattered shear waves thought to form the coda would not have had time to penetrate much deeper. Results indicate a strong variation in apparent crustal attenuation at high frequencies between the Franciscan and Salinian regions of central California and the Long Valley area of the Sierra Nevada. Although the coda Q measurements coincide at 1.5 Hz (Qc=100), at 24 Hz there is a factor of four difference between the measurements made in Franciscan (Qc=525) and Long Valley (Qc=2100) with the Salinian midway between (Qc=900). These are extremely large variations compared to measures of seismic velocities of comparable resolution, demonstrating the exceptional sensitivity of the high frequency coda Q measurement to regional geology. In addition, the frequency trend of the results is opposite to that seen in a compilation of coda Q measurements made worldwide by other authors which tend to converge at high and diverge at low frequencies, however, the worldwide results generally were obtained without limiting the coda lengths and probably reflect upper mantle rather than crustal properties. Our results match those expected due to scattering in random media represented by Von Karman autocorrelation functions of orders 1/2 to 1/3. The Von Karman medium of order 1/3 corresponding to the Franciscan coda Q measurement contains greater amounts of high wavenumber fluctuations. This indicates relatively large medium fluctuations with wavelengths on the order of 100 m in the highly deformed crust associated with the Franciscan, however, the influence of scattering on the coda Q measurement is

  10. History of crustal recycling recorded in transition zone diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, D. G.; Stachel, T.; Palot, M.; Ickert, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's transition zone (TZ) is a key region within the Earth that, from seismology, may be composed of a mixture of relatively primitive material together with the products of crustal recycling throughout the history of plate tectonics. The only samples of the TZ come in the form of inclusions in diamonds, that, for the most-part are retrogressed lower pressure equivalents of their precursor phases that formed at depth. Recent work by our group and others [1] on transition zone diamonds indicate that both peridotite and eclogitic paragenesis diamonds may record the products of crustal recycling. In-situ ion probe nitrogen and carbon isotopic measurements indicate the crystallisation of TZ diamonds from fluids bearing crustal signatures, of both oxidised and reduced forms. At the same time, majoritic garnets record extreme oxygen isotope compositions that track the interaction of oceanic crust with seawater at low temperature [2]. Such an origin is consistent with the few measured Sr-Nd isotope compositions of majorite garnet inclusions which resemble depleted MORB [3]. We have found considerably more enriched Sr isotope compositions (87Sr/86S ranging to > 0.8) in CaSiO3 inclusions that are from deep asthenosphere to TZ depths, supporting an origin that includes incorporation of recycled crustal sediment, in addition to the basaltic oceanic crust required to explain the phase equilibria [4]. Lastly, the discovery of hydrous ringwoodite in a diamond [5] containing more water than is soluble at the lower TZ adiabat indicates the possible role of recycling in transporting water as well as carbon into the TZ via a cool thermally unequilibrated slab. [1] Thomson et al (2014) CMP, 168, 1081. [2] Ickert et al (2015) Geochemical perspectives Letters, 1, 65-74. [3] Harte & Richardson (2011) Gondwana Research, 21, 236-235. [4] Walter et al. (2011) Science, 334, 54-57.[Pearson et al. (2014) Nature, 507, 221-224.

  11. Crustal blocks and seismicity in the Central Apennines of Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bella, F.; Della Monica, G. (Rome, Univ. ' Roma III' (Italy). Dip di Fisica ' E. Amaldi' ); Caputo, M. (Rome, Univ. ' La Sapienza' (Italy). Dip. di Fisica ' E. Fermi' )

    Kinematics and geo dynamics of crustal-block structures separated by compliant zones with viscoelastic rheology play an important role in defining the conditions for many deformation events such as ordinary seismic ruptures, silent and slow earthquakes and aseismic fault creep phenomena. New seismological data from the Latium-Abruzzi carbonatic platform of central Italy fit a block-tectonic modelling previously proposed for this area on the basis of structural and paleomagnetic evidences.

  12. Crustal radial anisotropy beneath Cameroon from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebayo Oluwaseun; Ni, Sidao; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    To increase the understanding of crustal deformation and crustal flow patterns due to tectonic processes in Cameroon, we study the lateral variability of the crustal isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy estimated using Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT). Rayleigh and Love wave Noise Correlation Functions (NCFs) were retrieved from the cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise data recorded in Cameroon, and phase velocities at periods of 8 to 30 s were measured to perform surface wave tomography. Joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave data for isotropic velocity models could not fit the observed dispersions simultaneously. We attribute the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy to the presence of radial anisotropy in the crust and estimated its magnitude. Our 3-D radial anisotropic model reveals the spatial variation of strong to weak positive (Vsh > Vsv) and negative (Vsv > Vsh) radial anisotropy in the crust. We observe negative radial anisotropy in the upper crust that is associated mainly with the location of a previously reported mantle plume. The anisotropy could be attributed to the vertical alignment of fossil microcracks or metamorphic foliations due to the upwelling of plume material. A strong positive radial anisotropy is centered at the location of an inferred boundary between the Congo Craton and the Oubanguides Belt that might be related to the preferred orientation of crustal anisotropic minerals associated with shearing in this fault zone. The middle crust is characterized by a widespread negative radial anisotropy that is likely caused by the flow-induced alignment of anisotropic minerals that crystallized during magma intrusion. The magnitude of the radial anisotropy varies systematically from predominantly negative in the middle crust to positive in the lower crust. The imaged patterns of the isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy are consistent with previous studies and agree with regional tectonics.

  13. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer and Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the _ crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The _ gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  14. Plate tectonics and crustal deformation around the Japanese Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Manabu; Jackson, David D.

    1993-01-01

    We analyze over a century of geodetic data to study crustal deformation and plate motion around the Japanese Islands, using the block-fault model for crustal deformation developed by Matsu'ura et al. (1986). We model the area including the Japanese Islands with 19 crustal blocks and 104 faults based on the distribution of active faults and seismicity. Geodetic data are used to obtain block motions and average slip rates of faults. This geodetic model predicts that the Pacific plate moves N deg 69 +/- 2 deg W at about 80 +/- 3 mm/yr relative to the Eurasian plate which is much lower than that predicted in geologic models. Substantial aseismic slip occurs on the subduction boundaries. The block containing the Izu Peninsula may be separated from the rigid part of the Philippine Sea plate. The faults on the coast of Japan Sea and the western part of the Median Tectonic Line have slip rates exceeding 4 mm/yr, while the Fossa Magna does not play an important role in the tectonics of the central Japan. The geodetic model requires the division of northeastern Japan, contrary to the hypothesis that northeastern Japan is a part of the North American plate. Owing to rapid convergence, the seismic risk in the Nankai trough may be larger than that of the Tokai gap.

  15. Moho depth and crustal composition in Southern Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina;

    2013-01-01

    heterogeneous crustal structure with short wavelength variations in thickness (H), Vp/Vs-ratio (composition), and Moho sharpness, which defines ~20 blocks that do not everywhere coincide with surface tectonic features. In the Zimbabwe Craton, the Tokwe block has H = 35–38 km and Vp/Vs = 1.74–1.79 whereas...... the thicker crust in the Tati block (H = 47–51 km)may be related to deformation of the Archean crust along the cratonicmargin. Two distinct crustal blocks with similar crustal thickness (42–46 km) but significantly different Vp/Vs-ratios are recognized in the Limpopo Belt. Extreme values of 1......-existing lower crust, which is further supported by a very sharp Moho transition. The exposed cross-section in the Vredefort impact crater is non-representative of cratonic crust due to shallowMoho (34 km) and high Vp/Vs ~ 1.80 attributed to shock metamorphism. High Vp/Vs = 1.76 is typical of the Witwatersrand...

  16. Boron isotope fractionation in magma via crustal carbonate dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Frances M; Troll, Valentin R; Whitehouse, Martin J; Jolis, Ester M; Freda, Carmela

    2016-08-04

    Carbon dioxide released by arc volcanoes is widely considered to originate from the mantle and from subducted sediments. Fluids released from upper arc carbonates, however, have recently been proposed to help modulate arc CO2 fluxes. Here we use boron as a tracer, which substitutes for carbon in limestone, to further investigate crustal carbonate degassing in volcanic arcs. We performed laboratory experiments replicating limestone assimilation into magma at crustal pressure-temperature conditions and analysed boron isotope ratios in the resulting experimental glasses. Limestone dissolution and assimilation generates CaO-enriched glass near the reaction site and a CO2-dominated vapour phase. The CaO-rich glasses have extremely low δ(11)B values down to -41.5‰, reflecting preferential partitioning of (10)B into the assimilating melt. Loss of (11)B from the reaction site occurs via the CO2 vapour phase generated during carbonate dissolution, which transports (11)B away from the reaction site as a boron-rich fluid phase. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of boron isotope fractionation during crustal carbonate assimilation and suggest that low δ(11)B melt values in arc magmas could flag shallow-level additions to the subduction cycle.

  17. Enhanced muscle shortening and impaired Ca2+ channel function in an acute septic myopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Oliver; Hund, Ernst; von Wegner, Frederic

    2010-04-01

    Myopathies in critically ill patients are increasingly documented. Various animal models of chronic sepsis have been employed to investigate reduced membrane excitability or altered isometric contractility of skeletal muscle. In contrast, immediate changes occurring during acute sepsis are significantly under-characterised; L-type Ca(2+) channel function or isotonic shortening are examples. We recorded slowly activating L-type Ca(2+) currents (I (Ca)) in voltage-clamped single intact mouse skeletal muscle fibres and tested the effects of acute challenge with serum fractions from critical illness myopathy patients (CIM). Using a high-speed camera system, we simultaneously recorded unloaded fibre shortening during isotonic contractions with unprecedented temporal resolution (approximately 1,600 frames/s). Time courses of fibre lengths and shortening velocity were determined from automated imaging algorithms. CIM fractions acutely induced depression of I (Ca) amplitudes with no shifts in I (Ca)-V-relations. Voltage-dependent inactivation was unaltered and I (Ca) activation and inactivation kinetics were prolonged compared to controls. Unexpectedly, maximum unloaded speed of shortening was slightly faster following CIM serum applications, suggesting a direct action of CIM serum on weak-binding-state cross-bridges. Our results are compatible with a model where CIM serum might acutely reduce a fraction of functional L-type Ca(2+) channels and could account for reduced SR Ca(2+) release and force production in CIM patients. Acute increase in isotonic shortening velocity might be an early diagnostic feature suitable for testing in clinical studies. The acute challenge model is also robust against atrophy or fibre type changes that ordinarily would have to be considered in chronic sepsis models.

  18. Force depression and relaxation kinetics after active shortening and deactivation in mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Noten, P; Van Leemputte, M

    2013-03-15

    After active shortening, isometric force production capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD). The mechanism is incompletely understood but increasing cross-bridge detachment and/or decreasing attachment rate might be involved. Therefore we aimed to investigate the relation between work delivered during shortening (W), and change in half-relaxation time (Δ0.5RT) and change in the slow phase of muscle relaxation (Δkslow), considered as a marker for cross-bridge detachment rate, after shortening and after a short (0.7s) interruption of activation (deactivation). We hypothesized that shortening induces an accelerated relaxation related to W which is, similar to FD, largely abolished by a short deactivation. In 10 incubated supra-maximally stimulated mouse soleus muscles, we varied the amount of FD at L0 by varying shortening amplitude (0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm). We found that W not only induces FD (R(2)=0.92) but also a dose dependent accelerated relaxation (R(2)=0.88 and R(2)=0.77 for respectively Δkslow and Δ0.5RT). In cyclic movements this is of functional significance, because the loss in force generating capacity might be (partially) compensated by faster relaxation. After a short deactivation, both FD and Δkslow were largely abolished but Δ0.5RT remained largely present. Under the assumption that Δkslow reflects a change in cross-bridge detachment rate, these results support the idea that FD is an intrinsic sarcomeric property originating from a work induced reduction of the number of force generating cross-bridges, however not via decreased attachment but via increased detachment rate.

  19. Residual force depression following muscle shortening is exaggerated by prior eccentric drop jump exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargeviciute, Gintare; Masiulis, Nerijus; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2013-10-15

    We studied the relation between two common force modifications in skeletal muscle: the prolonged force depression induced by unaccustomed eccentric contractions, and the residual force depression (rFD) observed immediately after active shortening. We hypothesized that rFD originates from distortion within the sarcomeres and the extent of rFD: 1) correlates to the force and work performed during the shortening steps, which depend on sarcomeric integrity; and 2) is increased by sarcomeric disorganization induced by eccentric contractions. Nine healthy untrained men (mean age 26 yr) participated in the study. rFD was studied in electrically stimulated knee extensor muscles. rFD was defined as the reduction in isometric torque after active shortening compared with the torque in a purely isometric contraction. Eccentric contractions were performed as 50 repeated drop jumps with active deceleration to 90° knee angle, immediately followed by a maximal upward jump. rFD was assessed before and 5 min to 72 h after drop jumps. The series of drop jumps caused a prolonged force depression, which was about two times larger at 20-Hz than at 50-Hz stimulation. There was a significant correlation between increasing rFD and increasing mechanical work performed during active shortening both before and after drop jumps. In addition, a given rFD was obtained at a markedly lower mechanical work after drop jumps. In conclusion, the extent of rFD correlates to the mechanical work performed during active shortening. A series of eccentric contractions causes a prolonged reduction of isometric force. In addition, eccentric contractions exaggerate rFD, which further decreases muscle performance during dynamic contractions.

  20. Oxidative Stress-induced Telomere Length Shortening of Circulating Leukocyte in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Soo; Kwak, Jin Wook; Lim, Su Jin; Park, Yong Kyun; Yang, Hoon Shik; Kim, Hyun Jik

    2016-01-01

    The main mechanism of pathogenesis which causes systemic complications in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is believed to be intermittent hypoxia-induced intermediary effect and it depends on the burden of oxidative stress during sleep. We aimed to search the predictive markers which reflect the burden of systemic oxidative stress in patients with OSA and whether excessive telomere length shortening is a characteristic feature that can assess oxidative stress levels. We used quantitative PCR to measure telomere length using peripheral blood genomic DNA. Telomere lengths were compared in an age- and body mass index (BMI)-dependent manner in 34 healthy volunteers and 43 OSA subjects. We also performed reactive oxygen species assay to measure the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers and OSA subjects. We found that the serum concentration of hydrogen peroxide was considerably higher in OSA patients, and that this was closely related with the severity of OSA. Significantly shortened telomere length was observed in the circulating leukocytes of the peripheral blood of OSA patients, and telomere length shortening was aggravated more acutely in an age- and BMI-dependent manner. An inverse correlation was observed between the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the telomere length of OSA patients and excessive telomere length shortening was also linked to severity of OSA. The results provided evidence that telomere length shortening or excessive cellular aging might be distinctive in circulating leukocyte of OSA patients and may be an predictive biomarker for reflect the burden of oxidative stress in the peripheral blood of OSA patients. PMID:27699083

  1. Two-Stage Surgical Treatment for Non-Union of a Shortened Osteoporotic Femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galal Zaki Said

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We report a case of non-union with severe shortening of the femur following diaphysectomy for chronic osteomyelitis.Case Presentation: A boy, aged 16 years presented with a dangling and excessively short left lower limb. He was using an elbow crutch in his right hand to help him walk. He had a history of diaphysectomy for chronic osteomyelitis at the age of 9. Examination revealed a freely mobile non-union of the left femur. The femur was the seat of an 18 cm shortening and a 4 cm defect at the non-union site; the knee joint was ankylosed in extension. The tibia and fibula were 10 cm short. Considering the extensive shortening in the femur and tibia in addition to osteoporosis, he was treated in two stages. In stage I, the femoral non-union was treated by open reduction, internal fixation and iliac bone grafting. The patient was then allowed to walk with full weight bearing in an extension brace for 7 months. In Stage II, equalization of leg length discrepancy (LLD was achieved by simultaneous distraction of the femur and tibia by unilateral frames. At the 6 month follow- up, he was fully weight bearing without any walking aid, with a heel lift to compensate the 1.5 cm shortening. Three years later he reported that he was satisfied with the result of treatment and was leading a normal life as a university student.Conclusions: Two-stage treatment succeeded to restore about 20 cm of the femoral shortening in a severely osteoporotic bone. It has also succeeded in reducing the treatment time of the external fixator.

  2. Handling of bulk solids theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Shamlou, P A

    1990-01-01

    Handling of Bulk Solids provides a comprehensive discussion of the field of solids flow and handling in the process industries. Presentation of the subject follows classical lines of separate discussions for each topic, so each chapter is self-contained and can be read on its own. Topics discussed include bulk solids flow and handling properties; pressure profiles in bulk solids storage vessels; the design of storage silos for reliable discharge of bulk materials; gravity flow of particulate materials from storage vessels; pneumatic transportation of bulk solids; and the hazards of solid-mater

  3. Palaeoproterozoic high-pressure granulite overprint of the Archaean continental crust: evidence for homogeneous crustal thickening (Man Rise, Ivory Coast)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitra, Pavel; Kouamelan, Alain N.; Ballèvre, Michel; Peucat, Jean-Jacques

    2010-05-01

    well as coeval intrusion of juvenile magmas. Crustal shortening was mainly accommodated by transpressive shear zones and by lateral crustal spreading rather than large-scale thrust systems. The occurrence of high-pressure granulites does not imply thrust-dominated tectonics. Feybesse, J.-L. & Milési, J.-P., 1994. The Archean/Proterozoic contact zone in West Africa: a mountain belt of décollement thrusting and folding on a continental margin related to 2.1 Ga convergence of Archean cratons? Precambrian Research, 69, 199-227. Schulmann, K., Schaltegger, U., Ježek, J., et al. 2002. Rapid burial and exhumation during orogeny: thickening and synconvergent exhumation of thermally weakened and thinned crust (Variscan orogen in Western Europe). American Journal of Science, 302, 856-879. Schulmann, K., Lexa, O., Štípská, P. et al., 2008. Vertical extrusion and horizontal channel flow of orogenic lower crust: key exhumation mechanisms in large hot orogens? Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 26(2), 273-297.

  4. Nanofluidics, from bulk to interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, Lydéric; Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2010-03-01

    Nanofluidics has emerged recently in the footsteps of microfluidics, following the quest for scale reduction inherent to nanotechnologies. By definition, nanofluidics explores transport phenomena of fluids at nanometer scales. Why is the nanometer scale specific? What fluid properties are probed at nanometric scales? In other words, why does 'nanofluidics' deserve its own brand name? In this critical review, we will explore the vast manifold of length scales emerging for fluid behavior at the nanoscale, as well as the associated mechanisms and corresponding applications. We will in particular explore the interplay between bulk and interface phenomena. The limit of validity of the continuum approaches will be discussed, as well as the numerous surface induced effects occurring at these scales, from hydrodynamic slippage to the various electro-kinetic phenomena originating from the couplings between hydrodynamics and electrostatics. An enlightening analogy between ion transport in nanochannels and transport in doped semi-conductors will be discussed (156 references).

  5. New fermions in the bulk

    CERN Document Server

    de Brito, K P S

    2016-01-01

    Spinor fields on 5-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds are classified, according to the geometric Fierz identities that involve their bilinear covariants. Based upon this classification that generalises the celebrated 4-dimensional Lounesto classification of spinor fields, new non-trivial classes of 5-dimensional spinor fields are, hence, found, with important potential applications regarding bulk fermions and their subsequent localisation on brane-worlds. In addition, quaternionic bilinear covariants are used to derive the quaternionic spin density, through the truncated exterior bundle. In order to accomplish a realisation of these new spinors, a Killing vector field is constructed on the horizon of 5-dimensional Kerr black holes. This Killing vector field is shown to reach the time-like Killing vector field at the spatial infinity, through a current 1-form density, constructed with the derived new spinor fields. The current density is, moreover, expressed as the f\\"unfbein components, assuming a condensed for...

  6. New fermions in the bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, K. P. S.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2016-10-01

    The spinor fields on 5-dimensional Lorentzian manifolds are classified according to the geometric Fierz identities, which involve their bilinear covariants. Based upon this classification, which generalises the celebrated 4-dimensional Lounesto classification of spinor fields, new non-trivial classes of 5-dimensional spinor fields are hence found, with important potential applications regarding bulk fermions and their subsequent localisation on brane-worlds. In addition, quaternionic bilinear covariants are used to derive the quaternionic spin density through the truncated exterior bundle. In order to accomplish the realisation of these new spinors, a Killing vector field is constructed on the horizon of a 5-dimensional Kerr black hole. This Killing vector field is shown to reach the time-like Killing vector field at spatial infinity through a current 1-form density, constructed with the new derived spinor fields. The current density is, moreover, expressed as the fünfbein component, assuming a condensed form.

  7. "Storms of crustal stress" and AE earthquake precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Gregori

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE displays violent paroxysms preceding strong earthquakes, observed within some large area (several hundred kilometres wide around the epicentre. We call them "storms of crustal stress" or, briefly "crustal storms". A few case histories are discussed, all dealing with the Italian peninsula, and with the different behaviour shown by the AE records in the Cephalonia island (Greece, which is characterized by a different tectonic setting.

    AE is an effective tool for diagnosing the state of some wide slab of the Earth's crust, and for monitoring its evolution, by means of AE of different frequencies. The same effect ought to be detected being time-delayed, when referring to progressively lower frequencies. This results to be an effective check for validating the physical interpretation.

    Unlike a seismic event, which involves a much limited focal volume and therefore affects a restricted area on the Earth's surface, a "crustal storm" typically involves some large slab of lithosphere and crust. In general, it cannot be easily reckoned to any specific seismic event. An earthquake responds to strictly local rheological features of the crust, which are eventually activated, and become crucial, on the occasion of a "crustal storm". A "crustal storm" lasts typically few years, eventually involving several destructive earthquakes that hit at different times, at different sites, within that given lithospheric slab.

    Concerning the case histories that are here discussed, the lithospheric slab is identified with the Italian peninsula. During 1996–1997 a "crustal storm" was on, maybe elapsing until 2002 (we lack information for the period 1998–2001. Then, a quiet period occurred from 2002 until 26 May 2008, when a new "crustal storm" started, and by the end of 2009 it is still on. During the 1996–1997 "storm" two strong earthquakes occurred (Potenza and

  8. Shortening in the Central Andes at the transition to flat slab subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safipour, R.; DeCelles, P. G.; Carrapa, B.; Kapp, P. A.; Gehrels, G. E.; Reiners, P. W.

    2011-12-01

    Shortening in the Central Andes is considered to decrease north and south of the apex of the Bolivian orocline, mainly owing to differences in the pre-existing stratigraphic architecture of the continental margin. Estimates of shortening in the central Andes of northern Argentina remain poorly documented, but are required for assessment of the regional kinematic history of the orogenic system. The problem is acute at the north to south transition from the high elevation Puna plateau to the lower elevation region of the Sierras Pampeanas intra-foreland block uplifts, which corresponds with a transition to a flat segment of the subducting Nazca plate. Although deformation in the Eastern Cordillera appears to have propagated forelandward from west to east, the trend in the Sierras Pampeanas is not clear from existing data. We mapped the structures along a roughly E-W transect at latitude 28°S in the Sierra de Las Planchadas of the northern Sierras Pampeanas to measure finite strain and kinematic indicators, and to develop a regional restorable cross section for measuring total shortening. We also sampled for low-T thermochronology in order to determine the timing of exhumation and inferred thrust propagation. A minimum of 40 km of shortening in the Sierra de Las Planchadas is estimated from our restored cross section. When added to the 20 km shortening documented in ranges to the east by previous studies, this brings the total minimum estimated shortening at this latitude to ~60 km. Apatite fission track ages from the hanging walls of thrusts are ~20 Ma, and apatite helium ages range from 10 Ma west of the range to 2.3 Ma in the Fiambalá basin which borders the range to the east. Cretaceous and Paleogene cooling ages are observed in ranges to the east of the Sierra de Las Planchadas, so the young cooling ages found in this study suggest that exhumation was complex and possibly diachronous at this latitude. To the extent that exhumation occurs simultaneously with

  9. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    Full Text Available Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001 and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02. The mean d-value (post-pre of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19-143.67 mm3. The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively. Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height.

  10. Serotonin in the solitary tract nucleus shortens the laryngeal chemoreflex in anaesthetized neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, William T; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J C

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Failure to terminate apnoea and arouse is likely to contribute to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Serotonin is deficient in the brainstems of babies who died of SIDS. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that serotonin in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) would shorten reflex apnoea. What is the main finding and its importance? Serotonin microinjected into the NTS shortened the apnoea and respiratory inhibition associated with the laryngeal chemoreflex. Moreover, this effect was achieved through a 5-HT3 receptor. This is a new insight that is likely to be relevant to the pathogenesis of SIDS. The laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR), an airway-protective reflex that causes apnoea and bradycardia, has long been suspected as an initiating event in the sudden infant death syndrome. Serotonin (5-HT) and 5-HT receptors may be deficient in the brainstems of babies who die of sudden infant death syndrome, and 5-HT seems to be important in terminating apnoeas directly or in causing arousals or as part of the process of autoresuscitation. We hypothesized that 5-HT in the brainstem would limit the duration of the LCR. We studied anaesthetized rat pups between 7 and 21 days of age and made microinjections into the cisterna magna or into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Focal, bilateral microinjections of 5-HT into the caudal NTS significantly shortened the LCR. The 5-HT1a receptor antagonist, WAY 100635, did not affect the LCR consistently, nor did a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, alter the duration of the LCR. The 5-HT3 specific agonist, 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-biguanide, microinjected bilaterally into the caudal NTS significantly shortened the LCR. Thus, endogenous 5-HT released within the NTS may curtail the respiratory depression that is part of the LCR, and serotonergic shortening of the LCR may be attributed to activation of 5-HT3 receptors within the NTS. 5-HT3 receptors are expressed presynaptically on C

  11. Effects of Crustal Fields on the Ionosphere of Mars as seen by MAVEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Flynn, Casey L.; Andersson, Laila; Brain, David; Mitchell, David; Connerney, Jack; Espley, Jared R.

    2016-10-01

    Mars lacks a global intrinsic magnetic field but possesses regions of strong crustal magnetic field that are concentrated in the southern hemisphere. Previous studies have used Mars Global Surveyor or Mars Express data to show that these crustal fields influence the electron densities in the Martian ionosphere. However, many of these studies relied on remote radio occultation or radar sounding measurements and therefore relied on models to infer the crustal magnetic field strength and direction. In fall 2015 the MAVEN spacecraft passed through these crustal field regions at low altitudes, on the day side, and collected comprehensive measurements of the local plasma and magnetic field properties. The MAVEN observations therefore provide an excellent dataset with which to examine the effects of crustal fields on the ionosphere. We report on the MAVEN electron density measurements in the southern crustal field regions and discuss the influence of the magnetic field direction and topology on the dayside Martian ionosphere.

  12. Protein degradation and post-deboning tenderization in broiler breast meat with different degrees of muscle shortening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboning broiler breast fillets prior to rigor mortis negatively influences tenderness due to sarcomere shortening. The effects of sarcomere shortening on muscle protein degradation and breast meat tenderization during post-deboning aging are not well understood. The objective of this study was to m...

  13. Does postsystolic motion or shortening predict recovery of myocardial function after primary percutanous coronary intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Christian Juhl; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde;

    2007-01-01

    or shortening appears more frequently in the acute phase in myocardial segments with impaired systolic function compared with normally functioning segments. However, presence of postsystolic contraction is not associated with improvement in strain or wall-motion score at follow-up, and does not seem......OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether presence of postsystolic motion or shortening defined by Doppler tissue imaging may predict recovery of regional myocardial function in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. METHODS: Echocardiography was performed a few hours......); and normal myocardial function in the acute phase (type E, n = 759). RESULTS: There were no differences among type A, B, C, and D segments with regard to the proportion presenting postsystolic tissue velocity equal to or greater than 1.0 cm/s (0.52, 0.54, 0.60, and 0.47, respectively, P = .20...

  14. A critical examination of the maximum velocity of shortening used in simulation models of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2010-12-01

    The maximum velocity of shortening of a muscle is an important parameter in musculoskeletal models. The most commonly used values are derived from animal studies; however, these values are well above the values that have been reported for human muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine the sensitivity of simulations of maximum vertical jumping performance to the parameters describing the force-velocity properties of muscle. Simulations performed with parameters derived from animal studies were similar to measured jump heights from previous experimental studies. While simulations performed with parameters derived from human muscle were much lower than previously measured jump heights. If current measurements of maximum shortening velocity in human muscle are correct, a compensating error must exist. Of the possible compensating errors that could produce this discrepancy, it was concluded that reduced muscle fibre excursion is the most likely candidate.

  15. Characterization of an ultrafast Bragg-Switch for shortening hard x-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, M.; Koc, A.; Kwamen, C. T.; Michaels, H.; Reppert, A. v.; Pudell, J.; Zamponi, F.; Bargheer, M.; Sellmann, J.; Schwarzkopf, J.; Gaal, P.

    2016-11-01

    We present a nanostructured device that functions as photoacoustic hard x-ray switch. The device is triggered by femtosecond laser pulses and allows for temporal gating of hard x-rays on picosecond (ps) timescales. It may be used for pulse picking or even pulse shortening in 3rd generation synchrotron sources. Previous approaches mainly suffered from insufficient switching contrasts due to excitation-induced thermal distortions. We present a new approach where thermal distortions are spatially separated from the functional switching layers in the structure. Our measurements yield a switching contrast of 14, which is sufficient for efficient hard x-ray pulse shortening. The optimized structure also allows for utilizing the switch at high repetition rates of up to 208 kHz.

  16. Telomere shortening leads to earlier age of onset in ALS mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkus, Birgit; Wiesner, Diana; MeΔner, Martina; Karabatsiakis, Alexander; Scheffold, Annika; Rudolph, K. Lenhard; Thal, Dietmar R.; Weishaupt, Jochen H.; Ludolph, Albert C.; Danzer, Karin M.

    2016-01-01

    Telomere shortening has been linked to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Recent evidence suggests that reduced telomerase expression results in shorter telomeres in leukocytes from sporadic patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) compared with healthy controls. Here, we have characterized telomere length in microglia, astroglia and neurons in human post mortem brain tissue from ALS patients and healthy controls. Moreover, we studied the consequences of telomerase deletion in a genetic mouse model for ALS. We found a trend towards longer telomeres in microglia in the brains of ALS patients compared to non-neurologic controls. Knockout of telomerase leading to telomere shortening accelerated the ALS phenotype in SOD1G93A–transgenic mice. Our results suggest that telomerase dysfunction might contribute to the age-related risk for ALS. PMID:26978042

  17. Telomeric noncoding RNA TERRA is induced by telomere shortening to nucleate telomerase molecules at short telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanelli, Emilio; Romero, Carmina Angelica Perez; Chartrand, Pascal

    2013-09-26

    Elongation of a short telomere depends on the action of multiple telomerase molecules, which are visible as telomerase RNA foci or clusters associated with telomeres in yeast and mammalian cells. How several telomerase molecules act on a single short telomere is unknown. Herein, we report that the telomeric noncoding RNA TERRA is involved in the nucleation of telomerase molecules into clusters prior to their recruitment at a short telomere. We find that telomere shortening induces TERRA expression, leading to the accumulation of TERRA molecules into a nuclear focus. Simultaneous time-lapse imaging of telomerase RNA and TERRA reveals spontaneous events of telomerase nucleation on TERRA foci in early S phase, generating TERRA-telomerase clusters. This cluster is subsequently recruited to the short telomere from which TERRA transcripts originate during S phase. We propose that telomere shortening induces noncoding RNA expression to coordinate the recruitment and activity of telomerase molecules at short telomeres.

  18. Stretch-shortening cycle muscle power in women and men aged 18-81 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwén, C E; Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Magnusson, Stig Peter;

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the age-related deterioration in stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) muscle power and concurrent force-velocity properties in women and men across the adult life span. A total of 315 participants (women: n = 188; men: n = 127) aged 18-81 years performed maximal countermovement jump...... on an instrumented force plate. Maximal SSC leg extension power expressed per kg body mass (Ppeak) was greater in men than in women across the adult age span (P ......This study explored the age-related deterioration in stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) muscle power and concurrent force-velocity properties in women and men across the adult life span. A total of 315 participants (women: n = 188; men: n = 127) aged 18-81 years performed maximal countermovement jumps...

  19. Influence of the heart rate on mean circumferential shortening velocity: echocardiographic study of 183 normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, R; Martinotti, R; Monzani, V; Sardella, F; Pierini, A; Pastori, M; Randazzo, A

    1986-01-01

    Echocardiography was used to explore the influence of independent variables (age, body surface area and heart rate) on the mean circumferential shortening velocity (MVCF) in 183 healthy subjects. Multiple stepwise regression analysis shows that heart rate is the only variable of the three just mentioned that influences MVCF. A regression equation is evolved and proposed as an index of MVCF correction for varying heart rates.

  20. Time course of isotonic shortening and the underlying contraction mechanism in airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syyong, Harley T; Raqeeb, Abdul; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y

    2011-09-01

    Although the structure of the contractile unit in smooth muscle is poorly understood, some of the mechanical properties of the muscle suggest that a sliding-filament mechanism, similar to that in striated muscle, is also operative in smooth muscle. To test the applicability of this mechanism to smooth muscle function, we have constructed a mathematical model based on a hypothetical structure of the smooth muscle contractile unit: a side-polar myosin filament sandwiched by actin filaments, each attached to the equivalent of a Z disk. Model prediction of isotonic shortening as a function of time was compared with data from experiments using ovine tracheal smooth muscle. After equilibration and establishment of in situ length, the muscle was stimulated with ACh (100 μM) until force reached a plateau. The muscle was then allowed to shorten isotonically against various loads. From the experimental records, length-force and force-velocity relationships were obtained. Integration of the hyperbolic force-velocity relationship and the linear length-force relationship yielded an exponential function that approximated the time course of isotonic shortening generated by the modeled sliding-filament mechanism. However, to obtain an accurate fit, it was necessary to incorporate a viscoelastic element in series with the sliding-filament mechanism. The results suggest that a large portion of the shortening is due to filament sliding associated with muscle activation and that a small portion is due to continued deformation associated with an element that shows viscoelastic or power-law creep after a step change in force.

