WorldWideScience

Sample records for bulimia nervosa

  1. [Bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeck, A; Hartmann, A; Sandholz, A; Joos, A

    2006-08-01

    Bulimia nervosa is characterized by episodes of binge eating and compensatory behaviours (self-induced vomiting, laxative misuse, dietary restriction). It has a complex aetiology and is mostly found in young women. Bulimia leads to substantial physical and psychosocial morbidity. Bulimia nervosa needs specialized psychotherapeutic treatment. In most cases outpatient treatment is sufficient, but comorbidity with other psychiatric disturbances has to be taken into account. Additional psychopharmacological interventions might be helpful. After 5 to 10 years about 50% of the patients show complete remissions, 30% partial remissions and about 20% a chronic course of the illness. General practitioners, dentists and gynaecologists should be informed about typical signs of the disorder that is often hidden by the patients.

  2. Bulimia Nervosa - medical complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Philip S; Rylander, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    As with anorexia nervosa, there are many medical complications associated with bulimia nervosa. In bulimia nervosa, these complications are a direct result of both the mode and the frequency of purging behaviours. For the purposes of this article, we will review in detail the many complications of the two major modes of purging, namely, self-induced vomiting and laxative abuse; these two account for more than 90% of purging behaviours in bulimia nervosa. Some of these complications are potentially extremely dangerous and need to be well understood to effectively treat patients with bulimia nervosa. Other methods of purging, such as diuretic abuse, are much less frequently utilized and will only be mentioned briefly. In a subsequent article, the treatments of these medical complications will be presented.

  3. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapo, Marg

    1987-01-01

    The article reviews the literature on anorexia nervosa, with or without bulimia, and presents a comprehensive picture of this eating disorder, focusing on terminology, historical references, prevalence, prognosis, classification, diagnostic criteria, physical and psychological characteristics, evolution of the disability, etiology, treatment, and…

  4. [Pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greetfeld, M; Cuntz, U; Voderholzer, U

    2012-01-01

    Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice for both anorexia nervosa and for bulimia nervosa. However, many patients are also treated by pharmaceutical drugs. For the clinician it is difficult to choose pharmacotherapy, because the drugs may not be licensed, because of pharmacodynamic problems due to underweight or purging behaviour, or because of comorbidity. The present review summarises the current knowledge on pharmacotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa considering the available guidelines. In general, the knowledge based on studies is insufficient for anorexia nervosa. Up to now, there is no proof of efficacy for any antidepressant or atypical antipsychotic with respect to weight gain; atypical antipsychotics may be helpful for ruminating or excessive motor hyperactivity. For bulimia nervosa antidepressants are the pharmacotherapy of first choice. Long-term effects, however, are still unknown.

  5. Medical Complications of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, Patricia; Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are serious psychiatric illnesses related to disordered eating and distorted body images. They both have significant medical complications associated with the weight loss and malnutrition of anorexia nervosa, as well as from the purging behaviors that characterize bulimia nervosa. No body system is spared from the adverse sequelae of these illnesses, especially as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa become more severe and chronic. We review the medical complications that are associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, as well as the treatment for the complications. We also discuss the epidemiology and psychiatric comorbidities of these eating disorders.

  6. Psychotherapeutic strategies for bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, J

    1992-01-01

    Psychotherapeutic strategies for bulimia nervosa have included behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and educational treatments used in individual, family, and group settings. Controlled studies have demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral and cognitive-behavioral approaches for these disorders, and extensive clinical experience suggests a role for individual psychodynamic and family approaches as well, particularly in the treatment of frequently encountered complex clinical conditions in which bulimia nervosa coexists with other mood, anxiety, personality, and interpersonal disorders. Guidelines for clinical management have emerged from both research studies and the cumulative experiences of specialists.

  7. Psychotherapeutic Strategies for Bulimia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Yager, Joel

    1992-01-01

    Psychotherapeutic strategies for bulimia nervosa have included behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, psychodynamic, and educational treatments used in individual, family, and group settings. Controlled studies have demonstrated the efficacy of behavioral and cognitive-behavioral approaches for these disorders, and extensive clinical experience suggests a role for individual psychodynamic and family approaches as well, particularly in the treatment of frequently encountered ...

  8. Treatments of medical complications of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Philip S; Krantz, Mori J; Sachs, Katherine V

    2015-01-01

    Inherent to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are a plethora of medical complications which correlate with the severity of weight loss or the frequency and mode of purging. Yet, the encouraging fact is that most of these medical complications are treatable and reversible with definitive care and cessation of the eating-disordered behaviours. Herein, these treatments are described for both the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and those which are a result of bulimia nervosa.

  9. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia: The Teenager's Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G. Sue

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are currently being studied with great intensity by the medical profession. Anorexia nervosa was first described in the medical literature in 1868, but was considered a rarity until the late 1930's. Bulimia was not identified in the medical literature until 1979. Recent studies suggest that approximately five percent…

  10. Tratamento nutricional da bulimia nervosa Nutritional therapy for bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marle dos Santos Alvarenga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A bulimia nervosa é um transtorno alimentar caracterizado por compulsões alimentares e métodos compen-satórios recorrentes. Os pacientes apresentam ingestão alimentar inadequada e comportamentos alimentares disfuncionais. O adequado tratamento do transtorno requer uma equipe multiprofissional e terapia nutricional especializada. Compreender as características desse transtorno, os padrões de consumo e o comportamento alimentar, bem como atentar para as atitudes alimentares dos pacientes, é fundamental para o planejamento e para a adequada condução da abordagem nutricional. A terapia nutricional para esse transtorno é diferenciada, exigindo do nutricionista maiores habilidades de aconselhamento nutricional. Educação nutricional e acon-selhamento nutricional, com ênfase na abordagem de atitudes alimentares e insatisfação corporal, são o foco da terapia nutricional. Para o atendimento eficaz desses pacientes e o sucesso no tratamento nutricional, é importante que o profissional se mantenha atualizado sobre nutrição e transtornos alimentares e procure especialização e experiência nessa área do conhecimento.Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating and compensatory behaviors. The patients present inappropriate food intake and dysfunctional eating behaviors. Proper treatment of this disorder requires a multidisciplinary team and specialized nutrition therapy. It is fundamental to understand the characteristics of this disorder, the intake patterns and the eating behavior, and be attentive to the eating attitudes of these patients to plan and conduct a nutritional approach properly. The nutrition therapy for this disorder is specific and demands greater skillfulness in nutrition counseling from the dietician. Nutrition therapy focuses on nutrition education and nutrition counseling, mainly addressing eating attitudes and dissatisfaction with body image. The professional must keep abreast on nutrition and

  11. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Research Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1985-01-01

    The eating disorders called anorexia nervosa and bulimia are examined in terms of their symptomatology, etiology, and treatment, and in terms of how the extension home economist or teacher can help. Resources for additional information or help are listed. (CT)

  12. Biological Aspects of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Allan S.; Woodside, D. Blake

    1987-01-01

    Reviews biological factors relevant to the understanding of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Considers the physical presentation of these disorders; the medical complications of starvation, binging, and purging; and the cognitive and behavioral effects of starvation. Reviews neurophysiological and neurochemical aspects of these illnesses and…

  13. [Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Psychological considerations for its treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriguete Meléndez, J Armando; Rojo, Luis; Emmelhainz, Marisa

    2004-11-01

    It is presented the current perspectives in the study and treatment of the eating disorders, in specific: anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, epidemiology, and the interface among the different medical specialties, nutrition and sciences of the behavior, the diagnostic approaches, instruments and current therapeutic models.

  14. Efficiency Biliopancreatic bypass surgery in bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu I Yashkov

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A clinical significance in the treatment of bulimia nervosa patients with morbid obesity had already been raised [10, 13], but we did not find publications on the effectiveness of bariatric surgery in these cases. There is also information about the possibility of applying the operation bilio-pancreatic bypass, effective in patients with morbid obesity with uncontrolled eating behavior for the treatment of patients with anorexia BILIM not suffering from morbid obesity. In this article the data of clinical observation of a small sample of patients. As a result, the treatment of these patients found that severe nervous BILIM can be seen as a latent form of morbid obesity. The choice of treatment should depend not only on the initial body weight of the patient, but also on the severity of the nervous BILIM. Unsuccessful attempts at organized-balanced, conservative treatment of patients with severe bulimia nervosa may be considered a variant of surgical treatment, while bilio-pancreatic bypass surgery is considered as the most preferred operation, compared with the installation of the gastric balloon and others. All candidates for surgical treatment of obesity must identify clinical signs of bulimia nervosa, as this may influence the choice of method of operation. Further study of the role of hyperinsulinemia, secretion of ghrelin, leptin, intestinal peptide may contribute to the elucidation of the true causes of bulimia nervosa, probably has a similar origin with morbid obesity.

  15. [Bulimia nervosa, a pathology with multiple complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot-Bedetti, Mathilde; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Moro, Marie Rose

    2015-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder associating binge eating with inappropriate compensatory methods. Patients suffer from multiple organic, psychological and social complications. Of these, the somatic consequences are numerous and of varying degrees of seriousness. Regular monitoring is therefore essential in order to identify them and treat them.

  16. Reboxetina no tratamento da bulimia nervosa Reboxetine in the treatment of bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Mancini Castilho

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available É vasta a literatura demonstrando a eficácia dos antidepressivos inibidores seletivos da recaptação de serotonina na Bulimia Nervosa, diminuindo a freqüência do comportamento alimentar compulsivo e dos vômitos. A boa resposta terapêutica aos agentes farmacológicos noradrenérgicos, como a desipramina e a reboxetina, embora menos encontrada na literatura, também já foi documentada. O presente relato de caso descreve o tratamento de uma paciente com Bulimia Nervosa utilizando-se reboxetina na dose de 4 a 8 mg ao dia. A resposta terapêutica vem confirmar os resultados favoráveis do uso desta droga no tratamento da Bulimia Nervosa.There is a substancial body of literature demonstrating the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants (SSRI in reducing binge eating and vomiting frequency in Bulimia Nervosa. Good therapeutic response to noradrenergic agents, like desipramine and reboxetine, though not frequently reported in literature, has already been demonstrated. This case report describes the treatment of Bulimia Nervosa with reboxetine (4 to 8 mg/day and its favorable therapeutic results.

  17. A case of hyperemesis in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrolli, Carlo; Sacchi, Manuela C; Togni, Michele; Cereda, Emanuele

    2015-05-01

    Bulimia nervosa is an eating disorder defined by recurrent episodes of binge eating followed by compensatory behaviors, primarily self-induced vomiting. Most common complications are due to purge behaviors and are frequently responsible for hospitalization. These include electrolyte disturbances, dehydration, hypovolemia, stomatitis, esophageal diseases, and functional impairment of the colon. However, an obstruction-like syndrome has never been reported. We report the case of a middle-age woman suffering from bulimia nervosa and referring at the emergency department with a 7-day story of hyperemesis responsible for an acute renal failure. During hospitalization, after the most important and common medical causes of hyperemesis were excluded, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was performed. The endoscopist reported the presence of an impressive bezoar, which underwent to mechanical fragmentation and biopsy sampling, revealing it was made up exclusively of liquorice wheels. An endoscopy performed few days after showed the complete dissolution of the bezoar, and the patient was discharged without any further gastrointestinal complaint.

  18. Dysthymia in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Borda-Más

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio ex post facto analiza la presencia de distimia en 155 mujeres. Noventa y tres pacientes cumplían los criterios diagnósticos para un trastorno de la conducta alimentaria (TCA: 31 con anorexia nerviosa restrictiva (ANr, 31 con anorexia nerviosa purgativa/bulímica (ANp y 31 con bulimia nerviosa purgativa (BNp; y 62 mujeres constituían los dos grupos comparativos: 31 con alto riesgo de padecer un TCA (grupo comparativo sintomático: GC-S y 31 sin patología conocida (grupo comparativo no sintomático: GC-NS. Todas ellas cumplimentaron la versión española del MCMI-II. En los resultados encontramos diferencias significativas en las medias obtenidas por los grupos con TCA respecto a los dos grupos comparativos, y que presentaban el posible síndrome distímico [puntuaciones Tasa Base (TB > 74] el 50% de las pacientes con ANr, el 60% con ANp y el 63,30% de las pacientes con BNp. Sólo el 16,70% de las mujeres de alto riesgo y el 5,70% de las mujeres sin patología lo presentaban. Estos hallazgos indican que el síndrome distímico es frecuente en las mujeres con TCA, y en aquellas que presentan conductas purgativas aumenta levemente la severidad del mismo.

  19. Defining recovery in adult bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jessica; Agras, W Stewart; Bryson, Susan

    2013-01-01

    To examine how different definitions of recovery lead to varying rates of recovery, maintenance of recovery, and relapse in bulimia nervosa (BN), end-of-treatment (EOT) and follow-up data were obtained from 96 adults with BN. Combining behavioral, physical, and psychological criteria led to recovery rates between 15.5% and 34.4% at EOT, though relapse was approximately 50%. Combining these criteria and requiring abstinence from binge eating and purging when defining recovery may lead to lower recovery rates than those found in previous studies; however, a strength of this definition is that individuals who meet this criteria have no remaining disordered behaviors or symptoms.

  20. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: brains, bones and breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Taylor B; Kreipe, Richard E

    2014-05-01

    Recent research has modified both the conceptualization and treatment of eating disorders. New diagnostic criteria reducing the "not otherwise specified" category should facilitate the early recognition and treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Technology-based studies identify AN and BN as "brain circuit" disorders; epidemiologic studies reveal that the narrow racial, ethnic and income profile of individuals no longer holds true for AN. The major organs affected long term-the brain and skeletal system-both respond to improved nutrition, with maintenance of body weight the best predictor of recovery. Twin studies have revealed gene x environment interactions, including both the external (social) and internal (pubertal) environments of boys and of girls. Family-based treatment has the best evidence base for effectiveness for younger patients. Medication plays a limited role in AN, but a major role in BN. Across diagnoses, the most important medicine is food.

  1. [Affective disorders in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briukhin, A E; Onegina, E Iu

    2011-01-01

    Authors studied 109 patients with eating disorders, including 49 with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 60 with bulimia nervosa (BN), using psychopathological and experimental/psychological methods, psychometric scales and follow-up. Four variants (2 AN and 2 BN) of clinical presentations and dynamics of affective disorders were singled out. It has been shown that many features of their symptoms and responses of patients to the complex therapy (diet-, psycho- and pharmacotherapy) depend on the belonging of AN or BN to a group of borderline mental disorders or to endogenous diseases. Taking into account the revealed features of affective disorders, the authors have formulated recommendations for treatment tactics and prevention measures for these groups of patients.

  2. The Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: A Multidimensional Group Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P. Scott

    This paper defines the eating disorders of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimia nervosa, a bulimic subtype of anorexia nervosa. The diagnosis of these disorders is discussed and similarities and differences among the three disorders are reviewed. Etiological factors are considered and current trends in treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and…

  3. [Anesthesia in patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenker, J; Hagenah, U; Rossaint, R

    2010-03-01

    Eating disorders are typical diseases of adolescence and early adulthood. About 1-3% of female juveniles suffer from anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN). Today AN is still the psychiatric disease with the highest mortality rate. The peri-operative mortality rate of patients suffering from AN is in the range up to 15%. The beginning of AN is a lingering process and the majority of patients show increasingly restrictive eating habits ending in cachexia. Patients are obsessed by the predominant idea of being obese in spite of having a significant underweight. Patients suffering from bulimia break the strict regimen by eating enormous amounts of high calorie food. Such eating attacks are followed by weight reducing measures, mostly vomiting. Most of the physical changes caused by AN are due to starvation and loss of weight. The most significant medical complications are alterations of the cardiovascular system accompanied by decreasing contractility of the heart, bradycardia, electrocardiographic changes as well as disequilibrium of electrolytic and water balance. Most of these symptoms can be reversed by putting on weight.

  4. Dimensions of emotion dysregulation in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross D; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Goldschmidt, Andrea B; Berg, Kelly C

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine associations between dimensions of emotion dysregulation and eating disorder (ED) symptoms in bulimia nervosa (BN). This investigation used baseline data from a BN treatment study that included 80 adults (90% women) with full or subthreshold BN. Participants completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) and the Eating Disorders Examination interview. The Eating Disorders Examination global score was significantly correlated with the DERS total score, as well as several DERS subscales: nonacceptance, impulse and strategies. Further, the DERS goals subscale was found to be uniquely associated with frequency of purging and driven exercise, although none of the subscales were associated with frequency of objective binge eating. Findings indicate that emotion dysregulation is associated with ED symptoms in BN, suggesting the utility of interventions that address emotion regulation skills deficits in the treatment of the disorder.

