WorldWideScience

Sample records for bulk chemical composition

  1. Mantle Metasomatism in Mars: Evidence from Bulk Chemical Compositions of Martian Basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    Bulk compositions of martian meteorite basalts suggest that they formed from a highly depleted mantle that was variably metasomatised and enriched in incompatible elements. These results are consistent with radio-isotope results. Bulk chemical compositions of basaltic rocks retain clues and tracers to their origins and histories. Interpretations of bulk compositions are not so straight-forward as once envisioned, because real-world magmatic processes can be far from theoretical simple models like one-stage partial melting or closed-system fractional crystallization. Yet, bulk chemistry can shed a broad (if dim) light on Martian basalt petrogenesis that complements the sharply focussed illumination of radio-isotope systematics.

  2. Bulk chemicals from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haveren, van J.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the current robust forces driving sustainable production, and available biomass conversion technologies, biomass-based routes are expected to make a significant impact on the production of bulk chemicals within 10 years, and a huge impact within 20-30 years. In the Port of Rotterdam there is a

  3. Mercury: a prediction for bulk chemical composition and internal structure in readiness for new MESSENGER data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    The MESSENGER spacecraft has confirmed that Mercury's magnetic field is dominantly dipolar and due to an active dynamo in a molten outer core (Solomon et al, 2008 Science 321 59). An energy source is needed to maintain this dynamo. Either liquid iron is freezing at the surface of an inner solid core (as proposed here) or solid iron is precipitating within an outer sulphur-rich core (Chen et al, 2008 GRL 35 L07201). If the outer core does not contain sulphur and consists solely of pure metal (Fe, Ni, Cr,..), then an active dynamo is inconsistent with previous numerical models for the radiogenic thermal evolution of the planet. Those earlier models found that the present temperature at the core/mantle boundary (CMB) is ~ 500 K below the melting temperature of metal ~ 2030 K for a CMB pressure of 70 kbar. The earlier calculations were based on low lunar abundances of U and Th. Here I present a new model for the bulk chemical composition, thermal evolution and current internal structure of Mercury. The model is based on the modern Laplacian theory of solar system origin (Prentice, 1978 Moon Planets 19 341; 2001 Earth Moon & Planets 87 11; 2006 Publ. Astron. Soc. Aust. (PASA) 23 1; 2008 - URL below). A key feature of this theory is that the planets formed from a concentric system of gas rings (n = 0, 1, 2,..) that were shed by the contracting protosolar cloud. The temperatures Tn of the rings scale with mean orbital radius Rn closely as Tn ~ Rn-0.9. Mercury plays a crucial role in calibrating this relationship because of a condensation process of metal/silicate fractionation (Lewis, 1972 EPSL 15 286). Choosing Tn ~ 1630 K for mean orbit gas ring pressure of 0.17 bar, the condensate consists mostly of Fe-Ni-Cr (mass fraction 0.671), gehlenite (0.190) and Mg-silicates (0.081). It has mean density 5.30 g/cm3. Na, K and S are absent. The mass fractions of U and Th, namely 5.66 × 10-8 & 2.08 × 10-7, are a factor of 4.3 times greater than those of the proto-Earth condensate

  4. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  5. Post-irradiation hardness development, chemical softening, and thermal stability of bulk-fill and conventional resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshali, Ruwaida Z; Salim, Nesreen A; Satterthwaite, Julian D; Silikas, Nick

    2015-02-01

    To measure bottom/top hardness ratio of bulk-fill and conventional resin-composite materials, and to assess hardness changes after dry and ethanol storage. Filler content and kinetics of thermal decomposition were also tested using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Six bulk-fill (SureFil SDR, Venus bulk fill, X-tra base, Filtek bulk fill flowable, Sonic fill, and Tetric EvoCeram bulk-fill) and eight conventional resin-composite materials (Grandioso flow, Venus Diamond flow, X-flow, Filtek Supreme Ultra Flowable, Grandioso, Venus Diamond, TPH Spectrum, and Filtek Z250) were tested (n=5). Initial and 24h (post-cure dry storage) top and bottom microhardness values were measured. Microhardness was re-measured after the samples were stored in 75% ethanol/water solution. Thermal decomposition and filler content were assessed by TGA. Results were analysed using one-way ANOVA and paired sample t-test (α=0.05). All materials showed significant increase of microhardness after 24h of dry storage which ranged from 100.1% to 9.1%. Bottom/top microhardness ratio >0.9 was exhibited by all materials. All materials showed significant decrease of microhardness after 24h of storage in 75% ethanol/water which ranged from 14.5% to 74.2%. The extent of post-irradiation hardness development was positively correlated to the extent of ethanol softening (R(2)=0.89, phardness ratio to conventional materials at recommended manufacturer thickness. Hardness was affected to a variable extent by storage with variable inorganic filler content and initial thermal decomposition shown by TGA. The manufacturer recommended depth of cure of bulk-fill resin-composites can be reached based on the microhardness method. Characterization of the primary polymer network of a resin-composite material should be considered when evaluating its stability in the aqueous oral environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Origin, Bulk Chemical Composition and Physical Structure of the Galilean Satellites of Jupiter: A Post-Galileo Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, A. J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Callisto, NH3 ice makes up -5% of the condensate mass next to h-rock (approximately 50%) and H2O ice (approximately 45%). Detailed thermal and structural models for each of Europa, Ganymede and Callisto are constructed on the basis of the above initial bulk chemical compositions. For Europa (E), a predicted 2-zone model consisting of a dehydrated rock core of mass 0.912 M (sub E) and a 150 km thick frozen mantle of salty H2O yields a moment-of-inertia coefficient which matches the Galileo Orbiter gravity measurement. For Ganymede (G), a 3-zone model possessing an inner core of solid FeS and mass approximately 0.116 M (sub G), and an outer H2O ice mantle of mass approximately 0.502 M (sub G) is needed to explain the gravity data. Ganymede's native magnetic field was formed by thermoremanent magnetization of Fe3O4. A new Callisto (C) model is proposed consisting of a core of mass 0.826 M (sub C) containing a uniform mixture of h-rock (60% by mass) and H2O and NH3 ices, and capped by a mantle of pure ice. This model may have the capacity to yield a thin layer of liquid NH3 (raised dot) 2H2O at the core boundary, in line with Galileo's discovery of an induced magnetic field.

  7. Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Willie; Cavanagh, Richard; Turk, Gregory; Winchester, Michael; Travis, John; Smith, Melody; Derose, Paul; Choquette, Steven; Kramer, Gary; Sieber, John; Greenberg, Robert; Lindstrom, Richard; Lamaze, George; Zeisler, Rolf; Schantz, Michele; Sander, Lane; Phinney, Karen; Welch, Michael; Vetter, Thomas; Pratt, Kenneth; Scott, John; Small, John; Wight, Scott; Stranick, Stephan

    Measurements of the chemical compositions of materials and the levels of certain substances in them are vital when assessing and improving public health, safety and the environment, are necessary to ensure trade equity, and are required when monitoring and improving industrial products and services. Chemical measurements play a crucial role in most areas of the economy, including healthcare, food and nutrition, agriculture, environmental technologies, chemicals and materials, instrumentation, electronics, forensics, energy, and transportation.

  8. MICROHARDNESS OF BULK-FILL COMPOSITE MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelić, Katarina; Matić, Sanja; Marović, Danijela; Klarić, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine microhardness of high- and low-viscosity bulk-fill composite resins and compare it with conventional composite materials. Four materials of high-viscosity were tested, including three bulk-fills: QuiXfi l (QF), x-tra fi l (XTF) and Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEBCF), while nanohybrid composite GrandioSO (GSO) served as control. The other four were low-viscosity composites, three bulk-fill materials: Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR), Venus Bulk Fill (VBF) and x-tra base (XB), and conventional control material X-Flow (XF). Composite samples (n=5) were polymerized for 20 s with Bluephase G2 curing unit. Vickers hardness was used to determine microhardness of each material at the surface, and at 2-mm and 4-mm depth. GSO on average recorded significantly higher microhardness values than bulk-fill materials (pcomposite XF revealed similar microhardness values as SDR, but significantly lower than XB (pmaterials was lower than microhardness of the conventional composite material (GSO). Surface microhardness of low-viscosity materials was generally even lower. The microhardness of all tested materials at 4 mm was not different from their surface values. However, additional capping layer was a necessity for low-viscosity bulk-fill materials due to their low microhardness.

  9. Chemical composition of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J. W.; Anders, E.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical composition of Mars is estimated from the cosmochemical model of Ganapathy and Anders (1974) with additional petrological and geophysical constraints. The model assumes that planets and chondrites underwent the same fractionation processes in the solar nebula, and constraints are imposed by the abundance of the heat-producing elements, U, Th and K, the volatile-rich component and the high density of the mantle. Global abundances of 83 elements are presented, and it is noted that the mantle is an iron-rich garnet wehrlite, nearly identical to the bulk moon composition of Morgan at al. (1978) and that the core is sulfur poor (3.5% S). The comparison of model compositions for the earth, Venus, Mars, the moon and a eucrite parent body suggests that volatile depletion correlates mainly with size rather than with radial distance from the sun.

  10. Multiphase composites with extremal bulk modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibiansky, L. V.; Sigmund, Ole

    2000-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the analytical and numerical study of isotropic elastic composites made of three or more isotropic phases. The ranges of their effective bulk and shear moduli are restricted by the Hashin-Shtrikman-Walpole (HSW) bounds. For two-phase composites, these bounds are attainabl...... isotropic three-dimensional three-phase composites with cylindrical inclusions of arbitrary cross-sections (plane strain problem) or transversely isotropic thin plates (plane stress or bending of plates problems). (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Radiopacity of bulk fill flowable resin composite materials | Yildirim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of currently marketed bulk fill flowable dental composite materials (Beautifil Bulk Flowable, SDR Flow, Filtek Bulk Fill Flow, and x‑tra Base Bulk Fill). Materials and Methods: Six specimens of each material with a thickness of 1 mm were prepared, and ...

  12. Nondestructive Method for Bulk Chemical Characterization of Barred Olivine Chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Perez, M. A.; Cervantes-de la Cruz, K. E.; Ruvalcaba-Sil, J. L.

    2017-05-01

    This work develops a bulk chemical characterization of barred olivine chondrules based on the XRF analysis using a portable equipment at the National Research and Conservation Science Laboratory of Cultural Heritage (LANCIC-IF) in Mexico City.

  13. Radiopacity of bulk fill flowable resin composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, T; Ayar, M K; Akdag, M S; Yesilyurt, C

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of currently marketed bulk fill flowable dental composite materials (Beautifil Bulk Flowable, SDR Flow, Filtek Bulk Fill Flow, and x-tra Base Bulk Fill). Six specimens of each material with a thickness of 1 mm were prepared, and digital radiographs were taken, using a CCD sensor along with an aluminum stepwedge and 1 mm-thick tooth slice. The mean gray level of each aluminum stepwedge and selected materials was measured, using the equal-density area tool of Kodak Dental Imaging software. The equivalent thickness of aluminum for each material was then calculated by using the stepwedge values in the CurveExpert version 1.4 program. The radiopacity of bulk fill flowable composites sorted in descending order as follows: Beautifil Bulk Flowable (2.96 mm Al) = x-tra base bulk fill (2.92 mm Al) = SureFil SDR Flow (2.89 mm Al) > Filtek Bulk Fill Flow (2.51 mm Al) (P materials had a radiopacity greater than dentin and enamel; their adequate radiopacity will help the clinicians during radiographic examination of restorations. Bulk fill composite materials have greater radiopacity, enabling clinicians to distinguish the bulk fill composites from dentin and enamel.

  14. Color of bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barutcigil, Çağatay; Barutcigil, Kubilay; Özarslan, Mehmet Mustafa; Dündar, Ayşe; Yilmaz, Burak

    2017-09-28

    To evaluate the color stability of novel bulk-fill composite resins. Color measurements of a nanohybrid composite resin (Z550) and 3 bulk-fill composite resins (BLK, AFX, XTF; n = 45) were performed before polymerization. After polymerization, color measurements were repeated and specimens were immersed in distilled water or red wine, or coffee. Color change [CIEDE2000 (ΔE00 )] was calculated after 24 h, 1 and 3 weeks. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon tests (α = 0.05). Color changes observed after polymerization were significant for all groups. Color changes observed in distilled water for Z550 and AFX were significant. Color changes after stored in red wine and coffee were significant for all groups. Bulk-fill composite resin color change increased over time for all groups in red wine and coffee (P composite resin and bulk-fill composite resins. AFX had the highest color change in distilled water. The color of tested bulk-fill composite resins significantly changed after immersion in beverages and over time. Color change observed with the nanohybrid composite resin after 1 week was stable. Clinicians should keep in mind that tested composite resins may change color when exposed to water and significantly change color immediately after they are polymerized. In addition, the color change continues over time should the patient is a coffee and/or red wine consumer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Microbial production of bulk chemicals: development of anaerobic processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusthuis, R.A.; Lamot, I.; Oost, van der J.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    nnovative fermentation processes are necessary for the cost-effective production of bulk chemicals from renewable resources. Current microbial processes are either anaerobic processes, with high yield and productivity, or less-efficient aerobic processes. Oxygen utilization plays an important role

  16. Essays on Port, Container, and Bulk Chemical Logistics Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van Asperen (Eelco)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe essays in this thesis are concerned with two main themes in port logistics. The first theme is the coordination of transport arrivals with the distribution processes and the use of storage facilities. We study this for both containerized and bulk chemical transport. The second theme

  17. Venus, Earth and Mars: Present bounds on similarities and differences in bulk composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1985-01-01

    The bulk compositions of the terrestrial planets are constrained in part by rigorous bounds derivable from geophysical data and from chemical data obtained in situ or by remote sensing. In large part, however, the bulk compositions are constrained only by the inferred plausibility of assumptions made about the processes responsible for producing planets. Present data are consistent with Venus, Earth and Mars all having solar ratios of the major, non-volatile elements. The mantle of Mars has a higher FeO content than the Earth's present upper mantle. The FeO content of the Venus mantle is poorly constrained. Abundances of minor elements are virtually unconstrained by geophysical data and only weakly constrained by existing chemical data. Inferences drawn from SNC meteorites suggest that Mars may be enriched in most volatiles relative to the Earth. Simple models in which volatiles are added in a single component probably do not accurately predict bulk volatile inventories of the planets.

  18. Apollo 17 high-Ti mare basalts - New bulk compositional data, magma types, and petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, R. D.; Taylor, G. J.; Conrad, G. H.; Northrop, H. R.; Barker, S.; Keil, K.; Ma, M.-S.; Schmitt, R.

    1979-01-01

    Bulk compositional and mineral chemical data for 28 previously unanalyzed samples support the classification of Apollo-17 high-Ti mare basalts into three-types (A, B, and C), defined on the basis of analyses of fine-grained basalts. The most MgO- and TiO2-rich fine-grained basalts of these types appear to be the best choices for representing the compositions of the parent magmas.

  19. Chemocatalytic conversion of ethanol into butadiene and other bulk chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelici, Carlo; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2013-09-01

    The development of new and improved processes for the synthesis of bio-based chemicals is one of the scientific challenges of our time. These new discoveries are not only important from an environmental point of view, but also represent an important economic opportunity, provided that the developed processes are selective and efficient. Bioethanol is currently produced from renewable resources in large amounts and, in addition to its use as biofuel, holds considerable promise as a building block for the chemical industry. Indeed, further improvements in production, both in terms of efficiency and feedstock selection, will guarantee availability at competitive prices. The conversion of bioethanol into commodity chemicals, in particular direct 'drop-in' replacements is, therefore, becoming increasingly attractive, provided that the appropriate (catalytic) technology is in place. The production of green and renewable 1,3-butadiene is a clear example of this approach. The Lebedev process for the one-step catalytic conversion of ethanol to butadiene has been known since the 1930s and has been applied on an industrial scale to produce synthetic rubber. Later, the availability of low-cost oil made it more convenient to obtain butadiene from petrochemical sources. The desire to produce bulk chemicals in a sustainable way and the availability of low-cost bioethanol in large volumes has, however, resulted in a renaissance of this old butadiene production process. This paper reviews the catalytic aspects associated with the synthesis of butadiene via the Lebedev process, as well as the production of other, mechanistically related bulk chemicals that can be obtained from (bio)ethanol. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Wear Behavior of Mechanically Alloyed Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the preparation and wear behavior of mechanically alloyed Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites containing carbon nanotube (CNT particles. The differential scanning calorimeter results show that the thermal stability of the amorphous matrix is affected by the presence of CNT particles. Changes in glass transition temperature (Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx suggest that deviations in the chemical composition of the amorphous matrix occurred because of a partial dissolution of the CNT species into the amorphous phase. Although the hardness of CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composites is increased with the addition of CNT particles, the wear resistance of such composites is not directly proportional to their hardness, and does not follow the standard wear law. A worn surface under a high applied load shows that the 12 vol. % CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composite suffers severe wear compared with monolithic Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass.

  1. Elution of monomer from different bulk fill dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Mehmet Ata; Cebe, Fatma; Cengiz, Mehmet Fatih; Cetin, Ali Rıza; Arpag, Osman Fatih; Ozturk, Bora

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the elution of Bis-GMA, TEGDMA, HEMA, and Bis-EMA monomers from six bulk fill composite resins over four different time periods, using HPLC. Six different composite resin materials were used in the present study: Tetric Evo Ceram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent, Amherst, NY), X-tra Fill (VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany), Sonic Fill (Kerr, Orange, CA, USA), Filtek Bulk Fill (3M ESPE Dental Product, St. Paul, MN), SDR (Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany), EQUIA (GC America INC, Alsip, IL). The samples (4mm thickness, 5mm diameter) were prepared and polymerized for 20s with a light emitted diode unit. After fabrication, each sample was immediately immersed in 75wt% ethanol/water solution used as extraction fluid and stored in the amber colored bottles at room temperature. Ethanol/water samples were taken (0.5mL) at predefined time intervals:10m (T1), 1h (T2), 24h (T3) and 30 days (T4). These samples were analyzed by HPLC. The obtained data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD at significance level of presins in all time periods and the amount of eluted monomers was increased with time. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Element-Element Correlations Among Martian Meteorite Bulk Compositions: Peculiarities Explained(?) by Mixing, with Implications for the Composition of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    Most estimates of the chemical corn position of Mars' mantle and core derive from elementelement correlations bulk analyses of Martian meteorites [I-31. To use the correlations in this manner assumes implicitly that they reflect mineraVmelt fractionations (e.g., partial melting, fractional crystallization, accumulation) among a cogenetic suite of igneous rocks. However, similar correlations can zppear from mixing of chemical components, and need not imply that the components were cogenetic nor that they had an igneous origin. Several aspects of the elemental and isotopic chem istries of the Martian meteorites can be explained by mixing of geochemical components (mantle or crustal), e.g. [5,6]. Thus, it is worth asking whether mixing rektions might be seen in bulk chemical data, and (if so) whether the mixing components can be used to infer average planet or mantle compositions.

  3. Catalytic Conversion of Renewable Resources into Bulk and Fine Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Johannes G

    2016-12-01

    Several strategies can be chosen to convert renewable resources into chemicals. In this account, I exemplify the route that starts with so-called platform chemicals; these are relatively simple chemicals that can be produced in high yield, directly from renewable resources, either via fermentation or via chemical routes. They can be converted into the existing bulk chemicals in a very efficient manner using multistep catalytic conversions. Two examples are given of the conversion of sugars into nylon intermediates. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) can be prepared in good yield from fructose. Two hydrogenation steps convert HMF into 1,6-hexanediol. Oppenauer oxidation converts this product into caprolactone, which in the past, has been converted into caprolactam in a large-scale industrial process by reaction with ammonia. An even more interesting platform chemical is levulinic acid (LA), which can be obtained directly from lignocellulose in good yield by treatment with dilute sulfuric acid at 200°C. Hydrogenation converts LA into gamma-valerolactone, which is ring-opened and esterified in a gas-phase process to a mixture of isomeric methyl pentenoates in excellent selectivity. In a remarkable selective palladium-catalysed isomerising methoxycarbonylation, this mixture is converted in to dimethyl adipate, which is finally hydrolysed to adipic acid. Overall selectivities of both processes are extremely high. The conversion of lignin into chemicals is a much more complicated task in view of the complex nature of lignin. It was discovered that breakage of the most prevalent β-O-4 bond in lignin occurs not only via the well-documented C3 pathway, but also via a C2 pathway, leading to the formation of highly reactive phenylacetaldehydes. These compounds went largely unnoticed as they immediately recondense on lignin. We have now found that it is possible to prevent this by converting these aldehydes in a tandem reaction, as they are formed. For this purpose, we have used

  4. [Sustainable production of bulk chemicals by application of "white biotechnology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M K; Dornburg, V; Hermann, B G; Shen, Li; van Overbeek, Leo

    2008-12-01

    Practically all organic chemicals and plastics are nowadays produced from crude oil and natural gas. However, it is possible to produce a wide range of bulk chemicals from renewable resources by application of biotechnology. This paper focuses on White Biotechnology, which makes use of bacteria (or yeasts) or enzymes for the conversion of the fermentable sugar to the target product. It is shown that White Biotechnology offers substantial savings of non-renewable energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for nearly all of the products studied. Under favorable boundary conditions up to two thirds (67%) of the current non-renewable energy use for the production of the selected chemicals can be saved by 2050 if substantial technological progress is made and if the use of lignocellulosic feedstocks is successfully developed. The analysis for Europe (E.U. 25 countries) shows that land requirements related to White Biotechnology chemicals are not likely to become a critical issue in the next few decades, especially considering the large unused and underutilized resources in Eastern Europe. Substantial macroeconomic savings can be achieved under favourable boundary conditions. In principle, natural bacteria and enzymes can be used for White Biotechnology but, according to many experts in the fields, Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) will be necessary in order to achieve the high yields, concentrations and productivities that are required to reach economic viability. Safe containment and inactivation of GMOs after release is very important because not all possible implications caused by the interaction of recombinant genes with other populations can be foreseen. If adequate precautionary measures are taken, the risks related to the use of genetically modified organisms in White Biotechnology are manageable. We conclude that the core requirements to be fulfilled in order to make clear steps towards a bio-based chemical industry are substantial technological progress in the

  5. Glass Formation, Chemical Properties and Surface Analysis of Cu-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihisa Inoue

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the influence of alloying elements Mo, Nb, Ta and Ni on glass formation and corrosion resistance of Cu-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs. In order to obtain basic knowledge for application to the industry, corrosion resistance of the Cu–Hf–Ti–(Mo, Nb, Ta, Ni and Cu–Zr–Ag–Al–(Nb bulk glassy alloy systems in various solutions are reported in this work. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS analysis is performed to clarify the surface-related chemical characteristics of the alloy before and after immersion in the solutions; this has lead to a better understanding of the correlation between the surface composition and the corrosion resistance.

  6. Producing Bio-Based Bulk Chemicals Using Industrial Biotechnology Saves Energy and Combats Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermann, B.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837415; Blok, K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07170275X; Patel, M.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/18988097X

    2007-01-01

    The production of bulk chemicals from biomass can make a significant contribution to solving two of the most urgent environmental problems: climate change and depletion of fossil energy. We analyzed current and future technology routes leading to 15 bulk chemicals using industrial biotechnology and

  7. Chemical compositions, methods of making the chemical compositions, and structures made from the chemical compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Cheng, Zhe; Liu, Ze; Liu, Meilin

    2015-01-13

    Embodiments of the present disclosure include chemical compositions, structures, anodes, cathodes, electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells, solid oxide fuel cells, fuel cells, fuel cell membranes, separation membranes, catalytic membranes, sensors, coatings for electrolytes, electrodes, membranes, and catalysts, and the like, are disclosed.

  8. The bulk composition, mineralogy and internal structure of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, John; Knittle, Elise; Holloway, John R.; Waenke, Heinrich

    1992-01-01

    A bulk composition for Mars is derived to a pressure-dependent mineralogy. The density distribution of the present model is compared with density distributions derived from the global gravity field. It is argued that the uppermost Martian mantle is likely to be dominated by olivine and orthopyroxene, as is the earth's upper mantle, although the Martian mantle has a lower MgO/(MgO + FeO) ratio (0.74 vs 0.89). The olivine-peridotite layer extends to a depth of 900 to 1100 km where the transition to silicate spinel begins. Calculations of the high-pressure liquidus and solidus temperatures indicate that for the case of a molten core the minimum temperature at the core-mantle boundary is about 2000 K, whereas for the case of a solid core the maximum temperature is about 1800 K. Summation of the masses in the various layers of Mars yields a value of 0.353 for the dimensionless moment of inertia, which is intermediate between the generally accepted value of 0.365 and the value of 0.345 predicated on a nonaxisymmetric distribution of mass about the Tharsis plateau.

  9. Microtensile bond strength of bulk-fill restorative composites to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandava, Jyothi; Vegesna, Divya-Prasanna; Ravi, Ravichandra; Boddeda, Mohan-Rao; Uppalapati, Lakshman-Varma; Ghazanfaruddin, M D

    2017-08-01

    To facilitate the easier placement of direct resin composite in deeper cavities, bulk fill composites have been introduced. The Mechanical stability of fillings in stress bearing areas restored with bulk-fill resin composites is still open to question, since long term clinical studies are not available so far. Thus, the objective of the study was to evaluate and compare the microtensile bond strength of three bulk-fill restorative composites with a nanohybrid composite. Class I cavities were prepared on sixty extracted mandibular molars. Teeth were divided into 4 groups (n= 15 each) and in group I, the prepared cavities were restored with nanohybrid (Filtek Z250 XT) restorative composite in an incremental manner. In group II, III and IV, the bulk-fill composites (Filtek, Tetric EvoCeram, X-tra fil bulk-fill restoratives) were placed as a 4 mm single increment and light cured. The restored teeth were subjected to thermocycling and bond strength testing was done using instron testing machine. The mode of failure was assessed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The bond strength values obtained in megapascals (MPa) were subjected to statistical analysis, using SPSS/PC version 20 software.One-way ANOVA was used for groupwise comparison of the bond strength. Tukey's Post Hoc test was used for pairwise comparisons among the groups. The highest mean bond strength was achieved with Filtek bulk-fill restorative showing statistically significant difference with Tetric EvoCeram bulk-fill ( p composites. Adhesive failures are mostly observed with X-tra fil bulk fill composites, whereas mixed failures are more common with other bulk fill composites. Bulk-fill composites exhibited adequate bond strength to dentin and can be considered as restorative material of choice in posterior stress bearing areas. Key words: Bond strength, Bulk-fill restoratives, Configuration factor, Polymerization shrinkage.

  10. Microalgae for the production of bulk chemicals and biofuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijffels, R.H.; Barbosa, M.J.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    The feasibility of microalgae production for biodiesel was discussed. Although algae are not yet produced at large scale for bulk applications, there are opportunities to develop this process in a sustainable way. It remains unlikely, however, that the process will be developed for biodiesel as the

  11. Effect of resin thickness on the microhardness and optical properties of bulk-fill resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ha; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Kil

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the resin thickness on the microhardness and optical properties of bulk-fill resin composites. Four bulk-fill (Venus Bulk Fill, Heraeus Kulzer; SDR, Dentsply Caulk; Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill, Ivoclar vivadent; SonicFill, Kerr) and two regular resin composites (Charisma flow, Heraeus Kulzer; Tetric N-Ceram, Ivoclar vivadent) were used. Sixty acrylic cylindrical molds were prepared for each thickness (2, 3 and 4 mm). The molds were divided into six groups for resin composites. The microhardness was measured on the top and bottom surfaces, and the colors were measured using Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) L (*) a (*) b (*) system. Color differences according to the thickness and translucency parameters and the correlations between the microhardness and translucency parameter were analyzed. The microhardness and color differences were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc test, and a student t-test, respectively. The level of significance was set to α = 0.05. The microhardness decreased with increasing resin thickness. The bulk-fill resin composites showed a bottom/top hardness ratio of almost 80% or more in 4 mm thick specimens. The highest translucency parameter was observed in Venus Bulk Fill. All resin composites used in this study except for Venus Bulk Fill showed linear correlations between the microhardness and translucency parameter according to the thickness. Within the limitations of this study, the bulk-fill resin composites used in this study can be placed and cured properly in the 4 mm bulk.

  12. Compositional ordering and stability in nanostructured, bulk thermoelectric alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Faleev, S.; Medlin, Douglas L.; Leonard, F.; Lensch-Falk, J.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Sugar, J. D.

    2009-09-01

    Thermoelectric materials have many applications in the conversion of thermal energy to electrical power and in solid-state cooling. One route to improving thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency in bulk material is to embed nanoscale inclusions. This report summarize key results from a recently completed LDRD project exploring the science underpinning the formation and stability of nanostructures in bulk thermoelectric and the quantitative relationships between such structures and thermoelectric properties.

  13. Cluster analysis on the bulk elemental compositions of Antarctic stony meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Niihara, Takafumi; Kuritani, Takeshi; Hong, Peng K.; Dohm, James M.; Sugita, Seiji

    2016-05-01

    Remote sensing observations by recent successful missions to small bodies have revealed the difficulty in classifying the materials which cover their surfaces into a conventional classification of meteorites. Although reflectance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for this purpose, it is influenced by many factors, such as space weathering, lighting conditions, and surface physical conditions (e.g., particle size and style of mixing). Thus, complementary information, such as elemental compositions, which can be obtained by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and gamma-ray spectrometers (GRS), have been considered very important. However, classifying planetary materials solely based on elemental compositions has not been investigated extensively. In this study, we perform principal component and cluster analyses on 12 major and minor elements of the bulk compositions of 500 meteorites reported in the National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR), Japan database. Our unique approach, which includes using hierarchical cluster analysis, indicates that meteorites can be classified into about 10 groups purely by their bulk elemental compositions. We suggest that Si, Fe, Mg, Ca, and Na are the optimal set of elements, as this set has been used successfully to classify meteorites of the NIPR database with more than 94% accuracy. Principal components analysis indicates that elemental compositions of meteorites form eight clusters in the three-dimensional space of the components. The three major principal components (PC1, PC2, and PC3) are interpreted as (1) degree of differentiations of the source body (i.e., primitive versus differentiated), (2) degree of thermal effects, and (3) degree of chemical fractionation, respectively.

  14. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K C; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-06-16

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19' phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties.

  15. Controlled Bulk Properties of Composite Polymeric Solutions for Extensive Structural Order of Honeycomb Polysulfone Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annarosa Gugliuzza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This work provides additional insights into the identification of operating conditions necessary to overcome a current limitation to the scale-up of the breath figure method, which is regarded as an outstanding manufacturing approach for structurally ordered porous films. The major restriction concerns, indeed, uncontrolled touching droplets at the boundary. Herein, the bulk of polymeric solutions are properly managed to generate honeycomb membranes with a long-range structurally ordered texture. Water uptake and dynamics are explored as chemical environments are changed with the intent to modify the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance and local water floatation. In this context, a model surfactant such as the polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate is used in combination with alcohols at different chain length extents and a traditional polymer such as the polyethersufone. Changes in the interfacial tension and kinematic viscosity taking place in the bulk of composite solutions are explored and examined in relation to competitive droplet nucleation and growth rate. As a result, extensive structurally ordered honeycomb textures are obtained with the rising content of the surfactant while a broad range of well-sized pores is targeted as a function of the hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance and viscosity of the composite polymeric mixture. The experimental findings confirm the consistency of the approach and are expected to give propulsion to the commercially production of breath figures films shortly.

  16. Evaluation of marginal integrity of four bulk-fill dental composite materials: in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orłowski, Mirosław; Tarczydło, Bożena; Chałas, Renata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare under in vitro conditions marginal sealing of 4 different bulk-fill materials composite restorations of class II. Comparative evaluation concerned 4 composites of a bulk-fill type: SonicFill, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Filtek Bulk Fill, and SDR. The study used 30 third molars without caries. In each tooth 4 cavities of class II were prepared. The prepared tooth samples were placed in a 1% methylene blue solution for 24 h, and after that in each restoration the depth of dye penetration along the side walls was evaluated. The highest rating (score 0, no dye penetration) was achieved by 93.33% of the restorations made of the SDR material, 90% of restorations of SonicFill system, 86.66% of restorations of the composite Filtek Bulk Fill, and 73.33% of restorations of the Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill. The performed study showed that bulk-fill flowable or sonic-activated flowable composite restorations have better marginal sealing (lack of discoloration) in comparison with bulk-fill paste-like composite.

  17. Cytotoxic effects of bulk fill composite resins on human dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şişman, Reyhan; Aksoy, Ayça; Yalçın, Muhammet; Karaöz, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Five bulk fill composite resins, including SDR, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEC), X-trafil (XTF), Sonic Fill (SF), Filtek Bulk Fill (FBF), were used in this study. Human dental pulp stem cells were cultured in 12-well culture dishes (3 × 104 cells per cm(2)) and stored in an incubator at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 1 day. On days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of co-culture, viable cells were measured using a WST-1 assay. Lower cell viability was observed with XTF and SDR bulk fill composite resins compared to the control group during the WST-1 assay. Although bulk fill composite resins provide advantages in practical applications, they are limited by their cytotoxic properties. (J Oral Sci 58, 299-305, 2016).

  18. Sustainable Production of Bulk Chemicals by Application of “White Biotechnology”

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, M.K.; Dornburg, V.; Hermann, B.G.; Shen, L.; Overbeek, van L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Practically all organic chemicals and plastics are nowadays produced from crude oil and natural gas. However, it is possible to produce a wide range of bulk chemicals from renewable resources by application of biotechnology. This paper focuses on White Biotechnology, which makes use of

  19. Composition and enzymatic activity in bulk milk from dairy farms with conventional or robotic milking systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, Monika; Lundh, Åse; Vries, de Ruben; Sjaunja, Kerstin Svennersten

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the studies reported in this research communication was to investigate differences in composition and enzymatic activities in bulk milk samples provided from Swedish dairy farms with different management systems, i.e. automated (AMS) and conventional milking systems (CMS). A bulk

  20. Effect of layer thickness on the elution of bulk-fill composite components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmund, Lena; Reichl, Franz-Xaver; Hickel, Reinhard; Styllou, Panorea; Styllou, Marianthi; Kehe, Kai; Yang, Yang; Högg, Christof

    2017-01-01

    An increment layering technique in a thickness of 2mm or less has been the standard to sufficiently convert (co)monomers. Bulk fill resin composites were developed to accelerate the restoration process by enabling up to 4mm thick increments to be cured in a single step. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of layer thickness on the elution of components from bulk fill composites. The composites ELS Bulk fill, SDR Bulk fill and Venus Bulkfill were polymerized according to the instruction of the manufacturers. For each composite three groups with four samples each (n=4) were prepared: (1) samples with a layer thickness of 2mm; (2) samples with a layer thickness of 4mm and (3) samples with a layer thickness of 6mm. The samples were eluted in methanol and water for 24h and 7 d. The eluates were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). A total of 11 different elutable substances have been identified from the investigated composites. Following methacrylates showed an increase of elution at a higher layer thickness: TEGDMA (SDR Bulk fill, Venus Bulk fill), EGDMA (Venus Bulk fill). There was no significant difference in the elution of HEMA regarding the layer thickness. The highest concentration of TEGDMA was 146μg/mL for SDR Bulk fill at a layer thickness of 6mm after 7 d in water. The highest HEMA concentration measured at 108μg/mL was detected in the methanol eluate of Venus Bulk fill after 7 d with a layer thickness of 6mm. A layer thickness of 4mm or more can lead to an increased elution of some bulk fill components, compared to the elution at a layer thickness of 2mm. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of LaFeCoSi alloy: Surface and bulk properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Basso, V.; Kuepferling, M.; Coïsson, M.; Olivetti, E. S.; Celegato, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), I-10135 Torino (Italy); Borgatti, F. [CNR, Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati (ISMN), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G. [CNR, Istituto Officina dei Materiali (IOM), Lab. TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Tortora, L. [Laboratorio di Analisi di Superficie, Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Università Tor Vergata, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G.; Offi, F. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

    2014-05-28

    We investigate the chemical, electronic, and magnetic structure of the magnetocaloric LaFeCoSi compound with bulk and surface sensitive techniques. We put in evidence that the surface retains a soft ferromagnetic behavior at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature of the bulk due to the presence of Fe clusters at the surface only. This peculiar magnetic surface effect is attributed to the exchange interaction between the ferromagnetic Fe clusters located at the surface and the bulk magnetocaloric alloy, and it is used here to monitor the magnetic properties of the alloy itself.

  2. Properties of dual-cure, bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalker, Jon Peter; Casey, Jeffery A; Lincoln, Todd A; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the properties of 2 new dual-cure, bulk-fill restorative composite resins to those of a hybrid composite resin material. Depth of cure, fracture toughness, porosity, microleakage, and volumetric shrinkage properties were examined. With the exception of fracture toughness, significant differences were found among materials. Compared to the incrementally placed hybrid composite, the dual-cure, bulk-fill restorative composites in self-cured mode had unlimited depth of cure, similar fracture toughness and porosity formation, and greater polymerization shrinkage and microleakage.

  3. Cuspal Deflection in Premolar Teeth Restored with Bulk-Fill Resin-Based Composite Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharkasi, M M; Platt, J A; Cook, N B; Yassen, G H; Matis, B A

    The present study investigated the effect of three high-viscosity bulk-fill resin-based composite materials on cuspal deflection in natural teeth. Thirty-two sound maxillary premolar teeth with large slot mesio-occlusal-distal cavities were distributed into four groups (n=8). Three groups were restored with bulk-fill resin composite materials (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein; x-tra fil, VOCO, Cuxhaven, Germany; and SonicFill, Kerr, Orange, CA, USA) in a single 4-mm increment. The conventional composite group, Filtek Z100 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), was used to restore the cavities in 2-mm increments. Cusp deflection was recorded postirradiation using a Nikon measurescope UM-2 (Nikon, Tokyo, Japan) by measuring the changes in the bucco-palatal widths of the teeth at five minutes, 24 hours, and 48 hours after completion of the restorations. Cuspal deflection was significantly higher in the conventional composite than in the Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill ( p=0.0031), x-tra fil ( p=0.0029), and SonicFill Bulk ( p=0.0002) groups. There were no significant differences in cuspal deflection among the three bulk-fill materials (all pcomposites exhibited cuspal deflection values that were smaller than those associated with a conventional incrementally placed resin composite.

  4. Bulk chemical analyses of petrographic thin sections of rocks of the Samli area, western Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, James R.; Leo, Gerhard W.

    1976-01-01

    Petrographic thin sections have been analyzed for their major-element composition using a fusion-dilution technique and measuring the intensity of X-rays by means of the electron microprobe. The balsam-mounted thin sections were removed from the glass slides by soaking them in methylene chloride. The freed sections were mixed with twice their weight of Li2B4O7, and fused at 1100° C. A fragment of the resulting glasslike bead was mounted for probe analysis. Both wavelength and energy-dispersive detector systems were used for quantitative determinations of elements sodium through iron. Because the samples and standards are diluted and fused, powdered rock standards may be used as reference materials. The calibration curves obtained by plotting X-ray intensity versus concentration of the analyte are linear over the concentration ranges used in this work and have an overall range of error of 2 to 8 percent. Although some of the analytical values show excessive scatter for petrographically similar rocks, in general the analyses are acceptable given the sample size and analytical uncertainties. Bulk chemical analyses were made of 18 thin sections, including altered diabase, amphibolite, and calc-silicate hornfels produced by progressive contact metamorphism and associated with metasomatic magnetite deposits in the Samli area, western Turkey. Normative plots indicate that (1) diabase and amphibolite are compositionally related and are similar to average compositions of basalts and orthoamphibolites, and (2) calc-silicate hornfels appears to have been derived in part from amphibolite and in part from crystalline limestone that underlies much of the region.

  5. Chemical Composition of Ceramic Tile Glazes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufrik, S. S.; Kurian, N. N.; Zhukova, I. I.; Znosko, K. F.; Belkov, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out laser emission and x-ray fluorescence spectral analysis of glaze before and after its application to ceramic tile produced by Keramin JSC (Belarus). We have studied the internal microstructure of the ceramic samples. It was established that on the surface and within the bulk interior of all the samples, there are micropores of sizes ranging from a few micrometers to tens of micrometers and microcracks as long as several hundred micrometers. The presence of micropores on the surface of the ceramic tile leads to an increase in the water absorption level and a decrease in frost resistance. It was found that a decrease in the surface tension of ceramic tile coatings is promoted by substitution of sodium by potassium, silica by boric anhydride, magnesium and barium by calcium, CaO by sodium oxide, and SiO2 by chromium oxide. We carried out a comparative analysis of the chemical composition of glaze samples using S4 Pioneer and ElvaX x-ray fluorescence spectrometers and also an LIBS laser emission analyzer.

  6. Effect of the method for producing Cu–Cr3C2 bulk composites on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 40; Issue 5. Effect of the method for producing Cu–Cr 3 C 2 bulk composites on the structure and properties ... A composite obtained bythe MPC of the powders synthesized using solid-phase mechano synthesis (MS) (copper, chromium and graphite) had thehighest ...

  7. Survey of transportation of liquid bulk chemicals in the Baltic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posti, A.; Hakkinen, J.

    2012-07-01

    This study is made as a part of the Chembaltic (Risks of Maritime Transportation of Chemicals in Baltic Sea) project which gathers information on the chemicals transported in the Baltic Sea. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of handling volumes of liquid bulk chemicals (including liquefied gases) in the Baltic Sea ports and to find out what the most transported liquid bulk chemicals in the Baltic Sea are. Oil and oil products are also viewed in this study but only in a general level. Oils and oil products may also include chemical-related substances (e.g. certain bio-fuels which belong to MARPOL annex II category) in some cargo statistics. Chemicals in packaged form are excluded from the study. Most of the facts about the transport volumes of chemicals presented in this study are based on secondary written sources of Scandinavian, Russian, Baltic and international origin. Furthermore, statistical sources, academic journals, periodicals, newspapers and in later years also different homepages on the Internet have been used as sources of information. Chemical handling volumes in Finnish ports were examined in more detail by using a nationwide vessel traffic system called PortNet. Many previous studies have shown that the Baltic Sea ports are annually handling more than 11 million tonnes of liquid chemicals transported in bulk. Based on this study, it appears that the number may be even higher. The liquid bulk chemicals account for approximately 4 % of the total amount of liquid bulk cargoes handled in the Baltic Sea ports. Most of the liquid bulk chemicals are handled in Finnish and Swedish ports and their proportion of all liquid chemicals handled in the Baltic Sea is altogether over 50 %. The most handled chemicals in the Baltic Sea ports are methanol, sodium hydroxide solution, ammonia, sulphuric and phosphoric acid, pentanes, aromatic free solvents, xylenes, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and ethanol and ethanol solutions. All of these chemicals

  8. Electrically conductive bulk composites through a contact-connected aggregate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan I Nawroj

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a concept that allows the creation of low-resistance composites using a network of compliant conductive aggregate units, connected through contact, embedded within the composite. Due to the straight-forward fabrication method of the aggregate, conductive composites can be created in nearly arbitrary shapes and sizes, with a lower bound near the length scale of the conductive cell used in the aggregate. The described instantiation involves aggregate cells that are approximately spherical copper coils-of-coils within a polymeric matrix, but the concept can be implemented with a wide range of conductor elements, cell geometries, and matrix materials due to its lack of reliance on specific material chemistries. The aggregate cell network provides a conductive pathway that can have orders of magnitude lower resistance than that of the matrix material--from 10(12 ohm-cm (approx. for pure silicone rubber to as low as 1 ohm-cm for the silicone/copper composite at room temperature for the presented example. After describing the basic concept and key factors involved in its success, three methods of implementing the aggregate into a matrix are then addressed--unjammed packing, jammed packing, and pre-stressed jammed packing--with an analysis of the tradeoffs between increased stiffness and improved resistivity.

  9. Radiopacity of bulk fill flowable resin composite materials

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-23

    Aug 23, 2015 ... selected by avoiding areas containing air bubbles inside the material. This procedure was repeated 5 times for each specimen and aluminum stepwedge, and the .... Financial support and sponsorship. Nil. Conflicts of interest. There are no conflicts of interest. References. 1. Ferracane JL. Resin composite ...

  10. SWOT analysis for safer carriage of bulk liquid chemicals in tankers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Ozcan; Er, Ismail Deha

    2008-06-15

    The application of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis to formulation of strategy concerned with the safe carriage of bulk liquid chemicals in maritime tankers was examined in this study. A qualitative investigation using SWOT analysis has been implemented successfully for ships that are designed to carry liquid chemicals in bulk. The originality of this study lies in the use of SWOT analysis as a management tool to formulate strategic action plans for ship management companies, ship masters and officers for the carriage of dangerous goods in bulk. With this transportation-based SWOT analysis, efforts were made to explore the ways and means of converting possible threats into opportunities, and changing weaknesses into strengths; and strategic plans of action were developed for safer tanker operation.

  11. Today’s and tomorrow’s bio-based bulk chemicals from white biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermann, B.G.; Patel, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    Little information is yet available on the economic viability of the production of bio-based bulk chemicals and intermediates from white biotechnology (WB). This paper details a methodology to systematically evaluate the techno-economic prospects of present and future production routes of bio-based

  12. Effect of preheating and light-curing unit on physicochemical properties of a bulk fill composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobaldo, Jéssica Dias; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Pini, Núbia Inocencya Pavesi; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Liporoni, Priscila Christiane Suzy; Catelan, Anderson

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of composite preheating and polymerization mode on degree of conversion (DC), microhardness (KHN), plasticization (P), and depth of polymerization (DP) of a bulk fill composite. Forty disc-shaped samples (n = 5) of a bulk fill composite were prepared (5 × 4 mm thick) and randomly divided into 4 groups according to light-curing unit (quartz-tungsten-halogen [QTH] or light-emitting diode [LED]) and preheating temperature (23 or 54 °C). A control group was prepared with a flowable composite at room temperature. DC was determined using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, KHN was measured with a Knoop indenter, P was evaluated by percentage reduction of hardness after 24 h of ethanol storage, and DP was obtained by bottom/top ratio. Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Regardless of light-curing, the highest preheating temperature increased DC compared to room temperature on bottom surface. LED showed a higher DC compared to QTH. Overall, DC was higher on top surface than bottom. KHN, P, and DP were not affected by curing mode and temperature, and flowable composite showed similar KHN, and lower DC and P, compared to bulk fill. Composite preheating increased the polymerization degree of 4-mm-increment bulk fill, but it led to a higher plasticization compared to the conventional flowable composite evaluated.

  13. Polymerization Behavior and Mechanical Properties of High-Viscosity Bulk Fill and Low Shrinkage Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibasaki, S; Takamizawa, T; Nojiri, K; Imai, A; Tsujimoto, A; Endo, H; Suzuki, S; Suda, S; Barkmeier, W W; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    The present study determined the mechanical properties and volumetric polymerization shrinkage of different categories of resin composite. Three high viscosity bulk fill resin composites were tested: Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TB, Ivoclar Vivadent), Filtek Bulk Fill posterior restorative (FB, 3M ESPE), and Sonic Fill (SF, Kerr Corp). Two low-shrinkage resin composites, Kalore (KL, GC Corp) and Filtek LS Posterior (LS, 3M ESPE), were used. Three conventional resin composites, Herculite Ultra (HU, Kerr Corp), Estelite ∑ Quick (EQ, Tokuyama Dental), and Filtek Supreme Ultra (SU, 3M ESPE), were used as comparison materials. Following ISO Specification 4049, six specimens for each resin composite were used to determine flexural strength, elastic modulus, and resilience. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage was determined using a water-filled dilatometer. Data were evaluated using analysis of variance followed by Tukey's honestly significant difference test (α=0.05). The flexural strength of the resin composites ranged from 115.4 to 148.1 MPa, the elastic modulus ranged from 5.6 to 13.4 GPa, and the resilience ranged from 0.70 to 1.0 MJ/m 3 . There were significant differences in flexural properties between the materials but no clear outliers. Volumetric changes as a function of time over a duration of 180 seconds depended on the type of resin composite. However, for all the resin composites, apart from LS, volumetric shrinkage began soon after the start of light irradiation, and a rapid decrease in volume during light irradiation followed by a slower decrease was observed. The low shrinkage resin composites KL and LS showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested materials at the measuring point of 180 seconds. In contrast, the three bulk fill resin composites showed higher volumetric change than the other resin composites. The findings from this study provide clinicians with valuable information regarding the mechanical properties and

  14. Internal Structure and Mineralogy of Differentiated Asteroids Assuming Chondritic Bulk Composition: The Case of Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, M. J.; Mizzon, H.; Forni, O.; Monnereau, M.; Prettyman, T. H.; McSween, H. Y.; McCoy, T. J.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Raymond, C. A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Bulk composition (including oxygen content) is a primary control on the internal structure and mineralogy of differentiated asteroids. For example, oxidation state will affect core size, as well as Mg# and pyroxene content of the silicate mantle. The Howardite-Eucrite-Diogenite class of meteorites (HED) provide an interesting test-case of this idea, in particular in light of results of the Dawn mission which provide information on the size, density and differentiation state of Vesta, the parent body of the HED's. In this work we explore plausible bulk compositions of Vesta and use mass-balance and geochemical modelling to predict possible internal structures and crust/mantle compositions and mineralogies. Models are constrained to be consistent with known HED samples, but the approach has the potential to extend predictions to thermodynamically plausible rock types that are not necessarily present in the HED collection. Nine chondritic bulk compositions are considered (CI, CV, CO, CM, H, L, LL, EH, EL). For each, relative proportions and densities of the core, mantle, and crust are quantified. Considering that the basaltic crust has the composition of the primitive eucrite Juvinas and assuming that this crust is in thermodynamic equilibrium with the residual mantle, it is possible to calculate how much iron is in metallic form (in the core) and how much in oxidized form (in the mantle and crust) for a given bulk composition. Of the nine bulk compositions tested, solutions corresponding to CI and LL groups predicted a negative metal fraction and were not considered further. Solutions for enstatite chondrites imply significant oxidation relative to the starting materials and these solutions too are considered unlikely. For the remaining bulk compositions, the relative proportion of crust to bulk silicate is typically in the range 15 to 20% corresponding to crustal thicknesses of 15 to 20 km for a porosity-free Vesta-sized body. The mantle is predicted to be largely

  15. Chemical composition of Chinese palm fruit and chemical properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PO and PKO exhibited good chemical properties and could be used as edible oils and for industrial applications. There are almost no data about Chinese palm fruit now and this study systematically researched on it, which can provide useful information for Chinese oil palm industry. Key words: Chemical composition, palm ...

  16. Anaerobic Fermentation for Production of Carboxylic Acids as Bulk Chemicals from Renewable Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jufang; Lin, Meng; Xu, Mengmeng; Yang, Shang-Tian

    Biomass represents an abundant carbon-neutral renewable resource which can be converted to bulk chemicals to replace petrochemicals. Carboxylic acids have wide applications in the chemical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. This chapter provides an overview of recent advances and challenges in the industrial production of various types of carboxylic acids, including short-chain fatty acids (acetic, propionic, butyric), hydroxy acids (lactic, 3-hydroxypropionic), dicarboxylic acids (succinic, malic, fumaric, itaconic, adipic, muconic, glucaric), and others (acrylic, citric, gluconic, pyruvic) by anaerobic fermentation. For economic production of these carboxylic acids as bulk chemicals, the fermentation process must have a sufficiently high product titer, productivity and yield, and low impurity acid byproducts to compete with their petrochemical counterparts. System metabolic engineering offers the tools needed to develop novel strains that can meet these process requirements for converting biomass feedstock to the desirable product.

  17. Viscoelastic properties, creep behavior and degree of conversion of bulk fill composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadogiannis, D; Tolidis, K; Gerasimou, P; Lakes, R; Papadogiannis, Y

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the viscoelastic properties and creep behavior of bulk fill composites under different conditions and evaluate their degree of conversion. Seven bulk fill composites were examined: everX Posterior (EV), SDR (SD), SonicFill (SF), Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TE), Venus Bulk Fill (VE), x-tra base (XB) and x-tra fil (XF). Each material was tested at 21°C, 37°C and 50°C under dry and wet conditions by applying a constant torque for static and creep testing and dynamic torsional loading for dynamic testing. Degree of conversion (%DC) was measured on the top and bottom surfaces of composites with ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Statistical analysis was performed with two-way ANOVA, Bonferroni's post hoc test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Shear modulus G ranged from 2.17GPa (VE) to 8.03GPa (XF) and flexural modulus E from 6.16GPa (VE) to 23GPa (XF) when the materials were tested dry at 21°C. The increase of temperature and the presence of water lead to a decline of these properties. Flowable materials used as base composites in restorations showed significantly lower values (p<0.05) than non-base composites, while being more prone to creep deformation. %DC ranged from 47.25% (XF) to 66.67% (SD) at the top material surface and 36.06% (XF) to 63.20% (SD) at the bottom. Bulk fill composites exhibited significant differences between them with base flowable materials showing in most cases inferior mechanical properties and higher degree of conversion than restorative bulk fill materials. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of Bulk Depth and Irradiation Time on the Surface Hardness and Degree of Cure of Bulk-Fill Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahat F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: For many years, application of the composite restoration with a thickness less than 2 mm for achieving the minimum polymerization contraction and stress has been accepted as a principle. But through the recent development in dental material a group of resin based composites (RBCs called Bulk Fill is introduced whose producers claim the possibility of achieving a good restoration in bulks with depths of 4 or even 5 mm. Objectives: To evaluate the effect of irradiation times and bulk depths on the degree of cure (DC of a bulk fill composite and compare it with the universal type. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on two groups of dental RBCs including Tetric N Ceram Bulk Fill and Tetric N Ceram Universal. The composite samples were prepared in Teflon moulds with a diameter of 5 mm and height of 2, 4 and 6 mm. Then, half of the samples in each depth were cured from the upper side of the mould for 20s by LED light curing unit. The irradiation time for other specimens was 40s. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water, the microhardness of the top and bottom of the samples was measured using a Future Tech (Japan- Model FM 700 Vickers hardness testing machine. Data were analyzed statistically using the one and multi way ANOVAand Tukey’s test (p = 0.050. Results: The DC of Tetric N Ceram Bulk Fill in defined irradiation time and bulk depth was significantly more than the universal type (p < 0.001. Also, the DC of both composites studied was significantly (p < 0.001 reduced by increasing the bulk depths. Increasing the curing time from 20 to 40 seconds had a marginally significant effect (p ≤ 0.040 on the DC of both bulk fill and universal studied RBC samples. Conclusions: The DC of the investigated bulk fill composite was better than the universal type in all the irradiation times and bulk depths. The studied universal and bulk fill RBCs had an appropriate DC at the 2 and 4 mm bulk depths respectively and

  19. Chemical composition of Clinopodium menthifolium aqueous extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition of Clinopodium menthifolium aqueous extract and its influence on antioxidant system in black nightshade (Solanum nigrum) and pepper (Capsicum annuum) seedlings and mortality rate of whitefly (Trialeurodes vaporariorum) adults.