  1. Shortened Length of Stay Improves Financial Outcomes in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Manuel; Siskind, Eric; Sameyah, Emil; Alex, Asha; Blum, Mark; Tyrell, Richard; Fana, Melissa; Mishler, Marni; Godwin, Andrew; Kuncewitch, Michael; Alexander, Mohini; Israel, Ezra; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Calderon, Kellie; Jhaveri, Kenar D.; Sachdeva, Mala; Bellucci, Alessandro; Mattana, Joseph; Fishbane, Steven; Coppa, Gene; Molmenti, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the preferred clinical and most cost-effective option for end-stage renal disease. Significant advances have taken place in the care of the transplant patients with improvements in clinical outcomes. The optimization of the costs of transplantation has been a constant goal as well. We present herein the impact in financial outcomes of a shortened length of stay after kidney transplant. PMID:24436592

  2. Effect of Preactivation on Torque Enhancement by the Stretch-Shortening Cycle in Knee Extensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Misaki, Jun; Isaka, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    The stretch-shortening cycle is one of the most interesting topics in the field of sport sciences, because the performance of human movement is enhanced by the stretch-shortening cycle (eccentric contraction). The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the influence of preactivation on the torque enhancement by stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. Twelve men participated in this study. The following three conditions were conducted for knee extensors: (1) concentric contraction without preactivation (CON), (2) concentric contraction with eccentric preactivation (ECC), and (3) concentric contraction with isometric preactivation (ISO). Muscle contractions were evoked by electrical stimulation to discard the influence of neural activity. The range of motion of the knee joint was set from 80 to 140 degrees (full extension = 180 degrees). Angular velocities of the concentric and eccentric contractions were set at 180 and 90 degrees/s, respectively. In the concentric contraction phase, joint torques were recorded at 85, 95, and 105 degrees, and they were compared among the three conditions. In the early phase (85 degrees) of concentric contraction, the joint torque was larger in the ECC and ISO conditions than in the CON condition. However, these clear differences disappeared in the later phase (105 degrees) of concentric contraction. The results showed that joint torque was clearly different among the three conditions in the early phase whereas this difference disappeared in the later phase. Thus, preactivation, which is prominent in the early phase of contractions, plays an important role in torque enhancement by the stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors.

  3. Effect of Preactivation on Torque Enhancement by the Stretch-Shortening Cycle in Knee Extensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuki Fukutani

    Full Text Available The stretch-shortening cycle is one of the most interesting topics in the field of sport sciences, because the performance of human movement is enhanced by the stretch-shortening cycle (eccentric contraction. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the influence of preactivation on the torque enhancement by stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors. Twelve men participated in this study. The following three conditions were conducted for knee extensors: (1 concentric contraction without preactivation (CON, (2 concentric contraction with eccentric preactivation (ECC, and (3 concentric contraction with isometric preactivation (ISO. Muscle contractions were evoked by electrical stimulation to discard the influence of neural activity. The range of motion of the knee joint was set from 80 to 140 degrees (full extension = 180 degrees. Angular velocities of the concentric and eccentric contractions were set at 180 and 90 degrees/s, respectively. In the concentric contraction phase, joint torques were recorded at 85, 95, and 105 degrees, and they were compared among the three conditions. In the early phase (85 degrees of concentric contraction, the joint torque was larger in the ECC and ISO conditions than in the CON condition. However, these clear differences disappeared in the later phase (105 degrees of concentric contraction. The results showed that joint torque was clearly different among the three conditions in the early phase whereas this difference disappeared in the later phase. Thus, preactivation, which is prominent in the early phase of contractions, plays an important role in torque enhancement by the stretch-shortening cycle in knee extensors.

  4. Disappearance of spasticity after selective dorsal rhizotomy does not prevent muscle shortening in children with cerebral palsy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijker, Margje; Strijers, Rob L M; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; Becher, Jules G

    2009-05-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy is an effective treatment for spasticity in children with cerebral palsy who have a spastic motor disorder. It is hypothesized that muscle shortening is related to spasticity; the lack of stretch of a muscle is thought to be the cause of muscle shortening. If this is true, the treatment for spasticity should prevent the occurrence of muscle shortening during growth. We present the case of 1 child with cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia, for whom the treatment with selective dorsal rhizotomy was successful in improving the walking abilities. She did, however, develop muscle shortening during growth. In conclusion, the development of muscle shortening during growth in children with cerebral palsy and spastic paresis cannot be prevented by treatment for the spasticity alone.

  5. Combined effects of Eurasia/Sunda oblique convergence and East-Tibetan crustal flow on the active tectonics of Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangin, Claude; Maurin, Thomas; Masson, Frederic

    2013-10-01

    It is widely accepted that deformation of the India/Sunda plate is the result of partitioned hyper oblique convergence. Presently, sub-meridian dextral strike slip faulting accommodates this India/Sunda motion in a buffer zone, the Burma platelet. This wide dextral strike slip shear zone is complicated by the side effect of the Tibet plateau collapse that can be described in term of crustal flow and gravity tectonics. The loss of potential energy related to this plateau collapse affects most of the Burmese platelet particularly in its northernmost part. Interaction of these two distinct geodynamic processes is recorded in the GPS based regional strain field, the analysis of seismic focal mechanism but also from direct geologic observations both onshore and offshore Myanmar and Bangladesh. We propose the apparent E-W shortening component of this so called partitioned hyper-oblique subduction is only the effect of regional gravitational forces related to the Tibet plateau collapse whereas the NS strike slip faulting accommodates the India/Sunda motion.

  6. INFLUENCE OF SHORTENED AND LENGTHENED IMMOBILIZATION ON RAT SOLEUS MUSCLE ATROPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国刚; 樊小力; 吴苏娣; 宋新爱; 朱保恭; 唐斌

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the possible mechanism and prevention of disuse muscle atrophy. Methods: The shortened immobilization (plaster fixation) of rat' s soleus muscle (SOL) was used as the model of muscle and the lengthened immobilization of rat' s SOL muscle as "passive stretch" method. Types of skeletal muscle fibers were differentiated with m - ATPase staining technique. The changes of rat' s SOL muscle weight (wet weight) as well as the types and the mean cross - sectional area (CSA) of muscle fibers were examined respectively on day 2, 4,7, 14 and 21 under both shortened and lengthened immobilization and then the effect of passive stretch on soleus muscle atrophy in immobilized rats was observed. Results: When shortened immobilization was applied for 4 days, SOL muscle weight (wet weight) became lighter; the fiber crosssectional area (CSA) shrank and type Ⅰ muscle fibers started transforming into type Ⅱ, which all indicated immobilized muscles began to atrophy and as immobilization proceeded, muscle atrophy proceeded toward higher level. In contrast to that, when lengthened immobilization was applied, SOL muscle didn' t show any sign of atrophy until 7th day, and reached its highest level on day 14 and maintained that level even though immobilization continued. Conclusion: From the results, we conclude that passive stretch can either relieve or defer disuse muscle atrophy.

  7. Relative shortening velocity in locomotor muscles: turkey ankle extensors operate at low V/V(max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaldón, Annette M; Nelson, Frank E; Roberts, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    The force-velocity properties of skeletal muscle have an important influence on locomotor performance. All skeletal muscles produce less force the faster they shorten and typically develop maximal power at velocities of approximately 30% of maximum shortening velocity (V(max)). We used direct measurements of muscle mechanical function in two ankle extensor muscles of wild turkeys to test the hypothesis that during level running muscles operate at velocities that favor force rather than power. Sonomicrometer measurements of muscle length, tendon strain-gauge measurements of muscle force, and bipolar electromyographs were taken as animals ran over a range of speeds and inclines. These measurements were integrated with previously measured values of muscle V(max) for these muscles to calculate relative shortening velocity (V/V(max)). At all speeds for level running the V/V(max) values of the lateral gastrocnemius and the peroneus longus were low (muscles were capable of producing 90% of peak isometric force but only 35% of peak isotonic power. V/V(max) increased in response to the demand for mechanical power with increases in running incline and decreased to negative values to absorb energy during downhill running. Measurements of integrated electromyograph activity indicated that the volume of muscle required to produce a given force increased from level to uphill running. This observation is consistent with the idea that V/V(max) is an important determinant of locomotor cost because it affects the volume of muscle that must be recruited to support body weight.

  8. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  9. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Bhargava, Valmik

    2015-09-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR.

  10. Field Monitoring of Column Shortenings in a High-Rise Building during Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Seon Park

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The automatic monitoring of shortenings of vertical members in high-rise buildings under construction is a challenging issue in the high-rise building construction field. In this study, a practical system for monitoring column shortening in a high-rise building under construction is presented. The proposed monitoring system comprises the following components: (1 a wireless sensing system and (2 the corresponding monitoring software. The wireless sensing system comprises the sensors and energy-efficient wireless sensing units (sensor nodes, master nodes, and repeater nodes, which automate the processes for measuring the strains of vertical members and transmitting the measured data to the remote server. The monitoring software enables construction administrators to monitor real-time data collected by the server via an Internet connection. The proposed monitoring system is applied to actual 66-floor and 72-floor high-rise buildings under construction. The system enables automatic and real-time measurements of the shortening of vertical members, which can result in more precise construction.

  11. Shortened Lifespan and Lethal Hemorrhage in a Hemophilia A Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Staber

    Full Text Available Hemophilia A animal models have helped advance our understanding of factor VIII deficiency. Previously, factor VIII deficient mouse models were reported to have a normal life span without spontaneous bleeds. However, the bleeding frequency and survival in these animals has not been thoroughly evaluated.To investigate the survival and lethal bleeding frequency in two strains of E-16 hemophilia A mice.We prospectively studied factor VIII deficient hemizygous affected males (n = 83 and homozygous affected females (n = 55 for survival and bleeding frequency. Animals were evaluated for presence and location of bleeds as potential cause of death.Hemophilia A mice had a median survival of 254 days, which is significantly shortened compared to wild type controls (p < 0.0001. In addition, the hemophilia A mice experienced hemorrhage in several tissues. This previously-underappreciated shortened survival in the hemophilia A murine model provides new outcomes for investigation of therapeutics and also reflects the shortened lifespan of patients if left untreated.

  12. Extreme femoral shortening: an approach to the chronically dislocated hip in the nonambulatory pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalawadia, Jay V; Patel, Ronak M; Jensen, Layne; Sarwark, John

    2014-09-01

    There are many surgical techniques for treating the chronically dislocated, painful hip in patients with neuromuscular spasticity, but each has significant complication rates. We conducted a study to examine the outcomes of a novel technique, an extreme varus femoral shortening osteotomy, used in nonambulatory patients with neuromuscular spasticity. Patients who underwent the procedure were identified retrospectively by surgical codes. Medical records were reviewed for range of motion, pain and functional assessment, surgical indications, complications, and results. In addition, preoperative and postoperative radiographs were assessed, and caretaker questionnaires reviewed. Between 2001 and 2010, 1 surgeon performed 6 femoral shortening osteotomies in 5 nonambulatory patients with neuromuscular spasticity. In all 5 cases, there were improvements in pain, sitting tolerance, ease of hygiene, and ease of transfers at a minimum follow-up of 2 years (mean, 3.4 years). Postoperative complications included asymptomatic heterotopic ossification and recurrent subluxation. Extreme femoral shortening is a reproducible surgical technique that alleviates pain and makes hygiene easier in nonambulatory children with symptomatic hip dislocations caused by neuromuscular spasticity. Our complication rate was comparable to that of other procedures.

  13. Decreasing initial telomere length in humans intergenerationally understates age-associated telomere shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holohan, Brody; De Meyer, Tim; Batten, Kimberly; Mangino, Massimo; Hunt, Steven C; Bekaert, Sofie; De Buyzere, Marc L; Rietzschel, Ernst R; Spector, Tim D; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-08-01

    Telomere length shortens with aging, and short telomeres have been linked to a wide variety of pathologies. Previous studies suggested a discrepancy in age-associated telomere shortening rate estimated by cross-sectional studies versus the rate measured in longitudinal studies, indicating a potential bias in cross-sectional estimates. Intergenerational changes in initial telomere length, such as that predicted by the previously described effect of a father's age at birth of his offspring (FAB), could explain the discrepancy in shortening rate measurements. We evaluated whether changes occur in initial telomere length over multiple generations in three large datasets and identified paternal birth year (PBY) as a variable that reconciles the difference between longitudinal and cross-sectional measurements. We also clarify the association between FAB and offspring telomere length, demonstrating that this effect is substantially larger than reported in the past. These results indicate the presence of a downward secular trend in telomere length at birth over generational time with potential public health implications.

  14. Effect of Crustal Density Structures on GOCE Gravity Gradient Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tenzer Pavel Novák

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravity gradient components corrected for major known anomalous density structures within the Earth¡¦s crust. Heterogeneous mantle density structures are disregarded. The gravimetric forward modeling technique is utilized to compute the gravity gradients based on methods for a spherical harmonic analysis and synthesis of a gravity field. The Earth¡¦s gravity gradient components are generated using the global geopotential model GOCO-03s. The topographic and stripping gravity corrections due to the density contrasts of the ocean and ice are computed from the global topographic/bathymetric model DTM2006.0 (which also includes the ice-thickness dataset. The discrete data of sediments and crust layers taken from the CRUST2.0 global crustal model are then used to apply the additional stripping corrections for sediments and remaining anomalous crustal density structures. All computations are realized globally on a one arc-deg geographical grid at a mean satellite elevation of 255 km. The global map of the consolidated crust-stripped gravity gradients reveals distinctive features which are attributed to global tectonics, lithospheric plate configuration, lithosphere structure and mantle dynamics (e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment, mantle convection. The Moho signature, which is the most pronounced signal in these refined gravity gradients, is superimposed over a weaker gravity signal of the lithospheric mantle. An interpretational quality of the computed (refined gravity gradient components is mainly limited by a low accuracy and resolution of the CRUST2.0 sediment and crustal layer data and unmodeled mantle structures.

  15. Crustal structure beneath northeast India inferred from receiver function modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Kajaljyoti; Bora, Dipok K.; Goyal, Ayush; Kumar, Raju

    2016-09-01

    We estimated crustal shear velocity structure beneath ten broadband seismic stations of northeast India, by using H-Vp/Vs stacking method and a non-linear direct search approach, Neighbourhood Algorithm (NA) technique followed by joint inversion of Rayleigh wave group velocity and receiver function, calculated from teleseismic earthquakes data. Results show significant variations of thickness, shear velocities (Vs) and Vp/Vs ratio in the crust of the study region. The inverted shear wave velocity models show crustal thickness variations of 32-36 km in Shillong Plateau (North), 36-40 in Assam Valley and ∼44 km in Lesser Himalaya (South). Average Vp/Vs ratio in Shillong Plateau is less (1.73-1.77) compared to Assam Valley and Lesser Himalaya (∼1.80). Average crustal shear velocity beneath the study region varies from 3.4 to 3.5 km/s. Sediment structure beneath Shillong Plateau and Assam Valley shows 1-2 km thick sediment layer with low Vs (2.5-2.9 km/s) and high Vp/Vs ratio (1.8-2.1), while it is observed to be of greater thickness (4 km) with similar Vs and high Vp/Vs (∼2.5) in RUP (Lesser Himalaya). Both Shillong Plateau and Assam Valley show thick upper and middle crust (10-20 km), and thin (4-9 km) lower crust. Average Vp/Vs ratio in Assam Valley and Shillong Plateau suggest that the crust is felsic-to-intermediate and intermediate-to-mafic beneath Shillong Plateau and Assam Valley, respectively. Results show that lower crust rocks beneath the Shillong Plateau and Assam Valley lies between mafic granulite and mafic garnet granulite.

  16. Crustal structure beneath the Songpan-Garze orogenic belt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王椿镛; 韩渭宾; 吴建平; 楼海; 白志明

    2003-01-01

    The Benzilan-Tangke deep seismic sounding profile in the western Sichuan region passes through the Songpan-Garze orogenic belt with trend of NNE. Based on the travel times and the related amplitudes of phases in the record sections, the 2-DP-wave crustal structure was ascertained in this paper. The velocity structure has quite strong lateral variation along the profile. The crust is divided into 5 layers, where the first, second and third layer belong to the upper crust, theforth and fifth layer belong to the lower crust. The low velocity anomaly zone generally exists in the central part of the upper crust on the profile, and it integrates into the overlying low velocity basement in the area to the north of Ma.erkang. The crustal structure in the section can be divided into 4 parts: in the south of Garze-Litang fault, between Garze-Litang fault and Xianshuihe fault,between Xianshuihe fault and Longriba fault and in the north of Longriba fault,which are basically coincided with the regional tectonics division. The crustalthickness decreases from southwest to northeast along the profile, that is, from 62 km in the region of the Jinshajiang River to 52 km in the region of the Yellow River. The Moho discontinuity does not obviously change across the Xianshuihe fault based on the PmP phase analysis. The crustal average velocity along the profile is lower, about 6.30 km/s. The Benzilan-Tangke profile reveals that the crust in the study area is orogenic. The Xianshuihe fault belt is located in thecentral part of the profile, and the velocity is positive anomaly on the upper crust, and negative anomaly on the lower crust and upper mantle. It is considered as a deep tectonic setting in favor of strong earthquake's accumulation and occurrence.

  17. Recent crustal deformation in west-central South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Matthew Earl

    I use interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to create maps of crustal deformation along the coast and within the volcanic arc of central South America. I image deformation associated with six subduction zone earthquakes, four volcanic centers, at least one shallow crustal earthquake, and several salt flats. In addition, I constrain the magnitude and location of post-seismic deformation from the aforementioned subduction zone earthquakes. I combine InSAR observations with data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) and teleseismic data to explore each source of deformation. I use the observations to constrain earthquake and volcanic processes of this subduction zone, including the plumbing system of the volcanoes and the decadal along strike variations in the subduction zone earthquake cycle. I created interferograms of over 900 volcanoes in the central Andes spanning 1992--2002, and found four areas of deformation. I constrained the temporal variability of the deformation, the depth of the sources of deformation assuming a variety of source geometries and crustal structures, and the possible cause of the deformation. I do not observe deformation associated with eruptions at several volcanoes, and I discuss the possible explanations for this lack of deformation. In addition, I constrain the amount of co-seismic and post-seismic slip on the subduction zone fault interface from the following earthquakes: 1995 Mw 8.1 Antofagasta, Chile; 1996 Mw 7.7 Nazca, Peru; 1998 Mw 7.1 Antofagasta, Chile; and 2001 Mw 8.4 Arequipa, Peru. In northern Chile, I compare the location and magnitude of co-seismic slip from 5 Mw > 7 earthquakes during the past 15 years with the post-seismic slip distribution. There is little post-seismic slip from the 1995 and 1996 earthquakes relative to the 2001 event and other recent subduction zone earthquakes.

  18. Coupling brane fields to bulk supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parameswaran, Susha L. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Theoretical Physics; Schmidt, Jonas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    In this note we present a simple, general prescription for coupling brane localized fields to bulk supergravity. We illustrate the procedure by considering 6D N=2 bulk supergravity on a 2D orbifold, with brane fields localized at the fixed points. The resulting action enjoys the full 6D N=2 symmetries in the bulk, and those of 4D N=1 supergravity at the brane positions. (orig.)

  19. Relative entropy equals bulk relative entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Jafferis, Daniel L; Maldacena, Juan; Suh, S Josephine

    2015-01-01

    We consider the gravity dual of the modular Hamiltonian associated to a general subregion of a boundary theory. We use it to argue that the relative entropy of nearby states is given by the relative entropy in the bulk, to leading order in the bulk gravitational coupling. We also argue that the boundary modular flow is dual to the bulk modular flow in the entanglement wedge, with implications for entanglement wedge reconstruction.

  20. Magnetar Outbursts from Avalanches of Hall Waves and Crustal Failures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xinyu; Belovorodov, Andrei M

    2016-01-01

    We explore the interaction between Hall waves and mechanical failures inside a magnetar crust, using detailed one-dimentional models that consider temperature-sensitive plastic flow, heat transport and cooling by neutrino emission, as well as the coupling of the crustal motion to the magnetosphere. We find that the dynamics is enriched and accelerated by the fast, short-wavelength Hall waves that are emitted by each failure. The waves propagate and cause failures elsewhere, triggering avalanches. We argue that these avalanches are the likely sources of outbursts in transient magnetars.

  1. Spectral Properties of the Martian Crustal Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K. W.; Simons, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Although the planet Mars no longer possesses an internal dynamo, its crustal rocks retain strong remanent magnetization thought to have been induced by an ancient core-sourced field. The strength and distribution of the crustal field is extremely heterogeneous, and particularly strong in the Terra Cimmeria region of the southern hemisphere. The field as a whole is inconsistent with induction from a single dipolar source, although previous studies have attempted to isolate individual magnetic anomalies to deduce paleopolar orientations. While several areas of the planet appear to have been demagnetized, including large impact basins and the Tharsis volcanic province, the distribution of the field is generally poorly correlated with surface geologic structures. However, beyond the spatial pattern of crustal magnetization, the magnetic power spectrum can provide information about the nature of the source and formation processes. Previous studies have used the power spectrum of the Martian field to estimate the approximate depth of the magnetic anomalies. We extend this approach by applying the spatiospectral localization technique of Wieczorek and Simons (2005) and Dahlen and Simons (2008) to isolate the magnetic power spectra of several areas of the Martian surface. This method allows us to look beyond the strongly magnetized Terra Cimmeria region, which dominates the global power spectrum. Localized spectral estimates, along with their appropriate errors, allow us to examine the significance of observed variations between distinct regions of the planet, and to evaluate the validity of analyses which operate on the whole sphere. Significant differences are observed between spectra of the Terra Cimmeria region and the remainder of the planet, a result of the concentration of power at certain spherical harmonic degrees in this anomalous region. Approximate depths to the magnetic sources are calculated for tiled windows on the planet using the stochastic magnetized

  2. Testing Predictions of Continental Insulation using Oceanic Crustal Thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Mark; Shorttle, Oliver; White, Nicky

    2016-04-01

    The thermal blanketing effect of continental crust has been predicted to lead to elevated temperatures within the upper mantle beneath supercontinents. Initial break-up is associated with increased magmatism and the generation of flood basalts. Continued rifting and sea-floor spreading lead to a steady reduction of this thermal anomaly. Recently, evidence in support of this behaviour has come from the major element geochemistry of mid-ocean ridge basalts, which suggest excess rifting temperatures of ˜ 150 °C that decay over ˜ 100 Ma. We have collated a global inventory of ˜ 1000 seismic reflection profiles and ˜ 500 wide-angle refraction experiments from the oceanic realm. Data are predominantly located along passive margins, but there are also multiple surveys in the centres of the major oceanic basins. Oceanic crustal thickness has been mapped, taking care to avoid areas of secondary magmatic thickening near seamounts or later thinning such as across transform faults. These crustal thicknesses are a proxy for mantle potential temperature at the time of melt formation beneath a mid-ocean ridge system, allowing us to quantify the amplitude and duration of thermal anomalies generated beneath supercontinents. The Jurassic break-up of the Central Atlantic and the Cretaceous rifting that formed the South Atlantic Ocean are both associated with excess temperatures of ˜ 50 °C that have e-folding times of ˜ 50 Ma. In addition to this background trend, excess temperatures reach > 150 °C around the region of the Rio Grande Rise, associated with the present-day Tristan hotspot. The e-folding time of this more local event is ˜ 10 Ma, which mirrors results obtained for the North Atlantic Ocean south of Iceland. In contrast, crustal thicknesses from the Pacific Ocean reveal approximately constant potential temperature through time. This observation is in agreement with predictions, as the western Pacific was formed by rifting of an oceanic plate. In summary

  3. Imaging the Western Iberia Crustal Structure by Noise Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, G. M.; Dias, N. A.; Custodio, S.; Kiselev, S.; Dündar, S.

    2014-12-01

    Portugal lies close to the Eurasian-African boundary, a region of tectonic regime transition from convergence in the Mediterranean to strike-slip in the Atlantic. Such broad convergence area, characterized by a slow rate of about 4.5-5.6 mm/yr, translates unto a scattered seismicity concentrated mainly in the offshore. Therefore, the irregular source-receiver geometry resulting from the inland seismic stations networks does not permit to derive high-resolution models of the Portuguese crustal structure using traditional passive seismology. Seismic interferometry/ambient noise surface-waves tomography allows imaging regions with a resolution that mainly depends on the seismic network coverage. Over the last decade, both Portuguese and Spanish permanent broadband (BB) seismic networks expanded significantly. This densification enabled to build a detailed image of the crustal structure of the Iberian Peninsula using ambient seismic noise. However, due to the existing network gaps towards west, the crustal image of Western Iberia is on the limit of resolution. The two years temporary deployment by the WILAS project contributed to fill those gaps and provide an excellent opportunity to study the Portuguese crustal structure. Dispersion measurements were computed for each pair of stations using empirical Green's functions generated by cross-correlating one-day-length seismic ambient-noise records. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the empirical Green functions computed from ambient noise records, we applied a phase cross-correlation method, followed by time-frequency domain phase weighted stack. Group-velocities were computed using the S-transform and we use the Fast Marching Surface Tomography algoritm to compute group velocity perturbation maps. Group velocities were then inverted as a function of depth to obtain S-wave velocity maps for diferent depths. The models will be compared with results from Ps receiver functions. The results obtained for the crust using

  4. Quaternary crustal deformation along a major branch of the San Andreas fault in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, G.E.; Lajoie, K.R.; Wehmiller, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    Deformed marine terraces and alluvial deposits record Quaternary crustal deformation along segments of a major, seismically active branch of the San Andreas fault which extends 190 km SSE roughly parallel to the California coastline from Bolinas Lagoon to the Point Sur area. Most of this complex fault zone lies offshore (mapped by others using acoustical techniques), but a 4-km segment (Seal Cove fault) near Half Moon Bay and a 26-km segment (San Gregorio fault) between San Gregorio and Point Ano Nuevo lie onshore. At Half Moon Bay, right-lateral slip and N-S horizontal compression are expressed by a broad, synclinal warp in the first (lowest: 125 ka?) and second marine terraces on the NE side of the Seal Cove fault. This structure plunges to the west at an oblique angle into the fault plane. Linear, joint0controlled stream courses draining the coastal uplands are deflected toward the topographic depression along the synclinal axis where they emerge from the hills to cross the lowest terrace. Streams crossing the downwarped part of this terrace adjacent to Half Moon Bay are depositing alluvial fans, whereas streams crossing the uplifted southern limb of the syncline southwest of the bay are deeply incised. Minimum crustal shortening across this syncline parallel to the fault is 0.7% over the past 125 ka, based on deformation of the shoreline angle of the first terrace. Between San Gregorio and Point Ano Nuevo the entire fault zone is 2.5-3.0 km wide and has three primary traces or zones of faulting consisting of numerous en-echelon and anastomozing secondary fault traces. Lateral discontinuities and variable deformation of well-preserved marine terrace sequences help define major structural blocks and document differential motions in this area and south to Santa Cruz. Vertical displacement occurs on all of the fault traces, but is small compared to horizontal displacement. Some blocks within the fault zone are intensely faulted and steeply tilted. One major block 0

  5. 33 CFR 127.313 - Bulk storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) WATERFRONT FACILITIES WATERFRONT FACILITIES HANDLING LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED HAZARDOUS GAS Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.313 Bulk storage. (a) The...

  6. Applications of bulk high-temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J. R.

    The development of high-temperature superconductors (HTS's) can be broadly generalized into thin-film electronics, wire applications, and bulk applications. We consider bulk HTS's to include sintered or crystallized forms that do not take the geometry of filaments or tapes, and we discuss major applications for these materials. For the most part applications may be realized with the HTS's cooled to 77 K, and the properties of the bulk HTS's are often already sufficient for commercial use. A non-exhaustive list of applications for bulk HTS's includes trapped field magnets, hysteresis motors, magnetic shielding, current leads, and magnetic bearings. These applications are briefly discussed in this paper.

  7. Dyslipidemia and chronic inflammation markers are correlated with telomere length shortening in Cushing's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aulinas

    Full Text Available Cushing's syndrome (CS increases cardiovascular risk (CVR and adipocytokine imbalance, associated with an increased inflammatory state. Telomere length (TL shortening is a novel CVR marker, associated with inflammation biomarkers. We hypothesized that inflammatory state and higher CVR in CS might be related to TL shortening, as observed in premature aging.To evaluate relationships between TL, CVR and inflammation markers in CS.In a cross-sectional study, 77 patients with CS (14 males, 59 pituitary-, 17 adrenal- and 1 ectopic-origin; 21 active disease and 77 age-, gender-, smoking-matched controls were included. Total white blood cell TL was measured by TRF-Southern technique. Clinical data and blood samples were collected (lipids, adrenal function, glucose. Adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL6 and C-reactive protein (CRP were available in a subgroup of patients (n=32. Correlations between TL and clinical features were examined and multiple linear regression analysis was performed to investigate potential predictors of TL.Dyslipidemic CS had shorter TL than non-dyslipidemic subjects (7328±1274 vs 7957±1137 bp, p<0.05. After adjustment for age and body mass index, cured and active CS dyslipidemic patients had shorter TL than non-dyslipidemic CS (cured: 7187±1309 vs 7868±1104; active: 7203±1262 vs 8615±1056, respectively, p<0.05. Total cholesterol and triglycerides negatively correlated with TL (r-0.279 and -0.259, respectively, p<0.05, as well as CRP and IL6 (r-0.412 and -0.441, respectively, p<0.05. No difference in TL according the presence of other individual CVR factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity were observed in CS or in the control group. Additional TL shortening was observed in dyslipidemic obese patients who were also hypertensive, compared to those with two or less CVR factors (6956±1280 vs 7860±1180, respectively, p<0.001. Age and dyslipidemia were independent negative predictors of TL.TL is shortened in dyslipidemic CS

  8. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorov, A. G.; Mastrano, A.; Geppert, U.

    2016-07-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within ˜104-105 yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths ˜1014 G maintained over ≳106 yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity ɛ ˜ 10-6, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after ˜105 yr. A pulsar rotating at ˜102 Hz with such ɛ is a promising gravitational wave source candidate. Since such large deformations can be caused only by a particular magnetic field configuration that penetrates the whole star and whose maximum magnetic energy is concentrated in the outer core region, gravitational wave emission observed from radio pulsars can thus inform us about the internal field structures of young neutron stars.

  9. Glacio-Seismotectonics: Ice Sheets, Crustal Deformation and Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauber, Jeanne; Stewart, Iain S.; Rose, James

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a significant growth in our understanding of the past and continuing effects of ice sheets and glaciers on contemporary crustal deformation and seismicity. This growth has been driven largely by the emergence of postglacial rebound models (PGM) constrained by new field observations that incorporate increasingly realistic rheological, mechanical, and glacial parameters. In this paper, we highlight some of these recent field-based investigations and new PGMs, and examine their implications for understanding crustal deformation and seismicity during glaciation and following deglaciation. The emerging glacial rebound models outlined in the paper support the view that both tectonic stresses and glacial rebound stresses are needed to explain the distribution and style of contemporary earthquake activity in former glaciated shields of eastern Canada and Fennoscandia. However, many of these models neglect important parameters, such as topography, lateral variations in lithospheric strength and tectonic strain built up during glaciation. In glaciated mountainous terrains, glacial erosion may directly modulate tectonic deformation by resetting the orogenic topography and thereby providing an additional compensatory uplift mechanism. Such effects are likely to be important both in tectonically active orogens and in the mountainous regions of glaciated shields.

  10. Gravitational radiation from neutron stars deformed by crustal Hall drift

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, Arthur George; Geppert, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    A precondition for the radio emission of pulsars is the existence of strong, small-scale magnetic field structures (`magnetic spots') in the polar cap region. Their creation can proceed via crustal Hall drift out of two qualitatively and quantitatively different initial magnetic field configurations: a field confined completely to the crust and another which penetrates the whole star. The aim of this study is to explore whether these magnetic structures in the crust can deform the star sufficiently to make it an observable source of gravitational waves. We model the evolution of these field configurations, which can develop, within $\\sim 10^4$ -- $10^5$ yr, magnetic spots with local surface field strengths $\\sim 10^{14}$ G maintained over $\\gtrsim 10^6$ yr. Deformations caused by the magnetic forces are calculated. We show that, under favourable initial conditions, a star undergoing crustal Hall drift can have ellipticity $\\epsilon\\sim 10^{-6}$, even with sub-magnetar polar field strengths, after $\\sim 10^5$ ...

  11. Lower crustal xenoliths, Chinese Peak lava flow, central Sierra Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, F.C.W.; Calk, L.C.; Kistler, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    This assemblage of pyroxenite, peridotite and mafic granulite xenoliths in the toe of a 10 m.y. trachybasalt flow remnant overlying late Cretaceous granitic rocks, indicates the presence of a mafic-ultramafic complex beneath this part of central California; orthopyroxenites, websterites and clinopyroxenites are dominant. A few of the xenoliths contain ovoid opaque patches that are apparently pseudomorphs after garnet and have pyralspite garnet compositions; using a garnet-orthopyroxene geobarometer, they indicate a lower crustal depth of approx 40 km. Abundant mafic granulites can be subdivided into those with Al2O3 = or 15% and showing considerable scatter on oxide variation diagrams. The high-alumina granulite xenoliths have relatively low 87Rb/86Sr but high 87Sr/86Sr, whereas the low-alumina and ultramafic xenoliths have a wide range of 87Rb/86Sr, but lower 87Sr/86Sr; the isotopic data indicate roughly the same age as that of overlying granitic plutons (approx 100 m.y.). However, the granitic rocks have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios intermediate between those of the high-alumina and ultramafic xenoliths, suggesting that they result from the mixing of basaltic magma (represented by the ultramafic rocks) and crustal materials, with subsequent crystal fractionation.-R.A.H.

  12. Magma-compensated crustal thinning in continental rift zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybo, H; Nielsen, C A

    2009-02-12

    Continental rift zones are long, narrow tectonic depressions in the Earth's surface where the entire lithosphere has been modified in extension. Rifting can eventually lead to rupture of the continental lithosphere and creation of new oceanic lithosphere or, alternatively, lead to formation of wide sedimentary basins around failed rift zones. Conventional models of rift zones include three characteristic features: surface manifestation as an elongated topographic trough, Moho shallowing due to crustal thinning, and reduced seismic velocity in the uppermost mantle due to decompression melting or heating from the Earth's interior. Here we demonstrate that only the surface manifestation is observed at the Baikal rift zone, whereas the crustal and mantle characteristics can be ruled out by a new seismic profile across southern Lake Baikal in Siberia. Instead we observe a localized zone in the lower crust which has exceptionally high seismic velocity and is highly reflective. We suggest that the expected Moho uplift was compensated by magmatic intrusion into the lower crust, producing the observed high-velocity zone. This finding demonstrates a previously unknown role for magmatism in rifting processes with significant implications for estimation of stretching factors and modelling of sedimentary basins around failed rift structures.

  13. The crustal structure of Egypt and the northern Red Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Ahmed; Nyblade, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    P-wave receiver functions from 26 stations in the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) have been modeled using the H-k stacking method and in a joint inversion method with Rayleigh wave group velocities to investigate crustal structure across Egypt and the northern Red Sea region. The new estimates of crustal structure, when combined with previous results, show that along the rifted margins of the Red Sea, Gulf of Suez and Gulf of Aqaba crustal thickness ranges from 25 to 30 km, the average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is 1.77, and the average crustal shear-wave velocity is 3.6 km/s. Beneath northern and central Egypt, including the Sinai Peninsula, crustal thickness ranges from 32 to 38 km, the average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is 1.79, and the average crustal shear-wave velocity is 3.5 km/s. Beneath southern Egypt, crustal thickness ranges from 35 to 40 km, the average crustal Vp/Vs ratio is 1.76, and the average crustal shear-wave velocity is 3.7 km/s. In southern Egypt, the crust is also characterized by a 10-20 km thick mafic lower crust. These findings indicate that crust along the rifted margins of the northern Red Sea, and Gulfs of Suez and Aqaba have been thinned by about 5 to 10 km. The thick mafic lower crust in southern Egypt can be attributed to suturing during the Neoproterozoic collision of east Gondwana against the Sahara metacraton. Overall, the structure of the crust in Egypt away from the northern Red Sea region is similar to the structure of Precambrian crust in many other parts of Africa.