  5. Sexual function of women suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Kravvariti, Vasilliki; Varsou, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The cross-sectional study aimed at examining the sexual function of young adult women suffering from eating disorders. The authors interviewed 53 women (26 with anorexia nervosa and 27 with bulimia nervosa) and 58 female students. Each participant was administered the Female Sexual Function Index, the Eating Attitudes Test, the Body Shape Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory. Comparisons among the 3 groups showed that patients with anorexia nervosa scored lower in each Female Sexual Function Index subscale than did healthy controls. There was no significant difference between bulimia nervosa and healthy controls. Sexual functionality of patients with anorexia nervosa was correlated only with body mass index (r = 0.5, p =.01). Sexual functionality of patients with bulimia nervosa was correlated only with the Beck Depression Inventory (r = -0.4, p =.03) Patients with anorexia nervosa had more disturbed sexual function than did controls. Sexual function can be related to the level of starvation and symptoms of depression.

  6. Genetic findings in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinney, Anke; Scherag, Susann; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are complex disorders associated with disordered eating behavior. Heritability estimates derived from twin and family studies are high, so that substantial genetic influences on the etiology can be assumed for both. As the monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems are involved in eating disorders (EDs), candidate gene studies have centered on related genes; additionally, genes relevant for body weight regulation have been considered as candidates. Unfortunately, this approach has yielded very few positive results; confirmed associations or findings substantiated in meta-analyses are scant. None of these associations can be considered unequivocally validated. Systematic genome-wide approaches have been performed to identify genes with no a priori evidence for their relevance in EDs. Family-based scans revealed linkage peaks in single chromosomal regions for AN and BN. Analyses of candidate genes in one of these regions led to the identification of genetic variants associated with AN. Currently, an international consortium is conducting a genome-wide association study for AN, which will hopefully lead to the identification of the first genome-wide significant markers.

  7. Epidemiology of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa in Bornholm County, Denmark, 1970-1989

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagsberg, A K; Wang, A R

    1994-01-01

    In a retrospective study of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, potential cases were traced, studied, and diagnosed according to ICD-10. Forty-two cases were found in Bornholm County, comprising the island of Bornholm in Denmark, in a population of 47,000 from 1970 to 1989. Less than half...... the number of cases in the population year by year, also increased during the late part of the study period. In 1989 the incidence rate of the high-risk group of females 10 to 24 years of age was 136 per 100,000 for anorexia nervosa and 45 per 100,000 for bulimia nervosa, and the prevalence rate was 222 per...... 100,000 for anorexia nervosa and 89 per 100,000 for bulimia nervosa....

  8. Initial evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Brian C; Jimerson, Michelle; Haxton, Christina; Jimerson, David C

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders are life-threatening conditions that are challenging to address; however, the primary care setting provides an important opportunity for critical medical and psychosocial intervention. The recently published Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., includes updated diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa (e.g., elimination of amenorrhea as a diagnostic criterion) and for bulimia nervosa (e.g., criterion for frequency of binge episodes decreased to an average of once per week). In addition to the role of environmental triggers and societal expectations of body size and shape, research has suggested that genes and discrete biochemical signals contribute to the development of eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa occur most often in adolescent females and are often accompanied by depression and other comorbid psychiatric disorders. For low-weight patients with anorexia nervosa, virtually all physiologic systems are affected, ranging from hypotension and osteopenia to life-threatening arrhythmias, often requiring emergent assessment and hospitalization for metabolic stabilization. In patients with frequent purging or laxative abuse, the presence of electrolyte abnormalities requires prompt intervention. Family-based treatment is helpful for adolescents with anorexia nervosa, whereas short-term psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavior therapy, is effective for most patients with bulimia nervosa. The use of psychotropic medications is limited for anorexia nervosa, whereas treatment studies have shown a benefit of antidepressant medications for patients with bulimia nervosa. Treatment is most effective when it includes a multidisciplinary, teambased approach.

  9. Wait Not, Want Not: Factors Contributing to the Development of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Trish

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine prevalence and incident rates of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. In addition, this article will review the psychological and sociological factors that contribute to the development and maintenance of an eating disorder. Finally, different treatment approaches will be discussed in…

  10. The validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Sinke, Sjoukje; Mitchell, James E.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To review the evidence for the validity and utility of subtyping bulimia nervosa (BN) into a purging (BN-P) and a nonpurging subtype (BN-NP), and of distinguishing BN-NP from binge eating disorder (BED), by comparing course, complications, and treatment. Method: A literature search of psy

  11. A Primary Prevention Program to Reduce Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullari, Salvatore; Redmon, William K.

    This paper presents a theoretical model for a primary prevention program for bulimia and anorexia nervosa to be used with adolescents and young women considered most at risk of developing these eating disorders. Characteristics of potential anorexics and bulimics are identified to aid in the selection of target groups for the program. It is…

  12. Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa: Psychological and Psychopharmacologic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Elaine L.; Greydanus, Donald E.; Pratt, Helen D.; Patel, Dilip R.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the current literature on psychological and psychopharmacologic treatments for bulimia nervosa in the adolescent population. Describes the two most researched psychological treatments--cognitive behavior therapy and interpersonal therapy--in terms of treatment protocols and outcome research. Reviews psychopharmacologic treatment, including…

  13. Weight Suppression Predicts Time to Remission from Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Michael R.; Berner, Laura A.; Swanson, Sonja A.; Clark, Vicki L.; Eddy, Kamryn T.; Franko, Debra L.; Shaw, Jena A.; Ross, Stephanie; Herzog, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether, at study entry, (a) weight suppression (WS), the difference between highest past adult weight and current weight, prospectively predicts time to first full remission from bulimia nervosa (BN) over a follow-up period of 8 years, and (b) weight change over time mediates the relationship between WS and time to first…

  14. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia: Questions and Answers for School Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, M. Joan

    1984-01-01

    School personnel can have a vital role in the early detection and treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia by understanding certain signs and symptoms. This article provides specific information about early detection, approaches to use when confronting the student, and methods to facilitate treatment. (Author/DF)

  15. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  16. Incidence and outcomes of bulimia nervosa : a nationwide population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, A.; Hoek, H. W.; Linna, M. S.; Raevuori, A.; Sihvola, E.; Bulik, C. M.; Rissanen, A.; Kaprio, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the epidemiology of bulimia nervosa outside clinical settings. We report the incidence, prevalence and outcomes of bulimia nervosa using for the first time a nationwide Study design. Method. To assess the incidence and natural course and outcomes of DSM-IV bulimia n

  17. A longitudinal investigation of mortality in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Debra L; Keshaviah, Aparna; Eddy, Kamryn T; Krishna, Meera; Davis, Martha C; Keel, Pamela K; Herzog, David B

    2013-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Although anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate, our understanding of the timing and predictors of mortality in eating disorders is limited. The authors investigated mortality in a long-term study of patients with eating disorders. METHOD Beginning in 1987, 246 treatment-seeking female patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa were interviewed every 6 months for a median of 9.5 years to obtain weekly ratings of eating disorder symptoms, comorbidity, treatment participation, and psychosocial functioning. From January 2007 to December 2010 (median follow-up of 20 years), vital status was ascertained with a National Death Index search. RESULTS Sixteen deaths (6.5%) were recorded (lifetime anorexia nervosa, N=14; bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa, N=2). The standardized mortality ratio was 4.37 (95% CI=2.4-7.3) for lifetime anorexia nervosa and 2.33 (95% CI=0.3-8.4) for bulimia nervosa with no history of anorexia nervosa. Risk of premature death among patients with lifetime anorexia nervosa peaked within the first 10 years of follow-up, resulting in a standardized mortality ratio of 7.7 (95% CI=3.7-14.2). The standardized mortality ratio varied by duration of illness and was 3.2 (95% CI=0.9-8.3) for patients with lifetime anorexia nervosa for 0 to 15 years (4/119 died), and 6.6 (95% CI=3.2-12.1) for those with lifetime anorexia nervosa for >15 to 30 years (10/67 died). Multivariate predictors of mortality included alcohol abuse, low body mass index, and poor social adjustment. CONCLUSIONS These findings highlight the need for early identification and intervention and suggest that a long duration of illness, substance abuse, low weight, and poor psychosocial functioning raise the risk for mortality in anorexia nervosa.

  18. Neurobiology of anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Walter

    2008-04-22

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders of unknown etiology that most commonly begin during adolescence in women. AN and BN have unique and puzzling symptoms, such as restricted eating or binge-purge behaviors, body image distortions, denial of emaciation, and resistance to treatment. These are often chronic and relapsing disorders, and AN has the highest death rate of any psychiatric disorder. The lack of understanding of the pathogenesis of this illness has hindered the development of effective interventions, particularly for AN. Individuals with AN and BN are consistently characterized by perfectionism, obsessive-compulsiveness, and dysphoric mood. Individuals with AN tend to have high constraint, constriction of affect and emotional expressiveness, ahendonia and asceticism, whereas individuals with BN tend to be more impulsive and sensation seeking. Such symptoms often begin in childhood, before the onset of an eating disorder, and persist after recovery, suggesting they are traits that create a vulnerability for developing an ED. There is growing acknowledgement that neurobiological vulnerabilities make a substantial contribution to the pathogenesis of AN and BN. Considerable evidence suggests that altered brain serotonin (5-HT) function contributes to dysregulation of appetite, mood, and impulse control in AN and BN. Brain imaging studies, using 5-HT specific ligands, show that disturbances of 5-HT function occur when people are ill, and persist after recovery from AN and BN. It is possible that a trait-related disturbance of 5-HT neuronal modulation predates the onset of AN and contributes to premorbid symptoms of anxiety, obsessionality, and inhibition. This dysphoric temperament may involve an inherent dysregulation of emotional and reward pathways which also mediate the hedonic aspects of feeding, thus making these individuals vulnerable to disturbed appetitive behaviors. Restricting food intake may become powerfully

  19. [Adaptation of psychodrama in psychotherapy of patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izydorczyk, Bernadetta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the article was an attempt to present selected theoretical motifs and moreover self experience in the adaptation of elements of psychodrama by Moreno in psychodynamic psychotherapy (individual and group psychotherapy) in a group of people with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Psychodrama through own creativity, spontaneity and taking action on the "here and now" stage helps to attain and intensify therapeutic aims which concern the consciousness of inner conflict of persons with anorexia and bulimia nervosa, which is translocated on their body.

  20. Effectiveness of individualized, integrative outpatient treatment for females with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Cara; Jones, Rebecca A; Livingston, Genvieve; Goetsch, Virginia; Schaffner, Angela; Buchanan, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of an individualized outpatient program was investigated in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN). Participants included 151 females who received outpatient eating disorder treatment in the partial hospitalization program, the intensive outpatient program, or a combination of the two programs. Outcome measures included the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-2), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), frequency of binge eating and purging, and mean body weight. Findings included significant increases in weight for the AN group, reductions in binge eating frequency for the BN group, and reductions in EDI-2 and BDI-II scores and purging frequency for both groups. This study provides preliminary support for the efficacy of a multimodal program for the treatment of both anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

  1. Outpatient management of electrolyte imbalances associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Ann F

    2005-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa are eating disorders with significant morbidity that often go undetected. Nurses and primary care providers are encouraged to recognize the early signs and symptoms of these disorders and to intervene appropriately. Several case reports in this article describe patients with these disorders and various related electrolyte abnormalities. Understanding electrolyte imbalances associated with both disorders may lead to earlier effective intervention and overall improved health outcomes.

  2. Anorexia nervosa e bulimia nervosa: abordagem cognitivo-construtivista de psicoterapia Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: a psychotherapeutic cognitive-constructivist approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Nabuco de Abreu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dos transtornos alimentares, a anorexia nervosa e a bulimia nervosa são os que mais têm levado pacientes adolescentes, geralmente do sexo feminino e cada vez mais jovens, a buscar ajuda. Essa ajuda se dá através de um tratamento multidisciplinar envolvendo médicos psiquiatras, psicólogos e nutricionistas. A psicoterapia tem se mostrado um componente eficaz para a melhora dessas pacientes. O presente artigo tem por objetivo expor uma proposta de tratamento psicoterápico a partir da abordagem cognitivo-construtivista.Among the eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are the ones that have made adolescent patients - often females and aged younger and younger - seek for help. This help is provided through a multidisciplinary treatment involving psychiatrists, psychologists and dietists. Psychotherapy has shown to be an efficient component for these patients' improvement. The present article aims at presenting a proposal of psychotherapeutic treatment based on a cognitive-constructivist approach.

  3. Symptoms of psychosis in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Paola; Pollini, Barbara; Restaneo, Antonietta; Favaretto, Gerardo; Sisti, Davide; Rocchi, Marco B L; Preti, Antonio

    2010-02-28

    Despite evidence from case series, the comorbidity of eating disorders with psychosis is less investigated than their comorbidity with anxiety and mood disorders. We investigated the occurrence of symptoms of psychosis in 112 female patients diagnosed with DSM-IV eating disorders (anorexia nervosa=61, bulimia nervosa=51) and 631 high school girls in the same health district as the patients: the items of the SCL-90R symptom dimensions "paranoid ideation" and "psychoticism" were specifically examined. No case of co-morbid schizophrenia was observed among patients. Compared with controls, the patients with anorexia nervosa were more likely to endorse the item "Never feeling close to another person"; the patients with bulimia nervosa were more likely to endorse the item "Feeling others are to blame for your troubles". Both groups of patients were more likely than controls to endorse the item "Idea that something is wrong with your mind". The students who were identified by the EAT and the BITE as being "at risk" for eating disorders were more likely to assign their body a causative role in their problems. Symptoms of psychosis can be observed in patients with eating disorders, but these could be better explained within the psychopathology of the disorders rather than by assuming a link with schizophrenia.

  4. Anorexia Nervosa/Bulimia. LC Science Tracer Bullet, TB 85-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasz, Hisako, Comp.

    This bibliography is intended to help readers locate material on anorexia nervosa and bulimia in the collections of the Library of Congress. A scope note briefly defines the terms "anorexia nervosa" and "bulimia" and discusses similarities and differences between the two eating disorders. Four references are included as introductions to the topic…

  5. A Pilot Study of a Functional Contextual Treatment for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Drew A.; Simmons, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the initial development of a treatment for bulimia nervosa using a functional contextual treatment approach. Seven women (6 with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa and 1 with a diagnosis of eating disorder not otherwise specified) completed 12 sessions of functional contextual treatment. Participants were assessed with the Eating…

  6. Identifying Persuasive Public Health Messages to Change Community Knowledge and Attitudes About Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Siân A; Paxton, Susan J; Massey, Robin; Hay, Phillipa J; Mond, Jonathan M; Rodgers, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Addressing stigma through social marketing campaigns has the potential to enhance currently low rates of treatment seeking and improve the well-being of individuals with the eating disorder bulimia nervosa. This study aimed to evaluate the persuasiveness of health messages designed to reduce stigma and improve mental health literacy about this disorder. A community sample of 1,936 adults (48.2% male, 51.8% female) from Victoria, Australia, provided (a) self-report information on knowledge and stigma about bulimia nervosa and (b) ratings of the persuasiveness of 9 brief health messages on dimensions of convincingness and likelihood of changing attitudes. Messages were rated moderately to very convincing and a little to moderately likely to change attitudes toward bulimia nervosa. The most persuasive messages were those that emphasized that bulimia nervosa is a serious mental illness and is not attributable to personal failings. Higher ratings of convincingness were associated with being female, with having more knowledge about bulimia nervosa, and with lower levels of stigma about bulimia nervosa. Higher ratings for likelihood of changing attitudes were associated with being female and with ratings of the convincingness of the corresponding message. This study provides direction for persuasive content to be included in social marketing campaigns to reduce stigma toward bulimia nervosa.

  7. Management of bulimia nervosa: a case study with the Roy adaptation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Xin Yi; Tham, Xiang Cong

    2015-04-01

    Bulimia nervosa is a crippling and chronic disorder, with individuals experiencing repeated binge-purge episodes. It is not widely understood by society. The use of the Roy adaptation model for the management of bulimia nervosa is examined in this article. Nursing models are utilized to provide a structure for planning and implementation of patient management. The Roy adaptation model focuses on the importance of individuals as able to adapt well to their changing surrounding environments. This model can be useful in managing patients with bulimia nervosa.