  20. Use of thermal neutron reflection method for chemical analysis of bulk samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, A., E-mail: papppa@atomki.hu [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, (ATOMKI), 4001 Debrecen, Pf. 51 (Hungary); Csikai, J. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, (ATOMKI), 4001 Debrecen, Pf. 51 (Hungary); Institute of Experimental Physics, University Debrecen (IEP), 4010 Debrecen-10, Pf. 105 (Hungary)

    2014-09-11

    Microscopic, σ{sub β}, and macroscopic, Σ{sub β}, reflection cross-sections of thermal neutrons averaged over bulk samples as a function of thickness (z) are given. The σ{sub β} values are additive even for bulk samples in the z=0.5–8 cm interval and so the σ{sub βmol}(z) function could be given for hydrogenous substances, including some illicit drugs, explosives and hiding materials of ∼1000 cm{sup 3} dimensions. The calculated excess counts agree with the measured R(z) values. For the identification of concealed objects and chemical analysis of bulky samples, different neutron methods need to be used simultaneously. - Highlights: • Check the proposed analytical expression for the description of the flux. • Determination of the reflection cross-sections averaged over bulk samples. • Data rendered to estimate the excess counts for various materials.

  1. Depth of cure of resin composites: is the ISO 4049 method suitable for bulk fill materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Hayoz, Stefanie; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Hüsler, Jürg; Lussi, Adrian

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate if depth of cure D(ISO) determined by the ISO 4049 method is accurately reflected with bulk fill materials when compared to depth of cure D(new) determined by Vickers microhardness profiles. D(ISO) was determined according to "ISO 4049; Depth of cure" and resin composite specimens (n=6 per group) were prepared of two control materials (Filtek Supreme Plus, Filtek Silorane) and four bulk fill materials (Surefil SDR, Venus Bulk Fill, Quixfil, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) and light-cured for either 10s or 20s. For D(new), a mold was filled with one of the six resin composites and light-cured for either 10 s or 20 s (n=22 per group). The mold was placed under a microhardness indentation device and hardness measurements (Vickers hardness, VHN) were made at defined distances, beginning at the resin composite that had been closest to the light-curing unit (i.e. at the "top") and proceeding toward the uncured resin composite (i.e. toward the "bottom"). On the basis of the VHN measurements, Vickers hardness profiles were generated for each group. D(ISO) varied between 1.76 and 6.49 mm with the bulk fill materials showing the highest D(ISO). D(new) varied between 0.2 and 4.0 mm. D(new) was smaller than D(ISO) for all resin composites except Filtek Silorane. For bulk fill materials the ISO 4049 method overestimated depth of cure compared to depth of cure determined by Vickers hardness profiles. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force ...

  3. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. Material and methods: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.......4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4...... mm as needed to fill the cavity 2 mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2 mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly...

  4. Factors affecting marginal integrity of class II bulk-fill composite resin restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Jafari Navimipour, Elmira; Ajami, Amir Ahmad; Ghiasvand, Negar; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2017-01-01

    Background. Bulk-fill composite resins are a new type of resin-based composite resins, claimed to have the capacity to be placed in thick layers, up to 4 mm. This study was carried out to evaluate factors affecting gap formation in Cl II cavities restored using the bulk-fill technique. Methods. A total of 60 third molars were used in this study. Two Cl II cavities were prepared in each tooth, one on the mesial aspect 1 mm coronal to the CEJ and one on the distal aspect 1 mm apical to the CEJ. The teeth were divided into 4 groups: A: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with Filtek P90 composite resin and its adhesive system and light-cured with quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light-curing unit. B: The cavities were restored similar to that in group A but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. C: The cavities were restored using the bulk-fill technique with X-tra Fil composite resin and Clearfil SE Bond adhesive system and light-cured with a QTH curing unit. D: The cavities were restored similar to that in group C but light-cured with an LED light-curing unit. The gaps were examined under a stereomicroscope at ×60. Data were analyzed with General Linear Model test. In cases of statistical significance (Pcomposite resin type and margin location (Pcomposite resin type were not significant; however, the cumulative effect of composite rein type*gingival margin was significant (P=0.04) Conclusion. X-tra Fil composite exhibited smaller gaps compared with Filtek P90 composite with both light-curing units. Both composite resins exhibited smaller gaps at enamel margins.

  5. Effect of preheating and light-curing unit on physicochemical properties of a bulk fill composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theobaldo JD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jéssica Dias Theobaldo,1 Flávio Henrique Baggio Aguiar,1 Núbia Inocencya Pavesi Pini,2 Débora Alves Nunes Leite Lima,1 Priscila Christiane Suzy Liporoni,3 Anderson Catelan3 1Department of Restorative Dentistry, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, 2Ingá University Center, Maringá, 3Departament of Dentistry, University of Taubaté, Taubaté, Brazil Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of composite preheating and polymerization mode on degree of conversion (DC, microhardness (KHN, plasticization (P, and depth of polymerization (DP of a bulk fill composite.Methods: Forty disc-shaped samples (n = 5 of a bulk fill composite were prepared (5 × 4 mm thick and randomly divided into 4 groups according to light-curing unit (quartz–tungsten–halogen [QTH] or light-emitting diode [LED] and preheating temperature (23 or 54 °C. A control group was prepared with a flowable composite at room temperature. DC was determined using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, KHN was measured with a Knoop indenter, P was evaluated by percentage reduction of hardness after 24 h of ethanol storage, and DP was obtained by bottom/top ratio. Data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05.Results: Regardless of light-curing, the highest preheating temperature increased DC compared to room temperature on bottom surface. LED showed a higher DC compared to QTH. Overall, DC was higher on top surface than bottom. KHN, P, and DP were not affected by curing mode and temperature, and flowable composite showed similar KHN, and lower DC and P, compared to bulk fill.Conclusion: Composite preheating increased the polymerization degree of 4-mm-increment bulk fill, but it led to a higher plasticization compared to the conventional flowable composite evaluated. Keywords: composite resins, physicochemical phenomena, polymerization, hardness, heating

  6. Chemical potential in active systems: predicting phase equilibrium from bulk equations of state?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Siddharth; Rodenburg, Jeroen; van Roij, René; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2018-01-01

    We derive a microscopic expression for a quantity μ that plays the role of chemical potential of active Brownian particles (ABPs) in a steady state in the absence of vortices. We show that μ consists of (i) an intrinsic chemical potential similar to passive systems, which depends on density and self-propulsion speed, but not on the external potential, (ii) the external potential, and (iii) a newly derived one-body swim potential due to the activity of the particles. Our simulations on ABPs show good agreement with our Fokker–Planck calculations, and confirm that μ (z) is spatially constant for several inhomogeneous active fluids in their steady states in a planar geometry. Finally, we show that phase coexistence of ABPs with a planar interface satisfies not only mechanical but also diffusive equilibrium. The coexistence can be well-described by equating the bulk chemical potential and bulk pressure obtained from bulk simulations for systems with low activity but requires explicit evaluation of the interfacial contributions at high activity.

  7. Bulk Compositional Trends in Meteorites: A Guide for Analysis and Interpretation of NEAR XGRS Data from Asteroid 433 Eros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittler, L. R.; Clark, P. E.; McCoy, T. J.; Murphy, M. E.; Trombka, J. I.

    2000-01-01

    We have compiled a large database of bulk meteorite elemental compositions. We investigate compositional trends in a variety of meteorite classes to aid in interpretation of NEAR XGRS elemental abundance data from the asteroid Eros.

  8. Binary stars: Mass transfer and chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that mass exchange (and mass loss) within a binary system should produce observable changes in the surface chemical composition of both the mass losing and mass gaining stars as a stellar interior exposed to nucleosyntheses is uncovered. Three topics relating mass exchange and/or mass loss to nucleosynthesis are sketched: the chemical composition of Algol systems; the accretion disk of a cataclysmic variable fed by mass from a dwarf secondary star; and the hypothesis that classical Ba II giants result from mass transfer from a more evolved companion now present as a white dwarf.

  9. Depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-03-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the depth of cure, flexural properties and volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill giomers and resin composites. Depth of cure and flexural properties were determined according to ISO 4049, and volumetric shrinkage was measured using a dilatometer. The depths of cure of giomers were significantly lower than those of resin composites, regardless of photo polymerization times. No difference in flexural strength and modulus was found among either high or low viscosity bulk fill materials. Volumetric shrinkage of low and high viscosity bulk-fill resin composites was significantly less than low and high viscosity giomers. Depth of cure of both low and high viscosity bulk-fill materials is time dependent. Flexural strength and modulus of high viscosity or low viscosity bulk-fill giomer or resin composite materials are not different for their respective category. Resin composites exhibited less polymerization shrinkage than giomers.

  10. Nacre-mimetic bulk lamellar composites reinforced with high aspect ratio glass flakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Selen N Gurbuz; Dericioglu, Arcan F

    2016-12-05

    Nacre-mimetic epoxy matrix composites reinforced with readily available micron-sized high aspect ratio C-glass flakes were fabricated by a relatively simple, single-step, scalable, time, cost and man-power effective processing strategy: hot-press assisted slip casting (HASC). HASC enables the fabrication of preferentially oriented two-dimensional inorganic reinforcement-polymer matrix bulk lamellar composites with a micro-scale structure resembling the brick-and-mortar architecture of nacre. By applying the micro-scale design guideline found in nacre and optimizing the relative volume fractions of the reinforcement and the matrix as well as by anchoring the brick-and-mortar architecture, and tailoring the interface between reinforcements and the matrix via silane coupling agents, strong, stiff and tough bio-inspired nacre-mimetic bulk composites were fabricated. As a result of high shear stress transfer lengths and effective stress transfer at the interface achieved through surface functionalization of the reinforcements, fabricated bulk composites exhibited enhanced mechanical performance as compared to neat epoxy. Furthermore, governed flake pull-out mode along with a highly torturous crack path, which resulted from extensive deflection and meandering of the advancing crack around well-aligned high aspect ratio C-glass flakes, have led to high work-of-fracture values similar to nacre.

  11. Creep deformation of restorative resin-composites intended for bulk-fill placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-08-01

    To determine the creep deformation of several "bulk-fill" resin-composite formulations in comparison with some other types. Six resin-composites; four bulk-fill and two conventional were investigated. Stainless steel split molds (4 mm × 6 mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens for creep testing. Specimens were thoroughly irradiated with 650 mW cm(-2). A total of 10 specimens for each material were divided into two groups (n = 5) according to the storage condition; Group A stored dry at 37 °C for 24h and Group B stored in distilled water at 37 °C in an incubator for 24h. Each specimen was loaded (20 MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. The strain deformation was recorded continuously for 4h. Statistical analysis was performed using a two-way ANOVA followed by one-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test at a significance level of a = 0.05. The maximum creep strain % ranged from 0.72% up to 1.55% for Group A and the range for Group B increased from 0.79% up to 1.80% due to water sorption. Also, the permanent set ranged from 0.14% up to 0.47% for Group A and from 0.20% up to 0.59% for Group B. Dependent on the material and storage condition, the percentage of creep strain recovery ranged between 64% and 81%. Increased filler loading in the bulk-fill materials decreased the creep strain magnitude. Creep deformation of all studied resin-composites increased with wet storage. The "bulk-fill" composites exhibited an acceptable creep deformation and within the range exhibited by other resin-composites. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanoindentation creep versus bulk compressive creep of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Akhtar, R; Watts, D C

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate nanoindentation as an experimental tool for characterizing the viscoelastic time-dependent creep of resin-composites and to compare the resulting parameters with those obtained by bulk compressive creep. Ten dental resin-composites: five conventional, three bulk-fill and two flowable were investigated using both nanoindentation creep and bulk compressive creep methods. For nano creep, disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material by first injecting the resin-composite paste into metallic molds. Specimens were irradiated from top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points to ensure optimal polymerization using a visible light curing unit with output irradiance of 650mW/cm(2). Specimens then were mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. Following grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h. Using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius), the nano creep was measured at a maximum load of 10mN and the creep recovery was determined when each specimen was unloaded to 1mN. For bulk compressive creep, stainless steel split molds (4mm×6mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens which were thoroughly irradiated at 650mW/cm(2) from multiple directions and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24h. Specimens were loaded (20MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. One-way ANOVA, Levene's test for homogeneity of variance and the Bonferroni post hoc test (all at p≤0.05), plus regression plots, were used for statistical analysis. Dependent on the type of resin-composite material and the loading/unloading parameters, nanoindentation creep ranged from 29.58nm to 90.99nm and permanent set ranged from 8.96nm to 30.65nm. Bulk compressive creep ranged from 0.47% to 1.24% and permanent set ranged from 0.09% to 0.38%. There was a significant (p=0.001) strong positive non-linear correlation (r(2)=0.97) between bulk

  13. Water sorption and solubility of bulk-fill composites polymerized with a third generation LED LCU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misilli, Tuğba; Gönülol, Nihan

    2017-09-28

    The aim of this study was to compare the degree of water sorption and solubility in bulk-fills after curing with a polywave light source. A total of 120 disc-shaped specimens (8 mm diameter; 4 mm depth) were prepared from three regular bulk-fill materials (X-tra Fil, Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill, SonicFill), and a control material (Filtek Z250), cured in 3 different modes (standard: 1000 mW/cm2-20 s; high power: 1400 mW/cm2-12 s; xtra power: 3200 mW/cm2-6 s) using a third generation light-emitting diode light curing unit. Water sorption and solubility levels of the specimens were measured according to the ISO 4049:2009 specification after storing in distilled water for 30 days. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (p solubility values were obtained for SonicFill. No statistically significant differences were found among other groups. No significant correlation was detected between water sorption and solubility. The traditional composite group exhibited a higher water sorption values than the bulk-fills. The reduction in polymerization time significantly increased the sorption of SonicFill. SonicFill showed the highest water solubility value among the composites tested.

  14. Effects of soil management systems on soil microbial activity, bulk density and chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valpassos Maria Alexandra Reis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to study the effects of soil management systems on the bulk density, chemical soil properties, and on the soil microbial activity on a Latossolo Vermelho distrófico (Oxisol. Soil samples were collected from plots under the following management conditions: a natural dense "cerrado" vegetation (savanna; b degraded Brachiaria decumbens pasture, 20 years old; c no-tillage treatment with annual crop sequence (bean, corn, soybean and dark-oat in continuous rotation, 8 years old; d conventional tillage treatment with crop residues added to the soil, and annual crop sequence, 10 years old. The continuous use of no-tillage system resulted in an increase in microbial biomass and decrease in soil basal respiration, therefore displaying evident long-term effects on the increase of soil C content. The no-tillage system also provided an improvement in bulk density and chemical properties of the soil. Hence, the no-tillage management system could be an alternative for the conservation and maintenance of physical and chemical conditions and the productive potential of "cerrado" soils.

  15. Wear Resistance of Bulk-fill Composite Resin Restorative Materials Polymerized under different Curing Intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the wear resistance of four bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials cured using high- and low-intensity lights. Twenty-four samples were prepared from each composite resin material (Tetric N-Ceram, SonicFill, Smart Dentin Replacement, Filtek Bulk-Fill) resulting in a total of 96 samples; they were placed into a mold in a single increment. All of the 96 samples were cured using the Bluephase N light curing unit for 20 seconds. Half of the total specimens (n = 48) were light cured using high-intensity output (1,200 mW/cm2), while the remaining half (n = 48) were light cured using low-intensity output (650 mW/cm2). Wear was analyzed by a three-dimensional (3D) noncontact optical profilometer (Contour GT-I, Bruker, Germany). Mean and standard deviation (SD) of surface loss (depth) after 120,000 cycles for each test material was calculated and analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a significance level at p materials with each other without taking the curing light intensity into consideration (p = 0.352). A significant difference in the mean surface loss was observed between SonicFill cured using high-intensity light compared with that cured using low-intensity light (p resistance of the four bulk-fill composite resin restorative materials tested compared with lower curing light intensity (650 mW/cm2). Furthermore, SonicFill cured using low-intensity light was the most wear-resistant material tested, whereas Tetric N-Ceram cured using high-intensity light was the least wear resistant. The wear resistance was better with the newly introduced bulk-fill composite resins under low-intensity light curing.

  16. Chemical composition and strength of dolomite geopolymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizat, E. A.; Al Bakri, A. M. M.; Liew, Y. M.; Heah, C. Y.

    2017-09-01

    The chemical composition of dolomite and the compressive strength of dolomite geopolymer composites were studied. The both composites prepared with mechanical mixer manufactured by with rotor speed of 350 rpm and curing in the oven for 24 hours at 80˚C. XRF analysis showThe dolomite raw materials contain fewer amounts of Si and Al but high Ca in its composition. Dolomite geopolymer composites with 20M of NaOH shows greater and optimum compressive strength compared to dolomite geopolymer with other NaOH molarity. This indicated better interaction of dolomite raw material and alkaline activator need high molarity of NaOH in order to increase the reactivity of dolomite.

  17. determination the chemical composition, the physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. IDARA AKPABIO

    ... can be used in many industrial preparations such as food supplements and body cream. However sufficient information on the physicochemical properties of the oil extract and the amino acid profiles of the seeds of Telfairia occidentalis are inadequate. Therefore, in this study, the chemical composition of the seed of fluted.

  18. Chemical composition, true metabolisable energy content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aneldavh

    characteristics (thousand seed and hectolitre mass), chemical composition (dry matter, ash, crude protein. (CP), ether extract, acid detergent fibre, neutral detergent fibre and mineral content), energy values (nitrogen corrected true metabolisable energy content (TMEn for roosters)) as well as the lysine and methionine.

  19. Chemical composition, true metabolisable energy content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition, true metabolisable energy content and amino acid availability of grain legumes for poultry. ... TS Brand, DA Brandt, CW Cruywagen ... energy values (nitrogen corrected true metabolisable energy content (TMEn for roosters)) as well as the lysine and methionine availability (with roosters) of the ...

  20. Chemical Composition, antioxidant activity, functional properties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-23

    Nov 23, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. Chemical Composition, antioxidant activity, ... 1Biochemistry Department, National Root Crops Research Institute, Umudike, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria. 2Department of Biochemistry, Michael ... alkaloid and 0.98 ± 0.00% flavonoid. The unripe plantain flour was found to have ...

  1. Fermentation characteristics and chemical composition of silage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermentation characteristics were determined by measuring: pH, lactic acid, acetic acid, butyric acid, and ammonia-nitrogen. Effective preservation with a favourable .... Table 1 Chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility of manure and maize residues used in. Replications 1 and 2. Replication 1. Replication 2.

  2. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Geniosporum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Geniosporum rotundifolium Briq and Haumaniastrum villosum (Bene) AJ Paton (Lamiaceae) Essential Oils from Tanzania. ... The oil of G. rotundifolium exhibited weak to moderate activity against the bacterial species but showed no activity against the test fungi. However ...

  3. Studies on the chemical composition and physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... establish the proximate composition and the physico-chemical characteristics of the oil and effect of storage on the oil. Results obtained showed that the saponification value (SV), iodine value (IV), peroxide value (PV), acid value (AV), percentage free fatty acid (%FFA) and refractive index of the oil are 196 ± 0.05 mg/KOH ...

  4. Determination of the chemical composition, the physicochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of the chemical composition, the physicochemical properties of the oil extract and the amino acid profiles of the seeds of Telfairia occidentalis ... The physicochemical properties of the seed oil show that the oil has high saponification value, low free fatty acid, low peroxide value and specific gravity of 0.87, thus ...

  5. Chemical Composition, antioxidant activity, functional properties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical Composition, antioxidant activity, functional properties and inhibitory action of unripe plantain ( M. Paradisiacae ) flour. ... Analytical Chemists (AOAC) and the gravimetric method of Harbone showed that it contained 1.58 ± 0.04% tannin, 1.82 ± 0.05% saponin, 1.37 ± 0.05% alkaloid and 0.98 ± 0.00% flavonoid.

  6. Next-Generation Catalysis for Renewables: Combining Enzymatic with Inorganic Heterogeneous Catalysis for Bulk Chemical Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennestrøm, Peter Nicolai Ravnborg; Christensen, C.H.; Pedersen, S.

    2010-01-01

    chemical platform under different conditions than those conventionally employed. Indeed, new process and catalyst concepts need to be established. Both enzymatic catalysis (biocatalysis) and heterogeneous inorganic catalysis are likely to play a major role and, potentially, be combined. One type...... of combination involves one-pot cascade catalysis with active sites from bio- and inorganic catalysts. In this article the emphasis is placed specifically on oxidase systems involving the coproduction of hydrogen peroxide, which can be used to create new in situ collaborative oxidation reactions for bulk...

  7. Food Simulating Organic Solvents for Evaluating Crosslink Density of Bulk Fill Composite Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neveen M. Ayad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate crosslink densities of two bulk fill composite resins and determine if the used Food Simulating Organic Solvent (FSOS affected them. Methods. Forty specimens were prepared from SureFill and SonicFill bulk fill composite resins, 20 each. All specimens were stored dry for 24 h. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups: stored in ethanol (E 75% or in methyl ethyl ketone (MEK 100% for 24 h. Crosslink density was evaluated by calculating the difference between the Vickers hardness numbers of the specimens stored dry and after their storage in FSOS. The data were statistically analyzed using t-test. Results. The means of crosslink density in E and MEK were 6.99% and 9.44% for SureFill and 10.54% and 11.92% for SonicFill, respectively. t-test displayed significant differences between crosslink densities of SureFill and SonicFill: (P<0.0001 in E and (P=0.02 in MEK and between crosslink densities of SureFill in E and MEK (P=0.02. Conclusions. Crosslink density of bulk fill composite resin can be evaluated using E or MEK. SureFill has higher crosslink density than SonicFill in both E and MEK.

  8. Degradation Potential of Bulk Versus Incrementally Applied and Indirect Composites: Color, Microhardness, and Surface Deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gezawi, M; Kaisarly, D; Al-Saleh, H; ArRejaie, A; Al-Harbi, F; Kunzelmann, K H

    This study investigated the color stability and microhardness of five composites exposed to four beverages with different pH values. Composite discs were produced (n=10); Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) and Filtek P90 (3M ESPE) were applied in two layers (2 mm, 20 seconds), and Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill (TetricBF, Ivoclar Vivadent) and SonicFill (Kerr) were applied in bulk (4 mm) and then light cured (40 seconds, Ortholux-LED, 1600 mW/cm2). Indirect composite Sinfony (3M ESPE) was applied in two layers (2 mm) and cured (Visio system, 3M ESPE). The specimens were polished and tested for color stability; ΔE was calculated using spectrophotometer readings. Vickers microhardness (50 g, dwell time=45 seconds) was assessed on the top and bottom surfaces at baseline, 40 days of storage, subsequent repolishing, and 60 days of immersion in distilled water (pH=7.0), Coca-Cola (pH=2.3), orange juice (pH=3.75), or anise (pH=8.5) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The materials had similar ΔE values (40 days, p>0.05), but TetricBF had a significantly greater ΔE than P90 or SF (40 days). The ΔE was less for P90 and TetricBF than for Z250, SonicFill, and Sinfony (60 days). Repolishing and further immersion significantly affected the ΔE (p<0.05) except for P90. All composites had significantly different top vs bottom baseline microhardnesses. This was insignificant for the Z250/water, P90/orange juice (40 days), and Sinfony groups (40 and 60 days). Immersion produced variable time-dependent deterioration of microhardness in all groups. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc Bonferroni tests were used to compare the results. ΔE and microhardness changes were significantly inversely correlated at 40 days, but this relationship was insignificant at 60 days (Pearson test). SEM showed degradation (40 days) that worsened (60 days). Bulk-fill composites differ regarding color-stability and top-to-bottom microhardness changes compared with those of other

  9. Chemical composition of silica-based biocidal modifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishina Anna Nikolaevna

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increase of the amount of fungi spores and micotixines causes the increase in the number of different diseases. Because of this, ensuring the biological safety in buildings is becoming more and more important today. The preferred way to guarantee the biological safety of a building is to employ modern building materials that prevent the settlement of the fungi colonies on the inner surfaces of walls. Such building materials can be produced using novel biocidal modifiers that allow controlling the number of microorganisms on the surface and in the bulk of a composite construction. The precipitation product of zinc hydrosilicates and sodium sulfate is one of the mentioned modifiers. Till now, the exact chemical composition of such precipitation product is controversial; it is obvious, though, that the efficacy of the biocidal modifier is mostly determined by the type of the copper compounds. In the present work an integrated approach is used for the investigation of the chemical composition of the biocidal modifier. Such an approach consists in the examination of the modifier’s composition by means of different, yet complementary, research methods: X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and DTA. It is shown that the chemical composition of the modifier mainly depends on the amount of precipitant. X-ray diffraction reveals that the major part of the modifier is represented by amorphous phase. Along with the increase of the precipitant’s amount the crystalline phase Zn4SO4(OH6•xH2O formation takes place. Such a crystalline phase is not appropriate as a component of the biocidal modifier. Another two methods - DTA and IR spectroscopy - reveal that the amorphous phase consists essentially of zinc hydrosilicates.

  10. Pre-heating of high-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites: Effects on shrinkage force and monomer conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Tobias T. Tauböck; Tarle, Zrinka; Marovic, Danijela; Attin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate the influence of pre-heating of high-viscosity bulk-fill composite materials on their degree of conversion and shrinkage force formation. METHODS Four bulk-fill composite materials (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill-TECBF, x-tra fil-XF, QuixFil-QF, SonicFill-SF) and one conventional nano-hybrid resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram-TEC) were used. The test materials were either kept at room temperature or pre-heated to 68°C by means of a commercial heating device, before being...

  11. Pulsed field magnetization strategies and the field poles composition in a bulk-type superconducting motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhen, E-mail: zhen.huang@sjtu.edu.cn [Academy of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ruiz, H.S., E-mail: dr.harold.ruiz@le.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Coombs, T.A., E-mail: tac1000@cam.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Different compositions of the magnetic poles have been obtained depending on the relative orientation of the magnetizing coil and the surfaces of the columns of bulks that conform a magnetic pole. • Two bidimensional models accounting for the electromagnetic response of the top and lateral cross sections of three columns of HTS bulks subjected to multiple pulsed magnetic fields have been created. • An extended PFM strategy has been proposed by considering the magnetization of at least three successive columns of HTS bulks per pole. In the extended PFM strategy the area of each one of the poles can be seen increased by a factor of 200%-400% - Abstract: High temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks offer the potential of trapping and maintaining much higher magnetic loading level compared with the conventional permanent magnets used in rotary machines, although the effective magnetization of multiple HTS bulks with different relative orientations over the surface of cylindrical rotors creates new challenges. In this paper, we present the design and numerical validation of the Pulse Field Magnetization (PFM) strategy considered for the magnetization of the four-pole synchronous fully superconducting motor developed at the University of Cambridge. In a first instance, singular columns of up to five HTS bulks aligned over the height of the rotor were subjected to up to three magnetic pulses of 1.5 T peak, and the experimental results have been simulated by considering the electrical and thermal properties of the system in a 2D approach. The entire active surface of the rotor is covered by HTS bulks of approximately the same dimensions, resulting in an uneven distribution of pole areas with at least one of the poles formed by up to 3 columns of magnetized bulks, with relatively the same peaks of trapped magnetic field. Thus, in order to effectively use the entire area of the superconducting rotor, multiple pulsed fields per column have been applied

  12. Magnetic levitation using high temperature superconducting pancake coils as composite bulk cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A.; Hopkins, S. C.; Baskys, A.; Kalitka, V.; Molodyk, A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2015-11-01

    Stacks of superconducting tape can be used as composite bulk superconductors for both trapped field magnets and for magnetic levitation. Little previous work has been done on quantifying the levitation force behavior between stacks of tape and permanent magnets. This paper reports the axial levitation force properties of superconducting tape wound into pancake coils to act as a composite bulk cylinder, showing that similar stable forces to those expected from a uniform bulk cylinder are possible. Force creep was also measured and simulated for the system. The geometry tested is a possible candidate for a rotary superconducting bearing. Detailed finite element modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics was also performed including a full critical state model for induced currents, with temperature and field dependent properties and 3D levitation force models. This work represents one of the most complete levitation force modeling frameworks yet reported using the H-formulation and helps explain why the coil-like stacks of tape are able to sustain levitation forces. The flexibility of geometry and consistency of superconducting properties offered by stacks of tapes, make them attractive for superconducting levitation applications.

  13. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vieira Caixeta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED. Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10 followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa were submitted to Student’s t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x. Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites.

  14. Chemical Composition of Essential Oil from Akway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Meilan Lisangan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical Composition of Essential Oil from Akway. Akway (Drimys piperita Hook f. is a woody, evergreen andaromatic plan that was a member of winteraceae. This plant is used by Sougb tribe lived in Sururey village, District ofManokwari, to heal malaria and to enhance the vitality of body. The objectives of this research were to know the yieldof essential oil using water distillation of leaves and its chemical composition using gas chromatography and massspectroscopy (GC-MS. The results indicated that the yield of leaves essential oil by using water distillation was 0.2%.The essential oil composed by 49 compounds categorized by terpene and its derivatives 83.67%, derivatives of benzene4.08% and alifatic compounds 8.16%.

  15. Chemical composition of Pechora Sea crude oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derkach S. R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The physicochemical properties of the Pechora Sea shelf oil and its chemical composition have been studied using the methods of refractometry, titrimetry, viscometry, rheometry and standard methods for the analysis of oil and petroleum products. The fractionation of oil is held at atmospheric pressure, some fractions boiling at the temperature below and above 211 °C have been received. Chemical structural-group composition of oil and its components has been investigated using a Fourier infrared (IR spectroscopy method. The density of oil has been obtained, it is equal to 24.2 API. The chemical composition analysis shows that water content in the investigated oil sample is about 0.03 % (by weight. The oil sample contains hydrocarbons (including alkanes, naphthenes, arenes and asphaltenes with resins; their content is equal to 89 and 10 % (by weight respectively. Alkane content is about 66 %, including alkanes of normal structure – about 37 %. The solidification temperature of oil sample is equal to –43 °C. This low temperature testifies obliquely low content of solid alkanes (paraffin. Bearing in mind the content of asphaltenes with resins we can refer the investigated oil sample to resinous oils. On the other hand spectral coefficient values (aromaticity quotient and aliphaticity quotient show that oil sample belongs to naphthenic oils. According to the data of Fourier IR spectroscopy contents of naphthenes and arenes are 5.9 and 17.8 % respectively. Thus, the obtained data of chemical structural-group composition of crude oil and its fractions indicate that this oil belongs to the heavy resinous naphthenic oils. The rheological parameters obtained at the shear deformation conditions characterize the crude oil as a visco-plastic medium.

  16. Water sorption and solubility of bulk-fill composites polymerized with a third generation LED LCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğba MİSİLLİ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to compare the degree of water sorption and solubility in bulk-fills after curing with a polywave light source. A total of 120 disc-shaped specimens (8 mm diameter; 4 mm depth were prepared from three regular bulk-fill materials (X-tra Fil, Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill, SonicFill, and a control material (Filtek Z250, cured in 3 different modes (standard: 1000 mW/cm2-20 s; high power: 1400 mW/cm2-12 s; xtra power: 3200 mW/cm2-6 s using a third generation light-emitting diode light curing unit. Water sorption and solubility levels of the specimens were measured according to the ISO 4049:2009 specification after storing in distilled water for 30 days. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test (p < 0.05. The Z250 sample exposed to high power presented a higher sorption compared to the X-tra Fil and SonicFill samples. In xtra power mode, the values of Z250 and SonicFill were similar to each other and higher compared to those of X-tra Fil. Only SonicFill exhibited significantly different sorption values depending on the curing mode, the highest of which was achieved when using the xtra power mode. The highest solubility values were obtained for SonicFill. No statistically significant differences were found among other groups. No significant correlation was detected between water sorption and solubility. The traditional composite group exhibited a higher water sorption values than the bulk-fills. The reduction in polymerization time significantly increased the sorption of SonicFill. SonicFill showed the highest water solubility value among the composites tested.

  17. Thermal and Electric Cloaking Effect in Concentric Composite Made of Homogeneous Bulk and Porous Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkhanyan, Roland H.; Niarchos, Dimitris G.

    2015-12-01

    A new material platform is presented to manipulate heat and charge transportation in steady-state conditions. More precisely, we investigate the conceptual realization of a concentric composite made of the same isotropic and homogeneous semiconductor material with layers of different porosity, and show the possibility of a simultaneous cloaking performance in such a device for both heat flux and electric current without disturbing external fields. The background medium in the composite is a porous material with a periodical 3D cubic lattice of spherical hollow pores while the cylindrical shell is made from the same bulk material with zero porosity. A sound analytical expression is found for the volume fraction of the pores at which bi-functional cloaking effect can be realized. To validate our theoretical results, we also demonstrate the temperature and heat flux profiles as well as the voltage and current profiles in numerical simulations for a composite consisting of bulk (cylindrical shell) and porous (background) n-type silicon layers.

  18. Etchant wettability in bulk micromachining of Si by metal-assisted chemical etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Lee, Yeong Bahl; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2016-05-01

    Wet bulk micromachining of Si by metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) has successfully been demonstrated. Based on the mechanism of defective etching results from Ag and Au metal catalyst experiments, the wettability of etchant solution, in addition to metal type, has been found to have profound effect on the etching process. Addition of low surface tension co-solvent, ethanol in this work, into conventional etchant formulation has enabled complete wetting of etchant on surface, which prevents hydrogen bubble attachment on sample surface during the etching. The complete elimination of bubble attachment guarantees very uniform etch rate on all over the sample surface, and thus prevents premature fragmentation/rupture of catalyst metal layer. Under the optimized etching conditions, the MaCE could be done for up to 12 h without any noticeable film rupture and thus etching defects. Thanks to very smooth surface of the etched patterns, conformal contact and direct bonding of elastomer on such surface has been easily accomplished. The method demonstrated here can pave the way for application of simple, low-cost MaCE process in the bulk micromachining of Si for various applications.

  19. Proximate chemical composition and fatty acid profiles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proximate chemical composition and fatty acid profiles of Longissimus Proximate chemical composition and fatty acid profiles of Longissimus thoracis from pasture fed LHRH immunocastrated, castrated and intact Bos indicus bulls.

  20. BULK COMPOSITION OF GJ 1214b AND OTHER SUB-NEPTUNE EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Diana [Earth, Atmosphere and Planetary Sciences Department, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Guillot, Tristan; Parmentier, Vivien [Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, Universite de Nice-Sophie Antipolis, CNRS UMR 7293, BP 4229, F-06300 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Freedman, Richard S., E-mail: dianav@mit.edu [Nasa Ames Research Center, MS 245-3, P.O. Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    GJ 1214b stands out among the detected low-mass exoplanets, because it is, so far, the only one amenable to transmission spectroscopy. Up to date there is no consensus about the composition of its envelope although most studies suggest a high molecular weight atmosphere. In particular, it is unclear if hydrogen and helium are present or if the atmosphere is water dominated. Here, we present results on the composition of the envelope obtained by using an internal structure and evolutionary model to fit the mass and radius data. By examining all possible mixtures of water and H/He, with the corresponding opacities, we find that the bulk amount of H/He of GJ 1214b is at most 7% by mass. In general, we find the radius of warm sub-Neptunes to be most sensitive to the amount of H/He. We note that all (Kepler-11b,c,d,f, Kepler-18b, Kepler-20b, 55Cnc-e, Kepler-36c, and Kepler-68b) but two (Kepler-11e and Kepler-30b) of the discovered low-mass planets so far have less than 10% H/He. In fact, Kepler-11e and Kepler-30b have 10%-18% and 5%-15% bulk H/He. Conversely, little can be determined about the H{sub 2}O or rocky content of sub-Neptune planets. We find that although a 100% water composition fits the data for GJ 1214b, based on formation constraints the presence of heavier refractory material on this planet is expected, and hence, so is a component lighter than water required. The same is true for Kepler-11f. A robust determination by transmission spectroscopy of the composition of the upper atmosphere of GJ 1214b will help determine the extent of compositional segregation between the atmosphere and the envelope.

  1. Basin Excavation, Lower Crust, Composition, and Bulk Moon Mass balance in Light of a Thin Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.; Ziegler, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    New lunar gravity results from GRAIL have been interpreted to reflect an overall thin and low-density lunar crust. Accordingly, crustal thickness has been modeled as ranging from 0 to 60 km, with thinnest crust at the locations of Crisium and Moscoviense basins and thickest crust in the central farside highlands. The thin crust has cosmochemical significance, namely in terms of implications for the Moon s bulk composition, especially refractory lithophile elements that are strongly concentrated in the crust. Wieczorek et al. concluded that the bulk Moon need not be enriched compared to Earth in refractory lithophile elements such as Al. Less Al in the crust means less Al has been extracted from the mantle, permitting relatively low bulk lunar mantle Al contents and low pre- and post-crust-extraction values for the mantle (or the upper mantle if only the upper mantle underwent LMO melting). Simple mass-balance calculations using the method of [4] suggests that the same conclusion might hold for Th and the entire suite of refractory lithophile elements that are incompatible in olivine and pyroxene, including the KREEP elements, that are likewise concentrated in the crust.

  2. The role of physico-chemical and bulk characteristics of co-spray dried L-leucine and polyvinylpyrrolidone on glidant and binder properties in interactive mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Sharad; Meiser, Felix; Lakio, Satu; Morton, David; Larson, Ian

    2015-02-20

    In this study, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was spray dried with l-leucine (PVP-Leu) to create a prototype multifunctional interactive excipient. The physico-chemical and bulk properties such as particle size, surface composition, surface energy and bulk cohesion of PVP-Leu was measured and compared against pure spray dried PVP (PVP-SD). The mixing behaviour of these excipients and their effect on flow and binder activity of paracetamol was assessed. The mean particle sizes of PVP-Leu PVP-SD and PVP were 2.5, 2.1 and 21.9μm, respectively. Surface composition characterization indicated that l-leucine achieved higher concentrations on the surface compared to the bulk of the PVP-Leu particles. The surface energy of PVP-Leu was significantly lower compared to PVP-SD. In addition, PVP-Leu exhibited a significantly lower bulk cohesion compared PVP-SD. The excipients were blended with paracetamol and qualitative characterization indicated that PVP-Leu blended more homogeneously with paracetamol compared to PVP-SD. Both PVP-Leu and PVP-SD then exhibited a significantly improved binder activity compared to PVP. The flow of the paracetamol was markedly improved with PVP-Leu while PVP-SD and PVP had negligible effect on its flow. This study reveals how physico-chemical and bulk properties of such prototype interactive excipients can play a key role in determining multi-factorial excipient performance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Effect of bulk chemistry in the spectral variability of igneous rocks in VIS-NIR region: Implications to remote compositional mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Archana M.; Mathew, George

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, a range of igneous rocks with weight percentage of silica ranging from 45% to 70% were used to generate reflectance spectra in the VIS-NIR region. The laboratory generated reflectance spectra of these rocks were used to study the effect of chemical composition and mineralogy on the spectral properties. The characteristic spectral features were evaluated based on the mineralogical and chemical characteristics of the rocks. The main spectral features in the VIS-NIR region are the 0.7 μm absorption band due to the inter valance charge transfer between Fe2+ and Fe3+ termed as Band F, the 1 μm broad absorption band from Fe2+ at the octahedral sites in pyroxene termed as Band I, the 1.9 μm and 2.3 μm narrow absorption bands due to H2O or OH functional group in hydrated minerals. The 2 μm absorption feature (Band II; Cloutis and Gaffey, 1991) is observed as a weak feature in all the mafic rocks. The analysis of Band I with the bulk chemistry and mineralogy, we observed a positive correlation to the bulk Ca abundance. Rocks with high bulk calcic content exemplify Band I as a prominent spectral feature towards longer wavelength. Consequently, basalt, gabbro and anorthositic rocks show Band I as a strong feature. However, rocks with low bulk Calcic content show Band I as weak absorption feature observed towards shorter wavelength. Thus, igneous rocks of alkaline affinity have subdued Band I feature that appears towards shorter wavelength. The analysis of Band F with the bulk chemistry and mineralogy showed a positive correlation to the bulk Fe abundance. The results of the present study have implications towards remote compositional mapping and lithological discrimination for Planetary Studies.

  4. Comparison of photopolymerization temperature increases in internal and external positions of composite and tooth cavities in real time: Incremental fillings of microhybrid composite vs. bulk filling of bulk fill composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryan Jin-Young; Son, Sung-Ae; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Lee, In-Bog; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated temperature increases in the composite and pulpal side of dentin from incremental and bulk fillings in composite restorations. Class-1 cavities (5 mm × 4 mm × 3 mm) were prepared in ten extracted third molars, filled with composite, and restored with two separate horizontal layers of Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) in the incremental group or a single layer of SureFil SDR Flow (Dentsply) in the bulk-fill group (n=5). After placing the specimens in a 36.5°C water bath, temperatures were measured with eight thermocouples at the bottom center (BC), middle center (MC), top center (TC), bottom corner (BE), middle corner (ME), and top corner (TE) of the cavity, at the pulpal side of the dentin within the pulp chamber (PD), and in the curing light (CL) tip during light curing at 750 mW/cm(2) for 20s and then analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's HSD tests (α=0.01). Maximum temperatures ranged from 39.0°C (PD 1st increment) to 60.0°C (MC 1st increment) in the incremental group and from 42.0°C (PD) to 74.9°C (TC) in the bulk-fill group. In the incremental group, temperatures were similar between the 1st and 2nd increments, except at MC and BC. Bulk-fill group exhibited a greater increase in temperature during composite restoration. Regardless of the filling technique, more heat was generated at the center than at the corner and at the top than at the bottom of the composite. PD temperatures increased by 3.1°C and 5.5°C in the incremental group and bulk-fill group, respectively. Although bulk fillings save clinical chair time, clinicians should be aware of the greater heat that is generated with increasing amounts of composites during polymerization, which can jeopardize the pulpal health, especially when a large and deep cavity is being restored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporal variability in Chemical and Stable isotopic characteristics of ambient bulk aerosols over a coastal environment of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, R.; Karapurkar, S. G.; Sarma, V. V.; Praveen, P.; Kumar, M. D.

    2012-12-01

    India, while local marine sources and mineral dust appear to dominate chemical composition of aerosols during pre-monsoon period. References: Agnihotri, R., Mandal, T. K., Karapurkar, S., Naja, M., Gadi, R., Ahammed, Y. N., Kumar, A., Saud, T., and Saxena, M. (2011) Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of bulk aerosols over India and Northern Indian Ocean, Atmos. Environ., 45, 2828-2835, 2011 Pavuluri, C. M., K. Kawamura, T. Swaminathan, and E. Tachibana (2011), Stable carbon isotopic compositions of total carbon, dicarboxylic acids and glyoxylic acid in the tropical Indian aerosols: Implications for sources and photochemical processing of organic aerosols, J. Geophys. Res., 116, D18307, doi:10.1029/2011JD015617 Turekian, V. C., S. A. Macko, and W. C. Keene (2003), Concentrations, isotopic compositions, and sources of size-resolved, particulate organic carbon and oxalate in near-surface marine air at Bermuda during spring, J. Geophys. Res., 108, 4157, doi:10.1029/2002JD002053

  6. Low beryllium content Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite with plasticity and work hardenability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Q., E-mail: qiangzheng616@hotmail.com, E-mail: dujuan@nimte.ac.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Ningbo University of Technology, Ningbo, 315016, China and Ningbo Branch of China Academy of Ordnance Science, Ningbo, 315103 (China); Du, J., E-mail: qiangzheng616@hotmail.com, E-mail: dujuan@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering (NIMTE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Application Technology, NIMTE, CAS, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2014-01-28

    A modified Zr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite Zr{sub 47.67}Cu{sub 40}Ti{sub 3.66}Ni{sub 2.66}Be{sub 6} has been produced by increasing the contents of elements of Zr and Cu with higher Poisson ratio and reducing the contents of Ti, Ni, and Be elements with lower Poisson ratio based on famous metallic glass former Vitreloy 1. A compressive yielding strength of 1804 MPa, fracture strength of 1938 MPa and 3.5% plastic strain was obtained for obtained metallic glass composite. Also, work-hardening behavior was observed during compressive experiment which was ascribed to the interaction of the in situ precipitated CuZr phase and shear bands.

  7. Composite bulk Heat Insulation Made of loose Mineral and Organic Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namsone Eva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The task of building energy-efficiency is getting more important. Every house owner wishes to save up exploitation costs of heating, cooling, hot water production, ventilation, etc. and find cost-effective investments. One of the ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE is to minimize the heat transfer through the building by insulating it. Loose heat insulation is a good alternative to traditional board insulation, it is simple in use and cost-effective. Main drawback of this insulation is tendency to compact during exploitation. In the frame of this research composite loose heat insulation is elaborated, consisting on porous mineral foamed glass aggregate and local organic fiber materials (hemp and flaxen shives. Composite bulk insulation is an alternative solution which combines heat insulating properties and mechanical stability.

  8. Bulk Metallic Glasses and Their Composites: A Brief History of Diverging Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C. Hofmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs and their derivative metal matrix composites (BMGMCs are emerging high-performance engineering materials that are on the precipice of widespread commercialization. This review article discusses the origin of these materials and how their applications and research focus have divided into two distinct fields, one primarily focused on the plastic-like processability of BMGs and the other on the enhanced fracture mechanics of BMGMCs. Although the materials are of similar composition and origin, it is argued that their implementation will be widely varying due to their different processing requirements and intended uses. BMGs will likely find use as plastic-replacement components in cosmetic applications (e.g., watches, cell phones, biomedical implants while BMGMCs will be used in structural applications (e.g., golf clubs, hardware for defense, energy absorbing structures.

  9. Deformation behaviors of a Ti-based bulk metallic glass composite in the dendrite softening region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Jing; Li, Jinshan; Wang, Jun, E-mail: nwpuwj@nwpu.edu.cn; Kou, Hongchao

    2016-01-20

    Deformation behaviors of the Ti{sub 50}Zr{sub 20}Nb{sub 12}Cu{sub 5}Be{sub 13} bulk metallic glass composite in the dendrite softening region have been investigated using uniaxial compressive and tensile tests. All the compressive stress–strain curves show work-hardening phenomenon with the same tendency, the tensile stress–strain curves show work-softening phenomenon. The strain rate sensitivity exponent ranges from 0.061 to 0.072 in the compressive tests, and 0.33 to 0.38 in the tensile tests. The activation volume of the Ti{sub 50}Zr{sub 20}Nb{sub 12}Cu{sub 5}Be{sub 13} bulk metallic glass composite at 710 K ranges from 1.6 nm{sup 3} to 2.5 nm{sup 3} under compressive tests and 1.0 nm{sup 3} to 2.7 nm{sup 3} under tensile tests, indicating that there is a migration of atomic group (about 170–180 atoms) during the deformation. The dendrite of the Ti{sub 50}Zr{sub 20}Nb{sub 12}Cu{sub 5}Be{sub 13} BMGC has been well spheroidized and undergoes severe plasticity deformation after the deformation in the dendrite softening region.

  10. Spectroscopic and Mechanical Properties of a New Generation of Bulk Fill Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterubbianesi, Riccardo; Orsini, Giovanna; Tosi, Giorgio; Conti, Carla; Librando, Vito; Procaccini, Maurizio; Putignano, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to in vitro evaluate the degree of conversion and the microhardness properties of five bulk fill resin composites; in addition, the performance of two curing lamps, used for composites polymerization, was also analyzed. Materials and Methods: The following five resin-based bulk fill composites were tested: SureFil SDR®, Fill Up!™, Filtek™, SonicFill™, and SonicFill2™. Samples of 4 mm in thickness were prepared using Teflon molds filled in one increment and light-polymerized using two LED power units. Ten samples for each composite were cured using Elipar S10 and 10 using Demi Ultra. Additional samples of SonicFill2, (3 and 5 mm-thick) were also tested. The degree of conversion (DC) was determined by Raman spectroscopy, while the Vickers microhardness (VMH) was evaluated using a microhardness tester. The experimental evaluation was carried out on top and bottom sides, immediately after curing (t0), and, on bottom, after 24 h (t24). Two-ways analysis of variance was applied to evaluate DC and VMH-values. In all analyses, the level of significance was set at p composites recorded satisfactory DCs on top and bottom sides. At t0, the top of SDR and SonicFill2 showed the highest DCs-values (85.56 ± 9.52 and 85.47 ± 1.90, respectively), when cured using Elipar S10; using Demi Ultra, SonicFill2 showed the highest DCs-values (90.53 ± 2.18). At t0, the highest DCs-values of bottom sides were recorded by SDR (84.64 ± 11.68), when cured using Elipar S10, and Filtek (81.52 ± 4.14), using Demi Ultra. On top sides, Demi Ultra lamp showed significant higher DCs compared to the Elipar S10 ( p composites showed higher VMH than the flowable or dual curing composites.

  11. Chemical Composition of Different Varieties of Linseed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laiq Khan*, M. Sharif, M. Sarwar, Sameea1 and M. Ameen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate chemical composition of six varieties of linseed (Chandni, LS-29, LS-49, LS-70, LS-75 and LS-76. Proximate composition, mineral profile and cyanogenic glycosides (linamarin were determined. Average proximate composition values for linseed i.e. crude protein, ether extract, crude fiber, ash and nitrogen free extract were 24.18, 37.77, 4.78, 3.50 and 25.86%, respectively. Higher values of crude protein, ether extract, crude fiber and nitrogen free extract were observed in varieties LS-49, LS-70, LS-29 and Chandni, respectively. Average mineral contents in linseed i.e. Ca, Mg, K, Na, Cl, P, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn were 0.39, 0.09, 1.41, 0.05, 0.08, 0.89, 4.67, 50.56, 8.29 and 13.55 ppm, respectively. Among micro minerals, varieties LS-29 and LS-70 were higher in Cu contents; LS-75 was higher in Fe content, while LS-49 was higher in Mn and Zn contents. Among macro minerals, level of Ca was higher in LS-70, levels of Mg, K and Na were higher in Chandni, while P was higher in LS-49. Average amount of linamarin in linseed was 31.05mg/100 gm DM. The variety LS-75 had the highest (35.22 mg/100 gm linamarin content, while variety LS-70 had least (26.22 mg/100 gm amount of linamarin. In conclusion, there is significant difference in chemical composition among linseed varieties. The varieties LS-49 showed higher crude protein content, LS-70 showed greater oil content, while LS-75 had higher content of linamarin.

  12. The effect of curing intensity on mechanical properties of different bulk-fill composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhudhairy FI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fahad I Alkhudhairy Restorative Dental Sciences Department, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two curing light intensities on the mechanical properties (Vickers microhardness, compressive strength, and diametral tensile strength of bulk-fill resin-based composites (RBCs.Materials and methods: Four commercially available bulk-fill RBCs (Tetric® N-Ceram, SonicFill™, Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR™ Posterior Flowable Material, and Filtek™ Posterior Restorative were used in this study. A total of 72 cylindrical specimens of each RBC (n=288 were prepared and subjected to Vickers microhardness, compressive strength, and diametral tensile strength tests at high (1200 mW/cm2 and low (650 mW/cm2 curing light intensities (each n=12. Results were evaluated using independent and paired sample t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and Tukey’s post hoc test. All tests were performed at a significance level of P<0.05.Results: The highest mean microhardness was observed for SonicFill (58.3 Vickers hardness number [VHN] cured using high-intensity light. Although having the least mean microhardness values, a significant difference was observed between SDR cured using high-intensity light and that cured using low-intensity light (P<0.05. In the total sample, the highest mean compressive strength was obtained for SonicFill (262.6 MPa, followed by SDR (253.2 MPa, both cured using high-intensity light, and the least was measured for Tetric N-Ceram cured using low-intensity light (214.3 MPa. At high and low curing light intensities, diametral tensile strength for all RBCs except SonicFill was significant (P<0.001.Conclusion: A higher curing light intensity (1200 mW/cm2 had a positive influence on the compressive and tensile strength of the four bulk-fill RBCs and microhardness of two materials tested compared with lower curing light intensity

  13. Microstructure and properties of bulk copper matrix composites strengthened with various kinds of graphene nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutkiewicz, Jan, E-mail: j.dutkiewicz@imim.pl; Ozga, Piotr; Maziarz, Wojciech; Pstruś, Janusz; Kania, Bogusz; Bobrowski, Piotr; Stolarska, Justyna

    2015-03-25

    Copper matrix composites strengthened with graphene were prepared by vacuum uniaxial hot pressing of ball milled mixtures of powders. Two grades of graphene platelets were used; one with thickness of 10–20 nm and with lateral size of less than 14 μm and another with much lower thickness of platelets of 2–4 nm and in (002) plane crystallite size below 100 nm. Hot pressing in vacuum allowed obtaining composites containing 1 and 2 wt% of graphene. The addition of fine graphene led to about 50% higher hardness and about 30% lower electrical resistivity than composite with coarse graphene platelets. SEM studies of samples with fine graphene additions showed much more homogeneous microstructure than those containing coarse graphene. Based on TEM studies, copper particle size was estimated between 100 and 300 nm, and smaller in the areas of copper particle boundaries, where plastic deformation of copper particles brought about mixing nanocrystalline copper and graphene phases. Graphene conglomerates were identified using electron diffraction and often consisted of elongated platelets of thickness up to 20 nm in both graphene composites studied. Raman spectra confirmed nonhomogeneity of graphene in bulk composites and showed increase of defect density within graphene platelets, as was assessed from low intensity ratio I(2D)/I(G), in places of high graphene concentration in both kinds of samples. The weak signal in more homogeneously distributed graphene in samples with fine graphene additions confirmed similar structural features, however the lateral size of finer graphene remain unchanged in composites, contrary to that with coarser graphene additions.