  14. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation and properties of bulk amorphous quarternary Mg-based alloys and the influence of additional elements on the ability of the alloy to form bulk amorphous. The main goal is to find a Mg-based alloy system which shows both high strength to weight ratio and...

  15. 27 CFR 20.191 - Bulk articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bulk articles. 20.191... Users of Specially Denatured Spirits Operations by Users § 20.191 Bulk articles. Users who convey articles in containers exceeding one gallon may provide the recipient with a photocopy of subpart G of...

  16. Constraints on plateau architecture and assembly from deep crustal xenoliths, northern Altiplano (SE Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alan; Ducea, Mihai; McQuarrie, Nadine; Coble, Matthew; Petrescu, Lucian; Hoffman, Derek

    2016-04-01

    northernmost Altiplano at ~30-40 km below the surface. Together, these results indicate that crustal thickening under the northernmost Altiplano started earlier than major latest Oligocene and Miocene uplift episodes affecting the region and was coeval with a flat slab-related regional episode of deformation. Total shortening must have been at least 20% more than previous estimates in order to satisfy the basement to cover depth constraints provided by the xenolith data. Sedimentary rocks at >30 km paleodepth require that Andean basement thrusts decapitated earlier Triassic normal faults, trapping Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks below the main décollement. Magma loading from intense Cenozoic plutonism within the plateau probably played an additional role in transporting Mesozoic cover rocks to >30 km and thickening the crust beneath the northern Altiplano.

  17. Subduction zone and crustal dynamics of western Washington; a tectonic model for earthquake hazards evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Dal; Villaseñor, Antonio; Benz, Harley

    1999-01-01

    buttress occurs under the North Cascades region of Washington and under southern Vancouver Island. We find that regional faults zones such as the Devils Mt. and Darrington zones follow the margin of this buttress and the Olympic-Wallowa lineament forms its southern boundary east of the Puget Lowland. Thick, high-velocity, lower-crustal rocks are interpreted to be a mafic/ultramafic wedge occuring just above the subduction thrust. This mafic wedge appears to be jointly deformed with the arch, suggesting strong coupling between the subducting plate and upper plate crust in the Puget Sound region at depths >30 km. Such tectonic coupling is possible if brittle-ductile transition temperatures for mafic/ultramafic rocks on both sides of the thrust are assumed. The deformation models show that dominant north-south compression in the coast ranges of Washington and Oregon is controlled by a highly mafic crust and low heat flow, allowing efficient transmission of margin-parallel shear from Pacific plate interaction with North America. Complex stress patterns which curve around the Puget Sound region require a concentration of northwest-directed shear in the North Cascades of Washington. The preferred model shows that greatest horizontal shortening occurs across the Devils Mt. fault zone and the east end of the Seattle fault.

  18. Varying mechanical coupling along the Andean margin: Implications for trench curvature, shortening and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaffaldano, G.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Corbi, F.; Funiciello, F.; Faccenna, C.; Bunge, H.-P.

    2012-03-01

    Convergent margins often exhibit spatial and temporal correlations between trench curvature, overriding plate shortening and topography uplift that provide insights into the dynamics of subduction. The Andean system, where the Nazca plate plunges beneath continental South America, is commonly regarded as the archetype of this class of tectonics systems. There is distinctive evidence that the degree of mechanical coupling between converging plates, i.e. the amount of resistive force mutually transmitted in the direction opposite to their motions, may be at the present-day significantly higher along the central Andean margin compared to the northern and southern limbs. However quantitative estimates of such resistance are still missing and would be desirable. Here we present laboratory models of subduction performed to investigate quantitatively how strong lateral coupling variations need to be to result in trench curvature, tectonic shortening and distribution of topography comparable to estimates from the Andean margin. The analogue of a two-layers Newtonian lithosphere/upper mantle system is established in a silicone putty/glucose syrup tank-model where lateral coupling variations along the interface between subducting and overriding plates are pre-imposed. Despite the simplicity of our setup, we estimate that coupling in the central margin as large as 20% of the driving force is sufficient to significantly inhibit the ability of the experimental overriding plate to slide above the subducting one. As a consequence, the central margin deforms and shortens more than elsewhere while the trench remains stationary, as opposed to the advancing lateral limbs. This causes the margin to evolve into a peculiar shape similar to the present-day trench of the Andean system.

  19. New insight into the shortening of the collagen fibril D-period in human cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebska, Maria; Tarnawska, Dorota; Wrzalik, Roman; Chrobak, Artur; Grelowski, Michal; Wylegala, Edward; Zygadlo, Dorota; Ratuszna, Alicja

    2017-02-01

    Collagen fibrils type I display a typical banding pattern, so-called D-periodicity, of about 67 nm, when visualized by atomic force or electron microscopy imaging. Herein we report on a significant shortening of the D-period for human corneal collagen fibrils type I (21 ± 4 nm) upon air-drying, whereas no changes in the D-period were observed for human scleral collagen fibrils type I (64 ± 4 nm) measured under the same experimental conditions as the cornea. It was also found that for the corneal stroma fixed with glutaraldehyde and air-dried, the collagen fibrils show the commonly accepted D-period of 61 ± 8 nm. We used the atomic force microscopy method to image collagen fibrils type I present in the middle layers of human cornea and sclera. The water content in the cornea and sclera samples was varying in the range of .066-.085. Calculations of the D-period using the theoretical model of the fibril and the FFT approach allowed to reveal the possible molecular mechanism of the D-period shortening in the corneal collagen fibrils upon drying. It was found that both the decrease in the shift and the simultaneous reduction in the distance between tropocollagen molecules can be responsible for the experimentally observed effect. We also hypothesize that collagen type V, which co-assembles with collagen type I into heterotypic fibrils in cornea, could be involved in the observed shortening of the corneal D-period.

  20. Human probing behavior of Aedes aegypti when infected with a life-shortening strain of Wolbachia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano A Moreira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mosquitoes are vectors of many serious pathogens in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Current control strategies almost entirely rely upon insecticides, which increasingly face the problems of high cost, increasing mosquito resistance and negative effects on non-target organisms. Alternative strategies include the proposed use of inherited life-shortening agents, such as the Wolbachia bacterium. By shortening mosquito vector lifespan, Wolbachia could potentially reduce the vectorial capacity of mosquito populations. We have recently been able to stably transinfect Aedes aegypti mosquitoes with the life-shortening Wolbachia strain wMelPop, and are assessing various aspects of its interaction with the mosquito host to determine its likely impact on pathogen transmission as well as its potential ability to invade A. aegypti populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have examined the probing behavior of Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes in an attempt to understand both the broader impact of Wolbachia infection on mosquito biology and, in particular, vectorial capacity. The probing behavior of wMelPop-infected mosquitoes at four adult ages was examined and compared to uninfected controls during video-recorded feeding trials on a human hand. Wolbachia-positive insects, from 15 days of age, showed a drastic increase in the time spent pre-probing and probing relative to uninfected controls. Two other important features for blood feeding, saliva volume and apyrase content of saliva, were also studied. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As A. aegypti infected with wMelPop age, they show increasing difficulty in completing the process of blood feeding effectively and efficiently. Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes on average produced smaller volumes of saliva that still contained the same amount of apyrase activity as uninfected mosquitoes. These effects on blood feeding behavior may reduce vectorial capacity and point to underlying physiological

  1. Incorporated fish oil fatty acids prevent action potential shortening induced by circulating fish oil fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester M Den Ruijter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased consumption of fatty fish, rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (3-PUFAs reduces the severity and number of arrhythmias. Long term 3-PUFA-intake modulates the activity of several cardiac ion channels leading to cardiac action potential shortening. Circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream and incorporated 3-PUFAs in the cardiac membrane have a different mechanism to shorten the action potential. It is, however, unknown whether circulating 3-PUFAs in the bloodstream enhance or diminish the effects of incorporated 3-PUFAs. In the present study, we address this issue. Rabbits were fed a diet rich in fish oil (3 or sunflower oil (9, as control for 3 weeks. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and action potentials were measured using the perforated patch clamp technique in the absence and presence of acutely administered 3-PUFAs. Plasma of 3 fed rabbits contained more free eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and isolated myocytes of 3 fed rabbits contained higher amounts of both EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in their sarcolemma compared to control. In the absence of acutely administered fatty acids, 3 myocytes had a shorter action potential with a more negative plateau than 9 myocytes. In the 9 myocytes, but not in the 3 myocytes, acute administration of a mixture of EPA+DHA shortened the action potential significantly. From these data we conclude that incorporated 3-PUFAs into the sarcolemma and acutely administered 3 fatty acids do not have a cumulative effect on action potential duration and morphology. As a consequence, patients with a high cardiac 3-PUFA status will probably not benefit from short term 3 supplementation as an antiarrhythmic therapy.

  2. Mid-term clinical outcome of radial shortening for kienbock disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Ebrahimzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To evaluate the intermediate-term outcomes of radius shortening as a treatment for Kienbock′s disease. Materials and Methods: In a historical cohort, 16 skeletally mature patients (9 men and 7 women with Kienbock disease, who were treated with radial shortening osteotomy between 2002 and 2012, were reviewed in our study. The mean age of our patients was 30 (range 18-43 years old. According to Litchman staging, there were 7 wrists at stage II and 9 wrists at stage III (6 at stage IIIA and 3 at stage IIIB. The data of grip strength, pain (visual analog scale (VAS score, wrist range of motion (ROM, ulnar variance (according to Palmer method, and the Lichtman stage were gathered before and after surgery. We evaluated overall wrist function using the Mayo Wrist score and disabilities of the arm shoulder and hand (DASH score before surgery and at the last follow-up. Results: The average of follow-up was 7 years (range from 5 to 9 years. Preoperative ulnar variance was -1.3 mm (range from 2.5 to 1 preoperatively. The mean postoperative ulnar variance was 1 mm positive (range from 0.5 to 1.5. The VAS pain score, the mean arc of wrist flexion and extension, and grip strength improved significantly preoperatively compared to after recovery from surgery. The Lichtman stage was unchanged in nine patients, one grade worse in six patients, and one grade better in one patient. The mean DASH and Mayo scores improved significantly postoperatively compare with preoperation. Comparing preoperative positive, neuter, and negative ulnar variance, there was no significant difference in terms of VAS, DASH, and Mayo scores as well as ROM and grip strength. Conclusion: Our study shows that radius shortening surgery improves pain and disability regardless of ulnar variance.

  3. Telomere longitudinal shortening as a biomarker for dementia status of adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Edmund C; Ye, Lingling; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J; Zigman, Warren B; Schupf, Nicole; Silverman, Wayne P

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that Alzheimer's disease (AD) causes an accelerated shortening of telomeres, the ends of chromosomes consisting of highly conserved TTAGGG repeats that, because of unidirectional 5'-3' DNA synthesis, lose end point material with each cell division. Our own previous work suggested that telomere length of T-lymphocytes might be a remarkably accurate biomarker for "mild cognitive impairment" in adults with Down syndrome (MCI-DS), a population at dramatically high risk for AD. To verify that the progression of cognitive and functional losses due to AD produced this observed telomere shortening, we have now examined sequential changes in telomere length in five individuals with Down syndrome (3F, 2M) as they transitioned from preclinical AD to MCI-DS (N = 4) or dementia (N = 1). As in our previous studies, we used PNA (peptide nucleic acid) probes for telomeres and the chromosome 2 centromere (as an "internal standard" expected to be unaffected by aging or dementia status), with samples from the same individuals now collected prior to and following development of MCI-DS or dementia. Consistent shortening of telomere length was observed over time. Further comparisons with our previous cross-sectional findings indicated that telomere lengths prior to clinical decline were similar to those of other adults with Down syndrome (DS) who have not experienced clinical decline while telomere lengths following transition to MCI-DS or dementia in the current study were comparable to those of other adults with DS who have developed MCI-DS or dementia. Taken together, findings indicate that telomere length has significant promise as a biomarker of clinical progression of AD for adults with DS, and further longitudinal studies of a larger sample of individuals with DS are clearly warranted to validate these findings and determine if and how factors affecting AD risk also influence these measures of telomere length.

  4. Developmental remodeling and shortening of the cardiac outflow tract involves myocyte programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M; Choudhry, A; Berlan, M; Singal, A; Siwik, E; Mohr, S; Fisher, S A

    1998-10-01

    The embryonic outflow tract is a simple tubular structure that connects the single primitive ventricle with the aortic sac and aortic arch arteries. This structure undergoes a complex sequence of morphogenetic processes to become the portion of the heart that aligns the right and left ventricles with the pulmonary artery and aorta. Abnormalities of the outflow tract are involved in many clinically significant congenital cardiac defects; however, the cellular and molecular processes governing the development of this important structure are incompletely understood. Histologic and tissue-tagging studies indicate that the outflow tract tissues compact and are incorporated predominantly into a region of the right ventricle. The hypothesis tested in the current study was that cell death or apoptosis in the muscular portion of the outflow tract is an important cellular mechanism for outflow tract shortening. The tubular outflow tract myocardium was specifically marked by infecting myocytes of the chicken embryo heart with a recombinant replication-defective adenovirus expressing beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. Histochemical detection of the beta -gal-labeled outflow tract myocytes revealed that the tubular structure shortened to become a compact ring at the level of the pulmonic infundibulum over several days of development (stages 25-32, embryonic days 4-8). The appearance of apoptotic cardiomyocytes was correlated with OFT shortening by two histologic assays, TUNEL labeling of DNA fragments and AnnexinV binding. The rise and fall in the number of apoptotic myocytes detected by histologic analyses paralleled the change in activity levels of Caspase-3, a protease in the apoptotic cascade, measured in outflow tract homogenates. These results suggest that the elimination of myocytes by programmed cell death is one mechanism by which the outflow tract myocardium remodels to form the proper connection between the ventricular

  5. Crustal Flows beneath the Eastern Tibetan Plateau Revealed by Magnetotelluric Observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Dengha; TENG Jiwen; MA Xiaobing; KONG Xiangru

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian and Asian continents has created the Himalayan and Tibetan plateau through a range of deformation processes that include crustal thickening, delamination, lateral extrusion and crustal flow. A debate continues as to which of these processes are most significant in terms of the overall mass balance of this continent-continent collision.

  6. NACr14: A 3D model for the crustal structure of the North American Continent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail; Mooney, Walter; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-01-01

    Based on the large number of crustal seismic experiments carried out in the last decadeswe create NACr14, a 3D crustal model of the North American continent at a resolution of 1° × 1°. We present maps of thickness and average velocities of the main layers that comprise the North American crystalline

  7. Crustal and upper mantle structure of Siberia from teleseismic receiver functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina;

    2015-01-01

    -frequency P-RF component as it has about an order of magnitude better resolution than S-RF. We find no indication for significant crustal anisotropy in the cratonic areas of Siberia. The preliminary crustal thickness results from the Hk stacking and from the inversion approach agree with a previous study...

  8. Effective shortening of picosecond pulses emitted by a YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dianov, E.M.; Karasik, A.Y.; Mamyshev, P.V.; Onishchukov, G.I.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Stel' makh, M.F.; Fomichev, A.A.

    1984-06-01

    A 15-fold reduction in the duration of YAG:Nd/sup 3 +/ laser pulses was achieved under conditions of active mode locking and Q switching at a pulse repetition frequency approx.1 kHz. Phase self-modulation in a single-mode quartz fiber waveguide of length 10 m resulted in broadening of the laser emission spectrum right up to approx.10 cm/sup -1/ at the waveguide exit. The pulses were then shortened in a system with a diffraction grating. The pulse duration was measured by a correlation system in which the second harmonic was generated.

  9. Lactose tolerance test shortened to 30 minutes: an exploratory study of its feasibility and impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Domínguez-Jiménez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactose malabsorption (LM is a very common condition with a high prevalence in our setting. Lactose tolerance test (LTT is a basic, affordable test for diagnosis that requires no complex technology. It has been recently shown that this test can be shortened to 3 measurements (baseline, 30 min, 60 min with no impact on final results. The purpose of our study was to assess the feasibility and benefits of LTT simplification and shortening to 30 min, as well as the financial impact entailed. Material and methods: A multicenter, observational study of consecutive patients undergoing LTT for LM suspicion. Patients received 50 g of lactose following a fasting period of 12 h, and had blood collected from a vein at all 3 time points for the measurement of blood glucose (mg/dl. Differences between the shortened and complete test forms were analyzed using McNemar's test. A comparison of blood glucose levels between patients with normal and abnormal results was performed using Student's T-test for independent mean values. Consistency was assessed using the kappa index. A p < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: A total of 270 patients (69.6% females were included, with a mean age of 39.9 ± 16 years. LTT was abnormal for 151 patients (55.9%. We observed no statistically significant differences in baseline blood glucose levels between patients with normal and abnormal LTT results (p = 0.13; however, as was to be expected, such differences were obvious for the remaining time points (p < 0.01. Deleting blood glucose measurements at 60 minutes only led to overdiagnose LM (false positive results in 6 patients (2.22 %, with a kappa index of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.92-0.99 (p < 0.001 versus the complete test. Suppressing measurements at 60 min would have saved at least € 7,726. Conclusion: The shortening of LTT to only 2 measurements (baseline and 30-min hardly leads to any differences in final results, and would entail savings in

  10. [Carotid endarterectomy. Experiences with shortening of interval between symptom and operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathenborg, L.K.; Baekgaard, N.; Jensen, Leif Pandora

    2008-01-01

    and in the neurological departments. The stroke and death rate was unchanged, 4% and 3% before and after fast track respectively. CONCLUSION: The time between symptom and CEA can be shortened by means of a fast track after thorough information and reorganization of the work involving these patients. In order to bring......INTRODUCTION: Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) prevents transient ischemic attack and stroke in patients with symptomatic high-grade carotid stenosis. In 2004 Rothwell et al showed that maximal benefit is gained if CEA is performed less than three weeks after the onset of the symptom. With the aim...

  11. Single clear corneal incision for glaucoma drainage device shortening in pediatric glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Phillip M; Bitrian, Elena; Grajewski, Alana L

    2016-06-01

    Glaucoma drainage devices are commonly used for management of glaucoma in adults and children. With time, the position of the tube can change and cause damage such as corneal scarring, iris or lens contact, and uveitis. Most of these problems can be improved with tube shortening and/or excision of adherent iris or fibrous tissue. We describe a surgical technique that uses a single clear corneal incision to externalize and trim the shunt in pediatric patients. The technique has a short surgical. We review the indications and outcomes for this procedure in 13 eyes of 12 children who required shunt revision.

  12. Internal Structure and Mineralogy of Differentiated Asteroids Assuming Chondritic Bulk Composition: The Case of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, M. J.; Mizzon, H.; Forni, O.; Monnereau, M.; Prettyman, T. H.; McSween, H. Y.; McCoy, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk composition (including oxygen content) is a primary control on the internal structure and mineralogy of differentiated asteroids. For example, oxidation state will affect core size, as well as Mg# and pyroxene content of the silicate mantle. The Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite class of meteorites (HED) provide an interesting test-case of this idea, in particular in light of results of the Dawn mission which provide information on the size, density and differentiation state of Vesta, the parent body of the HED's. In this work we explore plausible bulk compositions of Vesta and use mass-balance and geochemical modelling to predict possible internal structures and crust/mantle compositions and mineralogies. Models are constrained to be consistent with known HED samples, but the approach has the potential to extend predictions to thermodynamically plausible rock types that are not necessarily present in the HED collection. Nine chondritic bulk compositions are considered (CI, CV, CO, CM, H, L, LL, EH, EL). For each, relative proportions and densities of the core, mantle, and crust are quantified. Considering that the basaltic crust has the composition of the primitive eucrite Juvinas and assuming that this crust is in thermodynamic equilibrium with the residual mantle, it is possible to calculate how much iron is in metallic form (in the core) and how much in oxidized form (in the mantle and crust) for a given bulk composition. Of the nine bulk compositions tested, solutions corresponding to CI and LL groups predicted a negative metal fraction and were not considered further. Solutions for enstatite chondrites imply significant oxidation relative to the starting materials and these solutions too are considered unlikely. For the remaining bulk compositions, the relative proportion of crust to bulk silicate is typically in the range 15 to 20% corresponding to crustal thicknesses of 15 to 20 km for a porosity-free Vesta-sized body. The mantle is predicted to be largely

  13. Density heterogeneity of the North American upper mantle from satellite gravity and a regional crustal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    We present a regional model for the density structure of the North American upper mantle. The residual mantle gravity anomalies are based on gravity data derived from the GOCE geopotential models with crustal correction to the gravity field being calculated from a regional crustal model. We analyze...... how uncertainties and errors in the crustal model propagate from crustal densities to mantle residual gravity anomalies and the density model of the upper mantle. Uncertainties in the residual upper (lithospheric) mantle gravity anomalies result from several sources: (i) uncertainties in the velocity...... and by introducing variations into the crustal structure which corresponds to the uncertainty of its resolution by highquality and low-quality seismic models. We examine the propagation of these uncertainties into determinations of lithospheric mantle density. Given a relatively small range of expected density...

  14. Mapping sub-crustal reflectors in southwestern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomeras, I.; Ayarza, P.; Carbonell, R.; Ehsan, S. A.; Afonso, J. C.; Diaz Cusi, J.

    2015-12-01

    During the last 15 years, the IBERSEIS and ALCUDIA controlled source experiments have acquired vertical incidence and wide angle seismic reflection data in southwest Spain, in the Variscan Sub-Portuguese, Ossa-Morena and Central-Iberian Zones. Apart from providing detailed information of the crust, these datasets have also imaged a conspicuous sub-crustal reflector. First identified on the IBERSEIS wide-angle reflection dataset, this interface seemed to feature a positive seismic impedance contrast. A boundary located between 61-72 km depth, with a Vp increase from 8.2 km/s to 8.3 km/s allowed us to model clear wide-angle reflections found above 180 km offsets. The fact that this reflector was not identified in the coincident vertical incidence dataset led us to interpret it as a gradient zone. A correlation with the 'Hales gradient zone', i.e. the boundary between spinel and garnet peridotites was our preferred interpretation. The ALCUDIA experiment, later acquired northwards of the IBERSEIS profiles, also shows prominent sub-crustal arrivals with the same characteristics as those observed in the IBERSEIS wide-angle data. However, these reflections also appear, locally and at 19 s TWT, in the vertical incidence dataset, further constraining the depth at which this feature is located. In addition, the ALCUDIA wide-angle dataset shows deeper sub-horizontal reflectivity (at Vred=8 km/s) that maybe preliminarily associated with mantle anisotropy or even, with the lithosphere-astenosphere boundary. Integration of the information provided by the IBERSEIS and ALCUDIA datasets with older and lower resolution data from the ILIHA project, where three sub-crustal phases were identified in SW Iberia, allows us to conclude that, in this area, mantle reflectivity is outstanding. Also, modeling of all the datasets contributes to map, at a regional scale, the Hales discontinuity or gradient zone in southwest Iberia. Further research, involving receiver function analysis is

  15. Kinematics of the crustal velocity field in the western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollitz, F. F.

    2008-12-01

    GPS measurements embodied in PBO and PBO Nucleus allow the crustal velocity field of the western US to be constructed in unprecedented detail. Velocity and strain fields span the entire San Andreas fault system and Cascadia subduction zone from Baja California to northern Washington as well as the continental interior including the Great Basin and Wasatch Front. Rationalizing the GPS velocity field over the several tectonic regimes provides key tests of prevailing notions of interseismic crustal deformation. In our interpretation, we begin with the premise that the load-carrying portion of the lithosphere coincides with the (seismogenic) upper crust with an effective elastic thickness of ~20 km at the time scales of interseimic motions (Thatcher and Pollitz, 2008). End member kinematic models include (1) viscoelastic relaxation of the ductile lower crust and upper mantle following large earthquakes, and (2) slip in the lower elastic lithosphere, each of which serves to localize strain around major faults during interseismic periods. More detailed kinematic models emphasize the roles of lateral variations in rigidity and/or effective elastic plate thickness as well as distributed deformation. Our modeling of western US kinematics shows that the GPS velocity field is well explained with a range of models involving a combination of all of the above components; no single endmember suffices. Zones of inferred distributed deformation in the continental interior coincide with well-known seismic belts (Eastern California Shear Zone; Walker Lane; Interseismic Mountain Belt). Continued acquisition of vector constraints on crustal motions and study of available geodetic data are needed to clarify active deformation patterns in several areas. Some outstanding issues are: The nature of distributed faulting at the margins of the Great Basin (southern Nevada Transverse Zone, northern Walker Lane); understanding how dextral shear from the eastern boundary of the Sierra Nevada

  16. The effect of strength training, recreational soccer and running exercise on stretch-shortening cycle muscle performance during countermovement jumping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of contrasting training modalities on mechanical muscle performance and neuromuscular activity during maximal SSC (stretch-shortening cycle) countermovement jumps (CMJ). Bilateral countermovement jumping, surface electromyography (EMG...

  17. Two-stage revision of infected hip arthroplasty using a shortened post-operative course of antibiotics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenna, Paul B

    2009-04-01

    We present a series of 30 consecutive patients with 31 infected total hip arthroplasties treated by a single surgeon over a 4-year period in whom a shortened post-operative course of antimicrobial chemotherapy was used.

  18. Cenozoic geodynamics of the Ross Sea region, Antarctica: Crustal extension, intraplate strike-slip faulting, and tectonic inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvini, Francesco; Brancolini, Giuliano; Busetti, Martina; Storti, Fabrizio; Mazzarini, Francesco; Coren, Franco

    1997-11-01

    An integrated study of onshore and offshore geology of the Ross Sea region (namely, Victoria Land, north of Ross Island, and the Ross Sea, Antarctica) has revealed a complex, post-Eocene tectonic framework. Regional NW-SE right-lateral, strike-slip faults are the outstanding feature of this framework and overprint an older Mesozoic extensional event, responsible for formation of N-S basins in the Ross Sea. The Cenozoic framework includes kinematic deformation and reactivation along the NW-SE faults, including formation of pull-apart basins, both positive and negative flower structures, and push-up ridges. N-S extensional faults are well developed between NW-SE faults and indicate E-W extension during the Cenozoic, produced by the NW-SE right-lateral strike-slip motion together with regional crustal extension. NNW-SSE compression, induced by the right-lateral, strike-slip kinematics, is indicated by locally inverted NE-SW faults and basins. The evolution, geometry, and location of the Rennick Graben and the Lanterman Range fit well into this model. Variations in the deformational style across the region can be linked to corresponding variations in the bulk crustal rheology, from brittle behavior in the west, to ductile deformation (at subseismic-scale resolution) near the Eastern Basin. A semibrittle region that favors N-S clustering of Cenozoic magmatic activity lies in between. In this region, Cenozoic volcanoes develop at the intersections of the NW-SE and the major N-S faults. The NW-SE faults cut almost continually from the Ross Sea to East Antarctica through lithospheric sectors with different rheology and thickness. At least two of the NW-SE faults correspond to older Paleozoic terrane boundaries in northern Victoria Land. The NW-SE faults link in the Southern Ocean with major transform faults related to the plate motions of Australia, New Zealand, and Antarctica.

  19. The interpretation of crustal dynamics data in terms of plate motions and regional deformation near plate boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sean C.

    During our participation in the NASA Crustal Dynamics Project under NASA contract NAS-27339 and grant NAG5-814 for the period 1982-1991, we published or submitted for publication 30 research papers and 52 abstracts of presentations at scientific meetings. In addition, five M.I.T. Ph.D. students (Eric Bergman, Steven Bratt, Dan Davis, Jeanne Sauber, Anne Sheehan) were supported wholly or in part by this project during their thesis research. Highlights of our research progress during this period include the following: application of geodetic data to determine rates of strain in the Mojave block and in central California and to clarify the relation of such strain to the San Andreas fault and Pacific-North American plate motions; application of geodetic data to infer post seismic deformation associated with large earthquakes in the Imperial Valley, Hebgen Lake, Argentina, and Chile; determination of the state of stress in oceanic lithosphere from a systematic study of the centroid depths and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes; development of models for the state of stress in young oceanic regions arising from the differential cooling of the lithosphere; determination of the depth extent and rupture characteristics of oceanic transform earthquakes; improved determination of earthquake slip vectors in the Gulf of California, an important data set for the estimation of Pacific-North American plate motions; development of models for the state of stress and mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges; development of procedures to invert geoid height, residual bathymetry, and differential body wave travel time residuals for lateral variations in the characteristic temperature and bulk composition of the oceanic upper mantle; and initial GPS measurements of crustal deformation associated with the Imperial-Cerro Prieto fault system in southern California and northern Mexico. Full descriptions of the research conducted on these topics may be

  20. Emission-energy dependence of ultrafast P-emission decay in ZnO from bulk to nanofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakaiki, Shuji, E-mail: s.wakaiki@mls.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Material and Life Science, Division of Advanced Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ichida, Hideki [Department of Material and Life Science, Division of Advanced Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Laboratory, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Bamba, Motoaki [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kawase, Toshiki; Kawakami, Masaki [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Mizoguchi, Kohji [Department of Physical Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen, Naka-ku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Kim, DaeGwi; Nakayama, Masaaki [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University, 3-3-138 Sugimoto, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Kanematsu, Yasuo [Department of Material and Life Science, Division of Advanced Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Laboratory, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We have performed time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy for ZnO thin films with thicknesses of 90, 460, and 2800 nm under intense excitation condition. We clearly observed the P emission due to inelastic exciton–exciton scattering. It was found that, in the 460- and 2800-nm thick samples, the decay time of the P emission considerably depends on the detection energy inversely proportional to the group velocity of the polariton in a bulk crystal with each factor of proportionality. In contrast, the energy dependence is less remarkable in the 90-nm thick sample. The decay times are basically shortened with a decrease in the film thickness. The thickness dependence of the P-emission-decay profiles is explained by considering the crossover from the polariton modes in the 2800-nm thick sample (bulk-like film) to the exciton-/photon-like modes in the 90-nm thick sample (nanofilm). - Highlights: • We clearly observed the P-PL dynamics due to inelastic exciton–exciton scattering. • The P-PL decay times are basically shortened with a decrease in the film thickness. • The P-PL decay time depends on the detection energy in the bulk-like sample. • The energy dependence of the P-PL decay time almost disappears in the 90-nm sample. • The thickness dependence is explained by the crossover between exciton and photon.

  1. In-treatment midwall and endocardial fractional shortening predict cardiovascular outcome in hypertensive patients with preserved baseline systolic ventricular function: the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian; Gerdts, Eva; Palmieri, Vittorio;

    2010-01-01

    Endocardial fractional shortening (EFS) and midwall shortening (MWS) are impaired in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. However, it remains unknown whether improvement of left ventricular systolic function during treatment reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hypertensive pa...

  2. Temperature jump induced force generation in rabbit muscle fibres gets faster with shortening and shows a biphasic dependence on velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, K W; Roots, H; Offer, G W

    2010-02-01

    We examined the tension responses to ramp shortening and rapid temperature jump (muscle fibres at 8-9 degrees C (the fibre length (L(0)) was approximately 1.5 mm and sarcomere length 2.5 microm). The aim was to investigate the strain sensitivity of crossbridge force generation in muscle. The T-jump induced tension rise was examined during steady shortening over a wide range of velocities (V) approaching the V(max) (V range approximately 0.01 to approximately 1.5 L(0) s(1)). In the isometric state, a T-jump induced a biphasic tension rise consisting of a fast (approximately 50 s(1), phase 2b) and a slow (approximately 10 s(1), phase 3) component, but if treated as monophasic the rate was approximately 20 s(1). During steady shortening the T-jump tension rise was monophasic; the rate of tension rise increased linearly with shortening velocity, and near V(max) it was approximately 200 s(1), approximately 10x faster than in the isometric state. Relative to the tension reached after the T-jump, the amplitude increased with shortening velocity, and near V(max) it was 4x larger than in the isometric state. Thus, the temperature sensitivity of muscle force is markedly increased with velocity during steady shortening, as found in steady state experiments. The rate of tension decline during ramp shortening also increased markedly with increase of velocity. The absolute amplitude of T-jump tension rise was larger than that in the isometric state at the low velocities (shortening velocity is increased, probably enhancement of crossbridge force generation and faster (post-stroke) crossbridge detachment by negative strain. Overall, our results show that T-jump force generation is strain sensitive and becomes considerably faster when exposed to negative strain. Thus the crossbridge force generation step in muscle is both temperature sensitive (endothermic) and strain sensitive.

  3. Shortening spinal column reconstruction through posterior only approach for the treatment of unstable osteoporotic burst lumber fracture: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Shawky, Ahmed; Kroeber, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Study design Case report. Clinical question This study reports if shortening reconstruction procedure through posterior approach only can be used in osteoporotic unstable fracture as well as post-traumatic burst fracture. Methods An 80-year-old female patient with unstable burst osteoporotic fracture of L1 underwent posterior approach corpectomy and shortening reconstruction of the spinal column by non-expandable cages. Result The surgery was uneventful, with average blood loss. Using of smal...

  4. Changes in the maximum speed of shortening of frog muscle fibres early in a tetanic contraction and during relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, R K; Edman, K A

    1998-03-01

    1. Isotonic shortening velocities at very light loads were examined in single fibres of the anterior tibialis muscle of the frog, Rana temporaria, using load-clamp recording and slack tests (temperature, 1-3 degrees C; initial sarcomere length, 2.25 microns). 2. Shortening velocities at very light loads (force-clamp recording) were found to be higher early in the rise of a tetanic contraction than during the plateau of the contraction. The upper limit of the load at which there was elevated shortening velocity early in the contraction was 1.5-5.4% of the maximum tetanic tension (Fo) depending on the particular fibre. 3. The maximum shortening velocity determined using the slack test method (Vo) was as much as 30% greater early in a contraction than at the tetanic plateau. Vo was elevated above the plateau level up to about 30 ms after the end of the latent period, which is equivalent to the time required for the force in an isometric contraction to rise to about 30% of Fo. Vo is depressed below the plateau value during relaxation at the cessation of stimulation. 4. Stimulation studies show that the cross-bridge model of Huxley (1957) predicts the maximum shortening velocity to be greater early in a contraction, when new actin binding sites are becoming activated and new cross-bridge connections are being formed rapidly, than during steady-state contraction. The elevated shortening velocity in the model is a consequence of new cross-bridges being formed in the pulling configuration, and there being a delay before the newly added bridges are dragged beyond their equilibrium position so they begin to retard shortening. The model also predicts that maximum shortening velocity should be depressed below the plateau level during early relaxation as cross-bridge binding sites are rapidly removed from the active population.