  8. Association of CNR1 and FAAH endocannabinoid gene polymorphisms with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: evidence for synergistic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, P; Bifulco, M; Di Filippo, C; Gazzerro, P; Canestrelli, B; Monteleone, F; Proto, M C; Di Genio, M; Grimaldi, C; Maj, M

    2009-10-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate eating behavior; hence, endocannabinoid genes may contribute to the biological vulnerability to eating disorders. The rs1049353 (1359 G/A) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the gene coding the endocannabinoid CB1 receptor (CNR1) and the rs324420 (cDNA 385C to A) SNP of the gene coding fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the major degrading enzyme of endocannabinoids, have been suggested to have functional effects on mature proteins. Therefore, we explored the possibility that those SNPs were associated to anorexia nervosa and/or bulimia nervosa. The distributions of the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP and of the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP were investigated in 134 patients with anorexia nervosa, 180 patients with bulimia nervosa and 148 normal weight healthy controls. Additive effects of the two SNPs in the genetic susceptibility to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa were also tested. As compared to healthy controls, anorexic and bulimic patients showed significantly higher frequencies of the AG genotype and the A allele of the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP. Similarly, the AC genotype and the A allele of the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP were significantly more frequent in anorexic and bulimic individuals. A synergistic effect of the two SNPs was evident in anorexia nervosa but not in bulimia nervosa. Present findings show for the first time that the CNR1 1359 G/A SNP and the FAAH cDNA 385C to A SNP are significantly associated to anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, and demonstrate a synergistic effect of the two SNPs in anorexia nervosa.

  9. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasegian, Anna; Curcio, Francesco; Dalla Ragione, Laura; Rossetti, Francesca; Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders.

  10. Electrocortical processing of food and emotional pictures in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechert, Jens; Feige, Bernd; Joos, Andreas; Zeeck, Almut; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2011-06-01

    Objective To compare the electrocortical processing of food pictures in participants with anorexia nervosa (n = 21), bulimia nervosa (n = 22), and healthy controls (HCs) (n = 32) by measuring the early posterior negativity, an event-related potential that reflects stimulus salience and selective attention. Methods We exposed these three groups to a rapid stream of high- and low-calorie food pictures, as well as standard emotional and neutral pictures. Results Event-related potentials in the time range of 220 milliseconds to 310 milliseconds on posterior electrodes differed between groups: patients with eating disorders showed facilitated processing of both high- and low-calorie food pictures relative to neutral pictures, whereas HC participants did so only for the high-calorie pictures. Subjective palatability of the pictures was rated highest by patients with anorexia nervosa, followed by the HC and bulimia nervosa groups. Conclusions Patients with eating disorders show a generalized attentional bias for food images, regardless of caloric value. This might explain the persistent preoccupation with food in these individuals.

  11. Hypovitaminosis D3, Leukopenia, and Human Serotonin Transporter Polymorphism in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tasegian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D3 has been described to have different extraskeletal roles by acting as parahormone in obesity, diabetes, cancer, cognitive impairment, and dementia and to have important regulatory functions in innate immunity. There are no studies showing extraskeletal changes associated with hypovitaminosis D3 in eating disorders. Methods. We have analyzed the blood of 18 patients affected by anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa collected over a 15-month period. We performed a panel of chemical and clinical analyses: the assay of vitamin D3, the immunoblotting of vitamin D receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, and the genotyping of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region. Results. We choose 18 patients with a normal blood test profile such as thyroid hormones, hepatic and renal parameters, triglycerides, proteins, vitamin B12, and folic acid. Among these emerged the case of a woman with long-term anorexia nervosa and the case of a woman with long-term bulimia nervosa both complicated by anxiety and depression, severe hypovitaminosis D3, decrease of vitamin D receptor, leukopenia, and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter linked polymorphic region short allele. Conclusion. The results induce hypothesising that the severe hypovitaminosis D3 might be responsible for the lack of the inflammatory response and the depressive symptoms in patients with long-term eating disorders.

  12. Fractures in patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders--a nationwide register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter; Emborg, Charlotte; Støving, René K

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study fracture risk in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), or eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS). METHOD: Cohort study including all Danes diagnosed with AN (n = 2,149), BN (n = 1,294), or EDNOS (n = 942) between 1977 and 1998. Each patient...

  13. Review of Studies on the Relationships between Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa Tendency, Self Image, Body Image, and Sex-role

    OpenAIRE

    鈴木, 真理江

    1995-01-01

    In this study, the researches on relationships between anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, self image, body image, and sex role were reviewed. The etiology of eating disorder has been said to be multidimensional. We need to consider the relationships between these factors which constitute the multidimensional model.

  14. A abordagem familiar no tratamento da anorexia e bulimia nervosa Family assessment in the treatment of anorexia and bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Weisz Cobelo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available O final do século XX enfatiza a inclusão da família no tratamento de pacientes portadores de anorexia e bulimia nervosa. Pesquisas (Castro et al.,2000; Webster et al.,2000 colocam como relevante considerar a estrutura familiar, as práticas conversacionais e os legados transgeracionais como elementos que podem estar contribuindo, de modo significativo, no desenvolvimento ou na manutenção dos transtornos alimentares. No Ambulatório de Bulimia e Transtornos Alimentares e no Projeto de Atendimento a Crianças e Adolescentes do IPQ, o grande desafio dos terapeutas de família tem sido compartilhar com famílias e pacientes suas histórias repletas de inseguranças e angústias e construir uma ponte de união entre a família e a equipe multidisciplinar, para que a compreensão dos significados, refletida por todos, possa ser agilizada e transformada em novas contribuições de vida para as pacientes e seus familiares.The end of the 20th century emphasizes the inclusion of the family in the treatment of the patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Researches (Castro et al.,2000; Webster et al.,2000 determine as relevant to consider the family structure, the interaction pattern, and the "transgeneration bequest" - the legacy that goes from one generation to the next - as elements that might contribute in a significant way to the development or maintenance of the eating disorders. At the Bulimia and Eating Disorders Ambulatory and in the IPQ's Project for Attendance of Children and Adolescents, the great challenge for the family therapists has been to share with the families and patients their histories full of insecurity and anguish. The therapists must also overcome the difficulties of building a bridge that brings together the family and the multidisciplinary team so that the comprehension of the meanings, reflected by all, might be quickly transformed into new life contributions to these patients and their families.

  15. Dialectical Behavior Therapy of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa among Adolescents: A Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Bohnekamp, Inga; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Miller, Alec L.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a case series of adolescents (mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.0) with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) who received dialectical behavior therapy (DBT). Twelve outpatients with AN and BN took part in 25 weeks of twice weekly therapy consisting of individual therapy and a skills training group.…

  16. Neuropsychological correlates of decision making in patients with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Matthias; Franke-Sievert, Christiane; Jacoby, Georg E; Markowitsch, Hans J; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2007-11-01

    In addition to the core psychopathology of bulimia nervosa (BN), patients with BN often show impulsive behavior that has been related to decision making deficits in other patient groups, such as individuals with anorexia nervosa and pathological gamblers. However, it remains unclear whether BN patients also show difficulties in decision making. In this study, 14 patients with BN and 14 healthy comparison subjects, matched for age, gender, education, body mass index, and intelligence, were examined with the Game of Dice Task (M. Brand, E. Fujiwara, et al., 2005), a gambling task that has fixed winning probabilities and explicit rules for gains and losses, as well as with a neuropsychological test battery and personality questionnaires. On the task, the patients with BN chose the disadvantageous alternatives more frequently than did the comparison subjects. Performance on the Game of Dice Task was related to executive functioning but not to other neuropsychological functions, personality, or disease-specific variables in the BN group. Thus, in patients with BN, decision making abnormalities and executive reductions can be demonstrated and might be neuropsychological correlates of the patients' dysfunctional everyday-life decision making behavior. Neurocognitive functions should be considered in the treatment of BN.

  17. Trail making task performance in inpatients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vall, Eva; Wade, Tracey D

    2015-07-01

    Set-shifting inefficiencies have been consistently identified in adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). It is less clear to what degree similar inefficiencies are present in those with bulimia nervosa (BN). It is also unknown whether perfectionism is related to set-shifting performance. We employed a commonly used set-shifting measure, the Trail Making Test (TMT), to compare the performance of inpatients with AN and BN with a healthy control sample. We also investigated whether perfectionism predicted TMT scores. Only the BN sample showed significantly suboptimal performance, while the AN sample was indistinguishable from controls on all measures. There were no differences between the AN subtypes (restrictive or binge/purge), but group sizes were small. Higher personal standards perfectionism was associated with better TMT scores across groups. Higher concern over mistakes perfectionism predicted better accuracy in the BN sample. Further research into the set-shifting profile of individuals with BN or binge/purge behaviours is needed.

  18. Investigation of Oxytocin Secretion in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa: Relationships to Temperament Personality Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Volpe, Umberto; Di Maso, Virginia; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2016-01-01

    Published studies suggested an implication of oxytocin in some temperament characteristics of personality. Therefore, we measured oxytocin secretion in 23 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), 27 with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 19 healthy controls and explored the relationships between circulating oxytocin and patients' personality traits. Plasma oxytocin levels were significantly reduced in AN women but not in BN ones. In healthy women, the attachment subscale scores of the reward dependence temperament and the harm avoidance (HA) scores explained 82% of the variability in circulating oxytocin. In BN patients, plasma oxytocin resulted to be negatively correlated with HA, whereas no significant correlations emerged in AN patients. These findings confirm a dysregulation of oxytocin production in AN but not in BN and show, for the first time, a disruption of the associations between hormone levels and patients' temperament traits, which may have a role in certain deranged behaviours of eating disorder patients.

  19. Dying on the Inside: What Every Teacher Needs to Know About Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, and the Individual Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Marc

    This document provides teachers with information on the identifying features of anorexia nervosa and bulimia and suggests steps which teachers can take to encourage individual children in more positive behavior. The paper makes clear distinctions between anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and bulimarexia, describing the symptoms of each disorder. It is…

  20. Neural responses during social and self-knowledge tasks in bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie J Mcadams

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Self-evaluation closely dependent upon body shape and weight is one of the defining criteria for bulimia nervosa. We studied 53 adult women, 17 with bulimia nervosa, 18 with a recent history of anorexia nervosa, and 18 healthy comparison women, using three different fMRI tasks that required thinking about self-knowledge and social interactions: the Social Identity task, the Physical Identity task, and the Social Attribution task. Previously, we identified regions of interest (ROI in the same tasks using whole brain voxel-wise comparisons of the healthy comparison women and women with a recent history of anorexia nervosa. Here, we report on the neural activations in those ROIs in subjects with bulimia nervosa. In the Social Attribution task, we examined activity in the right temporoparietal junction, an area frequently associated with mentalization. In the Social Identity task, we examined activity in the precuneus and dorsal anterior cingulate. In the Physical Identity task, we examined activity in a ventral region of the dorsal anterior cingulate. Interestingly, in all tested regions, the average activation in subjects with bulimia was more than the average activation levels seen in the subjects with a history of anorexia but less than that seen in healthy subjects. In three regions, the right temporoparietal junction, the precuneus, and the dorsal anterior cingulate, group responses in the subjects with bulimia were significantly different from healthy subjects but not subjects with anorexia. The neural activations of people with bulimia nervosa performing fMRI tasks engaging social processing are more similar to people with anorexia nervosa than healthy people. This suggests biological measures of social processes may be helpful in characterizing individuals with eating disorders.

  1. The efficacy of a brief group CBT program in treating patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa: a brief report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Allan; Clausen, Loa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a brief group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program in treating a large cohort of patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. METHOD: Treatment outcome defined as reductions in bulimia related behavioral symptoms and bulimia related ...

  2. [Assessment of emotional reactivity to food images in bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Martínez, Ma Angeles; Bernabé, José Ramon Yela; Ruiz, Alfonso Salgado; Rodríguez, María Cortés

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the influence on reactivity to food images of the following variables: craving-trait, positive or negative mood state, and food restriction. Emotional modulation of the defense startle reflex (RMS) was assessed in 26 women at risk of suffering from bulimia nervosa; they were assigned one of to two groups: high craving-trait and low craving-trait. Before the test, positive or negative mood and restriction vs. non-restriction states were induced in each of the groups. Skin conductance response (SCR) and electromyogram activity from the orbiculari oculi region were recorded after the auditory stimuli; questionnaires such as Food Craving Trait Questionnaire (FCQ-T) and the Self-assessment Manikin (SAM) were used. Results showed that negative affect produced a negative valence of food images, more arousal, and more loss of control, as well as higher SCRs. Subjects with low FCQ-T levels reduced their RMS to food images as a consequence of experiencing positive emotions; when emotions were negative, their RMS increased.

  3. Frontostriatal circuits and the development of bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Laura A; Marsh, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by both recurrent episodes of binge eating that are, in part, defined by a sense of loss of control and compensatory behaviors to avoid weight gain. Impulsive behaviors are also common in individuals with BN, indicating more pervasive difficulties in behavioral self-regulation. Findings from functional and anatomical neuroimaging studies of individuals with BN suggest dysfunction in the dorsal frontostriatal circuits that support self-regulatory capacities and habit learning and in overlapping ventral circuits that support reward processing and reward-based learning. In this review, we describe the normal development of frontostriatal circuits and then present behavioral and neuroimaging data from adolescents and adults with BN. These data suggest that the abnormal maturation of frontostriatal circuits may contribute to the habitual binge-eating and purging behaviors of BN. Future longitudinal imaging studies will improve understanding of how these circuits contribute to the developmental trajectory of BN and will inform novel interventions that could target or prevent the impulsive and habit-like features of this disorder.

  4. Evaluation of the DSM-5 severity indicator for bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M; Ivezaj, Valentina; White, Marney A

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the DSM-5 severity criterion for bulimia nervosa (BN) based on the frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. 199 community volunteers classified with BN were categorized using DSM-5 severity levels and compared on demographic and clinical variables. 77 (39%) participants were categorized as mild, 68 (34%) as moderate, 32 (16%) as severe, and 22 (11%) as extreme. The severity groups did not differ significantly in demographic variables or body mass index. Shape and Weight concerns did not differ significantly across severity groups. Binge eating differed with the extreme group having significantly higher frequency than the severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Restraint differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than the mild group. Eating concerns differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than moderate and mild groups. Depression differed with the extreme group having significantly higher levels than severe, moderate, and mild groups, which did not differ from each other. Findings from this non-clinical group provide new, albeit modest, support for DSM-5 severity rating for BN based on frequency of inappropriate weight compensatory behaviors. Statistical findings indicate that differences in collateral clinical variables associated with the DSM-5 severity ratings reflect small effect sizes. Further research is needed with treatment-seeking patient groups with BN to establish the validity of the DSM-5 severity specifier and should include broader clinical and functional validators.

  5. Bulimia nervosa in overweight and normal-weight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masheb, Robin; White, Marney A

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine overweight bulimia nervosa (BN) in a community sample of women. Volunteers (n = 1964) completed self-report questionnaires of weight, binge eating, purging, and cognitive features. Participants were classified as overweight (body mass index ≥25) or normal weight (body mass index <25). Rates of BN within the overweight and normal-weight classes did not differ (6.4% vs 7.9%). Of the 131 participants identified as BN, 64% (n = 84) were classified as overweight BN and 36% (n = 47) as normal-weight BN. The overweight BN group had a greater proportion of ethnic minorities and reported significantly less restraint than the normal-weight BN group. Otherwise, the 2 groups reported similarly, even in terms of purging and depression. In summary, rates of BN did not differ between overweight and normal-weight women. Among BN participants, the majority (two thirds) were overweight. Differences in ethnicity and restraint, but little else, were found between overweight and normal-weight BN. Findings from the present study should serve to increase awareness of the weight range and ethnic diversity of BN, and highlight the need to address weight and cultural sensitivity in the identification and treatment of eating disorders.

  6. Normal interoceptive accuracy in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollatos, Olga; Georgiou, Eleana

    2016-06-30

    Previous studies suggest that patients suffering from bulimia nervosa (BN) have difficulties in perceiving internal bodily signals, mostly assessed by self-report questionnaires. Whether interoception is, in this case, attenuated or not remains an open question. Therefore, interoceptive processes were examined in twenty-three patients with current BN and were compared to healthy participants. We investigated Interoceptive Accuracy (IAc) assessed by the heartbeat detection task and Interoceptive Awareness (IA) assessed by the Eating Disorder Inventory-2. Patients with BN and healthy participants did not differ in terms of IAc when controlling for BMI, depression and anxiety, whereas IA among BN patients was found to have decreased. Although IAc and IA were not related among controls, we observed an inverse correlation in BN, suggesting that an abnormal overlap between these two levels of interoceptive signal processing is present in BN. The current study introduces a new perspective concerning the role of interoceptive processes in BN and generates further questions regarding the therapeutic utility of methods targeting the interaction between different levels of interoception in the treatment of BN.