  14. The Chemical Composition of Grape Fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolana Karovičová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary fibres from cereals are much more used than dietary fibres from fruits; however, dietary fibres from fruits have better quality. In recent years, for economic and environmental reasons, there has been a growing pressure to recover and exploit food wastes. Grape fibre is used to fortify baked goods, because the fibre can lower blood sugar, cut cholesterol and may even prevent colon cancer. Grape pomace is a functional ingredient in bakery goods to increase total phenolic content and dietary fibre in nourishment. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition of commercial fibres, obtained from different Grape sources concerning their chemical properties such as moisture, ash, fat, protein, total dietary fibre. The chemical composition of Grape fibre is known to vary depending on the Grape cultivar, growth climates, and processing conditions. The obliged characteristics of the fibre product are: total dietary fibre content above 50%, moisture lower than 9%, low content of lipids, a low energy value and neutral flavour and taste. Grape pomace represents a rich source of various high-value products such as ethanol, tartrates and malates, citric acid, Grape seed oil, hydrocolloids and dietary fibre. Used commercial Grape fibres have as a main characteristic, the high content of total dietary fibre. Amount of total dietary fibre depends on the variety of Grapes. Total dietary fibre content (TDF in our samples of Grape fibre varied from 56.8% to 83.6%. There were also determined low contents of moisture (below 9%. In the samples of Grape fibre were determined higher amount of protein (8.6 - 10.8%, mineral (1.3 - 3.8% and fat (2.8 - 8.6%. This fact opens the possibility of using both initial by-products as ingredients in the food industry, due to the effects associated with the high total dietary fibre content.

  15. Bulk hydrogen stable isotope composition of seaweeds: Clear separation between Ulvophyceae and other classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Matheus C; Carneiro, Pedro Bastos de Macedo; Dellatorre, Fernando Gaspar; Gibilisco, Pablo Ezequiel; Sachs, Julian; Eyre, Bradley D

    2017-10-01

    Little is known about the bulk hydrogen stable isotope composition (δ(2) H) of seaweeds. This study investigated the bulk δ(2) H in several different seaweed species collected from three different beaches in Brazil, Australia, and Argentina. Here, we show that Ulvophyceae (a group of green algae) had lower δ(2) H values (between -94‰ and -130‰) than red algae (Florideophyceae), brown algae (Phaeophyceae), and species from the class Bryopsidophyceae (another group of green algae). Overall the latter three groups of seaweeds had δ(2) H values between -50‰ and -90‰. These findings were similar at the three different geographic locations. Observed differences in δ(2) H values were probably related to differences in hydrogen (H) metabolism among algal groups, also observed in the δ(2) H values of their lipids. The marked difference between the δ(2) H values of Ulvophyecae and those of the other groups could be useful to trace the food source of food webs in coastal rocky shores, to assess the impacts of green tides on coastal ecosystems, and to help clarify aspects of their phylogeny. However, reference materials for seaweed δ(2) H are required before the full potential of using the δ(2) H of seaweeds for ecological studies can be exploited. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  16. Deformation-Induced Martensitic Transformation in Cu-Zr-Zn Bulk Metallic Glass Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianyu Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and mechanical properties of (Cu0.5Zr0.5100−xZnx (x = 0, 1.5, 2.5, 4.5, 7, 10, and 14 at. % bulk metallic glass (BMG composites were studied. CuZr martensitic crystals together with minor B2 CuZr and amorphous phases dominate the microstructures of the as-quenched samples with low Zn additions (x = 0, 1.5, and 2.5 at. %, while B2 CuZr and amorphous phases being accompanied with minor martensitic crystals form at a higher Zn content (x = 4.5, 7, 10, and 14 at. %. The fabricated Cu-Zr-Zn BMG composites exhibit macroscopically appreciable compressive plastic strain and obvious work-hardening due to the formation of multiple shear bands and the deformation-induced martensitic transformation (MT within B2 crystals. The present BMG composites could be a good candidate as high-performance structural materials.

  17. Stress distribution of bulk-fill resin composite in class II restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausiello, Pietro; Ciaramella, Stefano; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Martorelli, Massimo; Sorrentino, Roberto; Gloria, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    To study the influence of the resin bonding layer thickness and the bulk filling material stiffness in adhesive class II mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) restorations using numerical finite element analysis (FEA). Four 3D-FE models of teeth restored with different filling material stiffness and resin bonding layer thickness were built-up and analyzed. The 3D model of a sound lower molar was also analyzed and compared with restored ones. The tooth tissues (enamel, dentin), dental restoration and bolus on the occlusal surface, was divided into 3D solid CTETRA elements with four grid points. The adhesive bonding around the dental restoration was modeled with shell elements. Polymerization shrinkage was simulated with a thermal expansion approach. Mechanical behavior of restored models in terms of stress and displacement distributions, under the combination effects of polymerization shrinkage and occlusal load (600 N), was analyzed. All the materials were assumed to behave as elastic materials throughout the entire deformation. Numerical results show that the mechanical response of the restored models was very different compared to the sound tooth ones, where the stress was uniformly distributed from enamel to dentin with no critical stress concentration. In the restored models, the highest stress values were detected in the enamel, near the enamel-dentin interface and in the bulk restorative material. Tooth preparations A and B showed lower gradient stresses than corresponding C and D. The value of the vertical displacement components in models A and B were higher than corresponding C and D. The maximum displacement values were mainly located around the groove and were higher by an order of magnitude than the sound models. The results showed better mechanical response with models A and B compared to C and D. It is also evident that resin bonding thickness slightly affected the stress level of the restored teeth. Class II MOD direct bulk resin composite restorations showed

  18. Thermal conductivity of bulk boron nitride nanotube sheets and their epoxy-impregnated composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubinek, Michael B.; Kim, Keun Su; Simard, Benoit [Security and Disruptive Technologies, Division of Emerging Technologies, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Niven, John F. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Johnson, Michel B. [Institute for Research in Materials, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Ashrafi, Behnam [Aerospace, Division of Engineering, National Research Council Canada, Montreal, QC (Canada); White, Mary Anne [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Institute for Research in Materials, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    The thermal conductivity of bulk, self-supporting boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) sheets composed of nominally 100% BNNTs oriented randomly in-plane was measured by a steady-state, parallel thermal conductance method. The sheets were either collected directly during synthesis or produced by dispersion and filtration. Differences between the effective thermal conductivities of filtration-produced BNNT buckypaper (∝1.5 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}) and lower-density as-synthesized sheets (∝0.75 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}), which are both porous materials, were primarily due to their density. The measured results indicate similar thermal conductivity, in the range of 7-12 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}, for the BNNT network in these sheets. High BNNT-content composites (∝30 wt.% BNNTs) produced by epoxy impregnation of the porous BNNT network gave 2-3 W m{sup -1} K{sup -1}, more than 10 x the baseline epoxy. The combination of manufacturability, thermal conductivity, and electrical insulation offers exciting potential for electrically insulating, thermally conductive coatings and packaging. Thermal conductivity of free-standing BNNT buckypaper, buckypaper composites, and related materials at room temperature. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. The Evolution of Microstructures and the Properties of Bulk Metallic Glass with Consubstantial Composition Laser Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingjun Tao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Zr55Cu30Ni5Al10 plate-like bulk metallic glass (BMG was prepared using copper mold suction casting. Additionally, alloy powders with the same nominal composition were synthesized. The alloy powders were welded or melted to the cleaned surface of the BMG with a laser beam acceleration voltage of 60 kV, a beam current range from 60 to 100 mA, a welding speed of 60 mm/s, as well as an impulse width of 3.0 ms. The effect of consubstantial composition welding on the microstructures and properties was investigated. The molten and subsequently solidified metallic mixtures remain an amorphous structure, but the enthalpy of the welded or melted position varies due to the combination of the micro-structural relaxation and nano-crystals precipitated during the energy inputs. The surface layers of the BMG can be significantly intensified after welding processes; however, the heat-affected zones (HAZs exhibit a slight degradation in mechanical properties with respect to the BMG matrix. This study has important reference value for specialists working on the promotion of applications of BMGs.

  20. Impact of light transmittance mode on polymerisation kinetics in bulk-fill resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Nicoleta

    2017-08-01

    to determine the mode of light transmission and its impact on the polymerisation kinetic in modern bulk-fill resin-based composites (B-RBC). Four low-viscosity methacrylate-based and one high-viscosity ormocer-based B-RBCs were considered. One material was available in three different shades that were all analyzed. Polymerization kinetic and light transmittance were assessed in 2 and 4mm specimen depths. Incident and transmitted irradiance and radiant exposure were measured in real-time on a laboratory-grade spectrometer. A progressive enhanced light transmittance during polymerisation was identified in all materials except for TetricEvoFlow BulkFill, which became progressively opaque in all shades. One-way ANOVA and multivariate analysis (α=0.05) were performed. The parameter material has a significant (p0.95), differentiating between the gel- and the glass-phase and revealing a faster initiation of polymerization and a slower transition into the glass-phase by lowering the filler volume. Depth retarded the transition into the glass-phase, but did not alter DC measured 300s post-irradiation. Moderate inverse correlation was identified among DC and filler volume% (-0.646) or filler weight% (-0.403), while no correlation among DC and light transmittance (p=0.141; 0.125). The maximal rate of carbon-carbon double bond conversion varied within the analyzed materials but was independent from specimen's depths. Light transmission changes during polymerization do not alter polymerization kinetics in modern B-RBCs. DC 300s post-irradiation was maintained with depth, while light was attenuated, the faster the more translucent the material was. DC and quality of curing cannot be related to light transmittance in B-RBCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. On-line chemical composition analyzer development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.J.; Garrison, A.A.; Muly, E.C.; Moore, C.F.

    1992-02-01

    The energy consumed in distillation processes in the United States represents nearly three percent of the total national energy consumption. If effective control of distillation columns can be accomplished, it has been estimated that it would result in a reduction in the national energy consumption of 0.3%. Real-time control based on mixture composition could achieve these savings. However, the major distillation processes represent diverse applications and at present there does not exist a proven on-line chemical composition sensor technology which can be used to control these diverse processes in real-time. This report presents a summary of the findings of the second phase of a three phase effort undertaken to develop an on-line real-time measurement and control system utilizing Raman spectroscopy. A prototype instrument system has been constructed utilizing a Perkin Elmer 1700 Spectrometer, a diode pumped YAG laser, two three axis positioning systems, a process sample cell land a personal computer. This system has been successfully tested using industrially supplied process samples to establish its performance. Also, continued application development was undertaken during this Phase of the program using both the spontaneous Raman and Surface-enhanced Raman modes of operation. The study was performed for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, whose mission is to conduct cost-shared R D for new high-risk, high-payoff industrial energy conservation technologies. Although this document contains references to individual manufacturers and their products, the opinions expressed on the products reported do not necessarily reflect the position of the Department of Energy.

  2. Exploring the Utilization of Low-Pressure, Piston-Cylinder Experiments to Determine the Bulk Compositions of Finite, Precious Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, K. E.; McCubbin, F. M.; Harrington, A. D.

    2017-01-01

    Determining the bulk composition of precious materials with a finite mass (e.g., meteorite samples) is extremely important in the fields of Earth and Planetary Science. From meteorite studies we are able to place constraints on large scale planetary processes like global differentiation and subsequent volcanism, as well as smaller scale processes like crystallization in a magma chamber or sedimentary compaction at the surface. However, with meteorite samples in particular, far too often we are limited by how precious the sample is as well as its limited mass. In this study, we have utilized aliquots of samples previously studied for toxicological hazards, including both the fresh samples (lunar mare basalt NWA 4734, lunar regolith breccia NWA 7611, martian basalt Tissint, martian regolith breccia NWA 7034, a vestian basalt Berthoud, a vestian regolith breccia NWA 2060, and a terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)), and those that underwent iron leaching (Tissint, NWA 7034, NWA 4734, MORB). With these small masses of material, we performed low pressure (approx. 0.75 GPa), high temperature (greater than 1600 degrees Celsius) melting experiments. Each sample was analyzed using a JEOL 8530F electron microprobe to determine the bulk composition of the materials that were previously examined. When available, the results of our microprobe data were compared with bulk rock compositions in the literature. The results of this study show that with this technique, only approx. 50 mg of sample is required to accurately determine the bulk composition of the materials of interest.

  3. Stable isotope composition of bulk and secondary carbonates from the Quaternary loess-paleosol sequence in Sutto, Hungary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koeniger, Paul; Barta, Gabriella; Thiel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of pedogenic carbonates were studied from the Quaternary loess-paleosol sequence of Sutto in Hungary to investigate genetic processes in a paleoenvironmental context and to distinguish subtypes. Bulk carbonate samples taken at 2 cm vertical resolution...

  4. Chemical composition analysis and authentication of whisky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Paulina; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2015-08-30

    Whisky (whiskey) is one of the most popular spirit-based drinks made from malted or saccharified grains, which should mature for at least 3 years in wooden barrels. High popularity of products usually causes a potential risk of adulteration. Thus authenticity assessment is one of the key elements of food product marketing. Authentication of whisky is based on comparing the composition of this alcohol with other spirit drinks. The present review summarizes all information about the comparison of whisky and other alcoholic beverages, the identification of type of whisky or the assessment of its quality and finally the authentication of whisky. The article also presents the various techniques used for analyzing whisky, such as gas and liquid chromatography with different types of detectors (FID, AED, UV-Vis), electronic nose, atomic absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. In some cases the application of chemometric methods is also described, namely PCA, DFA, LDA, ANOVA, SIMCA, PNN, k-NN and CA, as well as preparation techniques such SPME or SPE. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Non-Magnetic, Tough, Corrosion- and Wear-Resistant Knives From Bulk Metallic Glasses and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Douglas C.; Potter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Quality knives are typically fabricated from high-strength steel alloys. Depending on the application, there are different requirements for mechanical and physical properties that cause problems for steel alloys. For example, diver's knives are generally used in salt water, which causes rust in steel knives. Titanium diver's knives are a popular alternative due to their salt water corrosion resistance, but are too soft to maintain a sharp cutting edge. Steel knives are also magnetic, which is undesirable for military applications where the knives are used as a tactical tool for diffusing magnetic mines. Steel is also significantly denser than titanium (8 g/cu cm vs. 4.5 g/cu cm), which results in heavier knives for the same size. Steel is hard and wear-resistant, compared with titanium, and can keep a sharp edge during service. A major drawback of both steel and titanium knives is that they must be ground or machined into the final knife shape from a billet. Since most knives have a mirrored surface and a complex shape, manufacturing them is complex. It would be more desirable if the knife could be cast into a net or near-net shape in a single step. The solution to the deficiencies of titanium, steel, and ceramic knives is to fabricate them using bulk metallic glasses (or composites). These alloys can be cast into net or near-net shaped knives with a combination of properties that exceed both titanium and steel. A commercially viable BMG (bulk metallic glass) or composite knife is one that exhibits one or all of the following properties: It is based on titanium, has a self-sharpening edge, can retain an edge during service, is hard, is non-magnetic, is corrosion-resistant against a variety of corrosive environments, is tough (to allow for prying), can be cast into a net-shape with a mirror finish and a complex shape, has excellent wear resistance, and is low-density. These properties can be achieved in BMG and composites through alloy chemistry and processing. For

  6. Pre-heating of high-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites: effects on shrinkage force and monomer conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Tarle, Zrinka; Marovic, Danijela; Attin, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the influence of pre-heating of high-viscosity bulk-fill composite materials on their degree of conversion and shrinkage force formation. Four bulk-fill composite materials (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill-TECBF, x-tra fil-XF, QuixFil-QF, SonicFill-SF) and one conventional nano-hybrid resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram-TEC) were used. The test materials were either kept at room temperature or pre-heated to 68°C by means of a commercial heating device, before being photoactivated with a LED curing unit for 20s at 1170mW/cm(2). Shrinkage forces (n=5) of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real-time for 15min inside a temperature-controlled chamber at 25°C (simulating intraoral temperature after rubber dam application) with a custom-made stress analyzer. Degree of conversion (n=5) was determined at the bottom of equally thick (1.5mm) specimens using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Data were analyzed with Student's t-test, ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post-hoc test (α=0.05). Composite pre-heating significantly increased the degree of conversion of TECBF, but had no effect on monomer conversion of the other materials investigated. For each of the test materials, pre-heated composite generated significantly lower shrinkage forces than room-temperature composite. At both temperature levels, TECBF created the significantly highest shrinkage forces, and QF caused significantly higher shrinkage forces than both XF and TEC. Both the composite material and the pre-cure temperature affect shrinkage force formation. Pre-heating of bulk-fill and conventional restorative composites prior to photoactivation decreases polymerization-induced shrinkage forces without compromising the degree of conversion. Composite pre-heating significantly reduces shrinkage force formation of high-viscosity bulk-fill and conventional resin composites, while maintaining or increasing the degree of monomer conversion, dependent upon the specific composite material used. Copyright

  7. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... The chemical composition of the essential oil obtained from the needles of Pinus caribaea by ... chemical compositions of essential oil of many Pinus species .... Synergistic bactericidal effect of carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde or thymol and refrigeration of inhibit Bacillus cereus in carrot broth. Food Microbiol.

  8. Fatty acid and cholesterol content, chemical composition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to determine the fatty acid and chemical composition and cholesterol concentration of horsemeat, and to evaluate its taste acceptability by the Brazilian population. Horsemeat samples (M. longissimus dorsi) were obtained from a Paraná State slaughterhouse. The chemical composition revealed a low lipid ...

  9. Chemical composition of chicken meat produced in extensive indoor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition of chicken meat produced in extensive indoor and free range rearing systems. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... The present study involves the analysis of the chemical composition of white meat (breast muscles) and dark meat (leg muscles) of broilers in extensive indoor and free range systems.

  10. Influence of age and formalin treatment on the chemical composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical composition and in vitro dry-matter digestibility (IVDMD) of manure collected from steers fed ... Formalin treatment under these conditions negatively influenced the chemical composition and IVDMD of these parameters with respect to nutritive value. .... value comparable to that of heat-damaged haylage.

  11. Tuning chemical potential in the dirac cone by compositional engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, R. K.; Singh, Sourabh; Sarkar, Jit; Mitra, Chiranjib

    2017-10-01

    To realize fully topological transport for any device applications it is essential to tune the chemical potential in the bulk gap of the Dirac cone. Bi2Se3 (BS) and Bi2Te3 (BT) thin films do not show in general topological transport as the chemical potential doesn't lie entirely in the bulk gap. We report the successful formation of bulk insulating ternary topological insulators Bi2Se2Te (BST) by double target pulsed laser deposition technique. The films were deposited with sequential ablation of separate BS and BT targets. From the X-ray diffraction analysis and temperature dependent resistivity, we were able to conclude that the as-grown thin films have ordered chalcogen layers and the chemical potential in these thin films lie in the bulk gap. We have been able to achieve this fully topological transport in our sample grown by this technique. Our Magnetotransport data exhibits pronounced two-dimensional weak-antilocalization behavior (WAL) at low temperatures. It was possible to tune the chemical potential at will in the gap by depositing thin films through pulsed laser deposition technique using this simple and cost effective double target approach to grow quaternary TI thin films.

  12. Chemical composition, physicochemical and functional properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the mean diameter, bulk density, sphericity, water absorption, swelling coefficient and swelling index were not significantly different between the two lupin seed samples. There was strong positive correlation between calcium content and the cooking time of lupin. The lower calcium concentration leads to a better ...

  13. Influence of irradiation time on subsurface degree of conversion and microhardness of high-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarle, Z; Attin, T; Marovic, D; Andermatt, L; Ristic, M; Tauböck, T T

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of irradiation time on degree of conversion (DC) and microhardness of high-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites in depths up to 6 mm. Four bulk-fill materials (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill--TECBF; x-tra fil--XF; QuixFil--QF; SonicFill-SF) and one conventional nano-hybrid resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram--TEC) were irradiated for 10, 20, or 30 s at 1,170 mW/cm(2). DC and Knoop microhardness (KHN) were recorded after 24-h dark storage at five depths: 0.1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 mm. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). With increasing bulk thickness, DC and KHN significantly decreased for TEC. TECBF and SF showed a significant decrease in DC and KHN at 4-mm depth after 10-s irradiation, but no decrease in DC after 30-s irradiation (p > 0.05). XF and QF demonstrated no significant DC decrease at depths up to 6 mm after irradiation of at least 20 s. At 4-mm depth, all materials tested achieved at least 80 % of their maximum DC value, irrespective of irradiation time. However, at the same depth (4 mm), only XF and QF irradiated for 30 s achieved at least 80 % of their maximum KHN value. Regarding DC, the tested bulk-fill resin composites can be safely used up to at least 4-mm incremental thickness. However, with respect to hardness, only XF and QF achieved acceptable results at 4-mm depth with 30 s of irradiation. Minimum irradiation times stated by the manufacturers cannot be recommended for placement of high-viscosity bulk-fill materials in 4-mm increments.

  14. THE STUDY OF CHEMICAL COMPOSITION FOR ANIMAL FATS DURING STORAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Flavia Pop; Cornel Laslo

    2009-01-01

    In this article the chemical composition for 3 types of animal fats (pork fat, beef tallow and buffalo tallow), following the variation of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids proportion during freezing storage was studied. Determination of chemical composition of animal fats is important in establishing organoleptic and physico-chemical parameters, the variation of them in time, nature and proportion of fatty acids conferring specific characteristics to them. For pork fat was determined the...

  15. Calcium isotopic fractionation in mantle peridotites by melting and metasomatism and Ca isotope composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin-Ting; Ionov, Dmitri A.; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Chen-Lei; Golovin, Alexander V.; Qin, Li-Ping; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Huang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    To better constrain the Ca isotopic composition of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) and explore the Ca isotope fractionation in the mantle, we determined the Ca isotopic composition of 28 peridotite xenoliths from Mongolia, southern Siberia and the Siberian craton. The samples are divided in three chemical groups: (1) fertile, unmetasomatized lherzolites (3.7-4.7 wt.% Al2O3); (2) moderately melt-depleted peridotites (1.3-3.0 wt.% Al2O3) with no or very limited metasomatism (LREE-depleted cpx); (3) strongly metasomatized peridotites (LREE-enriched cpx and bulk rock) further divided in subgroups 3a (harzburgites, 0.1-1.0% Al2O3) and 3b (fertile lherzolites, 3.9-4.3% Al2O3). In Group 1, δ44/40Ca of fertile spinel and garnet peridotites, which experienced little or no melting and metasomatism, show a limited variation from 0.90 to 0.99‰ (relative to SRM 915a) and an average of 0.94 ± 0.05‰ (2SD, n = 14), which defines the Ca isotopic composition of the BSE. In Group 2, the δ44/40Ca is the highest for three rocks with the lowest Al2O3, i.e. the greatest melt extraction degrees (average 1.06 ± 0.04 ‰, i.e. ∼0.1‰ heavier than the BSE estimate). Simple modeling of modal melting shows that partial melting of the BSE with 103 ln ⁡αperidotite-melt ranging from 0.10 to 0.25 can explain the Group 2 data. By contrast, δ44/40Ca in eight out of nine metasomatized Group 3 peridotites are lower than the BSE estimate. The Group 3a harzburgites show the greatest δ44/40Ca variation range (0.25-0.96‰), with δ44/40Ca positively correlated with CaO and negatively correlated with Ce/Eu. Chemical evidence suggests that the residual, melt-depleted, low-Ca protoliths of the Group 3a harzburgites were metasomatized, likely by carbonate-rich melts/fluids. We argue that such fluids may have low (≤0.25‰) δ44/40Ca either because they contain recycled crustal components or because Ca isotopes, similar to trace elements and their ratios, may be fractionated by kinetic and

  16. A thin FinFET Si-fin body structure fabricated with 193-nm scanner photolithography and composite hard mask etching technique upon bulk-Si substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wen-Shiang; Liu, Yu-Huan; Chang, Wen-Tung; Chen, Tung-Hung; Shih, Tommy; Tsen, Huan-Chiu; Chung, Lee

    2007-03-01

    A thin FinFET bulk Si-fin body structure has been successfully fabricated upon bulk-Si wafers through using 193nm scanner lithography and a composite hard mask etching technique. First, a 100Å-thick buffer SiO II layer was thermally grown upon the bulk silicon layer and subsequently a 1200Å-thick SiN x layer and a 1000Å-thick TEOS SiO II hard mask layer was chemically vapor deposited to form a composite hard mask structure of buffer-SiO II/SiN x/TEOS. Second, both 1050Å-thick BARC and 2650Å-thick photoresist (P/R) were coated and a 193nm scanner lithography tool was used for the Si-fin body layout patterning under relatively high exposure energy. This achieves the ADI (after develop inspection) of 80nm from the original as-drawn Si-fin layout of 110nm. Then, a deep sub-micron plasma etcher was used for an aggressive P/R and BARC trimming down processing and both the capping TEOS and CVD-SiN x with its underlying buffer oxide layers were subsequently etched in other etching plasma chambers, respectively. Resultantly, the AMI (after mask inspection) can reach 60nm. Subsequently, both the P/R and BARC were removed with a nominal plasma ashing as well as a RCA cleaning for the final sub-micron Si-fin plasma etching. Eventually, a 60nm-width and 400nm-height bulk Si-fin body structure can be successfully etched out after a fixed time-mode silicon plasma etching.

  17. Propolis chemical composition and honeybee resistance against Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, M; Reyes, M; Le Conte, Y; Bankova, V

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is known as honeybee chemical defence against infections and parasites. Its chemical composition is variable and depends on the specificity of the local flora. However, there are no data concerning the relationship between propolis chemical composition and honeybee colony health. We tried to answer this question, studying the chemical composition of propolis of bee colonies from an apiary near Avignon, which are tolerant to Varroa destructor, comparing it with colonies from the same apiary which are non-tolerant to the mites. The results indicated that non-tolerant colonies collected more resin than the tolerant ones. The percentage of four biologically active compounds - caffeic acid and pentenyl caffeates - was higher in propolis from tolerant colonies. The results of this study pave the way to understanding the effect of propolis in individual and social immunity of the honeybees. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between propolis chemical composition and honeybee colony health.

  18. Bond strength and ultimate tensile strength of resin composite filled into dentine cavity; effect of bulk and incremental filling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayif, Ma'an M; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between micro-tensile bond strength (muTBS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of resin composite restorations in cavities filled by a bulk or incremental technique using the micro-tensile test. Class I cavities (4mm long, 3mm wide, 3mm deep) were prepared into dentine of sixteen human molars. All cavities were bonded with Clearfil SE Bond and restored with AP-X composite with either a bulk or incremental technique. After storage in water for 24h, the teeth were vertically sectioned to yield two slabs. Each slab was sectioned into three sticks. Sticks of one slab were trimmed into an hourglass of 0.7 mm2 area at resin-dentine interface for bond strength measurement while the other sticks were trimmed at the centre of the restoration for UTS measurement. Specimens were tested in tension at 1mm/min until failure. The results obtained were statistically analysed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc test (alpha=0.05). Pearson's correlation test was used to identify any correlation between muTBS and UTS for each filling method. Both muTBS and UTS of resin composite decreased towards the bottom of the cavity (pvariables. There was a relationship between muTBS and UTS of resin composite filled into dentin cavity in bulk technique.

  19. Zinc isotope fractionation during magmatic differentiation and the isotopic composition of the bulk Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Heng; Savage, Paul S.; Teng, Fang-Zehn; Helz, Rosalind T.; Moynier, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    he zinc stable isotope system has been successfully applied to many and varied fields in geochemistry, but to date it is still not completely clear how this isotope system is affected by igneous processes. In order to evaluate the potential application of Zn isotopes as a proxy for planetary differentiation and volatile history, it is important to constrain the magnitude of Zn isotopic fractionation induced by magmatic differentiation. In this study we present high-precision Zn isotope analyses of two sets of chemically diverse, cogenetic samples from Kilauea Iki lava lake, Hawaii, and Hekla volcano, Iceland, which both show clear evidence of having undergone variable and significant degrees of magmatic differentiation. The Kilauea Iki samples display small but resolvable variations in Zn isotope composition (0.26‰66Zn66Zn defined as the per mille deviation of a sample's 66Zn/64Zn compositional ratio from the JMC-Lyon standard), with the most differentiated lithologies exhibiting more positive δ66Zn values. This fractionation is likely a result of the crystallization of olivine and/or Fe–Ti oxides, which can both host Zn in their crystal structures. Samples from Hekla have a similar range of isotopic variation (0.22‰66Zn66Zn=0.28±0.05‰ (2s.d.).

  20. Origin and chemical composition of evaporite deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, George William

    1960-01-01

    A comparative study of marine evaporite deposits forming at the present time along the pacific coast of central Mexico and evaporite formations of Permian age in West Texas Basin was made in order to determine if the modern sediments provide a basis for understanding environmental conditions that existed during deposition of the older deposits. The field work was supplemented by investigations of artificial evaporite minerals precipitated in the laboratory and by study of the chemical composition of halite rock of different geologic ages. The environment of deposition of contemporaneous marine salt deposits in Mexico is acidic, is strongly reducing a few centimeters below the surface, and teems with microscopic life. Deposition of salt, unlike that of many other sediments, is not wholly a constructional phenomenon. Permanent deposits result only if a favorable balance exists between deposition in the dry season and dissolution in the wet season. Evaporite formations chosen for special study in the West Texas Basin are, in ascending order, the Castile, Salado, and Rustler formations, which have a combined thickness of 1200 meters. The Castile formation is largely composed of gypsum rock, the Salado, halite rock, and the Rustler, quartz and carbonate sandstone. The lower part of the Castile formation is bituminous and contains limestone laminae. The Castile and Rustler formations thicken to the south at the expense of salt of the intervening Salado formation. The clastic rocks of the Rustler formation are interpreted as the deposits of a series of barrier islands north of which halite rock of the Salado was deposited. The salt is believed to have formed in shallow water of uniform density that was mixed by the wind. Where water depth exceeded the depth of the wind mixing, density stratification developed, and gypsum was deposited. Dense water of high salinity below the density discontinuity was overlain by less dense, more normally saline water which was derived from

  1. Chemical composition of Hyptis suaveolens and Ocimum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four medicinal plants belonging to the family Lamiaceae were chemically screened for their chemical constituents including alkaloids, tannins, saponins, flavonoids and phenols. The medicinal plants investigated were Hyptis suaveloens and three putative hybrids of Ocimum gratissimum (Hybrid A, B and C). All the plants ...

  2. Fabrication and mechanical behavior of bulk nanoporous Cu via chemical de-alloying of Cu–Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fei, E-mail: chenfei027@gmail.com [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Chen, Xi; Zou, Lijie; Yao, Yao; Lin, Yaojun; Shen, Qiang [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Lavernia, Enrique J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Zhang, Lianmeng, E-mail: lmzhang@whut.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2016-04-13

    We report on a study of the influence of microstructure on the mechanical behavior of bulk nanoporous Cu fabricated by chemical de-alloying of Cu{sub 50}Al{sub 50}, Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 60}, Cu{sub 33}Al{sub 67} and Cu{sub 30}Al{sub 70} (at%) alloys. The precursor Cu–Al alloys were fabricated using arc melting and bulk nanoporous Cu was obtained by subsequent de-alloying of Cu–Al alloys in 20 wt% NaOH aqueous solution at a temperature of 65 °C. We studied the microstructure of the precursor Cu–Al alloys, as well as that of the as de-alloyed bulk nanoporous Cu, using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. Moreover, the compressive strength of bulk nanoporous Cu was measured and the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties was studied. Our results show that the microstructure of bulk nanoporous Cu is characterized by bi-continuous interpenetrating ligament-channels with a ligament size of 130±20 nm (for Cu{sub 50}Al{sub 50}), 170±20 nm (for Cu{sub 40}Al{sub 60}) and 160±10 nm (for Cu{sub 33}Al{sub 67}). Interestingly the microstructure of de-alloyed Cu{sub 30}Al{sub 70} is bimodal with nanopores (100's nm) and interspersed featureless regions a few microns in size. The compressive strength increased with decreasing volume fraction of porosity; as porosity increased 56.3±2% to 73.9±2%, the compressive strength decreased from 17.18±1 MPa to 2.71±0.5 MPa.

  3. Advancing Consumer Product Composition and Chemical ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes EPA efforts to collect, model, and measure publically available consumer product data for use in exposure assessment. The development of the ORD Chemicals and Products database will be described, as will machine-learning based models for predicting chemical function. Finally, the talk describes new mass spectrometry-based methods for measuring chemicals in formulation and articles. This presentation is an invited talk to the ICCA-LRI workshop "Fit-For-Purpose Exposure Assessments For Risk-Based Decision Making". The talk will share EPA efforts to characterize the components of consumer products for use in exposure assessment with the international exposure science community.

  4. Chemical composition separation of a propylene-ethylene random copolymer by high temperature solvent gradient interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonggang; Phiri, Mohau Justice; Ndiripo, Anthony; Pasch, Harald

    2017-11-03

    A propylene-ethylene random copolymer was fractionated by preparative temperature rising elution fractionation (TREF). The structural heterogeneity of the bulk sample and its TREF fractions was studied by high temperature liquid chromatography with a solvent gradient elution from 1-decanol to 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. HPLC alone cannot resolve those propylene-ethylene copolymers with high ethylene content in the bulk sample, due to their low weight fractions in the bulk sample and a small response factor of these components in the ELSD detector, as well as their broad chemical composition distribution. These components can only be detected after being separated and enriched by TREF followed by HPLC analysis. Chemical composition separations were achieved for TREF fractions with average ethylene contents between 2.1 and 22.0mol%, showing that copolymers with higher ethylene contents were adsorbed stronger in the Hypercarb column and eluted later. All TREF fractions, except the 40°C fraction, were relatively homogeneous in both molar mass and chemical composition. The 40°C fraction was rather broad in both molar mass and chemical composition distributions. 2D HPLC showed that the molar masses of the components containing more ethylene units were getting lower for the 40°C fraction. HPLC revealed and confirmed that co-crystallization influences the separation in TREF of the studied propylene-ethylene copolymer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Composites of amorphous and nanocrystalline Zr–Cu–Al–Nb bulk materials synthesized by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drescher, P., E-mail: philipp.drescher@uni-rostock.de [Fluidic Technology and Microfluidics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Witte, K. [Physics of New Materials, Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Yang, B. [Polymer Physics, Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Steuer, R.; Kessler, O. [Chair of Materials Science, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Burkel, E. [Physics of New Materials, Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Schick, C. [Polymer Physics, Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Seitz, H. [Fluidic Technology and Microfluidics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    The fabrication of Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 24}Al{sub 4}Nb{sub 2} bulk metallic glass composite samples by spark plasma sintering (SPS) process has been successfully realized. The unique characteristics of bulk metallic glasses could lead to the possibility of future applications as new structural and functional materials. The densification of an amorphous Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 24}Al{sub 4}Nb{sub 2} powder was realized in a systematic study changing the sintering temperature in the SPS process leading to stable composites characteristic of amorphous and nanocrystalline structures. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as hardness tests were applied to determine the structural and mechanical properties of the sintered materials. A stable amorphous bulk metallic glass based on Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 24}Al{sub 4}Nb{sub 2} with a low fraction of crystallites could be fabricated applying a nominal sintering temperature of 400 °C. Higher sintering temperatures lead to composites with high fractions of nanocrystalline material with porosities below 0.5%.

  6. An investigation into the chemical composition of alternative invertebrate prey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonincx, D.G.A.B.; Dierenfeld, E.S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition of eight invertebrate species and evaluate their suitability as alternative prey. The species selected were rusty red cockroaches (Blatta lateralis), six-spotted cockroaches (Eublaberus distanti), Madagascar hissing cockroaches

  7. Chemical composition and microbial load of cheese produced using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aframomum sceptrum) on the chemical composition and microbial load of cheese was evaluated in a Completely Randomized Design. Cheese produced with 1% bear berry (Aframomum sceptrum) had the highest (P < 0.05) crude protein content ...

  8. Studies on chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of bioactive molecules from date palm ( Phoenix dactylifera L.) pollens and seeds. ... using different techniques, including optical density and GC/MS analyses of the natural extracts.

  9. Antimicrobial activity and chemical compositions of Turkish propolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative bacteria and its chemical composition were evaluated by the method of agar-well diffusion and GC-MS, respectively. Some typical compounds samples were identified in the propolis samples. Principal component analysis revealed that the ...

  10. Chemical compositions and antimicrobial activity of twig essential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical compositions and antimicrobial activity of twig essential oils from three Xylopia (Annonaceae) species. Siti Humeirah Abdul Ghani, Nor Azah Mohamad Ali, Mailina Jamil, Mastura Mohtar, Saiful Azmi Johari, Mazurah Mohamad Isa, Mohd Faridz Zoll Patah ...

  11. Inverted bulk-heterojunction organic solar cell using chemical bath deposited titanium oxide as electron collection layer

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwabara, Takayuki; Sugiyama, Hirokazu; Kuzuba, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takahashi, Kohshin

    2010-01-01

    Chemical bath deposited titanium oxide (TiOx ) as an electron collection layer is introduced between the organic layer and the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode for improving the performance of inverted bulk-heterojunction organic thin film solar cells with 1 cm2 active area, where regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were mainly used as the photo-active layer. The uniform and thin TiOx film was easily prepared onto the ITO electrode ...

  12. Peculiarities of chemical composition of sainfoin seeds powder

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Aleksandrovna Tarasenko; Elena Aleksandrovna Butina; Evgeny Olegovich Gerasimenko

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to studying chemical composition of the powder of the seeds of non-traditional legume, sainfoin. The experimental studies showed that crushed seeds of sainfoin make a flowing fine powder of light brown color with a pleasant unpronounced specific smell with floral notes. The taste is grassy with the after-taste typical for legumes. The chemical composition of sainfoin seeds is dominated by proteins and fiber, and fat content does not exceed 8%. The total content of amino-...

  13. Evaluation of chemical composition of defect wine distillates

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaljević Žulj, Marin; Posavec, Barbara; Škvorc, Melanija; Tupajić, Pavica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition of the distillate obtained from wine with off-flavour. The chemical composition of wine distillates obtained by distillation of Chardonnay wine with oxidation off-flavour was investigated. Distillation of wine was carried out using a simple distillation pot still by double distillation and separation the different portion of the first fraction. Volatile compounds of wine and wine distillates (acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol ...

  14. Chemical composition of sediments from White Sea, Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamza, Olga; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Novigatsky, Aleksandr

    2010-05-01

    The White Sea, the only Russian inland sea, is located on the north of outlying districts of the European part of Russia, belongs to Arctic Ocean. Area of water of sea occupies about 90 tousend square kilometers. The sea can be divided into some general parts: neck, funnel, basin and 4 Bays: Dvina Bay, Kandalaksha Bay, Mezen Bay and Onega Bay. The purpose of this work was geochemical mapping of the surface sediments of this area. The main tasks were: compilation data base of element composition of the surface sediments, geochemical mapping of each element, research of the anormal concentration of elements on the surface. To detect the content of chemical elements several methods were used: atomic absorption spectrometry (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology); neutron activation analysis (Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry), total and organic carbon analysis, photometric method to detection Si, Al, P (P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology). Bulk composition is one of the fundamental characteristics of sediments and bottom deposites of modern basins. Coarse-grained sediments with portion of pelitic component 80%). Character of elements distribution correlates with facial distribution of sediments from White Sea. According to litologic description, bottom surface of Dvina Bay is practically everywhere covered by layer of fine-grained sand. In the border area between Dvina Bay and White Sea basin on terraced subwater slope aleurite politic silts are abundant. They tend to exhange down the slope to clay silts. In Onega Bay fractions of non-deposition are observed. They are characterized by wide spread of thin blanket poorgraded sediments, which are likely to be relic. Relief of Kandalakscha Bay bottom is presented as alternation of abyssal fosses (near 300 m) with silles and elevations (depressions and in central part of the sea, which is quite wide from both places of original sedimentation and run off sources [2]. Thus, the interrelation

  15. Pulsed field magnetization strategies and the field poles composition in a bulk-type superconducting motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhen; Ruiz, H. S.; Coombs, T. A.

    2017-03-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) bulks offer the potential of trapping and maintaining much higher magnetic loading level compared with the conventional permanent magnets used in rotary machines, although the effective magnetization of multiple HTS bulks with different relative orientations over the surface of cylindrical rotors creates new challenges. In this paper, we present the design and numerical validation of the Pulse Field Magnetization (PFM) strategy considered for the magnetization of the four-pole synchronous fully superconducting motor developed at the University of Cambridge. In a first instance, singular columns of up to five HTS bulks aligned over the height of the rotor were subjected to up to three magnetic pulses of 1.5 T peak, and the experimental results have been simulated by considering the electrical and thermal properties of the system in a 2D approach. The entire active surface of the rotor is covered by HTS bulks of approximately the same dimensions, resulting in an uneven distribution of pole areas with at least one of the poles formed by up to 3 columns of magnetized bulks, with relatively the same peaks of trapped magnetic field. Thus, in order to effectively use the entire area of the superconducting rotor, multiple pulsed fields per column have been applied under the same experimental conditions, what results in about three times larger magnetic pole areas but with an average drop on the peaks of trapped magnetic field of about 50%.

  16. Honey: Chemical composition, stability and authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Priscila Missio; Gauche, Cony; Gonzaga, Luciano Valdemiro; Costa, Ana Carolina Oliveira; Fett, Roseane

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the chemical characteristics of compounds present in honey, their stability when heated or stored for long periods of time and the parameters of identity and quality. Therefore, the chemical characteristics of these compounds were examined, such as sugars, proteins, amino acids, enzymes, organic acids, vitamins, minerals, phenolic and volatile compounds present in honey. The stability of these compounds in relation to the chemical reactions that occur by heating or prolonged storage were also discussed, with increased understanding of the behavior regarding the common processing of honey that may compromise its quality. In addition, the identity and quality standards were described, such as sugars, moisture, acidity, ash and electrical conductivity, color, 5-HMF and diastase activity, along with the minimum and maximum limits established by the Codex Alimentarius. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical composition of hulled, dehulled and naked oat grains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In grain samples of hulled (5 samples), dehulled (5 samples) and naked (4 samples) oats, the following components were determined: chemical composition (ash, crude protein, crude fat, crude fibre and its components) and amino acids and fatty acid composition. The grain of naked and dehulled oats contained ...

  18. Chemical composition and nutritional value of boiled Christmas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the chemical composition and the nutritive value of boiled Christmas bush (Alchornea cordifolia) for starter broiler chickens. Dried Christmas bush fruits (Capsules + seed) were boiled for 30 minutes, sundried and ground into meal. The meal was analyzed for proximate composition and ...

  19. Chemical composition of the clays as indicator raw material sources

    OpenAIRE

    Khramchenkova Rezida Kh.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the results of study on the chemical composition of unglazed pottery from the excavations of the Bulgar fortified settlement site and the clay, selected from the modern deposits of ceramic raw materials located near the medieval settlement sites. Significant differences in macro- and microelement composition of different groups of ceramics have been revealed. The difference in the macroelemental composition is largely determined by the ceramic fabric recipe. Thus, the high ...

  20. Amino Acid Composition of Bulk Protein of Euglena Grown in Waste Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kott, Yehuda; Wachs, A. M.

    1964-01-01

    The amino acid content of bulk protein in a sewage-grown Euglena sp. was examined. Concentrations of the essential amino acids, threonine, histidine, tryptophan, and valine, were similar to those found in other algae. The concentration of alanine was much higher. Methionine was not found at all, proline only in traces, and other amino acids at low concentrations. These results indicate that the amino acid content of bulk protein of the species of Euglena studied resembles that of plants far more closely than that of animals. PMID:14199015

  1. AMINO ACID COMPOSITION OF BULK PROTEIN OF EUGLENA GROWN IN WASTE WATER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KOTT, Y; WACHS, A M

    1964-07-01

    The amino acid content of bulk protein in a sewage-grown Euglena sp. was examined. Concentrations of the essential amino acids, threonine, histidine, tryptophan, and valine, were similar to those found in other algae. The concentration of alanine was much higher. Methionine was not found at all, proline only in traces, and other amino acids at low concentrations. These results indicate that the amino acid content of bulk protein of the species of Euglena studied resembles that of plants far more closely than that of animals.

  2. Chemical composition, true metabolisable energy content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aneldavh

    Erickson, J.P., 1985. Lupins show potential as protein source for livestock. Feedstuffs 57, 22–23. Evans, A.J. & Cheung, P.C.K., 1993. The carbohydrate composition of cotyledons and hulls of cultivars of. Lupinus angustifolius from Western Australia. J. Sci. Food Agric. 61, 189–194. Garrido, A., Gomez-Cabrera, A., Guerrero, ...

  3. Chemical composition of the early universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harwit, M; Spaans, M

    2003-01-01

    A prediction of standard inflationary cosmology is that the elemental composition of the medium out of which the earliest stars and galaxies condensed consisted primarily of hydrogen and helium (4)He, with small admixtures of deuterium, lithium (7)Li, and (3)He. The most redshifted quasars,

  4. Proximate, chemical compositions and sulphur concentrations on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0, 10, 20, 50, 100, 150, 200, 250 and 300 ppm) on the nutritional value and the proximate composition of six selected mango cultivars (Tommy Atkins, Peach, Saber, Sunshine, Keitt and Vhavenda) grown in South Africa. The study shows that ...

  5. Joining and Assembly of Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Through Capacitive Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Kozachkov, Henry; Demetriou, Marios D.; Schramm, Joseph P.; Johnson, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a class of amorphous metals defined as having a thickness greater than 1 mm, are being broadly investigated by NASA for use in spacecraft hardware. Their unique properties, attained from their non-crystalline structure, motivate several game-changing aerospace applications. BMGs have low melting temperatures so they can be cheaply and repeatedly cast into complex net shapes, such as mirrors or electronic casings. They are extremely strong and wear-resistant, which motivates their use in gears and bearings. Amorphous metal coatings are hard, corrosion-resistant, and have high reflectivity. BMG composites, reinforced with soft second phases, can be fabricated into energy-absorbing cellular panels for orbital debris shielding. One limitation of BMG materials is their inability to be welded, bonded, brazed, or fastened in a convenient method to form larger structures. Cellular structures (which can be classified as trusses, foams, honeycombs, egg boxes, etc.) are useful for many NASA, commercial, and military aerospace applications, including low-density paneling and shields. Although conventional cellular structures exhibit high specific strength, their porous structures make them challenging to fabricate. In particular, metal cellular structures are extremely difficult to fabricate due to their high processing temperatures. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels, for example, are used widely as spacecraft shields due to their low density and ease of fabrication, but suffer from low strength. A desirable metal cellular structure is one with high strength, combined with low density and simple fabrication. The thermoplastic joining process described here allows for the fabrication of monolithic BMG truss-like structures that are 90% porous and have no heat-affected zone, weld, bond, or braze. This is accomplished by welding the nodes of stacked BMG composite panels using a localized capacitor discharge, forming a single monolithic structure

  6. Chemical composition and mutagenic assessment of petrochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    was first introduced by Levan (1938) and later was proposed as a standard method for the testing of chemicals, in environmental monitoring and in toxicity screening of wastewater and river water (Fiskesjö,. 1985a; 1985b; 1993). The Allium genetic material has been widely exploited for such purpose because of its excellent ...

  7. Chemical composition and physical characteristics of cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    The main aim of this research was to determine the effect of variety on physical and chemical characteristics of straws of long season cowpeas and also to determine if haulms of varieties that retain greenness longer will have a better nutritional value than those that dry early. Materials and Methods. Sixteen forages used in ...

  8. Chemical Composition, Resistant, Total Starch Content and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is aimed at the potential use of cowpea starch (CS) as resistant starch in the production of noodle as a functional food and its overall acceptability. Alkaline noodle was prepared from a mixture of 100% wheat flour and varying substitution of wheat flour (2, 4% and 6%) with cowpea starch (CS). Chemical analysis ...

  9. Relationship between chemical composition and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    younger (Quaternary) caldera forming lava dome/flows (e.g., tephriphonolite, trachyte) and pyro- ... rocks. In this paper, it is aimed (i) to present geo- chemical content of the volcanic rocks from the. Isparta area (SW Turkey), and (ii) to discuss the relationship between ..... highly oxidized magma during crystallization and cool-.

  10. Fabrication of Nanocarbon Composites Using In Situ Chemical Vapor Deposition and Their Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; Li, Jiajun

    2015-09-23

    Nanocarbon (carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene (GN)) composites attract considerable research interest due to their fascinating applications in many fields. Here, recent developments in the field of in situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for the design and controlled preparation of advanced nanocarbon composites are highlighted, specifically, CNT-reinforced bulk structural composites, as well as CNT, GN, and CNT/GN functional composites, together with their practical and potential applications. In situ CVD is a very attractive approach for the fabrication of composites because of its engaging features, such as its simplicity, low-cost, versatility, and tunability. The morphologies, structures, dispersion, and interface of the resulting nanocarbon composites can be easily modulated by varying the experimental parameters (such as temperature, catalysts, carbon sources, templates or template catalysts, etc.), which enables a great potential for the in situ synthesis of high-quality nanocarbons with tailored size and dimension for constructing high-performance composites, which has not yet been achieved by conventional methods. In addition, new trends of the in situ CVD toward nanocarbon composites are discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Application of pulse acoustic microscopy technique for 3D imaging bulk microstructure of carbon fiber-reinforced composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Songping; Guo, Enming; Levin, V M; Liu, Feifei; Petronyuk, Yu S; Zhang, Qianlin

    2006-12-22

    Impulse acoustic microscopy technique is applied for 3D imaging of bulk microstructure of composite materials. Short pulses of focused high-frequency ultrasound have been employed for layer-by-layer imaging of internal microstructure of carbon fiber-reinforced composite (CFRC) laminates. The method provides spatial resolution of 60 microm and in-depth resolution of 80 microm, approximately. Echo signals reflected from structural units--plies, fiber bundles; and microflaws form acoustic images of microstructure at different depth inside samples. The images make it possible to see ply arrays, packing of bundles in plies; binding material distribution over the specimen body. They reveal failure of interply adhesion, buckling of single plies and fiber bundles, internal defoliations and disbonds, voids in the specimen body. The series of successive images offer outstanding possibilities to reconstruct the bulk structure, to estimate local variations of properties, topological and geometrical characteristics of structural components. The imaging technique has been applied to study different types of fiber packing--unidirectional, cross-ply and woven laminates. Mechanisms of ultrasonic contrast for diverse elements in acoustic images of CFRC laminate bulk microstructure and structural defects are discussed.

  12. Potential of milk fatty acid composition to predict diet composition and authenticate feeding systems and altitude origin of European bulk milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, M; Chassaing, C; Ferlay, A; Agabriel, C; Laurent, C; Borreani, G; Barcarolo, R; Baars, T; Kusche, D; Harstad, O M; Verbič, J; Golecký, J; Delavaud, C; Chilliard, Y; Martin, B

    2015-03-01

    The aims of this work were to elucidate the potential of using milk fatty acid (FA) concentration to predict cow diet composition and altitude of bulk milk collected in 10 different European countries and to authenticate cow-feeding systems and altitude of the production area using a data set of 1,248 bulk cow milk samples and associated farm records. The predictions based on FA for cow diet composition were excellent for the proportions of fresh herbage [coefficient of determination (R2)=0.81], good for hay, total herbage-derived forages, and total preserved forages (R2>0.73), intermediate for corn silage and grass silage (R2>0.62), and poor for concentrates (R2diet. Milk samples were assigned to groups according to feeding system, level of concentrate supplementation, and altitude origin. Milk FA composition successfully authenticated cow-feeding systems dominated by a main forage (>93% of samples correctly classified), but the presence of mixed diets reduced the discrimination. Altitude prediction reliability was intermediate (R2composition was not able to authenticate concentrate supplementation level in the diet (composition (composition to authenticate cow feeding was confirmed using a data set representative of the diversity of European production conditions. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure and property evaluation of a vacuum plasma sprayed nanostructured tungsten-hafnium carbide bulk composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, K. E.; Viswanathan, V.; Kruize, A.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; O'Dell, S.; McKechnie, T.; Rajagopalan, S.; Vaidyanathan, R.; Seal, S.; O’Dell, S.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spray (VPS) forming of tungsten-based metal matrix nanocomposites (MMCs) has shown to be a cost effective and time saving method for the formation of bulk monolithic nanostructured then no-mechanical components. Spray drying of powder feedstock appears to have a significant effect on

  14. Genus Mikania: chemical composition and phytotherapeutical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane C. Rufatto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Mikania ranks high in the list of best-selling natural products in the world. Its main distribution is in South America, but some species are found in Asia, North America and Africa. It is used for treating fever, rheumatism, colds and respiratory diseases, as well as snake bites and scorpion stings, due to its broad spectrum of action. There are approximately 430 species of this genus and only 12% have been studied, highlighting their chemical and pharmacological diversity. The main chemical groups are: coumarins and derivatives, sesquiterpenes, sesquiterpenes lactones, diterpenes, phytosterols/terpenoids and flavonoids. This review aims to supply useful references for scientists interested in natural products and the search for new compounds, from over the 300 already described for the genus.