  5. Comparison of hydrogenated vegetable shortening and nutritionally complete high fat diet on limited access-binge behavior in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jon F.; Melhorn, Susan J; Heiman, Justin U.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Clegg, Deborah J.; Benoit, Stephen C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that intermittent exposure to hydrogenated vegetable shortening yields a binge/compensate pattern of feeding in rats. The present study was designed to assess whether rats would exhibit similar patterns of intake when given intermittent access to a nutritionally complete high-fat diet. Four groups of rats received varying exposure to either hydrogenated vegetable shortening or high-fat diet for 8 consecutive weeks. Animals were given daily and intermittent acce...

  6. The crustal micro-deformation anomaly and the credible precursor*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雁滨; 蒋骏; 钱家栋; 陈京; 和升棋; 张燕; 和平

    2002-01-01

    @@ What is a credible seismic precursor in observation of deformation A real seismic precursor ought to be resulted from the variations in the earth strain and stress. The deformation observation can provide the information during earthquake gestation and occurrence period for us. Usually the seismic precursors can be divided into field and epicentral region precursors. The precursor information is very useful for seismic prediction from epicentral region or near epicentral region. Micro-deformation observation mainly includes tilt, strain and gravity observation. Compared with GPS, geodesy and mobile deformation observation, micro-deformation (tilt, strain) shows the change of deformation which is continual in a limited volume with dominant observed range of 10(6~10(10 m. Because the variation of the crustal nature and cracking can be directly obtained by micro-deformation observation, it is an effective way to find middle-short term and short-term precursor.

  7. A new model of crustal structure of Siberia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherepanova, Yulia; Artemieva, Irina; Thybo, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We report a new model of the structure of the crust in Siberia that encompasses two large tectonic regions, the Paleozoic West Siberian Basin and the Precambrian Siberian craton. The area of study covers a significant part of the north Eurasia and extends from the Ural mountains in the west...... and receiver functions studies, based on old and newly acquired seismic data (from the late 1960-ies until present). Seismic structure along seismic profiles is digitized with a 50 km lateral spacing which is comparable with the resolution of seismic models. Structural parameters based on gravity modeling...... is paid to the data quality problem, and quality parameters are incorporated into the new database of regional crustal structure. The present database comprises detailed and reliable information on the seismic structure of the crust for most of the tectonic structures of the region and provides valuable...

  8. Crustal deformations at permanent GPS sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Knudsen, Per; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2005-01-01

    The National Survey and Cadastre (KMS) is responsible for the geodetic definition of the reference network in Denmark. Permanent GPS stations play an important role in the monitoring and maintenance of the geodetic network. During 1998 and 1999 KMS established three permanent GPS station in Denmark......, SMID, SULD and BUDP. Using almost 4.5 years of continuous data from the Danish station and the Swedish station, ONSA, we analyse the daily GPS solution due to crustal deformation caused by glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). Although, displacements due to GIA are only 1–3 mm/year at the Danish GPS...... sites, the current precision of positioning using GPS allows us to observe these effects. The modelled horizontal GIA velocities and the observed horizontal residuals obtained from GPS show almost the same direction for all station. However, the observed velocity residuals are larger than the modelled...

  9. Animal studies of life shortening and cancer risk from space radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D. H.; Yochmowitz, M. G.; Hardy, K. A.; Salmon, Y. L.

    The U. S. Air Force study of the delayed effects of single, total body exposures to simulated space radiation in rhesus monkeys is now in its 21st year. Observations on 301 irradiated and 57 age-matched control animals indicate that life expectancy loss from exposure to protons in the energy range encountered in the Van Allen belts and solar proton events can be expressed as a logarithmic function of the dose. The primary causes of life shortening are cancer and endometriosis (an abnormal proliferation of the lining of the uterus in females). Life shortening estimates permit comparison of the risk associated with space radiation exposures to be compared with that of other occupational and environmental hazards, thereby facilitating risk/benefit decisions in the planning and operational phases of manned space missions. Calculations of the relative risk of fatal cancers in the irradiated subjects reveal that the total body surface dose required to double the risk of death from cancer over a 20-year post exposure period varies with the linear energy transfer (LET) of the radiation. The ability to determine the integrated dose and LET spectrum in space radiation exposures of human is, therefore, critical to the assessment of life-time cancer risk.

  10. Hsp25 and Hsp72 content in rat skeletal muscle following controlled shortening and lengthening contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, Andrew M; Locke, Marius

    2014-12-01

    The cytoprotective proteins, Hsp25 and Hsp72, are increased in skeletal muscle after nondamaging, shortening contractions, but the temporal pattern of expression and stimulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, we sought to define the in vivo temporal patterns of expression for Hsp25 and Hsp72 after 2 opposing contractions types. To do this, male Sprague-Dawley rats had 1 tibialis anterior (TA) muscle electrically stimulated (5 sets of 20 repetitions) while being either forcibly lengthened (LC) or shortened (SC). At 2, 8, 24, 48, 72, or 168 h after the contractions both the stimulated and the nonstimulated (contra-lateral control) TA muscles were removed and processed to examine muscle damage (hemotoxylin and eosin staining) and Hsp content (Western blot analyses). Cross-sections from TA muscles subjected to LCs showed muscle fibre damage at 8 h and thereafter. In contrast, no muscle fibre damage was observed at any time point following SCs. When normalized to contra-lateral controls, Hsp25 and Hsp72 content were significantly (P < 0.01) increased at 24 h (3.1- and 3.8-fold, respectively) and thereafter. There were no significant increases in Hsp25 or Hsp72 content at any time point following SC. These data suggest that LCs, but not SCs, result in Hsp accumulation and that the fibre/cellular damage sustained from LCs may be the stimulus for elevating Hsp content.

  11. Unloaded shortening velocity of voluntarily and electrically activated human dorsiflexor muscles in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kazushige; Ishii, Naokata

    2010-09-27

    We have previously shown that unloaded shortening velocity (V(0)) of human plantar flexors can be determined in vivo, by applying the "slack test" to submaximal voluntary contractions (J Physiol 567:1047-1056, 2005). In the present study, to investigate the effect of motor unit recruitment pattern on V(0) of human muscle, we modified the slack test and applied this method to both voluntary and electrically elicited contractions of dorsiflexors. A series of quick releases (i.e., rapid ankle joint rotation driven by an electrical dynamometer) was applied to voluntarily activated dorsiflexor muscles at three different contraction intensities (15, 50, and 85% of maximal voluntary contraction; MVC). The quick-release trials were also performed on electrically activated dorsiflexor muscles, in which three stimulus conditions were used: submaximal (equal to 15%MVC) 50-Hz stimulation, supramaximal 50-Hz stimulation, and supramaximal 20-Hz stimulation. Modification of the slack test in vivo resulted in good reproducibility of V(0), with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.68-0.95). Regression analysis showed that V(0) of voluntarily activated dorsiflexor muscles significantly increased with increasing contraction intensity (R(2) = 0.52, Pmuscles remained unchanged (R(2)shortening velocity of human skeletal muscle in vivo.

  12. Diffusional kurtosis MRI of the lower leg: changes caused by passive muscle elongation and shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filli, Lukas; Kenkel, David; Wurnig, Moritz C; Boss, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Diffusional kurtosis MRI (DKI) quantifies the deviation of water diffusion from a Gaussian distribution. We investigated the influence of passive elongation and shortening of the lower leg muscles on the DKI parameters D (diffusion coefficient) and K (kurtosis). After approval by the local ethics committee, eight healthy volunteers (age, 29.1 ± 2.9 years) underwent MRI of the lower leg at 3 T. Diffusion-weighted images were acquired with 10 different b values at three ankle positions (passive dorsiflexion 10°, neutral position 0°, passive plantar flexion 40°). Parametrical maps of D and K were obtained by voxel-wise fitting of the signal intensities using a non-linear Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. D and K were measured in the tibialis anterior, medial and lateral gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles. In the neutral position, D and K values were in the range between 1.66-1.79 × 10(-3) mm(2) /s and 0.21-0.39, respectively. D and K increased with passive shortening, and decreased with passive elongation, which could also be illustrated on the parametrical maps. In dorsiflexion, D (p muscles are significantly influenced by the ankle joint position, indicating that the diffusion of water molecules in skeletal muscle deviates from a Gaussian distribution depending on muscle tonus. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Leucocyte Telomere Shortening in relation to Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhelong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the association between oxidative stress and telomere length shortening in the comorbid depression and diabetes. Therefore, 71 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2D and 52 subjects with normal glycemic level (control, Ctrl were enrolled. Depressive status was identified with the Depression Subscale of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D. Leukocyte telomere length ratio (T/S ratio was determined with quantitative PCR. Oxidative stress status was evaluated with 8-hydroxy-desoxyguanosine (8-OHdG assay kit. Some other biochemical blood testing was also performed. The data showed that T2D patients had higher proportion of depression evaluated by the HADS-D (x2=4.196, P=0.041. T/S ratio was significantly negatively correlated with 8-OHdG, HADS-D, age, HbA1c, FPG, and HOMA-IR. In addition, HADS-D was significantly positively correlated with HbA1c, FPG, HOMA-IR, and 8-OHdG. Both HADS-D and 8-OHdG were the major independent predictors for T/S ratio. This study indicates that oxidative stress contributes to both telomere length shortening and depression development in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients, while in depression status, some other mechanisms besides oxidative stress may also affect the telomere length.

  14. Increasing flux rate to shorten leaching period and ramp-up production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngantung, Billy; Agustin, Riska; Ravi'i

    2017-01-01

    J Resources Bolaang Mongondow (JBRM) has operated a dynamic heap leach in its Bakan Gold Mine since late 2013. After successfully surpassing its name plate capacity of 2.6 MT/annum in 2014, the clayey and transition ore become the next operational challenge. The presence of transition and clayey ore requires longer leaching period, hence reducing the leach pad capacity which then caused reduced production. Maintaining or even increasing production with such longer leaching ore types can be done by expanding the leach pad area which means an additional capital investment, and/or shortening the leaching cycle which compromise a portion of gold extraction. JBRM has been successfully increasing the leach pad production from 2.6 MT/annum to 3.8 MT/annum, whilst improving the gold extraction from around 70% to around 80%. This was achieved by managing the operation of the leach pad which is shortening the leach cycle by identifying and combining the optimal flux rate application versus the tonne processed in each cell, at no capital investment for expanding the cell capacity.

  15. Shortened telomere length in bipolar disorder: a comparison of the early and late stages of disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia M. Barbé-Tuana

    Full Text Available Objective: Bipolar disorder (BD has been associated with increased rates of age-related diseases, such as type II diabetes, metabolic syndrome, osteoporosis, and cardiovascular disorders. Several biological findings have been associated with age-related disorders, including increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and telomere shortening. The objective of this study was to compare telomere length among participants with BD at early and late stages and age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Methods: Twenty-six euthymic subjects with BD and 34 healthy controls were recruited. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and mean telomere length was measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Telomere length was significantly shorter in both the early and late subgroups of BD subjects when compared to the respective controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.005, respectively. The sample size prevented additional subgroup analyses, including potential effects of medication, smoking status, and lifestyle. Conclusion: This study is concordant with previous evidence of telomere shortening in BD, in both early and late stages of the disorder, and supports the notion of accelerated aging in BD.

  16. Mechanical versus kinematical shortening reconstructions of the Zagros High Folded Zone (Kurdistan region of Iraq)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frehner, Marcel; Reif, Daniel; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares kinematical and mechanical techniques for the palinspastic reconstruction of folded cross sections in collision orogens. The studied area and the reconstructed NE-SW trending, 55.5 km long cross section is located in the High Folded Zone of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in the Kurdistan region of Iraq. The present-day geometry of the cross section has been constructed from field as well as remote sensing data. In a first step, the structures and the stratigraphy are simplified and summarized in eight units trying to identify the main geometric and mechanical parameters. In a second step, the shortening is kinematically estimated using the dip domain method to 11%-15%. Then the same cross section is used in a numerical finite element model to perform dynamical unfolding simulations taking various rheological parameters into account. The main factor allowing for an efficient dynamic unfolding is the presence of interfacial slip conditions between the mechanically strong units. Other factors, such as Newtonian versus power law viscous rheology or the presence of a basement, affect the numerical simulations much less strongly. If interfacial slip is accounted for, fold amplitudes are reduced efficiently during the dynamical unfolding simulations, while welded layer interfaces lead to unrealistic shortening estimates. It is suggested that interfacial slip and decoupling of the deformation along detachment horizons is an important mechanical parameter that controlled the folding processes in the Zagros High Folded Zone.

  17. Moderate stem-cell telomere shortening rate postpones cancer onset in a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbek, Simon; Bendtsen, Kristian Moss; Juul, Jeppe

    2013-10-01

    Mammalian cells are restricted from proliferating indefinitely. Telomeres at the end of each chromosome are shortened at cell division and when they reach a critical length, the cell will enter permanent cell cycle arrest—a state known as senescence. This mechanism is thought to be tumor suppressing, as it helps prevent precancerous cells from dividing uncontrollably. Stem cells express the enzyme telomerase, which elongates the telomeres, thereby postponing senescence. However, unlike germ cells and most types of cancer cells, stem cells only express telomerase at levels insufficient to fully maintain the length of their telomeres, leading to a slow decline in proliferation potential. It is not yet fully understood how this decline influences the risk of cancer and the longevity of the organism. We here develop a stochastic model to explore the role of telomere dynamics in relation to both senescence and cancer. The model describes the accumulation of cancerous mutations in a multicellular organism and creates a coherent theoretical framework for interpreting the results of several recent experiments on telomerase regulation. We demonstrate that the longest average cancer-free lifespan before cancer onset is obtained when stem cells start with relatively long telomeres that are shortened at a steady rate at cell division. Furthermore, the risk of cancer early in life can be reduced by having a short initial telomere length. Finally, our model suggests that evolution will favor a shorter than optimal average cancer-free lifespan in order to postpone cancer onset until late in life.

  18. Crustal structure of Australia from ambient seismic noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, Erdinc; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2012-01-01

    Surface wave tomography for Australian crustal structure has been carried out using group velocity measurements in the period range 1-32 s extracted from stacked correlations of ambient noise between station pairs. Both Rayleigh wave and Love wave group velocity maps are constructed for each period using the vertical and transverse component of the Green's function estimates from the ambient noise. The full suite of portable broadband deployments and permanent stations on the continent have been used with over 250 stations in all and up to 7500 paths. The permanent stations provide a useful link between the various shorter-term portable deployments. At each period the group velocity maps are constructed with a fully nonlinear tomographic inversion exploiting a subspace technique and the Fast Marching Method for wavefront tracking. For Rayleigh waves the continental coverage is good enough to allow the construction of a 3D shear wavespeed model in a two stage approach. Local group dispersion information is collated for a distribution of points across the continent and inverted for a 1D SV wavespeed profile using a Neighbourhood Algorithm method. The resulting set of 1D models are then interpolated to produce the final 3D wavespeed model. The group velocity maps show the strong influence of thick sediments at shorter periods, and distinct fast zones associated with cratonic regions. Below the sediments the 3D shear wavespeed model displays significant heterogeneity with only moderate correlation with surface tectonic features. For example, there is no evident expression of the Tasman Line marking the eastern edge of Precambrian outcrop. The large number of available inter-station paths extracted from the ambient noise analysis provide detailed shear wavespeed information for crustal structure across the Australian continent for the first time, including regions where there was no prior sampling because of difficult logistics.

  19. Komsomolskaya diamondiferous eclogites: evidence for oceanic crustal protoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet-Fisher, John F.; Howarth, Geoffrey H.; Liu, Yang; Barry, Peter H.; Carmody, Laura; Valley, John W.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Spetsius, Zdislav V.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    2014-03-01

    The Komsomolskaya kimberlite is one of numerous (>1,000) kimberlite pipes that host eclogite xenoliths on the Siberian craton. Eclogite xenoliths from the adjacent Udachnaya kimberlite pipe have previously been geochemically well characterized; however, data from surrounding diamond-bearing kimberlite pipes from the center of the craton are relatively sparse. Here, we report major- and trace-element data, as well as oxygen isotope systematics, for mineral separates of diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths from the Komsomolskaya kimberlite, suggesting two distinct subgroups of a metamorphosed, subducted oceanic crustal protolith. Using almandine contents, this suite can be divided into two subgroups: group B1, with a high almandine component (>20 mol%) and group B2, with a low almandine component (oxygen isotope values, which are interpreted to reflect isotopic exchange with seawater at low temperatures (oxygen isotope values, suggesting an origin deep within the crustal pile, where little-to-no interaction with hydrothermal fluids has occurred. Major-element systematics were reconstructed based on mineral modes; group B1 eclogites have higher MgO wt% and lower SiO2 wt%, with respect to typical oceanic basalts, reflecting a partial melting event during slab subduction. Calculated residues from batch partial melt modeling of a range of Precambrian basalts overlap with group B1 trace-element chemistry. When taken together with the respective partial melt trajectories, these melting events are clearly linked to the formation of Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite (TTG) complexes. As a result, we propose that many, if not all, diamondiferous eclogite xenoliths from Komsomolskaya represent mantle `restites' that preserve chemical signatures of Precambrian oceanic crust.

  20. Distribution of crustal types in Canada Basin, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, D.; Jackson, H. R.; Hutchinson, D. R.; Shimeld, J. W.; Oakey, G. N.; Lebedeva-Ivanova, N.; Li, Q.; Saltus, R. W.; Mosher, D. C.

    2016-11-01

    Seismic velocities determined from 70 sonobuoys widely distributed in Canada Basin were used to discriminate crustal types. Velocities of oceanic layer 3 (6.7-7.1 km/s), transitional (7.2-7.6 km/s) and continental crust (5.5-6.6 km/s) were used to distinguish crustal types. Potential field data supports the distribution of oceanic crust as a polygon with maximum dimensions of 340 km (east-west) by 590 km (north-south) and identification of the ocean-continent boundary (OCB). Paired magnetic anomalies are associated only with crust that has oceanic velocities. Furthermore, the interpreted top of oceanic crust on seismic reflection profiles is more irregular and sometimes shallower than adjacent transitional crust. The northern segment of the narrow Canada Basin Gravity Low (CBGL), often interpreted as a spreading center, bisects this zone of oceanic crust and coincides with the location of a prominent valley in seismic reflection profiles. Data coverage near the southern segment of CBGL is sparse. Velocities typical of transitional crust are determined east of it. Extension in this region, close to the inferred pole of rotation, may have been amagmatic. Offshore Alaska is a wide zone of thinned continental crust up to 300 km across. Published longer offset refraction experiments in the Basin confirm the depth to Moho and the lack of oceanic layer 3 velocities. Further north, toward Alpha Ridge and along Northwind Ridge, transitional crust is interpreted to be underplated or intruded by magmatism related to the emplacement of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). Although a rotational plate tectonic model is consistent with the extent of the conjugate magnetic anomalies that occupy only a portion of Canada Basin, it does not explain the asymmetrical configuration of the oceanic crust in the deep water portion of Canada Basin, and the unequal distribution of transitional and continental crust around the basin.

  1. GPS derived Crustal Deformation and Strain determination in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay P. Singh,

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The theory of Plate tectonics has revolutionized the way thinking about the processes of Earth. According to this theory, the surface of the Earth is broken into large plates. The size and position of these plates change over time. The edges of these plates, where they move against each other, are sites of intense tectonic activity, suchas earthquakes, volcanism, and mountain building. It is well known that Indian Plate is currently moving in the northeast direction, while the Eurasian Plate is moving north. This is causing the Indian and Eurasian Plate to deform at the point of contact besides its interior. Modern geophysical and space geodetic techniques such asseismology and GPS (Global Positioning system, have become important tools in the study of the deformation in the Earth due to tectonic processes, leading to earthquakes. Geodesy has provided an important role for plate tectonics study with high temporal resolution of the plate movements, particular from space technologies such as GPS and VLBI. The Global Positioning System (GPS provides accurate measurements of the rate of displacement of crustal. Indeed, the GPS velocity field can only be compared to finite strain if one assumes adeformation mechanism and that the style of deformation has been the same over long periods of geological time. For study of crustal deformation National Center of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Allahabad, Allahabad installed highly efficient and accurate LEICA GRX1200 Pro receiver at Ghoorpur near to Allahabad. This instrument is also equipped withMET3A sensor to record pressure, temperature, humidity at regular interval of 30 second. The Latitude and longitude of the GPS sites is 25.21N, 81.28E.

  2. The role of crustal quartz in controlling Cordilleran deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Anthony R; Pérez-Gussinyé, Marta

    2011-03-17

    Large-scale deformation of continents remains poorly understood more than 40 years after the plate tectonic revolution. Rock flow strength and mass density variations both contribute to stress, so both are certain to be important, but these depend (somewhat nebulously) on rock type, temperature and whether or not unbound water is present. Hence, it is unclear precisely how Earth material properties translate to continental deformation zones ranging from tens to thousands of kilometres in width, why deforming zones are sometimes interspersed with non-deforming blocks and why large earthquakes occasionally rupture in otherwise stable continental interiors. An important clue comes from observations that mountain belts and rift zones cyclically form at the same locations despite separation across vast gulfs of time (dubbed the Wilson tectonic cycle), accompanied by inversion of extensional basins and reactivation of faults and other structures formed in previous deformation events. Here we show that the abundance of crustal quartz, the weakest mineral in continental rocks, may strongly condition continental temperature and deformation. We use EarthScope seismic receiver functions, gravity and surface heat flow measurements to estimate thickness and seismic velocity ratio, v(P)/v(S), of continental crust in the western United States. The ratio v(P)/v(S) is relatively insensitive to temperature but very sensitive to quartz abundance. Our results demonstrate a surprising correlation of low crustal v(P)/v(S) with both higher lithospheric temperature and deformation of the Cordillera, the mountainous region of the western United States. The most plausible explanation for the relationship to temperature is a robust dynamical feedback, in which ductile strain first localizes in relatively weak, quartz-rich crust, and then initiates processes that promote advective warming, hydration and further weakening. The feedback mechanism proposed here would not only explain

  3. Dynamic Route Shortening and Route Repairing Mechanism for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Rangaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ad hoc Networks are wireless networks without any fixed infrastructure. The network topology changes frequently and unpredictably due to the random movement of the nodes. The ad hoc on Demand Distant Vector Routing (AODV protocol works in a dynamic fashion, by establishing a route on demand and continues that route until it breaks. Due to the changing network topology of ad hoc networks, if other routes with less hop count become available, the network topology is not able to adapt until the route break occurs. Hence in the route shortening scheme is some redundant nodes in the active route is replaced with a node that is not on the active route. When there is any link failure between any two nodes, the alternative route with optimum route to be constructed and not sending RRER message to the source node to initiate the route discovery process again. Approach: This study proposes a new routing protocol called, Dynamic Route Shortening and Repairing mechanism (DRSR. The route shortening is incorporated with route repairing mechanism, to improve the performance of the AODV. The route shortening scheme works by replacing some redundant nodes in the active route, with a node that is not on the active route. If there is a link failure between the two nodes, the route repairing mechanism repairs the route, by using the nodes that are close enough to the route to overhear the message. Whenever the links go down, the DRSR replaces the failed links with the optimum route that is adjacent to the main route and not sending and RRER message to the source node to initiate the route discovery process again. The alternative route construction process could be initiated at any time, not just when a route has failed. The dynamically constructed alternative route’s information is passed on to the upstream nodes, which then determine by themselves when to direct their packets to the Normal 0 false false false EN-US X

  4. Density heterogeneity of the upper mantle beneath Siberia from satellite gravity and a new regional crustal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija; Thybo, Hans; Artemieva, Irina;

    2013-01-01

    on regional and global crustal models. We analyze how uncertainties and errors in the crustal model propagate from crustal densities to mantle residual gravity anomalies and the density model of the upper mantle. The new regional density model for the Siberian craton and the West Siberian Basin complements...

  5. Superconducting bulk magnets for magnetic levitation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, H.; Kamijo, H.

    2000-06-01

    The major applications of high-temperature superconductors have mostly been confined to products in the form of wires and thin films. However, recent developments show that rare-earth REBa 2Cu 3O 7- x and light rare-earth LREBa 2Cu 3O 7- x superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical-current density at 77 K and high magnetic fields. These superconductors will promote the application of bulk high-temperature superconductors in high magnetic fields; the superconducting bulk magnet for the Maglev train is one possible application. We investigated the possibility of using bulk magnets in the Maglev system, and examined flux-trapping characteristics of multi-superconducting bulks arranged in array.

  6. Measuring Bulk Flows in Large Scale Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, H A; Feldman, Hume A.; Watkins, Richard

    1993-01-01

    We follow a formalism presented by Kaiser to calculate the variance of bulk flows in large scale surveys. We apply the formalism to a mock survey of Abell clusters \\'a la Lauer \\& Postman and find the variance in the expected bulk velocities in a universe with CDM, MDM and IRAS--QDOT power spectra. We calculate the velocity variance as a function of the 1--D velocity dispersion of the clusters and the size of the survey.

  7. Prospects for Detecting a Cosmic Bulk Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Benjamin; Garnavich, Peter M.; Mathews, Grant James

    2015-01-01

    The ΛCDM model is based upon a homogeneous, isotropic space-time leading to uniform expansion with random peculiar velocities caused by local gravitation perturbations. The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation evidences a significant dipole moment in the frame of the Local Group. This motion is usually explained with the Local Group's motion relative to the background Hubble expansion. An alternative explanation, however, is that the dipole moment is the result of horizon-scale curvature remaining from the birth of space-time, possibly a result of quantum entanglement with another universe. This would appear as a single velocity (a bulk flow) added to all points in space. These two explanations differ observationally on cosmic distance scales (z > 0.1). There have been many differing attempts to detect a bulk flow, many with no detectable bulk flow but some with a bulk flow velocity as large as 1000 km/s. Here we report on a technique based upon minimizing the scatter around the expected cosine distribution of the Hubble redshift residuals with respect to angular distance on the sky. That is, the algorithm searches for a directional dependence of Hubble residuals. We find results consistent with most other bulk flow detections at z Type Ia Supernovae to be ~0.01, whereas the current error (~0.2.) is more than an order of magnitude too large for the detection of bulk flow beyond z~0.05.

  8. An analysis of the temperature dependence of force, during steady shortening at different velocities, in (mammalian) fast muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roots, H; Ranatunga, K W

    2008-01-01

    We examined, over a wide range of temperatures (10-35 degrees C), the isometric tension and tension during ramp shortening at different velocities (0.2-4 L(0)/s) in tetanized intact fibre bundles from a rat fast (flexor hallucis brevis) muscle; fibre length (L(0)) was 2.2 mm and sarcomere length approximately 2.5 microm. During a ramp shortening, the tension change showed an initial inflection of small amplitude (P(1)), followed by a larger exponential decline towards an approximate steady level; the tension continued to decline slowly afterwards and the approximate steady tension at a given velocity was estimated as the tension (P(2)) at the point of intersection between two linear slopes, as previously described (Roots et al. 2007). At a given temperature, the tension P(2) declined to a lower level and at a faster rate (from an exponential curve fit) as the shortening velocity was increased; the temperature sensitivity of the rate of tension decline during ramp shortening at different velocities was low (Q(10) 0.9-1.5). The isometric tension and the P(2) tension at a given shortening velocity increased with warming so that the relation between tension and (reciprocal) temperature was sigmoidal in both. In isometric muscle, the temperature T(0.5) for half-maximal tension was approximately 10 degrees C, activation enthalpy change (DeltaH) was approximately 100 kJ mol(-1) and entropy change (DeltaS) approximately 350 J mol(-1) K(-1). In shortening, these were increased with increase of velocity so that at a shortening velocity (approximately 4 L(0)/s) producing maximal power at 35 degrees C, T(0.5) was approximately 28 degrees C, DeltaH was approximately 200 kJ mol(-1) and DeltaS approximately 700 J mol(-1) K(-1); the same trends were seen in the tension data from isotonic release experiments on intact muscle and in ramp shortening experiments on maximally Ca-activated skinned fibres. In general, our findings show that the sigmoidal relation between force and

  9. [Iliopsoas muscle syndrome. Functional disorders: shortening, spasm and weakness of a structurally unchanged muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2009-01-01

    Functional (non-organic) disorders of the iliopsoas muscle (IPM), i.e. the shortening, spasm and weakness of the structurally unchanged IPM, can be manifested as abdominal and/or pelvic pain, pain in areas of the thoracolumbar (ThL) and lumbosacral (LS) spine, sacroiliac (SI) joint, hip, groin and anterior thigh on the side of the affected muscle as well as gait disturbances (iliopsoas muscle syndrome). By clinical examination of the IPM, including the transabdominal palpation, stretch and strength tests, pathological masses, shortening, painful spasm, weakness and tendon tenderness of that muscle can be diagnosed. The IPM is, like other postural muscles, inclined to shortening. The weakness of the IPM can be a consequence of the lesion of the lumbar plexus or femoral nerve that innervate the IPM, as well as a consequence of certain organic diseases of the IPM. Painful stimuli coming from somatic and visceral structures that are innervated from Th12-L4 nerve roots, from which the IPM segmental innervation also originates, can cause a reflex spasm of the IPM. A painful spasm of the IPM caused by disorders of the ThL and LS spine, SI and hip joint, can mimic diseases of the abdominal and pelvic organs. In the differential diagnosis of the IPM painful spasm, organic diseases of that muscle should be considered foremost (abscess, hematoma, tumor, metastase), as they can result in spasm, and the diseases of the abdominal and pelvic organs that can cause an IPM reflex spasm. The IPM functional disorders, which are not rare, are often overlooked during a clinical examination of a patient. Reasons for overlooking these disorders are: 1) a nonspecific and variable clinical picture presenting the IPM functional disorders, 2) the IPM functional disorders are a neglected source of pain, 3) the inaccessibility of the IPM for inspection, 4) the lack of knowledge of the IPM examination techniques and 5) the IPM functional disorders cannot be discovered by radiological

  10. Studies on Frying Quality of Virgin Coconut Oil and Shortening Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nor Omar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The frying performances of palm solid shortening (PS and virgin coconut oil (VCO blends were evaluated. The fresh chickens were fried in a blended frying medium using an open fryer for 8 hours per day intermittently at 30 min interval for five consecutive days. Three types of oils were used; i.e. palm shortening without blending (PS, a blend of VCO: PS (10:90, and a blend of VCO: PS (20:80. The frying oils were collected periodically and their fatty acid composition (FAC, free fatty acid (FFA content, total polar compound (TPC and total polymer material (TPM were determined. In addition, the fried chicken was subjected to the analyses of oil absorption and sensory evaluation. The results showed that the frying performance of the VCO:PS (20:80 blend was better than VCO:PS (10:90 blend and PS in terms of TPM and TPC contents. The VCO:PS (20:80 gave TPC and TPM values of 17.4 and 1.40% respectively, the blend of VCO:PS (10:90 gave values of TPC and TPM of 18. 7 and 2.20% respectively, whilst PS with TPC of and TPM of 20.5 and 3.02 % respectively. Meanwhile, the oil absorption patterns showed that the fried chicken in VCO: PS (10:90 blend absorbed less oil compared to chickens fried in PS and VCO:PS (20:80 blend. The oil uptake in chickens fried in VCO:PS (10:90 blend was 1.75%, while in PS and VCO:PS (20:80 blend were 2.82 and 2.57 % respectively. In term of sensory evaluation, the addition of virgin coconut oil (VCO to palm based solid shortening (PS showed significant differences (p < 0.05 on crispiness, taste and overall scores on the 1st , 3rd and 5th day of frying. Although there were no significant difference on oiliness on the 1st and 3rd day, there was a significant difference on the 5th day of frying. In conclusion, the addition of a small proportion of VCO in PS would improve the frying performance of oil as well as sensory scores of the fried products.

  11. Shortened telomere length is associated with increased risk of cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomeres play a key role in the maintenance of chromosome integrity and stability, and telomere shortening is involved in initiation and progression of malignancies. A series of epidemiological studies have examined the association between shortened telomeres and risk of cancers, but the findings remain conflicting. METHODS: A dataset composed of 11,255 cases and 13,101 controls from 21 publications was included in a meta-analysis to evaluate the association between overall cancer risk or cancer-specific risk and the relative telomere length. Heterogeneity among studies and their publication bias were further assessed by the χ(2-based Q statistic test and Egger's test, respectively. RESULTS: The results showed that shorter telomeres were significantly associated with cancer risk (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.14-1.60, compared with longer telomeres. In the stratified analysis by tumor type, the association remained significant in subgroups of bladder cancer (OR = 1.84, 95% CI = 1.38-2.44, lung cancer (OR = 2.39, 95% CI = 1.18-4.88, smoking-related cancers (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.83-2.78, cancers in the digestive system (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.53-1.87 and the urogenital system (OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.12-2.67. Furthermore, the results also indicated that the association between the relative telomere length and overall cancer risk was statistically significant in studies of Caucasian subjects, Asian subjects, retrospective designs, hospital-based controls and smaller sample sizes. Funnel plot and Egger's test suggested that there was no publication bias in the current meta-analysis (P = 0.532. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that the presence of shortened telomeres may be a marker for susceptibility to human cancer, but single larger, well-design prospective studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  12. Modulation of corticospinal excitability during lengthening and shortening contractions in the first dorsal interosseus muscle of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Hirofumi; Kohno, Yutaka; Hirano, Tatsuya; Akai, Masami; Nakajima, Yasoichi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2007-04-01

    Lengthening and shortening contractions are the fundamental patterns of muscle activation underlying various movements. It is still unknown whether or not there is a muscle-specific difference in such a fundamental pattern of muscle activation. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to investigate whether or not the relationship between lengthening and shortening contractions in the modulation of corticospinal excitability in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle is the same as that of previously tested muscles because the hand muscles are anatomically and functionally different from the other muscles. To this end, we investigated the relationship between the input-output curves of the corticospinal pathway (i.e., the relationship between the stimulus intensities vs. the area of motor-evoked potentials) during lengthening and shortening contractions in 17 healthy subjects. The shape of this relationship was sigmoidal and characterized by a plateau value, maximum slope, and threshold. The plateau value was at the same level between lengthening and shortening contractions. However, the maximum slope (P shortening contractions. These findings were different from the results of other muscles tested in previous studies (i.e., the soleus muscle and the elbow flexors). That is to say, the plateau value and the maximum slope during lengthening contractions were significantly lower than those during shortening contractions in previous studies. This study provides tentative evidence that the relationship between lengthening and shortening contractions in the modulation of corticospinal excitability differs between muscles, indicating that the underlying neural control is not necessarily the same even though the fundamental patterns of muscle activation are carried out.