  7. Frontostriatal circuits and the development of bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Berner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulimia nervosa (BN is characterized by both recurrent episodes of binge eating that are, in part, defined by a sense of loss of control and compensatory behaviors to avoid weight gain. Impulsive behaviors are also common in individuals with BN, indicating more pervasive difficulties in behavioral self-regulation. Findings from functional and anatomical neuroimaging studies of individuals with BN suggest dysfunction in the dorsal frontostriatal circuits that support self-regulatory capacities and habit learning and in overlapping ventral circuits that support reward processing and reward-based learning. In this review, we describe the normal development of frontostriatal circuits and then present behavioral and neuroimaging data from adolescents and adults with BN. These data suggest that the abnormal maturation of frontostriatal circuits may contribute to the habitual binge-eating and purging behaviors of BN. Future longitudinal imaging studies will improve understanding of how these circuits contribute to the developmental trajectory of BN and will inform novel interventions that could target or prevent the impulsive and habit-like features of this disorder.

  8. 神经性贪食症的心理干预%Psychotherapy for Bulimia Nervosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇; 陈健芷; 姜梦

    2013-01-01

    神经性贪食症(Bulimia Nervosa,BN)的治疗中,常采用心理干预的方法.本文对BN的心理干预研究进行系统的回顾,以确定不同干预方法的有效性、安全性及相关影响因素,并结合国内研究现状对其进行评价和展望.%In the treatment of bulimia nervosa,psychotherapy is a frequently-used method,which has certain effect.To evaluate the efficacy,security and influence factors of psychotherapy methods,we have reviewed the bulimia nervosa current research and put forward evaluations and prospects.

  9. Meal-induced compositional changes in blood and saliva in persons with bulimia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dynesen, Anja Weirsøe; Jensen, Allan Bardow; Astrup, Arne

    2008-01-01

    to be involved in the physiologic regulation of appetite and metabolism. Objective: The objective was to investigate whether circulating concentrations of the appetite-regulating peptides leptin and ghrelin and markers of metabolism (glucose and insulin) are different in persons with bulimia nervosa than...... of potentially xerogenic medication. Subjects with bulimia nervosa experienced reduced hunger, which could not be explained by pre- or postprandial alterations in circulating ghrelin, leptin, insulin, or glucose concentrations. Conclusions: There were no apparent differences in the composition of blood...

  10. Management of anorexia and bulimia nervosa: An evidence-based review

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are primarily psychiatric disorders characterized by severe disturbances of eating behavior. Eating disorders are most prevalent in the Western culture where food is in abundance and female attractiveness is equated with thinness. Eating disorders are rare in countries like India. Despite a plethora of management options available to the mental health professionals, no major breakthrough has been achieved in recent years. Nutritional rehabilitation along w...

  11. Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, and Binge Eating Disorder in Midlife and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elran-Barak, Roni; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Benyamini, Yael; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Hill, Laura L; Crosby, Ross D; Mitchell, James E; Le Grange, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    We examined eating disorders in midlife and beyond by comparing frequency of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and other specified feeding or eating disorder (OSFED) among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals and younger controls. We also compared demographic and eating disorder-related characteristics across diagnoses and age groups. Participants included 2,118 treatment-seeking adults who self-reported their eating-related symptoms on the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Results showed that percent of patients with BN was significantly lower whereas percent of patients with BED and OSFED was significantly higher among midlife relative to younger patients. Percent of patients with AN did not differ between midlife and younger patients. Additionally, midlife and younger patients with BED and OSFED differed on several demographic (e.g., marital status) and eating disorder-related characteristics (e.g., BMI, compulsive exercising). This study suggests that BN is less common whereas BED and OSFED are more common among midlife eating disorder treatment-seeking individuals relative to younger controls. In addition, AN and BN present fairly similarly whereas BED and OSFED present fairly differently among midlife patients relative to younger controls. Attention to these differences and similarities is necessary to understand eating disorders in midlife.

  12. CCK response in bulimia nervosa and following remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon-Engel, Sandra L; Filin, Evgeniy E; Wolfe, Barbara E

    2013-10-02

    The core defining features of bulimia nervosa (BN) are repeated binge eating episodes and inappropriate compensatory (e.g., purging) behavior. Previous studies suggest an abnormal post-prandial response in the satiety-signaling peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) in persons with BN. It is unknown whether this altered response persists following remission or if it may be a potential target for the development of clinical treatment strategies. To examine the nature of this altered response, this study assessed whether CCK normalizes following remission from BN (RBN). This study prospectively evaluated the plasma CCK response and corresponding eating behavior-related ratings (e.g., satiety, fullness, hunger, urge to binge and vomit) in individuals with BN-purging subtype (n=10), RBN-purging subtype (n=14), and healthy controls (CON, n=13) at baseline, +15, +30, and +60 min following the ingestion of a standardized liquid test meal. Subject groups did not significantly differ in CCK response to the test meal. A significant relationship between CCK response and satiety ratings was observed in the RBN group (r=.59, p<.05 two-tailed). A new and unanticipated finding in the BN group was a significant relationship between CCK response and ratings of "urge to vomit" (r=.86, p<.01, two-tailed). Unlike previous investigations, CCK response did not differ in BN and CON groups. Thus the role of symptom severity remains an area of further investigation. Additionally, findings suggest that in this sample, CCK functioning following remission from BN-purging subtype is not different from controls. It remains unknown whether or not CCK functioning may be a protective or liability factor in the stabilization and recovery process. Replication studies utilizing a larger sample size are needed to further elucidate the role of CCK in recovery from BN and its potential target of related novel treatment strategies.

  13. The Bulimia Test--Revised: Validation with "DSM-IV" Criteria for Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Bulimia Test--Revised (BULIT-R) was given to 23 female subjects who met the criteria for bulimia in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-IV) and 124 female controls. The BULIT-R appears to be a valid instruction for identifying individuals who meet DSM-IV criteria for bulimia. (SLD)

  14. Health services use in women with a history of bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Striegel-Moore, RH; Dohm, FA; Kraemer, HC; Schreiber, GB; Crawford, PB; Daniels, [No Value

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined health services use during the past 12 months in a sample of young women with a history of an adolescent eating disorder (bulimia nervosa [BN] or binge eating disorder [BED]). Method: A community sample of 1,582 young women (mean age = 21.5 years) was classified

  15. The Clinical Features of Binge Eating Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa: What Are the Differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Keri A.

    2001-01-01

    Compares the clinical characteristics of binge eating disorder (BED) and the related syndrome bulimia nervosa (BN). Findings suggest individuals with BED are distinguishable from those with BN on a number of traits, including higher rates of obesity and lower levels of eating concern and dietary restraint. (Contains 29 references and 2 tables.)…

  16. How Schools Can Help Combat Student Eating Disorders. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Michael P.

    This book presents a comprehensive review of anorexia nervosa and bulimia and the roles that schools can have in preventing, identifying, and treating these disorders. Chapter 1 provides an overview of student eating disorders and presents a case study of a high school student with an eating disorder. Chapter 2 discusses the nature of anorexia…

  17. Impact of fasting on food craving, mood and consumption in bulimia nervosa and healthy women participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Domínguez, Silvia; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Sonia; Fernández-Santaella, M Carmen; Ortega-Roldán, Blanca; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio

    2012-11-01

    Researchers have found that dietary restraint increases food cravings and may contribute to loss of control over eating. Negative mood states often precede food cravings and binge eating. In the present study, we tested the influence of a prolonged food deprivation period over emotional states and food cravings. Twenty-one bulimia nervosa participants and 20 healthy women participants were asked to refrain from any eating for 20 hours and reported, at baseline, after 6 hours and at the end of the fasting period, their mood and craving states. Food consumption was also measured. Fasting increased food cravings in both groups but increased negative mood in healthy women only. Bulimia nervosa participants reported improved mood following food deprivation. Whereas Bulimia nervosa and healthy women participants ate moderate and similar amounts of food following the 20-hour fasting period, food cravings were significantly associated with the number of calories ingested. These findings are congruent with self-regulation theories that predict that prolonged fasting may reduce negative emotions in women with bulimia nervosa.

  18. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for subthreshold bulimia nervosa: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C B; Miller, K B; Willer, M G; Ziesmer, J; Durkin, N; Arikian, A; Crow, S J

    2011-09-01

    The extent to which cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is helpful in treating individuals with bulimic symptoms who do not meet full criteria for bulimia nervosa is unclear. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the potential efficacy of CBT for eating disorder individuals with bulimic symptoms who do not meet full criteria for bulimia nervosa. Twelve participants with subthreshold bulimia nervosa were treated in a case series with 20 sessions of CBT. Ten of the 12 participants (83.3%) completed treatment. Intent-to-treat abstinent percentages were 75.0% for objectively large episodes of binge eating (OBEs), 33.3% for subjectively large episodes of binge eating (SBEs), and 50% for purging at end of treatment. At one year follow-up, 66.7% were abstinent for OBEs, 41.7% for SBEs, and 50.0% for purging. The majority also reported improvements in associated symptoms. This case series provides support for the use of CBT with individuals with subthreshold bulimia nervosa.

  19. Predictors and Moderators of Outcome in Family-Based Treatment for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, Daniel; Crosby, Ross D.; Lock, James

    2008-01-01

    The predictors and moderators of treatment outcome for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) are explored among those who participated in family based treatment or individual supportive psychotherapy. It is concluded that family-based treatment of BN may be most effective in those cases with low levels of eating disorder psychopathology.

  20. Emotion Awareness and Identification Skills in Adolescent Girls with Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Leslie; Zeman, Janice

    2004-01-01

    This study examined emotion-identification skills in 19 adolescent girls (M age = 16 years, 8 months) diagnosed with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV], American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnosis of bulimia nervosa or eating disorder not otherwise specified in the bulimic spectrum, 19 age-matched girls…

  1. Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Body Image Exposure for Bulimia Nervosa: A Case Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delinsky, Sherrie S.; Wilson, G. Terence

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for bulimia nervosa (BN). However, among patients with BN, symptom improvement is more pronounced for behavioral eating symptoms (i.e., bingeing and purging) than for body image disturbance, and the persistence of body image disturbance is associated with relapse. The need for more…

  2. Coping Strategies in Bulimia Nervosa Treatment: Impact on Outcome in Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binford, Roslyn B.; Mussell, Melissa Pederson; Crosby, Ross D.; Peterson, Carol B.; Crow, Scott J.; Mitchell, James E.

    2005-01-01

    This study's purpose was to examine the extent to which participants (N = 143) receiving cognitive-behavioral therapy for bulimia nervosa (BN) reported implementing therapeutic strategies to abstain from BN behaviors, and to assess whether use of specific strategies predicts outcome at treatment end and 1-and 6-month follow-up. Frequency of…

  3. An Examination of the Mechanisms of Action in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Diane L.; Baldwin, Scott A.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN) has received considerable empirical support for its efficacy. However, few investigators have examined the mechanisms proposed to account for the reduction of BN symptoms during CBT. The current study examined the associations between therapist interventions, client mechanisms, and…

  4. Comparison of Six- and Eight-Session Cognitive Guided Self-Help for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furber, Gareth; Steele, Anna; Wade, Tracey D.

    2004-01-01

    A previous case-series evaluation of a six-session guided self-help (GSH) approach with 15 people with bulimia nervosa (BN) showed significant reductions across all measures, including binge eating, self-induced vomiting, weight concern, shape concern and dietary restraint. However, the reduction of binge eating and self-induced vomiting was…

  5. Familial Contributions to the Etiology and Course of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Michael; Humphrey, Laura Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Discusses familial influences in anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Reviews descriptions of family interaction, familial correlates of course and phenomenology of symptoms, and studies of familial transmission. Concludes that certain personality factors, possibly genetically determined, predispose the individual to greater sensitivity and vulnerability…

  6. Assessment and Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia in School Age Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Carole; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are major concerns for high school students, especially females. These syndromes interfere with normal functioning and social development and can be life-threatening. Definitions, characteristics, symptoms, and treatment approaches for these two eating disorders are discussed, and suggestions for involvement of the…

  7. Depression and Drive for Thinness are Associated with Persistent Bulimia Nervosa in the Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Hoek, Hans W.; Sihvola, Elina; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine psychiatric comorbidity and factors that influence the outcome of bulimia nervosa (BN) in the general population. Method Women from the nationwide birth cohorts of Finnish twins were screened for lifetime BN (N=59) by using questionnaires and the Structured Clinical Interview fo

  8. A psychological typology of females diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadetta Izydorczyk

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The present paper reports the results of research aimed at identifying intra-group differences among females suffering from different eating disorders (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder in terms of the subjects’ psychological traits, adoption of socio-cultural norms (through media pressure, internationalization of norms, and exposure to information concerning body image standards, and the level of body dissatisfaction. The following research question was asked: is it possible to distinguish specific profiles of psychological characteristics, as well as levels of body dissatisfaction, social pressure, media exposure and internalization of common standards of body image? Participants and procedure The clinical population consisted of 121 females aged 20-26. The research was conducted in the years 2007-2012. The following research methods and procedures were applied: 1 a clinical interview, 2 the Contour Drawing Rating Scale, 3 the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI, 4 a Polish translation of the Socio-cultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire (SATAQ-3. Results Cluster analysis of the research data allowed four significantly different clusters to be distinguished in the group of 121 examined females suffering from eating disorders. In the next step, analysis of variance (the ANOVA test was used to compare the differences between the examined clusters in terms of the investigated variables and their indicators. Conclusions Due to significant differences between the examined females in terms of the strength levels and the configuration of psychological and socio-cultural variables investigated in the present study, the females were classified into four different psychological types referred to as neurotic, perfectionist, impulsive and adolescent-narcissistic.

  9. Bulimia nervosa patient diagnosed with previously unsuspected ADHD in adulthood: clinical case report, literature review, and diagnostic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, Konstantinos; Serfontein, Jaco; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing literature suggesting a link between attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and eating disorders (EDs), especially bulimia nervosa. ADHD is under-diagnosed in girls and children of high intelligence are typically missed. We identified a case of a 23-year-old woman suffering from severe bulimia nervosa and previously unsuspected ADHD in adulthood; we diagnosed and treated her with extended-release methylphenidate. We performed a literature review on the ADHD and bulimia nervosa comorbidity. We discuss the reasons why her ADHD remained undiagnosed and the difficulties in diagnosing ADHD in patients with EDs. We suggest that identifying comorbid ADHD is crucial for these patients and argue for the use of a structured interview, collateral history and investigation of onset of symptoms to establish a diagnosis of ADHD in adults with bulimia nervosa. Comorbidities and overlap of symptomatology need to be taken into account.

  10. Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition intervention in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that nutrition intervention, including nutritional counseling, by a registered dietitian (RD) is an essential component of the team treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other eating disorders during assessment and treatment across the continuum of care. Diagnostic criteria for eating disorders provide important guidelines for identification and treatment. However, it is thought that a continuum of disordered eating may exist that ranges from persistent dieting to subthreshold conditions and then to defined eating disorders, which include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Understanding the complexities of eating disorders, such as influencing factors, comorbid illness, medical and psychological complications, and boundary issues, is critical in the effective treatment of eating disorders. The nature of eating disorders requires a collaborative approach by an interdisciplinary team of psychological, nutritional, and medical specialists. The RD is an integral member of the treatment team and is uniquely qualified to provide medical nutrition therapy for the normalization of eating patterns and nutritional status. RDs provide nutritional counseling, recognize clinical signs related to eating disorders, and assist with medical monitoring while cognizant of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy that are cornerstones of eating disorder treatment. Specialized resources are available for RDs to advance their level of expertise in the field of eating disorders. Further efforts with evidenced-based research must continue for improved treatment outcomes related to eating disorders along with identification of effective primary and secondary interventions.

  11. Low density and high affinity of platelet [3H]paroxetine binding in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Agneta; Sundblad-Elverfors, Charlotta; Landén, Mikael; Eriksson, Tomas; Eriksson, Elias

    2006-06-15

    Impaired serotonin transmission has been suggested to be implicated in the pathophysiology of bulimia nervosa. As an indirect measure of brain serotonergic activity, the binding of tritiated ligands to platelet serotonin transporters has been studied in bulimia nervosa as well as in other putatively serotonin-related psychiatric disorders. In this study, the density and affinity of platelet serotonin transporters were assessed in 20 women meeting the DSM-IV criteria for bulimia nervosa and in 14 controls without previous or ongoing eating disorder using [(3)H]paroxetine as a ligand. In comparison to controls, women with bulimia nervosa had a significantly reduced number of platelet binding sites (B(max) = 721 +/- 313 vs. 1145 +/- 293 fmol/mg protein) and an increase in the affinity for the ligand demonstrated by a lower dissociaton constant (K(d) = 33 +/- 10 vs. 44 +/- 10 pM). A significant correlation between B(max) and K(d) values was found in patients but not in controls. Our results support the notion that bulimia nervosa is associated with a reduction in platelet serotonin transporter density. In addition, our study is the first to report that this reduced transporter density in women with bulimia nervosa is accompanied by an increase in the affinity of the transporter for the ligand.