  15. Genus Mikania: chemical composition and phytotherapeutical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane C. Rufatto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The genus Mikania ranks high in the list of best-selling natural products in the world. Its main distribution is in South America, but some species are found in Asia, North America and Africa. It is used for treating fever, rheumatism, colds and respiratory diseases, as well as snake bites and scorpion stings, due to its broad spectrum of action. There are approximately 430 species of this genus and only 12% have been studied, highlighting their chemical and pharmacological diversity. The main chemical groups are: coumarins and derivatives, sesquiterpenes, sesquiterpenes lactones, diterpenes, phytosterols/terpenoids and flavonoids. This review aims to supply useful references for scientists interested in natural products and the search for new compounds, from over the 300 already described for the genus.

  16. Yield, chemical composition, in vitro digestibility and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reza

    Feed Sci. Technol. 94,. 15-27. Ammar, H., 2002. Compositión química, digestibilidad y cinética de fermentacion ruminal in vitro de arbustos. PhD tesi, Universidad de León, Spain. Anderson, T.P. & Hoffman, P., 2006. Nutrient composition of straw used in dairy cattle diets. University of. Wisconsin Extension Focus on Forage.

  17. Evaluating the Marginal Integrity of Bulk Fill Fibre Reinforced Composites in Bio-mimetically Restored Tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnana, Arun Kumar; Vanga, V Narsimha Rao; Chandrabhatla, Srinivas Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Over the past years, composites in aesthetic dentistry are showing a considerable progress, but mechanical strength and polymerization shrinkage are the two main drawbacks, which limit their use in high stress bearing areas. To evaluate the marginal integrity of short glass fibre reinforced composite restorations, fibre reinforced composites with composite superficial layer, and fibre reinforced composites with underlying flowable composite layer. This study was done on twenty eight sound premolar teeth with standardized class V cavities restored under four groups as Group I: Particulate filler composite (Filtek Z 250 XT, 3M ESPE); Group II: Short glass fibre reinforced composite (everX Posterior, GC); Group III: Short glass fibre reinforced composite with an overlying layer of particulate filler composite; Group IV: Short glass fibre reinforced composite with an underlying layer of flowable composite (Filtek Z 250 XT, 3M ESPE). Test samples were immersed in a 2% methylene blue dye for 24 hours at 37°C and each tooth was sectioned bucco-lingually. Staining along the tooth restoration interface was recorded and results were analysed statistically using Independent sample t-test and Tukey's post-hoc one-way ANOVA. The results showed significant difference in the dye penetration between the restorative materials in the occlusal and gingival margins (p=0.02). Short fibre reinforced composites showed a statistically significant difference in the microleakage scores when compared with the particulate filler composites (p=0.01). Short glass fibre reinforced composite restorations showed an improved marginal integrity when compared to the traditional particulate filler composite restorations.

  18. Thermoplastic Joining and Assembly of Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Through Capacitive Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Roberts, Scott N. (Inventor); Kozachkov, Henry (Inventor); Demetriou, Marios D. (Inventor); Schramm, Joseph P. (Inventor); Johnson, William L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for joining BMG Composites are disclosed. Specifically, the joining of BMG Composites is implemented so as to preserve the amorphicity of their matrix phase and the microstructure of their particulate phase. Implementation of the joining method with respect to the construction of modular cellular structures that comprise BMG Composites is also discussed.

  19. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-04

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  20. Bio-refinery as the bio-inspired process to bulk chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, J.P.M.; Scott, E.L.; Weusthuis, R.A.; Mooibroek, H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes several examples of knowledge-intensive technologies for the production of chemicals from biomass, which take advantage of the biomass structure in a more efficient way than the production of fuels or electricity alone. The depletion in fossil feedstocks, increasing oil prices,

  1. Chemical composition of Lake Orta sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica BELTRAMI

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Lake Orta (18.2 km2, 1.3 km3, 143 m max. depth has been severely polluted since industrialisation of its watershed began in 1926, at which time the lake began to receive industrial effluents containing high concentrations of copper and ammonia. Chromium-, nickel-, and zinc-rich effluents from plating factories have also contributed to pollution levels, and pH -levels dropped below 4.0 as a result of the oxidation of ammonia to nitrates. More than 60 papers have documented the evolution of the chemical characteristics of both water and sediment, and the sudden decline of plankton, as well as benthos and fish. As a remedial action the lake was limed from May 1989 to June 1990 with 10,900 tons of CaCO3. The treatment was immediately effective in raising the pH and decreasing the metal concentrations in the water column, and plankton and fish communities quickly rebounded. However, the chemical characteristics of sediments were influenced by the liming to a much lesser extent. Since 900 tons of copper and the same amount of chromium were contained in the top 10 cm of sediment, it appears likely that the sediment could potentially act as a current and future source of these metals to the water column. This observation has resulted in the implementation of a vigorous monitoring regime to track the post-liming recovery of Lake Orta.

  2. Chemical composition of polluted mist droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Manabu; Kamijo, Kosuke; Nanzai, Ben; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2017-12-01

    Mist events occur frequently worldwide, but the chemical characteristics of the mist droplets has never been investigated because of very low liquid water contents of them. We estimated the concentrations of the mist water, the average concentration of the mist droplets, via the determination of water-soluble components of the coarse aerosol and the observation of the imprints of the droplets on a MgO-coated glass slide. The pH of the mist water was estimated from the equilibrium calculation with the data of the Gran plot of the solution of the dissolved coarse particles, the inorganic ion concentrations of aerosol larger than 10 μm, and the estimated volume of mist water. The mist water was measured as about 1 eq/L total concentration for typical inorganic ions and about pH 4.5 in Yokohama. Such highly concentrated mist droplets may have intense environmental effects.

  3. Unraveling the chemical composition of caramel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golon, Agnieszka; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2012-03-28

    Caramel is one of mankind's best known dietary materials obtained from carbohydrates by heating. Much effort has been expended toward the chemical characterization of the components of caramel but impeded by a lack of suitable analytical techniques sufficiently powerful for providing insight into an extraordinarily complex material. This paper reports the characterization of caramel formed by heating from glucose, fructose, and saccharose using a conceptually novel combination of mass spectrometrical techniques. The analytical strategy employed uses high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) followed by targeted liquid chromatography-tandem MS experiments. Caramel is composed from several thousand compounds formed by a small number of unselective and chemoselective reactions. Caramelization products include oligomers with up to six carbohydrate units formed through unselective glycosidic bond formation, dehydration products of oligomers losing up to a maximum of eight water molecules, hydration products of sugar oligomers, disproportionation products, and colored aromatic products.

  4. Sensory properties and chemical composition of Sharri cheese from Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agim Rysha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Food sensory properties, analyses and chemical composition are very important because they provide information about product quality and end-user acceptance or preferences. An assessment of sensory characteristics and chemical composition of mountain sheep and cow’s-milk cheese from shepherd’s huts and industrial manufacturers in Kosovo was carried out. Consumer-oriented tests using a 9 point hedonic scale were conducted in order to determine Sharri cheese acceptability. Chemical parameters (fat content, fat content of dry matter, acidity, protein, dry matter, mineral and water content and sodium chloride content of 45-day brine cheese samples were also analyzed. Chemical and sensory assessment demonstrated large property differences. A recommendation stems from the results showing that the standardization of both artisanal and industrial production of Sharri cheese is required.

  5. Inorganic chemical composition of native trees of the Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De França, E J; De Nadai Fernandes, E A; Bacchi, M A; Rodrigues, R R; Verburg, T G

    2005-03-01

    The Atlantic Forest with its exuberant vegetation of high level of biodiversity is classified as one hotspot of the world. Chemical composition of leaves from native trees and underlying soils was evaluated by INAA. The predominant species Euterpe edulis, Bathysa meridionalis, Hyeronima alchorneoides, Marlierea tomentosa, Gomidesia flagellaris, and Gomidesia spectabilis belonging to the diverse plant families were studied. Euterpe edulis, the most abundant understory specie, presented the lowest element concentrations except for Zn. Some variation in chemical composition was noted, however, the chemical specificity of tree species can be more predominant than the soil variability for the obtained leaf concentrations. Factor values obtained through the Monte-Carlo assisted factor analysis were used for species discrimination, The results indicate that chemical investigation of native trees is a quite promising tool for biodiversity studies in the Atlantic Forest.

  6. Chemical food composition: implications for atherosclerosis prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Carlos; Ribeiro, Jorge Pinto

    2011-01-01

    To compare the fatty acid and cholesterol content in food acquired in Brazil with the composition found in the most frequently used reference tables in the country. The fatty acid and cholesterol content in 41 food items frequently used in our country and the various directions to prepare them were reviewed by using specific methodology and the information was compared to the tables adopted by Unicamp and UNIFESP. According to Unicamp table, the cholesterol content found in parmesan cheese was 100.7 mg/100 g, while it was 68 mg/100 g in UNIFESP table, that is, a 48% (p cholesterol content 31% lower (94 mg/100 g vs. 123 mg/100 g, p cheese. For whole milk, we found a 52% difference regarding cholesterol content, while the difference for saturated fat ranged from 1.4 g/100 g in Unicamp table to 2.130 g/100 g in our study table (p cholesterol content formally analyzed and the content shown on commonly used tables, and this can compromise our recommendations on preventing atherosclerosis. One possible explanation for the differences would be the fact that the UNIFESP table is American in origin.

  7. All-polymer solar cells with bulk heterojunction nanolayers of chemically doped electron-donating and electron-accepting polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Sungho; Shin, Minjung; Park, Soohyeong; Lee, Sooyong; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2012-11-21

    We report the improved performance of all-polymer solar cells with bulk heterojunction nanolayers of an electron-donating polymer (poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)) and an electron-accepting polymer (poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-co-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT)), which were both doped with 4-ethylbenzenesulfonic acid (EBSA). To choose the doping ratio of P3HT for all-polymer solar cells, various EBSA doping ratios (0, 1, 3, 5, 10, 20 wt%) were tested by employing optical absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and space-charge-limited current (SCLC) mobility measurement. The doping reaction of P3HT with EBSA was followed by observing the colour change in solutions. The final doping ratio for P3HT was chosen as 1 wt% from the best hole mobility measured in the thickness direction, while that for F8BT was fixed as 10 wt% (F8BT-EBSA). The polymer:polymer solar cells with bulk heterojunction nanolayers of P3HT-EBSA (EBSA-doped P3HT) and F8BT-EBSA (EBSA-doped F8BT) showed greatly improved short circuit current density (J(SC)) and open circuit voltage (V(OC)), compared to the undoped solar cells. As a result, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was enhanced by ca. 300% for the 6 : 4 (P3HT-EBSA : F8BT-EBSA) composition and ca. 400% for the 8 : 2 composition. The synchrotron-radiation grazing incidence angle X-ray diffraction (GIXD) measurement revealed that the crystallinity of the doped nanolayers significantly increased by EBSA doping owing to the formation of advanced phase segregation morphology, as supported by the surface morphology change measured by atomic force microscopy. Thus the improved PCE can be attributed to the enhanced charge transport by the formation of permanent charges and better charge percolation paths by EBSA doping.

  8. Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cell Devices Prepared with Composites of Conjugated Polymer and Zinc Oxide Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Tam Nguyen Truong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanorods (Nrods with ~20–50 nm lengths were synthesized using an aqueous solution of zinc acetate and glacial acetic acid. Bulk heterojunction solar cells were fabricated with the structure of indium tin oxide (ITO/polyethylenedioxythiophene doped with polystyrene-sulfonic acid (PEDOT:PSS/ZnO-Nrods + polymer/electron transport layer (ETL/Al. Current density-voltage characterization of the resulting cells showed that, by adding an ETL and using polymers with a low band gap energy, the photoactive layer surface morphology and the device performance can be dramatically improved.

  9. Effect of MoSi2 Content on Dry Sliding Tribological Properties of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Yang, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 bulk metallic glass and its composites were prepared by suction casting into a copper mold. The effect of MoSi2 content on the tribological behavior of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 BMG was studied by using a high-speed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The results indicate that the friction coefficient and wear resistance of the BMGs can be improved by a certain amount of crystalline phase induced by MoSi2 content from 1 to 3% and deteriorated with MoSi2 content of 4%. The wear mechanism of both the metallic glass and its composite is abrasive wear. The mechanism of crystalline phase-dependent tribological properties of the composite was discussed based on the wear track and mechanical properties in the present work. The wear behavior of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 BMG and its composite indicates that a good combination of the toughness and the hardness can make the composite be well wear resistant.

  10. High frequency bulk resonators for bio/chemical diagnostics and monitoring applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto

    In the environmental monitoring eld there is a vast variety of possible applications for microfabricated MEMS sensors. As an example, a network of miniaturized sensors could detect toxic gases, harmful airbornes, explosives in air or, in liquid, monitor the quality of drinking water...... characterized in terms of electrical properties and mass sensing performance. Chemical and biological mass sensing experiments have been performed in order to investigate the behavior of these devices in dierent environments. The microresonators have been used to detect copper ions in drinking water...... and as temperature sensors in humid environment. Moreover, they have been used as tool to investigate the interaction between water molecules and DNA. Finally, nanograss have been etched into the body of the microresonators in order to improve the mass sensitivy of the devices. On the whole, the experimental results...

  11. On-line measurements of particle chemical composition with the Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, R. J.; Orsini, D.; Sullivan, A.; Ma, Y.; Meier, K.

    2002-12-01

    We describe a new instrument for near real-time quantitative measurements of bulk aerosol particle chemical composition. The device continuously captures particles into a small flow of purified water, whose flow rate can be selected. This flow may then be analyzed by existing analytical chemical techniques for measurements of the dissolved aerosol particle chemical composition. Coupled to a dual channel ion chromatograph, the instrument is capable of measuring a suite of aerosol ionic constituents at sensitivities down to approximately 10 ng per cubic meter of air with a duty cycle of roughly 4 minutes. Coupled to a total carbon analyzer, the water-soluble carbonaceous component of atmospheric aerosol particles can be determined with sensitivities down to approximately 0.2 ug per cubic meter at a duty cycle of 6 minutes. The device has been deployed for ground, ship, and airborne measurements in studies whose focus has ranged from urban air quality to characterization of Asian outflow. Current work is focused on speciation of the water-soluble organic carbon component and the extension of the technique to solvents other than water. Examples from various field studies will be presented along with future needs in composition measurements and ideas for addressing these needs.

  12. On the realization of the bulk modulus bounds for two-phase viscoelastic composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Andreassen, Erik; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    Materials with good vibration damping properties and high stiffness are of great industrial interest. In this paper the bounds for viscoelastic composites are investigated and material microstructures that realize the upper bound are obtained by topology optimization. These viscoelastic composites...... can be realized by additive manufacturing technologies followed by an infiltration process. Viscoelastic composites consisting of a relatively stiff elastic phase, e.g. steel, and a relatively lossy viscoelastic phase, e.g. silicone rubber, have non-connected stiff regions when optimized for maximum...... damping. In order to ensure manufacturability of such composites the connectivity of the matrix is ensured by imposing a conductivity constraint and the influence on the bounds is discussed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. Meteorite zircon constraints on the bulk Lu−Hf isotope composition and early differentiation of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Takao; Hibiya, Yuki; Amelin, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of planetary differentiation is crucial for understanding the chemical and thermal evolution of terrestrial planets. The 176Lu−176Hf radioactive decay system has been widely used to constrain the timescales and mechanisms of silicate differentiation on Earth, but the data interpretation requires accurate estimation of Hf isotope evolution of the bulk Earth. Because both Lu and Hf are refractory lithophile elements, the isotope evolution can be potentially extrapolated from the present-day 176Hf/177Hf and 176Lu/177Hf in undifferentiated chondrite meteorites. However, these ratios in chondrites are highly variable due to the metamorphic redistribution of Lu and Hf, making it difficult to ascertain the correct reference values for the bulk Earth. In addition, it has been proposed that chondrites contain excess 176Hf due to the accelerated decay of 176Lu resulting from photoexcitation to a short-lived isomer. If so, the paradigm of a chondritic Earth would be invalid for the Lu−Hf system. Herein we report the first, to our knowledge, high-precision Lu−Hf isotope analysis of meteorite crystalline zircon, a mineral that is resistant to metamorphism and has low Lu/Hf. We use the meteorite zircon data to define the Solar System initial 176Hf/177Hf (0.279781 ± 0.000018) and further to identify pristine chondrites that contain no excess 176Hf and accurately represent the Lu−Hf system of the bulk Earth (176Hf/177Hf = 0.282793 ± 0.000011; 176Lu/177Hf = 0.0338 ± 0.0001). Our results provide firm evidence that the most primitive Hf in terrestrial zircon reflects the development of a chemically enriched silicate reservoir on Earth as far back as 4.5 billion years ago. PMID:25870298

  14. Meteorite zircon constraints on the bulk Lu-Hf isotope composition and early differentiation of the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Takao; Hibiya, Yuki; Amelin, Yuri

    2015-04-28

    Knowledge of planetary differentiation is crucial for understanding the chemical and thermal evolution of terrestrial planets. The (176)Lu-(176)Hf radioactive decay system has been widely used to constrain the timescales and mechanisms of silicate differentiation on Earth, but the data interpretation requires accurate estimation of Hf isotope evolution of the bulk Earth. Because both Lu and Hf are refractory lithophile elements, the isotope evolution can be potentially extrapolated from the present-day (176)Hf/(177)Hf and (176)Lu/(177)Hf in undifferentiated chondrite meteorites. However, these ratios in chondrites are highly variable due to the metamorphic redistribution of Lu and Hf, making it difficult to ascertain the correct reference values for the bulk Earth. In addition, it has been proposed that chondrites contain excess (176)Hf due to the accelerated decay of (176)Lu resulting from photoexcitation to a short-lived isomer. If so, the paradigm of a chondritic Earth would be invalid for the Lu-Hf system. Herein we report the first, to our knowledge, high-precision Lu-Hf isotope analysis of meteorite crystalline zircon, a mineral that is resistant to metamorphism and has low Lu/Hf. We use the meteorite zircon data to define the Solar System initial (176)Hf/(177)Hf (0.279781 ± 0.000018) and further to identify pristine chondrites that contain no excess (176)Hf and accurately represent the Lu-Hf system of the bulk Earth ((176)Hf/(177)Hf = 0.282793 ± 0.000011; (176)Lu/(177)Hf = 0.0338 ± 0.0001). Our results provide firm evidence that the most primitive Hf in terrestrial zircon reflects the development of a chemically enriched silicate reservoir on Earth as far back as 4.5 billion years ago.

  15. Multiphase chemical kinetics of OH radical uptake by molecular organic markers of biomass burning aerosols: humidity and temperature dependence, surface reaction, and bulk diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arangio, Andrea M; Slade, Jonathan H; Berkemeier, Thomas; Pöschl, Ulrich; Knopf, Daniel A; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-05-14

    Multiphase reactions of OH radicals are among the most important pathways of chemical aging of organic aerosols in the atmosphere. Reactive uptake of OH by organic compounds has been observed in a number of studies, but the kinetics of mass transport and chemical reaction are still not fully understood. Here we apply the kinetic multilayer model of gas-particle interactions (KM-GAP) to experimental data from OH exposure studies of levoglucosan and abietic acid, which serve as surrogates and molecular markers of biomass burning aerosol (BBA). The model accounts for gas-phase diffusion within a cylindrical coated-wall flow tube, reversible adsorption of OH, surface-bulk exchange, bulk diffusion, and chemical reactions at the surface and in the bulk of the condensed phase. The nonlinear dependence of OH uptake coefficients on reactant concentrations and time can be reproduced by KM-GAP. We find that the bulk diffusion coefficient of the organic molecules is approximately 10(-16) cm(2) s(-1), reflecting an amorphous semisolid state of the organic substrates. The OH uptake is governed by reaction at or near the surface and can be kinetically limited by surface-bulk exchange or bulk diffusion of the organic reactants. Estimates of the chemical half-life of levoglucosan in 200 nm particles in a biomass burning plume increase from 1 day at high relative humidity to 1 week under dry conditions. In BBA particles transported to the free troposphere, the chemical half-life of levoglucosan can exceed 1 month due to slow bulk diffusion in a glassy matrix at low temperature.

  16. Anti-inflammation activity and chemical composition of flower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... tonic, excitant and anti-rheumatic in the Ayurvedic system of traditional Indian medicine (Jain et al., 1995). Studies on the chemical composition of the rhizome and flower of H. coronarium resulted in the isolation of several labdane-type diterpenes and farnesane-type sesquiterpenes (Itokawa et al., 1988a,b; ...

  17. Carcass properties, chemical content and fatty acid composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to examine carcass properties and variability in chemical content and fatty acid composition in the musculus longissimus lumborum et thoracis (MLLT) of different genotypes of pigs. Of 36 male castrated animals used in the trial, 24 were from two strains of Mangalitsa pigs (12 Swallow - bellied ...

  18. The chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leendert Snynan

    The chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) of untreated and ammoniated ... IVDMD of maize residues obtained by means of a whole plant maize harvester was found to be relatively high .... This value is high when compared with in vitro organic matter digestibility values reported for wheat straw.

  19. Chemical composition and larvicidal activity of Zanthoxylum gilletii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, larvicidal potential of essential oil from Zanthoxylum gilletii was evaluated against malaria vector mosquito, A. gambiae. The essential oil was extracted by hydro-distillation, and its chemical compositions determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. The oil was dominated by sesquiterpenes and ...

  20. Microbial Quality and Chemical Composition of Raw Whole Milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the microbial quality and chemical composition of raw milk from Horro cows raised at rural farm households was conducted in Guto Wayu and Bila Sayo districts of East Wolloga. Thirty willing households owning one or more cows were randomly selected from Guto Wayu and Bila Sayo districts of East Wollega.

  1. Chemical composition of essential oils of Eugenia caryophylla and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical composition was assigned by GC and GC/SM and showed that E. caryophylla was mainly composed of eugenol (80.0 %), E-caryophyllene (8.3%), and eugenol acetate (6.7%) while Mentha sp cf piperita was characterized by piperitone (67.5 %), menthol (10.0 %) and ß-phellandrene (5.8%). The result ...

  2. Chemical composition of essential oil of exudates of Dryobalanops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To identify the chemical composition of essential oil from the exudates of Dryobalanops aromatica from Malaysia. Methods: Exudate was collected from D. aromatica and subjected to fractional distillation to obtain essential oil. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to characterize the ...

  3. Chemical Composition and Antifungal Properties of Essential Oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare Linnaeus (Lamiaceae) on the growth of Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis. Methods: The chemical composition of the essential oil was investigated by gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC-FID). The minimum inhibitory ...

  4. Variation of the chemical composition of four forage shrubs ( Albizia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology and results: The leaves of each species were harvested at the beginning, at mid-season and at the end of dry season. They were dried and crushed to determine their chemical composition. The results showed that, with A. lebbeck, the levels of DM obtained at mid-season and the end that one, were higher ...

  5. Preliminary Studies of the Chemical Composition and Sensory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary studies of chemical composition and sensory properties of instant noodles from blends of wheat flour and sweet potato starch were carried out. Sweet potato starch was used to replace wheat flour at 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70%. Proximate, vitamin A, mineral analysis and sensory evaluation were carried out by ...

  6. Chemical composition, in vitro digestibility and palatability of nine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work studied the chemical composition of plants, and their digestibility and palatability to camels, selecting plants most eaten by camels from the Iranian desert of the province of Semnan. The results indicated that the order of usefulness, from the most useful, was: Salsola arbuscula, Seidlitzia rosmarinus, Suaeda ...

  7. Distribution and Chemical Composition of Browse Plants of Egbado ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four herds of cattle were used to investigate the distribution and chemical composition of browse plants in Egbado North of Ogun State. The results showed that a wide variety of browse plants abound-trees and shrubs. Glyricidia sepium and Ficus exasperata were the most frequent trees while Manihot utilissima was the ...

  8. Chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of fresh and shade dried Jatropha curcas aqueous leaves extracts (JCLE) on alloxan induced diabetic female wistar rats. Seven (7) kg of J. curcas leaves were pulverized and aqueous extracts produced. Thirty five (35) mature female rats were ...

  9. Chemical composition of essential oil from the leaves of Premna ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the chemical composition of the essential oil of Premna coriacea leaves was investigated. Extraction by hydrodistillation followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) yielded 27 compounds representing 99.89% of the oil. The major volatile components of the oil were aromadendrene ...

  10. Chemical composition and volatile compounds in the artisanal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition and volatile compounds in the artisanal fermentation of mezcal in Oaxaca, Mexico. ... ethyl acetate, and acetic acid production, and this practice is more convenient in fall than in spring. Key words: Fermentation, ammonium sulfate, volatile compounds, higher alcohol, gas chromatography, mezcal.

  11. Chemical composition and antifungal activity of essential oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their chemical composition and antifungal activity against four phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporum f.sp., albedinis sp, Penicelium sp., Alternaria sp. and Fusarium sp.) were studied. The inhibiting minimal concentration (CMI) effect was also given for four oils. Ten compounds were recorded jointly among the 51 ...

  12. Chemical composition and nutritive value of irrigated tall fescue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and produce less milk than ruminants that eat forages of similar chemical composition (Lassiter el ai., 1956; Seath el ai., 1956; Jacobson el ai., 1970; Warren el at., 1974; Smith el ai., 1975; Reid et ai., 1975; Nichols et ai., 1976), prompted this investigation into the nutritive value and potential of fescue for dairy production in ...

  13. Chemical composition of Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) fruit | Salim ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition of pulp, skin and seeds of fruit of Opuntia ficus-indica was investigated. Results showed high amount of water in the pulp (84.14%) and skin (90.33%). Glucose and fructose (29 and 24%, respectively) in the pulp were greater than in the skin (14 and 2.29%, respectively), whereas saccharose was very ...

  14. The chemical composition and potential nutritive value of the foliage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical composition and potential nutritive value of the foliage of four subtropical tree species in southern Africa for ruminants. ... The foliage contained relatively low levels of sodium (Na), 0.041 g/kg DM, based on beef cattle standards. The IVOMD ranged from 53% for C. mopane to 64% C. apiculatum and the rumen ...

  15. The chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility of untreated and ammoniated crop residues. ... high (IVDMD = 55.6±7.0%) while the crude protein (CP) (46±10 g/kg dry matter (DM)) and phosphorus (P) (1.2±0.5 g/kg DM) concentrations were below the maintenance requirement for dry gestating beef cows.

  16. Effect of Chemical and Mineralogical Composition of Rocks on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in Hewanie and its surrounding areas of 169.82 km2 with a major objective of identifying the effect of chemical and mineralogical composition of rocks on the chemistry of the groundwater quality. This was conducted by taking 11 groundwater and 5 rock samples from the main geological units of ...

  17. effect of chemical and mineralogical composition of rocks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    The study was conducted in Hewanie and its surrounding areas of 169.82 km2 with a major objective of identifying the effect of chemical and mineralogical composition of rocks on the chemistry of the groundwater quality. This was conducted by taking 11 groundwater and 5 rock samples from the main geological units of ...

  18. Chemical composition and biological studies of the essential oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition and biological studies of the essential oil of Thymus decussatus benth growing in Egypt. A A El-Hela. Abstract. The essential oil of Thymus decussatus Benth herb growing in Egypt was prepared by hydro distillation of the dried herb and analyzed by GC/ MS. It revealed the presence of 12 peaks, which ...

  19. Effect of fungal treatment on chemical composition and in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-28

    Dec 28, 2011 ... This study was conducted to investigate the effects of Trichoderma harzianum isolate T.447 (T.447) on the chemical composition and in vitro ruminal digestibility of treated maize, wheat, rapeseed and soybean straws. Preparation of each straw was divided into two equal parts and was treated with a.

  20. Effect of Trichoderma spp. inoculation on the chemical composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... To evaluate the cultural ability of some Trichoderma isolates on wheat straw and the influence of their exogenous enzyme activities on chemical compositions as well as in vitro digestibility and upgrading of the nutritive value of lignocellulolytic materials, sterilized and non sterilized wheat straw were.

  1. Chemical composition and in vitro gas production of vetch ( Vicia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition and in vitro gas production of vetch (Vicia sativa) and some browse and grass species from northern Ethiopia were investigated. Vetch (fresh cut) was sampled in September and vetch hay samples were taken in October both during the early dry period. Samples of the browse and grass species were ...

  2. Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Ocimum gratissimum L. growing in Eastern Kenya. ... aeruginosae, Salmonella typhi, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis) bacteria and a pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. The oil had pronounced antibacterial and antifungal activities on all the

  3. Effect of maturity stage and processing on chemical composition, in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of maturity stage and processing on chemical composition, in vitro gas production and preference of Panicum maximum and Pennisetum purpureum. ... It is concluded that in order to optimize DM intake farmers should consider the type of grasses and their age at harvest particularly for Muturu. Pelleting improves ...

  4. Chemical composition profiling and antifungal activity of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Minimum inhibitory activity was compared with four other different crude extracts of hexane, acetone, ethanol and aqueous samples from the same plant. The chemical composition of the essential oil, hexane, acetone and ethanol extracts was determined using GC-MS. Result: GC/MS analysis of the essential oil resulted in ...

  5. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... Abdullahi and Audu. 35. Comparative Analysis on Chemical Composition of Bentonite Clays. Obtained from Ashaka and Tango Deposits in Gombe State, Nigeria. Abdullahi S.L1 and Audu A.A2. 1Kano State Polytechnic, Kano - Nigeria. 2Department of Pure and Industrial Chemistry, Bayero University Kano ...

  6. The chemical composition of silages produced in a Mediterranean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    chemical composition of silages was also determined. Material and Methods. About 120 samples of seven silage crops were collected during 1996 on five farms in the Piketberg-. Eendekuil area of the Swartland. Samples were randomly collected from silage crops made in big bales, sealed in plastic bags and kept in cooler ...

  7. The chemical composition and industrial quality of Barite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that the mineralization is of high industrial quality and compares favourably with the Azara barite deposits of the Benue Trough. The quality of the barite meets American Petroleum institute (API) requirements for use as drilling mud. KEYWORDS: Barite, mineralization, quality, chemical composition, southeastern Nigeria.

  8. Chemical Composition, in situ Degradability and in vitro Gas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the quality profile of tagasaste forage harvested at different re-growth stages by measuring the chemical composition, in situ degradability and in vitro gas production. Tagasaste re-growths after one year of establishment was harvested and the re-growths starting from the main rainy season (July) was ...

  9. Analysis of physical and chemical composition of honey samples in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study analyzed the physical and chemical compositions of seven honey samples, which were obtained from selected markets in Ibadan metropolis. Seven samples of honey were obtained namely from sample A (Forestry honey Ibadan), Sample B (Pure honey), Sample C (Mr. honey), Sample D (Taraba honey), sample ...

  10. Probabilistic thermo-chemical analysis of a pultruded composite rod

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baran, Ismet; Tutum, Cem C.; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study the deterministic thermo-chemical pultrusion simulation of a composite rod taken from the literature [7] is used as a validation case. The predicted centerline temperature and cure degree profiles of the rod match well with those in the literature [7]. Following the validation

  11. Chemical composition changes of post-harvest coconut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coconut inflorescence sap (CIS) is sweet, oyster-white and translucent and was reported to be highly nutritive and a good digestive agent. The chemical composition changes including total sugar, reducing sugar, ethanol, total acidity, volatile acid, amino acid, vitamin C and total phenolic contents of postharvest coconut ...

  12. Proximate and chemical composition of three species of snails in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This trial was conducted to determine the proximate and chemical composition of three common species of snails in Nigeria. The species were Archachatina marginata (T1), Achatina achatina (T2), and Achatina fulica (T3). The three species constituted the three treatments and thirty-six adult snails were used for this trial ...

  13. Chemical Composition and Insecticidal Activity of the Essential Oil of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the chemical composition and insecticidal activity of the essential oil of the aerial parts of Ostericum grosseserratum against the maize weevil, Sitophilus zeamaisD. Methods: Steam distillation of the aerial parts of O. grosseserratum during the flowering stage was carried out using a Clavenger ...

  14. Seasonal chemical composition of wall barley ( Hodreum murinum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wall barley (Hodreum murinum L.) is an annual cool-season grass species that grows in areas with a Mediterranean climate. It has potential as a forage source in Jordan. The objective was to determine seasonal chemical composition of wall barley grown under sub-humid Mediterranean conditions. A field trial

  15. Genesis of some tertiary Indian coals from the chemical composition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vassilev S V, Vassileva C G, Baxter D and Andersen. L K 2010b Relationship between chemical and min- eral composition of coal and their potential appli- cation as genetic indicators. Part 2. Mineral classes, groups and species; Geologica Balcanica 39.3 Sofia. 43–67. Yudovich Ya E 1978 Geochemistry of Fossil Coals; ...

  16. Chemical Composition and Effect of Processing and Flour Particle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work investigated the chemical composition of cocoyam corms and cormels and the effect of processing and particle size on the physicochemical and organoleptic properties of the flours for use as soup thickener. Fresh cocoyam corms and cormels were peeled, sliced, washed, divided into four parts that were variously ...

  17. Effect of Trichoderma spp. inoculation on the chemical composition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To evaluate the cultural ability of some Trichoderma isolates on wheat straw and the influence of their exogenous enzyme activities on chemical compositions as well as in vitro digestibility and upgrading of the nutritive value of lignocellulolytic materials, sterilized and non sterilized wheat straw were inoculated with ...

  18. Antimicrobial properties and chemical compositions of the petroleum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial and chemical compositions of the petroleum ether extract of theaerial parts of Rauvolfia vomitoria. The aerial parts of the plant were air dried under shade, pounded using wooden mortar and pestle into coarse powder. The coarse powder was extracted in aSoxhlet ...

  19. Qualitative determination of chemical and nutritional composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Qualitative determination of chemical and nutritional composition of Parkia biglobosa seeds an underexploited crop seed in Nigeria was carried out. Seeds of P. biglobosa were found to be rich in lipid, protein, carbohydrate, soluble sugars and ascorbic acid. The cotyledon was very nutritious, has less fibre and ash contents ...

  20. Comparative chemical composition of 24-hour fermented sweet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative chemical composition of 24-hour fermented sweet orange fruit ( Citrus sinensis ) peel meal and maize and effect on performance response of starting pullet ... Substitution of maize with SOFPM significantly (p<0.05) reduced feed cost/25kg, feed cost/bird and cost of production while decreasing efficiency of feed ...

  1. effects of heat input on the chemical composition and hardness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-02

    Jul 2, 2012 ... This study examines the thermochemical reactions which alter weld metal chemistry by applying the arc heat ... Keywords: alloying element, brinell hardness number (BHN), chemical composition, heat input, thermochemical reaction ..... national Journal of Advances in Science and Tech- nology, Vol.

  2. Chemical composition of essential oil from Psidium cattleianum var.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rajuc

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... The aim of this study was to investigate the essential oil composition of Psidium cattleianum var. lucidum from South Africa. The essential oils were extracted by hydrodistillation and the components were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to determine the chemical ...

  3. Chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of Jatropha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Joy

    This study evaluates the chemical composition and anti-diabetic properties of fresh and shade dried. Jatropha curcas aqueous leaves extracts ... urgent health care intervention. Jatropha curcas is a drought resistant shrub or tree ..... Ipomea batata (11.10%) and Moringa oleifera (15.09%. DW) (Antia et al., 2006; Lockeett et ...

  4. Study on the chemical composition and extraction technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chemical composition of hydro-distilled oil from the ground aerial parts of Wedelia trilobata (L.) Hitchc. was analysed by gas chromatography/gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/GC–MS). 18 compounds ... The study offers theoretic basis for utilization of the medicinal herb W. trilobata. Key words: Wedelia ...

  5. Comparative analysis of the chemical composition of three spices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative analysis of the chemical composition of three spices – Allium sativum L. Zingiber officinale Rosc. and Capsicum frutescens L. commonly consumed in Nigeria. ... Phytochemical screening indicated that these spices are also rich in phytonutrients including alkaloid, tannin, carotenoids, saponin and flavonoids.

  6. Chemical Composition, Dry Matter Intake by West African Dwarf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experiment was conducted to determine dry matter intake (DMI) by West African dwarf (WAD) goats, chemical composition, in vitro gas production and dry matter digestibility of Panicum maximum (common name: Guinea grass or Panicum) with graded levels of palm kernel cake (PKC). Five diets were evaluated: ...

  7. Seasonal and species variation in chemical composition of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABUBAKER

    Association of Official Analytical Chemists,. International ®. AOAC International, Gaithersburg, Maryland. Batista, A.M.V., Mustafa, A.F., Santos, G.R.A., de Carvalho, F.F.R., Dubeux Jr, J.C.B., Lira, M.A. &. Barbosa, S.B.P., 2003. Chemical composition and ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradability of spineless cactus.

  8. Changes in chemical composition and bioassay assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2005-03-20

    Mar 20, 2005 ... Changes in chemical composition upon processing and bioassay assessment of nutritional potentials of almond fruit waste as an alternative feedstuff were conducted using day-old- cockerels. Proximate analyses revealed that AFW contained valuable nutrients, carbohydrate/dry matter, protein, fat, fiber, ...

  9. Chemical composition and anti-biofilm activity of burdock ( Arctium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the chemical composition and anti-biofilm activity of burdock leaf fractions against Staphylococcus aureus. Methods: The anti-biofilm activity of burdock leaf fractions obtained by column chromatography against S. aureus was determined by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Scanning electron ...

  10. Effect of chemical composition and alumina content on structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 37; Issue 2. Effect of chemical composition and alumina content on structure and properties of ceramic insulators. Arman Sedghi Nastaran Riahi-Noori Naser Hamidnezhad Mohammad Reza Salmani. Electronic Supplementary Material Volume 37 Issue 2 April 2014 pp ...

  11. Bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic based on polythiophene-polyelectrolyte carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Reyes, M. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Lopez-Sandoval, R. [Advanced Materials Department, IPICYT, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Col. Lomas 4a. Seccion, San Luis Potosi 78216 (Mexico); Liu, J.; Carroll, D.L. [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2007-09-22

    It is shown that carbon nanotubes can be used to enhance carrier mobility for efficient removal of the charges in thin film polymer-conjugated/fullerene photovoltaic devices. The fabricated photovoltaic devices consist of poly(3-octylthiophene) (P3OT) polymer blended with undoped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and carbon nanotubes doped with nitrogen (CNx-MWNTs). Nanophase formation and dispersion problems associated with the use of carbon nanotubes in polymer devices were addressed through the generation of functional groups and electrostatic attaching of the polyelectrolyte poly(dimethyldiallylamine) chloride (PDDA) in both MWNTs and CNx-MWNT systems. The resultant nanophase was highly dispersed allowing for excellent bulk heterojunction formation. Our results indicate that CNx-MWNTs enhance the efficiency of P3OT solar cells in comparison with MWNTs. (author)

  12. Black phosphorus mode-locked sub-100 fs bulk laser based on heterostructured Yb composite crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Fei; Zhang, Baitao; Sun, Shijia; Hu, Chen; Lin, Zhoubin; Jiang, Jieyu; Zhang, Shuaiyi; Wang, Xia; Teng, Bing; He, Jingliang

    2018-01-01

    A physically combined heterostructured (PCH) Yb:KGW/Yb:SYB crystal is used to demonstrate a black phosphorus (BP) mode-locked sub-100 fs bulk laser. Near-transform-limited 75 fs pulses are yielded at 1054.6 nm with an output power of 1.03 W, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 10%. This is the first implementation of the PCH concept into a mode-locked Yb-crystal laser to the best of our knowledge. The results not only illustrate the potential of the PCH Yb-crystal as an ideal candidate for realizing ultrafast lasers, but also indicate that BP mode-locking is a very promising approach for generating sub-100 fs pulses from a laser oscillator.

  13. Composition of bulk samples and a possible pristine clast from Allan Hills A81005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, W. V.; Hill, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Abundances of thirty-five elements were determined in two bulk samples and a white clast in the Allan Hills A81005 meteorite. High siderophile element content indicates that the sample is a regolith breccia. An Fe/Mn ratio of 77 in this meteorite eliminates parent bodies of known differentiated meteorites as the source of ALHA 81005. The incompatible elements are very similar to those found in most lunar highlands rocks, and provide very strong evidence that the sample is lunar in origin. The clast sample has the trace element pattern of a lunar anorthosite and is very low in KREEP and siderophile elements. It may be a fragment of a pristine lunar rock.

  14. The effect of bulk-resin CNT-enrichment on damage and plasticity in shear-loaded laminated composites

    KAUST Repository

    Ventura, Isaac Aguilar

    2013-07-01

    One way to improve multi functionality of epoxy-based laminated composites is to dope the resin with carbon nanotubes. Many investigators have focused on the elastic and fracture behavior of such nano-modified polymers under tensile loading. Yet, in real structural applications, laminated composites can exhibit plasticity and progressive damage initiated mainly by shear loading. We investigated the damage and plasticity induced by the addition of carbon nanotubes to the matrix of a glass fiber/epoxy composite system. We characterized both the modified epoxy resin and the associated modified laminates using classical mesoscale analysis. We used dynamic mechanical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and classical mechanical testing to characterize samples with different concentrations of nanofillers. Since the samples were prepared using the solvent evaporation technique, we also studied the influence of this process. We found that in addition to the global increase in elastic regime properties, the addition of carbon nanotubes also accelerates the damage process in both the bulk resin and its associated glass-fiber composite. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Electromagnetic response of the composites containing chemically modified carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemilentsau, A M; Shuba, M V; D' yachkov, P N; Slepyan, G Y A; Kuzhir, P P; Maksimenko, S A, E-mail: andrei.nemilentsau@gmail.co

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that the chemical modification of the bundles and composites containing mixture of semiconducting and metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) leads to the substantial enhancement of the characteristics of their electromagnetic response in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. Boron and nitrogen doping is used to illustrate the effect. In particular, frequencies of antenna resonances in the bundles containing doped SWNTs are shifted to the blue in comparison to the ones in the bundles containing the same number of pristine SWNTs. Moreover, doping increases the resonant values of the bundles polarizability. Enhancement of the conductivity of the composite containing doped SWNTs is also demonstrated. The origin of the behavior is the metallization of the chemically modified semiconducting SWNTs in the bundles and composites due to the injection of the additional charge carriers.

  16. Analysis of Structure and Composition of Bacterial Core Communities in Mature Drinking Water Biofilms and Bulk Water of a Citywide Network in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, Karsten; Kahlisch, Leila; Brettar, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial core communities of bulk water and corresponding biofilms of a more than 20-year-old drinking water network were compared using 16S rRNA single-strand confirmation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprints based on extracted DNA and RNA. The structure and composition of the bacterial core community in the bulk water was highly similar (>70%) across the city of Braunschweig, Germany, whereas all biofilm samples contained a unique community with no overlapping phylotypes from bulk water. Biofilm samples consisted mainly of Alphaproteobacteria (26% of all phylotypes), Gammaproteobacteria (11%), candidate division TM6 (11%), Chlamydiales (9%), and Betaproteobacteria (9%). The bulk water community consisted primarily of Bacteroidetes (25%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Actinobacteria (16%), and Alphaproteobacteria (11%). All biofilm communities showed higher relative abundances of single phylotypes and a reduced richness compared to bulk water. Only biofilm communities sampled at nearby sampling points showed similar communities irrespective of support materials. In all of our bulk water studies, the community composition determined from 16S rRNA was completely different from the 16S rRNA gene-based community composition, whereas in biofilms both molecular fractions resulted in community compositions that were similar to each other. We hypothesize that a higher fraction of active bacterial phylotypes and a better protection from oxidative stress in drinking water biofilms are responsible for this higher similarity. PMID:22389373

  17. Analysis of structure and composition of bacterial core communities in mature drinking water biofilms and bulk water of a citywide network in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henne, Karsten; Kahlisch, Leila; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred G

    2012-05-01

    The bacterial core communities of bulk water and corresponding biofilms of a more than 20-year-old drinking water network were compared using 16S rRNA single-strand confirmation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprints based on extracted DNA and RNA. The structure and composition of the bacterial core community in the bulk water was highly similar (>70%) across the city of Braunschweig, Germany, whereas all biofilm samples contained a unique community with no overlapping phylotypes from bulk water. Biofilm samples consisted mainly of Alphaproteobacteria (26% of all phylotypes), Gammaproteobacteria (11%), candidate division TM6 (11%), Chlamydiales (9%), and Betaproteobacteria (9%). The bulk water community consisted primarily of Bacteroidetes (25%), Betaproteobacteria (20%), Actinobacteria (16%), and Alphaproteobacteria (11%). All biofilm communities showed higher relative abundances of single phylotypes and a reduced richness compared to bulk water. Only biofilm communities sampled at nearby sampling points showed similar communities irrespective of support materials. In all of our bulk water studies, the community composition determined from 16S rRNA was completely different from the 16S rRNA gene-based community composition, whereas in biofilms both molecular fractions resulted in community compositions that were similar to each other. We hypothesize that a higher fraction of active bacterial phylotypes and a better protection from oxidative stress in drinking water biofilms are responsible for this higher similarity.

  18. Compressive strength and the effect of duration after photo-activation among dual-cure bulk fill composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad; Vohra, Fahim

    2016-01-01

    To assess compressive strength and effect of duration after photoactivation on the compressive strength of different dual cure bulk fill composites. Seventy-two disc shaped (4x10mm) specimens were prepared from three dual cure bulk fill materials, ZirconCore (ZC) (n=24), MulticCore Flow (MC) (n=24) and Luxacore Dual (LC) (n=24). Half of the specimens in each material were tested for failure loads after one hour [MC1 (n=12), LC1 (n=12) & ZC1 (n=12)] and the other half in 7 days [MC7 (n=12), LC7 (n=12), ZC7 (n=12)] from photo-polymerization using the universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 cm/minutes. Compressive strength was calculated using the formula UCS=4f/πd(2). Compressive strengths among different groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's multiple comparisons test. Maximum and minimum compressive strengths were observed in ZC7 (344.14±19.22) and LC1 (202.80±15.52) groups. Specimens in LC1 [202.80 (15.52)] showed significantly lower compressive strength as compared to MC1 [287.06 (15.03)] (pstrengths compared to LC7 [324.56 (19.47)] and MC7 [315.26 (12.36)]. Compressive strengths among all three materials were significantly higher (pstrength compared to MC and LC. Increasing the post photo-activation duration (from one hour to 7 days) significantly improves the compressive strengths of dual cure bulk fill material.

  19. Rhizosphere bacterial community composition in natural stands of Carex arenaria (sand sedge) is determined by bulk soil community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ridder-Duine, A.S.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Smant, W.; Van Veen, J.A.; De Boer, W.

    2005-01-01

    The relative importance of specific plant properties versus soil characteristics in shaping the bacterial community structure of the rhizosphere is a topic of considerable debate. Here, we report the results of a study on the bacterial composition of the rhizosphere of the wild plant Carex arenaria

  20. Structural, compositional and magnetic characterization of bulk V{sub 2}O{sub 5} doped ZnO system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamat, S. [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 (Singapore); Rawat, R.S., E-mail: rajdeep.rawat@nie.edu.sg [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 (Singapore); Lee, P.; Tan, T.L. [Natural Sciences and Science Education, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, 637616 (Singapore); Ramanujan, R.V. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zhou, W. [Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology Centre, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2010-02-01

    This paper investigates the structural, compositional and magnetic properties of vanadium doped ZnO bulk samples prepared by solid state reaction technique. The Rietveld refinement analysis for XRD results of samples showed small change in lattice parameters for 3 and 5% vanadium doped ZnO samples indicating the substitution of Zn{sup 2+} ions by vanadium ions in ZnO lattice. Raman spectroscopy reveals the change in ZnO modes positions due to vanadium doping. The appearance of E{sub 1} and E{sub 2} modes showed that the wurtzite structure of ZnO is still maintained after doping of vanadium oxide. XPS analysis confirms the presence of the different elements and oxidation states of vanadium ions. M-H curves obtained from VSM showed weak ferromagnetism in the samples. The observation of ferromagnetic behavior indicates the formation of ZnVO phase with V{sup 2+} ion substitution in the ZnO lattice. XPS scans of the etched bulk samples confirmed the 2+ oxidation state of vanadium ions in our samples explaining the origin of ferromagnetism.

  1. Meteorite Dust and Health - A Novel Approach for Determining Bulk Compositions for Toxicological Assessments of Precious Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, K. E.; Harrington, A. D.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    With the resurgence of human curiosity to explore planetary bodies beyond our own, comes the possibility of health risks associated with the materials covering the surface of these planetary bodies. In order to mitigate these health risks and prepare ourselves for the eventuality of sending humans to other planetary bodies, toxicological evaluations of extraterrestrial materials is imperative (Harrington et al. 2017). Given our close proximity, as well as our increased datasets from various missions (e.g., Apollo, Mars Exploration Rovers, Dawn, etc…), the three most likely candidates for initial human surface exploration are the Moon, Mars, and asteroid 4Vesta. Seven samples, including lunar mare basalt NWA 4734, lunar regolith breccia NWA 7611, martian basalt Tissint, martian regolith breccia NWA 7034, a vestian basalt Berthoud, a vestian regolith breccia NWA 2060, and a terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt, were examined for bulk chemistry, mineralogy, geochemical reactivity, and inflammatory potential. In this study, we have taken alliquots from these samples, both the fresh samples and those that underwent iron leaching (Tissint, NWA 7034, NWA 4734, MORB), and performed low pressure, high temperature melting experiments to determine the bulk composition of the materials that were previously examined.

  2. Two-phase quasi-equilibrium in β-type Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Pauly, S; Tang, M Q; Eckert, J; Zhang, H F

    2016-01-12

    The microstructural evolution of cast Ti/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) containing β-Ti still remains ambiguous. This is why to date the strategies and alloys suitable for producing such BMGCs with precisely controllable volume fractions and crystallite sizes are still rather limited. In this work, a Ti-based BMGC containing β-Ti was developed in the Ti-Zr-Cu-Co-Be system. The glassy matrix of this BMGC possesses an exceptional glass-forming ability and as a consequence, the volume fractions as well as the composition of the β-Ti dendrites remain constant over a wide range of cooling rates. This finding can be explained in terms of a two-phase quasi-equilibrium between the supercooled liquid and β-Ti, which the system attains on cooling. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium allows predicting the crystalline and glassy volume fractions by means of the lever rule and we succeeded in reproducing these values by slight variations in the alloy composition at a fixed cooling rate. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium could be of critical importance for understanding and designing the microstructures of BMGCs containing the β-phase. Its implications on the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase are elaborated.

  3. The Influence of Irradiation Time and Layer Thickness on Elution of Triethylene Glycol Dimethacrylate from SDR® Bulk-Fill Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagocka, Ryta; Jakubowska, Katarzyna; Chlubek, Dariusz; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) elution from SDR bulk-fill composite. Methods. Three groups of samples were prepared, including samples polymerized in a 4 mm layer for 20 s, in a 4 mm layer for 40 s, and in a 2 mm layer for 20 s. Elution of TEGDMA into 100% ethanol, a 75% ethanol/water solution, and distilled water was studied. The TEGDMA concentration was measured using HPLC. Results. The TEGDMA concentration decreased in the following order: 100% ethanol > 75% ethanol > distilled water. Doubling the energy delivered to the 4 mm thick sample caused decrease (p SDR layer thickness decreases TEGDMA elution.

  4. P3HT/PCBM bulk heterojunction solar cells: impact of blend composition and 3D morphology on device performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavel, Svetlana S. van; Loos, Joachim [Laboratory of Materials and Interface Chemistry and Soft Matter Cryo-TEM Research Unit, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Dutch Polymer Institute, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Baerenklau, Maik; Hoppe, Harald [Institute of Physics Technical, University Ilmenau (Germany); With, Gijsbertus de [Laboratory of Materials and Interface Chemistry and Soft Matter Cryo-TEM Research Unit, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2010-05-10

    The performance of polymer solar cells (PSC) strongly depends on the 3D morphological organization of the donor and acceptor compounds within the bulk heterojunction active layer. The technique of electron tomography is a powerful tool for studying 3D morphology of the layers composed of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and a fullerene derivative ([6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester; PCBM), especially to quantify the amount and distribution of fibrillar P3HT nanocrystals throughout the volume of the active layer. In this study, electron tomography is used to characterize P3HT/PCBM layers with different blend compositions, both before and after thermal annealing. The power conversion efficiency of the corresponding PSCs is strongly dependent on the overall crystallinity of P3HT and the way P3HT crystals are distributed throughout the thickness of the active layer. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Phase Composition and Microstructure of Hot-Pressing Sintered Ti2AlN Metal-Ceramic Bulk Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Suying

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ti2AlN metal-ceramic bulk material was fabricated by hot-pressing sintering (HPS using TiN, Ti and Al powder in a stoichiometric ratio of 1:1:1.03 after mechanical mixing. XRD, SEM and TEM were employed to investigate the phase composition and microstructures of the products. The results show that the high purity Ti2AlN can be obtained by HPS at 1300 ℃ for 2.5 h. The sintered Ti2AlN presented a hexagonal system layered structure with an anisotropy. Twins are found in the Ti2AlN. There were a few nano-scale TiN particles in the products.

  6. Enhanced Mechanical Properties of MgZnCa Bulk Metallic Glass Composites with Ti-Particle Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Chun Wong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rod samples of Mg60Zn35Ca5 bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs dispersed with Ti particles have been successfully fabricated via injection casting. The glass forming ability (GFA and the mechanical properties of these Mg-based BMGCs have been systematically investigated as a function of the volume fraction (Vf of Ti particles. The results showed that the compressive ductility increased with Vf. The mechanical performance of these BMGCs, with up to 5.4% compressive failure strain and 1187 MPa fracture strength at room temperature, can be obtained for the Mg-based BMGCs with 50 vol % Ti particles, suggesting that these dispersed Ti particles can absorb the energy of the crack propagations and can induce branches of the primary shear band into multiple secondary shear bands. It follows that further propagation of the shear band is blocked, enhancing the overall plasticity.