  13. Effect of positional changes of anatomic structures on upper airway dilating muscle shortening during electro- and chemostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliven, A; Odeh, M

    2006-09-01

    Positional changes of anatomic structures surrounding the upper airway are known to affect pharyngeal mechanics and collapsibility. We hypothesized that these alterations also affect the ability of the upper airway dilator muscles to enlarge the pharynx by altering their ability to shorten when activated. Using sonomicrometry, we evaluated in seven anesthetized dogs the effects of changes in tracheal and head position on the length of the genioglossus (GG) and the geniohyoid (GH) and the effects of these positional changes on the magnitude of shortening of the two muscles in response to electro- (ES) and chemostimulation (CS). Caudal traction of the trachea lengthened the GG and GH in all dogs, whereas cranial displacement of the trachea and flexion of the head to a vertical position shortened the muscles. Compared with the magnitude of ES-induced shortening in the neutral position, ES-induced shortening of the GG was 144.7 +/- 14.6, 49.3 +/- 4.3, and 33.5 +/- 11.6% during caudal and cranial displacement of the trachea and during head flexion, respectively. Similar effects of the positional changes were found for the GH, as well as for both muscles during respiratory stimulation with P(CO2) of 90 Torr at the end of CO(2) rebreathing, although inspiratory muscle shortening during CS reached only one-quarter to one-third of the magnitude observed during ES. We conclude that positional alterations of anatomic structures in the neck have a dramatic effect on the magnitude of shortening of the activated GG and GH, which may reduce substantially their ability to protect pharyngeal patency.

  14. Present-day shortening in Southern Haiti from GPS measurements and implications for seismic hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symithe, Steeve; Calais, Eric

    2016-06-01

    The ~ 3 M inhabitant capital region of Haiti, severely affected by the devastating January 12, 2010, M7.0 earthquake, continues to expand at a fast rate. Accurate characterization of regional earthquake sources is key to inform urban development and construction practices through improved regional seismic hazard estimates. Here we use a recently updated Global Positioning System (GPS) data set to show that seismogenic strain accumulation in southern Haiti involves an overlooked component of shortening on a south-dipping reverse fault along the southern edge of the Cul-de-Sac basin, in addition to the well-known component of left-lateral strike-slip motion. This tectonic model implies that ground shaking may be twice that expected if the major fault was purely strike-slip, as assumed in the current seismic hazard map for the region.

  15. Semi-automated detection of fractional shortening in zebrafish embryo heart videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrat Sara

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying cardiac functions in model organisms like embryonic zebrafish is of high importance in small molecule screens for new therapeutic compounds. One relevant cardiac parameter is the fractional shortening (FS. A method for semi-automatic quantification of FS in video recordings of zebrafish embryo hearts is presented. The software provides automated visual information about the end-systolic and end-diastolic stages of the heart by displaying corresponding colored lines into a Motion-mode display. After manually marking the ventricle diameters in frames of end-systolic and end-diastolic stages, the FS is calculated. The software was evaluated by comparing the results of the determination of FS with results obtained from another established method. Correlations of 0.96 < r < 0.99 between the two methods were found indicating that the new software provides comparable results for the determination of the FS.

  16. Prediction of peak forces for a shortening smooth muscle tissue subjected to vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidaparti, Ramana M; Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Meiss, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the peak forces for a tracheal smooth muscle tissue subjected to an applied longitudinal vibration following isotonic shortening. A non-linear finite element analysis was carried out to simulate the vibratory response under experimental conditions that corresponds to forced length oscillations at 33 Hz for 1 second. The stiffness change and hysteresis estimated from the experimental data was used in the analysis. The finite element results of peak forces are compared to the experimental data obtained. The comparison of results indicate that the approach and the vibratory response obtained may be useful for describing the cross-bridge de-attachments within the cells as well as connective tissue connections characteristic of tracheal smooth muscle tissue.

  17. A Posteriori Equivalence: A New Perspective for Design of Optimal Channel Shortening Equalizers

    CERN Document Server

    Venkataramani, Raman

    2007-01-01

    The problem of channel shortening equalization for optimal detection in ISI channels is considered. The problem is to choose a linear equalizer and a partial response target filter such that the combination produces the best detection performance. Instead of using the traditional approach of MMSE equalization, we directly seek all equalizer and target pairs that yield optimal detection performance in terms of the sequence or symbol error rate. This leads to a new notion of a posteriori equivalence between the equalized and target channels with a simple characterization in terms of their underlying probability distributions. Using this characterization we show the surprising existence an infinite family of equalizer and target pairs for which any maximum a posteriori (MAP) based detector designed for the target channel is simultaneously MAP optimal for the equalized channel. For channels whose input symbols have equal energy, such as q-PSK, the MMSE equalizer designed with a monic target constraint yields a so...

  18. Age-dependent Muscle Adaptation after Chronic Stretch-shortening Contractions in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Erik P; Layner, KaylaN; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Chetlin, Robert D; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related differences in contraction-induced adaptation have been well characterized especially for young and old rodent models but much less so at intermediate ages. Therefore, additional research is warranted to determine to what extent alterations in adaptation are due to maturation versus aging per se. The purpose of our study was to evaluate muscles of Fisher 344XBrown Norway rats of various ages following one month of exposure to stretch-shortening contractions (SSCs). With exposure, muscles mass increased by ~10% for 27 and 30 month old rats vs. ~20% for 3 and 6 month old rats (P muscle performance in general beginning at late adulthood. Such findings motivate careful investigation to determine appropriate SSC exposures at all stages of life.

  19. The Paley ulnarization of the carpus with ulnar shortening osteotomy for treatment of radial club hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paley Dror

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent deformity from centralization and radialization led to the development in 1999 of a new technique by the author called ulnarization. This method is performed through a volar approach in a vascular and physeal sparing fashion. It biomechanically balances the muscle forces on the wrist by dorsally transferring the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU from a deforming to a corrective force. The previous problems of a prominent bump from the ulnar head and ulnar deviation instability were solved by acutely shortening the diaphysis and by temporarily fixing the station of the carpus to the ulnar head at the level of the scaphoid. This is the first report of this modified Paley ulnarization method, which the author considers a significant improvement over his original procedure.

  20. The Paley ulnarization of the carpus with ulnar shortening osteotomy for treatment of radial club hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Dror

    2017-01-01

    Recurrent deformity from centralization and radialization led to the development in 1999 of a new technique by the author called ulnarization. This method is performed through a volar approach in a vascular and physeal sparing fashion. It biomechanically balances the muscle forces on the wrist by dorsally transferring the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) from a deforming to a corrective force. The previous problems of a prominent bump from the ulnar head and ulnar deviation instability were solved by acutely shortening the diaphysis and by temporarily fixing the station of the carpus to the ulnar head at the level of the scaphoid. This is the first report of this modified Paley ulnarization method, which the author considers a significant improvement over his original procedure. PMID:28120747

  1. To the problem of cross-bridge tension in steady muscle shortening and lengthening

    CERN Document Server

    Kokshenev, Valery B

    2009-01-01

    Despite the great success of the Huxley sliding filament model proposed half a century ago for actin-myosin linkages (cross-bridges), it fails to explain the force-velocity behavior of stretching skeletal muscles. Huxley's two-state kinetic equation for cross-bridge proportions is therefore reconsidered and a new solution to the problem of steady muscle eccentric and concentric contractions is reported. When the second law of statistical thermodynamics is applied to cross-bridge proportions, the weakly bound states appear to be correlated to the strongly bound states via structural and kinetic intrinsic muscle characteristics. The explicit force-velocity curve fits the empirical tension-velocity data on frog muscle shortening using only one adjustable parameter, while the Huxley model employed four parameters.

  2. Characterization of graininess formed in all beef tallow-based shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zong; Liu, Yuan-Fa; Jin, Qing-Zhe; Huang, Jian-Hua; Song, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Feng-Yan; Wang, Xing-Guo

    2010-11-10

    A batch of all beef tallow (BT)-based model shortening (divided into six rectangular block samples) was stored under temperature fluctuation cycles of 5-20 °C until granular crystals were observed. The lipid composition, thermal properties, and polymorphism of the granular crystals and their surrounding materials were evaluated. Furthermore, the isothermal crystallization behavior of two parts noted above was also examined by pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR), rheology, and polarized light microscopy (PLM). The changes of nanostructure including the aggregation of high-melting triacylglycerols (TAGs) and transformation into the most stable β polymorph occurred in granular crystals compared with surrounding materials. Concomitantly, a slower crystallization rate with a simultaneous increase in crystal growth led to the formation of large crystals and further aggregated to larger granular crystals when the size ultimately exceeded the sensory threshold.

  3. Shortening trinucleotide repeats using highly specific endonucleases: a possible approach to gene therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Guy-Franck

    2015-04-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are involved in more than two dozen neurological and developmental disorders. Conventional therapeutic approaches aimed at regulating the expression level of affected genes, which rely on drugs, oligonucleotides, and/or transgenes, have met with only limited success so far. An alternative approach is to shorten repeats to non-pathological lengths using highly specific nucleases. Here, I review early experiments using meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN), and transcription-activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) to contract trinucleotide repeats, and discuss the possibility of using CRISPR-Cas nucleases to the same end. Although this is a nascent field, I explore the possibility of designing nucleases and effectively delivering them in the context of gene therapy.

  4. Unloaded shortening velocity of voluntarily and electrically activated human dorsiflexor muscles in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Sasaki

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that unloaded shortening velocity (V(0 of human plantar flexors can be determined in vivo, by applying the "slack test" to submaximal voluntary contractions (J Physiol 567:1047-1056, 2005. In the present study, to investigate the effect of motor unit recruitment pattern on V(0 of human muscle, we modified the slack test and applied this method to both voluntary and electrically elicited contractions of dorsiflexors. A series of quick releases (i.e., rapid ankle joint rotation driven by an electrical dynamometer was applied to voluntarily activated dorsiflexor muscles at three different contraction intensities (15, 50, and 85% of maximal voluntary contraction; MVC. The quick-release trials were also performed on electrically activated dorsiflexor muscles, in which three stimulus conditions were used: submaximal (equal to 15%MVC 50-Hz stimulation, supramaximal 50-Hz stimulation, and supramaximal 20-Hz stimulation. Modification of the slack test in vivo resulted in good reproducibility of V(0, with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.87 (95% confidence interval: 0.68-0.95. Regression analysis showed that V(0 of voluntarily activated dorsiflexor muscles significantly increased with increasing contraction intensity (R(2 = 0.52, P<0.001. By contrast, V(0 of electrically activated dorsiflexor muscles remained unchanged (R(2<0.001, P = 0.98 among three different stimulus conditions showing a large variation of tetanic torque. These results suggest that the recruitment pattern of motor units, which is quite different between voluntary and electrically elicited contractions, plays an important role in determining shortening velocity of human skeletal muscle in vivo.

  5. Maximum shortening velocity of lymphatic muscle approaches that of striated muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongzhen; Taucer, Anne I; Gashev, Anatoliy A; Muthuchamy, Mariappan; Zawieja, David C; Davis, Michael J

    2013-11-15

    Lymphatic muscle (LM) is widely considered to be a type of vascular smooth muscle, even though LM cells uniquely express contractile proteins from both smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. We tested the hypothesis that LM exhibits an unloaded maximum shortening velocity (Vmax) intermediate between that of smooth muscle and cardiac muscle. Single lymphatic vessels were dissected from the rat mesentery, mounted in a servo-controlled wire myograph, and subjected to isotonic quick release protocols during spontaneous or agonist-evoked contractions. After maximal activation, isotonic quick releases were performed at both the peak and plateau phases of contraction. Vmax was 0.48 ± 0.04 lengths (L)/s at the peak: 2.3 times higher than that of mesenteric arteries and 11.4 times higher than mesenteric veins. In cannulated, pressurized lymphatic vessels, shortening velocity was determined from the maximal rate of constriction [rate of change in internal diameter (-dD/dt)] during spontaneous contractions at optimal preload and minimal afterload; peak -dD/dt exceeded that obtained during any of the isotonic quick release protocols (2.14 ± 0.30 L/s). Peak -dD/dt declined with pressure elevation or activation using substance P. Thus, isotonic methods yielded Vmax values for LM in the mid to high end (0.48 L/s) of those the recorded for phasic smooth muscle (0.05-0.5 L/s), whereas isobaric measurements yielded values (>2.0 L/s) that overlapped the midrange of values for cardiac muscle (0.6-3.3 L/s). Our results challenge the dogma that LM is classical vascular smooth muscle, and its unusually high Vmax is consistent with the expression of cardiac muscle contractile proteins in the lymphatic vessel wall.

  6. New reconstruction algorithm allows shortened acquisition time for myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenta, Ines; Treyer, Valerie; Husmann, Lars; Gaemperli, Oliver; Schindler, Michael J.; Herzog, Bernhard A.; Veit-Heibach, Patrick; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Buechel, Ronny R.; Nkoulou, Rene [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-04-15

    Shortening scan time and/or reducing radiation dose at maintained image quality are the main issues of the current research in radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). We aimed to validate a new iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm for SPECT MPI allowing shortened acquisition time (HALF time) while maintaining image quality vs. standard full time acquisition (FULL time). In this study, 50 patients, referred for evaluation of known or suspected coronary artery disease by SPECT MPI using 99mTc-Tetrofosmin, underwent 1-day adenosine stress 300 MBq/rest 900 MBq protocol with standard (stress 15 min/rest 15 min FULL time) immediately followed by short emission scan (stress 9 min/rest 7 min HALF time) on a Ventri SPECT camera (GE Healthcare). FULL time scans were processed with IR, short scans were additionally processed with a recently developed software algorithm for HALF time emission scans. All reconstructions were subsequently analyzed using commercially available software (QPS/QGS, Cedars Medical Sinai) with/without X-ray based attenuation correction (AC). Uptake values (percent of maximum) were compared by regression and Bland-Altman (BA) analysis in a 20-segment model. HALF scans yielded a 96% readout and 100% clinical diagnosis concordance compared to FULL. Correlation for uptake in each segment (n = 1,000) was r = 0.87at stress (p < 0.001) and r = 0.89 at rest (p < 0.001) with respective BA limits of agreement of -11% to 10% and -12% to 11%. After AC similar correlation (r = 0.82, rest; r = 0.80, stress, both p < 0.001) and BA limits were found (-12% to 10%; -13% to 12%). With the new IR algorithm, SPECT MPI can be acquired at half of the scan time without compromising image quality, resulting in an excellent agreement with FULL time scans regarding to uptake and clinical conclusion. (orig.)

  7. Ankle morphology amplifies calcaneus movement relative to triceps surae muscle shortening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, R; Hodgson, J; Kinugasa, R; Edgerton, V R; Sinha, S

    2013-08-15

    The present study investigated the mechanical role of the dorsoventral curvature of the Achilles tendon in the conversion of the shortening of the plantarflexor muscles into ankle joint rotation. Dynamic, sagittal-plane magnetic resonance spin-tagged images of the ankle joint were acquired in six healthy subjects during both passive and active plantarflexion movements driven by a magnetic resonance compatible servomotor-controlled foot-pedal device. Several points on these images were tracked to determine the 1) path and deformation of the Achilles tendon, 2) ankle's center of rotation, and 3) tendon moment arms. The degree of mechanical amplification of joint movement was calculated as the ratio of the displacements of the calcaneus and myotendinous junction. In plantarflexion, significant deflection of the Achilles tendon was evident in both the passive (165.7 ± 7.4°; 180° representing a straight tendon) and active trials (166.9 ± 8.8°). This bend in the dorsoventral direction acts to move the Achilles tendon closer to the ankle's center of rotation, resulting in an ∼5% reduction of moment arm length. Over the entire range of movement, the overall displacement of the calcaneus exceeded the displacement of the myotendinous junction by ∼37%, with the mechanical gains being smaller in dorsi- and larger in plantarflexed joint positions. This is the first study to assess noninvasively and in vivo using MRI the curvature of the Achilles tendon during both passive and active plantarflexion movements. The dorsoventral tendon curvature amplifies the shortening of the plantarflexor muscles, resulting in a greater displacement of the tendon's insertion into the calcaneus compared with its origin.

  8. Shortening Infusion Time for High-Dose Methotrexate Alters Antileukemic Effects: A Randomized Prospective Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Torben S.; Sparreboom, Alex; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Yinmei; Boyett, James M.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Panetta, John C.; Bowman, W. Paul; Sandlund, John T.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Relling, Mary V.; Evans, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether shortening the infusion duration of high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX; 1 g/m2) affects the in vivo accumulation of active methotrexate polyglutamates (MTXPG1-7) in leukemia cells and whether this differs among major acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) subtypes. Methods From June 2000 through October 2007, 356 children with ALL were randomly assigned to receive initial single-agent treatment with HDMTX (1 g/m2) as either a 24-hour infusion or a 4-hour infusion at two pediatric hospitals in the United States. The primary outcome measures were the accumulation of MTXPG1-7 in leukemia cells and the antileukemic effects (eg, inhibition of de novo purine synthesis in bone marrow ALL cells, and decrease in circulating ALL cells). Results The 24-hour infusion resulted in significantly higher amounts of MTXPG1-7 in bone marrow leukemia cells (median: 1,695 v 1,150 pmol/109 cells, P = .0059), and better antileukemic effects. The 24-hour infusion had the greatest effect on MTXPG1-7 accumulation in hyperdiploid ALL (median: 3,919 v 2,417 pmol/109 cells, P = .0038); T-cell ALL exhibited smaller differences in MTXPG1-7 but greater antileukemic effects with the longer infusion (median decrease in leukemia cells: 88.4% v 51.8%, P = .0075). In contrast, infusion duration had no significant impact on MTXPG1-7 accumulation or antileukemic effects in ALL with the t(12;21)/(ETV6-RUNX1) chromosomal translocation. Conclusion Shortening the infusion time of HDMTX reduces accumulation of active methotrexate in leukemia cells and decreases antileukemic effects, with differing consequences among major ALL subtypes. PMID:21444869

  9. HIV Infection Is Associated with Shortened Telomere Length in Ugandans with Suspected Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Elizabeth; Lin, Jue; Chang, Emily; Byanyima, Patrick; Ayakaka, Irene; Musisi, Emmanuel; Worodria, William; Davis, J. Lucian; Segal, Mark; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Huang, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is a risk factor for opportunistic pneumonias such as tuberculosis (TB) and for age-associated health complications. Short telomeres, markers of biological aging, are also associated with an increased risk of age-associated diseases and mortality. Our goals were to use a single cohort of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected individuals hospitalized with pneumonia to assess whether shortened telomere length was associated with HIV infection, TB diagnosis, and 2-month mortality. Methods This was a sub-study of the IHOP Study, a prospective observational study. Participants consisted of 184 adults admitted to Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda who underwent evaluation for suspected TB and were followed for 2 months. Standardized questionnaires were administered to collect demographic and clinical data. PBMCs were isolated and analyzed using quantitative PCR to determine telomere length. The association between HIV infection, demographic and clinical characteristics, and telomere length was assessed, as were the associations between telomere length, TB diagnosis and 2-month mortality. Variables with a P≤0.2 in bivariate analysis were included in multivariate models. Results No significant demographic or clinical differences were observed between the HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects. Older age (Ptelomere length in bivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis adjusting for these five variables, HIV-positive participants had significantly shorter telomeres than HIV-negative participants (β = -0.0621, 95% CI -0.113 to -0.011, P = 0.02). Shortened telomeres were not associated with TB or short-term mortality. Conclusions The association between HIV infection and shorter telomeres suggests that HIV may play a role in cellular senescence and biological aging and that shorter telomeres may be involved in age-associated health complications seen in this population. The findings indicate a need to further research the impact of HIV on aging. PMID

  10. Feline chronic kidney disease is associated with shortened telomeres and increased cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, Jessica M; Maranon, David G; Battaglia, Christine L R; McLeland, Shannon M; Brock, William T; Bailey, Susan M

    2013-08-01

    Telomeres are protective structures at the ends of chromosomes that have important implications for aging. To address the question of whether telomeres contribute to feline chronic kidney disease (CKD), we evaluated kidney, liver, and skin samples from 12 cats with naturally occurring CKD, 12 young normal cats, and 6 old normal cats. Telomere length was assessed using standard telomere fluorescent in situ hybridization (TEL-FISH) combined with immunohistochemistry (TELI-FISH) to identify proximal (PTEC) and distal tubular epithelial cells (DTEC), whereas senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SABG) staining was used to evaluate senescence. Results revealed statistically significant decreases in the average telomere fluorescence intensity (TFI) of PTEC in CKD cats compared with young and geriatric normal cats, and in the DTEC of CKD cats compared with young normal cats. When histograms of individual TFI were compared, statistically significant decreases in the PTEC and DTEC of CKD cats were observed compared with young and geriatric normal cats. Concomitantly, a statistically significant increase in SABG staining was seen in CKD kidney samples compared with young normal cats. CKD cats tended to have increased SABG staining in the kidney compared with normal geriatric cats, but this did not reach statistical significance. No significant telomere shortening in liver or skin from any group was observed. Real-time quantitative telomeric repeat amplification protocol assessment of renal telomerase activity revealed comparable low levels of telomerase activity in all groups. Our results suggest that shortened telomeres and increased senescence in the kidneys of CKD cats may represent novel targets for interventional therapy.

  11. Anesthetic Sevoflurane Causes Rho-Dependent Filopodial Shortening in Mouse Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H Zimering

    Full Text Available Early postnatal anesthesia causes long-lasting learning and memory impairment in rodents, however, evidence for a specific neurotoxic effect on early synaptogenesis has not been demonstrated. Drebrin A is an actin binding protein whose localization in dendritic protrusions serves an important role in dendritic spine morphogenesis, and is a marker for early synaptogenesis. We therefore set out to investigate whether clinically-relevant concentrations of anesthetic sevoflurane, widely- used in infants and children, alters dendritic morphology in cultured fetal day 16 mouse hippocampal neurons. After 7 days in vitro, mouse hippocampal neurons were exposed to four hours of 3% sevoflurane in 95% air/5% CO2 or control condition (95% air/5% CO2. Neurons were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and stained with Alexa Fluor555-Phalloidin, and/or rabbit anti-mouse drebrin A/E antibodies which permitted subcellular localization of filamentous (F-actin and/or drebrin immunoreactivity, respectively. Sevoflurane caused acute significant length-shortening in filopodia and thin dendritic spines in days-in-vitro 7 neurons, an effect which was completely rescued by co-incubating neurons with ten micromolar concentrations of the selective Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Filopodia and thin spine recovered in length two days after sevoflurane exposure. Yet cluster-type filopodia (a precursor to synaptic filopodia were persistently significantly decreased in number on day-in-vitro 9, in part owing to preferential localization of drebrin immunoreactivity to dendritic shafts versus filopodial stalks. These data suggest that sevoflurane induces F-actin depolymerization leading to acute, reversible length-shortening in dendritic protrusions through a mechanism involving (in part activation of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling and impairs localization of drebrin A to filopodia required for early excitatory synapse formation.

  12. Reactive overprint of the Central Indian Ridge mantle and formation of hybrid troctolites: reassessing the significance of bulk oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, A.; Morishita, T.; Kumagai, H.; Nakamura, K.; Okino, K.; Tamura, A.; Arai, S.

    2014-12-01

    The idea that hybridized mantle rocks can contribute to the oceanic crust composition has recently emerged thanks to studies on primitive (olivine-rich) troctolites [e.g. 1]. These rocks are considered to be formed by melt-rock interaction, but the exact reaction process by which they originate is still debated and their role on the bulk oceanic crust composition has been never defined. Olivine-rich troctolites have been mostly found at slow spreading ridges [2] or at their fossil analogues [3]. Similar rocks have been recently collected in the 25ºS area of the intermediate spreading Central Indian Ridge (CIR), and rarely characterize the crust mantle boundary at fast spreading ridges [4]. We show that textural and chemical inheritances of the pre-existing mantle are preserved in the CIR troctolites. In particular, the local occurrence of granular, mantle-derived orthopyroxenes and the composition of the associated clinopyroxene indicate that these crustal rocks formed through a direct (one-stage) conversion of a mantle peridotite. We use chemical evidence to infer the same origin of the olivine-rich troctolites worldwide, concluding that the reactive overprint of the oceanic mantle is a process diffused over the entire spreading rate spectrum. Bulk oceanic crust estimates of the Hess Deep (Pacific) and Atlantis Massif (Atlantic) crustal sections are used to quantify and compare the effect of these rocks on the bulk crust composition at fast and slow spreading ridges. Our inferences suggest that the significance of the bulk oceanic crust should be reassessed. When hybrid troctolites are included at crustal levels, the oceanic crust cannot be considered equal to the composition of the melt extracted from the mantle, but it results more primitive and importantly thicker. References: [1] Suhr G., Hellebrand E., Johnson K., Brunelli D., 2008, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 9, doi:10.1029/2008GC002012; [2] Drouin M., Godard M., Ildefonse B., Bruguier O., Garrido C

  13. 75 FR 64585 - Bulk Solid Hazardous Materials: Harmonization With the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... nonsubstantive changes, however, to correct grammar, internal paragraph references, and a temperature conversion... means the English version of the ``International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes Code'' published by...

  14. Crustal and deep seismicity in Italy (30 years after

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Selvaggi

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The first modern studies of seismicity in Italy date back to the late 60's and early 70's. Although with a sparse seismic network available and only a few telemetered short-period stations, significant studies were carried out that outlined the main features of Italian seismicity (see, e.g., Boschi et al., 1969. Among these studies, one of the most important achievements was the reconnaissance of a Wadati-Benioff zone in Southern Tyrrhenian, described for the first time in detail in the papers of Caputo et al.(1970, 1973. Today, after three decades of more and more detailed seismological monitoring of the Italian region and tens of thousands earthquakes located since then, the knowledge of the earthquake generation processes in our country is much improved, although some of the conclusions reached in these early papers still hold. These improvements were made possible by the efforts of many institutions and seismologists who have been working hard to bring seismological research in Italy to standards of absolute quality, under the pivoting role of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING. From the relocation of about 30000 crustal earthquakes and detailed studies on intermediate and deep shocks carried out in the last few years, we show that seismic release in peninsular Italy is only weakly related to the Africa-Eurasia convergence, but rather is best explained by the existence of two separate subduction/collision arcs (Northern Apennines and Southern Apennines-Calabria-Sicily. The width of the deforming belt running along peninsular Italy is 30 to 60 km, it is broader in the north than in the south, and the two arcs are separated by a region of more distributed deformation and stress rotations in the Central Apennines. Along the belt, the reconnaissance of regions of continuous and weak release of seismic energy, adjacent to fault areas which are currently «locked» (and therefore are the best candidates for future earthquakes is another

  15. Deep crustal reflections from a Vibroseis survey in northern Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckh, P.; Ansorge, J.; Mueller, St.; Sprecher, Chr.

    1984-10-01

    In 1982 a Vibroseis survey comprising 180 km of reflection profiles was run in northern Switzerland in order to investigate the suitability of the crystalline basement for the deposition of highly radioactive waste. A configuration was chosen with 144 channels, 25 m of geophone spacing, 20 s sweeps ranging from 11 to 61 Hz and stacking of 4 or 8 sweeps of 3 simultaneous vibrators at twice the geophone spacing. The listening time was generally 4 s and at 4 sites it was extended to 11s for the detection of deeper crustal reflectors. This survey unravelled the complicated fault and thrust system beneath the Swiss folded Jura mountains. The stack from 4 s to 11 s reveals clearly a strong sloping reflector between 3.0 and 3.5 s which is strong evidence for a pronounced differentiation in the upper crust. A series of reflections is observed between 5.8 and 7.2 s the top of which can be correlated with the Conrad discontinuity. A strong "layered" signal between 9.0 and 9.5 s is interpreted as reflections from the M-discontinuity. The main features are compatible with results from nearby refraction surveys in the southern Rhinegraben rift system which show a distinct velocity increase of about 0.5 km/s in the lower crust at a depth ranging from 15 to 20 km, followed by an inversion zone or a laminated structure before reaching the Moho at about 27 km depth. The correlation of the field recordings with the first 10 s of the up-sweep only, shows some loss of resolution in the uppermost 3 s because of the lower frequency content of the signal. However, the lower parts of the sections are nearly identical. The fact that the deeper reflectors in the sections can consistently be traced laterally is a strong argument for using this processing technique. Thus high-coverage Vibroseis surveys utilizing up-sweep can be processed for deep crustal reflections even if the recording time is restricted to the standard 4 s, provided the surface static corrections are carried out with high

  16. Crustal structure of the Nordland region, northern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maystrenko, Yuriy P.; Olesen, Odleiv; Gernigon, Laurent; Gradmann, Sofie

    2016-04-01

    To understand the major structural features of the sedimentary cover and crystalline crust within the Nordland County area of Norway, a data-based 3D structural model has been constructed in the framework of the Neonor2 project, "Neotectonics in Nordland - implications for petroleum exploration". The 3D structural model covers the Lofoten Ridge, the Ribban and Vestfjorden basins and adjacent areas of the Norwegian mainland. The model also covers the northern part of the adjacent Vøring Basin. At the regional scale, the 3D model includes the rifted margin which is located at the transition from the exposed crystalline rocks of the Fennoscandian Shield in the east to the Cenozoic oceanic domain of the Norwegian-Greenland Sea in the west. During the construction of the 3D structural model, all recently published and/or released data have been compiled in order to set the initial model. This initial 3D model has been validated by a 3D density modelling in order to obtain a gravity-consistent 3D structural model of the entire study area. The 3D density modelling has been carried out by using the IGMAS plus software (the Interactive Gravity and Magnetic Application System). During the 3D density modelling, densities have been assigned as constant values for the crystalline rocks. In contrast, densities of sedimentary rocks have been set to be depth-dependent in order to reflect the compaction of sedimentary rocks with depth. According to the results of the 3D density modeling, the crystalline crust of the investigated region consists of several layers with different densities. The deepest crustal layer is the high-density lower crust which corresponds to the high-velocity lower crustal layer. The regional-scale gravity response associated with the positions of the Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary is one of the key factors for performing a proper 3D density model of the study area. At the regional scale, the Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary are

  17. Crustal thinning and tectonic geomorphology: redefining the passive margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, T.; Osmundsen, P. T.

    2012-04-01

    We describe Scandinavia's passive margin in terms of a hyper-extended distal margin, a variably tapered proximal margin that includes the outer onshore areas, and an upwarped, unstretched, continent-sloping hinterland that terminates against the "undeformed" cratonic interior. Two benchmark locations, defined as the taper break (TB) and the Hinterland Break in Slope (HBSL), occur at the inner boundary of the distal margin and at the transition from the continent-sloping hinterland and craton, respectively. The elevation of the seaward-facing escarpment is directly scaled to the distance between the taper break and the Hinterland Break in Slope. Scaling relationships between the taper of the crystalline crust in the direction of the distal margin and the length/dip of the hinterland backslope follow directly. The shape factors of major catchments are directly scaled to the taper of the proximal margin and drainage azimuths are parallel to the mean transport lineation recorded from a distinct population of range-bounding normal faults. Topographic expressions of the footwalls and offsets in apatite fission-track age-patterns indicate that fault movement controlled topography, locally and regionally inboard of sharp crustal tapers long after the main phase of crustal thinning. We extend our definition of the passive margin to other post-breakup margins. One particularly fine example is SE Brasil. New data (Zalan et al., 2011) suggest the direct correlation of SE Brasil's Taper Break with its escarpment elevation in a manner consistent with our Scandinavian and global observations. The Taper Hypothesis appears to hold across old and young, glaciated, and unglaciated margins. Following the stretching, thinning, and exhumation phase, an "accommodation phase" is warranted. During accommodation, the initially elevated escarpments can be eroded to very low base levels and subsequently undergo inboard rejuvenation by footwall uplift, in response to tensile stresses

  18. Crustal-scale block tilting during Andean trench-parallel extension: Structural and geo-thermochronological insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noury, M.; Bernet, M.; Schildgen, T. F.; Simon-Labric, T.; Philippon, M.; Sempere, T.

    2016-09-01

    Despite a long history of plate convergence at the western margin of the South American plate that has been ongoing since at least the Early Paleozoic, the southern Peruvian fore-arc displays little to no evidence of shortening. In the light of this observation, we assess the deformation history of the southern Peruvian fore-arc and its geodynamic implications. To accomplish this, we present a new structural and geo-thermochronological data set (zircon U-Pb, mica 40Ar/39Ar, apatite and zircon fission-track and zircon (U-Th)/He analyses) for samples collected along a 400 km long transect parallel to the trench. Our results show that the Mesoproterozoic gneissic basement was mainly at temperatures ≤350°C since the Neoproterozoic and was later intruded by Jurassic volcanic arc plutons. Along the coast, a peculiar apatite fission-track age pattern, coupled with field observations and a synthesis of available geological maps, allows us to identify crustal-scale tilted blocks that span the coastal Peruvian fore-arc. These blocks, bounded by normal faults that are orthogonal to the trench, suggest post-60 Ma trench-parallel extension that potentially accommodated oroclinal bending in this region. Block tilting is consistent with the observed and previously described switch in the location of sedimentary sources in the fore-arc basin. Our data set allows us to estimate the cumulative slip on these faults to be less than 2 km and questions the large amount of trench-parallel extension suggested to have accommodated this bending.

  19. Tension and heat production during isometric contractions and shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, S H

    1978-09-01

    1. Tension and heat production were measured during phasic isometric contractions and isovelocity shortening in the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis at 20 degrees C. 2. Isometric tension at lo was 550 +/- 40 mN/mm2 (S.D. for 173 observations in nine muscles), while the isometric maintenance heat rate was 1.0 +/- 0.2 mW/g wet wt. (S.D. for seventy-eight observations in eight muscles). 3. Isometric tension and heat production were measured as functions of muscle length over a range of 0.79--1.14 lo and were found to bear a linear relation to each other. 4. The force-velocity relation was determined in isovelocity releases imposed during tetanic stimulation and was found to fit the Hill equation with parameters alpha/Po = 0.07 +/- 0.01 and b/lo = 0.016 +/- 0.0007 sec-1 (S.E. from non-linear least-squares regression of the pooled data from seven experiments). 5. Heat production measured in the same experiments showed that shortening heat is produced with a shortening heat coefficient alpha/Po of 0.15. Shortening heat does not appear to be force-dependent, and separate experiments confirmed that it is a linear function of the amount of shortening.