  12. Prevalence of Disordered Eating Behaviors and Bulimia Nervosa in a Sample of Mexican American Female College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Regan; Petrie, Trent A.

    1998-01-01

    Disordered eating behaviors and bulimia nervosa were examined in a sample of female Mexican Americans. Results showed that 1.45% to 4.3% could be classified with bulimia. Just over 11% indicated regular binge eating. Dieting and exercising were the primary techniques used for weight control. Implications for intervention are briefly discussed.…

  13. [Prevention and Treatment of Eating Disorders: The Health Care Network Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Angelika; Gumz, Antje; Kästner, Denise; Romer, Georg; Wegscheider, Karl; Löwe, Bernd

    2015-07-01

    The "Health care network anorexia and bulimia nervosa", a subproject of psychenet - the Hamburg network for mental health - aims to decrease the incidence of eating disorders as well as the risk for chronic illness courses. One focal project, therefore, evaluates a school-based prevention manual in a randomized controlled trial. The other one examines the impact of a systemic public health intervention on early treatment initiation in anorexia nervosa. The present article provides an overview about study design and interventions in both focal projects as well as preliminary results.

  14. Client attachment security predicts alliance in a randomized controlled trial of two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Sofie; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Poulsen, Stig Bernt;

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relation between clients’ attachment patterns and the therapeutic alliance in two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa. Method: Data derive from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy for bulimia...... nervosa. Client attachment patterns were assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview. Independent raters scored audiotapes of early, middle, and late therapy sessions for 68 clients (175 sessions) using the Vanderbilt Therapeutic Alliance Scale. Results: Client attachment security was found...... to be a significant (p = .007) predictor of alliance levels at the three measured time points, with clients higher on attachment security developing stronger alliances with their therapists in both treatments as compared to clients higher on attachment insecurity. No evidence was found to support a hypothesized...

  15. Orlistat abuse in a case of bulimia nervosa: the changing Indian society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Koushik Sinha; Gupta, Rishab; Varshney, Mohit

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders like bulimia nervosa, generally considered to be rare in Asian countries, are currently on the rise among the youth, probably secondary to rapid westernization and globalization of the orient. Clinical manifestations of these disorders, which were previously thought to be different in the oriental countries, are now also often seen to parallel their western counterparts. However, detailed clinical descriptions of such cases from Asian countries, documenting the societal change, are missing. In addition, the possibility of abuse of various anti-obesity drugs as a part of bulimic compensatory behavior is high in this population, given the easy and unsupervised access of these drugs over the counter. We report a case of bulimia nervosa in a female medical graduate from India, presenting with classic bulimic symptomatology and with a compensatory behavior consisting almost exclusively of Orlistat abuse. This case sensitizes health professionals to the abuse liability of new medications like Orlistat and also documents the changing symptomatology of bulimia nervosa in India.

  16. The Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa through Adventure Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Rebecca; Priest, Simon

    1994-01-01

    Describes how adventure therapy can be adapted to help individuals suffering from bulimia develop effective coping mechanisms, increase self-esteem, and gain appreciation for their bodies. Goal is for participants to recognize compulsive behavior in relation to their attitudes and to understand underlying processes that lead to those behaviors and…

  17. Correlates of Bulimia Nervosa: Early Family Mealtime Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Debra A. F.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined relationship of early mealtime experiences to later bulimia in 128 female college students. Found significant group differences among bulimics, nonbulimics, and repeat dieters on early meal experience questionnaire, with bulimic group reporting most negative and unusual experiences. Found significant differences among groups on depression…

  18. Central and peripheral peptides regulating eating behaviour and energy homeostasis in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorella, Alfonso; Brambilla, Francesca; Fabrazzo, Michele; Volpe, Umberto; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Mastromo, Daniele; Monteleone, Palmiero

    2014-09-01

    A large body of literature suggests the occurrence of a dysregulation in both central and peripheral modulators of appetite in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), but at the moment, the state or trait-dependent nature of those changes is far from being clear. It has been proposed, although not definitively proved, that peptide alterations, even when secondary to malnutrition and/or to aberrant eating behaviours, might contribute to the genesis and the maintenance of some symptomatic aspects of AN and BN, thus affecting the course and the prognosis of these disorders. This review focuses on the most significant literature studies that explored the physiology of those central and peripheral peptides, which have prominent effects on eating behaviour, body weight and energy homeostasis in patients with AN and BN. The relevance of peptide dysfunctions for the pathophysiology of eating disorders is critically discussed.

  19. De-stabilization of the positive vago-vagal reflex in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Patricia L; Hofbauer, Randall D; Daughters, Randall; Vandenlangenberg, Erin; Iversen, Laureen; Goodale, Robert L; Maxwell, Robert; Eckert, Elke D; Hartman, Boyd K

    2008-04-22

    Bulimia nervosa is characterized by consuming large amounts of food over a defined period with a loss of control over the eating. This is followed by a compensatory behavior directed at eliminating the consumed calories, usually vomiting. Current treatments include antidepressants and/or behavioral therapies. Consensus exists that these treatments are not very effective and are associated with high relapse rates. We review evidence from literature and present original data to evaluate the hypothesis that bulimia involves alterations in vago-vagal function. Evidence in support of this include (1) laboratory studies consistently illustrate deficits in meal size, meal termination, and satiety in bulimia; (2) basic science studies indicate that meal size and satiation are under vagal influences; (3) anatomical, behavioral and physiological data suggest that achieving satiety and the initiation of emesis involve common neural substrates; (4) abnormal vagal and vago-vagal reflexive functions extend to non-eating activational stimuli; and (5) studies from our laboratory modulating vagal activation have shown significant effects on binge/vomit frequencies and suggest a return of normal satiation. We propose a model for the pathophysiology of bulimia based upon de-stabilization of a bi-stable positive vago-vagal feedback loop. This model is not meant to be complete, but rather to stimulate anatomical, psychobiological, and translational neuroscience experiments aimed at elucidating the pathophysiology of bulimia and developing novel treatment strategies.

  20. Altered structural and effective connectivity in anorexia and bulimia nervosa in circuits that regulate energy and reward homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, G K W; Shott, M E; Riederer, J; Pryor, T L

    2016-11-01

    Anorexia and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders that share many behaviors. Structural and functional brain circuits could provide biological links that those disorders have in common. We recruited 77 young adult women, 26 healthy controls, 26 women with anorexia and 25 women with bulimia nervosa. Probabilistic tractography was used to map white matter connectivity strength across taste and food intake regulating brain circuits. An independent multisample greedy equivalence search algorithm tested effective connectivity between those regions during sucrose tasting. Anorexia and bulimia nervosa had greater structural connectivity in pathways between insula, orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum, but lower connectivity from orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala to the hypothalamus (Panorexia and bulimia nervosa effective connectivity was directed from anterior cingulate via ventral striatum to the hypothalamus. Across all groups, sweetness perception was predicted by connectivity strength in pathways connecting to the middle orbitofrontal cortex. This study provides evidence that white matter structural as well as effective connectivity within the energy-homeostasis and food reward-regulating circuitry is fundamentally different in anorexia and bulimia nervosa compared with that in controls. In eating disorders, anterior cingulate cognitive-emotional top down control could affect food reward and eating drive, override hypothalamic inputs to the ventral striatum and enable prolonged food restriction.

  1. Women with bulimia nervosa exhibit attenuated secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1, pancreatic polypeptide, and insulin in response to a meal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessén, Sabine; Carlström, Kjell; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2011-01-01

    The eating disorder bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by frequent episodes of binge eating, followed regularly by inappropriate compensatory behavior, such as self-induced vomiting.......The eating disorder bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by frequent episodes of binge eating, followed regularly by inappropriate compensatory behavior, such as self-induced vomiting....

  2. Art therapy, psychodrama, and verbal therapy. An integrative model of group therapy in the treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond-Raab, Lisa; Orrell-Valente, Joan K

    2002-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa typically afflict individuals in adolescence. Given the intractability of these diseases in combination with the natural recalcitrance of adolescence, treatment with this population presents a daunting challenge. Traditional group therapy that focuses on verbal therapy is often not effective with this population, particularly in the acute stages of the diseases. A group therapy approach that integrates art therapy, psychodrama, and verbal therapy offers an innovative alternative to traditional group therapy.

  3. Effect of management of patients with Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa on symptoms and impulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sernec, Karin; Tomori, Martina; Zalar, Bojan

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the study was to provide further and up to date information on the evaluation of the management of Anorexia and Bulimia nervosa at the Eating Disorders Unit (EDU) of the Ljubljana Psychiatric Clinic, based upon detailed assessment of the eating disorders specific and non specific symptoms of impulsive behaviors, highly correlated with these entities. 34 female patients with anorexia (restrictive or purgative type) and 38 female patients with Bulimia nervosa (purgative or non-purgative type) undergoing hospital treatment at the EDU were evaluated upon admission, as well as upon discharge and three and six months after discharge, using the Eating Disorder Questionnaire. Upon discharge a marked decrease in the overall symptoms was noted. The differences in symptoms incidences between the two groups were significantly specific for the individual form of eating disorder, especially upon admission, and were more pronounced in anorexia group. In later measurements, performed during the period of three and six months after discharge, a mild trend of increase in the disorder specific symptoms was detected in both groups, but was not statistically significant. In addition to binging on food, striking, quarreling and spending sprees are characteristics of patients with eating disorders, which in particular apply to the Bulimia nervosa group. Apart from the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior was also reduced during study period, while the difference in its occurrence between the two groups gradually became non-significant. The management of patients with eating disorders at the EDU was successful in both groups, confirmed by an intense reduction of the disorder specific symptoms, impulsive behavior and increased stability recorded three and six months after discharge. The study strongly suggests that the effect of treatment regime for eating disorders can be predicted by careful assessment of the relevant symptoms and impulsive behavioral patterns.

  4. Negative affect and neural response to palatable food intake in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Cara; Stice, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Binge eating is often preceded by reports of negative affect, but the mechanism by which affect may lead to binge eating is unclear. This study evaluated the effect of negative affect on neural response to anticipation and receipt of palatable food in women with bulimia nervosa (BN) versus healthy controls. We also evaluated connectivity between the amygdala and reward-related brain regions. Females with and without BN (n=26) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during receipt and anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake and a tasteless solution. We measured negative affect just prior to the scan. Women with BN showed a positive correlation between negative affect and activity in the putamen, caudate, and pallidum during anticipated receipt of milkshake (versus tasteless solution). There were no significant relations between negative affect and receipt of milkshake. Connectivity analyses revealed a greater relation of amygdala activity to activation in the left putamen and insula during anticipated receipt of milkshake in the bulimia group relative to the control group. The opposite pattern was found for the taste of milkshake; the control group showed a greater relation of amygdala activity to activation in the left putamen and insula in response to milkshake receipt than the bulimia group. Results show that as negative affect increases, so does responsivity of reward regions to anticipated intake of palatable food, implying that negative affect may increase the reward value of food for individuals with bulimia nervosa or that negative affect has become a conditioned cue due to a history of binge eating in a negative mood.

  5. Distinguishing Between Risk Factors for Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder, and Purging Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Karina L; Byrne, Susan M; Crosby, Ross D

    2015-08-01

    Binge eating disorder and purging disorder have gained recognition as distinct eating disorder diagnoses, but risk factors for these conditions have not yet been established. This study aimed to evaluate a prospective, mediational model of risk for the full range of binge eating and purging eating disorders, with attention to possible diagnostic differences. Specific aims were to determine, first, whether eating, weight and shape concerns at age 14 would mediate the relationship between parent-perceived childhood overweight at age 10 and a binge eating or purging eating disorder between age 15 and 20, and, second, whether this mediational model would differ across bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and purging disorder. Participants (N = 1,160; 51 % female) were drawn from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study, which has followed children from pre-birth to age 20. Eating disorders were assessed via self-report questionnaires when participants were aged 14, 17 and 20. There were 146 participants (82 % female) with a binge eating or purging eating disorder with onset between age 15 and 20 [bulimia nervosa = 81 (86 % female), binge eating disorder = 43 (74 % female), purging disorder = 22 (77 % female)]. Simple mediation analysis with bootstrapping was used to test the hypothesized model of risk, with early adolescent eating, weight and shape concerns positioned as a mediator between parent-perceived childhood overweight and later onset of a binge eating or purging eating disorder. Subsequently, a conditional process model (a moderated mediation model) was specified to determine if model pathways differed significantly by eating disorder diagnosis. In the simple mediation model, there was a significant indirect effect of parent-perceived childhood overweight on risk for a binge eating or purging eating disorder in late adolescence, mediated by eating, weight and shape concerns in early adolescence. In the conditional process model

  6. Predictors of early change in bulimia nervosa after a brief psychoeducational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernàndez-Aranda, Fernando; Alvarez-Moya, Eva M; Martínez-Viana, Cristina; Sànchez, Isabel; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Forcano, Laura; Peñas-Lledó, Eva

    2009-06-01

    We aimed to examine baseline predictors of treatment response in bulimic patients. 241 seeking-treatment females with bulimia nervosa completed an exhaustive assessment and were referred to a six-session psychoeducational group. Regression analyses of treatment response were performed. Childhood obesity, lower frequency of eating symptomatology, lower body mass index, older age, and lower family's and patient's concern about the disorder were predictors of poor abstinence. Suicidal ideation, alcohol abuse, higher maximum BMI, higher novelty seeking and lower baseline purging frequency predicted dropouts. Predictors of early symptom changes and dropouts were similar to those identified in longer CBT interventions.

  7. Neurobiological and clinical variables associated with alcohol abuse in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Leal, Francisco J; Ramos-Fuentes, María I; Rodríguez-Santos, Laura; Flores-Mateos, Isabel S; Franco-Zambrano, Andrés; Rojo-Moreno, Luis; Beato-Fernández, Luis

    2015-05-01

    The study was aimed at analysing the reciprocal relationships of several clinical and neurobiological items in order to predict alcohol misuse in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN). Seventy BN patients and 70 healthy controls were assessed for depression, impulsivity, borderline personality traits and self-defeating behaviours using specific scales; serum cortisol and 24-hour urinary excretion of serotonin and 5-hydroxiindolacetic acid were also assessed. The study confirmed the implications of these clinical factors for alcohol misuse in BN patients, but the results suggested that depressive symptoms and hypercortisolism could lie behind these relationships.

  8. Experiences of women with bulimia nervosa in a mindfulness-based eating disorder treatment group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    The experience of 6 college-age women with bulimia nervosa was examined after they participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based eating disorder treatment group. This phenomenological study used individual interview and pre- and post-treatment self-portraits. Participants described their experience of transformation from emotional and behavioral extremes, disembodiment, and self-loathing to the cultivation of an inner connection with themselves resulting in greater self-awareness, acceptance, and compassion. They reported less emotional distress and improved abilities to manage stress. This treatment may help the 40% of women who do not improve with current therapies and might be useful to prevent symptoms in younger women.

  9. Food cravings discriminate between anorexia and bulimia nervosa. Implications for "success" versus "failure" in dietary restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Silvia; Warren, Cortney S; Rodríguez, Sonia; Fernández, M Carmen; Cepeda-Benito, Antonio

    2009-06-01

    Food cravings are subjective, motivational states thought to induce binge eating among eating disorder patients. This study compared food cravings across eating disorders. Women (N=135) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, restrictive (ANR) or binge-purging (ANBP) types, or bulimia nervosa, non-purging (BNNP) or purging (BNP) types completed measures of food cravings. Discriminant analysis yielded two statistically significant functions. The first function differentiated between all the four group pairs except ANBP and BNNP, with levels of various food-craving dimensions successively increasing for ANR, ANBP, BNNP, and BNP participants. The second function differentiated between ANBP and BNNP participants. Overall, the functions improved classification accuracy above chance level (44% fewer errors). The findings suggest that cravings are more strongly associated with loss of control over eating than with dietary restraint tendencies.