  7. Chemical composition, crystal structure, and their relationships with the intrinsic properties of spinel-type crystals based on bond valences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Wang, Hao; Lavina, Barbara; Tu, Bingtian; Wang, Weimin; Fu, Zhengyi

    2014-06-16

    Spinel-type crystals may possess complex and versatile chemical composition and crystal structure, which leads to difficulty in constructing relationships among the chemical composition, crystal structure, and intrinsic properties. In this work, we develop new empirical methods based on bond valences to estimate the intrinsic properties, namely, compressibility and thermal expansion of complex spinel-type crystals. The composition-weighted average of bond force constants in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination polyhedra is derived as a function of the composition-weighted average of bond valences, which can be calculated according to the experimental chemical composition and crystal structural parameters. We discuss the coupled effects of tetrahedral and octahedral frameworks on the aforementioned intrinsic properties. The bulk modulus could be quantitatively calculated from the composition-weighted average of bond force constants in tetrahedral and octahedral coordination polyhedra. In contrast, a quantitative estimation of the thermal expansion coefficient could be obtained from the composition-weighted average of bond force constants in octahedral coordination polyhedra. These empirical methods have been validated by the results obtained for a new complex quaternary spinel-type oxynitride Mg0.268Al2.577O3.733N0.267 as well as MgAl2O4 and Al2.85O3.45N0.55 from the literature. Further, these empirical methods have the potential to be extensively applied in other types of complex crystals.

  8. The Brittleness and Chemical Stability of Optimized Geopolymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinerova, Michaela; Matulova, Lenka; Vermach, Pavel; Kotas, Jindrich

    2017-04-09

    Geopolymers are known as high strength and durable construction materials but have a brittle fracture. In practice, this results in a sudden collapse at ultimate load, without any chance of preventing the breakdown of parts or of withstanding the stress for some time. Glass fiber usage as a total anisotropic shape acting as a compact structure component should hinder the fracture mechanism. The optimized compositions in this study led to a significant reinforcement, especially in the case of flexural strength, but also in terms of the compressive strength and notch toughness. The positive and negative influence of the fibers on the complex composite properties provided chemical stability.

  9. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Royal Jelly - Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Ioana Bărnuţiu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper presents the literature data regarding the chemical composition and antimicrobial activity of RoyalJelly. Royal Jelly is a secretion from the hypofaringeal glands of worker bees which serves as a food for queen beeand to the growing up larvae. Having biological properties already proven, Royal Jelly has considerable commercialappeal and is today used in many sectors (pharmaceutical, food industries and cosmetic products. Thephysicochemical composition of pure royal jelly are analyzed by determining moisture, ash, lipids, proteins,vitamins,aminoacids, carbohydrates, 10-HDA; RJ is the key substance in the antimicrobial function of the system Apismellifera. The intact Royal Jelly exhibited the highest antibacterial activity.

  10. Microstructure Effects on Spall Strength of Titanium-based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Rene; Hofmann, Douglas; Thadhani, Naresh; Georgia Tech Team; GT-JPL Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    The spall strength of Ti-based metallic glass composites is investigated as a function of varying volume fractions (0-80%) of in-situ formed crystalline dendrites. With increasing dendrite content, the topology changes such that neither the harder glass nor the softer dendrites dominate the microstructure. Plate-impact experiments were performed using the 80-mm single-stage gas gun over impact stresses up to 18 GPa. VISAR interferometry was used to obtain rear free-surface velocity profiles revealing the velocity pullback spall failure signals. The spall strengths were higher than for Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and remained high up to impact stress. The influence of microstructure on the spall strength is indicated by the constants of the power law fit with the decompression strain rate. Differences in fracture behavior reveal void nucleation as a dominant mechanism affecting the spall strength. The microstructure with neither 100% glass nor with very high crystalline content, provides the most tortuous path for fracture and therefore highest spall strength. The results allow projection of spall strength predictions for design of in-situ formed metallic glass composites. ARO Grant # W911NF-09 ``1-0403 NASA JPL Contract # 1492033 ``Prime # NNN12AA01C; NSF GRFP Grant #DGE-1148903; and NDSE & G.

  11. Origin of soluble chemical species in bulk precipitation collected in Tokyo, Japan: Statistical evaluation of source materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurumi, Makoto; Takahashi, Akira; Ichikuni, Masami

    An iterative least-squares method with a receptor model was applied to the analytical data of the precipitation samples collected at 23 points in the suburban area of Tokyo, and the number and composition of the source materials were determined. Thirty-nine monthly bulk precipitation samples were collected in the spring and summer of 1987 from the hilly and mountainous area of Tokyo and analyzed for Na +, K +, NH 4+, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, F -, Cl -, Br -, NO 3- and SO 42- by atomic absorption spectrometry and ion chromatography. The pH of the samples was also measured. A multivariate ion balance approach (Tsurumi, 1982, Anal. Chim. Acta138, 177-182) showed that the solutes in the precipitation were derived from just three major sources; sea salt, acid substance (a mixture of 53% HNO 3, 39% H 2SO 4 and 8% HCl in equivalent) and CaSO 4. The contributions of each source to the precipitation were calculated for every sampling site. Variations of the contributions with the distance from the coast were also discussed.

  12. Medium and long-term opportunities and risk of the biotechnological production of bulk chemicals from renewable resources - The potential of white biotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, M.; Crank, M.; Dornberg, V.; Hermann, B.; Roes, L.; Hüsing, B.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Terragni, F.; Recchia, E.

    2006-01-01

    This report studies processes which convert biomass-derived feedstocks (e.g. fermentable sugar) into organic bulk chemicals (e.g. lactic acid, acetic acid, butanol and ethanol) by means of white biotechnology (e.g. fermentation or enzymatic conversion), either with or without genetically modified

  13. Improved properties of chemically modified graphene/poly(methyl methacrylate nanocomposites via a facile in-situ bulk polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Y. Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The nanosheet of graphene was chemically modified by long alkyl chain for enhanced compatibility with polymer matrix and graphene/poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA nanocomposites with homogeneous dispersion of the nanosheets and enhanced nanofiller-matrix interfacial interaction were fabricated via a facile in-situ bulk polymerization. The nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetry. The results showed that the graphene nanosheets were fully exfoliated in PMMA matrix and the thermal and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were significantly improved at low graphene loadings. Large shifts of 15°C in the glass transition temperature and 27°C improvement of onset thermal degradation temperature were achieved with graphene loading as low as 0.07 wt%. A 67% increase in tensile strength was also observed by the addition of only 0.5 wt% graphene. The method used in this study provided a novel route to other graphene-based polymers.

  14. Chemical Composition and Bioactive Compounds of Some Wild Edible Mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda NAGY

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, the consumption of mushrooms has significantly increased due to the scientific evidence of their ability to help the organism in the combat and prevention of several diseases (Kalac, 2009. Fruiting bodies of mushrooms are consumed as a delicacy for their texture and flavour, but also for their nutritional properties that makes them even more attractable (Heleno S. 2015. In this paper data were collected from several scientific studies with the aim to characterize the chemical composition and content of bioactive compounds of various mushrooms species: Agaricus bisporus, Boletus edulis, Cantharellus cibarius, Pleurotus ostreatus, Lactarius piperatus. The chemical composition of 5 wild edible studied mushrooms, including moisture, ash, total carbohydrates, total sugars, crude fat, crude protein and energy were determined according to AOAC procedures.

  15. Predicted bulk composition of petroleum generated by Lower Cretaceous Wealden black shales, Lower Saxony Basin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegs, Volker; Mahlstedt, Nicolaj; Bruns, Benjamin; Horsfield, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Berriasian Wealden Shale provides the favourable situation of possessing immature to overmature source rock intervals due to differential subsidence within the Lower Saxony Basin. Hydrocarbon generation kinetics and petroleum physical properties have been investigated on four immature Wealden Shale samples situated in different depth intervals and following the PhaseKinetics approach of di Primio and Horsfield (AAPG Bull 90(7):1031-1058, 2006). Kinetic parameters and phase prediction were applied to a thermally calibrated 1D model of the geodynamic evolution at the location of an overmature well. The immature source rocks of all depth intervals comprise kerogen type I being derived from the lacustrine algae Botryococcus braunii. Bulk kinetics of the lower three depth intervals (sample 2-4) can be described by one single activation energy E a, typical for homogeneous, lacustrine organic matter (OM), whereas sample 1 from the uppermost interval shows a slightly broader E a distribution which hints to a more heterogeneous, less stable OM, but still of lacustrine origin. Predicted physical properties of the generated petroleum fluids are characteristic of variably waxy, black oil possessing GOR's below 100 Sm3/Sm3 and saturations pressures below 150 bar. Petroleum fluids from the more heterogeneous OM-containing sample 1 can always be described by slightly higher values. Based on the occurrence of paraffinic, free hydrocarbons in the uppermost horizon of the overmature well and gas/condensate in the lower 3 depth intervals, two scenarios have been discussed. From the first and least realistic scenario assuming no expulsion from the source rock, it can be deduced that phase separation in the course of uplift can only have occurred in the uppermost interval containing the slightly less stable OM but not in the lower intervals being composed of a more stable OM. Therefore and taking secondary cracking into account, all depth intervals should contain gas

  16. The Influence of Chemical Composition on LNG Pool Vaporization

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    A model is used to examine the influence of chemical composition on the vaporization rate of LNG during spreading. Calculations have been performed whereby the vaporization rate of the LNG mixtures has been compared to the vaporization of pure methane under the initial conditions. The detailed results indicate that the vaporization rate LNG mixture is different to that of pure methane. LNG as the liquid mixture gets rich in ethane and isobaric latent heat increases rapidly, leading to the rat...

  17. Chemical Composition of Essential Oil from Marrubium Vulgare L. Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Bayir, Burcu; Gündüz, Hatice; Usta, Tuba; Şahin, Esma; Özdemir, Zeynep; Kayır, Ömer; Sen, Özkan; Akşit, Hüseyin; Elmastaş, Mahfuz; Erenler, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    – The essential oils are significant for pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic industries. Marrubium vulgare L. has been used as a traditional medicine to treat the various illnesses. The chemical composition of the essential oil from leaves of Marrubium vulgare L.was obtained by steam distillation using the Clevenger apparatus. The oil was analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main constituent of the oil was α-pinene (28.85%)

  18. Chemical composition of the flower oil of Cinnamomum zeylanicum blume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakasha, G K; Jagan Mohan Rao, L; Sakariah, K K

    2000-09-01

    The steam-distilled oil of cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) flowers was analyzed by GC and GC-MS. It consists of 23% hydrocarbons and 74% oxygenated compounds. A total of 26 compounds constituting approximately 97% of the oil were characterized. (E)-Cinnamyl acetate (41.98%), trans-alpha-bergamotene (7.97%), and caryophyllene oxide (7.2%) are found to be major compounds. This is the first report on the chemical composition of the flower oil of Cinnamomum zeylanicum.

  19. Chemical composition and mineral elements of edible insects (at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Chemical Composition and Mineral Elements of two edible insects' larvae and termite soldiers were assayed. Their ash content were between 1.01% and 7.50%. The legless larva (LS) had 28.52% fat, while the solider ant had 7.14% and the Legged larva (LG) had 1.50%. The white ant (SA) had 15.61% protein while ...

  20. Influence of Chemical Composition on Porosity in Aluminium Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Kucharčík L.; Brůna M.; Sládek A.

    2014-01-01

    Porosity is one of the major defects in aluminum castings, which results is a decrease of a mechanical properties. Porosity in aluminum alloys is caused by solidification shrinkage and gas segregation. The final amount of porosity in aluminium castings is mostly influenced by several factors, as amount of hydrogen in molten aluminium alloy, cooling rate, melt temperature, mold material, or solidification interval. This article deals with effect of chemical composition on porosity in Al-Si alu...

  1. Thermomechanical behavior of bulk Ni/MWNT composites produced via powder metallurgy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, Sebastian; Soldera, Flavio; Muecklich, Frank [Department of Materials Science, Saarland University, Building D3.3, D-66123, Saarbruecken (Germany); Gonzalez Oliver, Carlos [C.O.N.I.C.E.T., Av. Rivadavia 1917, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Acevedo, Diego [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, RN36 Km601, X5804ZAB, Rio Cuarto (Argentina)

    2012-07-15

    The thermal expansion behavior of Ni matrix composites reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) fabricated by pressureless sintering and hot uniaxial pressing was studied in the range between 50 and 1050 C and compared to that of pure Ni. The results show an active interaction between the MWNT and the Ni matrix by reducing the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of pure Ni up to 76% between 50 and 400 C. This reduction is due to the strong interfacial interaction between the matrix and the reinforcement and the low intrinsic CTE of the nanotubes. This outstanding behavior may be very useful in applications were low CTE is required as for example structural materials. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Solidification behavior and thermal conductivity of bulk sodium acetate trihydrate composites with thickening agents and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dannemand, Mark; Johansen, Jakob Berg; Furbo, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Sodium acetate trihydrate is a promising phase change material for long term storage of solar thermal energy if supercooling is actively utilized. Well performing thermal energy storages need to be able to charge and discharge energy at a high rate. The relatively low thermal conductivity...... of the phase change material limits the heat exchange capacity rate to and from the storage. Another factor that limits the heat transfer is the contraction and expansion of the salt hydrate during the phase change. This density change causes formation of cavities inside the solid storage material...... fewer large cavities but had a lower thermal conductivity. A composite with sodium acetate trihydrate, thickening agent and 5% graphite flakes had a thermal conductivity of up to 1.1 W/m K....

  3. Chemical composition of the clays as indicator raw material sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khramchenkova Rezida Kh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of study on the chemical composition of unglazed pottery from the excavations of the Bulgar fortified settlement site and the clay, selected from the modern deposits of ceramic raw materials located near the medieval settlement sites. Significant differences in macro- and microelement composition of different groups of ceramics have been revealed. The difference in the macroelemental composition is largely determined by the ceramic fabric recipe. Thus, the high calcium content corresponds to the addition of river shells, the high content of silicon results from sand addition. A more interesting picture has been revealed in the course of studies of the so-called “trace elements” (microelements. Nine groups of ceramics with different elemental set have been distinguished. The first two groups consist of imported ceramics; other groups have demonstrated a rather pronounced elemental composition. The most notable variations are observed in chromium, vanadium and nickel content. Similar microelement composition variety has been observed in clays from deposits of different localization, while the concentration of the mentioned elements in a variety of clays also differs considerably. Therefore, marker elements typical of different clays have been identified. A comparative analysis of the data obtained for clay raw materials and ceramics has been conducted. The results demonstrate the potential of studying the elemental composition in order to determine the localization of the raw material sources for ceramic production.

  4. Preliminary study of chemical compositional data from Amazon ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyota, Rosimeiri G.; Munita, Casimiro S.; Luz, Fabio A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: rosimeiritoy@yahoo.com.br; Neves, Eduardo G. [Museu de Arqueologia e Etnolgia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: egneves@usp.br; Oliveira, Paulo M.S. [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Inst. de Matematica e Estatistica]. E-mail: poliver@usp.br

    2005-07-01

    Eighty seven ceramic samples from Acutuba, Lago Grande and Osvaldo archaeological sites located in the confluence of the rivers Negro and Solimoes were submitted to chemical analysis using instrumental neutron activation analysis to determine As, Ba, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Rb, Na, Nd, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, Yb, Zn, and U. The database were studied using the Mahalanobis distance, and discriminant analysis. The results showed that the ceramics of each site differ from each other in chemical composition and that they form three different groups. Chemical classification of the ceramics suggests that vessels were made locally, as only ceramics from the same area show homogeneity of data. (author)

  5. Mesostructured Cu–Mn–Ce–O composites with homogeneous bulk composition for chlorobenzene removal: Catalytic performance and microactivation course

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Chi, E-mail: chi_he@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Yu, Yanke [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Shi, Jianwen [Center of Nanomaterials for Renewable Energy, State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Shen, Qun [Research Center for Greenhouse Gases and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201210 (China); Chen, Jinsheng [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Liu, Hongxia, E-mail: hxliu72@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Cu–Mn–Ce–O composites with enhanced surface area and developed mesoporosity were synthesized using a homogeneous coprecipitation (hcp) method, and were tested in the catalytic destruction of chlorobenzene (CB). X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR), temperature programmed desorption of CB/O{sub 2} (CB/O{sub 2}-TPD), and diffuse reflectance ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (DRUV-Vis) were used to characterize the structure and textural properties of catalysts. Mn and Cu enter CeO{sub 2} matrix with a fluorite-like structure, and produce large amounts of oxygen vacancies. Addition of manganese promotes the formation of reduced copper phase, and the presence of large numbers of high valence Mn{sup 4+} ions strongly enhances the redox couple of Cu{sup +}–Cu{sup 2+} in the composites. Both the synthesis protocol and metal doping amount significantly affect the catalyst reducibility, surface state and oxygen density. Cu{sub 0.15}Mn{sub 0.15}Ce{sub 0.85}O{sub x} synthesized via the hcp method exhibits the highest catalytic activity with 90% of chlorobenzene destructed at 255 °C (CO{sub 2} selectivity > 99.5%). Enriched surface oxygen, excellent active oxygen mobility and CB adsorption ability guarantee the superior activity and stability of Cu–Mn–Ce–O composite catalysts. Nucleophilic and electrophilic substitutions happen in sequence during chlorobenzene destruction, and the adsorbed Cl can be finally removed in the form of Cl{sub 2} via the Deacon reaction. Furthermore, the incorporation of CuO and MnO{sub x} phases can inhibit the formation of organic byproducts, such as phenolates, maleates, and o-benzoquinone-type species, especially at elevated reaction temperatures. - Highlights: • Cu–Mn–Ce–O mesoporous oxides possess enhanced surface oxygen

  6. Dataset for acrylate/silica nanoparticles formulations and photocured composites: Viscosity, filler dispersion and bulk Poisson׳s ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Gojzewski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available UV-curable polymer composites are of importance in industry, biomedical applications, scientific fields, and daily life. Outstanding physical properties of polymer composites were achieved with nanoparticles as filler, primarily in enhancing mechanical strength or barrier properties. Structure-property relationships of the resulting nanocomposites are dictated by the polymer-filler molecular architecture, i.e. interactions between polymer matrix and filler, and high surface area to volume ratio of the filler particles. Among monomers, acrylates and methacrylates attracted wide attention due to their ease of polymerization and excellent physicochemical and mechanical properties of the derived polymers. We prepared and photopolymerized two series of formulations containing hydrophobized silica nanofiller (Aerosil R7200 dispersed in 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA or polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA monomers. We compared selected physical properties of the formulations, both before and after photocuring; specifically the viscosity of formulations and dispersion of the filler in the polymer matrices. Additionally, we estimated the bulk Poisson׳s ratio of the investigated nanocomposites. This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Nanoscale Young׳s modulus and surface morphology in photocurable polyacrylate/nanosilica composites” (Gojzewski et al., 2017 [1].

  7. Characteristics of low polymerization shrinkage flowable resin composites in newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    NITTA, Keiko; NOMOTO, Rie; TSUBOTA, Yuji; TSUCHIKAWA, Masuji; HAYAKAWA, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate polymerization shrinkage and other physical properties of newly-developed cavity base materials for bulk filling technique, with the brand name BULK BASE (BBS...

  8. Chemical Composition Measurements of LAWA44 Glass Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-11-15

    DOE is building the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. Both low-activity and high-level wastes will then be vitrified into borosilicate glass using Joule-heated ceramic melters. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in the glass. One area of work is enhancing waste glass composition/property models and broadening the compositional regions over which those models are applicable. In this report, the Savannah River National Laboratory provides chemical analysis results for several samples of a simulated low-activity waste glass, LAWA44, provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as part of an ongoing development task. The measured chemical composition data are reported and compared with the targeted values for each component for each glass. A detailed review showed no indications of errors in the preparation or measurement of the study glasses. All of the measured sums of oxides for the study glasses fell within the interval of 97.9 to 102.6 wt %, indicating acceptable recovery of the glass components. Comparisons of the targeted and measured chemical compositions showed that the measured values for the glasses met the targeted concentrations within 10% for those components present at more than 5 wt %. It was noted that the measured B2O3 concentrations are somewhat above the targeted values for the study glasses. No obvious trends were observed with regard to the multiple melting steps used to prepare the study glasses, indicating that any potential effects of volatility were below measurable thresholds.

  9. Bioactive carbon-PEEK composites prepared by chemical surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Matsunami, Chisato; Shirosaki, Yuki

    2017-01-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted much attention as an artificial intervertebral spacer for spinal reconstruction. Furthermore, PEEK plastic reinforced with carbon fiber has twice the bending strength of pure PEEK. However, the PEEK-based materials do not show ability for direct bone bonding, i.e., bioactivity. Although several trials have been conducted for enabling PEEK with bioactivity, few studies have reported on bioactive surface modification of carbon-PEEK composites. In the present study, we attempted the preparation of bioactive carbon-PEEK composites by chemical treatments with H2SO4 and CaCl2. Bioactivity was evaluated by in vitro apatite formation in simulated body fluid (SBF). The apatite formation on the carbon-PEEK composite was compared with that of pure PEEK. Both pure PEEK and carbon-PEEK composite formed the apatite in SBF when they were treated with H2SO4 and CaCl2; the latter showed higher apatite-forming ability than the former. It is conjectured that many functional groups able to induce the apatite nucleation, such as sulfo and carboxyl groups, are incorporated into the dispersed carbon phase in the carbon-PEEK composites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Mineral and chemical composition of the Jezersko meteorite—A new chondrite from Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miler, Miloš; Ambrožič, Bojan; Mirtič, Breda; Gosar, Mateja; Å turm, Sašo.; Dolenec, Matej; Jeršek, Miha

    2014-10-01

    The Jezersko meteorite is a newly confirmed stony meteorite found in 1992 in the Karavanke mountains, Slovenia. The meteorite is moderately weathered (W2), indicating short terrestrial residence time. Chondrules in partially recrystallized matrix are clearly discernible but often fragmented and have mean diameter of 0.73 mm. The meteorite consists of homogeneous olivine (Fa19.4) and low-Ca pyroxenes (Fs16.7Wo1.2), of which 34% are monoclinic, and minor plagioclase (Ab83An11Or6) and Ca-pyroxene (Fs6Wo45.8). Troilite, kamacite, zoned taenite, tetrataenite, chromite, and metallic copper comprise about 16.5 vol% of the meteorite. Phosphates are represented by merrillite and minor chlorapatite. Undulatory extinction in some olivine grains and other shock indicators suggests weak shock metamorphism between stages S2 and S3. The bulk chemical composition generally corresponds to the mean H chondrite composition. Low siderophile element contents indicate the oxidized character of the Jezersko parent body. The temperatures recorded by two-pyroxene, olivine-chromite, and olivine-orthopyroxene geothermometers are 854 °C, 737-787 °C, and 750 °C, respectively. Mg concentration profiles across orthopyroxenes and clinopyroxenes indicate relatively fast cooling at temperatures above 700 °C. A low cooling rate of 10 °C Myr-1 was obtained from metallographic data. Considering physical, chemical, and mineralogical properties, meteorite Jezersko was classified as an H4 S2(3) ordinary chondrite.

  11. Chemical Composition of Rainwater in Córdoba City, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M. L.; Asar, M. L.; Ceppi, S.; Bürgesser, R. E.; Avila, E.

    2013-05-01

    Sampling and chemical analysis of rainwater has proved to be a useful technique for studying its chemical composition and provides a greater understanding of local and regional dispersion of pollutants and their potential impacts to ecosystems through deposition processes. Samples of rainwater were collected during 2009-2012, in Córdoba city, Argentina. Two kind of sampling were performed: event-specific and sequential. The objective of the first of these was to determine the chemical concentration of the total rain, while the objective of the second one was to analyze the variability of the chemical concentration during an individual rain event. The total volume of each sample was divided in halves. One half was filtered through 0.45 μm membrane filter. After this, all the samples were reduced by evaporation to a final volume of 10 ml. The non-filtered samples were acidified and digested in accordance to the method 3050B of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for acid digestion of sediments. Multi-elemental standard solutions in different concentrations were prepared by adequate dilutions. Gallium was added as an internal standard in all standard solutions and samples. Exactly 5 μL of these solutions were deposited on acrylic supports. When these droplets were dried, Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence technique was used for determining the chemical elements. Spectra were analyzed with the AXIL package for spectrum analysis. Due to the intrinsic characteristics of the total reflection technique, the background of the measurements is significantly reduced and there are no matrix effects, therefore quantification can be obtained from the linear correlation between fluorescence intensity and the concentration of the element of interest. The elements quantified were S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, and Pb. For all of them a calibration curve was performed in order to quantify their concentrations on the

  12. Mechanical behavior of bulk direct composite versus block composite and lithium disilicate indirect Class II restorations by CAD-FEM modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausiello, Pietro; Ciaramella, Stefano; Fabianelli, Andrea; Gloria, Antonio; Martorelli, Massimo; Lanzotti, Antonio; Watts, David C

    2017-06-01

    To study the influence of resin based and lithium disilicate materials on the stress and strain distributions in adhesive class II mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) restorations using numerical finite element analysis (FEA). To investigate the materials combinations in the restored teeth during mastication and their ability to relieve stresses. One 3D model of a sound lower molar and three 3D class II MOD cavity models with 95° cavity-margin-angle shapes were modelled. Different material combinations were simulated: model A, with a 10μm thick resin bonding layer and a resin composite bulk filling material; model B, with a 70μm resin cement with an indirect CAD-CAM resin composite inlay; model C, with a 70μm thick resin cement with an indirect lithium disilicate machinable inlay. To simulate polymerization shrinkage effects in the adhesive layers and bulk fill composite, the thermal expansion approach was used. Shell elements were employed for representing the adhesive layers. 3D solid CTETRA elements with four grid points were employed for modelling the food bolus and tooth. Slide-type contact elements were used between the tooth surface and food. A vertical occlusal load of 600 N was applied, and nodal displacements on the bottom cutting surfaces were constrained in all directions. All the materials were assumed to be isotropic and elastic and a static linear analysis was performed. Displacements were different in models A, B and C. Polymerization shrinkage hardly affected model A and mastication only partially affected mechanical behavior. Shrinkage stress peaks were mainly located marginally along the enamel-restoration interface at occlusal and mesio-distal sites. However, at the internal dentinal walls, stress distributions were critical with the highest maximum stresses concentrated in the proximal boxes. In models B and C, shrinkage stress was only produced by the 70μm thick resin layer, but the magnitudes depended on the Young's modulus (E) of the inlay

  13. A bootstrap estimation scheme for chemical compositional data with nondetects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palarea-Albaladejo, J; Martín-Fernández, J.A; Olea, Ricardo A.

    2014-01-01

    The bootstrap method is commonly used to estimate the distribution of estimators and their associated uncertainty when explicit analytic expressions are not available or are difficult to obtain. It has been widely applied in environmental and geochemical studies, where the data generated often represent parts of whole, typically chemical concentrations. This kind of constrained data is generically called compositional data, and they require specialised statistical methods to properly account for their particular covariance structure. On the other hand, it is not unusual in practice that those data contain labels denoting nondetects, that is, concentrations falling below detection limits. Nondetects impede the implementation of the bootstrap and represent an additional source of uncertainty that must be taken into account. In this work, a bootstrap scheme is devised that handles nondetects by adding an imputation step within the resampling process and conveniently propagates their associated uncertainly. In doing so, it considers the constrained relationships between chemical concentrations originated from their compositional nature. Bootstrap estimates using a range of imputation methods, including new stochastic proposals, are compared across scenarios of increasing difficulty. They are formulated to meet compositional principles following the log-ratio approach, and an adjustment is introduced in the multivariate case to deal with nonclosed samples. Results suggest that nondetect bootstrap based on model-based imputation is generally preferable. A robust approach based on isometric log-ratio transformations appears to be particularly suited in this context. Computer routines in the R statistical programming language are provided. 

  14. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Algerian propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Mencherini, Teresa; Celano, Rita; Mouhoubi, Zina; Tamendjari, Azeddine; Aquino, Rita Patrizia; Rastrelli, Luca

    2013-05-29

    Chemical composition of propolis samples from north Algeria was characterized by chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses. High-performance liquid chromatorgaphy with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD) fingerprint of the methanol extracts allowed the definition of two main types of Algerian propolis (AP) directly related to their secondary metabolite composition. Investigation of two representative types of AP by preparative chromatographic procedure and mass spectrometric (MS) and NMR techniques led to the identification of their main constituents: caffeate esters and flavonoids from an AP type rich in phenolic compounds (PAP) and labdane and clerodane diterpenes, together with a polymethoxyflavonol, from an AP type containing mainly diterpenes (DAP). Subsequently, two specific HPLC-MS/MS methods for detection of PAP and DAP markers were developed to study the chemical composition of propolis samples of different north Algerian regions. Antioxidant activity of AP samples was evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay, and a significant free-radical scavenging effect was observed for propolis of the PAP series rich in polyphenols.

  15. Values below detection limit in compositional chemical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palarea-Albaladejo, J; Martín-Fernández, J A

    2013-02-18

    Samples representing part of a whole, usually called compositional data in statistics, are commonplace in analytical chemistry--say chemical data in percentage, ppm, or μg g(-1). Their distinctive feature is that there is an inherent relationship between all the analytes constituting a chemical sample as they only convey relative information. Some compositional data analysis principles and the log-ratio based methodology are outlined here in practical terms. Besides, one often finds that some analytes are not present in sufficient concentration in a sample to allow the measuring instruments to effectively detect them. These non-detects are usually labelled as "data set, indicating that the values are below known detection limits. Many data analysis techniques require complete data sets. Thus, there is a need of sensible replacement strategies for less-thans. The peculiar nature of compositional data determines any data analysis and demands for a specialised treatment of less-thans that, unfortunately, is not usually covered in chemometrics. Some well-founded statistical methods are revisited in this paper aiming to prevent practitioners from relying on popular but untrustworthy approaches. A new proposal to estimate less-thans combining a log-normal probability model and a multiplicative modification of the samples is also introduced. Their performance is illustrated and compared on a real data set, and guidelines are provided for practitioners. Matlab and R code implementing the methods are made available for the reader. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chemical composition of the sediment from Lake 20 (Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria ROSSI

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Lake 20 (19,000 m2 is located on the coast of the Ross Sea, in the North-Central part of Victoria Land, and its surface is ice-free between the end of December and early February. Within the framework of the Italian National Research Programme in Antarctica, a study was made of the chemical composition of sediments from the lake, with the intention of using this information to contribute to a better understanding of the processes involved in the long range transport of pollutants and their role in global changes. A sediment core from Lake 20 (Antarctica, 18 cm long, was collected in 1994, sliced into 2 cm sections and analysed using X Ray fluorescence spectrometry for 17 elements (Si, Al, Ca, K, Fe, Mg, Ti, S, P, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn, Cr, Na, Cl, by CHN Elemental Analyser for C and N, by Flameless Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for As, and by Cold Vapour Atomic Absorption Spectrometry for Hg. The chemical composition of the sediments is consistent with the known geochemical characteristics of the drainage basin. While the chemical analyses reveal that sedimentation in Lake 20 has changed through time, the variations along the core are most probably related to the climatic evolution of the area, to the consequent changes in weathering processes, and possibly to an increase in the primary productivity of the lake, rather than to anthropogenic influences on the biogeochemical cycles of the elements.

  17. Structural, chemical, and thermoelectric properties of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} Peltier materials. Bulk, thin films, and superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peranio, Nicola

    2008-07-01

    In this work, the nature of the natural nanostructure (nns) was analysed and the correlations to the transport coefficients, particularly the lattice thermal conductivity, is discussed. Experimental methods are presented for the first time, yielding an accurate quantitative analysis of the chemical composition and of stress fields in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and in compounds with similar structural and chemical microstructures. This work can be subdivided as follows: (I) N-type Bi{sub 2}(Te{sub 0.91}Se{sub 0.09}){sub 3} and p-type (Bi{sub 0.26}Sb{sub 0.74}){sub 1.98}(Te{sub 0.99}Se{sub 0.01}){sub 3.02} bulk materials synthesised by the Bridgman technique. (II) Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} thin films and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}/Bi{sub 2}(Te{sub 0.88}Se{sub 0.12}){sub 3} superlattices epitaxially grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on BaF{sub 2} substrates with periods of {delta}-12 nm at the Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Physikalische Messtechnik (IPM). (III) Experimental methods, i.e., TEM specimen preparation, high-accuracy quantitative chemical analysis by EDX in the TEM, and image simulations of dislocations and the nns according to the two-beam dynamical diffraction theory. The nns was analysed in detail by stereomicroscopy and by image simulation and was found to be a pure sinusoidal displacement field with (i) a displacement vector parallel to <5,-5,1> and an amplitude of about 10 pm and (ii) a wave vector parallel to {l_brace}1,0,10{r_brace} and a wavelength of 10 nm. The results obtained here showed a significant amount of stress in the samples, induced by the nns which was still not noticed and identified. Both kinds of nanostructures, artificial (ans) and natural (nns) nanostructures, yielded in thermoelectric materials a low lattice thermal conductivity which was beneficial for the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT. (orig.)

  18. Chemical composition of cold pressed Brazilian grape seed oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Branco SHINAGAWA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Grape seed oil (GSO is an important by-product of the wine-making industry which has received attention as an alternative source of vegetable oils; its chemical compounds can be influenced by agricultural practices and industrial processing. Knowledge of the composition of Brazilian GSO is scarce; thus, this study aimed to analyze the chemical characteristics, as well as the antioxidant activity of these oils. GSO samples were obtained from Brazilian markets and showed significantly high amounts of phenolic, γ-tocotrienol and phytosterols as well as, the presence of several volatile compounds. Based on these results, is possible to show that oils exhibited good antioxidant activity. Therefore, it can be inferred that Brazilian GSO had a considerable content of phytochemical compounds with biological activity, which allows its association with other vegetable oils.

  19. Physical Characterization and Steam Chemical Reactivity of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, Robert Andrew; Pawelko, Robert James; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2001-05-01

    This report documents experiments and analyses that have been done at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to measure the steam chemical reactivity of two types of carbon fiber composites, NS31 and NB31, proposed for use at the divertor strike points in an ITER-like tokamak. These materials are 3D CFCs constituted by a NOVOLTEX preform and densified by pyrocarbon infiltration and heat treatment. NS31 differs from NB31 in that the final infiltration was done with liquid silicon to reduce the porosity and enhance the thermal conductivity of the CFC. Our approach in this work was twofold: (1) physical characterization measurements of the specimens and (2) measurements of the chemical reactivity of specimens exposed to steam.

  20. Nepheline structural and chemical dependence on melt composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcial, José; Crum, Jarrod; Neill, Owen; McCloy, John

    2016-02-01

    Nepheline crystallizes upon slow-cooling in some melts concentrated in Na2O and Al2O3, which can result in a residual glass phase of low chemical durability. Nepheline can incorporate many components often found in high-level waste radioactive borosilicate glass, including glass network ions (e.g., Si, Al, Fe), alkali metals (e.g., Cs, K, Na, and possibly Li), alkaline-earth metals (e.g., Ba, Sr, Ca, Mg), and transition metals (e.g., Mn, and possibly Cr, Zn, Ni). When crystallized from melts of different compositions, nepheline chemistry varies as a function of starting glass composition. Five simulated high level nuclear waste borosilicate glasses shown to crystallize large fractions of nepheline on slow cooling, were selected for study. These melts constituted a range of Al2O3, B2O3, CaO, Na2O, K2O, Fe2O3, and SiO2 compositions. Compositional analyses of nepheline crystals in glass by electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) indicate that boron is unlikely to be present in any significant concentration, if at all, in nepheline. Also, several models are presented for calculating the fraction of vacancies in the nepheline structure.

  1. Chemical composition and temperature influence on honey texture properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroian, Mircea; Paduret, Sergiu; Amariei, Sonia; Gutt, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the chemical composition and temperatures (20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 °C) influence on the honey texture parameters (hardness, viscosity, adhesion, cohesiveness, springiness, gumminess and chewiness). The honeys analyzed respect the European regulation in terms of moisture content and inverted sugar concentration. The texture parameters are influenced negatively by the moisture content, and positively by the °Brix concentration. The texture parameters modelling have been made using the artificial neural network and the polynomial model. The polynomial model predicted better the texture parameters than the artificial neural network.

  2. Chemical composition of volatile oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaprakasha, Guddadarangavvanahally K; Rao, Lingamallu Jaganmohan; Sakariah, Kunnumpurath K

    2002-01-01

    The hydro-distilled volatile oil of the Cinnamomum zeylanicum (C. zeylanicum) buds was analyzed using GC and GC-MS for the first time. Thirty-four compounds representing approximately 98% of the oil was characterized. It consists of terpene hydrocarbons (78%) and oxygenated terpenoids (9%). alpha-Bergamotene (27.38%) and alpha-copaene (23.05%) are found to be the major compounds. A comparison of the chemical composition of the oil was made with that of flowers and fruits.

  3. Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni - chemical composition and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinek, Katarzyna; Krejpcio, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Sweetleaf (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni), currently investigated by many researchers, has been known and used for more than a thousand years indigenous tribes of South America, who called it "kaa-hee" ("sweet herb"). Thanks to its chemical composition and processability sweetleaf may be an alternative for synthetic sweeteners. Nutritional and health-promoting aspects of Stevia rebaudiana are presently being studied in many research centres. The aim of this study is to present nutritional and health-promoting value of the still-little known sweetleaf.

  4. Chemical composition and fatty acid contents in farmed freshwater prawns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Gasperi Portella

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the chemical composition and fatty acid contents of Amazonian and giant river prawns. After four-month farming, with the same diet for both species, palmitic and stearic acids were the main saturated fatty acids. Oleic acid was the main monounsatured fatty acid, and the eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids were the most abundant polyunsaturated acids. Amazonian prawn has higher levels of protein and polyunsaturated fatty acids than those of the giant river prawn, which shows its potential for aquaculture.

  5. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  6. The Influence of Irradiation Time and Layer Thickness on Elution of Triethylene Glycol Dimethacrylate from SDR® Bulk-Fill Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryta Łagocka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to evaluate triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA elution from SDR bulk-fill composite. Methods. Three groups of samples were prepared, including samples polymerized in a 4 mm layer for 20 s, in a 4 mm layer for 40 s, and in a 2 mm layer for 20 s. Elution of TEGDMA into 100% ethanol, a 75% ethanol/water solution, and distilled water was studied. The TEGDMA concentration was measured using HPLC. Results. The TEGDMA concentration decreased in the following order: 100% ethanol > 75% ethanol > distilled water. Doubling the energy delivered to the 4 mm thick sample caused decrease (p<0.05 in TEGDMA elution to distilled water. In ethanol solutions, the energy increase had no influence on TEGDMA elution. Decreasing the sample thickness resulted in decrease (p<0.05 in TEGDMA elution for all the solutions. Conclusions. The concentration of eluted TEGDMA and the elution time were both strongly affected by the hydrophobicity of the solvent. Doubling the energy delivered to the 4 mm thick sample did not decrease the elution of TEGDMA but did decrease the amount of the monomer available to less aggressive solvents. Elution of TEGDMA was also correlated with the exposed sample surface area. Clinical Relevance. Decreasing the SDR layer thickness decreases TEGDMA elution.

  7. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND SENSORY EVALUATION OF PLUM FRUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina BOZHKOVA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Plum fruits (Prunus domestica L. have long been known as food for people since ancient times. They are consumed fresh, dried or processed. The increasing consumers’ demand for quality of fruit is a relevant reason to present information about the differences in the chemical composition and the sensory characteristics between the widely spread and newly studied plum cultivars. The present study was carried out in the period 2009 - 2012 at the Fruit-Growing Institute – Plovdiv, Bulgaria on 12 plum cultivars. The results of chemical composition analysis showed that the fruits of ‘Jojo’, ‘Topking’, ‘Topfive’ and ‘Mirabelle de Nancy’ have a total soluble solid above 20 0Brix. The highest sugar content was found in the fruits of ‘Jojo’. Fruits of ‘Pacific’ have the highest titratable acids content (1.28% compared to the other cultivars. The highest vitamin C content (11.92 mg/100 g was determined in the fruits of ‘Stanley’ cultivar. According to the sensory data, fruits of the cultivars ‘Bellamira’, ‘President’ and ‘Tuleu Timpuriu’ were grouped as the most delicious fruits and were regarded as suitable for fresh consumption. The general sensory evaluation showed that the fruits of ‘Bellamira’, ‘Haganta’, ‘President’ and ‘Tuleu Timpuriu’ are excellent in quality and they could be recommended to consumers and traders.

  8. Chemical Composition of Sea Buckthorn Leaves, Branches and Bark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradt Ina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea buckthorn leaves and branches presently create waste-/by-products of harvesting after pruning the plants. It is already known that sea buckthorn berries are important for their chemical composition and based on this occupy a wide field in nutrition. We raised the idea that sea buckthorn leaves, branches, and especially the bark, have also an extraordinary chemical composition like the berries. The aim of this study was to describe these by-products. For this purpose, detailed full analyses of corresponding samples from Russia (seven varieties and Germany (four varieties were performed. Especially the dry mass, fat content, proteins, carbohydrates, starch content, and crude fiber were investigated to obtain an overview. Minor components like total phenol content, metals, and water- and fat-soluble vitamins were also studied. All analytical parameters were based on an official collection of analysis methods (German ASU - amtliche Sammlung von Untersuchungsverfahren. The results of the full analysis of leaves and branches show some interesting aspects about the differences between male and female plants. Furthermore, we observed differences between Russian and German sea buckthorn varieties. Investigation of minor components showed that vitamins were present in very low amount (< 0.1 %.

  9. Methods of chemical and phase composition analysis of gallstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorova, E. I.; Pantushev, V. V.; Voloshin, A. E.

    2017-11-01

    This review presents the instrumental methods used for chemical and phase composition investigation of gallstones. A great body of data has been collected in the literature on the presence of elements and their concentrations, obtained by fluorescence microscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, proton (particle) induced X-ray emission, atomic absorption spectroscopy, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance. Structural methods—powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy—provide information about organic and inorganic phases in gallstones. Stone morphology was studied at the macrolevel with optical microscopy. Results obtained by analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy with X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry are discussed. The chemical composition and structure of gallstones determine the strategy of removing stone from the body and treatment of patients: surgery or dissolution in the body. Therefore one chapter of the review describes the potential of dissolution methods. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the disease depend on the development of clinical methods for in vivo investigation, which gave grounds to present the main characteristics and potential of ultrasonography (ultrasound scanning), magnetic resonance imaging, and X-ray computed tomography.

  10. Chemical composition and larvicidal activity of Rollinia leptopetala (Annonaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feitosa, Edinilza M.A.; Arriaga, Angela M.C.; Lemos, Telma L.G.; Oliveira, M. Conceicao F. de; Vasnconcelos, Jackson Nunes e; Lima, Jefferson Q.; Malcher, Grazielle T. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica]. E-mail: angelamcarriaga@yahoo.com.br; Santiago, Gilvandete M.P. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia; Nascimento, Ronaldo F. do [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais. Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas

    2009-07-01

    The aim of present study was to describe the chemical composition of the essential oils from the leaf and stem of Rollinia leptopetala R. E. Fries (Annonaceae) and to evaluate the larvicidal activities of these essential oils, of the methanol extract from roots of this plant and of the oxoaporphine alkaloid, liriodenine (1) against the third-instar of Aedes aegypti larvae. The methanol extract from the roots showed larvicidal activity with LC{sub 50} 64.6 {+-} 1.5 ppm. Higher activity was observed for the isolated alkaloid liriodenine (1), LC{sub 50} 3.6 {+-} 0.4 ppm. The essential oils from the leaves and stems, also exhibited larvicidal activity with LC{sub 50} 104.7 {+-} 0.2 and 34.7 {+-} 0.3 ppm, respectively. These results suggest R. leptopetala as a source of natural larvicidal compounds. This is the first report about the chemical composition and larvicidal activity of the leaf and stem essential oils of R. leptopetala. (author)

  11. Study of chemical composition of rainwater at an urban (Pune) and a rural (Sinhagad) location in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, G. A.; Ali, K.; Rao, P. S. P.; Safai, P. D.; Chate, D. M.; Praveen, P. S.; Rodhe, Henning; Granat, Lennart

    2005-04-01

    Data are presented on the chemical composition of rainwater collected at a rural site (Sinhagad) near Pune, India, between August 2002 and August 2003 and at an urban site in Pune between April 2002 and August 2003. Both bulk water samples and wet-only samples were alkaline at both sites, with an average pH of 6.6 (both bulk and wet-only) at Pune and 6.4 (bulk) and 6.2 (wet-only) at Sinhagad. Only one case of acidic rain was recorded: at Sinhagad with pH of 5.2 (bulk) and 4.9 (wet-only). The major cations were Ca2+ and Na+, and the major anions were Cl- and SO42-. Higher concentrations of both SO42- and Cl- at Pune compared to Sinhagad were balanced by higher concentration of Ca2+ such that the pH remained approximately similar and, on average, well on the alkaline side. The difference in ionic composition between the two sites, available so far only for the monsoon period, is quite small (especially in case of wet only samples) and interpreted as an influence of local sources at the Pune site. At both sites the concentrations in the bulk samples were only slightly larger than those in the wet-only samples. Our analysis demonstrates that the Sinhagad site provides useful data representative of the regional situation. The data are also analyzed in terms of seasonal (monsoon versus postmonsoon) variations and air mass trajectories. Surprisingly high concentrations of SO42- at the rural site (Sinhagad) during the SW monsoon period may indicate transport from the African continent.

  12. Galactic Archaeology: The Chemical Composition of a Fossil Stellar Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivans, I. I.

    2001-12-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the Milky Way may have formed by an ``assembly'' process. Star formation and chemical enrichment possibly took place in proto-galactic fragments (subsystems possibly resembling small irregular galaxies) prior to and during their assembly into the Galaxy. Clear evidence of an ancient galactic merger has been uncovered in the local solar neighbourhood (in a statistically significant clumping of stars in angular momentum phase space, along with an additional trail of stars). These stars, possibly the debris originating from the accretion of a dwarf galaxy system, could have experienced an entirely different chemical history from those born within the Milky Way. Equally interesting is the prospect of discovering that the smaller and less massive dwarf galaxy or proto-galactic fragment could have produced abundance patterns indistinguishable from those of ``normal'' halo field stars. I have employed high resolution stellar spectra to analyze the abundances of important elements which are required (i) to help unravel the nucleosynthetic history of these stars and (ii) that could set further constraints on the evolution of low-mass dwarf galaxies as they existed at the time of the merger. At this meeting, I will report initial chemical composition results which were derived in order to infer the mass function and star formation history of the merger object, as well as to test the ``universality'' of the heavy element r-process production mechanism.

  13. Cuspal deflection and microleakage in premolar teeth restored with bulk-fill flowable resin-based composite base materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moorthy, A; Hogg, C H; Dowling, A H

    2012-01-01

    To assess the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage of standardised Class II cavities incrementally filled with a dimethacrylate RBC or bulk-fill flowable RBC bases.......To assess the cuspal deflection and cervical microleakage of standardised Class II cavities incrementally filled with a dimethacrylate RBC or bulk-fill flowable RBC bases....

  14. Effect of reinforcement surface functionalization on the mechanical properties of nacre-like bulk lamellar composites processed by a hybrid conventional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Selen N; Dericioglu, Arcan F

    2013-05-01

    Alumina platelet reinforced epoxy matrix composites with an architecture resembling to natural nacre were fabricated by a hybrid conventional method called Hot-press Assisted Slip Casting process (HASC). Correlation between processing parameters, platelet content, platelet orientation and mechanical property enhancement of the fabricated composites was examined. In order to investigate the effect of interfacial compatibility and bonding on the mechanical properties of the fabricated inorganic-organic composites, platelet surfaces were modified with both epoxy- and amino-functional silanes. As received and functionalized platelet surfaces were studied by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to confirm the success of surface modification. Fabricated bio-inspired bulk lamellar composite materials were characterized in terms of their microstructural architecture and mechanical properties. The results obtained indicated that HASC processed composites exhibit enhanced flexural strength, stiffness and hardness, as compared to neat epoxy and composites fabricated by simple mixing, as a result of their nacre-like architecture with well aligned platelets. It has been also observed that functionalization by both type of silanes improves interfacial adhesion between platelets and epoxy matrix resulting in further enhancement of the mechanical properties of bulk lamellar composites fabricated by HASC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Calculation of complex chemical equilibrium compositions of composite rocket propellants combustion products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIKOLA KILIBARDA

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available An adequate method for calculating chemical equilibrium in a predominantly gaseous, multi-component reactive mixture was investigated and successfully applied. This method involves the stated equilibrium reaction scheme, including, first, the formation of chemical species, of which concentrations prevail in the mixture, then the formation of gaseous atomic species by dissociation of previous ones, and, finally, the formation of complex chemical species from the atomic species. A computer program, which permits calculations of equilibrium compositions by the iteration procedure, has been developed. The results of calculations have been compared with data obtained by the programs OPHELIE, MICROPEP, and the program SPP, as documented in the NASA-Lewis Code, which is presently the world-wide standard. All comparisons gave satisfactory agreement.

  16. Prebiotic Potential and Chemical Composition of Seven Culinary Spice Extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing‐Yi; Summanen, Paula H.; Lee, Ru‐Po; Huang, Jianjun; Henning, Susanne M.; Heber, David; Finegold, Sydney M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate prebiotic potential, chemical composition, and antioxidant capacity of spice extracts. Seven culinary spices including black pepper, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, ginger, Mediterranean oregano, rosemary, and turmeric were extracted with boiling water. Major chemical constituents were characterized by RP‐HPLC‐DAD method and antioxidant capacity was determined by measuring colorimetrically the extent to scavenge ABTS radical cations. Effects of spice extracts on the viability of 88 anaerobic and facultative isolates from intestinal microbiota were determined by using Brucella agar plates containing serial dilutions of extracts. A total of 14 phenolic compounds, a piperine, cinnamic acid, and cinnamaldehyde were identified and quantitated. Spice extracts exhibited high antioxidant capacity that correlated with the total amount of major chemicals. All spice extracts, with the exception of turmeric, enhanced the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. All spices exhibited inhibitory activity against selected Ruminococcus species. Cinnamon, oregano, and rosemary were active against selected Fusobacterium strains and cinnamon, rosemary, and turmeric were active against selected Clostridium spp. Some spices displayed prebiotic‐like activity by promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria and suppressing the growth of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting their potential role in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and the enhancement of gastrointestinal health. The identification and quantification of spice‐specific phytochemicals provided insight into the potential influence of these chemicals on the gut microbial communities and activities. Future research on the connections between spice‐induced changes in gut microbiota and host metabolism and disease preventive effect in animal models and humans is needed. PMID:28678344

  17. Prebiotic Potential and Chemical Composition of Seven Culinary Spice Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Summanen, Paula H; Lee, Ru-Po; Huang, Jianjun; Henning, Susanne M; Heber, David; Finegold, Sydney M; Li, Zhaoping

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate prebiotic potential, chemical composition, and antioxidant capacity of spice extracts. Seven culinary spices including black pepper, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, ginger, Mediterranean oregano, rosemary, and turmeric were extracted with boiling water. Major chemical constituents were characterized by RP-HPLC-DAD method and antioxidant capacity was determined by measuring colorimetrically the extent to scavenge ABTS radical cations. Effects of spice extracts on the viability of 88 anaerobic and facultative isolates from intestinal microbiota were determined by using Brucella agar plates containing serial dilutions of extracts. A total of 14 phenolic compounds, a piperine, cinnamic acid, and cinnamaldehyde were identified and quantitated. Spice extracts exhibited high antioxidant capacity that correlated with the total amount of major chemicals. All spice extracts, with the exception of turmeric, enhanced the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. All spices exhibited inhibitory activity against selected Ruminococcus species. Cinnamon, oregano, and rosemary were active against selected Fusobacterium strains and cinnamon, rosemary, and turmeric were active against selected Clostridium spp. Some spices displayed prebiotic-like activity by promoting the growth of beneficial bacteria and suppressing the growth of pathogenic bacteria, suggesting their potential role in the regulation of intestinal microbiota and the enhancement of gastrointestinal health. The identification and quantification of spice-specific phytochemicals provided insight into the potential influence of these chemicals on the gut microbial communities and activities. Future research on the connections between spice-induced changes in gut microbiota and host metabolism and disease preventive effect in animal models and humans is needed. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Food Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Institute of

  18. Effect of chemical composition of sheep’s milk on the chemical composition of Livno and Travnik cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Hrković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bosnia and Herzegovina has a centuries-old tradition in the family dairy products, among which 2-3 types of cheeses dominate. Well known dairy products in BiH are indigenous Livno and Travnik cheese, a group of cheeses produced from thermally untreated raw sheep milk. The aim of this study was assessing the effects of certain parameters on the chemical composition of the milk composition of indigenous cheeses - Livno and Travnik. Two manufacturers within two different locations (Livno and Travnik during summer grazing of sheep, were selected for this research. The study included 117sheep (Livno 57 sheep, Travnik 60 sheep. The cheese milk was used for determination of fat, protein and lactose content. Six samples were taken from obtained cheeses: 3 samples of Livno and 3samples of Travnik cheese, which means one for each sampling period. In cheese dry matter content, water, fat, fat in dry matter and acidity (pH were determined, and then correlation between the constituents of milk and cheese ingredients content was set. The most common causes of such phenomenon is non-standard production, storage and ripening. On Travnik area, the content of fat and milk protein varied according to sampling period, which can be attributed to the already mentioned diet and stage of lactation. At the same time the protein content decreased mainly by the end of lactating period. Lactose content has proven to be the most stable parameter of milk. In both investigated cheese samples slightly higher water content was found compared to normal values for these two local cheese, while the proportion of fat and dry matter varied within the sampling period. Variation of certain parameters of the chemical composition of investigated samples of Livno and Travnik cheese, as well as their correlation with parameters of milk is primarily a consequence of changing the chemical composition of milk as the basic raw materials and/or significant variations in technology that could

  19. Temperature effects on the chemical composition of nickel-phosphorus alloy thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguocha, I.N.A., E-mail: iko340@mail.usask.c [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Building, 57 Campus Drive, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Taheri, R.; Yannacopoulos, S. [School of Engineering, University of British Columbia Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, B.C. V1V 1V7 (Canada); Uju, W.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Building, 57 Campus Drive, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Sammynaiken, R., E-mail: r.sammynaiken@usask.c [Saskatchewan Structural Science Centre, University of Saskatchewan, 110 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 5C9 (Canada); Wettig, S. [School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Hu, Y.-F. [Canadian Light Source Inc., 101 Perimeter Road, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 0X4 (Canada)

    2010-02-01

    Electroless Ni-P (EN) alloys are widely used as coating materials. Their properties depend on the level of phosphorus present and the extent of thermal treatment. We report the results of two complimentary electronic structure techniques, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the site-specific surface chemistry in EN alloys of different phosphorus compositions and thermal treatments. In XANES experiment, absorption at the Ni L{sub 3,2} edge and the P K edge were measured and the P 2p, Ni 2p, and Ni 3p bands were measured by XPS. Heating EN alloys to high temperatures result in a competitive reaction between phosphorus and nickel on the surface for oxygen. There is an increase in the level of phosphates and other forms of phosphorus oxides and a decrease in the oxidized nickel on the surface of the EN alloy thin film. Changes in the electronic structure and chemical composition in the bulk of the EN alloy are not obvious.