  20. Comparison of EMG during passive stretching and shortening phases of each muscle for the investigation of parkinsonian rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yuri; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Ji-Sun; Koh, Seong-Beom; Eom, Gwang-Moon; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis in the literature that torque resistance of parkinsonian rigidity is the difference between the independent contributions of stretched and shortened muscles. The hypothesis was tested using muscle-specific stretch-shortening (MSSS) EMG ratio in this study. Nineteen patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) and 18 healthy subjects (the mean age comparable to that of patients) participated in this study. The EMG activity was measured in the four muscles involved in wrist joint movement, i.e. flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis and extensor carpi ulnaris. The passive flexion-extension movement with a range of ±30∘ was applied at wrist joint. Root mean squared (RMS) mean was calculated from the envelope of the EMG for each of stretching and shortening phases. MSSS EMG ratio was defined as the ratio of RMS EMG of stretching phase and RMS EMG of shortening phase of a single muscle, and it was calculated for each muscle. MSSS EMG ratios were smaller than one in all muscles. These results indicate that all wrist muscles generate greater mean EMG during shortening than during stretching. Therefore, the torque resistance of parkinsonian rigidity cannot be explained as the simple summation of independent antagonistic torque pair.

  1. Stretch and shortening of skeletal muscles activated along the ascending limb of the force-length relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassier, Dilson E; Pun, Clara

    2010-01-01

    There is a history dependence of skeletal muscle contraction. When muscles are activated and subsequently stretched, they produce a long lasting force enhancement. When muscles are activated and subsequently shortened, they produce a long-lasting force depression. The purposes of the studies shown in this chapter were (1) to evaluate if force enhancement and force depression are present along the ascending limb of the force-length (FL) relation, (2) to evaluate if the history-dependent properties of force production are associated with sarcomere length (SL) non-uniformity, and (3) to determine the effects of cross-bridge (de)activation on force depression. Isolated myofibrils were activated by either Ca²(+) or MgADP and were subjected to consecutive stretches or shortenings along the ascending limb of the FL relation, separated by periods (approximately 5 s) of isometric contraction. Force after stretch was higher than force after shortening when the contractions were produced at similar SLs. The difference in force could not be explained by SL non-uniformity. After shortening, MgADP activation produced forces that were higher than Ca²(+) activation. Since MgADP induces the formation of strongly bound cross-bridges, the result suggests that force depression following shortening is associated with cross-bridge deactivation.

  2. Modulation of soleus H-reflex during shortening and lengthening muscle actions in young and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Sheng; Zhou, Shi; Cartwright, Colleen

    2015-02-28

    The H-reflex is dependently modulated during isometric and anisometric muscle actions. However, the manner of the H-reflex modulation during dynamic muscle movements in relation to ageing is less stated in the literature. This study was designed to investigate the effects of ageing on soleus (SOL) H-reflex modulation during dynamic muscle actions. Twenty young (24 ± 4 years of age) and 20 older adults (73 ± 5 years of age) voluntarily participated in the study. The SOL H-reflex was measured during passive and active shortening and lengthening muscle actions in a sitting position. The older group showed a lower ratio of the maximal amplitude of H-reflex to M-wave (SOL Hmax/Mmax) during the passive lengthening than that during the passive shortening (shortening: 0.40 ± 0.22 vs. lengthening: 0.15 ± 0.10, P shortening than that during the lengthening contractions at maximal effort (shortening: 0.51 ± 0.26 vs. lengthening: 0.37 ± 0.18, P muscle actions between young and older adults.

  3. A Comparative Field Monitoring of Column Shortenings in Tall Buildings Using Wireless and Wired Sensor Network Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative field measurement for column shortening of tall buildings is presented in this study, with a focus on the reliability and stability of a wireless sensor network. A wireless sensor network was used for monitoring the column shortenings of a 58-story building under construction. The wireless sensor network, which was composed of sensor and master nodes, employed the ultra-high-frequency band and CDMA communication methods. To evaluate the reliability and stability of the wireless sensor network system, the column shortenings were also measured using a conventional wired monitoring system. Two vibration wire gauges were installed in each of the selected 7 columns and 3 walls. Measurements for selected columns and walls were collected for 270 days after casting of the concrete. The results measured by the wireless sensor network were compared with the results of the conventional method. The strains and column shortenings measured using both methods showed good agreement for all members. It was verified that the column shortenings of tall buildings could be monitored using the wireless sensor network system with its reliability and stability.

  4. Into the Bulk: A Covariant Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhardt, Netta

    2016-01-01

    I propose a general, covariant way of defining when one region is "deeper in the bulk" than another. This definition is formulated outside of an event horizon (or in the absence thereof) in generic geometries; it may be applied to both points and surfaces, and may be used to compare the depth of bulk points or surfaces relative to a particular boundary subregion or relative to the entire boundary. Using the recently proposed "lightcone cut" formalism, the comparative depth between two bulk points can be determined from the singularity structure of Lorentzian correlators in the dual field theory. I prove that, by this definition, causal wedges of progressively larger regions probe monotonically deeper in the bulk. The definition furthermore matches expectations in pure AdS and in static AdS black holes with isotropic spatial slices, where a well-defined holographic coordinate exists. In terms of holographic RG flow, this new definition of bulk depth makes contact with coarse-graining over both large distances ...

  5. Development of superconductor bulk for superconductor bearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Joong; Jun, Byung Hyuk; Park, Soon Dong (and others)

    2008-08-15

    Current carrying capacity is one of the most important issues in the consideration of superconductor bulk materials for engineering applications. There are numerous applications of Y-Ba-Cu-O (YBCO) bulk superconductors e.g. magnetic levitation train, flywheel energy storage system, levitation transportation, lunar telescope, centrifugal device, magnetic shielding materials, bulk magnets etc. Accordingly, to obtain YBCO materials in the form of large, single crystals without weak-link problem is necessary. A top seeded melt growth (TSMG) process was used to fabricate single crystal YBCO bulk superconductors. The seeded and infiltration growth (IG) technique was also very promising method for the synthesis of large, single-grain YBCO bulk superconductors with good superconducting properties. 5 wt.% Ag doped Y211 green compacts were sintered at 900 .deg. C {approx} 1200 .deg.C and then a single crystal YBCO was fabricated by an infiltration method. A refinement and uniform distribution of the Y211 particles in the Y123 matrix were achieved by sintering the Ag-doped samples. This enhancement of the critical current density was ascribable to a fine dispersion of the Y211 particles, a low porosity and the presence of Ag particles. In addition, we have designed and manufactured large YBCO single domain with levitation force of 10-13 kg/cm{sup 2} using TSMG processing technique.

  6. The topography of a continental indenter: The interplay between crustal deformation, erosion, and base level changes in the eastern Southern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberer, B.; Prasicek, G.; Neubauer, F.; Hergarten, S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The topography of the eastern Southern Alps (ESA) reflects indenter tectonics causing crustal shortening, surface uplift, and erosional response. Fluvial drainages were perturbed by Pleistocene glaciations that locally excavated alpine valleys. The Late Miocene desiccation of the Mediterranean Sea and the uplift of the northern Molasse Basin led to significant base level changes in the far field of the ESA and the Eastern Alps (EA), respectively. Among this multitude of mechanisms, the processes that dominate the current topographic evolution of the ESA and the ESA‐EA drainage divide have not been identified. We demonstrate the expected topographic effects of each mechanism in a one‐dimensional model and compare them with observed channel metrics. We find that the normalized steepness index increases with uplift rate and declines from the indenter tip in the northwest to the foreland basin in the southeast. The number and amplitude of knickpoints and the distortion in longitudinal channel profiles similarly decrease toward the east. Changes in slope of χ‐transformed channel profiles coincide spatially with the Valsugana‐Fella fault linking crustal stacking and uplift induced by indenter tectonics with topographic evolution. Gradients in χ across the ESA‐EA drainage divide imply an ongoing, north directed shift of the Danube‐ESA watershed that is most likely driven by a base level rise in the northern Molasse basin. We conclude that the regional uplift pattern controls the geometry of ESA‐EA channels, while base level changes in the far field control the overall architecture of the orogen by drainage divide migration.

  7. JERS-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry Applications: Mapping of Rain Forest Environments and Crustal Deformation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, P.; Hensley, S.; Peltzer, G.; Rignot, E.; Werner, C.

    1999-01-01

    This research using JERS-1 SAR data has been very fruitful, resulting in a strong collaboration with geodesists and geophysicists in Japan, and several important papers characterizing crustal deformation, and the capabilities and limitations of JERS data for these studies.

  8. Crustal structure and tectonics of the Ninetyeast Ridge from seismic and gravity studies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Neprochnov, Y.P.; Rao, D.G.; Grinko, B.N.

    Seismic reflection and refraction, gravity, and bathymetric data across and along the central part of the Ninetyeast Ridge were analyzed to determine the crustal structure of the ridge and to understand its tectonics. The ridge in the study area...

  9. Large bulk Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors fabricated by multiseeding melt growth methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We have fabricated the large single domain YBaCuO bulk superconductors by using multiseeding technique combined with composition gradient in the precursor. Obviously, the growth time can be shortened by multiseeding method and the weak links between grain boundaries originated from different seeds can be also overcome with introducing the chemical component gradient and arranging the seeds exactly. For these YBCO disks, only single peak occurs in the distributions of trapped field, and the magnetic levitation force is equal to that of the same size sample fabricated with single seed. Although the arrangement of seeds is similar, the distribution of trapped field still shows four peaks for the sample without composition gradient.

  10. Analytical formulas for shear and bulk viscosities in relativistic gaseous mixtures with constant cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Moroz, O

    2014-01-01

    Using Mathematica package, we derive analytical closed-form expressions for the shear and the bulk viscosity coefficients in multicomponent relativistic gases with constant cross sections, being the relativistic generalization for the hard spheres model. Some of them are cumbersome and require symbolic manipulations in an algebraic package. The constant cross sections are of the elastic processes, while the inelastic (or number-changing) processes (collisions or decays) are considered only partly. As examples, we find explicit expressions of the correct single-component first-order shear viscosity coefficient and some explicit analytical results for the binary mixture. These formulas have numerous applications in approximate nonequilibrium descriptions of gases of particles or quasiparticles with averaged (temperature dependent) cross sections. In addition to this, we present formulas for collision rates and some other related formulas. This paper is a shortened version of a previous one.

  11. Crustal deformation across the Southern Patagonian Icefield observed by GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A.; Ivins, E.; Lange, H.; Mendoza, L.; Schröder, L.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Casassa, G.; Marderwald, E.; Fritsche, M.; Perdomo, R.; Horwath, M.; Dietrich, R.

    2016-10-01

    Geodetic GNSS observations at 43 sites well distributed over the Southern Patagonian Icefield region yield site velocities with a mean accuracy of 1 mm/a and 6 mm/a for the horizontal and vertical components, respectively. These velocities are analyzed to reveal the magnitudes and patterns of vertical and horizontal present-day crustal deformation as well as their primary driving processes. The observed vertical velocities confirm a rapid uplift, with rates peaking at 41 mm/a, causally related to glacial-isostatic adjustment (GIA). They yield now an unambiguous preference between two competing GIA models. Remaining discrepancies between the preferred model and our observations point toward an effective upper mantle viscosity even lower than 1.6 ṡ1018 Pas and effects of lateral rheological heterogeneities. An analysis of the horizontal strain and strain-rate fields reveals some complex superposition, with compression dominating in the west and extension in the east. This deformation field suggests significant contributions from three processes: GIA, a western interseismic tectonic deformation field related to plate subduction, and an extensional strain-rate field related to active Patagonian slab window tectonics.

  12. Fragmentation of wall rock garnets during deep crustal earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austrheim, Håkon; Dunkel, Kristina G.; Plümper, Oliver; Ildefonse, Benoit; Liu, Yang; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    Fractures and faults riddle the Earth’s crust on all scales, and the deformation associated with them is presumed to have had significant effects on its petrological and structural evolution. However, despite the abundance of directly observable earthquake activity, unequivocal evidence for seismic slip rates along ancient faults is rare and usually related to frictional melting and the formation of pseudotachylites. We report novel microstructures from garnet crystals in the immediate vicinity of seismic slip planes that transected lower crustal granulites during intermediate-depth earthquakes in the Bergen Arcs area, western Norway, some 420 million years ago. Seismic loading caused massive dislocation formations and fragmentation of wall rock garnets. Microfracturing and the injection of sulfide melts occurred during an early stage of loading. Subsequent dilation caused pervasive transport of fluids into the garnets along a network of microfractures, dislocations, and subgrain and grain boundaries, leading to the growth of abundant mineral inclusions inside the fragmented garnets. Recrystallization by grain boundary migration closed most of the pores and fractures generated by the seismic event. This wall rock alteration represents the initial stages of an earthquake-triggered metamorphic transformation process that ultimately led to reworking of the lower crust on a regional scale.

  13. Reflection Character of the Continental Lithosphere and Crustal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Reflection images represent the high-frequency end member of the suite of seismological tools commonly used to probe the lithosphere. The global inventory of deep reflection profiles has documented reflection characters as varied as the surface geology that provides the primary boundary condition for the interpretation of reflection images. Past reviews of reflection results have stressed similarities in reflection patterns between various geographic regions and attempted to associate these patterns with specific tectonic processes. Examples include: laminated sequences (shear fabrics formed during extension or collision), reflective Mohos (mafic underplating), bright spots (contemporary and fossil magma bodies), dipping mantle reflections rooted in the lower crust (fossil subduction zones) and subhorizontal mantle reflections (phase changes in the lower lithosphere). Here I focus on relating reflection character to the inversion and/or interpretation of results from broadband techniques such as receiver functions, body wave and surface wave tomography. Among the underappreciated aspects of reflectivity are its dependence upon density as well as velocity, and the limitations of 2D images in a 3D world. A core consideration is the need to meaningfully relate integrated physical properties (e.g. velocity inferred from refraction and surface wave measurements) with the differential physical properties (e.g. reflection coefficients) to which reflection images are primarily sensitive. Examples from Tibet and Eurasia are used to illustrate examples of successful integration of controlled (active) and natural (passive) source observations to constrain models of crustal evolution.

  14. Crustal kinematics of the Colorado Plateau from GPS geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, A. A.; Broermann, J.; Bennett, R. A.; Kreemer, C.; Blewitt, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from new continuous and campaign GPS networks spanning the state of Arizona and the southern portion of Utah. The 33 station continuous GPS network, funded by the NSF EarthScope Program, supplements a sparse distribution of continuous GPS stations that comprise the NSF EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory network. The campaign network originally established by the National Geodetic survey in the mid-1990's, has been reoccupied two or more times over the past five years with support from the Arizona Geological Survey. The data from the continuous GPS stations are analyzed independently with the GIPSY and GAMIT software. The new horizontal velocity data set provides an improved image of deformation in the transition zone between the Colorado Plateau and the Northern and Southern Basin and Ranges Provinces. Preliminary modeling of the crustal kinematics reveals that only a very limited part of the region can be modeled as a rigid-body rotation. Most of the area is part of a broad zone of diffuse east-west directed extension from the Rio Grande Rift in the East to the Mojave Desert in the west. Only near the transition from the northern Colorado Plateau to the northern Basin and Range Province is the extension more localized. Besides a discussion of the regional kinematics, we will also discuss the affect the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake had on the geodetic data in the southern Basin and Range.

  15. Investigation of upper crustal structure beneath eastern Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha, Agustya Adi; Widiyantoro, Sri; Cummnins, Phil; Saygin, Erdinc; Masturyono

    2016-05-01

    The complexity of geology structure in eastern Java causes this region has many potential resources as much as the disasters. Therefore, the East Java province represents an interesting area to be explored, especially regarding its upper crustal structure. To investigate this structure, we employ the Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT) method. We have used seismic waveform data from 25 Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG) stationary seismographic stations and 26 portable seismographs installed for 2 to 8 weeks. Inter-station cross-correlation produces more than 800 Rayleigh wave components, which depict the structure beneath eastern Java. Based on the checkerboard resolution test, we found that the optimal grid size is 0.25ox0.25o. Our inversion results for the periods of 1 to 10 s indicate a good agreement with geological and Bouguer anomaly maps. Rembang high depression, most of the southern mountains zone, the northern part of Rembang zone and the central part of the Madura Island, the area of high gravity anomaly and areas dominated with igneous rocks are associated with high velocity zones. On the other hand, Kendeng zone and most of the basin in the Rembang zone are associated with low velocity zones.

  16. Decrease in oceanic crustal thickness since the breakup of Pangaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Avendonk, Harm J. A.; Davis, Joshua K.; Harding, Jennifer L.; Lawver, Lawrence A.

    2017-01-01

    Earth's mantle has cooled by 6-11 °C every 100 million years since the Archaean, 2.5 billion years ago. In more recent times, the surface heat loss that led to this temperature drop may have been enhanced by plate-tectonic processes, such as continental breakup, the continuous creation of oceanic lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges and subduction at deep-sea trenches. Here we use a compilation of marine seismic refraction data from ocean basins globally to analyse changes in the thickness of oceanic crust over time. We find that oceanic crust formed in the mid-Jurassic, about 170 million years ago, is 1.7 km thicker on average than crust produced along the present-day mid-ocean ridge system. If a higher mantle temperature is the cause of thicker Jurassic ocean crust, the upper mantle may have cooled by 15-20 °C per 100 million years over this time period. The difference between this and the long-term mantle cooling rate indeed suggests that modern plate tectonics coincide with greater mantle heat loss. We also find that the increase of ocean crustal thickness with plate age is stronger in the Indian and Atlantic oceans compared with the Pacific Ocean. This observation supports the idea that upper mantle temperature in the Jurassic was higher in the wake of the fragmented supercontinent Pangaea due to the effect of continental insulation.

  17. Maps of North American crustal stability and geothermal potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairbridge, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    A three-year program of analysis of crustal movements in North America was planned with the objective of preparing a series of 1 = 5 million scale maps depicting relative stability/instability. The part of the proposal completed during the first year is described; much of this first year's work was preparatory. Three time scales were considered for the data analysis: 1 - 10/sup 2/ yr., 10/sup 4/ yr., and 10/sup 8/ yr. Significant differences in sign and rate were suspected between short and long-term motions and these are now confirmed. The first part of the program is now complete. It consisted of two principal activities: (a) data collection for the short and mid-term scales on a U.S.-wide basis, excluding Alaska and Hawaii (all of this material has been reduced to compatible computer language and is stored on tape ready for further study, analysis and final cartography); (b) map and data analysis of the long-term scale with a completed draft map, applied specifically to the Mid-West and eastern U.S.

  18. Bulk fields from the boundary OPE

    CERN Document Server

    Guica, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has established an equality between the geodesic integral of a free bulk field in AdS and the contribution of the conformal descendants of its dual CFT primary operator to the OPE of two other operators inserted at the endpoints of the geodesic. Working in the context of AdS$_3$/CFT$_2$, we extend this relation to include all $1/N$ corrections to the bulk field obtained by dressing it with i) a $U(1)$ current and ii) the CFT stress tensor, and argue it equals the contribution of the Ka\\v{c}-Moody/the Virasoro block to the respective boundary OPE. This equality holds for a particular framing of the bulk field to the boundary that involves a split Wilson line.

  19. A Diphoton Resonance from Bulk RS

    CERN Document Server

    Csaki, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Recent LHC data hints at a 750 GeV mass resonance that decays into two photons. A significant feature of this resonance is that its decays to Higges and to any other Standard Model particles are so far too low to be detected. Such a state has a compelling explanation in terms of a scalar or a pseudoscalar that is strongly coupled to vector states charged under the Standard Model gauge groups. We argue that if the state is a scalar, some form of sequestering is likely to be necessary to naturally explain the suppressed scalar-Higgs interactions. Such a scenario is readily accommodated in bulk RS with a scalar localized in the bulk away from the Higgs. Turning this around, we argue that a good way to find the elusive bulk RS model might be the search for a resonance with prominent couplings to gauge bosons.

  20. Bulk Comptonization by Turbulence in Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, J

    2016-01-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent "wave" temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, ra...

  1. A diphoton resonance from bulk RS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csáki, Csaba; Randall, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Recent LHC data hinted at a 750 GeV mass resonance that decays into two photons. A significant feature of this resonance is that its decays to any other Standard Model particles would be too low to be detected so far. Such a state has a compelling explanation in terms of a scalar or a pseudoscalar that is strongly coupled to vector states charged under the Standard Model gauge groups. Such a scenario is readily accommodated in bulk RS with a scalar localized in the bulk away from but close to the Higgs. Turning this around, we argue that a good way to find the elusive bulk RS model might be the search for a resonance with prominent couplings to gauge bosons.

  2. Orchestrating Bulk Data Movement in Grid Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazhkudai, SS

    2005-01-25

    Data Grids provide a convenient environment for researchers to manage and access massively distributed bulk data by addressing several system and transfer challenges inherent to these environments. This work addresses issues involved in the efficient selection and access of replicated data in Grid environments in the context of the Globus Toolkit{trademark}, building middleware that (1) selects datasets in highly replicated environments, enabling efficient scheduling of data transfer requests; (2) predicts transfer times of bulk wide-area data transfers using extensive statistical analysis; and (3) co-allocates bulk data transfer requests, enabling parallel downloads from mirrored sites. These efforts have demonstrated a decentralized data scheduling architecture, a set of forecasting tools that predict bandwidth availability within 15% error and co-allocation architecture, and heuristics that expedites data downloads by up to 2 times.

  3. Multiphase composites with extremal bulk modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibiansky, L. V.; Sigmund, Ole

    2000-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analytical and numerical study of isotropic elastic composites made of three or more isotropic phases. The ranges of their effective bulk and shear moduli are restricted by the Hashin-Shtrikman-Walpole (HSW) bounds. For two-phase composites, these bounds are attainable......, that is, there exist composites with extreme bulk and shear moduli. For multiphase composites, they may or may not be attainable depending on phase moduli and volume fractions. Sufficient conditions of attainability of the bounds and various previously known and new types of optimal composites...... are described. Most of our new results are related to the two-dimensional problem. A numerical topology optimization procedure that solves the inverse homogenization problem is adopted and used to look for two-dimensional three-phase composites with a maximal effective bulk modulus. For the combination...

  4. A stereoscopic look into the bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Mosk, Benjamin; Sully, James

    2016-07-01

    We present the foundation for a holographic dictionary with depth perception. The dictionary consists of natural CFT operators whose duals are simple, diffeomorphisminvariant bulk operators. The CFT operators of interest are the "OPE blocks," contributions to the OPE from a single conformal family. In holographic theories, we show that the OPE blocks are dual at leading order in 1 /N to integrals of effective bulk fields along geodesics or homogeneous minimal surfaces in anti-de Sitter space. One widely studied example of an OPE block is the modular Hamiltonian, which is dual to the fluctuation in the area of a minimal surface. Thus, our operators pave the way for generalizing the Ryu-Takayanagi relation to other bulk fields.

  5. Spherically symmetric brane spacetime with bulk gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sumanta; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2015-01-01

    Introducing term in the five-dimensional bulk action we derive effective Einstein's equation on the brane using Gauss-Codazzi equation. This effective equation is then solved for different conditions on dark radiation and dark pressure to obtain various spherically symmetric solutions. Some of these static spherically symmetric solutions correspond to black hole solutions, with parameters induced from the bulk. Specially, the dark pressure and dark radiation terms (electric part of Weyl curvature) affect the brane spherically symmetric solutions significantly. We have solved for one parameter group of conformal motions where the dark radiation and dark pressure terms are exactly obtained exploiting the corresponding Lie symmetry. Various thermodynamic features of these spherically symmetric space-times are studied, showing existence of second order phase transition. This phenomenon has its origin in the higher curvature term with gravity in the bulk.

  6. The role of length scales in bridging the gap between rock CPO and seismic signals of crustal anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaya, D.; Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.; Song, W. J.; Christensen, N. I.

    2012-04-01

    Recent studies based on laboratory petrophysics and in particular EBSD-based calculations indicate material rock anisotropy for crustal rocks can possess significant low orders of symmetry. These symmetries based on elastic tensor calculations can range from hexagonal and orthorhombic down to monoclinic and triclinic. On the other hand, interpretation of field seismic data yield crustal anisotropy of fast- or slow-axis transverse isotropy (hexagonal) symmetry at best; identification of orthorhombic symmetry is barely possible. Seismic results are often limited to simple orientations of the symmetry axes, such as vertical (radial anisotropy) or horizontal (azimuthal anisotropy). The physical scales of earth anisotropic fabrics and of seismic waves affect the types of information that may be extracted from seismic signals. A seismic wave has inherent limits to resolving capabilities, usually measured as some percentage of its wavelength, λ. This wave will accumulate anisotropic signal in two ways based on its path through anisotropic media of physical size, L: (1) When the wave is much smaller than the anisotropic material (λ > L), the wave will not see details of the material but will respond to just the bulk average of the material. In the first case, the wave will be sensitive to large scale earth changes such as limbs of an antiformal mountain range. The accumulating anisotropic seismic signal can get complicated (e.g., shear wave splits of splits). In the second case, the wave is too large to see any fine detail, and the material can be represented by an equivalent "effective media" that produces the same seismic response. Geometrical structure is a factor that helps bridge the scales of rock CPO to lower resolution seismic signals. Local rock CPO can fill or be mapped into a structure that is large enough for a seismic wave to respond to. We use tensor representation of anisotropic elasticity to formulate a way to separate structural effects from local rock

  7. Parametric second Stokes Raman laser output pulse shortening to 300 ps due to depletion of pumping of intracavity Raman conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetanin, S. N.; Jelínek, M.; Kubeček, V.; Jelínková, H.; Ivleva, L. I.

    2016-10-01

    A new effect of the pulse shortening of the parametrically generated radiation down to hundreds of picosecond via depletion of pumping of intracavity Raman conversion in the miniature passively Q-switched Nd: SrMoO4 parametric self-Raman laser with the increasing energy of the shortened pulse under pulsed pumping by a high-power laser diode bar is demonstrated. The theoretical estimation of the depletion stage duration of the convertible fundamental laser radiation via intracavity Raman conversion is in agreement with the experimentally demonstrated duration of the parametrically generated pulse. Using the mathematical modeling of the pulse shortening quality and quantity deterioration is disclosed, and the solution ways are found by the optimization of the laser parameters.

  8. Astrocytes phagocytose focal dystrophies from shortening myelin segments in the optic nerve of Xenopus laevis at metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Elizabeth A; Davis, Chung-ha O; Bushong, Eric A; Boassa, Daniela; Kim, Keun-Young; Ellisman, Mark H; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2015-08-18

    Oligodendrocytes can adapt to increases in axon diameter through the addition of membrane wraps to myelin segments. Here, we report that myelin segments can also decrease their length in response to optic nerve (ON) shortening during Xenopus laevis metamorphic remodeling. EM-based analyses revealed that myelin segment shortening is accomplished by focal myelin-axon detachments and protrusions from otherwise intact myelin segments. Astrocyte processes remove these focal myelin dystrophies using known phagocytic machinery, including the opsonin milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (Mfge8) and the downstream effector ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). By the end of metamorphic nerve shortening, one-quarter of all myelin in the ON is enwrapped or internalized by astrocytes. As opposed to the removal of degenerating myelin by macrophages, which is usually associated with axonal pathologies, astrocytes selectively remove large amounts of myelin without damaging axons during this developmental remodeling event.

  9. A Domain Decomposition Approach to Implementing Fault Slip in Finite-Element Models of Quasi-static and Dynamic Crustal Deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Aagaard, Brad T; Williams, Charles A

    2013-01-01

    We employ a domain decomposition approach with Lagrange multipliers to implement fault slip in a finite-element code, PyLith, for use in both quasi-static and dynamic crustal deformation applications. This integrated approach to solving both quasi-static and dynamic simulations leverages common finite-element data structures and implementations of various boundary conditions, discretization schemes, and bulk and fault rheologies. We have developed a custom preconditioner for the Lagrange multiplier portion of the system of equations that provides excellent scalability with problem size compared to conventional additive Schwarz methods. We demonstrate application of this approach using benchmarks for both quasi-static viscoelastic deformation and dynamic spontaneous rupture propagation that verify the numerical implementation in PyLith.

  10. Making bulk-conductive glass microchannel plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jay J. L.; Niu, Lihong

    2008-02-01

    The fabrication of microchannel plate (MCP) with bulk-conductive characteristics has been studied. Semiconducting clad glass and leachable core glass were used for drawing fibers and making MCP. Co-axial single fiber was drawn from a platinum double-crucible in an automatic fiberizing system, and the fibers were stacked and redrawn into multifiber by a special gripping mechanism. The multifibers were stacked again and the boule was made and sliced into discs. New MCPs were made after chemically leaching process without the traditional hydrogen firing. It was shown that bulk-conductive glass MCP can operate at higher voltage with lower noise.

  11. Synthesis of Bulk Superconducting Magnesium Diboride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margie Olbinado

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Bulk polycrystalline superconducting magnesium diboride, MgB2, samples were successfully prepared via a one-step sintering program at 750°C, in pre Argon with a pressure of 1atm. Both electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirmed the superconductivity of the material at 39K, with a transition width of 5K. The polycrystalline nature, granular morphology, and composition of the sintered bulk material were confirmed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX.

  12. Towards a Reconstruction of General Bulk Metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhardt, Netta

    2016-01-01

    We prove that the metric of a general holographic spacetime can be reconstructed (up to an overall conformal factor) from distinguished spatial slices - "light-cone cuts" - of the conformal boundary. Our prescription is covariant and applies to bulk points in causal contact with the boundary. Furthermore, we describe a procedure for determining the light-cone cuts corresponding to bulk points in the causal wedge of the boundary in terms of the divergences of correlators in the dual field theory. Possible extensions for determining the conformal factor and including the cuts of points outside of the causal wedge are discussed. We also comment on implications for subregion/subregion duality.

  13. Crustal architecture across Phanerozoic Australia along the Eromanga-Brisbane Geoscience Transect: evolution and analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, D. M.

    1993-03-01

    The crustal architecture across Phanerozoic Australia has been established from seismic data along an 1100-km-long east-west transect, the Eromanga-Brisbane Geoscience Transect. This has enabled a better understanding of deep structures and processes that have controlled the development of major sedimentary basin systems. It has shown that crustal dynamics throughout geological history have played an important role in the development of these sedimentary basins and that structures developed during the early Palaeozoic have influenced, and continue to influence, basin systems. The transect crosses three major basement provinces of the Tasman Orogenic System in eastern Australia - the Thomson, northern Lachlan, and New England Orogens. The basement geology in the transect region has, until now, been only poorly understood because it is largely obscured by the Mesozoic cover rocks of the Eromanga, Surat and Clarence-Moreton Basins. The transect interpretation has firmly identified crustal-scale ramp structures, multiple intra-crustal detachment surfaces, strike-slip fault architecture, lower-crustal magmatism/underplating, Mono remobilisation, and intra-crustal terranes in the geological reconstructions of southern Queensland. The boundaries between the orogens, the Foyleview and Burunga—Mooki Geosutures, have been identified as lithospheric-scale structures that have influenced the evolution of the Tasman Orogenic System as a whole.

  14. Near-axis crustal structure and thickness of the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Dax; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Weekly, Robert T.

    2016-06-01

    A model of crustal thickness and lower crustal velocities is obtained for crustal ages of 0.1-1.2 Ma on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge by inverting travel times of crustal paths and non-ridge-crossing wide-angle Moho reflections obtained from a three-dimensional tomographic experiment. The crust is thicker by 0.5-1 km beneath a 200 m high plateau that extends across the segment center. This feature is consistent with the influence of the proposed Heckle melt anomaly on the spreading center. The history of ridge propagation on the Cobb overlapping spreading center may also have influenced the formation of the plateau. The sharp boundaries of the plateau and crustal thickness anomaly suggest that melt transport is predominantly upward in the crust. Lower crustal velocities are lower at the ends of the segment, likely due to increased hydrothermal alteration in regions influenced by overlapping spreading centers, and possibly increased magmatic differentiation.

  15. Neogene and active shortening offshore the reactivated Levant margin in Lebanon: results of the SHALIMAR cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briais, A.; Singh, S. C.; Tapponnier, P.; Elias, A.; Sursock, A.; Jomaa, R.; Carton, H.; Daeron, M.; King, G.; Jacques, E.

    2004-12-01

    The objectives of the SHALIMAR cruise were to study recent deformation of the Mediterranean seafloor west of Mt Lebanon. We collected multibeam bathymetry and back-scatter images, reflection seismic profiles - surface and deep-towed, 3.5 kHz echo-sounder data, gravity and magnetic data over an 80 km-wide zone offshore the entire Lebanese coast. The bathymetry reveals a very steep slope between Beyrouth and Batroun, with a water depth of 1500 m only 5 km offshore. Between Saida and Tripoli (33.5N to 34.5N), both the bathymetry and seismic lines show a series of ramp anticlines affecting Plio-Quaternary deposits and a seismically transparent layer with variable thickness corresponding to the Messinian evaporites (5.6 Ma). This fold-and-thrust belt is the offshore expression of shortening related to the formation of Mt Lebanon. It is limited westwards by a prominent fold front 30 km from shore. Some ramps appear to be submarine continuations of faults documented ashore (e.g., Aabde and Tripoli thrusts). The strikes of fold axes are consistent with WNW-ESE shortening and slip-partitioning along the 30° Lebanese bend of the Levant fault. North of Tripoli and south of Saida, the continental margin displays a wider shelf (20 km) and gentler slope. In the south, at 1200-1500 m depth small, closely spaced, NE-trending scarps attest to young, distributed dip-slip faulting, although deformation is much less than north of Beyrouth. At the southern extremity of our survey, NW-trending normal fault scarps roughly aligned with the Mt Carmel-Haifa fault vanish 50 km offshore in the Levant basin. Bouguer gravity anomalies, estimated by removing from free-air gravity data the effect of bathymetry, display a very steep gradient between Beyrouth and Tripoli, marking the passage from thickened Mt Lebanon crust to thin crust in the Levant basin. Gravity anomalies also outline large, NE-SW trending steps between the basin crust and thinned continental crust near and south of Beyrouth

  16. A case of Distributed Continental Collision: Late Cretaceous Intraplate Shortening from Central Europe to North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kley, J.; Voigt, T.; Jaehne, F.