  10. [Eating disorders in childhood and adolescence. Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinghoff, M; Backmund, H

    2004-03-01

    The most important eating disorders are anorexia and bulimia, which most frequently occur for the first time during adolescence and continue into adulthood. Medical complications and accompanying psychological disturbances cause a significant mortality rate of up to 6% in anorexia and up to 3% in bulimia. The pathogenesis of eating disorders is still unclear. Current etiological concepts are multidimensional including biological, individual, familial, and sociocultural factors. In spite of a great variety of therapeutic possibilities, the prognosis for eating disorders is quite poor. In the long term, only about 50% of the persons affected overcome their illness. Preventive measures are therefore indispensable.

  11. Emotion Dysregulation and Affective Intensity Mediate the Relationship Between Childhood Abuse and Suicide-Related Behaviors Among Women with Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kathryn H; Simonich, Heather; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Dhankikar, Swati; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Kwan, Mun Yee; Mitchell, James E; Engel, Scott G

    2016-02-01

    Self-harm and suicide attempts occur at elevated rates among individuals with bulimia nervosa, particularly among those who have experienced childhood abuse. This study investigated the potential mediating roles of emotion dysregulation and affective intensity in the relationship between these variables in 125 women with bulimia nervosa. Analyses revealed that emotion dysregulation mediated the relationship between sexual and emotional abuse with both self-harm and suicide attempts. Negative affective intensity mediated the relationship between abuse and suicide attempts. The findings may advance the understanding of mechanisms underlying suicide-related behaviors in women with bulimia nervosa who experienced abuse and suggest potential clinical targets.

  12. Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Adherence in Two Interventions for Bulimia Nervosa: A Study of Process and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Katharine L.; Wilson, G. Terence; Labouvie, Erich; Pratt, Elizabeth M.; Hayaki, Jumi; Walsh, B. Timothy; Agras, W. Stewart; Fairburn, Christopher G.

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between therapeutic alliance, therapist adherence to treatment protocol, and outcome was analyzed in a randomized trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and interpersonal psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. Independent observers rated audiotapes of full-length therapy sessions. Purging frequency was the primary outcome…

  13. The prevalence of DSM-IV personality pathology among individuals with bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jonge, PV; Van Furth, EF; Lacey, JH; Waller, G

    2003-01-01

    Background. There are numerous reports of personality disorder pathology in different eating disorders. However, few studies have directly compared personality pathology in bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and obesity. The present study examines group differences in DSM-IV personality patholog

  14. Psychiatric Disorders Associated with the Onset and Persistence of Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder during Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaider, Talia I.; Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cockell, Sarah J.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a prospective longitudinal study to investigate whether anxiety, depressive, personality, or substance abuse disorders increase risk for onset of bulimia nervosa (BN) or binge eating disorder (BED) during adolescence. Findings for 201 adolescents suggest that adolescents with chronic depressive symptoms may be at elevated risk for the…

  15. Subtyping Women with Bulimia Nervosa along Dietary and Negative Affect Dimensions: Further Evidence of Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stice, Eric; Bohon, Cara; Marti, C. Nathan; Fischer, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Studies have found that individuals with bulimia nervosa can be classified into dietary and dietary-negative affect subtypes and that the latter exhibit greater eating pathology, psychiatric comorbidity, and functional impairment; a more protracted clinical course; and a worse treatment response. In this report, the authors describe 2 prospective…

  16. Neuroendocrinology and brain imaging of reward in eating disorders: A possible key to the treatment of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Castellini, Giovanni; Volpe, Umberto; Ricca, Valdo; Lelli, Lorenzo; Monteleone, Palmiero; Maj, Mario

    2017-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are severe eating disorders whose etiopathogenesis is still unknown. Clinical features suggest that eating disorders may develop as reward-dependent syndromes, since eating less food is perceived as rewarding in anorexia nervosa while consumption of large amounts of food during binge episodes in bulimia nervosa aims at reducing the patient's negative emotional states. Therefore, brain reward mechanisms have been a major focus of research in the attempt to contribute to the comprehension of the pathophysiology of these disorders. Structural brain imaging data provided the evidence that brain reward circuits may be altered in patients with anorexia or bulimia nervosa. Similarly, functional brain imaging studies exploring the activation of brain reward circuits by food stimuli as well as by stimuli recognized to be potentially rewarding for eating disordered patients, such as body image cues or stimuli related to food deprivation and physical hyperactivity, showed several dysfunctions in ED patients. Moreover, very recently, it has been demonstrated that some of the biochemical homeostatic modulators of eating behavior are also implicated in the regulation of food-related and non-food-related reward, representing a possible link between the aberrant behaviors of ED subjects and their hypothesized deranged reward processes. In particular, changes in leptin and ghrelin occur in patients with anorexia or bulimia nervosa and have been suggested to represent not only homeostatic adaptations to an altered energy balance but to contribute also to the acquisition and/or maintenance of persistent starvation, binge eating and physical hyperactivity, which are potentially rewarding for ED patients. On the basis of such findings new pathogenetic models of EDs have been proposed, and these models may provide new theoretical basis for the development of innovative treatment strategies, either psychological and pharmacological, with the aim to

  17. Neural Responses during Social and Self-Knowledge Tasks in Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Carrie J; Krawczyk, Daniel C

    2013-01-01

    Self-evaluation closely dependent upon body shape and weight is one of the defining criteria for bulimia nervosa (BN). We studied 53 adult women, 17 with BN, 18 with a recent history of anorexia nervosa (AN), and 18 healthy comparison women, using three different fMRI tasks that required thinking about self-knowledge and social interactions: the Social Identity task, the Physical Identity task, and the Social Attribution task. Previously, we identified regions of interest (ROI) in the same tasks using whole-brain voxel-wise comparisons of the healthy comparison women and women with a recent history of AN. Here, we report on the neural activations in those ROIs in subjects with BN. In the Social Attribution task, we examined activity in the right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ), an area frequently associated with mentalization. In the Social Identity task, we examined activity in the precuneus (PreC) and dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC). In the Physical Identity task, we examined activity in a ventral region of the dACC. Interestingly, in all tested regions, the average activation in subjects with bulimia was more than the average activation levels seen in the subjects with a history of anorexia but less than that seen in healthy subjects. In three regions, the RTPJ, the PreC, and the dACC, group responses in the subjects with bulimia were significantly different from healthy subjects but not subjects with anorexia. The neural activations of people with BN performing fMRI tasks engaging social processing are more similar to people with AN than healthy people. This suggests biological measures of social processes may be helpful in characterizing individuals with eating disorders.

  18. Computerized assessment of body image in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: comparison with standardized body image assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Asaf; Amiaz, Revital; Davidson, Noa; Czerniak, Efrat; Gur, Eitan; Kiryati, Nahum; Harari, Daniel; Furst, Miriam; Stein, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Body image disturbances are a prominent feature of eating disorders (EDs). Our aim was to test and evaluate a computerized assessment of body image (CABI), to compare the body image disturbances in different ED types, and to assess the factors affecting body image. The body image of 22 individuals undergoing inpatient treatment with restricting anorexia nervosa (AN-R), 22 with binge/purge AN (AN-B/P), 20 with bulimia nervosa (BN), and 41 healthy controls was assessed using the Contour Drawing Rating Scale (CDRS), the CABI, which simulated the participants' self-image in different levels of weight changes, and the Eating Disorder Inventory-2-Body Dissatisfaction (EDI-2-BD) scale. Severity of depression and anxiety was also assessed. Significant differences were found among the three scales assessing body image, although most of their dimensions differentiated between patients with EDs and controls. Our findings support the use of the CABI in the comparison of body image disturbances in patients with EDs vs.

  19. Psychological and weight-related characteristics of patients with anorexia nervosa-restricting type who later develop bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagata Katsutaro

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with anorexia nervosa-restricting type (AN-R sometimes develop accompanying bulimic symptoms or the full syndrome of bulimia nervosa (BN. If clinicians could predict who might change into the bulimic sub-type or BN, preventative steps could be taken. Therefore, we investigated anthropometric and psychological factors possibly associated with such changes. Method All participants were from a study by the Japanese Genetic Research Group for Eating Disorders. Of 80 patients initially diagnosed with AN-R, 22 changed to the AN-Binge Eating/Purging Type (AN-BP and 14 to BN for some period of time. The remaining 44 patients remained AN-R only from the onset to the investigation period. Variables compared by ANOVA included anthropometric measures, personality traits such as Multiple Perfectionism Scale scores and Temperament and Character Inventory scores, and Beck Depression Inventory-II scores. Results In comparison with AN-R only patients, those who developed BN had significantly higher current BMI (p Conclusion The present findings suggest a tendency toward obesity among patients who cross over from AN-R to BN. Low self-directedness and high parental criticism may be associated with the development of BN by patients with AN-R, although the differences may also be associated with depression.

  20. Drop-out and treatment outcome of outpatient cognitive-behavioral therapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnicker, Katja; Hiller, Wolfgang; Legenbauer, Tanja

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, drop-out-analyses were carried out for a manual-based cognitive-behavioral therapy for 104 females with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN), in the service setting of a university outpatient clinic (naturalistic setting). A total of 22.9% of patients with AN terminated therapy prematurely (drop-outs), compared to 40.6% of patients with BN. Group differences between drop-outs and completers show that the group of drop-outs with BN had higher values in the depression score at the start of therapy and was almost two times more likely to have a comorbid disorder (odds ratio 1.69), whereas drop-outs with AN had higher values in the outcome-scale drive for thinness and the odds ratio for being employed or living in a partnership was slightly lower. Completers and drop-outs did not differ significantly within groups in regard to age, body mass index at the start and end of therapy, or the number of comorbid disorders. On the whole, the therapy effect in the group of drop-outs was relatively moderate. For patients with AN, even higher therapy effects were observed among the drop-outs than among the completers. These data suggest that moderate therapy effects and responses can be achieved even among the drop-outs.

  1. Dimensions of emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: A conceptual review of the empirical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Engel, Scott G; Gordon, Kathryn H; Kaye, Walter H; Mitchell, James E

    2015-08-01

    Several existing conceptual models and psychological interventions address or emphasize the role of emotion dysregulation in eating disorders. The current article uses Gratz and Roemer's (2004) multidimensional model of emotion regulation and dysregulation as a clinically relevant framework to review the extant literature on emotion dysregulation in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Specifically, the dimensions reviewed include: (1) the flexible use of adaptive and situationally appropriate strategies to modulate the duration and/or intensity of emotional responses, (2) the ability to successfully inhibit impulsive behavior and maintain goal-directed behavior in the context of emotional distress, (3) awareness, clarity, and acceptance of emotional states, and (4) the willingness to experience emotional distress in the pursuit of meaningful activities. The current review suggests that both AN and BN are characterized by broad emotion regulation deficits, with difficulties in emotion regulation across the four dimensions found to characterize both AN and BN, although a small number of more specific difficulties may distinguish the two disorders. The review concludes with a discussion of the clinical implications of the findings, as well as a summary of limitations of the existing empirical literature and suggestions for future research.

  2. A history of the identification of the characteristic eating disturbances of Bulimia Nervosa, Binge Eating Disorder and Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaner, Martica K; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-06-01

    During the last 25 years, the careful examination of the eating behavior of individuals with eating disorders has provided critical insights into the nature of these disorders. Crucially, studies investigating components of different eating behaviors have documented that Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Binge Eating Disorder (BED) are characterized by objective disturbances in eating patterns that are significantly different than behaviors exhibited by individuals who do not have these eating disorders. The detailed description of the disturbances in eating behavior has helped to identify diagnostic criteria associated with each disorder, and has led to important hypotheses about the underlying pathophysiology. These advances in understanding have provided, and continue to provide, a foundation for translational research and for the development of novel treatment interventions. This review is based on a presentation given by B. Timothy Walsh, M.D. at the 40th anniversary symposium of the Columbia University Appetite talks outlining the evolution of the discovery of the characteristic eating disturbances seen with each disorder.

  3. As terapias cognitivo-comportamentais no tratamento da bulimia nervosa: uma revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A. Bertulino da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo Realizar uma revisão na literatura sobre a utilização da terapia cognitivo-comportamental (TCC no tratamento da bulimia nervosa entre 2009 e 2013. Métodos Três bases de dados eletrônicas foram pesquisadas, considerando artigos em língua inglesa, espanhola e portuguesa. Resultados Após as análises e exclusão dos artigos, seguindo o método PRISMA, foram selecionados 20 artigos. Os artigos selecionados foram produzidos ou na Europa ou nos Estados Unidos, em língua inglesa. Os diagnósticos da amostra variaram de exclusivamente bulimia nervosa (60% aos que incluíram pessoas com transtorno de compulsão alimentar (35%, além de diagnósticos mistos (5%. Os estudos foram, em sua maioria, realizados em mulheres adultas. A TCC, em sua abordagem clássica no consultório, foi utilizada em todos os artigos, ora utilizada individualmente, ora comparada com outras intervenções (internet, CD-ROM e autoajuda. Encontrou-se como resultado que a TCC diminui os sintomas de compulsão alimentar e de purgação, além de oferecer ganhos secundários aos participantes, como melhora de sintomas depressivos, de ansiedade e até mudanças na personalidade. As outras intervenções pesquisadas obtiveram bons resultados na modificação dos sintomas, demonstrando que há um novo caminho a ser galgado com essas novas formas de tratamento. Conclusão O tratamento da bulimia nervosa possui evidências suficientes para que seja realizado com a terapia cognitivo-comportamental. Além dela, intervenções psicoterápicas inovadoras baseadas na TCC clássica apresentam bons indicativos de eficácia. Futuras pesquisas sobre essas diferentes intervenções são necessárias.

  4. [Diuretic-Abuse in Chronic Bulimia Nervosa--Case Report and Clinical Management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greetfeld, Martin; Bröckel-Ristevski, Nicole; Fumi, Markus; Cuntz, Ulrich; Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    We give account of a patient, who works in health care, with bulimia nervosa (BN) and a long term abuse of Furosemide. Due to patients' tendency to conceal addictive behavior and symptoms of BN, the prevalence of purging behavior caused by the intake of diuretics is difficult to quantify 10% of BN patients exhibit a long-term harmful abuse. Discontinuation of diuretics causes the development of edema, attributable to pathophysiological changes with hyperaldosteronism. These can lead to renewed escalation of purging behaviour, provoked either by phobia of weight gain or by unbearable feelings of tension in the facial area or in the legs. For an adequate clinical management, it is vital to have thorough knowledge of the pathophysiological context which consists of psychoeducation, provision of information, treatment of water-electrolyte imbalance and, in individual cases, the administration of aldosterone antagonists.

  5. Dieting in bulimia nervosa is associated with increased food restriction and psychopathology but decreased binge eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Michael R; Witt, Ashley A; Grossman, Stephanie L

    2013-08-01

    The cognitive behavioral model of bulimia nervosa (BN) suggests that dieting is central to the maintenance of binge eating. However, correlational and experimental studies suggest that additional clarification is needed about the nature of this relationship. Dieting, weight, eating disorder psychopathology, and depression were assessed at admission among 166 patients with BN presenting for residential treatment. As in past research, a significant fraction (43%) of patients with BN reported not currently dieting. A comparison of weight loss dieters and non-dieters found greater food restriction and eating disorder psychopathology among weight loss dieters. However, dieters reported less frequent binge eating. There were no significant group differences in depression. Results suggest that 1) while many individuals with BN are attempting to restrict their food intake, the goal of losing weight fundamentally alters the effect of such restriction on binge eating, and 2) treatment may benefit from helping patients to establish a healthier approach to achieving long-term weight stability.

  6. Evaluation of a functional treatment for binge eating associated with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddings, T D; Miltenberger, R G

    2010-01-01

    Binge-eating disorders (BED) are a common problem affecting up to 5 percent of the American population in any given 6-month period. Currently, the most widely accepted treatment is some variation of Cognitive Behavior Therapy, although the abstinence rates following this type of treatment are only around 50%. A recent study by Bosch et al. explored the effects of extinction with four women who engaged in binge-eating behavior associated with BED and bulimia nervosa (BN). The treatment was successful, with three of the four participants obtaining abstinence. To date, this has been the only study examining this procedure. The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate extinction of binge eating with four young women who met diagnostic criteria for BN. The results showed that the treatment decreased binge eating to zero for all four women, although one dropped out of the study shortly after beginning the intervention.

  7. Intentional hypoglycemia to control bingeing in a patient with type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Mandana; Kreisman, Stuart; Hall, Lacresha

    2015-02-01

    Most cases of eating disorders associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus are categorized as diabulimia, a disorder of withholding insulin treatment to lose weight through sustained hyperglycemia. In this paper, we report a unique case of a patient with both type 1 diabetes and bulimia nervosa who has an atypical way of controlling her bingeing by keeping her blood sugars low. This pattern of intentionally sustained hypoglycemia has not been previously described in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Knowing various presentations of eating disorders in patients with type 1 diabetes can provide healthcare workers with enhanced ability in recognizing and educating at-risk patients, in the hope of preventing serious hypoglycemia or complications. Furthermore, a patient's awareness of complications associated with suboptimal control of diabetes, whether by overdosing or underdosing their insulin regimen, might lead to avoidance of disordered eating behaviours.