  20. Year-round record of bulk and size-segregated aerosol composition in central Antarctica (Concordia site – Part 2: Biogenic sulfur (sulfate and methanesulfonate aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Legrand

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple year-round (2006–2015 records of the bulk and size-segregated composition of aerosol were obtained at the inland site of Concordia located in East Antarctica. The well-marked maximum of non-sea-salt sulfate (nssSO4 in January (100 ± 28 ng m−3 versus 4.4 ± 2.3 ng m−3 in July is consistent with observations made at the coast (280 ± 78 ng m−3 in January versus 16 ± 9 ng m−3 in July at Dumont d'Urville, for instance. In contrast, the well-marked maximum of MSA at the coast in January (60 ± 23 ng m−3 at Dumont d'Urville is not observed at Concordia (5.2 ± 2.0 ng m−3 in January. Instead, the MSA level at Concordia peaks in October (5.6 ± 1.9 ng m−3 and March (14.9 ± 5.7 ng m−3. As a result, a surprisingly low MSA-to-nssSO4 ratio (RMSA is observed at Concordia in mid-summer (0.05 ± 0.02 in January versus 0.25 ± 0.09 in March. We find that the low value of RMSA in mid-summer at Concordia is mainly driven by a drop of MSA levels that takes place in submicron aerosol (0.3 µm diameter. The drop of MSA coincides with periods of high photochemical activity as indicated by high ozone levels, strongly suggesting the occurrence of an efficient chemical destruction of MSA over the Antarctic plateau in mid-summer. The relationship between MSA and nssSO4 levels is examined separately for each season and indicates that concentration of non-biogenic sulfate over the Antarctic plateau does not exceed 1 ng m−3 in fall and winter and remains close to 5 ng m−3 in spring. This weak non-biogenic sulfate level is discussed in the light of radionuclides (210Pb, 10Be, and 7Be also measured on bulk aerosol samples collected at Concordia. The findings highlight the complexity in using MSA in deep ice cores extracted from inland Antarctica as a proxy of past dimethyl sulfide emissions from the Southern Ocean.

  1. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry.

  2. Martensitic zirconium alloys: Influence of chemical composition on creep characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pahutova, M.; Kucharova, K.; Cadek, J. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie)

    1985-03-01

    Results of an extensive investigation of creep in martensitic zirconium alloys are summarized with the aim to show the influence of chemical composition on the main creep characteristics - the steady state creep rate and the time and strain to fracture. The activation energy of creep and the parameter of stress sensitivity of steady state creep rate are determined and possible creep mechanisms as well as creep strenghtening mechanisms are discussed. The time to fracture tsub(f) is related to the steady state creep rate epsilonsub(s) through the Monkman-Grant relation as modified by Dobes and Milicka. The creep fracture shows features different from those of ''classical'' intergranular cavitation creep fracture. Most probably the creep fracture is controlled by the same deformation mechanism as the creep.

  3. Influence of Chemical Composition on Porosity in Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucharčík L.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Porosity is one of the major defects in aluminum castings, which results is a decrease of a mechanical properties. Porosity in aluminum alloys is caused by solidification shrinkage and gas segregation. The final amount of porosity in aluminium castings is mostly influenced by several factors, as amount of hydrogen in molten aluminium alloy, cooling rate, melt temperature, mold material, or solidification interval. This article deals with effect of chemical composition on porosity in Al-Si aluminum alloys. For experiment was used Pure aluminum and four alloys: AlSi6Cu4, AlSi7Mg0, 3, AlSi9Cu1, AlSi10MgCu1.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of Iranian propolis and its chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaghoubi M.J.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of ethanol extract of Iranian propolis on some microorganisms using disc diffusion method. The chemical composition of the propolis was also investigated using thin layer chromatography and spectrophotometric methods. Ethanol extract of propolis showed activity only against Gram-positives and fungi, whereas no activity was observed against Gram-negatives. Thin layer chromatography screening revealed the presence of pinocembrine, caffeic acid, kaempferol, phenethyl caffeate, chrysin, and galangin in Iranian propolis. The total flavonoid and phenolic contents were 7.3% and 36%, respectively, which suggests that the strong antimicrobial activity of Iranian propolis may be due to high levels of phenolic and flavonoid compounds.

  5. Comparison of Push-Out Bond Strength of Two Bulk-Fill and One Conventional Composite to Intracanal Dentin in Severely Damaged Primary Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Mosharrafian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study sought to compare the push-out bond strength of two bulk-fill and one conventional composite to intracanal dentin in primary anterior teeth.Materials and Methods: This in vitro, experimental study was conducted on 39 primary anterior teeth, which were randomly divided into three groups. After cleaning and shaping, the root canals were filled with Metapex in such a way that after the application of 1mm light-cure liner on top of it, the coronal 3mm of the canal remained empty for composite post space. Z250 conventional composite was used in group 1 and SonicFill and Filtek bulk-fill composites along with Single Bond 2 were used in groups 2 and 3, respectively. The samples were subjected to thermocycling. One-millimeter thick sections were made of the mid-root and subjected to push-out bond strength test. Mode of failure was determined under a stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.Results: The mean (±standard deviation push-out bond strength was 11.40±4.23MPa, 10.94±6.69MPa and 8.79±4.12MPa in the conventional, SonicFill and Filtek groups, respectively. The difference in this regard among the three groups was not statistically significant (P=0.397.Conclusions: Based on the results, bulk-fill composites, similar to conventional types, can be successfully used for the fabrication of composite intracanal posts in primary teeth to decrease the treatment time in children.Keywords: Composite Resins; Dentin; Tooth, Deciduous

  6. Chemical composition and mosquito larvicidal activities of Salvia essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jija; Thoppil, John E

    2011-05-01

    Vector control is facing a threat due to the emergence of resistance to synthetic insecticides. In this context, essential oils have received much attention as potentially useful bioactive compounds against insects. Therefore, our present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of essential oils from the aerial parts of Salvia elegans Vahl, Salvia dorisiana Standl., Salvia splendens Sello ex J.A. Schult Blue Ribbon, and S. splendens Sello ex J.A. Schult Scarlet Sage Red (Lamiaceae) against the fourth instar larvae of Aedes albopictus Skuse (Diptera: Culicidae). The mosquito larvicidal activities of the essential oils and chemical composition of four taxa of Salvia are investigated in this article for the first time. Chemical compositions of essential oils obtained from four taxa of Salvia were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), GC-FID, and the effects of essential oils on fourth instar larvae of A. albopictus were investigated. The main components identified from each Salvia essential oils were as follows: spathulenol (38.73%) and caryophyllene (10.32%) from S. elegans; ledol (45.8%) and 4,4'-[(p-phenylene)diisopropylidene]diphenol (17.38%) from S. dorisiana; β-cubebene (22.9%), and caryophyllene (12.99%) from S. splendens Blue Ribbon; phytol (41.46%) and cyclooctasulfur (24.88%) from S. splendens Scarlet Sage Red. The essential oils of S. elegans and S. splendens Blue Ribbon had excellent inhibitory larvicidal effect against A. albopictus larvae, and their LC(50) values in 24 h were 46.4 ppm (LC(90) = 121.8 ppm) and 59.2 ppm (LC(90) = 133.0 ppm), respectively. These findings demonstrate that the essential oils of these Salvia species could be considered as the powerful candidates to bring about useful botanicals so as to prevent the resurgence of mosquito vectors.

  7. Linking Remotely Sensed Aerosol Types to Their Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Kyle William; Kacenelenbogen, Meloe S.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Burton, Sharon P.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Meskhidze, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol types measured during the Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) experiment are related to GEOS-Chem model chemical composition. The application for this procedure to link model chemical components to aerosol type is desirable for understanding aerosol evolution over time. The Mahalanobis distance (DM) statistic is used to cluster model groupings of five chemical components (organic carbon, black carbon, sea salt, dust and sulfate) in a way analogous to the methods used by Burton et al. [2012] and Russell et al. [2014]. First, model-to-measurement evaluation is performed by collocating vertically resolved aerosol extinction from SABOR High Spectral Resolution LiDAR (HSRL) to the GEOS-Chem nested high-resolution data. Comparisons of modeled-to-measured aerosol extinction are shown to be within 35% +/- 14%. Second, the model chemical components are calculation into five variables to calculate the DM and cluster means and covariances for each HSRL-retrieved aerosol type. The layer variables from the model are aerosol optical depth (AOD) ratios of (i) sea salt and (ii) dust to total AOD, mass ratios of (iii) total carbon (i.e. sum of organic and black carbon) to the sum of total carbon and sulfate (iv) organic carbon to black carbon, and (v) the natural log of the aerosol-to-molecular extinction ratio. Third, the layer variables and at most five out of twenty SABOR flights are used to form the pre-specified clusters for calculating DM and to assign an aerosol type. After determining the pre-specified clusters, model aerosol types are produced for the entire vertically resolved GEOS-Chem nested domain over the United States and the model chemical component distributions relating to each type are recorded. Resulting aerosol types are Dust/Dusty Mix, Maritime, Smoke, Urban and Fresh Smoke (separated into 'dark' and 'light' by a threshold of the organic to black carbon ratio). Model-calculated DM not belonging to a specific type (i.e. not meeting a threshold

  8. Linking remotely sensed aerosol types to their chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K. W.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Johnson, M. S.; Burton, S. P.; Hostetler, C. A.; Meskhidze, N.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol types measured during the Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) experiment are related to GEOS-Chem model chemical composition. The application for this procedure to link model chemical components to aerosol type is desirable for understanding aerosol evolution over time. The Mahalanobis distance (DM) statistic is used to cluster model groupings of five chemical components (organic carbon, black carbon, sea salt, dust and sulfate) in a way analogous to the methods used by Burton et al. [2012] and Russell et al. [2014]. First, model-to-measurement evaluation is performed by collocating vertically resolved aerosol extinction from SABOR High Spectral Resolution LiDAR (HSRL) to the GEOS-Chem nested high-resolution data. Comparisons of modeled-to-measured aerosol extinction are shown to be within 35% ± 14%. Second, the model chemical components are calculation into five variables to calculate the DM and cluster means and covariances for each HSRL-retrieved aerosol type. The layer variables from the model are aerosol optical depth (AOD) ratios of (i) sea salt and (ii) dust to total AOD, mass ratios of (iii) total carbon (i.e. sum of organic and black carbon) to the sum of total carbon and sulfate (iv) organic carbon to black carbon, and (v) the natural log of the aerosol-to-molecular extinction ratio. Third, the layer variables and at most five out of twenty SABOR flights are used to form the pre-specified clusters for calculating DM and to assign an aerosol type. After determining the pre-specified clusters, model aerosol types are produced for the entire vertically resolved GEOS-Chem nested domain over the United States and the model chemical component distributions relating to each type are recorded. Resulting aerosol types are Dust/Dusty Mix, Maritime, Smoke, Urban and Fresh Smoke (separated into `dark' and `light' by a threshold of the organic to black carbon ratio). Model-calculated DM not belonging to a specific type (i.e. not meeting a threshold

  9. Chemical Composition of Iran's Pistacia atlantica Cold-Pressed Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saber-Tehrani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipid fraction of Pistacia atlantica seeds was extracted for the first time by means of cold-press technique and analyzed for its chemical composition. The fatty acids, sterols, triacylglycerols (TAG, tocopherols, polyphenols, and pigments were identified and their concentrations were determined by means of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC and gas chromatography (GC. Because of its high content of unsaturated fatty acids, it might prove to be of value in diets and it may be used as edible cooking or salad oils or for margarine manufacture. Pistacia atlantica seed oil has the unique sterols and tocopherols content providing source of natural antioxidants. The main triacylglycerols were SLL + PLO, SOL + POO, OOLn + PLL, OOO, and SOO. This paper examined the phenolic fraction of Pistacia atlantica seed oil. Moreover, caffeic acid followed by cinnamic acid, pinoresinol, vanillin, p-Coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and o-Coumaric acid was also determined. This paper presents the first investigation of chlorophyll's and carotene's composition in Pistacia atlantica seed oil. Furthermore, pheophytin a was the major component, followed by luteoxanthin, neoxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, lutein isomers, chlorophyll a, chlorophyll a′, and pheophytin a′ were also determined.

  10. Contributions of surface and bulk heterogeneities to the NO oxidation activities of ceria-zirconia catalysts with composition Ce(0.76)Zr(0.24)O(2) prepared by different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atribak, Idriss; Bueno-López, Agustín; García-García, Avelina; Azambre, Bruno

    2010-11-07

    The study of the catalytic activity towards NO oxidation to NO(2) was approached by using ceria-zirconia mixed oxides with the same nominal composition (Ce(0.76)Zr(0.24)O(2)) but prepared by different routes of synthesis: coprecipitation, solid combustion synthesis with urea, citrate complexation route, reversed microemulsion and template synthesis. The characterisation of the catalysts was performed by N(2) adsorption at -196 °C, XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, H(2)-TPR and XPS in order to ascertain the relationships between their catalytic activities and their bulk and surface properties. The results showed that the preparation method is critical for the physico-chemical properties of the mixed oxides, exhibiting very different BET surface areas, crystalline phase/s contributions and bulk oxygen mobility. The distribution of Ce and Zr on the surface with regard to the bulk is very much influenced by the preparation method as well. The NO(2) production from NO oxidation was shown to be mostly correlated with the Ce/Zr surface atomic ratio and the proportion of Ce(4+) (presumably in a doped cubic phase) in the uppermost layers.

  11. Cosmetics chemical composition characterization by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Ana Paula; Pereira, Gustavo Jose; Amaral, Angela Maria; Ferreira, Andrea Vidal, E-mail: ana_allves2008@hotmail.co [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Brazil is in the third position in the world's cosmetics market. It is an expanding and growing market where new products and manufacturing processes are in a constant and steady expansion. Therefore, it is mandatory that the composition of the products is well known in order to guarantee safety and quality of daily used cosmetics. The Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has issued a resolution, RDC No. 48, March 16, 2006, which defines a 'List of Substances which can not be used in personal hygiene products, cosmetics and perfumes'. In this work, samples of locally manufactured and imported cosmetics (lipsticks, eye shadows, etc.) were analyzed using the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis technique. The samples were irradiated in the TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor of the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN), on a 100kW thermal power, with a thermal neutron fluence rate about 8x10{sup 11}ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis has detected the chemical elements Br, Ba, Ga, Na, K, Sc, Fe, Cr, Zn, Sm, W, La, Rb, Cs, Ta, Ge, Co, U, Ti, V, Cl, Al, Mn and Cu. The concentrations of these elements are on a range from 5 to 3000mug.g{sup -1}. Some chemical elements observed in samples (Cl, Br, Cr, U) are included at ANVISA prohibitive list. (author)

  12. Epicuticular wax crystals of Wollemia nobilis: morphology and chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragota, Simona; Riederer, Markus

    2007-08-01

    The morphology of the epicuticular leaf waxes of Wollemia nobilis (Araucariaceae) was studied with special emphasis on the relationship between the microstructure of epicuticular wax crystals and their chemical composition. Wollemia nobilis is a unique coniferous tree of the family Araucariaceae and is of very high scientific value as it is the sole living representative of an ancient genus, which until 1994 was known only from fossils. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) were used for characterizing the morphology and the chemical structure of the epicuticular wax layer of W. nobilis needles. The main component of the leaf epicuticular wax of W. nobilis is nonacosan-10-ol. This secondary alcohol together with nonacosane diols is responsible for the tubular habit of the epicuticular wax crystals. Scanning electron micrographs revealed differences in the fine structure of adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces that could be explained by gas chromatographic studies after selective mechanical removal of the waxes. SEM investigations established the tubular crystalline microstructure of the epicuticular wax of W. nobilis leaves. GC-MS and NMR experiments showed that nonacosan-10-ol is the major constituent of the epicuticular wax of W. nobilis leaves.

  13. Chemical composition of precipitation and its sources in Hangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Bi, Xiao-Hui; Feng, Yin-Chang; Lin, Feng-Mei; Jiao, Li; Hong, Sheng-Mao; Liu, Wen-Gao; Zhang, Xiao-Yong

    2011-12-01

    To understand the origin and chemical characteristics of precipitation in Hangzhou, rainwater samples were collected from June 2006 to May 2008. All samples were analyzed for pH, electrical conductivity, and major ions (NH⁴⁺, Ca²⁺, Mg²⁺, Na⁺, K⁺, SO₄²⁻, NO₃⁻, F⁻, and Cl⁻). Acidification of precipitation in Hangzhou was serious with volume-weighted mean pH value of 4.5, while frequency of acid rain was 95%. The calculated SO₄²⁻/NO₃⁻ ratio in Hangzhou precipitation was 2.87, which indicated that the precipitation of Hangzhou belonged to sulfate-based acid rain. The results of acid neutralization analysis showed that not all the acidity in the precipitation of Hangzhou was neutralized by alkaline constituents. The results of sea salt contribution analysis showed that nearly all SO₄²⁻, Ca²⁺, and Mg²⁺ and 33.7% of K⁺ were of non-sea origins, while all Na⁺ and Cl⁻ and 66.3% of K⁺ originated from sea sources. The principal component analysis which was used to analyze the sources of various ions indicated that chemical compositions of precipitation in Hangzhou mainly came from terrestrial sources, factory emissions, fuel wood burning, and marine sources.

  14. Chemical Composition and Hypotensive Effect of Campomanesia xanthocarpa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liane Santariano Sant’Anna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Campomanesia xanthocarpa is known in Brazil as Guabiroba and is popularly used for various diseases, such as inflammatory, renal, and digestive diseases and dyslipidemia. The aim of the study was to analyze the chemical composition and investigate the effects of aqueous extract of C. xanthocarpa on the blood pressure of normotensive rats, analyzing the possible action mechanism using experimental and in silico procedures. The extract was evaluated for total phenolic compounds and total flavonoid content. The chemical components were determined by HPLC analyses. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were measured with extract and drugs administration. The leaves of C. xanthocarpa presented the relevant content of phenolics and flavonoids, and we suggested the presence of chlorogenic acid, gallic acid, quercetin, and theobromine. The acute administration of aqueous extract of C. xanthocarpa has a dose-dependent hypotensive effect in normotensive rats, suggesting that the action mechanism may be mediated through the renin-angiotensin system by AT1 receptor blockade and sympathetic autonomic response. Docking studies showed models that indicated an interaction between chlorogenic acid and quercetin with the AT1 receptor (AT1R active site. The findings of these docking studies suggest the potential of C. xanthocarpa constituents for use as preventive agents for blood pressure.

  15. The effect of prolonged immersion of giomer bulk-fill composite resin on the pH value of artificial saliva and resin surface roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratna, A. A.; Triaminingsih, S.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of immersion time on the surface roughness of Giomer Bulk-Fill composite resin and on the pH value of artificial saliva. Sixty-three specimens were divided into nine groups and immersed in artificial saliva with pH values of 7, 5.5, and 4.5 for 1 hour, 24 hours, and 72 hours at 37 °C. The changes in artificial saliva pH were measured using a pH meter and the surface roughness was measured using a surface roughness tester. Longer immersion time increases the pH of artificial saliva and the surface roughness of Giomer Bulk-Fill composite resin.

  16. Chemical Composition and Bioactivity of Essential Oil from Blepharocalyx salicifolius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Barcelos Furtado

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural products represent a source of biologically active molecules that have an important role in drug discovery. The aromatic plant Blepharocalyx salicifolius has a diverse chemical constitution but the biological activities of its essential oils have not been thoroughly investigated. The aims of this paper were to evaluate in vitro cytotoxic, antifungal and antibacterial activities of an essential oil from leaves of B. salicifolius and to identify its main chemical constituents. The essential oil was extracted by steam distillation, chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and biological activities were performed by a microdilution broth method. The yield of essential oil was 0.86% (w/w, and the main constituents identified were bicyclogermacrene (17.50%, globulol (14.13%, viridiflorol (8.83%, γ-eudesmol (7.89% and α-eudesmol (6.88%. The essential oil was cytotoxic against the MDA-MB-231 (46.60 μg·mL−1 breast cancer cell line, being more selective for this cell type compared to the normal breast cell line MCF-10A (314.44 μg·mL−1. Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity results showed that this oil does not act by inducing cell death, but rather by impairment of cellular metabolism specifically of the cancer cells. Furthermore, it presented antifungal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (156.25 μg·mL−1 but was inactive against other fungi and bacteria. Essential oil from B. salicifolius showed promising biological activities and is therefore a source of molecules to be exploited in medicine or by the pharmaceutical industry.

  17. Chemical Composition and Bioactivity of Essential Oil from Blepharocalyx salicifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Fabiana Barcelos; Borges, Bruna Cristina; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Garces, Hans Garcia; Almeida Junior, Luiz Domingues de; Alves, Fernanda Cristina Bérgamo; Silva, Claudio Vieira da; Fernandes Junior, Ary

    2018-01-04

    Natural products represent a source of biologically active molecules that have an important role in drug discovery. The aromatic plant Blepharocalyx salicifolius has a diverse chemical constitution but the biological activities of its essential oils have not been thoroughly investigated. The aims of this paper were to evaluate in vitro cytotoxic, antifungal and antibacterial activities of an essential oil from leaves of B. salicifolius and to identify its main chemical constituents. The essential oil was extracted by steam distillation, chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, and biological activities were performed by a microdilution broth method. The yield of essential oil was 0.86% (w/w), and the main constituents identified were bicyclogermacrene (17.50%), globulol (14.13%), viridiflorol (8.83%), γ-eudesmol (7.89%) and α-eudesmol (6.88%). The essential oil was cytotoxic against the MDA-MB-231 (46.60 μg·mL-1) breast cancer cell line, being more selective for this cell type compared to the normal breast cell line MCF-10A (314.44 μg·mL-1). Flow cytometry and cytotoxicity results showed that this oil does not act by inducing cell death, but rather by impairment of cellular metabolism specifically of the cancer cells. Furthermore, it presented antifungal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (156.25 μg·mL-1) but was inactive against other fungi and bacteria. Essential oil from B. salicifolius showed promising biological activities and is therefore a source of molecules to be exploited in medicine or by the pharmaceutical industry.

  18. Evaluation of intrapulpal temperature changes caused by bulk-fill composite resins cured with different light-source modes: ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Atalayın

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effects on intrapulpal temperature change of two different LED light-source modes used during the polymerization of bulk-fill composite resins placed in deep cavities. Materials and Method: Human extracted mandibular molar teeth (n=5 were used to create single-tooth model with an occlusal dentin-thickness of 0.5 mm. Filtek Bulk Fill Posterior (3M ESPE and SDR (Dentsply were applied according to manufacturers’ instructions. A conventional composite resin, Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE was used as control. The soft and turbo modes of LED (Bluephase 20i, Ivoclar Vivadent were used for polymerization. Intrapulpal temperature changes were determined by using a device simulating pulpal blood microcirculation. For each material, initial and maximum temperature was determined during the curing. Difference between the initial and the highest temperature value was considered as the maximum temperature change (Δt. The data were analyzed with two-way variance analysis and post-hoc Tukey test (p<0.05. Results: The turbo mode was found to cause significantly greater temperature rise than the soft mode (p<0.001; Tukey test. When the filling material was taken as the variable, the greatest temperature change was observed in the SDR, whereas the least temperature change was observed in the control (p<0.05; Tukey test. Conclusion: The polymerization of bulk-fill composite resins in the turbo mode of the LED light-source led to greater pulpal temperature rise. The materials’ content and structure also affected the temperature increase. Using the soft mode of a LED light-source for the polymerization of bulk-fill composite resins in deep cavities is preferable to keep the intrapulpal temperature rise minimum.

  19. Color stability of bulk-fill and incremental-fill resin-based composites polished with aluminum-oxide impregnated disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzay Koc-Vural

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the color stability of bulk-fill and nanohybrid resin-based composites polished with 3 different, multistep, aluminum-oxide impregnated finishing and polishing disks. Materials and Methods Disk-shaped specimens (8 mm in diameter and 4 mm in thickness were light-cured between two glass slabs using one nanohybid bulk-fill (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent, one micro-hybrid bulk-fill (Quixfil, Dentsply, and two nanohybrid incremental-fill (Filtek Ultimate, 3M ESPE; Herculite XRV Ultra, Kerr resin-based composites, and aged by thermocycling (between 5 - 55℃, 3,000 cycles. Then, they were divided into subgroups according to the polishing procedure as SwissFlex (Coltène/Whaledent, Optidisc (Kerr, and Praxis TDV (TDV Dental (n = 12 per subgroup. One surface of each specimen was left unpolished. All specimens were immersed in coffee solution at 37℃. The color differences (ΔE were measured after 1 and 7 days of storage using a colorimeter based on CIE Lab system. The data were analyzed by univariate ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U test, and Friedmann tests (α = 0.05. Results Univariate ANOVA detected significant interactions between polishing procedure and composite resin and polishing procedure and storage time (p 0.05. Polishing reduced the discoloration resistance of Tetric EvoCeram/SwissFlex, Tetric EvoCeram/Praxis TDV, Quixfil-SwissFlex, and all Herculite XRV Ultra groups after 7 days storage (p < 0.05. Conclusions Discoloration resistance of bulk-fill resin-based composites can be significantly affected by the polishing procedures.

  20. Chemical affinities between the solvent extractable and the bulk organic matter of fossil resin associated with an extinct podocarpaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimalt, J.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Analyses by GC-MS and GC-IR of resin associated to Dacridiumites mawsonii deposits, an extinct species of Podocarpaceae occurring on the South Island of New Zealand during the Bortonian (Middle Eocene), have revealed that dehydroabietic acid is the predominant component of the solvent soluble fraction. Accordingly, this diterpenoid has been selected as the principal component material for spectroscopic comparison with the bulk resin using IR and CP/MAS 13C NMR. ?? 1989.

  1. Polymerization kinetics and impact of post polymerization on the Degree of Conversion of bulk-fill resin-composite at clinically relevant depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahdal, Khold; Ilie, Nicoleta; Silikas, Nick; Watts, David C

    2015-10-01

    Since bulk-fill (BF) resin composites should cure efficiently to a depth up to 4mm, the aim of the study was to determine the time-dependence of degree of conversion (DC) at that depth during 24h post-irradiation. Eight representative BF resin composites were studied [x-tra base (XTB), Venus Bulk Fill (VBF), Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TECBF), Sonic Fill (SF), Filtek Bulk Fill (FBF), everX Posterior (eXP), Beautifil-Bulk Flowable (BBF), Beautifil-Bulk Restorative (BBR)]. Specimens were fabricated in white Delrin moulds of 4mm height and 5mm internal diameter directly on an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory attachment of an (FTIR) spectrometer (Nicolet iS50, Thermo Fisher, Madison, USA). Upper specimen surfaces were irradiated in situ for 20 s with an LED curing unit (Elipar S10 with average tip irradiance of 1200 mW/cm(2)). Spectra from the lower surface were recorded continuously in real-time for 5 min and then at 30 and 60 min and 24h post irradiation. Mean ranges of DC4mm (%) of the materials at 4mm depth were 39-67; 48-75; 45-74; and 50-72 at 5, 30 and 60 min and 24h respectively. DCs for XTB, VBF, TECBF, FBF, BBR increased significantly 30 min after irradiation (p0.05). DC for SF was not affected by subsequent time after 5 min (p>0.05). For eXP and BBF, DC increased 24h after irradiation (ppolymerization impact of bulk-fill composites is material dependent. Five materials exhibited their maximum DC4mm already 30 min after starting the irradiation while DC4mm for two materials optimized after 24h. BF materials were found to exhibit after 24h a DC between 50 and 72% at 4mm depth under the stated irradiation conditions. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The simulation method of chemical composition of vermicular graphite iron on the basis of genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, L. R.; Klochkova, K. V.; Simonova, L. A.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents a methodology of modeling the chemical composition of the composite material via genetic algorithm for optimization of the manufacturing process of products. The paper presents algorithms of methods based on intelligent system of vermicular graphite iron design

  3. Chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols resolved via positive matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Äijälä, Mikko; Junninen, Heikki; Heikkinen, Liine; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas; Ehn, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter is a complex mixture of various chemical species such as organic compounds, sulfates, nitrates, ammonia, chlorides, black carbon and sea salt. As aerosol chemical composition strongly influences aerosol climate effects (via cloud condensation nucleus activation, hygroscopic properties, aerosol optics, volatility and condensation) as well as health effects (toxicity, carcinogenicity, particle morphology), detailed understanding of atmospheric fine particle composition is widely beneficial for understanding these interactions. Unfortunately the comprehensive, detailed measurement of aerosol chemistry remains difficult due to the wide range of compounds present in the atmosphere as well as for the miniscule mass of the particles themselves compared to their carrier gas. Aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS; Canagaratna et al., 2007) is an instrument often used for characterization of non-refractive aerosol types: the near-universal vaporization and ionisation technique allows for measurement of most atmospheric-relevant compounds (with the notable exception of refractory matter such as sea salt, black carbon, metals and crustal matter). The downside of the hard ionisation applied is extensive fragmentation of sample molecules. However, the apparent loss of information in fragmentation can be partly offset by applying advanced statistical methods to extract information from the fragmentation patterns. In aerosol mass spectrometry statistical analysis methods, such as positive matrix factorization (PMF; Paatero, 1999) are usually applied for aerosol organic component only, to keep the number of factors to be resolved manageable, to retain the inorganic components for solution validation via correlation analysis, and to avoid inorganic species dominating the factor model. However, this practice smears out the interactions between organic and inorganic chemical components, and hinders the understanding of the connections between primary and

  4. Mechanical properties of uniaxial natural fabric Grewia tilifolia reinforced epoxy based composites: Effects of chemical treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jayaramudu, J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of chemical treatment on the mechanical, morphological, and chemical resistance properties of uniaxial natural fabrics, Grewia tilifolia/epoxy composites, were studied. In order to enhance the interfacial bonding between the epoxy matrix...

  5. Chemical composition of olive oils of the cultivar Colombaia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunin, P.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of monovarietal olive oils from the cultivar Colombaia was studied. Free acidity, peroxide value and UV absorbance attested to the good quality of the analyzed oils. Their fatty acid composition appeared to be quite different from the typical fatty acid profile of olive oils from Liguria but met the limits reported in the EC Regulations for olive oils. On the contrary, the amounts of Δ7-stigmastenol were often higher than the 0.5 % limit set by EC Regulations and total ß-sitosterol was below the minimum 93 % limit. The composition of polar compounds and of the volatile fraction was representative of the peculiar organoleptic character of these oils. Thus, the anomalous sterol composition of the monovarietal oils from the cultivar Colombaia calls for blending with other oils. Moreover, the use of these oils for the production of PDO oils “Riviera Ligure” must also be carefully controlled because it changes their nutritional and sensorial featuresEn este trabajo se ha estudiado la composición química de aceites de oliva mono-varietales de la variedad Colombaia. La acidez libre, el índice de peróxidos y la absorción UV confirmaron la buena calidad de los aceites analizados. Su composición en ácidos grasos resultó bastante diferente del perfil típico de ácidos grasos de los aceites de oliva virgen de la región de Liguria, pero se mantuvo dentro de los límites establecidos por los Reglamentos EC para aceites de oliva. Por otro lado, las cantidades de Δ7-estigmastenol resultaron normalmente superiores al 0.5 % del límite fijado por los Reglamentos EC y el ß-sitosterol total fue inferior al 93 % del límite mínimo. La composición en compuestos polares y de la fracción volátil confirmó las características organolépticas peculiares de estos aceites. Por tanto, la composición esterólica anómala de los aceites mono-varietales de la variedad Colombaia hace necesaria una mezcla con otros

  6. The Relationship of Culture Media Composition and Chemical Composition on Spirulina sp for Metal Ion Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda Zulkifli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis relationship of Spirulina sp medium with chemical composition has been conducted. Chemical analysis was performed using X-Ray Fluorescence analysis. Furthermore, potention of Spirulina sp as adsorbent of metal ions was analyzed using FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that metals such as Zn, Fe, Mn, Ca, Cu, and Mo were mainly metals in Spirulina sp. These metals were not correlated with cultivated medium of Spirulina sp. Analysis of potention Spirulina sp as metal ions adsorbent showed that Spirulina sp has functional groups –C=O and –OH as ligand. Intercation of metal ions Cu(II and Cr(III with Spirulina sp indicated that metal ions bond to –C=O functional group.

  7. On ultrahigh temperature crustal metamorphism: Phase equilibria, trace element thermometry, bulk composition, heat sources, timescales and tectonic settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Kelsey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultrahigh temperature (UHT metamorphism is the most thermally extreme form of regional crustal metamorphism, with temperatures exceeding 900 °C. UHT crustal metamorphism is recognised in more than 50 localities globally in the metamorphic rock record and is accepted as ‘normal’ in the spectrum of regional crustal processes. UHT metamorphism is typically identified on the basis of diagnostic mineral assemblages such as sapphirine + quartz, orthopyroxene + sillimanite ± quartz and osumilite in Mg–Al-rich rock compositions, now usually coupled with pseudosection-based thermobarometry using internally-consistent thermodynamic data sets and/or Al-in-Orthopyroxene and ternary feldspar thermobarometry. Significant progress in the understanding of regional UHT metamorphism in recent years includes: (1 development of a ferric iron activity–composition thermodynamic model for sapphirine, allowing phase diagram calculations for oxidised rock compositions; (2 quantification of UHT conditions via trace element thermometry, with Zr-in-rutile more commonly recording higher temperatures than Ti-in-zircon. Rutile is likely to be stable at peak UHT conditions whereas zircon may only grow as UHT rocks are cooling. In addition, the extent to which Zr diffuses out of rutile is controlled by chemical communication with zircon; (3 more fully recognising and utilising temperature-dependent thermal properties of the crust, and the possible range of heat sources causing metamorphism in geodynamic modelling studies; (4 recognising that crust partially melted either in a previous event or earlier in a long-duration event has greater capacity than fertile, unmelted crust to achieve UHT conditions due to the heat energy consumed by partial melting reactions; (5 more strongly linking U–Pb geochronological data from zircon and monazite to P–T points or path segments through using Y + REE partitioning between accessory and major phases, as well as phase

  8. Vector diagram of the chemical compositions of tektites and earth lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasha, L. G.; Gorshkov, G. S.

    1978-01-01

    The chemical compositions of tektites and various volcanic glasses, similar in composition to tektites are compared by a petrochemical method. The advantage of the method is that a large number of chemical analyses of igneous rocks can be graphically compared with the help of vectors, plotted in relation to six parameters. These parameters, calculated from ratios of the main oxides given by silicate analysis, reflect the chief characteristics of igneous rock. Material for the study was suppled by data from chemical analysis characterizing tektites of all known locations and data from chemical analyses of obsidians similar in chemical composition to tektites of various petrographical provinces.

  9. Facile preparation of graphene-copper nanoparticle composite by in situ chemical reduction for electrochemical sensing of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiwen; Zhang, Luyan; Chen, Gang

    2012-01-03

    A novel graphene-copper nanoparticle composite was prepared by the in situ chemical reduction of a mixture containing graphene oxide and copper(II) ions using potassium borohydride as a reductant. It was mixed with paraffin oil and packed into one end of a fused capillary to fabricate microdisc electrodes for sensing carbohydrates. The morphology and structure of the graphene-copper nanoparticle composite were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that copper nanoparticles with an average diameter of 20.8 nm were successfully deposited on graphene nanosheets to form a well interconnected hybrid network. The analytical performance of these unique graphene-copper nanoparticle composite paste electrodes was demonstrated by sensing five carbohydrates in combination with cyclic voltammetry and capillary electrophoresis (CE). The advantages of the composite detectors include higher sensitivity, satisfactory stability, surface renewability, bulk modification, and low expense of fabrication. They should find applications in microchip CE, flowing-injection analysis, and other microfluidic analysis systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Fatty acid composition and δ13 C of bulk and individual fatty acids as marker for authenticating Italian PDO/PGI extra virgin olive oils by means of isotopic ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faberi, Angelo; Marianella, Rosa Maria; Fuselli, Fabio; La Mantia, Alessandro; Ciardiello, Felice; Montesano, Camilla; Mascini, Marcello; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario

    2014-09-01

    European Regulation (EEC) 2568/91 has been setting the minimum requirements in order to allow labeling of oil as extra virgin. These general requirements, are based on physical-chemical and organoleptic parameters directly linked to the freshness and quality of the product. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was demonstrated to be a useful tool for the discrimination of the origin of unknown samples, because the obtained data are practically independent of the cultivar employed and the production technique. In this work, the evaluation of the composition of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) alongside with the determination of stable isotope ratio of C in bulk oils and in main FAME constituents have been investigated as a tool to improve geographical discrimination of Italian Protected Designation of Origin/Protected Geographical Indication (PDO/PGI) samples. For this purpose, authentic PDO/PGI extra virgin olive oils were sampled at oil mills and grouped into different sets according to their areas of provenience. The use of principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis multivariate analysis techniques demonstrated that discrimination of olive oil samples can be done using geographical and pedoclimatic parameters predominantly by using δ(13) C results of bulk and individual fatty acids. Results showed that δ(13) C values are a more reliable marker of origin with respect to fatty acid composition. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Exploring the chemical composition of water in the Kandalaksha Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazukhina, Svetlana; Masloboev, Vladimir; Chudnenko, Konstantin; Khaitov, Vadim; Maksimova, Victoria; Belkina, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    Oil films were noted at the head of the Kandalaksha Bay as far back as in 1971, as soon as the first stage of the oil tank farm had been commissioned (the autumn of 1970). In 1997-1998 there were accidental oil spills posing a real threat to the Kandalaksha Reserve biota. In May 2011, oil spills from the Belomorsk oil tank farm resulted in a local environmental emergency. In this work we have traced the evolution of polluted water by means of hydrogeochemical monitoring and reconstructing the chemical composition of surface and near-bottom water of the Kandalaksha Bay by using physical-chemical modeling (Selector software package, Chudnenko, 2010). The surface and near-bottom water was sampled in the summer of 2012 and 2013 at the following sites: under the numbers 3 (N 67.2.673, E 32.23.753); 4 (N 67.3.349, E 32.28.152); 1 (N 67.5.907, E 32.29.779), and 2 (N 67.6.429, E 32.30.539). The monitored objects and sampling time were sensitive to both the effects of the White Sea water (high tide), fresh water, and water affected by human impact (the oil tank farm). At each site, three samples were taken. The next stage involved reconstructing of the sea water ion composition by modeling within the Al-B-Br-Ar-He-Ne-C-Ca-Cl-F-K-Mg-Mn-N-Na-P-S-Si-Sr-Cu-Zn-H-O-e system, where e is an electron. Modeling of the chemical composition of near-bottom water (site 3) has revealed high contents of carbon dioxide, hydrogen disulphide, hydrocarbonates, and no oxygen (Eh<0). All this suggests a transformation of hydrocarbons that might have got to the sampling area in May 2011, or as the result of constant leakage of petroleum hydrocarbons from the oil tank farm. Sampling at site 4 in 2013 has revealed petroleum hydrocarbons both in surface (0.09 mg/l) and near-bottom (0.1 mg/l) water. Both monitoring and modeling have demonstrated that hydrobionts on areas adjoining the oil tank farm are far from prospering. Monitoring should be accompanied by express analysis of oxidizing conditions

  12. Composite-Material Tanks with Chemically Resistant Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    Lightweight composite-material tanks with chemically resistant liners have been developed for storage of chemically reactive and/or unstable fluids . especially hydrogen peroxide. These tanks are similar, in some respects, to the ones described in gLightweight Composite-Material Tanks for Cryogenic Liquids h (MFS-31379), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 1 (January, 2001), page 58; however, the present tanks are fabricated by a different procedure and they do not incorporate insulation that would be needed to prevent boil-off of cryogenic fluids. The manufacture of a tank of this type begins with the fabrication of a reusable multisegmented aluminum mandrel in the shape and size of the desired interior volume. One or more segments of the mandrel can be aluminum bosses that will be incorporated into the tank as end fittings. The mandrel is coated with a mold-release material. The mandrel is then heated to a temperature of about 400 F (approximately equal to 200 C) and coated with a thermoplastic liner material to the desired thickness [typically approxiamtely equal to 15 mils (approximately equal to 0.38 mm)] by thermal spraying. In the thermal-spraying process, the liner material in powder form is sprayed and heated to the melting temperature by a propane torch and the molten particles land on the mandrel. The sprayed liner and mandrel are allowed to cool, then the outer surface of the liner is chemically and/or mechanically etched to enhance bonding of a composite overwrap. The etched liner is wrapped with multiple layers of an epoxy resin reinforced with graphite fibers; the wrapping can be done either by manual application of epoxy-impregnated graphite cloth or by winding of epoxy-impregnated filaments. The entire assembly is heated in an autoclave to cure the epoxy. After the curing process, the multisegmented mandrel is disassembled and removed from inside, leaving the finished tank. If the tank is to be used for storing hydrogen peroxide, then the liner material

  13. Chemical composition of bioactive pressurized extracts of Romanian aromatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, T L; Plaza, M; Bahrim, G; Ibáñez, E; Herrero, M

    2011-07-29

    In this contribution, pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) has been employed to isolate bioactive compounds from three native Romanian plants, oregano (Origanum vulgare), tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus) and wild thyme (Thymus serpyllum). Different PLE conditions have been tested including extraction with water, ethanol and their mixtures in a wide range of extraction temperatures (50-200°C), and the antioxidant capacity of the extracts was measured using different assays (DPPH radical scavenging, TEAC assay and Folin-Ciocalteau assay to measure total phenols). Moreover, a complete chemical characterization by using LC-MS/MS was carried out to be able to correlate the bioactivity with the particular chemical composition of each extract and plant. The use of PLE with water as a solvent at the highest temperature tested (200°C) always provided the highest extraction yields for the three studied plants, being maximum for oregano (>60%). Besides, oregano's pressurized water extracts at lower temperatures (50°C) presented the highest content on total phenols (184.9 mg gallic acid/g extract) and the best antioxidant activities (EC(50) 6.98 μg/ml). In general, oregano extracts were the most active, followed by wild thyme extracts. The antioxidant capacity measured by DPPH assay was highly correlated with the amount of total phenols. Moreover, the use of a LC-MS/MS method allowed the identification of 30 different phenolic compounds in the different extracts, including phenolic acids, flavones, flavanones and flavonols, which have an important influence on the total antioxidant capacity of the different extracts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Wear behaviour of Zr-based in situ bulk metallic glass matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cracks, and occur plastic deformation homogeneously. Keywords. Zr-based bulk metallic glasses; in situ composites; ductile phase; wear behaviours. 1. Introduction. Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with special short-range order and long-range disorder microstructure usually exhibit unique physical, chemical and mechanical ...

  15. Evaluation of the performance of four chemical transport models in predicting the aerosol chemical composition in Europe in 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prank, M.; Sofiev, M.; Tsyro, S.; Hendriks, C.; Semeena, V.; Francis, X.V.; Butler, T.; Gon, H.D. van der; Friedrich, R.; Hendricks, J.; Kong, X.; Lawrence, M.; Righi, M.; Samaras, Z.; Sausen, R.; Kukkonen, J.; Sokhi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Four regional chemistry transport models were applied to simulate the concentration and composition of particulate matter (PM) in Europe for 2005 with horizontal resolution 20 km. The modelled concentrations were compared with the measurements of PM chemical composition by the European Monitoring

  16. Bark anatomy, chemical composition and ethanol-water extract composition of Anadenanthera peregrina and Anadenanthera colubrina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciene S Mota

    Full Text Available The bark of Anadenanthera peregrina (L. Speg and Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell. Brenan were characterized in relation to anatomical and chemical features. The barks were similar and included a thin conducting phloem, a largely dilated and sclerified non-conducting phloem, and a rhyridome with periderms with thin phellem interspersed by cortical tissues. Only small differences between species were observed that cannot be used alone for taxonomic purposes. The summative chemical composition of A. peregrina and A. colubrina was respectively: 8.2% and 7.7% ash; 28.8% and 29.3% extractives; 2.4% and 2.6% suberin; and 18.9% lignin. The monosaccharide composition showed the predominance of glucose (on average 82% of total neutral sugars and of xylose (9%. The ethanol-water extracts of A. peregrina and A. colubrina barks included a high content of phenolics, respectively: total phenolics 583 and 682 mg GAE/g extract; 148 and 445 mg CE/g extract; tannins 587 and 98 mg CE/g extract. The antioxidant activity was 238 and 269 mg Trolox/g extract. The barks of the Anadenanthera species are a potential source of polar extractives that will represent an important valorization and therefore contribute to improve the overall economic potential and sustainability of A. peregrina and A. colubrina.

  17. Life Cycle Risks for Human Health: A Comparison of Petroleum Versus Bio-Based Production of Five Bulk Organic Chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, A.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303022388; Patel, M.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/18988097X

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the development and application of a generic approach to the comparative assessment of risks related to the production of organic chemicals by petrochemical processes versus white biotechnology. White biotechnology, also referred to as industrial biotechnology, typically uses

  18. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of two strawberry cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đilas Sonja M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The macro- and micro-chemical composition, as well as antioxidant activity of two strawberry cultivars, Marmolada and Clery, were studied. Results showed a noticeable difference in the sugar, protein and pectin contents. Clery had 6.92% and Marmolada 4.93% of total sugar. Also, protein and pectin contents were higher in the Clery cultivar. No significant difference was observed in acidity, as well as in ash and cellulose content. Marmolada had a higher content of total phenolics and flavonoids (228.04 mg GAE /100 g FW and 136.01 mg RE/100 g FW, respectively . The anthocyanins content in Marmolada (32.0 mg CGE/100 g FW was slightly lower than in Clery (36.0 mg CGE/100 g FW. The antioxidant activity was evaluated spectrophotometrically, using 2,2-diphenyl- 1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity assay. The DPPH free radical scavenging activity, expressed as EC50 value, of Marmolada (0.77 mg/ml was higher than of Clery (0.83 mg/ml. There was a significant positive correlation (R2>0.90 between the concentration of phenolics/flavonoids/anthocyanins and DPPH radical scavenging activity of both strawberry cultivars. These results also showed that the antioxidant value of 100 g FW Marmolada and Clery is equivalent to 237.91 mg and 219.01 mg of vitamin C, respectively.

  19. Brazilian kefir: structure, microbial communities and chemical composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Karina Teixeira; de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Campos, Cássia Roberta; Dragone, Giuliano; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2011-01-01

    Microbial ecology and chemical composition of Brazilian kefir beverage was performed. The microorganisms associated with Brazilian kefir were investigated using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods. A total of 359 microbial isolates were identified. Lactic acid bacteria (60.5%) were the major isolated group identified, followed by yeasts (30.6%) and acetic acid bacteria (8.9%). Lactobacillus paracasei (89 isolates), Lactobacillus parabuchneri (41 isolates), Lactobacillus casei (32 isolates), Lactobacillus kefiri (31 isolates), Lactococcus lactis (24 isolates), Acetobacter lovaniensis (32 isolates), Kluyveromyces lactis (31 isolates), Kazachstania aerobia (23 isolates), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (41 isolates) and Lachancea meyersii (15 isolates) were the microbial species isolated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the microbiota was dominated by bacilli (short and curved long) cells growing in close association with lemon-shaped yeasts cells. During the 24 h of fermentation, the protein content increased, while lactose and fat content decreased. The concentration of lactic acid ranged from 1.4 to 17.4 mg/ml, and that of acetic acid increased from 2.1 to 2.73 mg/ml. The production of ethanol was limited, reaching a final mean value of 0.5 mg/ml. PMID:24031681

  20. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB{sub 2} composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Starr, T.L. [Georgia Tech Research Inst., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB{sub 2} cathode surface. The use of TiB{sub 2}, however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB{sub 2} is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB{sub 2}. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB{sub 2} from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000{degrees}C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB{sub 2}THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  1. Chemical vapor infiltration of TiB[sub 2] composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Miller, J.H.; Cooley, K.C.; Lowden, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Starr, T.L. (Georgia Tech Research Inst., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Efficiency of the Hall-Heroult electrolytic reduction of aluminum can be substantially improved by the use of a TiB[sub 2] cathode surface. The use of TiB[sub 2], however, has been hampered by the brittle nature of the material and the grain-boundary attack of sintering-aid phases by molten aluminum. In the current work, TiB[sub 2] is toughened through the use of reinforcing fibers, with chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) used to produce pure TiB[sub 2]. It has been observed, however, that the formation of TiB[sub 2] from chloride precursors at fabrication temperatures below 900 to 1000[degrees]C alloys the retention of destructive levels of chlorine in the material. At higher fabrication temperatures and under appropriate infiltration conditions, as determined from the use of a process model, a TIB[sub 2]THORNEL P-25 fiber composite, 45 mm in diam and 6 mm thick, has been fabricated in 20 h. The material has been demonstrated to be stable in molten aluminum in short-duration tests.

  2. Soursop (Annona muricata) vinegar production and its chemical compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Chin Wai; Lazim, Azwan Mat; Fazry, Shazrul; Zaki, Umi Kalsum Hj Hussain; Lim, Seng Joe

    2016-11-01

    Vinegar is a liquid product that undergoes double fermentations, which are alcoholic and acetous fermentation. Sugar source was converted to ethanol in alcoholic fermentation, meanwhile ethanol was oxidised to acetic acid during acetous fermentation. Soursop (Annona muricata) was the starting material in this study, as it is easily available in Malaysia. Its highly aromatic, juicy and distinctive flavours enables the production of high quality vinegar. The objective of this research is to produce good quality soursop vinegar as an innovative method to preserve and utilise the soursop fruit in Malaysia and to determine its chemical compositions. It was found that the sugar content reduces over time, and it is inversely proportional to the ethanol concentration, due to the production of ethanol from sugar. Acetic acid was also found to increase with increasing fermentation time. pH showed no significant difference (p>0.05) in the reduction of sugar and the production of ethanol. However, significantly higher (p 0.05) in Vitamin C contents in all soursop vinegar samples produced using different treatments.

  3. Pereskia aculeata Muller (Cactaceae Leaves: Chemical Composition and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucèia Fàtima Souza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this work were to study the chemical composition of the essential oil from the leaves of Pereskia aculeata and to evaluate some biological activities of three leaf extracts. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and in vitro antimicrobial and antifungal activities were determined. The methanol extract showed antioxidant activity (EC50 7.09 mg/mL and high polyphenols content (15.04 ± 0.31 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE/g. The petroleum ether extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas the chloroform extract showed inhibitory activity against Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The petroleum ether and methanol extracts were more effective in inhibiting the growth of Aspergillus versicolor. The possible cytotoxicity of extracts on neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cancer cell line and the influence on adenylate cyclase (ADCY expression was also studied. P. aculeata chloroform extract showed antiproliferative activity with an IC50 value of 262.83 µg/mL. Treatments of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with 100 µg/mL of methanol extract significantly reduced ADCY1 expression.

  4. Chemical Composition, Antifungal and Insecticidal Activities of Hedychium Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanniah Rajasekaran

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial properties of essential oils have been documented, and their use as “biocides” is gaining popularity. The aims of this study were to analyze the chemical composition and assess the biological activities of Hedychium essential oils. Oils from 19 Hedychium species and cultivars were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS techniques. The antifungal and insecticidal activities of these oils were tested against Colletotrichum acutatum, C. fragariae, and C. gloeosporioides, and three insects, the azalea lace bug (Stephanitis pyrioides, the yellow fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti, and the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta. Hedychium oils were rich in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, especially 1,8-cineole (0.1%–42%, linalool (<0.1%–56%, a-pinene (3%–17%, b-pinene (4%–31%, and (E-nerolidol (0.1%–20%. Hedychium oils had no antifungal effect on C. gloeosporioides, C. fragariae, and C. acutatum, but most Hedychium oils effectively killed azalea lace bugs. The oils also show promise as an adult mosquito repellent, but they would make rather poor larvicides or adulticides for mosquito control. Hedychium oils acted either as a fire ant repellent or attractant, depending on plant genotype and oil concentration.