    2008-12-01

    Intraplate thrusting and basin inversion affected west-central Europe in Late Cretaceous time. The timing of this event is fairly well constrained between c. 90 and 65 Ma. The dominantly NW-trending European intraplate structures were often interpreted to have been dextrally transpressive, reflecting a northward push induced by the early collision of the Adria microplate with Europe's southern margin. However, many fault kinematic and other structural data from central Europe indicate dip-slip contraction essentially perpendicular to the main faults, suggesting a push from the southwest. In addition, recent plate reconstructions of the Mediterranean around 85 Ma place Adria far to the southeast and roughly along strike of the central European intraplate structures. The early Alpine nappe stack on Adria's leading edge was still separated from Europe by subducting oceanic lithosphere and had entered a phase of extension after the first orogenic event. All this makes Alpine collision an unlikely cause for intraplate thrusting in Europe. Rather, the timing, kinematics and location of structures suggest that intraplate shortening in Europe was a direct effect of convergence with the Iberian and African plates, with stresses transmitted across the Azores-Gibraltar fracture zone. This hypothesis is supported by structures of Late Cretaceous age indicating SW-NE to S-N shortening in France, Spain (particularly the onset of convergence in the Pyrenees) and northwestern Africa. In contrast to other examples such as the Laramides, intraplate thrusting in this case was not a foreland phenomenon related to a coeval orogen. It does not reflect a transition from subduction to continental collision, but the beginning of convergence across two former transform boundaries. This system which included no strongly thickened and weakened crust was mostly governed by far-field stresses and therefore responded rapidly to plate reorganizations. Specifically, the onset of thrusting

  17. THE OPTIMIZATION OF PLUSH YARNS BULKING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VINEREANU Adam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experiments that were conducted on the installation of continuous bulking and thermofixing “SUPERBA” type TVP-2S for optimization of the plush yarns bulking process. There were considered plush yarns Nm 6.5/2, made of the fibrous blend of 50% indigenous wool sort 41 and 50% PES. In the first stage, it performs a thermal treatment with a turboprevaporizer at a temperature lower than thermofixing temperature, at atmospheric pressure, such that the plush yarns - deposed in a freely state on a belt conveyor - are uniformly bulking and contracting. It was followed the mathematical modeling procedure, working with a factorial program, rotatable central composite type, and two independent variables. After analyzing the parameters that have a direct influence on the bulking degree, there were selected the pre-vaporization temperature (coded x1,oC and the velocity of belt inside pre-vaporizer (coded x 2, m/min. As for the dependent variable, it was chosen the plush yarn diameter (coded y, mm. There were found the coordinates of the optimal point, and then this pair of values was verified in practice. These coordinates are: x1optim= 90oC and x 2optim= 6.5 m/min. The conclusion is that the goal was accomplished: it was obtained a good cover degree f or double-plush carpets by reducing the number of tufts per unit surface.

  18. The Bulk Multicore Architecture for Improved Programmability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    dependences bundled together. In the Bulk Multi- core, the log must store only the total order of chunk commits, an approach we call DeLorean .13 The...ACM Press, New York, 2007, 69–80. 13. Montesinos, P., Ceze, L., and Torrellas, J. DeLorean : Recording and deterministically replaying shared

  19. Failure by fracture in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, C.M.A.; Alves, Luis M.; Nielsen, Chris Valentin

    2015-01-01

    This paper revisits formability in bulk metal forming in the light of fundamental concepts of plasticity,ductile damage and crack opening modes. It proposes a new test to appraise the accuracy, reliability and validity of fracture loci associated with crack opening by tension and out-of-plane she...

  20. Bulk viscosity effects on ultrasonic thermoacoustic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jeffrey; Scalo, Carlo; Hesselink, Lambertus

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out unstructured fully-compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of a minimal-unit traveling-wave ultrasonic thermoacoustic device in looped configuration. The model comprises a thermoacoustic stack with 85% porosity and a tapered area change to suppress the fundamental standing-wave mode. A bulk viscosity model, which accounts for vibrational and rotational molecular relaxation effects, is derived and implemented via direct modification of the viscous stress tensor, τij ≡ 2 μSij +λ/2 μ ∂uk/∂xk δij , where the bulk viscosity is defined by μb ≡ λ +2/3 μ . The effective bulk viscosity coefficient accurately captures acoustic absorption from low to high ultrasonic frequencies and matches experimental wave attenuation rates across five decades. Using pressure-based similitude, the model was downscaled from total length L = 2 . 58 m to 0 . 0258 m, corresponding to the frequency range f = 242 - 24200 Hz, revealing the effects of bulk viscosity and direct modification of the thermodynamic pressure. Simulations are carried out to limit cycle and exhibit growth rates consistent with linear stability analyses, based on Rott's theory.

  1. Forming of bulk metallic glass microcomponents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wert, John A.; Thomsen, Christian; Jensen, Rune Debel

    2009-01-01

    The present article considers forward extrusion, closed-die forging and backward extrusion processes for fabrication of individual microcomponents from two bulk metallic glass (BMG) compositions: Mg60Cu30Y10 and Zr44Cu40Ag8Al8. Two types of tooling were used in the present work: relatively massive...

  2. Polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, RAJ; Hummelen, JC; Saricifti, NS

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured phase-separated blends, or bulk heterojunctions, of conjugated Polymers and fullerene derivatives form a very attractive approach to large-area, solid-state organic solar cells.The key feature of these cells is that they combine easy, processing from solution on a variety of substrate

  3. Fluctuating brane in a dilatonic bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, P; Rodríguez-Martinez, M; Brax, Philippe; Langlois, David; Rodriguez-Martinez, Maria

    2003-01-01

    We consider a cosmological brane moving in a static five-dimensional bulk spacetime endowed with a scalar field whose potential is exponential. After studying various cosmological behaviours for the homogeneous background, we investigate the fluctuations of the brane that leave spacetime unaffected. A single mode embodies these fluctuations and obeys a wave equation which we study for bouncing and ever-expanding branes.

  4. Longitudinal bulk a coustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja;

    2009-01-01

    Design, fabrication and characterization, in terms of mass sensitivity, is presented for a polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever. The device is operated in air at 51 MHz, resulting in a mass sensitivity of 100 HZ/fg (1 fg = 10{su−15 g). The initial characterization...

  5. A Stereoscopic Look into the Bulk

    CERN Document Server

    Czech, Bartlomiej; McCandlish, Samuel; Mosk, Benjamin; Sully, James

    2016-01-01

    We present the foundation for a holographic dictionary with depth perception. The dictionary consists of natural CFT operators whose duals are simple, diffeomorphism-invariant bulk operators. The CFT operators of interest are the "OPE blocks," contributions to the OPE from a single conformal family. In holographic theories, we show that the OPE blocks are dual at leading order in 1/N to integrals of effective bulk fields along geodesics or homogeneous minimal surfaces in anti-de Sitter space. One widely studied example of an OPE block is the modular Hamiltonian, which is dual to the fluctuation in the area of a minimal surface. Thus, our operators pave the way for generalizing the Ryu-Takayanagi relation to other bulk fields. Although the OPE blocks are non-local operators in the CFT, they admit a simple geometric description as fields in kinematic space--the space of pairs of CFT points. We develop the tools for constructing local bulk operators in terms of these non-local objects. The OPE blocks also allow ...

  6. Force generation examined by laser temperature-jumps in shortening and lengthening mammalian (rabbit psoas) muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranatunga, K W; Coupland, M E; Pinniger, G J; Roots, H; Offer, G W

    2007-11-15

    We examined the tension change induced by a rapid temperature jump (T-jump) in shortening and lengthening active muscle fibres. Experiments were done on segments of permeabilized single fibres (length (L0) approximately 2 mm, sarcomere length 2.5 microm) from rabbit psoas muscle; [MgATP] was 4.6 mm, pH 7.1, ionic strength 200 mm and temperature approximately 9 degrees C. A fibre was maximally Ca2+-activated in the isometric state and a approximately 3 degrees C, rapid (shortening or ramp lengthening at a limited range of velocities (0-0.2 L0 s(-1)). The tension increased to 2- to 3 x P0 (isometric force) during ramp lengthening at velocities > 0.05 L0 s(-1), whereas the tension decreased to about shortening at 0.1-0.2 L0 s(-1); the unloaded shortening velocity was approximately 1 L0 s(-1) and the curvature of the force-shortening velocity relation was high (a/P0 ratio from Hill's equation of approximately 0.05). In isometric state, a T-jump induced a tension rise of 15-20% to a new steady state; by curve fitting, the tension rise could be resolved into a fast (phase 2b, 40-50 s(-1)) and a slow (phase 3, 5-10 s(-1)) exponential component (as previously reported). During steady lengthening, a T-jump induced a small instantaneous drop in tension, followed by recovery, so that the final tension recorded with and without a T-jump was not significantly different; thus, a T-jump did not lead to a net increase of tension. During steady shortening, the T-jump induced a pronounced tension rise and both its amplitude and the rate (from a single exponential fit) increased with shortening velocity; at 0.1-0.2 L0 s(-1), the extent of fibre shortening during the T-jump tension rise was estimated to be approximately 1.2% L(0) and it was shorter at lower velocities. At a given shortening velocity and over the temperature range of 8-30 degrees C, the rate of T-jump tension rise increased with warming (Q10 approximately 2.7), similar to phase 2b (endothermic force generation) in

  7. Lower crustal relaxation beneath the Tibetan Plateau and Qaidam Basin following the 2001 Kokoxili earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, I.; Burgmann, R.; Pollitz, F.

    2011-01-01

    In 2001 November a magnitude 7.8 earthquake ruptured a 400 km long portion of the Kunlun fault, northeastern Tibet. In this study, we analyse over five years of post-seismic geodetic data and interpret the observed surface deformation in terms of stress relaxation in the thick Tibetan lower crust. We model GPS time-series (first year) and InSAR line of sight measurements (years two to five) and infer that the most likely mechanism of post-seismic stress relaxation is time-dependent distributed creep of viscoelastic material in the lower crust. Since a single relaxation time is not sufficient to model the observed deformation, viscous flow is modelled by a lower crustal Burgers rheology, which has two material relaxation times. The optimum model has a transient viscosity 9 ?? 1017 Pa s, steady-state viscosity 1 ?? 1019 Pa s and a ratio of long term to Maxwell shear modulus of 2:3. This model gives a good fit to GPS stations south of the Kunlun Fault, while displacements at stations north of the fault are over-predicted. We attribute this asymmetry in the GPS residual to lateral heterogeneity in rheological structure across the southern margin of the Qaidam Basin, with thinner crust/higher viscosities beneath the basin than beneath the Tibetan Plateau. Deep afterslip localized in a shear zone beneath the fault rupture gives a reasonable match to the observed InSAR data, but the slip model does not fit the earlier GPS data well. We conclude that while some localized afterslip likely occurred during the early post-seismic phase, the bulk of the observed deformation signal is due to viscous flow in the lower crust. To investigate regional variability in rheological structure, we also analyse post-seismic displacements following the 1997 Manyi earthquake that occurred 250 km west of the Kokoxili rupture. We find that viscoelastic properties are the same as for the Kokoxili area except for the transient viscosity, which is 5 ?? 1017 Pa s. The viscosities estimated for the

  8. A diversity compression and combining technique based on channel shortening for cooperative networks

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Syed Imtiaz

    2012-02-01

    The cooperative relaying process with multiple relays needs proper coordination among the communicating and the relaying nodes. This coordination and the required capabilities may not be available in some wireless systems where the nodes are equipped with very basic communication hardware. We consider a scenario where the source node transmits its signal to the destination through multiple relays in an uncoordinated fashion. The destination captures the multiple copies of the transmitted signal through a Rake receiver. We analyze a situation where the number of Rake fingers N is less than that of the relaying nodes L. In this case, the receiver can combine N strongest signals out of L. The remaining signals will be lost and act as interference to the desired signal components. To tackle this problem, we develop a novel signal combining technique based on channel shortening principles. This technique proposes a processing block before the Rake reception which compresses the energy of L signal components over N branches while keeping the noise level at its minimum. The proposed scheme saves the system resources and makes the received signal compatible to the available hardware. Simulation results show that it outperforms the selection combining scheme. © 2012 IEEE.

  9. The implementation of an Intensive Care Information System allows shortening the ICU length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Eric; Hoti, Emir; Azoulay, Daniel; Ichai, Philippe; Samuel, Didier; Saliba, Faouzi

    2015-04-01

    Intensive care information systems (ICIS) implemented in intensive care unit (ICU) were shown to improve patient safety, reduce medical errors and increase the time devolved by medical/nursing staff to patients care. Data on the real impact of ICIS on patient outcome are scarce. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of ICIS on the outcome of critically-ill patients. From January 2004 to August 2006, 1,397 patients admitted to our ICU were enrolled in this observational study. This period was divided in two phases: before the implementation of ICIS (BEFORE) and after implementation of ICIS (AFTER). We compared standard ICU patient's outcomes: mortality, length of stay in ICU, hospital stay, and the re-admission rate depending upon BEFORE and AFTER. Although patients admitted AFTER were more severely ill than those of BEFORE (SAPS II: 32.1±17.5 vs. 30.5±18.5, p=0.014, respectively), their ICU length of stay was significantly shorter (8.4±15.2 vs. 6.8±12.9 days; p=0.048) while the re-admission rate and mortality rate were similar (4.4 vs. 4.2%; p=0.86, and 9.6 vs 11.2% p=0.35, respectively) in patients admitted AFTER. We observed that the implementation of ICIS allowed shortening of ICU length of stay without altering other patient outcomes.

  10. Shortened cortical silent period in adductor spasmodic dysphonia: evidence for widespread cortical excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samargia, Sharyl; Schmidt, Rebekah; Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson

    2014-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to compare cortical inhibition in the hand region of the primary motor cortex between subjects with focal hand dystonia (FHD), adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), and healthy controls. Data from 28 subjects were analyzed (FHD n=11, 53.25 ± 8.74 y; AdSD: n=8, 56.38 ± 7.5 y; and healthy controls: n=941.67 ± 10.85 y). All subjects received single pulse TMS to the left motor cortex to measure cortical silent period (CSP) in the right first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle. Duration of the CSP was measured and compared across groups. A one-way ANCOVA with age as a covariate revealed a significant group effect (p<0.001). Post hoc analysis revealed significantly longer CSP duration in the healthy group vs. AdSD group (p<0.001) and FHD group (p<0.001). These results suggest impaired intracortical inhibition is a neurophysiologic characteristic of FHD and AdSD. In addition, the shortened CSP in AdSD provides evidence to support a widespread decrease in cortical inhibition in areas of the motor cortex that represent an asymptomatic region of the body. These findings may inform future investigations of differential diagnosis as well as alternative treatments for focal dystonias.

  11. Pinealectomy shortens resynchronisation times of house sparrow ( Passer domesticus) circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Gwinner, Eberhard

    2005-09-01

    In many birds periodic melatonin secretion by the pineal organ is essential for the high-amplitude self-sustained output of the circadian pacemaker, and thus for the persistence of rhythmicity in 24 h oscillations controlled by it. The elimination of the pineal melatonin rhythm, or a reduction of its amplitude, renders the circadian pacemaker a less self-sustained, often highly damped, oscillatory system. A reduction in the degree of self-sustainment of a rhythm should not only increase its range of entrainment but also shorten the resynchronization times following phase-shifts of the zeitgeber. This hypothesis has not yet been directly tested. We therefore carried out the present study in which house sparrows (Passer domesticus) were subjected to both 6-h advance and 6-h delay phase-shifts of the light-dark cycle before and after the pinealectomy, and the rhythms in locomotion and feeding were recorded. The results indicate that following the delay, but not the advance, phase shift, resynchronization times were significantly shorter after pinealectomy. The dependence of resynchronization times on the presence or absence of the pineal organ is not only of theoretical interest but might also be of functional significance in the natural life of birds. A reduction or elimination of the amplitude of the melatonin secretion rhythm by the pineal organ might be responsible for faster adjustment to changes in zeitgeber conditions in nature.

  12. Relationships between muscle power output using the stretch-shortening cycle and eccentric maximum strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaguchi, Kazuyoshi; Demura, Shinichi

    2008-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationships between muscle power output using the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) and eccentric maximum strength under elbow flexion. Eighteen young adult males pulled up a constant light load (2 kg) by ballistic elbow flexion under the following two preliminary conditions: 1) the static relaxed muscle state (SR condition), and 2) using the SSC with countermovement (SSC condition).Muscle power was determined from the product of the pulling velocity and the load mass by a power measurement instrument that adopted the weight-loading method. We assumed the pulling velocity to be the subject's muscle power parameters as a matter of convenience, because we used a constant load. The following two parameters were selected in reference to a previous study: 1) peak velocity (m x s(-1)) (peak power) and 2) 0.1-second velocity during concentric contraction (m x s(-1)) (initial power). Eccentric maximum strength by elbow flexion was measured by a handheld dynamometer.Initial power produced in the SSC condition was significantly larger than that in the SR condition. Eccentric maximum strength showed a significant and high correlation (r = 0.70) with peak power in the SSC condition but not in the SR condition. Eccentric maximum strength showed insignificant correlations with initial power in both conditions. In conclusion, it was suggested that eccentric maximum strength is associated with peak power in the SSC condition, but the contribution of the eccentric maximum strength to the SSC potentiation (initial power) may be low.

  13. NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE THEORY OF CROSS-BRIDGE TENSION OF STEADILY SHORTENING AND STRETCHING MUSCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOKSHENEV V.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great success, seminal Huxley's sliding filament model broadly fails to explain the steady state behavior of stretched activated skeletal muscles. Here, a new self-consistent solution to the fundamental kinetic equation for the distribution of actin-myosin linkages (cross-bridges is proposed in light of the generalized thermodynamic theory of fluctuations, thus substituting the transition state theory traditionally used for the transition rates. The unified description for mechanism of the force output in both shortening and stretching regimes is attributed to the interplay between the uniformly-state distributed, thermodynamically equilibrated myosin heads attached to actin filaments and asymmetrically-state distributed, mechanically equilibrated rotating myosin heads. The crossover between two steady regimes is associated with a reconstruction of the cross-bridge domains and change their attach-detach rates, leaving unchanged basic mechanical characteristics. Theory suggests a unified generic force-velocity equation, using only a single combination of the cross-bridge parameters for each regime, while Huxley's approach (1957 as well as its subsequent modifications, requires four adjustable parameters to fit the same data.

  14. Response of tibialis anterior tendon to a chronic exposure of stretch-shortening cycles: age effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker Brent B

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of aging on tendon response to repetitive exposures of stretch-shortening cycles (SSC's. Methods The left hind limb from young (3 mo, N = 4 and old (30 mo, N = 9 male Fisher 344 × Brown Norway rats were exposed to 80 maximal SSCs (60 deg/s, 50 deg range of motion 3x/week for 4.5 weeks in vivo. After the last exposure, tendons from the tibialis anterior muscle were isolated, stored at -80°C, and then tested using a micro-mechanical testing machine. Deformation of each tendon was evaluated using both relative grip-to-grip displacements and reference marks via a video system. Results At failure, the young control tendons had higher strain magnitude than the young exposed (p Conclusion The chronic protocol enhanced the elastic stiffness of young tendon and the loads in both the young and old tendons. The old exposed tendons were found to exhibit higher load capacity than their younger counterparts, which differed from our initial hypothesis.

  15. Shortening distance of forward and reverse primers for nucleic acid isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitao, Qu; Wenchao, Zhang; Xiaohui, Zhang; Xiujun, Wang; Sulong, Li

    2014-06-01

    Existent nucleic acid isothermal detection techniques for clinical diseases are difficult to promote greatly due to limitations in such aspects as methodology, costs of detection, amplification efficiency and conditions for operation. There is therefore an urgent need for a new isothermal amplification method with the characteristics of high accuracy, easy operation, short time of detection and low costs. We have devised a new method of nucleic acid isothermal amplification using Bst DNA polymerase under isothermal conditions (60-65°C). We call this method of amplification by shortening the distance between forward and reverse primers for nucleic acid isothermal amplification SDAMP. The results demonstrated that this technique is highly sensitive, specific and has short reaction times (40-60 min). Results of sequencing show that the products of SDAMP amplification are mainly polymers formed by series connection of monomers formed through linkage of forward primer and complementary sequences in reverse primer via a few bases. The method is different from current methods of nucleic acid amplification. Our study shows, however, that it is a specific method of nucleic acid isothermal amplification depending on interactions between primers and DNA template.

  16. Urban environment shortens telomere length in nestling great tits, Parus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmón, P; Nilsson, J F; Nord, A; Bensch, S; Isaksson, C

    2016-06-01

    Urban environments are expanding rapidly, and with urbanization come both challenges and opportunities for wildlife. Challenges include combating the anthropogenic disturbances such as light, noise and air pollution and lower availability of natural food sources. The benefits are many, including the availability of anthropogenic food sources, breeding boxes and warmer temperatures. Thus, depending on the context, urbanization can have both positive and negative effects on fitness related traits. It is well known that early-life conditions can have lifelong implications on fitness; little is however known about development in urban environments. We reciprocally cross-fostered urban and rural nestling great tits (Parus major L.) to study how growing up in an urban versus rural habitat affected telomere length (TL)-a suggested biomarker of longevity. We show, for the first time, that growing up in an urban environment significantly shortens TL, independently of natal origin (i.e. urban or rural). This implies that the urban environment imposes a challenge to developing birds, with potentially irreversible effects on lifespan.

  17. Active shortening within the Himalayan orogenic wedge implied by the 2015 Gorkha earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Kelin X.; Shirzaei, Manoochehr; Hodges, Kip V.; Ramon Arrowsmith, J.

    2016-09-01

    Models of Himalayan neotectonics generally attribute active mountain building to slip on the Himalayan Sole Thrust, also termed the Main Himalayan Thrust, which accommodates underthrusting of the Indian Plate beneath Tibet. However, the geometry of the Himalayan Sole Thrust and thus how slip along it causes uplift of the High Himalaya are unclear. We show that the geodetic record of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake sequence significantly clarifies the architecture of the Himalayan Sole Thrust and suggests the need for revision of the canonical view of how the Himalaya grow. Inversion of Gorkha surface deformation reveals that the Himalayan Sole Thrust extends as a planar gently dipping fault surface at least 20-30 km north of the topographic front of the High Himalaya. This geometry implies that building of the high range cannot be attributed solely to slip along the Himalayan Sole Thrust over a steep ramp; instead, shortening within the Himalayan wedge is required to support the topography and maintain rapid rock uplift. Indeed, the earthquake sequence may have included a moderate rupture (Mw 6.9) on an out-of-sequence thrust fault at the foot of the High Himalaya. Such internal deformation is an expected response to sustained, focused rapid erosion, and may be common to most compressional orogens.

  18. Line end shortening and application of novel correction algorithms in e-beam direct write

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Martin; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Gutsch, Manuela; Hohle, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    For the manufacturing of semiconductor technologies following the ITRS roadmap, we will face the nodes well below 32nm half pitch in the next 2~3 years. Despite being able to achieve the required resolution, which is now possible with electron beam direct write variable shaped beam (EBDW VSB) equipment and resists, it becomes critical to precisely reproduce dense line space patterns onto a wafer. This exposed pattern must meet the targets from the layout in both dimensions (horizontally and vertically). For instance, the end of a line must be printed in its entire length to allow a later placed contact to be able to land on it. Up to now, the control of printed patterns such as line ends is achieved by a proximity effect correction (PEC) which is mostly based on a dose modulation. This investigation of the line end shortening (LES) includes multiple novel approaches, also containing an additional geometrical correction, to push the limits of the available data preparation algorithms and the measurement. The designed LES test patterns, which aim to characterize the status of LES in a quick and easy way, were exposed and measured at Fraunhofer Center Nanoelectronic Technologies (CNT) using its state of the art electron beam direct writer and CD-SEM. Simulation and exposure results with the novel LES correction algorithms applied to the test pattern and a large production like pattern in the range of our target CDs in dense line space features smaller than 40nm will be shown.

  19. Accelerated Telomere Shortening and Replicative Senescence in Human Fibroblasts Overexpressing Mutant and Wild Type Lamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shurong; Risques, Rosa Ana; Martin, George M.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.; Oshima, Junko

    2008-01-01

    LMNA mutations are responsible for a variety of genetic disorders, including muscular dystrophy, lipodystrophy, and certain progeroid syndromes, notably Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria. Although a number of clinical features of these disorders are suggestive of accelerated aging, it is not known whether cells derived from these patients exhibit cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated aging. We examined a series of isogenic skin fibroblast lines transfected with LMNA constructs bearing known pathogenic point mutations or deletion mutations found in progeroid syndromes. Fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A exhibited accelerated rates of loss of telomeres and shortened replicative lifespans, in addition to abnormal nuclear morphology. To our surprise, these abnormalities were also observed in lines overexpressing wild-type lamin A. Copy number variants are common in human populations; those involving LMNA, whether arising meiotically or mitotically, might lead to progeroid phenotypes. In an initial pilot study of 23 progeroid cases without detectible WRN or LMNA mutations, however, no cases of altered LMNA copy number were detected. Nevertheless, our findings raise a hypothesis that changes in lamina organization may cause accelerated telomere attrition, with different kinetics for overexpession of wild-type and mutant lamin A, which leads to rapid replicative senescence and progroid phenotypes. PMID:17870066

  20. Chronic circadian disturbance by a shortened light-dark cycle increases mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Noheon; Cheon, Solmi; Son, Gi Hoon; Cho, Sehyung; Kim, Kyungjin

    2012-06-01

    Chronic circadian disturbance, a condition of desynchronization between endogenous clock and environmental light-dark (LD) cycle, is known to cause adverse physiological changes including mortality. However, it is yet unclear whether these consequences result from disturbance of endogenous clock or condition of the LD cycle per se. To address this issue, we imposed 3 different periods of LD cycle (T) on wild type and functional clock-defective (Per1(-/-)Per2(-/-)) mice. We found that the disturbed rhythms of locomotor activity and body temperature resulted from interaction of endogenous clock and T cycle and the chronic state of the disturbance suppressed the endogenous circadian rhythm. Interestingly, the endogenous clock and the T cycles affected body weight and food intake independently, while their interaction affected the life span resulting increased mortality of wild type mice in a shortened T cycle. These results strongly indicate the presence of both separate and combined effects of the endogenous clock and T cycle on different physiological variables implying that shift work scheduling can be an important influence on health parameters.

  1. Property improvement of pulsed laser deposited boron carbide films by pulse shortening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csako, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Budai, J. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Szoerenyi, T. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: t.szorenyi@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2006-04-30

    Growth characteristics and surface morphology of boron carbide films fabricated by ablating a B{sub 4}C target in high vacuum with a traditional KrF excimer laser and a high brightness hybrid dye/excimer laser system emitting at the same wavelength while delivering 700 fs pulses are compared. The ultrashort pulse processing is highly effective. Energy densities between 0.25 and 2 J cm{sup -2} result in apparent growth rates ranging from 0.017 to 0.085 nm/pulse. Ablation with nanosecond pulses of one order of magnitude higher energy densities yields smaller growth rates, the figures increase from 0.002 to 0.016 nm/pulse within the 2-14.3 J cm{sup -2} fluence window. 2D thickness maps derived from variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry reveal that, when ablating with sub-ps pulses, the spot size rather than the energy density determines both the deposition rate and the angular distribution of film material. Pulse shortening leads to significant improvement in surface morphology, as well. While droplets with number densities ranging from 1 x 10{sup 4} to 7 x 10{sup 4} mm{sup -2} deteriorate the surface of the films deposited by the KrF excimer laser, sub-ps pulses produce practically droplet-free films. The absence of droplets has also a beneficial effect on the stoichiometry and homogeneity of the films fabricated by ultrashort pulses.

  2. Telomere shortening and cell senescence induced by perylene derivatives in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taka, Thanachai; Huang, Liming; Wongnoppavich, Ariyaphong; Tam-Chang, Suk-Wah; Lee, T Randall; Tuntiwechapikul, Wirote

    2013-02-15

    Cancer cells evade replicative senescence by re-expressing telomerase, which maintains telomere length and hence chromosomal integrity. Telomerase inhibition would lead cancer cells to senesce and therefore prevent cancer cells from growing indefinitely. G-quadruplex ligands can attenuate telomerase activity by inducing G-quadruplex formation at the 3'-overhang of telomere and at the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter; the former prevents telomerase from accessing the telomere, and the latter acts as a transcriptional silencer. The present investigation found that perylene derivatives PM2 and PIPER induced G-quadruplex formation from both telomeric DNA and the hTERT promoter region in vitro. Further, TRAP assay showed that these compounds inhibited telomerase in a dose-dependent manner. When A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with these compounds, hTERT expression was down-regulated. Moreover, the crude protein extract from these treated cells exhibited less telomerase activity. In the long-term treatment of A549 lung cancer cells with sub-cytotoxic dose of these perylenes, telomere shortening, reduction of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity, and cell senescence were observed. The results of this study indicate that perylene derivatives warrant further consideration as effective agents for cancer therapy.

  3. Genetic Heterogeneity of HER2 Amplification and Telomere Shortening in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Caria

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research is dedicated to understanding if sporadic and familial papillary thyroid carcinoma are distinct biological entities. We have previously demonstrated that familial papillary thyroid cancer (fPTC cells exhibit short relative telomere length (RTL in both blood and tissues and that these features may be associated with chromosome instability. Here, we investigated the frequency of HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 amplification, and other recently reported genetic alterations in sporadic PTC (sPTC and fPTC, and assessed correlations with RTL and BRAF mutational status. We analyzed HER2 gene amplification and the integrity of ALK, ETV6, RET, and BRAF genes by fluorescence in situ hybridization in isolated nuclei and paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed sections of 13 fPTC and 18 sPTC patients. We analyzed BRAFV600E mutation and RTL by qRT-PCR. Significant HER2 amplification (p = 0.0076, which was restricted to scattered groups of cells, was found in fPTC samples. HER2 amplification in fPTCs was invariably associated with BRAFV600E mutation. RTL was shorter in fPTCs than sPTCs (p < 0.001. No rearrangements of other tested genes were observed. These findings suggest that the association of HER2 amplification with BRAFV600E mutation and telomere shortening may represent a marker of tumor aggressiveness, and, in refractory thyroid cancer, may warrant exploration as a site for targeted therapy.

  4. Deciphering oblique shortening of central Alborz in Iran using geodetic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernant, Ph.; Nilforoushan, F.; Chéry, J.; Bayer, R.; Djamour, Y.; Masson, F.; Nankali, H.; Ritz, J.-F.; Sedighi, M.; Tavakoli, F.

    2004-06-01

    The Alborz is a narrow (100 km) and elevated (3000 m) mountain belt which accommodates the differential motion between the Sanandaj-Sirjan zone in central Iran and the South Caspian basin. GPS measurements of 12 geodetic sites in Central Alborz between 2000 and 2002 allow to constrain the motion of the belt with respect to western Eurasia. One site velocity on the Caspian shoreline suggests that the South Caspian basin moves northwest at a rate of 6±2 mm/year with respect to western Eurasia. North-South shortening across the Alborz occurs at 5±2 mm/year. To the South, deformation seems to extend beyond the piedmont area, probably due to active thrusting on the Pishva fault. We also observe a left-lateral shear of the overall belt at a rate of 4±2 mm/year, consistent with the geological motion observed along E-W active strike-slip faults inside the belt (e.g., the Mosha fault).

  5. Changes in the soleus muscle architecture after exhausting stretch-shortening cycle exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, M; Dousset, E; Avela, J; Kyröläinen, H; Kallio, J; Linnamo, V; Kuitunen, S; Nicol, C; Komi, P V

    2006-06-01

    This study focused on the architectural changes in the muscle-tendon complex during the immediate and secondary (delayed) reductions of performance (bimodal recovery) caused by an exhaustive rebound type stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise. The isometric plantar flexor torque during maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) was measured together with recording of electromyography (EMG) and ultrasonography from the soleus muscle before (BEF), after (AFT), 2 h (2H), 2 and 8 days (2D, 8D) after the SSC exercise (n=8). The performance variables (MVC torque and EMG activation) followed the bimodal recovery patterns. This was not the case in the changes of the fascicle length and muscle thickness. The relative torque changes in MVC correlated positively (R=0.78, P=0.02) to the corresponding averaged EMG changes between BEF and 2H (BEF-->2H); the significance disappeared in the comparison between 2H and 2D (2H-->2D), during which period MVC showed a secondary reduction. The relative torque changes in MVC showed no correlation with the changes in muscle thickness between BEF-2H. However, this correlation between 2H-2D was negative (R=-0.85, PMVC increased at 2H, and then decreased more at 2D than 2H (PMVC could be related to the increase in muscle volume.

  6. Inula Viscosa Extracts Induces Telomere Shortening and Apoptosis in Cancer Cells and Overcome Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merghoub, Nawal; El Btaouri, Hassan; Benbacer, Laila; Gmouh, Saïd; Trentesaux, Chantal; Brassart, Bertrand; Terryn, Christine; Attaleb, Mohammed; Madoulet, Claudie; Benjouad, Abdelaziz; Amzazi, Saaïd; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Morjani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase is activated in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive cervical cancer and targeting telomeres offers a novel anticancer therapeutic strategy. In this study, the telomere targeting properties, the cytotoxic as well as the pro-apoptotic effects of hexane (IV-HE) and dichloromethane (IV-DF) fractions from Inula viscosa L. extracts were investigated on human cervical HeLa and SiHa cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that IV-HE and IV-DF extracts were able to inhibit cell growth in HeLa and SiHa cells in a dose-dependent manner and studied resistant cell lines exhibited a resistance factor less than 2 when treated with the extracts. IV-HE and IV-DF extracts were able to inhibit telomerase activity and to induce telomere shortening as shown by telomeric repeat amplification protocol and TTAGGG telomere length assay, respectively. The sensitivity of fibroblasts to the extracts was increased when telomerase was expressed. Finally, IV-HE and IV-DF were able to induce apoptosis as evidenced by an increase in annexin-V labeling and caspase-3 activity. This study provides the first evidence that the IV-HE and IV-DF extracts from Inula viscosa L. target telomeres induce apoptosis and overcome drug resistance in tumor cells. Future studies will focus on the identification of the molecules involved in the anticancer activity.

  7. Palliative sedation in advanced cancer patients: Does it shorten survival time? - A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Barathi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with advanced cancer often suffer from multiple refractory symptoms in the terminal phase of their life. Palliative sedation is one of the few ways to relieve this refractory suffering. Objectives: This systematic review investigated the effect of palliative sedation on survival time in terminally ill cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Six electronic databases were searched for both prospective and retrospective studies which evaluated the effect of palliative sedation on survival time. Only those studies which had a comparison group that did not receive palliative sedation were selected for the review. Abstracts of all retrieved studies were screened to include the most relevant studies and only studies which met inclusion criteria were selected. References of all retrieved studies were also screened for relevant studies. Selected studies were assessed for quality and data extraction was done using the structured data extraction form. Results: Eleven studies including four prospective and seven retrospective studies were identified. Mean survival time (MST was measured as the time from last admission until death. A careful analysis of the results of all the 11 studies indicated that MST of sedated and non-sedated group was not statistically different in any of the studies. Conclusion: This systematic review supports the fact that palliative sedation does not shorten survival in terminally ill cancer patients. However, this conclusion needs to be taken with consideration of the methodology, study design, and the population studied of the included studies in this review.

  8. A signal combining technique based on channel shortening for cooperative sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Syed Imtiaz

    2010-06-01

    The cooperative relaying process needs proper coordination among the communicating and the relaying nodes. This coordination and the required capabilities may not be available in some wireless systems, e.g. wireless sensor networks where the nodes are equipped with very basic communication hardware. In this paper, we consider a scenario where the source node transmits its signal to the destination through multiple relays in an uncoordinated fashion. The destination can capture the multiple copies of the transmitted signal through a Rake receiver. We analyze a situation where the number of Rake fingers N is less than that of the relaying nodes L. In this case, the receiver can combine N strongest signals out of L. The remaining signals will be lost and act as interference to the desired signal components. To tackle this problem, we develop a novel signal combining technique based on channel shortening. This technique proposes a processing block before the Rake reception which compresses the energy of L signal components over N branches while keeping the noise level at its minimum. The proposed scheme saves the system resources and makes the received signal compatible to the available hardware. Simulation results show that it outperforms the selection combining scheme. ©2010 IEEE.