  8. Regional grey matter volume abnormalities in bulimia nervosa and binge-eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Axel; Vaitl, Dieter; Schienle, Anne

    2010-04-01

    This study investigated whether bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge-eating disorder (BED) are associated with structural brain abnormalities. Both disorders share the main symptom binge-eating, but are considered differential diagnoses. We attempted to identify alterations in grey matter volume (GMV) that are present in both psychopathologies as well as disorder-specific GMV characteristics. Such information can help to improve neurobiological models of eating disorders and their classification. A total of 50 participants (patients suffering from BN (purge type), BED, and normal-weight controls) underwent structural MRI scanning. GMV for specific brain regions involved in food/reinforcement processing was analyzed by means of voxel-based morphometry. Both patient groups were characterized by greater volumes of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) compared to healthy controls. In BN patients, who had increased ventral striatum volumes, body mass index and purging severity were correlated with striatal grey matter volume. Altogether, our data implicate a crucial role of the medial OFC in the studied eating disorders. The structural abnormality might be associated with dysfunctions in food reward processing and/or self-regulation. The bulimia-specific volume enlargement of the ventral striatum is discussed in the framework of negative reinforcement through purging and associated weight regulation.

  9. Eating attitudes of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder and obesity without eating disorder female patients: differences and similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, M S; Koritar, P; Pisciolaro, F; Mancini, M; Cordás, T A; Scagliusi, F B

    2014-05-28

    The objective was to compare eating attitudes, conceptualized as beliefs, thoughts, feelings, behaviors and relationship with food, of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) patients and a group of obese (OBS) without eating disorders (ED). Female patients from an Eating Disorder (ED) Unit with AN (n=42), BN (n=52) and BED (n=53) and from an obesity service (n=37) in Brazil answered the Disordered Eating Attitude Scale (DEAS) which evaluate eating attitudes with 5 subscales: relationship with food, concerns about food and weight gain, restrictive and compensatory practices, feelings toward eating, and idea of normal eating. OBS patients were recruited among those without ED symptoms according to the Binge Eating Scale and the Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns. ANOVA was used to compare body mass index and age between groups. Bonferroni test was used to analyze multiple comparisons among groups. AN and BN patients presented more dysfunctional eating attitudes and OBS patients less dysfunctional (p<0.001). For DEAS total score, AN and BN patients were similar and all other were different (p<0.001). Similarities suggested between BN and BED were true just for the "Relationship with food" and "Idea of normal eating." BED patients were worst than OBS for "Relationship with food" and as dysfunctional as AN patients - besides their behavior could be considered the opposite. Differences and similarities support a therapeutic individualized approach for ED and obese patients, call attention for the theoretical differences between obesity and ED, and suggest more research focused on eating attitudes.

  10. A Needs Assessment for Health Care Professionals in the Detection, Intervention and Interdisciplinary Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa Using Focus Group Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Anne; Kovacich, Joann

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of bulimia nervosa has increased significantly in the second half of the twentieth century and its occurrence is more than twice that of anorexia nervosa. Due to its complex nature, successful treatment requires an interdisciplinary approach with nutritional, psychological, medical, pharmacological and dental therapies. Despite…

  11. Altered sensitization patterns to sweet food stimuli in patients recovered from anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Angela; Simmons, Alan N; Oberndorfer, Tyson A; Frank, Guido K W; McCurdy-McKinnon, Danyale; Fudge, Julie L; Yang, Tony T; Paulus, Martin P; Kaye, Walter H

    2015-12-30

    Recent studies show that higher-order appetitive neural circuitry may contribute to restricted eating in anorexia nervosa (AN) and overeating in bulimia nervosa (BN). The purpose of this study was to determine whether sensitization effects might underlie pathologic eating behavior when a taste stimulus is administered repeatedly. Recovered AN (RAN, n=14) and BN (RBN, n=15) subjects were studied in order to avoid the confounding effects of altered nutritional state. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measured higher-order brain response to repeated tastes of sucrose (caloric) and sucralose (non-caloric). To test sensitization, the neuronal response to the first and second administration was compared. RAN patients demonstrated a decreased sensitization to sucrose in contrast to RBN patients who displayed the opposite pattern, increased sensitization to sucrose. However, the latter was not as pronounced as in healthy control women (n=13). While both eating disorder subgroups showed increased sensitization to sucralose, the healthy controls revealed decreased sensitization. These findings could reflect on a neuronal level the high caloric intake of RBN during binges and the low energy intake for RAN. RAN seem to distinguish between high energy and low energy sweet stimuli while RBN do not.

  12. Selective Visual Attention during Mirror Exposure in Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa.

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    Brunna Tuschen-Caffier

    Full Text Available Cognitive theories suggest that body dissatisfaction results from the activation of maladaptive appearance schemata, which guide mental processes such as selective attention to shape and weight-related information. In line with this, the present study hypothesized that patients with anorexia nervosa (AN and bulimia nervosa (BN are characterized by increased visual attention for the most dissatisfying/ugly body part compared to their most satisfying/beautiful body part, while a more balanced viewing pattern was expected for controls without eating disorders (CG.Eye movements were recorded in a group of patients with AN (n = 16, BN (n = 16 and a CG (n = 16 in an ecologically valid setting, i.e., during a 3-min mirror exposure.Evidence was found that patients with AN and BN display longer and more frequent gazes towards the most dissatisfying relative to the most satisfying and towards their most ugly compared to their most beautiful body parts, whereas the CG showed a more balanced gaze pattern.The results converge with theoretical models that emphasize the role of information processing in the maintenance of body dissatisfaction. Given the etiological importance of body dissatisfaction in the development of eating disorders, future studies should focus on the modification of the reported patterns.

  13. Characteristics of suicide attempts in anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a case-control study.

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    Sébastien Guillaume

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Compared to other eating disorders, anorexia nervosa (AN has the highest rates of completed suicide whereas suicide attempt rates are similar or lower than in bulimia nervosa (BN. Attempted suicide is a key predictor of suicide, thus this mismatch is intriguing. We sought to explore whether the clinical characteristics of suicidal acts differ between suicide attempters with AN, BN or without an eating disorders (ED. METHOD: Case-control study in a cohort of suicide attempters (n = 1563. Forty-four patients with AN and 71 with BN were compared with 235 non-ED attempters matched for sex, age and education, using interview measures of suicidal intent and severity. RESULTS: AN patients were more likely to have made a serious attempt (OR = 3.4, 95% CI 1.4-7.9, with a higher expectation of dying (OR = 3.7,95% CI 1.1-13.5, and an increased risk of severity (OR = 3.4,95% CI 1.2-9.6. BN patients did not differ from the control group. Clinical markers of the severity of ED were associated with the seriousness of the attempt. CONCLUSION: There are distinct features of suicide attempts in AN. This may explain the higher suicide rates in AN. Higher completed suicide rates in AN may be partially explained by AN patients' higher desire to die and their more severe and lethal attempts.

  14. Serotonin alterations in anorexia and bulimia nervosa: new insights from imaging studies.

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    Kaye, Walter H; Frank, Guido K; Bailer, Ursula F; Henry, Shannan E; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Price, Julie C; Mathis, Chester A; Wagner, Angela

    2005-05-19

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are related disorders with relatively homogenous presentations such as age of onset and gender distribution. In addition, they share symptoms, such as extremes of food consumption, body image distortion, anxiety and obsessions, and ego-syntonic neglect, raises the possibility that these symptoms reflect disturbed brain function that contributes to the pathophysiology of this illness. Recent brain imaging studies have identified altered activity in frontal, cingulate, temporal, and parietal cortical regions in AN and BN. Importantly, such disturbances are present when subjects are ill and persist after recovery, suggesting that these may be traits that are independent of the state of the illness. Emerging data point to a dysregulation of serotonin pathways in cortical and limbic structures that may be related to anxiety, behavioral inhibition, and body image distortions. In specific, recent studies using PET with serotonin specific radioligands implicate alterations of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors and the 5-HT transporter. Alterations of these circuits may affect mood and impulse control as well as the motivating and hedonic aspects of feeding behavior. Such imaging studies may offer insights into new pharmacology and psychotherapy approaches.

  15. Does anger mediate between personality and eating symptoms in bulimia nervosa?

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    Amianto, Federico; Siccardi, Sara; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Marech, Lucrezia; Barosio, Marta; Fassino, Secondo

    2012-12-30

    The goals of the study were to explore anger correlation with bulimic symptoms and to test the mediation power of anger between personality and eating psychopathology. A total of 242 bulimia nervosa (BN) outpatients and 121 healthy controls were recruited. Assessment was performed using Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI); State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory 2 (STAXI-2); Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2); Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ); Binge Eating Scale (BES); and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Mediation was tested on the whole BN group, on controls and on two BN subgroups based on a previous history of anorexia nervosa. Self-Directedness and Cooperativeness extensively relate to anger and psychopathology in bulimic group. Bulimic symptoms are related to Trait Reactive Anger. Trait Anger and Anger Expression fully mediate Cooperativeness effects on binge eating and Impulsiveness in the BN subjects. Anger Expression-In partially mediates between Harm Avoidance and Social Insecurity/Interpersonal Distrust in BN subjects. The comparison with controls and the analysis of subgroups underlines that these patterns are specific for BN. Anger mediation between Cooperativeness, and binge eating and impulsive behaviours confirm the relevance of relational dynamics in the expression of these core eating symptoms. Relational skills may represent a relevant target for the treatment of BN.

  16. Conductas purgativas y estado nutricional en anorexia nerviosa y bulimia nerviosa Purging behaviours and nutritional status in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa

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    F. J. Vaz

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: La intención del estudio fue comprobar si el empleo de métodos purgativos en pacientes con trastornos alimentarios (anorexia nerviosa [AN], y bulimia nerviosa [BN] podía reflejarse en la existencia de un estado nutricional específico. Ámbito y pacientes: El grupo en estudio estuvo formado por 184 pacientes ambulatorios con diagnóstico confirmado de trastorno de la alimentación DSM-IV. Ciento dieciséis pacientes (63% padecían BN: 90 del subtipo purgativo y 26 del subtipo no-purgativo. Sesenta y ocho pacientes (37,0% cumplían los criterios diagnósticos del DSM-IV para la AN: 48 del subtipo restrictivo y 20 del subtipo compulsivo-purgativo. Intervenciones: El proceso de evaluación incluyó antropometría (perímetros corporales y pliegues cutáneos y análisis de la impedancia corporal. Resultados: Los dos subgrupos de pacientes AN presentaron diferencias significativas frente a cada uno de los subgrupos de pacientes BN. Desde el punto de vista nutricional, fueron encontradas diferencias entre pacientes con patrones purgativos y no purgativos dentro de la población anoréxica pero no entre los pacientes bulímicos. Conclusiones: La significación clínica de estos hallazgos es discutida y se propone la identificación alternativa de tres subgrupos de pacientes AN: 1 tipo restrictivo [pacientes que controlan la ingesta y no utilizan métodos de purga]; 2 tipo purgativo [pacientes con verdaderos atracones que utilizan métodos de purga], y 3 tipo pseudo-purgativo [pacientes con episodios subjetivos de descontrol alimentario que utilizan métodos de purga].Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate whether the use of purgative methods in patients with eating disorders (anorexia nervosa [AN] and bulimia nervosa [BN] could be capable of producing changes in the nutritional status of the patients. Setting and Patients: The group under study was composed of 184 female eating disordered outpatients. One hundred and sixteen

  17. Refluxo laringofaríngeo e bulimia nervosa: alterações vocais e larínegas Laryngopharyngeal reflux and bulimia nervosa: laryngeal and voice disorders

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    Carla Aparecida Cielo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: Características da bulimia nervosa (BN e do Refluxo Laringofaríngeo (RLF e alterações vocais e laríngeas que podem decorrer da exposição da laringe ao ácido gástrico. OBJETIVO: Descrever, por meio de revisão de literatura, as características do RLF e da BN, relacionando-os com as alterações vocais e laríngeas que podem se originar da exposição da laringe ao ácido gástrico que ocorre em ambas as condições. CONCLUSÃO: A BN se caracteriza por um transtorno alimentar de causa principalmente psicológica em que ocorre ingestão compulsiva de grande quantidade de alimentos, seguida de episódios de vômitos auto-induzidos com a finalidade de evitar o ganho de peso. O RLF consiste em uma variação clínica da DRGE, na qual o fluxo retrógrado do alimento e do ácido gástrico entra em contato com a laringe e suas estruturas. Em comum, a BN e o RLF apresentam este mecanismo de regurgitação que pode atingir a laringe. Dentre os sinais e sintomas laríngeos e vocais decorrentes da regurgitação do ácido gástrico sobre a laringe estão: globus faríngeo, disfonia, rouquidão, tosse seca, disfagia, halitose, lesões inflamatórias nas pregas vocais, laringite, amigdalite, edema e eritema glótico posterior e ou de aritenóides, da região retrocricóidea e interaritenóidea, estenose subglótica, irregularidades na mucosa das pregas vocais, hipertrofia de mucosa laríngea, leucoplasia, carcinoma, laringoespasmos, granulomas, úlcera de contato, nódulos vocais, pólipos vocais, edema difuso, granuloma, fixação uni ou bilateral de aritenóides, edema de Reinke, laringomalácia, estridor, e odinofagia.BACKGROUND: Characteristics of bulimia nervosa (BN and laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR and laryngeal and voice disorders that can arise from exposure to gastric acid of the larynx. PURPOSE: To describe, through literature review, the characteristics of LPR and the BN, linking them with laryngeal and voice disorders that can stem

  18. Bulimia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... talk therapy and nutritional therapy are the first treatments for bulimia that does not respond to support groups. Medicines that also treat depression, known as selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are ...

  19. Dysregulation of brain reward systems in eating disorders: neurochemical information from animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E

    2012-07-01

    Food intake is mediated, in part, through brain pathways for motivation and reinforcement. Dysregulation of these pathways may underlay some of the behaviors exhibited by patients with eating disorders. Research using animal models of eating disorders has greatly contributed to the detailed study of potential brain mechanisms that many underlie the causes or consequences of aberrant eating behaviors. This review focuses on neurochemical evidence of reward-related brain dysfunctions obtained through animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, or anorexia nervosa. The findings suggest that alterations in dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh) and opioid systems in reward-related brain areas occur in response to binge eating of palatable foods. Moreover, animal models of bulimia nervosa suggest that while bingeing on palatable food releases DA, purging attenuates the release of ACh that might otherwise signal satiety. Animal models of anorexia nervosa suggest that restricted access to food enhances the reinforcing effects of DA when the animal does eat. The activity-based anorexia model suggests alterations in mesolimbic DA and serotonin occur as a result of restricted eating coupled with excessive wheel running. These findings with animal models complement data obtained through neuroimaging and pharmacotherapy studies of clinical populations. Information on the neurochemical consequences of the behaviors associated with these eating disorders will be useful in understanding these complex disorders and may inform future therapeutic approaches, as discussed here. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  20. Resting-state synchrony between anterior cingulate cortex and precuneus relates to body shape concern in anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seojung; Ran Kim, Kyung; Ku, Jeonghun; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Namkoong, Kee; Jung, Young-Chul

    2014-01-30

    Cortical areas supporting cognitive control and salience demonstrate different neural responses to visual food cues in patients with eating disorders. This top-down cognitive control, which interacts with bottom-up appetitive responses, is tightly integrated not only in task conditions but also in the resting-state. The dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) is a key node of a large-scale network that is involved in self-referential processing and cognitive control. We investigated resting-state functional connectivity of the dACC and hypothesized that altered connectivity would be demonstrated in cortical midline structures involved in self-referential processing and cognitive control. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity was analyzed in women with anorexia nervosa (N=18), women with bulimia nervosa (N=20) and age matched healthy controls (N=20). Between group comparisons revealed that the anorexia nervosa group exhibited stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and retrosplenial cortex, whereas the bulimia nervosa group showed stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Both groups demonstrated stronger synchronous activity between the dACC and precuneus, which correlated with higher scores of the Body Shape Questionnaire. The dACC-precuneus resting-state synchrony might be associated with the disorder-specific rumination on eating, weight and body shape in patients with eating disorders.

  1. Femininity, Feminine Gender Role Stress, Body Dissatisfaction, and their Relationships to Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Nancy M.