  5. Essential oil of Algerian Eucalyptus citriodora: Chemical composition, antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, H; Moghrani, H; Benelmouffok, A; Kellou, D; Maachi, R

    2015-12-01

    Essential oil of Eucalyptus citriodora is a natural product which has been attributed for various medicinal uses. In the present investigation, E. citriodora essential oil was used to evaluate its antifungal effect against medically important dermatophytes. Essential oil from the Algerian E. citriodora leaves was analyzed by GC and GC/MS. The antifungal effect of E. citriodora essential oil was evaluated against four dermatophytes: Microsporum canis, Microsporum gypseum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Trichophyton rubrum using disc diffusion method, disc volatilization method, and agar dilution method. The chemical composition of the oil revealed the presence of 22 compounds accounting for 95.27% of the oil. The dominant compounds were citronellal (69.77%), citronellol (10.63%) and isopulegol (4.66%). The disc diffusion method, MIC and MFC determination, indicated that E. citriodora essential oil had a higher antifungal potential against the tested strains with inhibition zone diameter which varied from (12 to 90mm) and MIC and MFC values ranged from (0.6 to 5μL/mL and 1.25 to 5μL/mL) respectively. The M. gypseum was the most resistant to the oil. The results of the present study indicated that E. citriodora essential oil may be used as a new antifungal agent recommended by the pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemical composition and antifungal activity of Bubonium imbricatum volatile oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAKIM ALILOU

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of the essential oil extracted from the aerial parts of Bubonium imbricatum, an endemic plant of southern Morocco, was analysed. GC-MS showed 51 compounds, representing 60.2% of the total oil. Thymol isobutyrate (18.3% and 2,5-dimethoxy-p-cymene (16.2% were the major constituents of the oil. The oil was tested for antifungal activity in mycelial growth inhibition tests in vitro against three agricultural pathogenic fungi: Penicillium digitatum, P. expansum and Botrytis cinerea. The oil at 1000 ppm was highly effective against mycelial growth of P. digitatum with 99% inhibition. For P. expansum and B. cinerea the percentage of mycelial growth inhibition at 1000 ppm was respectively 87.2% and 87.8%. At 2000 ppm the oil was 100% effective in controlling mycelial growth of all three fungi. B. imbricatum essential oil was also tested at different concentrations on citrus fruits (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Nules inoculated with P. digitatum (105 conidia ml-1. The oil had a fungistatic or fungicidal effect on C. reticulata.

  7. Microbial population, chemical composition and silage fermentation of cassava residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napasirth, Viengsakoun; Napasirth, Pattaya; Sulinthone, Tue; Phommachanh, Kham; Cai, Yimin

    2015-09-01

    In order to effectively use the cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) residues, including cassava leaves, peel and pulp for livestock diets, the chemical and microbiological composition, silage preparation and the effects of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants on silage fermentation of cassava residues were studied. These residues contained 10(4) to 10(5) LAB and yeasts, 10(3) to 10(4) coliform bacteria and 10(4) aerobic bacteria in colony forming units (cfu) on a fresh matter (FM) basis. The molds were consistently at or below the detectable level (10(2) cfu of FM) in three kinds of cassava residues. Dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content of cassava residues were 17.50-30.95%, 1.30-16.41% and 25.40-52.90% on a DM basis, respectively. The silage treatments were designed as control silage without additive (CO) or with LAB inoculants Chikuso-1 (CH, Lactobacillus plantarum) and Snow Lacto (SN, Lactobacillus rhamnosus) at a rate of 5 mg/kg of FM basis. All silages were well preserved with a low pH (below 4.0) value and when cassava residues silage treated with inoculants CH and SN improved fermentation quality with a lower pH, butyric acid and higher lactic acid than control silage. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  8. Atmospheric aerosol over Vermont: chemical composition and sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polissar, A.V.; Hopke, P.K. [Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2001-12-01

    Aerosol chemical composition data for PM{sub 2.5} samples collected during the period from 1988 to 1995 at Underhill, VT were analyzed. The six sources representing wood burning, coal and oil combustion, coal combustion emissions plus photochemical sulfate production, metal production plus municipal wastes incineration, and emissions from motor vehicles were identified. Emissions from smelting of nonferrous metal ores, arsenic smelting, and soil particles and particles with high concentrations of Na were also identified by PMF. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis for the black carbon factor shows high probabilities in the area surrounding the sampling wood combustion in northern New England and southwestern Quebec. Similar large potential source areas in the midwestern United States were identified for the coal combustion factors. The oil combustion factor was associated with the east coast of the United States. canadian Ni smelters are the main sources for the As factor, although there is some contribution from coal-fired power plants to the south and west of Underhill, VT. It is concluded that the combination of the two receptor modeling methods, PMF and PSCF, provides an effective way in identifying atmospheric aerosol sources and their likely locations. Emissions from different anthropogenic activities as well as secondary aerosol production are the main sources of aerosol measured in Vermont. Fuel combustion, local wood smoke, municipal waste incineration and the secondary sulfate production collectively accounted for about 87% of the fine mass concentrations measured in Vermont. 29 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Chemical composition of some seaweed from Mediterranean Sea coast, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Said, Ghada F; El-Sikaily, Amany

    2013-07-01

    This study pointed to the assessment of the chemical composition (F, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Cd, and carbohydrate) of different marine seaweeds (red, green, and brown) from the Egyptian Mediterranean Sea coast. The results showed that green seaweeds supplied better calcium sources than the red and brown ones. Also, red and brown seaweeds showed higher averages of Na and K than that in green species and these seaweeds could play an important role in the electrolyte balance in humans. On the other hand, green seaweeds gave the highest average carbohydrate concentration; thus, these green species could be used as a source of polysaccharides. Ion quotient values for almost seaweed species were between 1.4 and 4.0, so they can reduce hypertension, preeclampsia, and heart disease in human beings. Interestingly, the calculated hazard quotient of elements was below 1. Accordingly, these seaweed species were of high quality and safety and might be used in the field of nutrition.

  10. Brazilian kefir: structure, microbial communities and chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Teixeira Magalhães

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial ecology and chemical composition of Brazilian kefir beverage was performed. The microorganisms associated with Brazilian kefir were investigated using a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods. A total of 359 microbial isolates were identified. Lactic acid bacteria (60.5% were the major isolated group identified, followed by yeasts (30.6% and acetic acid bacteria (8.9%. Lactobacillus paracasei (89 isolates, Lactobacillus parabuchneri (41 isolates, Lactobacillus casei (32 isolates, Lactobacillus kefiri (31 isolates, Lactococcus lactis (24 isolates, Acetobacter lovaniensis (32 isolates, Kluyveromyces lactis (31 isolates, Kazachstania aerobia (23 isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (41 isolates and Lachancea meyersii (15 isolates were the microbial species isolated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the microbiota was dominated by bacilli (short and curved long cells growing in close association with lemon-shaped yeasts cells. During the 24 h of fermentation, the protein content increased, while lactose and fat content decreased. The concentration of lactic acid ranged from 1.4 to 17.4 mg/ml, and that of acetic acid increased from 2.1 to 2.73 mg/ml. The production of ethanol was limited, reaching a final mean value of 0.5 mg/ml.

  11. Distinct effects of Cr bulk doping and surface deposition on the chemical environment and electronic structure of the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Turgut, E-mail: yilmaz@phys.uconn.edu [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Hines, William [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Sun, Fu-Chang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Pletikosić, Ivo [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Budnick, Joseph [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Valla, Tonica [Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Sinkovic, Boris [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Cr doping into the bulk of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} opens an energy gap at the Dirac point which is observable in the non-magnetic state. • Cr surface deposition does not lead to open an energy gap at the Dirac point of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. • Formation of two distinct Bi and Cr core level peaks was observed upon the deposition of Cr on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}. - Abstract: In this report, it is shown that Cr doped into the bulk and Cr deposited on the surface of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films produced by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have strikingly different effects on both the electronic structure and chemical environment. Angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) shows that Cr doped into the bulk opens a surface state energy gap which can be seen at room temperature; much higher than the measured ferromagnetic transition temperature of ≈10 K. On the other hand, similar ARPES measurements show that the surface states remain gapless down to 15 K for films with Cr surface deposition. In addition, core-level photoemission spectroscopy of the Bi 5d, Se 3d, and Cr 3p core levels show distinct differences in the chemical environment for the two methods of Cr introduction. Surface deposition of Cr results in the formation of shoulders on the lower binding energy side for the Bi 5d peaks and two distinct Cr 3p peaks indicative of two Cr sites. These striking differences suggests an interesting possibility that better control of doping at only near surface region may offer a path to quantum anomalous Hall states at higher temperatures than reported in the literature.

  12. Acoustical Properties of Rubber as a Function of Chemical Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1951-02-01

    RESTRICTED NAVORD REPORT 1778 FIG.15 COMPARISON OF THE REAL PARTS OF THE BULK MODULUS FOR ALL SAMPLES ArT .5 KG AND T-𔃽O"G 3.5. (ALL SAMPLES HC-25=HYGAROR...sli~ght decreases. The data for the 3Yo.-MR~s modulus anid the bulk modulus of’ Hycan OR-l5 as, a function of type and amo,,Lt of plasticaizer are...YOUNG’S MODULUS vs NUMBER OF PARTS E.PC. FILLER FOR VARIOUS BASIC RUBBERS. FREQUENCYzI.5KC 0 >0 00 20 5 NUMBE OF ARTS ILLE II .1 39 RESTRICTED RESTRICTED

  13. The Effect of Preceding Crops on the Chemical Fractions of Copper (Cu in the Rhizosphere and the Bulk Soil and its Relationship with Copper Uptake by Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shahrzad kabirinejad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preceding crops as a source of organic matter are an important source of micronutrient and can play an important role in the soil fertility and the micronutrients cycle of soil. In addition to the role of the organic matter in increasing the concentration of micronutrients in soil solution, attention also should be paid to the role of the kind and the quantity of the root’s exudates that are released in response to the incorporation of different plant residues in the rhizosphere. Present research was conducted with the objective of studying the effect of the kind of preceding crops: Trifolium (Trifolium pretense L, Sofflower (Carthamus tinectirus L, Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L, Sunflower (Heliantus annus L and control (fallow on the chemical forms of copper in the wheat rhizosphere and the bulk soil and Cu uptake by wheat and also investigating the correlation between the fractions of Cu in soil and Cu uptake in wheat. Materials and Methods: The present research was conducted as split plot in a Randomized Complete Block design (RCBD with 3 replications and 5 treatments, in field conditions. In the beginning, the preceding crops were cultivated in the experimental plots and after ending growth, preceding crops were harvested. Then the wheat was cultivated in the experimental plots. Finally, after harvesting the wheat, soil samples were collected from the two parts of the root zone (the wheat rhizosphere and the bulk soil. The soil samples were air dried ground and passed through a 2-mm sieve and stored for chemical analysis. Soil pH (in the soil saturation extract and organic matter (Walkley–Black wet digestion were measured in standard methods (1. The Total Organic Carbon (TOC was measured by Analyzer (Primacs SLC TOC Analyzer (CS22, Netherlands. The available Cu in soil was extracted by DTPA and determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy (2. The fractionation of soil Cu was carried out using the MSEP method (3. Results and

  14. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  15. Effect of oilseed type on milk fatty acid composition of individual cows, and also bulk tank milk fatty acid composition from commercial farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliem, K E; Humphries, D J; Reynolds, C K; Morgan, R; Givens, D I

    2017-02-01

    Supplementing dairy cow diets with oilseed preparations has been shown to replace milk saturated fatty acids (SFA) with mono- and/or polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA, PUFA), which may reduce risk factors associated with cardio-metabolic diseases in humans consuming milk and dairy products. Previous studies demonstrating this are largely detailed, highly controlled experiments involving small numbers of animals, but in order to transfer this feeding strategy to commercial situations further studies are required involving whole herds varying in management practices. In experiment 1, three oilseed supplements (extruded linseed (EL), calcium salts of palm and linseed oil (CPLO) and milled rapeseed (MR)) were included in grass silage-based diets formulated to provide cows with ~350 g oil/day, and compared with a negative control (Control) diet containing no supplemental fat, and a positive control diet containing 350 g/cow per day oil as calcium salt of palm oil distillate (CPO). Diets were fed for 28-day periods in a 5×4 Latin Square design, and milk production, composition and fatty acid (FA) profile were analysed at the end of each period. Compared with Control, all lipid supplemented diets decreased milk fat SFA concentration by an average of 3.5 g/100 g FA, by replacement with both cis- and trans-MUFA/PUFA. Compared with CPO, only CPLO and MR resulted in lower milk SFA concentrations. In experiment 2, 24 commercial dairy farms (average herd size±SEM 191±19.3) from the south west of the United Kingdom were recruited and for a 1 month period asked to supplement their herd diets with either CPO, EL, CPLO or MR at the same inclusion level as the first study. Bulk tank milk was analysed weekly to determine FA concentration by Fourier Transform mid-IR spectroscopy prediction. After 4 weeks, EL, CPLO and MR all decreased herd milk SFA and increased MUFA to a similar extent (average -3.4 and +2.4 g/100 g FA, respectively) when compared with CPO. Differing responses

  16. Water uptake and chemical composition of fresh aerosols generated in open burning of biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Carrico

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiments (FLAME in 2006–2007, we examined hygroscopic properties of particles emitted from open combustion of 33 select biomass fuels. Measurements of humidification growth factors for subsaturated water relative humidity (RH conditions were made with a hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA for dry particle sizes of 50, 100 and 250 nm. Results were then fit to a single-parameter model to obtain the hygroscopicity parameter, κ. Particles in freshly emitted biomass smoke exhibited a wide range of hygroscopicity (individual modes with 0<κ<1.0, spanning a range from the hygroscopicity of fresh diesel soot emissions to that of pure inorganic salts commonly found in the ambient aerosol. Smoke aerosols dominated by carbonaceous species typically had a unimodal growth factor with corresponding mean κ=0.1 (range of 0<κ<0.4. Those with a substantial inorganic mass fraction typically separated into less- and more-hygroscopic modes at high RH, the latter with mean κ=0.4 (range of 0.1<κ<1. The bimodal κ distributions were indicative of smoke chemical heterogeneity at a single particle size, whereas heterogeneity as a function of size was indicated by typically decreasing κ values with increasing dry particle diameters. Hygroscopicity varied strongly with biomass fuel type and, to a lesser extent, with combustion conditions. Among the most hygroscopic smokes were those from palmetto, rice straw, and sawgrass, while smoke particles from coniferous species such as spruces, firs, pines, and duffs were among the least hygroscopic. Overall, hygroscopicity decreased with increasing ratios of total carbon to inorganic ions as measured in PM2.5 filter samples. Despite aerosol heterogeneity, reconstructions of κ using PM2.5 bulk chemical composition data fell along a 1:1 line with measured ensemble κ values.

  17. RESEARCH REGARDING THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AT VINEGAR TYPES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liviu Giurgiulescu; Olimpia Mihaela Hoban

    2009-01-01

    In this article are presented some physico-chemical applied vinegar, to see some chemical properties of vinegar suchas total acidity, volatile and fixed, by colorimetric determination of iron content...

  18. Anionic Extraction for Efficient Recovery of Biobased 2,3-Butanediol-A Platform for Bulk and Fine Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabo, Peter; Tiso, Till; Heyman, Benedikt

    2017-01-01

    2,3-Butanediol (BDO) presents a promising platform molecule for the synthesis of basic and fine chemicals. Biotechnological production of BDO from renewable resources with living microbes enables high concentrations in the fermentation broth. The recovery of high-boiling BDO from an aqueous ferme...

  19. Quantification of chemical sulphur species in bulk soil and organic sulphur fractions by S K-edge Xanes spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, K; Almkvist, G; Nilsson, S I

    2011-01-01

    A new data treatment method for fitting spectra obtained by sulphur (S) K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to quantify the chemical S speciation at three experimental sites with arable soils receiving the same long-term field treatments. Two treatments, crop...

  20. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activities of Iranian Propolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrouzan, Houshang; Tahghighi, Azar; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Es-haghi, Ali

    2018-01-01

    With considering the importance of natural products for their remedial and therapeutic value, this research was aimed to analyze the chemical compositions and antimicrobial activity of four propolis samples from different areas of Iran (Chenaran, Taleghan, Morad Beyg, and Kalaleh) with various climates and flora. Ethanolic (70% EtOH) and dichlromethane (DCM) extracts of Iranian propolis were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods, and antimicrobial activity was evaluated against Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus using disk diffusion antimicrobial method. The results of GC-MS analysis showed the presence of fatty acids, flavonoids, terpenes, aromatic-aliphatic acids, and their related esters. The total flavonoids in DCM extract of Chenaran, Taleghan, Morad Beyg, and Kalaleh propolis were pinocembrin and pinostrobin chalcone. The common phenolic and terpene compounds detected in all four tested EtOH extracts were P-cumaric acid and dimethyl -1,3,5,6-tetramethyl-[1,3-(13C2)] bicycloce [5.5.0] dodeca-1,3,5,6,8,10-hexaene-9,10-dicarboxylate, respectively. The highest inhibitory diameter zone of the Iranian propolis against C. albicans, E. coli, and S. aureus was for DCM extract of Kalaleh propolis (13.33 mm), Morad Beyg propolis (12 mm), and Kalaleh (11.67 mm), respectively. Iranian propolis showed antimicrobial activities against C. albicans, E. coli, and S. aurous, perhaps due to the presence of flavonoids, phenolic acids, and terpenes as active components that can be used alone or in combination with the selected antibiotics to synergize antibiotic effect, as well as to prevent microbial resistance to available antimicrobial drugs.

  1. Chemical composition and pharmacological activities of Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilani, Md Nazmul Hasan; Sultana, Tamanna; Asabur Rahman, S M; Anisuzzman, Md; Islam, Md Amirul; Shilpi, Jamil A; Hossain, Md Golam

    2017-03-27

    Consumption of vegetables has been proven to be effective in the prevention of different diseases. Traditionally edible aerial part of Pisum sativum L. subsp. sativum (Fabaceae) is used to treat diabetes, heart diseases and as blood purifier. Present study was aimed to explore the traditional use of aerial parts of P. sativum as a source of antidiabetic agent. In addition, antioxidant activity and chemical composition was carried out. Total polyphenol content was spectrophotometrically determined using Folin Chiocalteu's reagent while the flavonoids by aluminum chloride colorimetric assay. Identification of compounds of the extract was made through HPLC and LCMS. Antihyperglycemic activity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance test in mice. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH free radical scavenging and reducing power assay. Total polyphenol and total flavonoids content were found to be 51.23 mg gallic acid equivalent and 30.88 mg quercetin equivalent per gram of dried plant extract respectively. Ellagic acid and p-coumeric acid were detected through HPLC. A total of eight compounds including naringenin, β-sitosterol were indentified through LCMS. In OGTT, extract (200 mg/kg bw) showed a 30.24% decrease (P< 0.05) in blood glucose levels at 30 min compared to the normal control. The extract showed IC50 value of 158.52 μg/mL in DPPH scavenging assay and also showed comparable reducing power. Along with other compounds ellagic acid and β-sitosterol present in the extract may be responsible for its antioxidant as well as antihyperglycemic activities. Altogether these results rationalize the use of this vegetable in traditional medicine.

  2. Chemical composition and antimicrobial evaluation of Achillea aucheri essential oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The majority of the Achillea spp. are used as medicinal plants with therapeutic applications worldwide. Achillea aucheri was selected in our study to assess its essential oil chemical composition along with antimicrobial evaluation. Methods: The essential oil of A. aucheri achieved through hydrodistillation, was analyzed via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Afterwards, the microbial growth inhibitory property of the A. aucheri essential oil was determined using the agar disk-diffusion method against five Gram-positive strains (Staphylococus aureus, Staphylococus epidermidis, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, three Gram-negative bacteria (Eschrichia coli, Psedumonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and a fungus (Candida albicans. Besides, minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the sensitive strains were determined by broth dilution method to evaluate the inhibitory properties.Results: The GC-MS analysis, allowed us to identify 28 compounds, representing 98.1% of the total essential oil. The main components of the oil were identified as α-thujone (45.6%, artemisia alcohol (26.5% and yomogi alcohol (8.8%. The findings of the antimicrobial assay indicated that S. aureus was the most sensitive strain with the strongest inhibition zone of 31.5 ± 0.5 and MIC of 2.5 % v/v, followed by S. epidermidis and M. luteus, respectively.Conclusion: Overall, A. aucheri essential oil possessed potential antibacterial and antioxidant activities that could be attributed to the high content of oxygenated monoterpenes present in the oil which requisite for further exploration of the compounds in charge, considering the growing statistics of bacterial resistance worldwide.

  3. Chemical composition of fruits of some important chestnut cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümran Ertürk

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, chemical compositions of the fruits of some important domestic chestnut types and cultivars were investigated. They contained (g/100g dry matter basis total carbohydrates 75.32 - 86.31, total sugar 10.32 - 22.79, invert sugar 0.08 - 1.25, starch 54.45 - 69.70, sucrose 8.86 - 21.28, ash 1.02 - 3.22, crude cellulose 3.58 - 5.96, total fat 0.49 - 2.01, total protein 4.88 - 10.87. Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, P, Na and K contents were (mg/100g 43 - 230, 70 - 160, 0.4 - 5.7, 0.7 - 5.5, 0.6 - 3.8, 1.8 - 9.1, 107 - 191, 6 - 41, 761 - 1271, respectively.Neste estudo, a composição química das frutas domésticas importadas tipo castanha e seus cultivares foram investigados. Seu conteúdo (base da matéria seca de g/100g com base em matéria seca carboidratos totais 75,32 - 86,31, açúcares total 10,32 - 22,79, açúcar invertido 0,08 - 1,25, amido 54,45 - 69,70, sacarose 8,86 - 21,28, cinzas 1,02 - 3,22, celulose bruta 3,58 - 5,96, gordura total 0,49 - 2,01 do total, proteína total 4,88 - 10,87. Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, P, Na e k índice foi (mg/100g 43 - 230, 70 - 160, 0,4 - 5,7, 0,7 - 5,5, 0,6 - 3,8, 1,8 - 9,1, 107 - 191, 6 - 41, 761 - 1271, respectivamente.

  4. Brazilian Propolis: Correlation between Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Salomão

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of ethanol extracts from samples of Brazilian propolis (EEPs determined by HPLC and their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Sporothrix schenckii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were determined. Based on the predominant botanical origin in the region of samples' collection, the 10 extracts were separated into three groups: A (B. dracunculifolia + Auraucaria spp, B (B. dracunculifolia and C (Araucaria spp. Analysis by the multiple regression of all the extracts together showed a positive correlation, higher concentrations leading to higher biological effect, of S. aureus with p-coumaric acid (PCUM and 3-(4-hydroxy-3-(oxo-butenyl-phenylacrylic acid (DHCA1 and of trypomastigotes of T. cruzi with 3,5-diprenyl-4-hydroxycinnamic acid derivative 4 (DHCA4 and 2,2-dimethyl-6-carboxyethenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (DCBEN. When the same approach was employed for each group, due to the small number of observations, the statistical test gave unreliable results. However, an overall analysis revealed for group A an association of S. aureus with caffeic acid (CAF and dicaffeoylquinic acid 3 (CAFQ3, of S. pneumoniae with CAFQ3 and monocaffeoylquinic acid 2 (CAFQ2 and of T. cruzi also with CAFQ3. For group B, a higher activity against S. pneumoniae was associated DCBEN and for T. cruzi with CAF. For group C no association was observed between the anitmicrobial effect and any component of the extracts. The present study reinforces the relevance of PCUM and derivatives, especially prenylated ones and also of caffeolyquinic acids, on the biological activity of Brazilian propolis.

  5. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of berry fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stajčić Slađana M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main chemical composition, contents of total phenolic (TPh, total flavonoid (TF, and total monomeric anthocyianin (TMA, as well as the antioxidant activity of two raspberry cultivars (Meeker and Willamette, two blackberry cultivars (Čačanska bestrna and Thornfree and wild bilberry were studied. The raspberry cultivars had the highest total solids among fruits investigated. Bilberry fruits had the highest sugar-to-acid ratio. Blackberry fruits were richer in crude fibers (cellulose in comparison to raspberry and bilberry fruits. The content of pectic substances was highest in the bilberry. Also, bilberry had a highest content of TPh (808.12 mg GAE/100 g FW, TF (716.31 mg RE/100 g FW and TMA (447.83 mg CGE/100 g FW. The antioxidant activity was evaluated spectrophotometrically, using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity assay. The DPPH free radical scavenging activity, expressed as the EC50 value (in mg of fresh weight of berry fruit per ml of the reaction mixture, of bilberry (0.3157 ± 0.0145 mg/ml was the highest. These results also showed that the antioxidant value of 100 g FW bilberry, raspberry - Willamette, raspberry - Meeker, blackberry - Čačanska bestrna and blackberry - Thornfree is equivalent to 576.50 mg, 282.74 mg, 191.58 mg, 222.28 mg and 272.01 mg of vitamin C, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between the antioxidant activities and content of total phenolics (RTPh 2=0.9627, flavonoids (RTF 2=0.9598 and anthocyanins (RTMA 2=0.9496 in berry fruits. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31044

  6. Effects of Deboning Methods on Chemical Composition and Some Properties of Beef and Turkey Meat

    OpenAIRE

    Meltem SERDAROĞLU; TURP, Gülen YILDIZ

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare some chemical and physical characteristics of mechanically deboned and hand deboned turkey meat and beef. Samples were analyzed for proximate composition, cholesterol, TBA, calcium and iron contents, hunter colour parameters and fatty acid composition. Deboning method affected chemical composition of beef and turkey meat. Mechanical deboning resulted higher cholesterol values and calcium and iron content. In hand deboned turkey meat the most abund...

  7. Estimation of Macronutrient Content in Kindergartens Meals: Food Composition Tables or Chemical Analysis?

    OpenAIRE

    Konstansa, Lazarevic; Dusica, Stojanovic; Dragan, Bogdanovic

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The nutrition of children in kindergartens has a great significance for proper growth and development of children. In order to save time and money, the control of macronutrients content is performed by calculations using food composition tables instead of performing a chemical analysis. Methods: We examined the macronutrients content of 240 whole day meals using food composition tables and performed chemical analysis of meals to determine adequacy and validity of food composition t...

  8. Effects of different water storage procedures on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically contrasted waters from the Amazon River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Daniel S; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo R

    2015-11-15

    Although recent studies have investigated the Fe isotopic composition of dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases from continental and oceanic natural waters, few efforts have been made to evaluate whether water sample storage and the separation of different pore-size fractions through filtration can cause any change to the Fe isotopic compositions. The present study investigates the possible biases introduced by different water storage conditions on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically different waters. Water samples were collected from an organic-rich river and from mineral particulate-rich rivers. Filtered and unfiltered water samples were stored either at room temperature or frozen at -18°C in order to assess possible biases due to (i) different water storage temperature, and (ii) storage of bulk (unfiltered) vs filtered water. Iron isotope measurements were performed by Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry with a Thermo Electron Neptune instrument, after Fe purification using anion-exchange resins. Our data reveal that bulk water storage at room temperature without filtration produces minor changes in the dissolved Fe isotopic composition of mineral particulate-rich waters, but significant isotopic composition changes in organic-rich waters. In both cases, however, the impact of the different procedures on the Fe concentrations was strong. On the other hand, the bulk water stored frozen without filtration produced more limited changes in the dissolved Fe concentrations, and also on isotopic compositions, relative to the samples filtered in the field. The largest effect was again observed for the organic-rich waters. These findings suggest that a time lag between water collection and filtration may cause isotopic exchanges between the dissolved and particulate Fe fractions. When it is not possible to filter the samples in the field immediately after collection, the less detrimental approach is to

  9. Polypropylene-modified kaolinite composites: Effect of chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanical properties of the composites exhibited important variations, the morphology of the composites was further studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and showed poor dispersion of used nanoclay in PP matrix. Keywords: polypropylene; composites; kaolinite; surface treatment; melt intercalation ...

  10. Bulk strain solitons as a tool for determination of the third order elastic moduli of composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, I. V.; Belashov, A. V.; Garbuzov, F. E.; Samsonov, A. M.; Semenov, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate an alternative approach to determination of the third order elastic moduli of materials based on registration of nonlinear bulk strain waves in three basic structural waveguides (rod, plate and shell) and further calculation of the Murnaghan moduli from the recorded wave parameters via simple algebra. These elastic moduli are available in literature for a limited number of materials and are measured with considerable errors, that evidences a demand in novel approaches to their determination.

  11. The tooth attachment mechanism defined by structure, chemical composition and mechanical properties of collagen fibers in the periodontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sunita P; Marshall, Sally J; Ryder, Mark I; Marshall, Grayson W

    2007-12-01

    In this study, a comparison between structure, chemical composition and mechanical properties of collagen fibers at three regions within a human periodontium, has enabled us to define a novel tooth attachment mechanism. The three regions include, (1) the enthesis region: insertion site of periodontal ligament (PDL) fibers (collagen fibers) into cementum at the root surface, (2) bulk cementum, and (3) the cementum-dentin junction (CDJ). Structurally, continuity in collagen fibers was observed from the enthesis, through bulk cementum and CDJ. At the CDJ the collagen fibers split into individual collagen fibrils and intermingled with the extracellular matrix of mantle dentin. Under wet conditions, the collagen fibers at the three regions exhibited significant swelling suggesting a composition rich in polyanionic molecules such as glycosaminoglycans. Additionally, site-specific indentation illustrated a comparable elastic modulus between collagen fibers at the enthesis (1-3 GPa) and the CDJ (2-4 GPa). However, the elastic modulus of collagen fibers within bulk cementum was higher (4-7 GPa) suggesting presence of extrafibrillar mineral. It is known that the tooth forms a fibrous joint with the alveolar bone, which is termed a gomphosis. Although narrower in width than the PDL space, the hygroscopic CDJ can also be termed as a gomphosis; a fibrous joint between cementum and root dentin capable of accommodating functional loads similar to that between cementum and alveolar bone. From an engineering perspective, it is proposed that a tooth contains two fibrous joints that accommodate the masticatory cyclic loads. These joints are defined by the attachment of dissimilar materials via graded stiffness interfaces, such as: (1) alveolar bone attached to cementum with the PDL; and (2) cementum to root dentin with the CDJ. Thus, through variations in concentrations of basic constituents, distinct regions with characteristic structures and graded properties allow for attachment

  12. The influence of chemical composition of milk on yield of semi-hard cheese

    OpenAIRE

    Bojanić-Rašović M.; Mirecki S.; Nikolić N.; Rašović R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of paper was to examine the impact of the milk quality on yield of semi-hard naturally dried cheese, produced in cheese plant factory ZZ 'Cijevna' in Podgorica. Tests were conducted on 6 samples of bulk milk of cows and 6 productive batch of cheese. Chemical tests of the bulk milk have been done on the device MilcoScan 4000, and the determination content dry matter of whey and dry matter of cheese on the device MilcoScan FT 120. Theoretical yield of cheese wa...

  13. Estimation of macronutrient content in kindergartens meals: food composition tables or chemical analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstansa, Lazarevic; Dusica, Stojanovic; Dragan, Bogdanovic

    2014-10-01

    The nutrition of children in kindergartens has a great significance for proper growth and development of children. In order to save time and money, the control of macronutrients content is performed by calculations using food composition tables instead of performing a chemical analysis. We examined the macronutrients content of 240 whole day meals using food composition tables and performed chemical analysis of meals to determine adequacy and validity of food composition tables in calculation of macronutrient contents in kindergarten meals. We established no correlation (P>0.05) between the value of proteins, fats and carbohydrates. Significant difference was established between the average content of proteins (t=2.57; P0.05) (food composition tables vs chemical analysis). Until we establish new food composition tables, chemical analysis remains the only valid method for assessment of macronutrients content and energy value of a meal in kindergarten.

  14. Effect of chemical treatments on the chemical composition and properties of flax fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Biljana D.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flax fibers were modified with NaOH and NaClO2 under different conditions in order to clarify effects of hemicelluloses and lignin removal on the morphology and properties of flax fibers, but also to improve fiber quality. The quality of flax fibers was characterized in terms of chemical composition, fineness, whiteness, mechanical and sorption properties. Both treatments, alkali treatment leading to hemicelluloses removal (up to 72 % of hemicelluloses removed and chlorite treatment leading to lignin removal (up to 96 % of lignin removed, induce a modification of morphology and properties of flax fibers. For 5 % NaOH treatments, as well as all NaClO2 treatments, increase in the crystallinity was observed, while for higher NaOH concentrations, the mercerization phenomenon induces a slight decrease of the crystallinity. Modification with NaClO2 results in fiber fibrillation while modification with NaOH at boiling temperature results in smoother fiber surfaces. Both treatments cause decrease in tensile strength and water retention values, with maximal decrease obtained for NaOH treatment at boiling temperature. Chlorite treatment results in finer fibers having a higher whiteness index compare to alkali modified fibers. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 172029

  15. Unveiling the structure and composition of titanium oxide nanotubes through ion exchange chemical reactions and thermal decomposition processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Odair P.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the ion exchange reactions and the thermal decomposition of titanium oxide nanotubes, obtained by hydrothermal treatment of TiO2 and NaOH. Based on these results we propose a new composition for the as-prepared nanotubes as Na2Ti3O7.nH2O. Our results also suggest that nanotube walls have structure similar to those observed in the layer of the bulk Na2Ti3O7. Depending on how the washing process is performed on the nanotubes (water or acid solutions the Na+ content can be modified via the exchange reaction of Na+ by H+. Thus, a general chemical formula was also proposed: Na2-xHxTi3O7 .nH2O (0 < x < 2, x being dependent on the washing process.

  16. Effect of short-term versus long-term grassland management and seasonal variation in organic and conventional dairy farming on the composition of bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Govasmark, E

    2013-01-01

    Bulk tank milk from 28 dairy farms was sampled every second month for 2 yr to assess the effects of grassland management, production system and season on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins, Se, and milk sensory quality. Grassland management varied in terms...... of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long...... feeding periods had potential health benefits due to FA composition. In contrast, the higher milk-fat proportions of saturated FA in milk from ORG farms may be perceived as negative for human health....

  17. Influence of the N:P supply ratio on biomass productivity and time-resolved changes in elemental and bulk biochemical composition of Nannochloropsis sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayers, Joshua J; Flynn, Kevin J; Shields, Robin J

    2014-10-01

    This work reports for the first time the detailed impacts of dual nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) stress on growth dynamics and biochemical composition in the Eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis sp. P-stress concurrent with N-stress had subtle effects on culture bulk biochemical composition, but negatively influenced biomass productivity. However, the N:P supply ratio can be raised to at least 32:1 without compromising productivity (yielding a maximum lipid content of 52% of dry weight and volumetric lipid concentration of 233 mg L(-1)). The maximum biomass and lipid yields per unit of cell-P were 1.2 kg DW (gP)(-1) and 0.54 kg lipid (gP)(-1). The P concentration of many common media is thus in surplus for optimal Nannochloropsis sp. biomass and lipid production, offering potential for significant savings in P usage and improving the sustainability of algal cultivation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Quality evaluation of Gualou Guizhi decoction based on chemical compositions and biological effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huang; Qiao, Li-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Xu, Wen; Xu, Wei; Chu, Ke-Dan; Lin, Yu

    2017-05-01

    The paper was aimed to establish a quality evaluation model for Gualou Guizhi decoction based on the chemical compositions and biological effects. Ultra high performance liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer was used to analyze and determine 24 kinds of chemical compositions in Gualou Guizhi decoction, and then, biological activity effect was quantitatively assessed in a zebrafish neuronal injury model which was induced by mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). As a result, the established method for quality evaluation of Gualou Guizhi decoction based on the chemical compositions and biological effects is feasible, stable and reliable, which can provide reference for quality control of compound Chinese medicines. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  19. Evaluation of characteristics on the bulk heterojunction solar cells prepared by PCDTBT: PC71BM composite thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masakazu; Santhakumar, Kannappan; Kumar, Palanisamy; Kojima, Kenzo; Shin, Paik-Kyun; Ochiai, Shizuyasu

    2012-09-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on blends comprising conjugated polymers and fullerene acceptors are the subject of considerable investigation because of their potential to enable the fabrication of low-cost devices that convert sunlight into electricity. Recently, poly(2,7-carbazole) derivatives have gained momentum as a class of promising alternative materials to poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in organic solar cell applications. Among them, poly[N-900-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(40,70-di-2-thienyl-20,10,30-benzo thiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) has a relatively deeper highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 5.45 eV compared to the HOMO of 5.1 eV of the P3HT. In this work we systematically study the effect of donor and acceptor ratio on the device performance of bulk heterojunction solar cells made with blends of PCDTBT and PC71BM. We used PEDOT: PSS as a hole transport layer, and TiOX as a hole-blocking layer in order to improve the power conversion efficiency. The current density-voltage (JV) characteristics of photovoltaic cells were measured under the illumination of simulated solar light with 100 mW/cm2 (AM 1.5G) by an Oriel 1000 W solar simulator. The power conversion efficiency of the solar cell is more than 5%.

  20. Chemical composition of Annona senegalensis from Nupe land ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-28

    Jun 28, 2010 ... The proximate, mineral composition, amino acids content and phytochemical screening of Anona senegalensis seed vegetable collected from different farm site in Bida town, Niger State, Nigeria, were carried out using standard methods of food analysis. The results of the proximate composition show.

  1. RESEARCH REGARDING THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AT VINEGAR TYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviu Giurgiulescu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article are presented some physico-chemical applied vinegar, to see some chemical properties of vinegar suchas total acidity, volatile and fixed, by colorimetric determination of iron content in the vinegar, the extract andresidue determination dry.

  2. Prediction of chemical composition of South African Medicago sativa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict chemical and digestibility parameters was investigated. Samples (n = 168) representing the spectral characteristics of the South African. Medicago sativa L. hay population were chemically analysed for the development of calibration equations. Values for r² and ...

  3. Inorganic-organic hybrid polyoxometalate containing supramolecular helical chains: Preparation, characterization and application in chemically bulk-modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han Zhangang [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin, 130024 (China); Zhao Yulong [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin, 130024 (China); Peng Jun [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin, 130024 (China)]. E-mail: jpeng@nenu.edu.cn; Liu Qun [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin, 130024 (China); Wang Enbo [Faculty of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun, Jilin, 130024 (China)

    2005-10-10

    An inorganic-organic hybrid polyoxometalate (POM) (Hbpy){sub 4}[SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}] (1) (bpy = 2,4-bipyridine), has been prepared and characterized. X-ray diffraction study reveals that compound 1 contains interesting organic double helical chains. The hybrid nanoparticles was used as a solid bulkmodifier to fabricate a three-dimensional chemically modified carbon paste electrode (1-CPE) by direct mixing. The electrochemical behavior and electrocatalysis of 1-CPE has been studied in detail. The results indicate that 1-CPE has a good electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of nitrite in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} aqueous solution. 1-CPE shows remarkable stability that can be ascribed to the interactions existed between POM anions and organic double helical bpy chains, which are very important for practical applications in electrode modification.

  4. Chemical composition of nanomodified composite binder with nano- and microsized barium silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOROLEV Evgenij Valerjevich

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available There are several possibilities to improve cement-based binders. In particular, many properties of cement stone can be enhanced by means of micro- and nanoscale modification. In a number of previous works we had shown that application of barium hydrosilicates leads to such improvement. The present article is devoted to the investigation of the chemical composition of the cement stone which is modified by means of addition of barium hydrosilicates. The modification was performed on different scales: micro- and nanoscale; the results of simultaneous multi-scale modification are also presented. The examination was carried out with help of different modern research techniques – FT IR spectroscopy, differential thermal analysis and X-ray phase analysis. Identification of the new phases and comparative quantitative assessment of their content are performed. It is found that the use of nano- and micro-sized barium hydrosilicates as additives leads to reduction of portlandite by 27...28%; by means of multi-scale modification it is possible to reduce the content of portlandite much more (by 83.3%. Due to addition of nano- and micro-sized barium-based modifiers both the amount of calcium hydrosilicates in reaction products is enlarged, and structure of the mentioned hydrosilicates is changed (the formation of a fine-grained structure of hydration products takes place. Micro-sized barium hydrosilicates are chemically active additives and promote the formation of an additional quantity of calcium hydrosilicates of type CSH (I. The use of nanoscale barium hydrosilicates promotes the formation of CSH (I and CSH (II calcium hydrosilicates, and also both riversidite and xonotlite. As a result of simultaneous application of nano- and micro-sized barium hydrosilicates the content of CSH (II increases. This can be confirmed by means of differential thermal and X-ray analysis. The amount of CSH (I, riversidite and various tobermorites is also increases. It is

  5. Near-oscillatory relaxation behavior of levitation force in infiltration and growth processed bulk YBCO/Ag superconducting composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, R.; Lakshmi, M. M.; Seshubai, V.

    2011-07-01

    Time relaxation behavior of levitation force has been studied in IGP bulk YBCO/Ag superconductor using levitation force measurements as these measurements throw light on the magnetic relaxation in superconductors and the underlying vortex dynamics, pinning mechanisms and the nature of pinning forces. The measurements have revealed a hitherto unknown near-oscillatory relaxation of the levitation force with varying magnetic field. This kind of behavior is found to be more pronounced at smaller gap distances between the permanent magnet and the superconductor. A switch-type polarity bistable equilibrium model for the supercurrent structure has been proposed based on the understanding that even the permanent magnet gets magnetized in the presence of the superconductor, which has also been verified and reported here. This model satisfactorily explains the observed oscillatory behavior of relaxation rates.

  6. Atmospheric aerosol over Vermont: chemical composition and sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissar, A V; Hopke, P K; Poirot, R L

    2001-12-01

    Aerosol chemical composition data for PM2.5 samples collected during the period from 1988 to 1995 at Underhill, VT, were analyzed. Sulfur and black carbon mass concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 6.5 microg m(-3) and from 0.05 to 2.2 microg m(-3), respectively, while the total fine aerosol mass concentration ranged from 0.2 to 51.1 microg m(-3). Seasonal variations with maxima during the summer and minima in winter/spring were observed for sulfur and the fine mass concentrations. No annual pattern was observed for black carbon. Seasonal variations for most of the other anthropogenic species had maxima in winter and spring and minima in the summer. A factor analysis method, positive matrix factorization (PMF), utilizing error estimates of the data to provide optimum data point scaling was used to obtain information about possible sources of the aerosol. An 11-factor solution was obtained. The six sources representing wood burning, coal and oil combustion, coal combustion emissions plus photochemical sulfate production, metal production plus municipal waste incineration, and emissions from motor vehicles were identified. Emissions from smelting of nonferrous metal ores, arsenic smelting, and soil particles and particles with high concentrations of Na were also identified by PMF. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis combines the aerosol data with the air parcel backward trajectories. PSCF was applied to identify possible source areas and pathways that give rise to the observed high particulate mass concentrations from these 11 sources. The CAPITA Monte Carlo trajectory model was used to obtain 10 sets of 5-day air parcel back trajectories arriving every 2 h for the 7-yr period from 1988 to 1995. The PSCF plot for the black carbon factor shows high probabilities in the area surrounding the sampling site, indicating a strong local influence from residential wood combustion in northern New England and southwestern Quebec. Similar large potential source

  7. Particle size distribution and physico-chemical composition of clay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Chemically and Thermally Stable High Energy Density Silicone Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal energy storage systems with 300 ? 1000 kJ/kg energy density through either phase changes or chemical heat absorption are sought by NASA. This proposed effort...

  9. PASTA ADDED WITH CHICKPEA FLOUR: CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, IN VITRO STARCH DIGESTIBILITY AND PREDICTED GLYCEMIC INDEX

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osorio-Díaz, P; Agama-Acevedo, E; Mendoza-Vinalay, M; Tovar, J; Bello-Pérez, L. A

    2008-01-01

    Pasta was prepared with of durum wheat flour mixed with chickpea flour at two different levels and its chemical composition, in vitro starch digestibility and predicted glycemic index were assessed...

  10. Variation in size, morphology and chemical composition of polymetallic nodules from the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Karisiddaiah, S.M.; Parthiban, G.

    Chemical composition of 613 polymetallic nodules from 150 stations in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) are determined and variations in Mn, Fe, Cu, Ni, Co, Zn and moisture content are studied with respect to their size and surface texture...

  11. Collocated observations of cloud condensation nuclei, particle size distributions, and chemical composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmale, J.; Henning, S.; Henzing, B.; Keskinen, H.; Sellegri, K.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Bougiatioti, A.; Kalivitis, N.; Stavroulas, I.; Jefferson, A.; Park, M.; Schlag, P.; Kristensson, A.; Iwamoto, Y.; Pringle, K.; Reddington, C.; Aalto, P.; Äijälä, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Bialek, J.; Birmili, W.; Bukowiecki, N.; Ehn, M.; Fjæraa, A.M.; Fiebig, M.; Frank, G.; Fröhlich, R.; Frumau, A.; Furuya, M.; Hammer, E.; Heikkinen, L.; Herrmann, E.; Holzinger, R.; Hyono, H.; Kanakidou, M.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kinouchi, K.; Kos, G.; Kulmala, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Motos, G.; Nenes, A.; O'Dowd, C.; Paramonov, M.; Petäjä, T.; Picard, D.; Poulain, L.; Prévôt, A.S.H.; Slowik, J.; Sonntag, A.; Swietlicki, E.; Svenningsson, B.; Tsurumaru, H.; Wiedensohler, A.; Wittbom, C.; Ogren, J.A.; Matsuki, A.; Yum, S.S.; Myhre, C.L.; Carslaw, K.; Stratmann, F.; Gysel, M.

    2017-01-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations alongside with submicrometer particle number size distributions and particle chemical composition have been measured at atmospheric observatories of the Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure (ACTRIS) as well as other

  12. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils against human pathogenic bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sokovic, M.; Marin, P.D.; Brkic, D.; Griensven, van L.J.L.D.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from 10 aromatic plants Matricaria chamommilla, Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Lavandula angustifolia, Ocimum basilicum, Thymus vulgaris, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis, Citrus limon and C. aurantium have been determined.

  13. Chemical composition and properties of ashes from combustion plants using Miscanthus as fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerstorfer, Christof

    2017-04-01

    Miscanthus giganteus is one of the energy crops considered to show potential for a substantial contribution to sustainable energy production. In the literature there is little data available about the chemical composition of ashes from the combustion of Miscanthus and practically no data about their physical properties. However, for handling, treatment and utilization of the ashes this information is important. In this study ashes from two biomass combustion plants using Miscanthus as fuel were investigated. The density of the ashes was 2230±35kg/m(3), which was similar to the density of ashes from straw combustion. Also the bulk densities were close to those reported for straw ashes. The flowability of the ashes was a little worse than the flowability of ashes from wood combustion. The measured heavy metal concentrations were below the usual limits for utilization of the ashes as soil conditioner. The concentrations in the bottom ash were similar to those reported for ash from forest residue combustion plants. In comparison with cyclone fly ashes from forest residue combustion the measured heavy metal concentrations in the cyclone fly ash were considerably lower. Cl(-), S and Zn were enriched in the cyclone fly ash which is also known for ashes from wood combustion. In comparison with literature data obtained from Miscanthus plant material the concentrations of K, Cl(-) and S were lower. This can be attributed to the fact that the finest fly ash is not collected by the cyclone de-dusting system of the Miscanthus combustion plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Filter measurements of chemical composition during the airborne Antarctic ozone experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandrud, B. W.; Sperry, P. D.; Sanford, L.

    1988-01-01

    During the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment campaign, a filter sampler was flown to measure the bulk composition of aerosol and gas phases. The background sulfate aerosol was measured in regions inside and outside of the chemically perturbed region (CPR) of the polar vortex. The mass ratio of sulfate outside to inside was 2.8. This is indicative of a cleansing mechanism effecting the CPR or of a different air mass inside versus outside. The absolute value of the sulfate mixing ratio shows that the background aerosol has not been influenced by recent volcanic eruptions. The sulfate measured on the ferry flight returning to NASA Ames shows a decrease towards the equator with increasing concentrations in the northern hemisphere. Nitrate in the aerosol phase was observed on two flights. The largest amount of nitrate measured in the aerosol was 44 percent of the total amount of nitrate observed. Other samples on the same flights show no nitrate in the aerosol phase. The presence of nitrate in the aerosol is correlated with the coldest temperatures observed on a given flight. Total nitrate (aerosol plus acidic vapor nitrate) concentrations were observed to increase at flight altitude with increasing latitude north and south of the equator. Total nitrate was lower inside the CPR than outside. Chloride and flouride were not detected in the aerosol phase. From the concentrations of acidic chloride vapor, the ratio of acidic vapor Cl to acidic vapor F and a summing of the individual chloride containing species to yield a total chloride concentration, there is a suggestion that some of the air sampled was dechlorinated. Acidic vapor phase fluoride was observed to increase at flight altitude with increasing latitude both north and south of the equator. The acidic vapor phase fluoride was the only compound measured with the filter technique that exhibited larger concentrations inside the CPR than outside.

  15. Computation of air chemical equilibrium composition until 30000K - Part I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Rocha Pimentel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm was developed to obtain the air chemical equilibrium composition. The air was considered to be composed of 79% N2 and 21% O2, and the models are 5 chemical species, N2, O2, NO, N, O, NO+, e-, respectively. The air chemical equilibrium composition is obtained through the equilibrium constants method and it was used the Absolute Newton method for convergence.The algorithm can be coupled as a subroutine into a Computational Fluid Dynamics code, given the flow field over an atmosphere reentry vehicle where, due to high velocities, dissociative chemical reactions and air ionization can occur. This work presents results of air chemical equilibrium composition for pressures of 1, 5, 10, 50 and 100 atm in a temperature range from 300 to 30000K.

  16. Differential effects of conifer and broadleaf litter inputs on soil organic carbon chemical composition through altered soil microbial community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Shi-Rong; Wang, Jing-Xin; Shi, Zuo-Min; Xu, Jia; Hong, Pi-Zheng; Ming, An-Gang; Yu, Hao-Long; Chen, Lin; Lu, Li-Hua; Cai, Dao-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    A strategic selection of tree species will shift the type and quality of litter input, and subsequently magnitude and composition of the soil organic carbon (SOC) through soil microbial community. We conducted a manipulative experiment in randomized block design with leaf litter inputs of four native subtropical tree species in a Pinus massoniana plantation in southern China and found that the chemical composition of SOC did not differ significantly among treatments until after 28 months of the experiment. Contrasting leaf litter inputs had significant impacts on the amounts of total microbial, Gram-positive bacterial, and actinomycic PLFAs, but not on the amounts of total bacterial, Gram-negative bacterial, and fungal PLFAs. There were significant differences in alkyl/O-alkyl C in soils among the leaf litter input treatments, but no apparent differences in the proportions of chemical compositions (alkyl, O-alkyl, aromatic, and carbonyl C) in SOC. Soil alkyl/O-alkyl C was significantly related to the amounts of total microbial, and Gram-positive bacterial PLFAs, but not to the chemical compositions of leaf litter. Our findings suggest that changes in forest leaf litter inputs could result in changes in chemical stability of SOC through the altered microbial community composition.

  17. Surge-Resistant Nanocomposite Enameled Wire Using Silica Nanoparticles with Binary Chemical Compositions on the Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Jeseung Yoo; Yongbeom Kim; Suyong Kwon; Joohyun Lee; Young-Soo Seo

    2015-01-01

    We developed polyesterimide (PEI) nanocomposite enameled wires using surface-modified silica nanoparticles with binary chemical compositions on the surface. The modification was done using silanes assisted by ultrasound, which facilitated high density modification. Two different trimethoxysilanes were chosen for the modification on the basis of resemblance of chemical compositions on the silica surface to PEI varnish. The surface-modified silica was well dispersed in PEI varnish, which was co...

  18. Microflora and chemical composition of dental plaque from subjects with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoover, C I; Newbrun, E; Mettraux, G; Graf, H

    1980-01-01

    We compared the microbiological and chemical composition of dental plaque from subjects with hereditary fructose intolerance who restrict their dietary sugar intake with that of control subjects who do not. The two groups showed no significant differences in chemical composition of plaque: the mean protein, carbohydrate, calcium, magnesium, and phosphate contents were similar. Dental plaque from both groups contained similar numbers of total colony-forming units per microgram of plaque protei...

  19. Electrical performance and chemical composition studies on original and falsified Ni-MH batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Urbano; Jair Scarminio; Carlos Roberto Appoloni; Ricardo Floriano; Fábio Luiz Melquíades; Adenílson de Oliveira dos Santos; Paulo Rogério Catarini da Silva; Fábio Lopes; Rafael Bonacin de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    We show in this paper that falsifications on technological products have hit even rechargeable nickel metal hydride batteries (Ni-MH). The electrical performance and the electrode chemical composition were investigated for authentic and falsified AAA Ni-MH batteries, purchased in the Londrina market, Paraná State. Battery charge capacities were measured at 0,2 C discharge rate and average electrical power was measured at 0.2 and 0.8 C discharge rate. To perform chemical composition analysis, ...

  20. Chemical composition and amino acid profile of differently processed feather meal

    OpenAIRE

    Adejumo Oluseun Isaac; Adetunji Oluwaseun Charles; Ogundipe Kunle; Osademe Ndudi Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Feather wastes represent potential alternative ingredients for animal feedstuffs which can ameliorate the protein shortage for food and feed. Previous attempts to provide information about the nutrient composition of feather meal are either too complicated for rural livestock farmers in developing countries or they provided incomplete information on chemical composition. Washed feathers were subjected to different processing techniques such as pre-soaking i...

  1. Milk production and chemical composition of milk of Ukrainian mountain Carpathian sheep in pasture period

    OpenAIRE

    CHOKAN T.

    2011-01-01

    The comparative analysis of the milk chemical composition depending on milk productivity of Ukrainian Mountain Carpathian sheep during the pasture period were studied. It was found changes of milk composition (increasing of protein content, fat, dry matter and nutritive value) with a decrease of milk yield in the end period of lactation.

  2. The chemical composition of the low-mass Galactic globular cluster NGC 6362

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massari, D.; Mucciarelli, A.; Dalessandro, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Cassisi, S.; Fiorentino, G.; Ibata, R. A.; Lardo, C.; Salaris, M.