  9. Deep crustal reflection results from the central Eromanga Basin, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, S. P.

    1983-12-01

    From 1980 to 1982 deep seismic reflection profiles were recorded across the central Eromanga Basin in eastern Australia to study the regional structure, stratigraphy and geological history of the Eromanga Basin and infra-basins. The reflection data were recorded to 20 s to obtain additional information on the nature and structure of the crust below the sediments and their relationship to the development of the basins. The seismic sections show good quality reflections from the deep crust as well as from the sedimentary layers. Based on the character, strength, coherence, continuity and spatial distribution of the reflections, the sections can be divided into four zones. The tope zone between 0 and 2.5 s shows fairly uniform, coherent and continuous events which correlate with the Mesozoic and Late Palaeozoic sediments. The zone from 2.5 to 8 s (4 to 22 km) does not show any primary reflections and is interpreted as the highly-deformed metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of the Early Palaeozoic Thomson Orogen underlying the sediments. Without any recognisable reflection or diffraction patterns in this zone, it is difficult to say whether the faulting and folding observed in the sediments extend into the upper crustal basement. The deeper zone of numerous reflection segments between 8 and 12.5 s (22 to 36 km) is interpreted as thin laminae of alternating low and high velocity (intermediate and basic) rocks, and correlates with the lower crust bounded by refraction velocity discontinuities. The lowest zone of no reflections below 12.5 s corresponds with the upper mantle. The reflection character and thickness as well as the refraction velocity structure of the crust under the central Eromanga Basin area are significantly different from those of the Precambrian crust under the Georgina Basin to the northwest. It is proposed that the crust under the Eromanga Basin is extensionally attenuated crust which had been intruded by sills of basaltic melt from the underlying

  10. Shallow Crustal Thermal Structures of Central Taiwan Foothills Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Kai Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Crustal thermal structures are closely related to metamorphism, rock rheology, exhumation processes, hydrocarbon maturation levels, frictional faulting and other processes. Drilling is the most direct way to access the temperature fields in the shallow crust. However, a regional drilling program for geological investigation is usually very expensive. Recently, a large-scale in-situ investigation program in the Western Foothills of Central Taiwan was carried out, providing a rare opportunity to conduct heat flow measurements in this region where there are debates as to whether previous measured heat flows are representative of the thermal state in this region. We successfully collected 28 geothermal gradients from these wells and converted them into heat flows. The new heat flow dataset is consistent with previous heat flows, which shows that the thermal structures of Central Taiwan are different from that of other subduction accretionary prisms. We then combine all the available heat flow information to analyze the frictional parameters of the Chelungpu fault zone that ruptured during the 1999, Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake. The heat flow dataset gave consistent results compared with the frictional parameters derived from another independent study that used cores recovered from the Chelungpu fault zone at depth. This study also shows that it is suitable for using heat-flow data obtained from shallow subsurface to constrain thrusting faulting parameters, similar to what had been done for the strike-slip San Andreas Fault in California. Additional fieldworks are planned to study heat flows in other mountainous regions of Taiwan for more advanced geodynamic modeling efforts.

  11. Crustal Structure of Salton Trough using Deformable Layer Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F.

    2012-12-01

    Salton Trough is an important geologic structure to understand the active rift between Imperial Fault and San Andreas Fault. To determine the underground geometry of Salton Trough and its nearby faults, we analyzed seismic phase data recorded by Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC). Both 2-D and 3-D models have been made to refine the velocity model so as to determine the basin and moho geometry beneath Salton Trough region. Here three inline and five cross-line velocity profiles were built by using 2D Deformable Layer Tomography (DLT) method. From these 2D profiles, we can see that the velocity gradient is very small in the low velocity zone. The low velocity anomaly can be detected beneath the axis of the Salton Trough around the depth of 19-21 km, and the relatively high velocity can be seen beneath the San Andreas faults. Within 100*150*40 km3 model volume, 90,180 P-wave and S-wave first arrival picks from 27,663 local events (from 2001 to 2012), which were obtained from 44 stations, were used to build 3D seismic velocity model of the crust. During the iterations of velocity updating, full 3-D ray tracing is implemented. From these 3-D velocity models with different sizes of grids, low velocity anomalies are present under the southwest of Salton Sea, while high velocity zone is present across Southern San Andreas Fault throughout all the depths. Profiles from 2-D velocity models compared to 3-D velocity models show similar geometry. 3-D crustal structure, which is determined from 3-D DLT, helps to better understand the divergent boundary between the North American and the Pacific tectonic plates

  12. Mechanism of crustal extension in the Laxmi Basin, Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Pandey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Continental rifting and magmatism has been extensively studied worldwide as it is believed that continental rifting, break up of continents and associated magmatism lead to genesis of new oceanic crust. However, various regions of the world show that these processes may lead to genesis of other types of crust than the oceanic crust. Laxmi Basin in the western continental margin of the India is one such region with an enigmatic crust. Due to its extreme strategic significance for the palaeogeographic reconstruction of continents during Cretaceous continental breakup of India, this basin has attracted various workers for more than two decades. However, still the issue of nature of crust in the basin remains controversial. In this contribution, in order to identify nature of crust, mechanism of continental extension in the Laxmi Basin has been studied for the first time through newly acquired seismic data from the basin. Here, we propose a plausible mechanism of crustal extension in the Laxmi Basin which eventually constrains the nature of crust of the Laxmi Basin. We have demonstrated that the crust in the Laxmi Basin can be categorised in two zones of stretched and transitional crust. In the stretched zone several fault bounded horst and graben structures are identified which preserve syn- and post-rift sediments along with different periods of hiatus in sedimentations as unconformities. These faults are identified as listric faults in the upper crust which sole out in the detachment faults. Detachment faults decouples the upper brittle and lower ductile crust. The transitional crust is identified as heavily intruded by sills and basaltic volcanic which were emplaced due to melting of subcontinental mantle (SCM after hyper-stretching of crust and serpentinisation of the SCM. Panikkar Ridge is proposed to be one such basaltic volcanic body derived from melting of lower part of the SCM.

  13. Integration of bulk piezoelectric materials into microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    Bulk piezoelectric ceramics, compared to deposited piezoelectric thin-films, provide greater electromechanical coupling and charge capacity, which are highly desirable in many MEMS applications. In this thesis, a technology platform is developed for wafer-level integration of bulk piezoelectric substrates on silicon, with a final film thickness of 5-100microm. The characterized processes include reliable low-temperature (200°C) AuIn diffusion bonding and parylene bonding of bulk-PZT on silicon, wafer-level lapping of bulk-PZT with high-uniformity (+/-0.5microm), and low-damage micro-machining of PZT films via dicing-saw patterning, laser ablation, and wet-etching. Preservation of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties is confirmed with hysteresis and piezo-response measurements. The introduced technology offers higher material quality and unique advantages in fabrication flexibility over existing piezoelectric film deposition methods. In order to confirm the preserved bulk properties in the final film, diaphragm and cantilever beam actuators operating in the transverse-mode are designed, fabricated and tested. The diaphragm structure and electrode shapes/sizes are optimized for maximum deflection through finite-element simulations. During tests of fabricated devices, greater than 12microm PP displacement is obtained by actuation of a 1mm2 diaphragm at 111kHz with management IC, which incorporates a supply-independent bias circuitry, an active diode for low-dropout rectification, a bias-flip system for higher efficiency, and a trickle battery charger. The overall system does not require a pre-charged battery, and has power consumption of sleep-mode (simulated). Under lg vibration at 155Hz, a 70mF ultra-capacitor is charged from OV to 1.85V in 50 minutes.

  14. 46 CFR 148.04-23 - Unslaked lime in bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unslaked lime in bulk. 148.04-23 Section 148.04-23... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN BULK Special Additional Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-23 Unslaked lime in bulk. (a) Unslaked lime in bulk must be transported in unmanned, all steel, double-hulled...

  15. A comparison study on the electronic structures, lattice dynamics and thermoelectric properties of bulk silicon and silicon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng-Xian; Qu, Ling-Bo; Cheng, Qiao-Huan

    2013-11-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of the electron and phonon transport in a silicon nanotube (SiNT), the electronic structures, the lattice dynamics, and the thermoelectric properties of bulk silicon (bulk Si) and a SiNT have been calculated in this work using density functional theory and Boltzmann transport theory. Our results suggest that the thermal conductivity of a SiNT is reduced by a factor of 1, while its electrical conductivity is improved significantly, although the Seebeck coefficient is increased slightly as compared to those of the bulk Si. As a consequence, the figure of merit (ZT) of a SiNT at 1200 K is enhanced by 12 times from 0.08 for bulk Si to 1.10. The large enhancement in electrical conductivity originates from the largely increased density of states at the Fermi energy level and the obviously narrowed band gap. The significant reduction in thermal conductivity is ascribed to the remarkably suppressed phonon thermal conductivity caused by a weakened covalent bonding, a decreased phonon density of states, a reduced phonon vibration frequency, as well as a shortened mean free path of phonons. The other factors influencing the thermoelectric properties have also been studied from the perspective of electronic structures and lattice dynamics.

  16. Enhanced Corticospinal Excitability and Volitional Drive in Response to Shortening and Lengthening Strength Training and Changes Following Detraining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallent, Jamie; Goodall, Stuart; Gibbon, Karl C.; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Howatson, Glyn

    2017-01-01

    There is a limited understanding of the neurological adaptations responsible for changes in strength following shortening and lengthening resistance training and subsequent detraining. The aim of the study was to investigate differences in corticospinal and spinal responses to resistance training of the tibialis anterior muscle between shortening or lengthening muscle contractions for 4 weeks and after 2 weeks of detraining. Thirty-one untrained individuals were assigned to either shortening or lengthening isokinetic resistance training (4 weeks, 3 days/weeks) or a non-training control group. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) were used to assess corticospinal and spinal changes, respectively, at pre-, mid-, post-resistance training and post detraining. Greater increases changes (P MVC were found from the respective muscle contraction training. Motor evoked potentials (expressed relative to background EMG) significantly increased in lengthening resistance training group under contraction intensities ranging from 25 to 80% of the shortening and lengthening contraction intensity (P MVC and V-wave did not change (P > 0.05), although MEP amplitude decreased during the detraining period (P < 0.01). No changes in H-reflex were found pre to post resistance training or post detraining. Modulation in V-wave appeared to be contraction specific, whereby greatest increases occurred following lengthening resistance training. Strength and volitional drive is maintained following 2 weeks detraining, however corticospinal excitability appears to decrease when the training stimulus is withdrawn. PMID:28223941

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of the original 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale in nursing home patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongenelis, K; Eisses, AMH; Gerritsen, DL; Beekman, ATF; Kluiter, H; Ribbe, MW

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the diagnostic accuracy of the 30-item and shortened versions of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) in diagnosing depression in older nursing home patients. Method Three hundred and thirty-three older nursing home patients participated in a prospective cross-sectional study

  18. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of shortening rehabilitation programs for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain; Design of a RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterschoot, F.P.C.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Dijkstra, P.U.; Reneman, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pain Rehabilitation Programs (PRP's) are proven effective for patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP). Evidence about the relationship of dose on the effect of PRP however, is unavailable. We hypothesized that shortening PRP will not be inferior to care as usual. The ai

  19. Effects of shortening the dry period of dairy cows on milk production, energy balance, health, and fertility: A systemtic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knegsel, van A.T.M.; Drift, van der S.G.A.; Cermáková, J.; Kemp, B.

    2013-01-01

    A dry period of 6–8 weeks for dairy cows is generally thought to maximise milk production in the next lactation. However, the value of such a long dry period is increasingly questioned. In particular, shortening the dry period shifts milk production from the critical period after calving to the week

  20. Item response theory was used to shorten EORTC QLQ-C30 scales for use in palliative care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Petersen; M. Groenvold; N. Aaronson; J. Blazeby; Y. Brandberg; A. de Graeff; P. Fayers; E. Hammerlid; M. Sprangers; G. Velikova; J.B. Bjorner

    2006-01-01

    Background and Objective: The goal was to develop a shortened version of the EORTC QLQ-C30 for use in palliative care. We wanted to keep as few items as possible in each scale while still being able to compare results with studies using the original scales. We examined the possibilities of shortenin

  1. 3'UTR Shortening Potentiates MicroRNA-Based Repression of Pro-differentiation Genes in Proliferating Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonit Hoffman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most mammalian genes often feature alternative polyadenylation (APA sites and hence diverse 3'UTR lengths. Proliferating cells were reported to favor APA sites that result in shorter 3'UTRs. One consequence of such shortening is escape of mRNAs from targeting by microRNAs (miRNAs whose binding sites are eliminated. Such a mechanism might provide proliferation-related genes with an expression gain during normal or cancerous proliferation. Notably, miRNA sites tend to be more active when located near both ends of the 3'UTR compared to those located more centrally. Accordingly, miRNA sites located near the center of the full 3'UTR might become more active upon 3'UTR shortening. To address this conjecture we performed 3' sequencing to determine the 3' ends of all human UTRs in several cell lines. Remarkably, we found that conserved miRNA binding sites are preferentially enriched immediately upstream to APA sites, and this enrichment is more prominent in pro-differentiation/anti-proliferative genes. Binding sites of the miR17-92 cluster, upregulated in rapidly proliferating cells, are particularly enriched just upstream to APA sites, presumably conferring stronger inhibitory activity upon shortening. Thus 3'UTR shortening appears not only to enable escape from inhibition of growth promoting genes but also to potentiate repression of anti-proliferative genes.

  2. Shortening delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing proton energy layers during treatment plan optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van de Water (Steven); H.M. Kooy; B.J.M. Heijmen (Ben); M.S. Hoogeman (Mischa)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose To shorten delivery times of intensity modulated proton therapy by reducing the number of energy layers in the treatment plan. Methods and Materials We have developed an energy layer reduction method, which was implemented into our in-house-developed multicriteria treatment plann

  3. Crustal shear velocity structure in the Southern Lau Basin constrained by seafloor compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yang; Webb, Spahr C.

    2016-05-01

    Seafloor morphology and crustal structure vary significantly in the Lau back-arc basin, which contains regions of island arc formation, rifting, and seafloor spreading. We analyze seafloor compliance: deformation under long period ocean wave forcing, at 30 ocean bottom seismometers to constrain crustal shear wave velocity structure along and across the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC). Velocity models obtained through Monte Carlo inversion of compliance data show systematic variation of crustal structure in the basin. Sediment thicknesses range from zero thickness at the ridge axis to 1400 m near the volcanic arc. Sediment thickness increases faster to the east than to the west of the ELSC, suggesting a more abundant source of sediment near the active arc volcanoes. Along the ELSC, upper crustal velocities increase from the south to the north where the ridge has migrated farther away from the volcanic arc front. Along the axial ELSC, compliance analysis did not detect a crustal low-velocity body, indicating less melt in the ELSC crustal accretion zone compared to the fast spreading East Pacific Rise. Average upper crust shear velocities for the older ELSC crust produced when the ridge was near the volcanic arc are 0.5-0.8 km/s slower than crust produced at the present-day northern ELSC, consistent with a more porous extrusive layer. Crust in the western Lau Basin, which although thought to have been produced through extension and rifting of old arc crust, is found to have upper crustal velocities similar to older oceanic crust produced at the ELSC.

  4. Mercury's Crustal Magnetic Field from Low-Altitude Measurements by MESSENGER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. L.; Phillips, R. J.; Purucker, M. E.; Anderson, B. J.; Byrne, P. K.; Denevi, B. W.; Fan, K. A.; Feinberg, J. M.; Hauck, S. A., II; Head, J. W., III; Korth, H.; James, P. B.; Mazarico, E.; Neumann, G. A.; Philpott, L. C.; Siegler, M. A.; Strauss, B. E.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetized rocks can record the history of a planet's magnetic field, a key constraint for understanding interior evolution. From orbital vector magnetic field measurements of Mercury taken by the MESSENGER spacecraft at altitudes below 150 km, we have detected fields indicative of crustal magnetization. Fields from non-crustal sources, which dominate the observations even at low altitudes, were estimated and subtracted from the observations using both magnetospheric models and signal filtering. The resulting high-pass filtered fields have amplitudes of a few to 20 nT. The first low-altitude signals were detected over the Suisei Planitia region and were confirmed by upward continuation to be of crustal origin. At least some contribution from thermoremanent magnetization is required to account for these signals, and we infer a lower bound on the average age of magnetization of 3.7-3.9 Ga on the basis of correlation of crustal magnetic fields with volcanic units of that age range. Ancient field strengths that range from those similar to Mercury's present dipole field to Earth-like values are consistent with the magnetic field observations and with the low iron content of Mercury's crust derived from MESSENGER elemental composition data. Here, we extend these initial results with observations obtained at spacecraft altitudes below 60 km at all body-fixed longitudes from ~40°N to ~75°N. The strongest crustal fields occur in the region 120°E to 210°E, and weaker signals characterize the northern volcanic plains. We test the hypothesis that the longest-wavelength crustal field signals in this region reflect magnetization contrasts between the Caloris basin and the surrounding intercrater plains and circum-Caloris plains. We report the spatial distribution of observed crustal fields, together with magnetization models derived from them and the implications of these models, particularly for the depth distribution of sources compatible with the observations.

  5. Exploring Geothermal Energy Potential in Ireland through 3-D Geophysical-Petrological Modelling of Surface Heat-Flow and Crustal and Upper-Mantle Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullea, J.; Muller, M. R.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    Little is known of Ireland's deep, low-enthalpy geothermal resources and the potential for space heating and/or electricity generation based on geothermal energy to displace Ireland's significant reliance on carbon-based fuels. IRETHERM (www.iretherm.ie) is a four-and-a-half year, all-island, academic-government-industry collaborative project, initiated in 2011, with the overarching objective of developing a strategic and holistic understanding of Ireland's geothermal energy potential through integrated modelling of new and existing geophysical and geological data. One of the challenges in searching for deep geothermal resources in the relatively unexplored setting of Ireland lies in identifying those areas most likely to support significantly elevated temperatures at depth. Available borehole data, although sparse and clustered around areas of mineral and hydrocarbon interest, suggest a marked regional increase in surface heat-flow across Ireland, from ~40 mW/m2 in the south to >80 mW/m2 in the north. The origins of both the observed regional heat-flow trend and local temperature anomalies have not been investigated and are not currently understood. Although variations in the structure of the crust and lithosphere have been revealed by a number of active-source seismic and teleseismic experiments, their effects on surface heat-flow have not been modelled. Bulk 3-D variation in crustal heat-production across Ireland, which may contribute significantly to the observed regional and local temperature variations, has also not been determined. We investigate the origins of Ireland's regional heat-flow trend and regional and local temperature variations using the software package LitMod. This software combines petrological and geophysical modelling of the lithosphere and sub-lithospheric upper mantle within an internally consistent thermodynamic-geophysical framework, where all relevant properties are functions of temperature, pressure and chemical composition. The major

  6. Upper crustal seismic structure of the Endeavour segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge from traveltime tomography: Implications for oceanic crustal accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekly, Robert T.; Wilcock, William S. D.; Toomey, Douglas R.; Hooft, Emilie E. E.; Kim, Eunyoung

    2014-04-01

    isotropic and anisotropic P wave velocity structure of the upper oceanic crust on the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is studied using refracted traveltime data collected by an active-source, three-dimensional tomography experiment. The isotropic velocity structure is characterized by low crustal velocities in the overlapping spreading centers (OSCs) at the segment ends. These low velocities are indicative of pervasive tectonic fracturing and persist off axis, recording the history of ridge propagation. Near the segment center, velocities within the upper 1 km show ridge-parallel bands with low velocities on the outer flanks of topographic highs. These features are consistent with localized thickening of the volcanic extrusive layer from eruptions extending outside of the axial valley that flow down the fault-tilted blocks that form the abyssal hill topography. On-axis velocities are generally relatively high beneath the hydrothermal vent fields likely due to the infilling of porosity by mineral precipitation. Lower velocities are observed beneath the most vigorous vent fields in a seismically active region above the axial magma chamber and may reflect increased fracturing and higher temperatures. Seismic anisotropy is high on-axis but decreases substantially off axis over 5-10 km (0.2-0.4 Ma). This decrease coincides with an increase in seismic velocities resolved at depths ≥1 km and is attributed to the infilling of cracks by mineral precipitation associated with near-axis hydrothermal circulation. The orientation of the fast-axis of anisotropy is ridge-parallel near the segment center but curves near the segment ends reflecting the tectonic fabric within the OSCs.

  7. Crustal evolution and recycling in a juvenile continent: Oxygen isotope ratio of zircon in the northern Arabian Nubian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'eri-Shlevin, Yaron; Katzir, Yaron; Valley, John W.

    2009-02-01

    Crustal recycling patterns during the evolution of the Neoproterozoic Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) were defined using the oxygen isotope ratio of zircon [ δ18O(Zrn)]. Evidence for early (~ 870-740 Ma) crustal recycling in the northernmost ANS (southern Israel and Sinai, Egypt) is given by laser fluorination analysis of bulk zircon separates, which yield higher than mantle δ18O(Zrn) values of several island arc complex (IAC) orthogneisses (6.9 to 8.2‰) and also from the average δ18O(Zrn) value of 6.4‰ determined for detrital zircons (~ 870-780 Ma) from the Elat-schist; the latter representing the oldest known rock sources in the region. These results indicate prolonged availability of surface-derived rocks for burial or subduction, melting, and assimilation at the very early stages of island arc formation in the ANS. Other IAC intrusions of ~ 800 Ma show mantle-like δ18O(Zrn) values, implying that not all magmas involved supracrustal contribution. Much younger (650-625 Ma) deformed syn-collisional calc-alkaline (CA1) intrusions are characterized by δ18O(Zrn) values of 5.0 to 7.9‰ indicating continued recycling of the felsic crust. The main sample set of this study comprises rocks from the mostly granitic, post-collisional calc-alkaline (CA2: ~ 635-590 Ma) and alkaline (AL: ~ 608-580 Ma) magmatic suites. Despite having distinct geochemical characteristics and petrogenetic paths and spans of magmatic activity, the two suites are indistinguishable by their average δ18O(Zrn) values of 5.7 and 5.8‰ pointing to the dominance of mantle-like δ18O sources in their formation. Nonetheless, grouping the two suites together reveals geographical zoning in δ18O(Zrn) where a large southeastern region of δ18O(Zrn) = 4.5 to 5.9‰ is separated from a northwestern belt with δ18O(Zrn) = 6 to 8‰ by a '6‰ line'. It is thus suggested that all CA2 and AL magmas of the northernmost ANS were derived from mantle-like δ18O reservoirs in the mafic lower-crust and the

  8. Treatment of tibial defect and bone nonunion with limb shortening with external fixator and reconstituted bone xenograft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志刚; 刘建; 胡蕴玉; 孟国林; 金格勒; 袁志; 王海强; 戴先文

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of external fixator and reconstituted bone xenograft (RBX) in the treatment of tibial bone defect, tibial bone nonunion and congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia with limb shortening. Methods: Twenty patients ( 13 males and 7 females) with tibial bone defect, tibial bone nonunion or congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia with limb shortening were treated with external fixation. Two kinds of external fixators were used: a half ring sulcated external fixator used in 13 patients and a combined external fixator in 7 patients. Foot-drop was corrected at the same time with external fixation in 4 patients. The shortened length of the tibia was in the range of 2-9 cm, with an average of 4.8 cm. For bone grafting, RBX was used in 12 patients, autogenous ilium was used in 3 patients and autogenous fibula was implanted as a bone plug into the medullary canal in 1 case, and no bone graft was used in 4 patients. Results: All the 20 patients were followed-up for 8 months to 7 years, averaging 51 months. Satisfactory function of the affected extremities was obtained. All the shortened extremities were lengthened to the expected length. For all the lengthening area and the fracture sites, bone union was obtained at the last. The average healing time of 12 patients treated with RBX was 4.8 months. Conclusions: Both the half ring sulcated external fixator and the combined external fixator have the advantages of small trauma, simple operation, elastic fixation without stress shielding and non-limitation from local soft tissue conditions, and there is satisfactory functional recovery of affected extremities in the treatment of tibial bone defects, tibial bone nonunion and congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia combined with limb shortening. RBX has good biocompatibility and does not cause immunological rejections. It can also be safely used in treatment of bone nonunion and has reliable effect to promote bone healing.

  9. Distinct Chlorine Isotopic Reservoirs on Mars: Implications for Character, Extent and Relative Timing of Crustal Interaction with Mantle-Derived Magmas, Evolution of the Martian Atmosphere, and the Building Blocks of an Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, C. K.; Messenger, S.; Sharp, Z. D.; Burger, P. V.; Nguyen, N.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    The style, magnitude, timing, and mixing components involved in the interaction between mantle derived Martian magmas and Martian crust have long been a point of debate. Understanding this process is fundamental to deciphering the composition of the Martian crust and its interaction with the atmosphere, the compositional diversity and oxygen fugacity variations in the Martian mantle, the bulk composition of Mars and the materials from which it accreted, and the noble gas composition of Mars and the Sun. Recent studies of the chlorine isotopic composition of Martian meteorites imply that although the variation in delta (sup 37) Cl is limited (total range of approximately14 per mille), there appears to be distinct signatures for the Martian crust and mantle. However, there are potential issues with this interpretation. New Cl isotope data from the SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) instrument on the Mars Science Lab indicate a very wide range of Cl isotopic compositions on the Martian surface. Recent measurements by [10] duplicated the results of [7,8], but placed them within the context of SAM surface data. In addition, Martian meteorite Chassigny contains trapped noble gases with isotopic ratios similar to solar abundance, and has long been considered a pristine, mantle derived sample. However, previous studies of apatite in Chassigny indicate that crustal fluids have interacted with regions interstitial to the cumulus olivine. The initial Cl isotope measurements of apatite in Chassigny suggest an addition of crustal component to this lithology, apparently contradicting the rare gas data. Here, we examine the Cl isotopic composition of multiple generations and textures of apatite in Chassigny to extricate the crustal and mantle components in this meteorite and to reveal the style and timing of the addition of crustal components to mantle-derived magmas. These data reveal distinct Martian Cl sources whose signatures have their origins linked to both the early Solar

  10. The stretch-shortening cycle : a model to study naturally occurring neuromuscular fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Caroline; Avela, Janne; Komi, Paavo V

    2006-01-01

    Neuromuscular fatigue has traditionally been examined using isolated forms of either isometric, concentric or eccentric actions. However, none of these actions are naturally occurring in human (or animal) ground locomotion. The basic muscle function is defined as the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC), where the preactivated muscle is first stretched (eccentric action) and then followed by the shortening (concentric) action. As the SSC taxes the skeletal muscles very strongly mechanically, its influence on the reflex activation becomes apparent and very different from the isolated forms of muscle actions mentioned above. The ground contact phases of running, jumping and hopping etc. are examples of the SSC for leg extensor muscles; similar phases can also be found for the upper-body activities. Consequently, it is normal and expected that the fatigue phenomena should be explored during SSC activities. The fatigue responses of repeated SSC actions are very versatile and complex because the fatigue does not depend only on the metabolic loading, which is reportedly different among muscle actions. The complexity of SSC fatigue is well reflected by the recovery patterns of many neuromechanical parameters. The basic pattern of SSC fatigue response (e.g. when using the complete exhaustion model of hopping or jumping) is the bimodality showing an immediate reduction in performance during exercise, quick recovery within 1-2 hours, followed by a secondary reduction, which may often show the lowest values on the second day post-exercise when the symptoms of muscle soreness/damage are also greatest. The full recovery may take 4-8 days depending on the parameter and on the severity of exercise. Each subject may have their own time-dependent bimodality curve. Based on the reviewed literature, it is recommended that the fatigue protocol is 'completely' exhaustive to reduce the important influence of inter-subject variability in the fatigue responses. The bimodality concept is

  11. Acute and prolonged reduction in joint stiffness in humans after exhausting stretch-shortening cycle exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuitunen, S; Avela, J; Kyröläinen, H; Nicol, C; Komi, P V

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the acute and long-term fatigue effects of exhausting stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise on the stiffness of ankle and knee joints. Five subjects were fatigued on a sledge apparatus by 100 maximal rebound jumps followed by continuous submaximal jumping until complete exhaustion. Neuromuscular fatigue effects were examined in submaximal hopping (HOP) and in maximal drop jumps (DJ) from 35 (DJ35) and 55 cm (DJ55) heights on a force plate. Additional force and reflex measurements were made using an ankle ergometer. Jumping tests and ankle ergometer tests were carried out before, immediately after, 2 h (2H), 2 days and 7 days (7D) after the SSC exercise. Kinematics, force and electromyography (EMG) recordings were complemented with inverse dynamics, which was used to calculate joint moments. The quotient of changes in joint moment divided by changes in joint angle was used as a value of joint stiffness (JS). In addition, blood lactate concentrations and serum creatine kinase activities were determined. The exercise induced a clear decrease in knee joint stiffness by [mean (SD)] 29 (13)% (P < 0.05) in HOP, 31 (6)% (P < 0.05) in DJ35 and 34 (14)% (P < 0.05) in DJ55. A similar trend was observed in the ankle joint stiffness with significant post-exercise reductions of 22 (8)% (P < 0.05) in DJ35 and of 27 (19)% (P < 0.05) at 2H in DJ55. The subsequent recovery of JS was slow and in some cases incomplete still at 7D. Generally, all the EMG parameters were fully recovered by 2H, whereas the force recovery was still incomplete at this time. These data indicate that the immediate reduction in JS was probably related to the effects of both central (neural) and peripheral (metabolic) fatigue, whereas the prolonged impairment was probably due to peripheral fatigue (muscle damage).

  12. Shortened Conditioned Eyeblink Response Latency in Male but not Female Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanellou, Alexandra; Schachinger, Kira M.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Reductions in the volume of the cerebellum and impairments in cerebellar-dependent eyeblink conditioning have been observed in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Recently, it was reported that subjects with ADHD as well as male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a strain that is frequently employed as an animal model in the study of ADHD, exhibit a parallel pattern of timing deficits in eyeblink conditioning. One criticism that has been posed regarding the validity of the SHR strain as an animal model for the study of ADHD is that SHRs are not only hyperactive but also hypertensive. It is conceivable that many of the behavioral characteristics seen in SHRs that seem to parallel the behavioral symptoms of ADHD are not solely due to hyperactivity but instead are the net outcome of the interaction between hyperactivity and hypertension. We used Wistar-Kyoto Hyperactive (WKHA) and Wistar-Kyoto Hypertensive (WKHT) rats (males and females), strains generated from recombinant inbreeding of SHRs and their progenitor strain, Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, to compare eyeblink conditioning in strains that are exclusively hyperactive or hypertensive. We used a long-delay eyeblink conditioning task in which a tone conditioned stimulus was paired with a periorbital stimulation unconditioned stimulus (750-ms delay paradigm). Our results showed that WKHA and WKHT rats exhibited similar rates of conditioned response (CR) acquisition. However, WKHA males displayed shortened CR latencies (early onset and peak latency) in comparison to WKHT males. In contrast, female WKHAs and WKHTs did not differ. In subsequent extinction training, WKHA rats extinguished at similar rates in comparison to WKHT rats. The current results support the hypothesis of a relationship between cerebellar abnormalities and ADHD in an animal model of ADHD-like symptoms that does not also exhibit hypertension, and suggest that cerebellar-related timing deficits are specific to males. PMID:19485572

  13. Brain targeted transcranial administration of diazepam and shortening of sleep latency in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Pathirana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of medicated oils on scalp had been practiced for centuries in the Ayurvedic system of medicine in diseases associated with the central nervous system. It is possible that the effectiveness of the therapy may be a result of targeted delivery of active compounds to the brain transcranially. Evidence also comes from two previous studies with positive results on brain targeted transcranial delivery of methadone base and diazepam on rat models. Possibility of transcranial drug delivery was investigated in healthy human volunteers using electroencephalography techniques by assessing the ability of transcranially administered diazepam in bringing about β activity in the electroencephalographic wave patterns and shortening of the sleep latency period. Non polar drug molecules dissolved in a non-aqueous sesame oil based vehicle is a significant feature in the transcranial dosage design. The study was under taken in two phases. In the Phase-I study scalp application of a single dose of 2 mg/3 ml of the oil was employed and in the Phase-II study repeat application of three doses 24 h apart were employed. Sleep latency changes were monitored with Multiple Sleep Latency Tests with 5 naps employing the standard electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography electrodes. Sleep onset was identified with the first epoch of any sleep stage non rapid eye movement 1, 2, 3, 4 or rapid eye movement using electroencephalography, electroocculography and electromyography criteria. In both phases of the study there was significant reduction in the sleep latencies. It was much more pronounced in the Phase-II study. None of the subjects however displayed beta activity in the electroencephalography. Sleep latency reduction following scalp application in both the phases are suggestive of transcranial migration of diazepam molecules to the receptor sites of the nerve tissue of the brain eliciting its pharmacological effect of sedation

  14. Factors of force potentiation induced by stretch-shortening cycle in plantarflexors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuki Fukutani

    Full Text Available Muscle force is potentiated by countermovement; this phenomenon is called stretch-shortening cycle (SSC effect. In this study, we examined the factors strongly related to SSC effect in vivo, focusing on tendon elongation, preactivation, and residual force enhancement. Twelve healthy men participated in this study. Ankle joint angle was passively moved by a dynamometer, with a range of motion from 15° dorsiflexion (DF to 15° plantarflexion (PF. Muscle contraction was evoked by electrical stimulation, with stimulation timing adjusted to elicit three types of contraction: (1 concentric contraction without preliminary contraction (CON, (2 concentric contraction after preliminary eccentric contraction (ECC, and (3 concentric contraction after preliminary isometric contraction (ISO. Joint torque was recorded at DF5°, PF0°, and PF5°, respectively. SSC effect was calculated as the ratio of joint torque obtained in ECC or ISO with respect to that obtained in CON at the aforementioned three joint angles. SSC effect was prominent in the first half of movement in both ECC (DF5°, 329.3 ± 101.2%; PF0°, 159.2 ± 29.4%; PF5°, 125.5 ± 20.8% and ISO (DF5°, 276.4 ± 87.0%; PF0°, 134.5 ± 24.5%; PF5°, 106.8 ± 18.0% conditions. SSC effect was significantly larger in ECC than in ISO at all joint angles (P < 0.001. Even without preliminary eccentric contraction (i.e., ISO condition, SSC effect was clearly large, indicating that a significant part of SSC effect is derived from preactivation. However, the active lengthening-induced force potentiation mechanism (residual force enhancement also contributes to SSC effect.

  15. An increase in telomere sister chromatid exchange in murine embryonic stem cells possessing critically shortened telomeres

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