    We present chemical abundances for 17 elements in a sample of 11 red giant branch stars in NGC 6362 from UVES spectra. NGC 6362 is one of the least massive globulars where multiple populations have been detected, yet its detailed chemical composition has not been investigated so far. NGC 6362 turns

  3. Chemical erosion of different carbon composites under ITER-relevant plasma conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Borodin, D.; Al, R.S.; Brezinsek, S.; Hoen, Mhjt; Kirschner, A.; Lisgo, S.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Philipps, V.; van de Pol, M.J.; Shumack, A. E.; De Temmerman, G.; Vijvers, W. A. J.; Wright, G. M.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Rapp, J.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the chemical erosion of different carbon composites in Pilot-PSI at ITER-relevant hydrogen plasma fluxes (similar to 10(24) m(-2) s(-1)) and low electron temperatures (T-e similar to 1 eV). Optical emission spectroscopy on the CH A-X band was used to characterize the chemical

  4. Chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles over the Aegean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezantakos, S.; Barmpounis, K.; Giamarelou, M.; Bossioli, E.; Tombrou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Kalogiros, J.; Allan, J.D.; Bacak, A.; Percival, C.J.; Coe, H.; Biskos, G.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition and water uptake characteristics of sub-micrometre atmospheric particles over the region of the Aegean Sea were measured between 25 August and 11 September 2011 within the framework of the Aegean-Game campaign. High temporal-resolution measurements of the chemical

  5. The effect of plant age on the chemical composition of fresh and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the second study the chemical composition of whole leaves from young, bud and mature micro-ensilaged (3.5 kg as fed) Agave was determined over a 36 weeks fermentation period. Agave silage had acceptable chemical characteristics. As time of fermentation increased, a linear decrease in DM and saponin ...

  6. Biological resistance of polyethylene composites made with chemically modified fiber or flour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Craig M. Clemons

    2002-01-01

    The role of moisture in the biological decay of wood-plastic composites was investigated. Southern pine wood fiber and ponderosa pine wood flour were chemically modified using either acetic anhydride (AA), butylene oxide (BO), or propylene oxide (PO). A 50:50 mixture of high density polyethylene and either chemically modified fiber or flour, or untreated fiber or flour...

  7. High-precision Mg isotope measurements of terrestrial and extraterrestrial material by HR-MC-ICPMS—implications for the relative and absolute Mg isotope composition of the bulk silicate Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Paton, Chad; Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn

    2011-01-01

    We report novel methods for the chemical purification of Mg from silicate rocks by ion-exchange chromatography, and high-precision analysis of Mg-isotopes by high-resolution multiple collector inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (HR-MC-ICPMS). Using these methods, we have measured...... the data obtained by the relative and absolute methods, we propose that these new values represent the absolute Mg-isotope composition of the bulk inner solar system. Using the absolute Mg-isotope composition of the J12 olivine, we calculate the isotopic abundances of Mg as 24Mg 1/4 0.789548 ¿ 0.000026, 25......Mg 1/4 0.100190 ¿ 0.000018, and 26Mg 1/4 0.110261 ¿ 0.000023. Based on this result, we have calculated an atomic weight for Mg of 24.305565 ¿ 0.000045, which is marginally heavier than previous estimates but a factor of 10 more precise....

  8. Recent Advances in the Chemical Composition of Propolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Huang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a honeybee product with broad clinical applications. Current literature describes that propolis is collected from plant resins. From a systematic database search, 241 compounds were identified in propolis for the first time between 2000 and 2012; and they belong to such diverse chemical classes as flavonoids, phenylpropanoids, terpenenes, stilbenes, lignans, coumarins, and their prenylated derivatives, showing a pattern consistent with around 300 previously reported compounds. The chemical characteristics of propolis are linked to the diversity of geographical location, plant sources and bee species.

  9. Near-oscillatory relaxation behavior of levitation force in infiltration and growth processed bulk YBCO/Ag superconducting composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthasarathy, R.; Lakshmi, M.M. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India); Seshubai, V., E-mail: drseshubai@yahoo.co.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Magnetic relaxation of superconductor using levitation force measurements. Observed oscillatory behavior of relaxation rate. Bistable equilibrium theory and model proposed for the current structure in the superconductor. Experimental verification of magnetization of permanent magnet by the superconductor. Time relaxation behavior of levitation force has been studied in IGP bulk YBCO/Ag superconductor using levitation force measurements as these measurements throw light on the magnetic relaxation in superconductors and the underlying vortex dynamics, pinning mechanisms and the nature of pinning forces. The measurements have revealed a hitherto unknown near-oscillatory relaxation of the levitation force with varying magnetic field. This kind of behavior is found to be more pronounced at smaller gap distances between the permanent magnet and the superconductor. A switch-type polarity bistable equilibrium model for the supercurrent structure has been proposed based on the understanding that even the permanent magnet gets magnetized in the presence of the superconductor, which has also been verified and reported here. This model satisfactorily explains the observed oscillatory behavior of relaxation rates.

  10. Chemical composition of clays as indicator of the raw material sources

    OpenAIRE

    Khramchenkova Rezida Kh.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents the results of study on the chemical composition of unglazed pottery from the excavations of the Bulgar fortified settlement site and the clay, selected from the modern deposits of ceramic raw materials located near the medieval settlement sites. Significant differences in macro- and microelement composition of different groups of ceramics have been revealed. The difference in the macroelemental composition is largely determined by the ceramic fabric recipe. Thus, the high ...

  11. Chemical composition of the essential oil of Commiphora erythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotullio, Maria Carla; Santi, Claudio; Mwankie, Gildas Norbert Oball-Mond; Curini, Massimo

    2009-12-01

    The essential oil composition of Commiphora erythraea (Ehrenb) Engl. is reported for the first time. The oil is rich in sesquiterpenes, particularly furanosesquiterpenes (50.3%). GC-MS analysis of the oil permitted differentiation between C. erythraea and C. kataf, two often confused species.

  12. Chemical and sulphur isotope compositions of pyrite in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 120; Issue 3 ... Pyrite; minor element; sulphur isotope; evolution; Jaduguda; Singhbhum; India. ... By integrating minor element and sulphur isotope compositions of pyrite in conjunction with other published data on the Jaduguda deposit, it is proposed that reduced ...

  13. Chemical composition of essential oil of exudates of Dryobalanops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Su J, Chen L, Li B, Li L. Extraction and Composition. Analysis of Volatile Components in Leaves of. Cinnamomun burmannii B1. J Food Science 2010; 31: 399-401. 11. Buchbauer G, Jager W, Jirovetz L, Meyer F, Dietrich H. Effects of valerian root oil, borneol, isoborneol, bornyl acetate and isobornyl acetate on the motility of.

  14. Chemical composition and palaeobotanical origin of Miocene resins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The terpenoid composition of resins from the Miocene lignite horizons from the Kerala –Konkan Coast,western India was analyzed by Curie-point pyrolysis –gas chromatography –mass spectrometry (Cupy –GC –MS).The major pyrolysates were cadalene-based bicyclic sesquiterpenoids including some C30-C31 ...

  15. The chemical composition of tertiary Indian coal ash and its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The regression analysis of high temperature ash (HTA) composition and initial deformation temperature (IDT) show a definite increasing or decreasing trend, which has been used to determine the predictive indices for slagging, fouling, and abrasion propensities during combustion practices. The increase or decrease of IDT ...

  16. physical and chemical composition of storage-ripened papaya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    The proximate composition (ash, titratable acidity, crude fat, crude fibre, moisture and sugars), soluble solids ... during room temperature storage. ... in the stomach. Papaya is known for its fine and natural laxative virtue which aids digestion. Papaya fruits are rich in enzymes called papain and chymopapain that break.

  17. Physio-chemical, mineral composition and antioxidant properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dried roselle calyces at a ratio of 1:10 (dried roselle calyces: water) were extracted at 50oC for 30 minutes. The roselle extracts were blended at various proportions of fruit (mango, papaya and guava) juices. Physiochemical, mineral composition and antioxidant properties were evaluated in all the roselle fruit juice blends ...

  18. Composition and chemical variability of Corsican Pinus halepensis cone oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Anne-Marie; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix; Bighelli, Ange

    2014-09-01

    The composition of the essential oil isolated from cones of Pinus halepensis grown in Corsica has been investigated by a combination of chromatographic (CC, GC) and spectroscopic (MS, 13C NMR) techniques. In total, 48 compounds that accounted for 95.5% of the whole composition have been identified. α-Pinene (47.5%) was the major component followed by myrcene (11.0%), (E)-β-caryophyllene (8.3%) and caryophyllene oxide (5.9%). Various diterpenes have been identified by 13C NMR in the fractions of CC. Fifteen oil samples isolated from cones harvested in three forests have been analyzed and two groups of similar importance have been differentiated within the 15 compositions. Oil samples of the first group contained α-pinene (mean 45.0 g/100 g, SD = 5.5) as the major component. The composition of samples of the second group was dominated by myrcene (mean 30.3 g/100g, SD = 9.0) and α-pinene (mean 24.6 g/100 g, SD = 3.1).

  19. Morphology and chemical composition of Tunisian caper seeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caper, as a spontaneous plant, has a large natural distribution in the Mediterranean Sea basin. It is an interesting crop with an economic importance; especially the species Capparis spinosa. The morphology of seeds and their composition in lipid and protein were studied in 15 wild Tunisian caper populations: 9 ...

  20. Chemical composition of essential oil of Psidium cattleianum var ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the essential oil composition of Psidium cattleianum var. lucidum from South Africa. The essential oils were extracted by ... The presence of many terpenic and ester compounds is thought to contribute to the unique flavor of the P. cattleianum var. lucidum leaves. Keywords: Psidium ...

  1. Chemical composition, cytotoxic activity and antimicrobial activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrodistillation of berries and leaves of Juniperus phoenicea grown in Sinai yielded volatile oils in the yield of 0.36 and 1.96%, respectively. Using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique, fifty eight compounds were identified in berry oil representing 99.2% of the oil composition. α-Pinene was the major

  2. The chemical composition, energy and amino acid digestibility of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of the AA's ranged from 72.8 to 81.0%, with methionine having the highest digestibility and lysine the lowest. Cowpeas appear to be suitable for use in poultry feeds, their composition being equivalent to plant protein sources such as lupins and field peas, but lower in most nutrients compared with soybeans and canola.

  3. chemical composition and nutritive. significance of the land crab

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that ash was the highest with a value of 42.23i0.02% while protein, moisture, fat, fibre and ... values. C. armatum is a rich source of animal nutrients and it could therefore be used in human diets and animal feeds formulations. Key words: Proximate composition, ..... Akubor, P. I. and Chukwu, J. K. (1999).

  4. Volume 10 No. 2 February 2010 2124 CHEMICAL COMPOSITION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-02

    Feb 2, 2010 ... Volume 10 No. 2. February 2010. 2125. ABSTRACT. Proximate composition, mineral and vitamin contents of Syzygium malaccensis (red) and Eugenia owariensis (green) apples obtained from Calabar, Nigeria were determined. Musts of the two apple species were fermented for six days into wines.

  5. Chemical and essential amino acid composition of South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-05-05

    May 5, 1997 ... Since there is no information regarding the essential amino acid requirements of these ani- mals, further research is required. To determine the amino acid composition of the carcass, at least half the carcass has to be milled, thoroughly mixed and a representative sample taken for analysis (MacRae er al.,.

  6. Effect of chemical composition and alumina content on structure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the present work, six electrical porcelain compositions with different amount of alumina and silica have been prepared and fired in an industrial furnace at 1300 ◦C. Density, porosity, bending strength and electrical strength were measured in the samples. In order to find a relationship between properties and ...

  7. Chemical composition and nutritive value of South African sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mabelebele, Monnye

    2015-07-20

    Jul 20, 2015 ... sorghum varieties should be evaluated for their suitability as food and feed. The physical characteristics and proximate composition, total phenolic content, mineral content, amino acid profile and digestibility, and true metabolizable energy of four sorghum varieties were studied. The condensed tannin ...

  8. Chemical Composition and Biological Properties of Essential Oils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To analyze the composition of essential oils of two types of mint as well as compare the antimicrobial, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the two oils. Methods: Peppermint (M. piperita L.) and chocolate mint (M. piperita L.) oils were obtained by steam distillation in a Clevenger-type apparatus.

  9. Relationships of chemical composition, quantity of milt to fertility and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biochemical composition of milt and the effect of its varying quantity on fertility and hatchability of Clarias gariepinus (African catfish) eggs were investigated. The study aimed at determining the right quantity of milt that can be used to fertilize certain quantity of eggs. The study further examined the effect of varying ...

  10. Chemical Compositions of Soils in Parts of Edo State, Southwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    Clay mineral composition and such physical characteristics as particle size distribution, organic matter content and geologic history also influence their agricultural productivity and engineering performance. (Onyeobi, et al 2013). In agricultural terms, this is because the soil's capacity for ion – exchange, water retention and ...

  11. Chemical composition of acid precipitation in central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hal B. H., Jr. Cooper; Jerry M. Demo; Jose A. Lopez

    1976-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine factors affecting composition of acidic precipitation formation in the Austin area of Central Texas. The study was initiated to determine background levels of acid and alkalinity producing constituents in an area with elevated natural dust levels from nearby limestone rock formations. Results showed normal rainfall pH values of 6.5...

  12. Chemical and nutrient composition of tomato varieties grown in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1997-09-06

    Sep 6, 1997 ... esculantum) grown in ligarulll. Bush, Money-maker, Maglope, Heinz and Italia tomato varieties were purchased at the red ripe sl:age of matur i(y frorn Nakasero market, Kampala and their pH, total soluble solids, total titratable acidity, proximate composition, vitamin (A and C) and mineral (sodium, ...

  13. Effect of fermentation on the chemical composition of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... proximate composition as well as the anti-nutritional content. ... The fungi iso- lates were Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus flavus and Rhizopus oryzae. The changes in pH in fermenting mango peels are shown in Table 1. There was decrease ... The levels of tannin and phytate which the plant proba-.

  14. Chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility of lichens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torstein H. Garmo

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility of 45 samples of different species of lichen are reported. Mean content (g/100 g dry matter of the main nutrients was: crude protein 4.2, crude fat 3.2, crude fibre 16.6, ash 1.9, Ca 0.15, P 0.09, Mg 0.05, K 0.13, Na 0.035, S 0.07. The content of microminerals (mg/kg dry matter was: Cu 2.5, Mo 0.11, Zn 27.2, Se 0.12, Fe 898, Mn 154. The mean in vitro dry matter digestibility was 35%. However, the in vitro method do underestimate the dry matter digestibility of lichens. Stereocaulon spp. showed higher levels of crude protein, P, S, Cu and Mo than Cetraria spp. and Cladonia spp. Cetraria nivalis showed higher digestibility and contained more NFE, ash, Ca, Mg, but less crude fibre than Cladonia stellaris. Lichens contained less amounts of most nutrients compared with grasses (Fig. 1, exept for crude fat, NFE, Se and Fe.Kjemisk innhald og in vitro fordøyelsesgrad av lav.Abstract in Norwegian / Samandrag: Kjemisk innhald og in vitro fordøyelsesgrad av tørrstoffet er bestemt i 45 prøver av beitelav frå to stader i Sør-Noreg. Middel innhald (g/100g tørrstoff av følgjande næringsstoff var: protein 4.2, feitt 3.2, trevlar 16.6, oske 1.9, kalsium 0.15, fosfor 0.09, magnesium 0.05, kalium 0.13, natrium 0.035, svovel 0.07. Innhaldet (mg/kg tørrstoff av mikronæringsstoffa var: kopar 2.5, molybden 0.11, sink 27.2, selen 0.12, jern 898 og mangan 154. Den midlare fordøyelsesgraden av tørrstoffet i lav-prøvene var 35%, men in vitro fordøyelsesanalyser undervurderer fordøyelsesgraden av lav. Det var ein stor variasjon mellom dei ulike lavartane for dei fleste næringsstoffa og fordøyelsesgraden. Stereocaulon spp. inneheldt meir protein, fosfor, svovel, kopar og molybden enn Cetraria spp. og Cladonia spp. Gulskinn hadde høgare fordøyelsesgrad, og innehaldet av NFE, oske, kalsium og magnesium var høgre enn i kvitkrull, medan trevleinnhaldet var størst i kvitkrull. Lav inneheldt

  15. Chemical compositions of snow from Mt. Yulong, southeastern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    404. Hewen Niu et al. climate change and are natural archives of varia- tions in atmospheric circulation processes and ion burdens. Chemical and physical analyses of ice cores or snowpits recovered from carefully selected accumulation zones of Asian glaciers or ice caps not only hold great potential for the development.

  16. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent decades, the essential oils of plants have drawn great interest as sources of natural products. Essential oil from the fruits of Vismia guianensis was tested for its chemical constituents and antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the essential oil revealed ...

  17. Chemical Composition of Essential Oil from Rosmarinus Officinalis L. Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Türkmen, Necla; Öz, Ayşenur; Sönmez, Aslı; Erol, Tuğçe; Gülümser, Deniz; Yurdakul, Burcu; Kayır, Ömer; Elmastas, Mahfuz; Erenler, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    – The chemical constituents of the essential oil from leaves of Rosmarinus officinalis L. was produced by steam distillation using the Clevenger apparatus. The oil was analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main constituent of the oil was 1,8-cineole with 81.47% which is important for medicinal and pharmaceutical

  18. Physico-chemical composition of unripe (green) plantain and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post harvest characteristics are important selection criteria in the genetic improvement of starchy staple food crops. This study aimed at determining the proximate chemical constituents of thirteen clones of new plantain and banana hybrids at harvest. Flour was produced and analysed for starch and sugar contents. The pulp ...

  19. Chemical compositions of seven essential oils from Blighia sapida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Blighia sapida traditionally to treat many ailments, these chemical constituents identified might be useful pharmaceutically and industrially. These results indicate that Blighia sapida essential oils were mostly dominated by terpenoids and esters. Keywords: Hydrodistillation, gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry ...

  20. Chemical Composition, Fibre Fraction and Anti-Nutritional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Many plants also produce chemicals which are not directly involved in the process of plant growth (secondary compound) but act as deterrents to insects and fungal attack. These compounds also affect animals and the nutritive value of the forages. Mycotoxins (fungal metabolites) produced by saprophytic and endophytic ...

  1. Seasonal variation in chemical composition, aroma volatiles and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TSS and TA showed strong relationships with most of the chemical indices, each showing significantly (p < 0.05) strong correlations with phenolic components as well as with the antioxidant capacity (FRAP and DPPH) measured. There were no significant (p < 0.05) seasonal effects on juice absorbance (colouration) and TA ...

  2. The Chemical Composition of Different Sources of Liming Materials ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of some liming materials on soil chemical properties. The treatments comprised Cocoa Husk Pod Ash (CPHA), Oyster Shell Ash (OSA), Palm Bunch Ash (PBA), Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3), Kitchen Residues Ash (KRA) and Saw Dust Ash (SDA) at five levels ...

  3. Fabrication and Mechanical Behavior of Ex Situ Mg-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite Reinforced with Electroless Cu-Coated SiC Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs have better plasticity than the corresponding bulk metallic glasses (BMGs; however, their strength and density are often compromised due to the fact that the effective reinforcement phase is mostly plastic heavy metal. For lightweight SiC-particle reinforced BMGMCs, interface wettability and the sharpness of the particles often reduce the strengthening effect. In this work, SiC particles were coated with a thin Cu coating by electroless plating, and added to Mg54Cu26.5Ag8.5Gd11 melt in an amount of 5 wt % to prepare a BMGMC. The microstructure of the interface, mechanical behavior and fracture morphology of the BMGMC were studied by scanning electron microscopy and quasi-static compression testing. The results showed that the Cu coating improved the wettability between SiC and the matrix alloy without obvious interfacial reactions, leading to the dispersion of SiC particles in the matrix. The addition of Cu-coated SiC particles improved the plastic deformation ability of Mg54Cu26.5Ag8.5Gd11 BMG, proving that electroless plating was an effective method for controlling the interface microstructure and mechanical behavior of BMGMCs.

  4. Strong Composition Effects in All-Polymer Phototransistors with Bulk Heterojunction Layers of p-type and n-type Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyemi; Lee, Chulyeon; Kim, Hwajeong; Seo, Jooyeok; Song, Myeonghun; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2017-01-11

    We report the composition effect of polymeric sensing channel layers on the performance of all-polymer phototransistors featuring bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure of electron-donating (p-type) and electron-accepting (n-type) polymers. As an n-type component, poly(3-hexylthiopehe-co-benzothiadiazole) end-capped with 4-hexylthiophene (THBT-4ht) was synthesized via two-step reactions. A well-studied conjugated polymer, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), was employed as a p-type polymer. The composition of BHJ (P3HT:THBT-4ht) films was studied in detail by varying the THBT-4ht contents (0, 1, 3, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 100 wt %). The best charge separation in the P3HT:THBT-4ht films was measured at 30 wt % by the photoluminescence (PL) study, while the charge transport characteristics of devices were improved at the low THBT-4ht contents (polymer phototransistors was higher than that of the phototransistors with the pristine P3HT layers and strongly dependent on the BHJ composition. The highest (corrected) responsivity (RC) was achieved at 20 wt %, which can be attributable to the balance between the best charge separation and transport states, as investigated for crystal nanostructures and surface morphology by employing synchrotron-radiation grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering, high-resolution/scanning transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy.

  5. Chemical composition of the semi-volatile grains of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurz, Peter; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Bieler, André; Calmonte, Ursina; De Keyser, Johan; Fiethe, Björn; Fuselier, Stefan; Gasc, Sébastien; Gombosi, Tamas; Jäckel, Annette; Korth, Axel; Le Roy, Lena; Mall, Urs; Rème, Henri; Rubin, Martin; Tzou, Chia-Yu

    2017-04-01

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft (Glassmeier et al., 2007) has been in orbit of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/C-G) since August 2014. On board is the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) instrument suite (Balsiger et al., 2007). ROSINA consists of two mass spectrometers, the Double Focusing Mass Spectrometer (DFMS) and the Reflectron-type Time-Of-Flight (RTOF) (Scherer et al., 2006), as well as the COmet Pressure Sensor (COPS). ROSINA is designed to detect and monitor the neutral gas and thermal plasma environment in the comet's coma by in situ investigation. The two mass spectrometers have high dynamic ranges and complement each other with high mass resolution (DFMS) and high time resolution and large mass range (RTOF). Especially the unprecedented sensitivity and mass resolution of DFMS together with the large mass range of RTOF allow determining precisely light species (e.g. isotopologues) as well as detecting heavy organic species. The pressure sensor COPS measures total gas densities, bulk velocities, and gas temperatures. ROSINA has been collecting data on the composition of the coma and activity of the comet from 3.5 AU to pericentre and out again to 3.5 AU. The Rosetta mission presents a unique opportunity to directly sample the parent species in the thin cometary atmosphere of a Kuiper-belt object at distances in excess of 2.5 AU from the Sun all the way to the pericentre of the cometary orbit at 1.24 AU. The ROSINA experiment continuously measured the chemical composition of the gases in the cometary coma. Occasionally, a dust grain of cometary origin enters the ion source of a ROSINA instrument where the volatile part evaporates since these ion sources are hot. We will report on the first measurements of the volatile inventory of such dust grains. Volatile release from cometary dust grains was observed with all three ROSINA instruments on several occasions. Because the volatile content of such a dust

  6. Thermomagnetic transitions and coercivity mechanism in bulk composite Nd{sub 60}Fe{sub 30}Al{sub 10} alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Zempoalteca, R. [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Betancourt, I. [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: israelb@correo.unam.mx; Valenzuela, R. [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    The thermomagnetic behaviour (within the temperature range 553-300 K) for the bulk composite Nd{sub 60}Fe{sub 30}Al{sub 10} alloy is described in terms of a transition from paramagnetic to superferromagnetic state at T=553 K, followed by a ferromagnetic ordering for T<473 K. For the superferromagnetic regime, the alloy thermomagnetic response was associated to a homogeneous distribution of magnetic clusters with mean magnetic moment and size of 1072 {mu}{sub B} and 2.5 nm, respectively. For T<473 K, a pinning model of domain walls described properly the alloy coercivity dependence with temperature, from which the domain wall width and the magnetic anisotropy constant were estimated as being of {approx}8 nm and {approx}10{sup 5} J/m{sup 3}, typical values of hard magnetic phases. Results are supported by microstructural and magnetic domain observations.

  7. Indirect Determination of Chemical Composition and Fuel Characteristics of Solid Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Christian; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    Determination of chemical composition of solid waste can be performed directly or indirectly by analysis of combustion products. The indirect methodology instrumented by a full scale incinerator is the only method that can conclude on elements in trace concentrations. These elements are of great...... interest in evaluating waste management options by for example LCA modeling. A methodology description of indirect determination of chemical composition and fuel properties of waste is provided and validated by examples. Indirect analysis of different waste types shows that the chemical composition...... is significantly dependent on waste type. And the analysis concludes that the transfer of substances in the incinerator is a function of waste chemical content, incinerator technology and waste physical properties. The importance of correct representation of rare items in the waste with high concentrations...

  8. Prediction of the chemical body composition of Nellore and crossbreed bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, A; Lanna, D P D; da Cruz, G M; Tullio, R R; Sakamoto, L S; de Alencar, M M

    2017-09-01

    Young Nellore and crossbreed bulls were comparatively slaughtered to generate equation models for predicting the chemical composition of the empty body and carcass from the chemical composition of the Hankins and Howe section (; ). Data were collected from 236 animals from different genetic groups: Nellore, one-half Canchim + one-half Nellore, one-half Angus + one-half Nellore, and one-half Simmental + one-half Nellore, with 48 baseline animals (BW range from 218 to 433 kg) and 188 animals finished in the feedlot (BW range from 356 to 618 kg). The chemical composition prediction equation model was developed for all genetic groups using stepwise regression analysis. Across all animals, the percentages of water and ether extract in the HH section were highly correlated ( composition were lower than those obtained from the empty body composition. It was concluded that the chemical composition of the empty body and the carcass can be predicted from the composition of the HH section, using a general equation for different genetic groups.

  9. Mechanical behavior of chemically treated Jute/Polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fiber which serves as a reinforcement in reinforced plastics may be synthetic or natural past studies show that only artificial fibers such as glass, carbon etc., have been used in fiber reinforced plastics. Although glass and other synthetic fiber reinforced plastics possess high specific strength, their fields of application are very limited because of their inherent higher cost of production. In this connection, an investigation has been carried out to make use of jute , a natural fiber abundantly available in India. Natural fibers are not only strong and lightweight but also relatively very cheap. In the present work, jute composites are developed and their mechanical properties are evaluated. Mechanical properties of jute/polymer and compared with glass fiber/epoxy. These results indicate that jute can be used as a potential reinforcing material for making low load bearing thermoplastic composites.

  10. Chemical Composition and Particle Size Analysis of Kaolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehu Yahaya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mineral and elemental composition, crystal structure and particle size distribution of kaolin clays have been determined to ascertain its industrial significance. The mineral composition is evaluated by X- Ray Fluorescence (XRF, crystalline structure by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and particle size distribution using low angle laser light scattering (LALLS technique. The results shows the presence of eight elements expressed in percentages in form of their oxides as: SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, CaO, K2O, TiO2 and P2O5. Five crystalline structures are revealed by XRD result. The particle size distribution shows that kaolin particles are mainly in the range of 25–35 µm, while few particles have size distribution varied between 0.4–0.75 μm. The report is found to be in agreement with other researchers.

  11. Essential oil variation in wild populations of Artemisia saharae (Asteraceae) from Tunisia: chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouari, Sami; Ayadi, Imen; Fakhfakh, Nahed; Jdir, Hamida; Aloui, Latifa; Kossentini, Mohamed; Rebai, Ahmed; Zouari, Nacim

    2014-12-01

    Artemisia saharae Pomel is a new taxon of Artemisia herba-alba Asso (Asteraceae) which is endemic to Tunisia and Algeria. This shrub, commonly known as white wormwood or desert wormwood, is largely used in folk medicine and as a culinary herb. The bulks aromatic plants come from wild populations whose essential oils compositions as well as their biological properties are severely affected by several factors such as geographic conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present work is to provide more information about the influence of altitude variation on the essential oil composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of Artemisia saharae growing wild in the same geographical area. Essential oils were extracted by hydrodistillation of leaves and flowers of the plant collected from seven different altitudes of the Baten Zamour region (southwest of Tunisia). The highest essential oil yields (2.70-2.80%) were obtained for populations of high altitudes. Seventy-five compounds, representing 92.78 to 96.95% of the total essential oils, were separated and identified. Essential oils were characterized by very high percentage of oxygenated monoterpenes (52.1-72.6%) which constituted the predominant class. From the analyzed populations, the major compounds (>7%) were α-thujone, β-thujone, chrysanthenone, camphor, chrysanthenyl acetate, and sabinyl acetate. Sabinyl acetate which was detected in some populations at relatively high percentages (7.7-10.8%) seems to be characteristic to Southern Tunisian A. saharae. The studied essential oil showed a chemical diversity depending on the population altitude as revealed by linear discriminant and cluster analyses. Three population groups associated with altitudinal levels were distinguished. It is worthy to note that the most discriminating compounds of chemical groups were the minor ones. Despite the high variation of essential oil compositions, the high altitude population did not affect severely the antibacterial activity

  12. Studies on the chemical compositions and anti nutrients of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    showed that tannin content ranged between 1.0 and 7.5 mg/g catechin equivalent. Phytate, oxalate and trypsin inhibitor ranged from 0.20 - 6.65 mg/g, 0.23 - 1.17 g /100 g, 9.64 - 58.2 TIU/g respectively. The fruit parts with low level of anti nutrient, high elemental composition, protein, lipid, carbohydrates and ascorbic acid ...

  13. Particle size distribution and physico-chemical composition of clay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loss on Ignition (LOI) was by gravimetry. The data obtained on the alkaline metals, alkali metals, silica, sesquioxides/titanium, pH and Loss on ignition (LOI) reveal a general reduction in composition as particles sizes reduces. However, Mg (MgO) increased (16.09% - 30.86%) through <300μm to <44μm as sieved sizes ...

  14. Classification Characteristics of Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite Chemical Vapor Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    eight- detector carbon black/polymer composite array was exposed to DMMP, DIMP, THF, benzene, methanol, toluene , water, lighter fluid, vinegar, or diesel...the same SWNT in a flow of argon (Ar) containing 1% NH3 (Kong et al., 2000:624).... 16 Figure 5. Calibration curve for nitrotoluene (Li et al...sensors could differentiate between these agents and other background analytes (benzene, toluene , diesel fuel, etc.) at limits of detection lower than the

  15. The Brittleness and Chemical Stability of Optimized Geopolymer Composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Steinerová, Michaela; Matulová, Lenka; Vermach, P.; Kotas, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 396. ISSN 1996-1944 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP104/12/P477 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : metakaolin * interfacial transition zone * compressive * flexural strength * elastic modulus * impact strength * acid leaching * porosity Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.654, year: 2016 http://www.mdpi.com/1996-1944/10/4/396

  16. Chemical composition and nutritive significance of the land crab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proximate, nutritionally valuable minerals and anti-nutrient compositions were determined in land crab, Cardisoma armatum. Results showed that ash was the highest with a value of 42.23±0.02% while protein, moisture, fat, fibre and carbohydrate levels were 33.30±1.20%, 9.60±0.06%, 5.35±0.01%, 8.31±0.01% and ...

  17. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Matlin, W.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-06-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  18. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Matlin, W.M.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Processing equipment for the infiltration of fiber-reinforced composite tubes is being designed that incorporates improvements over the equipment used to infiltrate disks. A computer-controlled machine-man interface is being developed to allow for total control of all processing variables. Additionally, several improvements are being made to the furnace that will reduce the complexity and cost of the process. These improvements include the incorporation of free standing preforms, cast mandrels, and simpler graphite heating elements.

  19. Production and chemical composition of Istria and Pag whey cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Antunac

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Istria and Pag curd are specific products that are mostly consumed fresh made in coastal areas and on islands. Curd is a sort of soft cheese. Due to its structure, it is very healthy. It has a high nutritional value which is the result of a great amount of proteins that are easy to digest and have a high level of utilization. The aim of this study was to describe the technological process of production, to determine the chemical structure and to suggest the value of standardization on the basis of sensory evaluation. The total of 28 curd samples were physically and chemically analyzed according to standard and accredited scientific methods. Statistical data analysis was carried out by using the procedures of Microsoft Office Excel (2007. According to water content in cheese, Istria and Pag curd belongs to a group of soft cheeses. On average the water content in Istrian curd was 56.62 %, and in Pag curd was 63.03 %. Istrian curd showed higher values of the fat content (28.9 % and the fat in a dry matter (64.47 % than Pag curd (23.25 % and 59.65 %. The sensory quality of Istrian curd was not as homogenous as of Pag curd. Based on the research results, it can be concluded that the physical and chemical structure of Istria and Pag curd was uneven, which is understandable if the production terms and conditions and the way of draining the curd are taken into account. The description of technological process of production and the understanding of physical and chemical structure of the curd, represent the significant contribution to the research and knowledge of domestic dairy products, which certainly should not be neglected in our dairy industry. In any case, these products deserve the experts full attention.

  20. MOFwich: Sandwiched Metal-Organic Framework-Containing Mixed Matrix Composites for Chemical Warfare Agent Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Gregory W; Lu, Annie X; Hall, Morgan G; Browe, Matthew A; Tovar, Trenton; Epps, Thomas H

    2018-02-13

    This work describes a new strategy for fabricating mixed matrix composites containing layered metal-organic framework (MOF)/polymer films as functional barriers for chemical warfare agent protection. Through the use of mechanically robust polymers as the top and bottom encasing layers, a high-MOF-loading, high-performance-core layer can be sandwiched within. We term this multifunctional composite "MOFwich". We found that the use of elastomeric encasing layers enabled core layer reformation after breakage, an important feature for composites and membranes alike. The incorporation of MOFs into the core layer led to enhanced removal of chemical warfare agents while simultaneously promoting moisture vapor transport through the composite, showcasing the promise of these composites for protection applications.

  1. Compaction of an Oxisol and chemical composition of palisadegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eurico Lucas de Sousa Neto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Compaction is an important problem in soils under pastoral land use, and can make livestock systems unsustainable. The objective of this research was to study the impact of soil compaction on yield and quality of palisade (UROCHLOA BRIZANTHA cv. Marandu. The experiment was conducted on an Oxisol in the State of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Treatments consisted of four levels of soil compaction: no compaction (NC, slight compaction (SC, medium compaction (MC and high compaction (HC. The following soil properties were evaluated (layers 0-0.05 and 0.05-0.10 m: aggregate size distribution, bulk density (BD, macroporosity, microporosity, total porosity (TP, relative compaction (RC, and the characteristics of crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF and dry matter yield (DMY of the forage. Highly compacted soil had high BD and RC, and low TP (0-0.05 m. Both DMY and CP were affected by HC, and both were strongly related to BD. Higher DMY (6.96 Mg ha-1 and CP (7.8 % were observed in the MC treatment (BD 1.57 Mg m-3 and RC 0.91 Mg m-3, in 0-0.05 m. A high BD of 1.57 Mg m-3 (0-0.05 m did not inhibit plant growth. The N concentration in the palisade biomass differed significantly among compaction treatments, and was 8.72, 11.20, 12.48 and 10.98 g kg-1 in NC, SC, MC and HC treatments, respectively. Increase in DMY and CP at the MC level may be attributed to more absorption of N in this coarse-textured soil.

  2. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. CONCLUSION: In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  3. Characterization of chemical composition of bee pollen in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Wu, Dan; Ye, Xingqian; Liu, Donghong; Chen, Jianchu; Sun, Peilong

    2013-01-23

    Bee pollen has been praised for its good nutrition and therapeutic values. China is the largest producer in the world. Twelve common varieties of monofloral bee pollen collected from China's main producing regions were selected for nutritional composition analysis, including proximate contents, dietary fibers, amino acid distribution, fatty acid composition, and mineral elements. The proximate compositions mostly met the specifications regulating pollen load quality of China. Proline and glutamic acids were found to be the predominant amino acids in the form of both total amino and free amino acids. Lysine was the relative limiting amino acid. The percentage of total essential amino acids (TEAA) to total amino acids (TAA) reached the nutrition recommendation of the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). The major fatty acids, presented as mean values, were C18:3 (25.1%), C16:0 (19.6%), C18:1 (17.3%), C18:2 (8.78%), C22:0 (4.07%), and C18:0 (2.96%) acids. The proportions of C18:3 were generally higher than those of C18:2, and the ratio of total unsaturated fatty acids (TUS) to total saturated fatty acids (TS) was >1.0, except for Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. pollen for the characteristic absence of C18:3 acids. High levels of beneficial elements such as K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Fe, Mn. and Cu were observed in pollen samples. The contents of detrimental trace elements of Cd, Pb, and Hg were primarily lower or not detected. However, more attention should be paid to a large amount of Al, with a concentration of >100 mg/kg DW in most samples. There were some significant differences between samples. On the whole, the Chinese bee pollen was evaluated as a good complement to diet.

  4. Chemical and isotopic composition of secondary organic aerosol generated by α-pinene ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusinger, Carl; Dusek, Ulrike; King, Stephanie M.; Holzinger, Rupert; Rosenørn, Thomas; Sperlich, Peter; Julien, Maxime; Remaud, Gerald S.; Bilde, Merete; Röckmann, Thomas; Johnson, Matthew S.

    2017-05-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) plays a central role in air pollution and climate. However, the description of the sources and mechanisms leading to SOA is elusive despite decades of research. While stable isotope analysis is increasingly used to constrain sources of ambient aerosol, in many cases it is difficult to apply because neither the isotopic composition of aerosol precursors nor the fractionation of aerosol forming processes is well characterised. In this paper, SOA formation from ozonolysis of α-pinene - an important precursor and perhaps the best-known model system used in laboratory studies - was investigated using position-dependent and average determinations of 13C in α-pinene and advanced analysis of reaction products using thermal-desorption proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). The total carbon (TC) isotopic composition δ13C of the initial α-pinene was measured, and the δ13C of the specific carbon atom sites was determined using position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA). The PSIA analysis showed variations at individual positions from -6.9 to +10. 5 ‰ relative to the bulk composition. SOA was formed from α-pinene and ozone in a constant-flow chamber under dark, dry, and low-NOx conditions, with OH scavengers and in the absence of seed particles. The excess of ozone and long residence time in the flow chamber ensured that virtually all α-pinene had reacted. Product SOA was collected on two sequential quartz filters. The filters were analysed offline by heating them stepwise from 100 to 400 °C to desorb organic compounds that were (i) detected using PTR-MS for chemical analysis and to determine the O : C ratio, and (ii) converted to CO2 for 13C analysis. More than 400 ions in the mass range 39-800 Da were detected from the desorbed material and quantified using a PTR-MS. The largest amount desorbed at 150 °C. The O : C ratio of material from the front filter increased from 0.18 to 0.25 as the desorption temperature was

  5. Effect of Rain Leaching on Chemical Composition of Alfalfa Hay

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia de Hernandez, Mercedes M.

    1981-01-01

    Yield and chemical changes of second-cutting alfalfa hay treated with artificial rain were determined in a 2 x 3 x 2 factorial experiment. Factors were 2 stages of maturity (1 late vegetative; 2 early bloom), 3 levels of artificial rain applied (1 =no rain; 2 =low or approximately 5 mm; 3 =high or approximately 20 mm), and 2 times of applying artificial rain (1 = when drying forage was 40-60% dry matter; 2 =when drying forage was 60-75% dry matter). Thirty samples of alfalfa were collected at...

  6. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlin, W.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A two-step forced chemical vapor infiltration process was developed that reduced infiltration times for 4.45 cm dia. by 1.27 cm thick Nicalon{sup +} fiber preforms by two thirds while maintaining final densities near 90 %. In the first stage of the process, micro-voids within fiber bundles in the cloth were uniformly infiltrated throughout the preform. In the second stage, the deposition rate was increased to more rapidly fill the macro-voids between bundles within the cloth and between layers of cloth. By varying the thermal gradient across the preform uniform infiltration rates were maintained and high final densities achieved.

  7. Fabrication of fiber-reinforced composites by chemical vapor infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besmann, T.M.; McLaughlin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Probst, K.J.; Anderson, T.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Starr, T.L. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    Silicon carbide-based heat exchanger tubes are of interest to energy production and conversion systems due to their excellent high temperature properties. Fiber-reinforced SiC is of particular importance for these applications since it is substantially tougher than monolithic SiC, and therefore more damage and thermal shock tolerant. This paper reviews a program to develop a scaled-up system for the chemical vapor infiltration of tubular shapes of fiber-reinforced SiC. The efforts include producing a unique furnace design, extensive process and system modeling, and experimental efforts to demonstrate tube fabrication.

  8. [Influence of specification on chemical composition of dissolution and hepatocytes toxicity of Polygonum multiflorum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    lI, Yu-Meng; Li, Rui-Yu; Niu, Ming; Li, Chun-Yu; Bai, Zhao-Fang; Feng, Wu-Wen; Zhang, Cong-En; Tan, Peng; Huang, Zhi-Pu; Ma, Wei-Guang; Wang, Jia-Bo; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2016-03-01

    According to different toxicities of various aqueous extracts of Polygonum multiflorum on hepatocyte, the impacts of chemical composition on the safety of P. multiforum was studied. In this study, 8 main chemical compositions in aqueous extracts of P. multiflorum were determined by the established HPLC method; at the same time, the inhibition ratios of different aqueous extracts of P. multiflorum on L02 cell were determined. Afterwards, the potential compounds related to the toxicity of P. multiforum were tentatively found through a multiple correlation analysis. The results showed that P. multiforum with different chemical compositions exhibited great differences in dissolution. The hepatocyte toxicity of P. multiflorum powder was much greater than P. multiflorum lumps. In addition, three constituents closely related to toxicity of P. multiflorum were found by multiple correlation analysis. The study revealed that chemical composition of P. multiflorum is closely related to the hepatotoxicity, and the hepatotoxicity of P. multiflorum powder is greater than that of other dosage forms. This study indicates that P. multiflorum with different chemical compositions show varying toxicity, which therefore shall be given high attention. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  9. [Submerged cultivation and chemical composition of Hericium erinaceus mycelium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtonomova, A V; Bakanov, A V; Shuktueva, M I; Vinokurov, V A; Popova, O V; Usov, A I; Krasnopol'skaia, L M

    2012-01-01

    Submerged cultivation of Hericium erinaceus in various media was studied. The yield of the biomass was shown to depend mainly on the carbon source, whereas the content of water soluble polysaccharides depended mainly on the nitrogen source. The optimal medium composition provided the biomass yield of 21-23 g/l in 7 days. The biomass was characterized by the content of total protein, lipids and carbohydrates. In addition, the amino acid composition of the biomass was determined and shown to meet all the requirements of FAO/WHO concerning the amounts of essential amino acids (with exception of tryptophane). Oleinic and linoleic acids were identified as the main components of the fatty acids. Two water soluble polysaccharide fractions differing in solubility in aqueous ethanol were isolated and shown to contain rhamnose, fucose, xylose, glucose and galactose in different proportions. Vitamins B1, B2, B6, PP and E, ergosterol and coenzyme Q were also detected in the biomass of H. erinaceus.

  10. Nanoscale chemical interaction enhances the physical properties of bioglass composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravarian, Roya; Zhong, Xia; Barbeck, Mike; Ghanaati, Shahram; Kirkpatrick, Charles James; Murphy, Ciara M; Schindeler, Aaron; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Dehghani, Fariba

    2013-10-22

    Bioglasses are favorable biomaterials for bone tissue engineering; however, their applications are limited due to their brittleness. In addition, the early failure in the interface is a common problem of composites of bioglass and a polymer with high mechanical strength. This effect is due to the phase separation, nonhomogeneous mixture, nonuniform mechanical strength, and different degradation properties of two compounds. To address these issues, in this study a nanoscale interaction between poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and bioactive glass was formed via silane coupling agent (3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPMA). A monolith was produced at optimum composition from this hybrid by the sol-gel method at 50 °C with a rapid gelation time (bioglass and physical mixture. For instance, the Young's modulus of bioglass was decreased 40-fold and the dissolution rate of silica was retarded 1.5-fold by integration of PMMA. Prolonged dissolution of silica fosters bone integration due to the continuous dissolution of bioactive silica. The primary osteoblast cells were well anchored and cell migration was observed on the surface of the hybrid. The in vivo studies in mice demonstrated that the integrity of the hybrids was maintained in subcutaneous implantation. They induced mainly a mononuclear phagocytic tissue reaction with a low level of inflammation, while bioglass provoked a tissue reaction with TRAP-positive multinucleated giant cells. These results demonstrated that the presence of a nanoscale interaction between bioglass and PMMA affects the properties of bioglass and broadens its potential applications for bone replacement.

  11. Investigation of the effect of preliminary treatment of cranberry berries with a multi-enzyme composition on the chemical composition of juice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E. V. Alekseenko; E. A. Bystrova; Y. M. Dikareva

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the investigation results of red whortleberry chemical composition juices, obtained with using of pre-enzymatic treatment of red whortleberries and without enzymatic preparations...

  12. Chemical composition of water from roofs in Gdansk, Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakovski, Stefan, E-mail: stsakovski@chem.uni-sofia.b [Chair of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, J Bourchier Blvd. 1, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Tobiszewski, Marek [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology (GUT), 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Simeonov, Vasil, E-mail: vsimeonov@chem.uni-sofia.b [Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Polkowska, Zaneta [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology (GUT), 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Namiesnik, Jacek, E-mail: chemanal@pg.gda.p [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology (GUT), 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2010-01-15

    This study deals with the assessment of roof runoff waters from the region of Gdansk collected during the winter season (2007/2008). The chemical analysis includes 16 chemical variables: major ions, PAHs and PCBs measured at 3 sampling sites for 6-14 rain events. Although the data set is of limited volume the statistical data treatment using self-organizing maps (SOM) reveals the main factors controlling roof runoff water quality even for a data set with small dimension. This effort for explanation of the identified factors by the possible emission sources of the urban environment and air-particulate formation seems to be very reliable. Additionally to the roof runoff water quality factors the rain events patterns are found: 'background' group of events and groups formally named 'PAHs', 'PCBs' and 'air-borne particles' - dominated events. The SOM classification results give an opportunity to uncover the role of roof 'impact' on the runoff waters. Rain runoff water quality is described by four latent factors and the 'roof' impact is uncovered. - Identification of the urban roof runoff water quality factors and 'roof' impact by self-organizing map classification.

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis of rice kernels and flours: Measurement of surface chemical composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Malik A; Gaiani, Claire; Fukai, Shu; Bhandari, Bhesh

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the ability of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to differentiate rice macromolecules and to calculate the surface composition of rice kernels and flours. The uncooked kernels and flours surface composition of the two selected rice varieties, Thadokkham-11 (TDK11) and Doongara (DG) demonstrated an over-expression of lipids and proteins and an under-expression of starch compared to the bulk composition. The results of the study showed that XPS was able to differentiate rice polysaccharides (mainly starch), proteins and lipids in uncooked rice kernels and flours. Nevertheless, it was unable to distinguish components in cooked rice samples possibly due to complex interactions between gelatinized starch, denatured proteins and lipids. High resolution imaging methods (Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy) were employed to obtain complementary information about the properties and location of starch, proteins and lipids in rice kernels and flours. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. The MajuagaaA Kimberlite Dike, Maniitsoq Regio, West Greenland: Constraints on an Mg-rich Silicocarbonatitic Melt Composition from Groundmass Mineralogy and Bulk Compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels F. D.; Sand, Karina Krarup

    2008-01-01

    The Majuagaa kimberlite dike in the Maniitsoq region, southern West Greenland, is 564 Ma old, 2.5 km long, and up to 2 m wide. It is well exposed and very fresh, allowing detailed petrographic and chemical investigations. Little or no serpentinization is observed, and primary petrographic charact...

  15. Interfacial analysis of the ex-situ reinforced phase of a laser spot welded Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huei-Sen, E-mail: huei@isu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 84001, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, 81148, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hou-Guang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 84001, Taiwan (China); Jang, Jason Shian-Ching [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering and Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Chung-Li 32001, Taiwan (China); Lin, Dong-Yih [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National University of Kaohsiung, 81148, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Gu, Jhen-Wang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 84001, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    To study the interfacial reaction of the ex-situ reinforced phase (Ta) of a Zr-based ((Zr{sub 48}Cu{sub 36}Al{sub 8}Ag{sub 8})Si{sub 0.75} + Ta{sub 5}) bulk metallic glass composite after laser spot welding, the interfacial regions of the reinforced phases located at specific zones in the welds including the parent material, weld fusion zone and heat affected zone were investigated. Specimen preparation from the specific zones for transmission electron microscopy analysis was performed using the focused ion beam technique. The test results showed that the reinforced phases in the parent material, weld fusion zone and heat affected zone were all covered by an interfacial layer. From microstructure analysis, and referring to the phase diagram, it was clear that the thin layers are an intermetallic compound ZrCu phase. However, due to their different formation processes, those layers show the different morphologies or thicknesses. - Highlights: • An ex-situ Zr-based BMG composite was laser spot welded. • The interfacial regions of the RPs located at PM, WFZ and HAZ were investigated. • The RPs in the PM, WFZ and HAZ were all covered by a ZrCu interfacial layer. • Due to different formation processes, those layers show the different morphology.

  16. Carbon-13 composition of bulk dry wines by irm-EA/MS and irm-13C NMR: An indicator of vine water status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guyon Francois

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements performed on a set of 32 authentic wines (not submitted to any oenological treatment and their ethanol, recovered by distillation, show high correlation between δ13C of bulk wine and its ethanol. These measurements were performed by isotope ratio monitoring by mass spectrometry coupled to an elemental analyzer (irm-EA/MS. Then a series of wines produced by vines of which water status was assessed during the growing season with predawn leaf water potential measurements, was studied by irm-EA/MS. As expected δ13C is correlated to vine water status conditions, as a result of stomatal closure. The ethanol of these specific wines was also analyzed by isotope ratio monitoring and by nuclear magnetic resonance (irm-13C NMR to determine carbon-13 composition on the two specific sites of the ethanol skeleton. If these measurements confirm the correlation between 13C composition and vine growth conditions, the 13C stereospecific information does not make vine water status assessment more precise.

  17. Effect of short-term versus long-term grassland management and seasonal variation in organic and conventional dairy farming on the composition of bulk tank milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, S A; Jensen, S K; Govasmark, E; Steinshamn, H

    2013-09-01

    Bulk tank milk from 28 dairy farms was sampled every second month for 2 yr to assess the effects of grassland management, production system and season on milk fatty acid (FA) composition, concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins, Se, and milk sensory quality. Grassland management varied in terms of time since establishment. Short-term grassland management (SG) was defined as establishment or reseeding every fourth year or more often, and long-term grassland management (LG) was defined as less frequent establishment or reseeding. Fourteen organic (ORG) dairy farms with either short-term or long-term grassland management were paired with 14 conventional (CON) farms with respect to grassland management. Within ORG farms, SG farms differed from LG farms in herbage botanical composition, but not in concentrate FA concentrations, dry matter intake, or milk yield. Within CON farms, herbage composition, concentrate FA concentrations, dry matter intake, and milk yield showed no or insignificant variations. The ORG farms differed from CON farms in herbage botanical composition, concentrate FA concentrations, concentrate intake, and milk yield. Compared with ORG-LG farms, ORG-SG farms produced milk fat with higher proportions of C10:0 and C12:0 associated with higher herbage proportions of legumes (Fabaceae) and lower proportions of other dicotyledon families. Compared with milk from CON farms, milk fat from ORG farms had higher proportions of most saturated FA and all n-3 FA, but lower proportions of C18:0 and C18:1 cis-9 associated with higher forage proportion and differences in concentrations of FA in concentrates. Compared with the outdoor-feeding periods, the indoor feeding periods yielded milk fat with higher proportions of most short-chain and medium-chain FA and lower proportions of most C18-FA associated with grazing and higher forage proportions. Milk concentrations of α-tocopherol and β-carotene were lower during the grazing periods. Inclusion of fishmeal in

  18. Chemical Composition and Biological Activities of Beebread – Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina URCAN

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Beebread is a product of the hive obtained from pollen collected by bees, to which they add honey, digestive enzymes and subsequently is stored in the combs. The bees transform the bee pollen in beebread by an anaerobic fermentation process. A proper hive management promotes beebread collection, aimed at marketing it for human consumption since it can be considered a valuable food supplement due to its content of a wide range of nutrients. Its value is given by the content in protein, amino acids, fatty acids, carbohydrates, mineral salts, polyphenols and flavonoids, which depends on the botanical source of bee pollen. The nutritional and functional composition of beebread is widely reported; nevertheless, few studies on transformation processes of the pollen to improve the availability of the compounds present in this product were found. Overall, beebread is a recent collected and consumed bee product and at this stage it can be used as a food supplement.

  19. Chemical composition of umbu (Spondias tuberosa Arr. Cam seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Vilela Borges

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The umbu tree (Spondias tuberosa Arr. Cam is an important fruit tree the economy of the semi-arid northeastern region of Brazil. With the objective of finding use for the seeds, physical and chemical characterizations of the seeds from 2 cultivars in 2 maturation stages were carried out and their fatty acid and mineral profiles determined. The results showed no differences between the seeds analyzed. The yield was about 10% and the dimensions as follows: length from 1.48 to 2.11 cm and width from 0.76 to 1.16 cm. The average lipid content was 55% of which 69% was unsaturated and the average protein content was 24%. The seeds were a good source of the following minerals: P, K, Mg, Fe and Cu. The overall results indicated that the oil or the seeds could be used for food stuffs if no toxic agents were found.

  20. Chemical composition and biological activities of the Agaricus mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Munkhgerel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Two species of Agaricus mushroom grown in Mongolia were analyzed for their element content. Biological activity and chemical components study of Agaricus, grown in the Mongolian flora has been investigated for the first time. The ethanol extracts of dried Agaricus sp. mushrooms were analyzed for antioxidant activity on 1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radicals and interferon-like activity. The ethanol extracts from Agaricus arvensis showed the most potent radical scavenging activity. The IC50 of A. silvaticus and A. arvensis were 216 and 17.75 g/ml respectively. Among the twenty three mushroom extracts, the extracts from A. silvatisus and A. arvensis have shown the interferon-like activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5564/mjc.v14i0.197Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 14 (40, 2013, p41-45