    2008-01-01

    Femininity, Feminine Gender Role Stress, Body Dissatisfaction, and their Relationships to Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder Nancy Romero Abstract Research suggests that the associations between femininity, body image and eating disorders are intricate. How these constructs are linked to each other still needs to be determined. The purpose of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of these links, examining the mediational relationship among these constructs. Also...

  2. Understanding Eating Disorders, Anorexia, Bulimia, and Binge-Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Photo: iStock Eating disorders, such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating , are among ... There are three main types of eating disorders: anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder. People ...

  3. Prevalence, incidence, and natural course of anorexia and bulimia nervosa among adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagl, Michaela; Jacobi, Corinna; Paul, Martin; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Höfler, Michael; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to assess the prevalence, incidence, age-of-onset and diagnostic stability of threshold and subthreshold anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) in the community. Data come from a prospective-longitudinal community study of 3021 subjects aged 14-24 at baseline, who were followed up at three assessment waves over 10 years. Eating disorder (ED) symptomatology was assessed with the DSM-IV/M-CIDI at each wave. Diagnostic stability was defined as the proportion of individuals still affected with at least symptomatic eating disorders (EDs) at follow-ups. Baseline lifetime prevalence for any threshold ED were 2.9 % among females and 0.1 % among males. For any subthreshold ED lifetime prevalence were 2.2 % for females and 0.7 % for males. Symptomatic expressions of EDs (including core symptoms of the respective disorder) were most common with a lifetime prevalence of 11.5 % among females and 1.8 % among males. Symptomatic AN showed the earliest onset with a considerable proportion of cases emerging in childhood. 47 % of initial threshold AN cases and 42 % of initial threshold BN cases showed at least symptomatic expressions of any ED at any follow-up assessment. Stability for subthreshold EDs and symptomatic expressions was 14-36 %. While threshold EDs are rare, ED symptomatology is common particularly in female adolescents and young women. Especially threshold EDs are associated with a substantial risk for stability. A considerable degree of symptom fluctuation is characteristic especially for subthreshold EDs.

  4. Brain volumetric abnormalities in patients with anorexia and bulimia nervosa: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amianto, Federico; Caroppo, Paola; D'Agata, Federico; Spalatro, Angela; Lavagnino, Luca; Caglio, Marcella; Righi, Dorico; Bergui, Mauro; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Rigardetto, Roberto; Mortara, Paolo; Fassino, Secondo

    2013-09-30

    Recent studies focussing on neuroimaging features of eating disorders have observed that anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by significant grey matter (GM) atrophy in many brain regions, especially in the cerebellum and anterior cingulate cortex. To date, no studies have found GM atrophy in bulimia nervosa (BN) or have directly compared patients with AN and BN. We used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to characterize brain abnormalities in AN and BN patients, comparing them with each other and with a control group, and correlating brain volume with clinical features. We recruited 17 AN, 13 BN and 14 healthy controls. All subjects underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1-weighted 3D image. VBM analysis was carried out with the FSL-VBM 4.1 tool. We found no global atrophy, but regional GM reduction in AN with respect to controls and BN in the cerebellum, fusiform area, supplementary motor area, and occipital cortex, and in the caudate in BN compared to AN and controls. Both groups of patients had a volumetric increase bilaterally in somatosensory regions with respect to controls, in areas that are typically involved in the sensory-motor integration of body stimuli and in mental representation of the body image. Our VBM study documented, for the first time in BN patients, the presence of volumetric alterations and replicated previous findings in AN patients. We evidenced morphological differences between AN and BN, demonstrating in the latter atrophy of the caudate nucleus, a region involved in reward mechanisms and processes of self-regulation, perhaps involved in the genesis of the binge-eating behaviors of this disorder.

  5. Conceptualizing the Role of Estrogens and Serotonin in the Development and Maintenance of Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Lauren; Tricamo, Michelle; Pfaff, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    Serotonergic dysregulation is thought to underlie much of the pathology in bulimia nervosa (BN). The purpose of this review is to expand the serotonergic model by incorporating specific and nonspecific contributions of estrogens to the development and maintenance of bulimic pathology in order to guide research from molecular genetics to novel therapeutics for BN. Special emphasis is given to the organizing theory of general brain arousal which allows for integration of specific and nonspecific effects of these systems on behavioral endpoints such as binge eating or purging as well as arousal states such as fear, novelty seeking, or sex. Regulation of the serotonergic system by estrogens is explored, and genetic, epigenetic, and environmental estrogen effects on bulimic pathology and risk factors are discussed. Genetic and neuroscientific research support this two-system conceptualization of BN with both contributions to the developmental and maintenance of the disorder. Implications of an estrogenic-serotonergic model of BN are discussed as well as guidelines and suggestions for future research and novel therapeutic targets. PMID:20554102

  6. Enhanced ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of food ingestion in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Serritella, Cristina; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Maj, Mario

    2010-02-01

    In humans, the cephalic phase response to food ingestion consists mostly of vagal efferent activation, which promotes the secretion of entero-pancreatic hormones, including ghrelin. Since symptomatic patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) are characterized by increased vagal tone, we hypothesized an enhanced ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of vagal stimulation. Therefore, we investigated ghrelin response to modified sham feeding (MSF) in both BN and healthy women. Six drug-free BN women and 7 age-matched healthy females underwent MSF with initially seeing and smelling a meal, and then chewing the food without swallowing it. Blood samples were drawn immediately before and after MSF for hormone assay. Circulating ghrelin increased after MSF in both groups with BN individuals exhibiting a greater ghrelin increase, which positively correlated with the patients' weekly frequency of binge-purging. These results show for the first time an increased ghrelin secretion in the cephalic phase of vagal stimulation in symptomatic BN patients, likely resulting in a potentiation of the peripheral hunger signal, which might contribute to their aberrant binge-purging behavior.

  7. A risk and maintenance model for bulimia nervosa: From impulsive action to compulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Carolyn M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Smith, Gregory T

    2015-07-01

    This article offers a new model for bulimia nervosa (BN) that explains both the initial impulsive nature of binge eating and purging, as well as the compulsive quality of the fully developed disorder. The model is based on a review of advances in research on BN and advances in relevant basic psychological science. It integrates transdiagnostic personality risk, eating-disorder-specific risk, reinforcement theory, cognitive neuroscience, and theory drawn from the drug addiction literature. We identify both a state-based and a trait-based risk pathway, and we then propose possible state-by-trait interaction risk processes. The state-based pathway emphasizes depletion of self-control. The trait-based pathway emphasizes transactions between the trait of negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly when distressed) and high-risk psychosocial learning. We then describe a process by which initially impulsive BN behaviors become compulsive over time, and we consider the clinical implications of our model. (PsycINFO Database Record

  8. Can the reinforcing value of food be measured in bulimia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schebendach, Janet; Broft, Allegra; Foltin, Richard W; Walsh, B Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Binge eating is a core clinical feature of bulimia nervosa (BN). Enhanced reinforcing value of food may play a role in this behavioral disturbance, but a systematic behavioral assessment of objective measures of the rewarding value of binge eating is lacking. The purpose of this study was to quantify the reinforcing value of food in BN patients as compared with normal controls. A progressive ratio (PR) computerized work task was completed under binge and non-binge instruction. The task consisted of 12 trials. The first trial required 50 keyboard taps to earn one portion of yogurt shake, and subsequent trials required progressive work increments of 200 taps for each additional portion. Completion of all 12 trials required 13,800 taps to earn 2100ml of shake. The breakpoint, defined as the largest ratio completed before a participant stopped working, was the measure of reinforcing efficacy. Ten patients and 10 controls completed the experiment. Under binge instruction, patients completed more trials and taps, and had a higher breakpoint than controls. The non-binge instruction yielded opposite findings; compared to controls, patients completed fewer trials and taps, and had a lower breakpoint. These results support the feasibility and potential utility of a PR task to quantify the reinforcing value of food in patients with BN.

  9. Hard exercise, affect lability, and personality among individuals with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownstone, Lisa M; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Joiner, Thomas E; Le Grange, Daniel; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross D; Klein, Marjorie H; Bardone-Cone, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    The current study explores the personality traits of compulsivity (e.g., sense of orderliness and duty to perform tasks completely) and restricted expression (e.g., emotion expression difficulties) as potential moderators of the relation between affect lability and frequency of hard exercise episodes in a sample of individuals with bulimic pathology. Participants were 204 adult females recruited in five Midwestern cities who met criteria for threshold or subthreshold bulimia nervosa (BN). Compulsivity was found to significantly moderate the relation between affect lability and number of hard exercise episodes over the past 28 days, such that among those with high compulsivity, level of affect lability was associated with the number of hard exercise episodes; whereas, among those with low compulsivity, affect lability was not associated with the number of hard exercise episodes. The same pattern of findings emerged for restricted expression; however, this finding approached, but did not reach statistical significance. As such, it appears that affect lability is differentially related to hard exercise among individuals with BN depending upon the level of compulsivity and, to a more limited extent, restricted expression. These results suggest that, for individuals with BN with either compulsivity or restricted expression, focusing treatment on increasing flexibility and/or verbal expression of emotions may help in the context of intense, fluctuating affect.

  10. Reactivity to 35% carbon dioxide in bulimia nervosa and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznica, Andrea; Vickers, Kristin; Koerner, Naomi; Fracalanza, Katie

    2015-08-30

    The inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide (CO₂) induces panic and anxiety in people with panic disorder (PD) and in people with various other psychiatric disorders. The anxiogenic effect of CO₂ in people with eating disorders has received sparse attention despite the fact that PD and bulimia nervosa (BN) have several common psychological and neurobiological features. This study compared CO₂-reactivity across three groups of participants: females with BN, females with PD, and female controls without known risk factors for enhanced CO₂-reactivity (e.g., social anxiety disorder, first degree relatives with PD). Reactivity was measured by self-reported ratings of panic symptomatology and subjective anxiety, analyzed as both continuous variables (change from room-air to CO₂) and dichotomous variables (positive versus negative responses to CO₂). Analyses of each outcome measure demonstrated that CO₂-reactivity was similar across the BN and PD groups, and reactivity within each of these two groups was significantly stronger than that in the control group. This is the first study to demonstrate CO₂-hyperreactivity in individuals with BN, supporting the hypothesis that reactivity to this biological paradigm is not specific to PD. Further research would benefit from examining transdiagnostic mechanisms in CO₂-hyperreactivity, such as anxiety sensitivity, which may account for this study's results.

  11. Rumination but not distraction increases eating-related symptoms in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Eva; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Caffier, Detlef; Svaldi, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    Recent models of eating disorders emphasize the importance of ruminative thinking in the occurrence of unhealthy eating behavior. Hence, the aim of the current study was to examine the influence of induced rumination and distraction on the desire to engage in eating-related symptoms in anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). After a sadness induction, either a ruminative or distractive emotion regulation style was encouraged in women with AN (n = 38), BN (n = 37), and non-eating disordered controls (CG; n = 36). At baseline and after the emotion regulation induction feelings of sadness, desire to abstain from eating (DTA) and desire to binge (DTB) were assessed. Main results reveal that rumination led to a significant increase of DTA in the AN group and of DTB in patients with BN. In the CG, DTA significantly decreased after distraction. Although there were significant increases in subjective sadness in the rumination condition, no changes were found in the distraction condition. The results suggest that rumination in response to sadness has a detrimental effect on eating-related symptoms in eating disorders.

  12. A Bidirectional Examination of Expressed Emotion among Families of Adolescents with Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoste, Renee Rienecke; Lebow, Jocelyn; Le Grange, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this paper was to examine expressed emotion (EE) measured from adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN) toward their parents, in addition to measuring EE from parents toward patients. Method Fifty-four adolescents and their parents who were receiving treatment for BN participated in a videotaped family interview, from which ratings of EE were made. Results Parent and patient scores were highly correlated. Four family profiles were created (Low Patient EE/Low Parent EE; High Patient EE/High Parent EE; Low Patient EE/High Parent EE; High Patient EE/Low Parent EE) to determine whether the match between parent and patient EE was related to treatment outcome. The Low Patient EE/Low Parent EE group demonstrated the greatest reduction in purging from baseline to end-of-treatment; the High Patient EE/Low Parent EE group showed the smallest reduction in purging. Discussion Expressed emotion has historically been rated from relatives toward patients, but patients’ own EE may also be related to treatment outcome. PMID:24888496

  13. Psychosocial Factors Associated with Bulimia Nervosa during Pregnancy: An Internal Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hunna J.; Von Holle, Ann; Knoph, Cecilie; Hamer, Robert M.; Torgersen, Leila; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Magnus, Per; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this paper was to internally validate previously reported relations (1) between psychosocial factors and bulimia nervosa (BN) outcomes during pregnancy. Method This study is based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Participants were women enrolled during pregnancy (N = 69,030). Internal validity was evaluated by way of bootstrapped parameter estimates using the overall sample and a split sample calibration approach. Results Bootstrap bias estimates were below the problematic threshold, and extend earlier findings(1) by providing support for the validity of the models at the population level of all pregnant women in Norway. Bootstrap risk ratios indicated that prevalence, incidence, and remission of BN during pregnancy were significantly associated with psychosocial factors. The split sample procedure showed that the models developed on the training sample did not predict risks in the validation sample. Discussion This study characterizes associations between psychosocial exposures and BN outcomes among pregnant women in Norway. Women with lifetime and current self-reported psychosocial adversities were at a much higher risk for BN during pregnancy. Psychosocial factors were associated with BN remission during pregnancy, inviting the prospect of enhancing therapeutic interventions. We consider the findings in the context of reproducibility in science. PMID:25346291

  14. Tratamento da bulimia nervosa: síntese das evidências

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacaltchuk Josué

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As duas abordagens terapêuticas mais estudadas para o tratamento da bulimia nervosa (BN são os tratamentos psicológicos, principalmente a terapia cognitivo-comportamental (TCC e o uso de antidepressivos. Os resultados de duas revisões sistemáticas da literatura mostram que a TCC é melhor que fila de espera e que os antidepressivos são superiores ao placebo na remissão a curto prazo dos sintomas bulímicos. A comparação direta das duas abordagens mostra que, quando usados como abordagens exclusivas, a TCC é clinicamente mais eficaz e mais aceita do que os antidepressivos. A associação dos dois tipos de tratamento é clinicamente mais eficaz que cada um isoladamente, mas a aceitação das abordagens psicológicas exclusivas é maior. Como a BN é um transtorno grave e com baixa taxa de remissão espontânea, o tratamento associado, com abordagem multidimensional e multidisciplinar, pode ser indicado.

  15. Acompanhamento da evolução dos distúrbios de imagem corporal em pacientes com bulimia nervosa, ao longo do tratamento multiprofissional Longitudinal assessment of body image disturbances in patients with bulimia nervosa submitted to multidisciplinary treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Timerman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Aumentar a compreensão sobre os distúrbios da imagem corporal em pacientes com bulimia nervosa e sua evolução após o tratamento multidisciplinar. MÉTODOS: Onze mulheres responderam dois questionários de imagem corporal (Body Attitudes Questionnaire e Escala de Figuras de Stunkard antes e após o tratamento e preencheram o diário alimentar, utilizado para a análise de sintomas de bulimia nervosa. RESULTADOS: Tanto no pré quanto no pós-tratamento o índice de massa corporal médio se encontrava na faixa de eutrofia. Cerca de 57,0% da amostra teve remissão total dos sintomas de bulimia nervosa. Em relação à imagem corporal, na escala de Stunkard, o tamanho da figura escolhida como ideal aumentou e houve redução da insatisfação corporal após o tratamento. Não houve redução significativa da superestimativa do tamanho corporal, porém no início do tratamento 57,1% das pacientes já não superestimavam seu tamanho. Em relação ao questionário de atitudes, notou-se diminuição das seguintes variáveis: depreciação corporal; sentir-se gorda; sensação de ter gordura nos membros inferiores e importância pessoal do corpo. CONCLUSÕES: O tratamento foi eficaz em alguns aspectos atitudinais, porém deve ser aprimorado em outros, como a distorção perceptual.OBJECTIVE: Increase the comprehension of body image disturbances in patients with bulimia nervosa and its evolution after treatment, multidisciplinary. METHODS: Eleven women answered two body image questionnaires (Body Attitudes Questionnaire and Stunkard's Figure Scale before and after treatment and filled a food diary used to analyze the frequency of bulimia nervosa symptoms. RESULTS: The mean body mass index was found at normal weight category before and after treatment. Approximately 57.0% of the sample had total remission of bulimia nervosa symptoms. In relation to body image based on Stunkard's scale, the size of the figure chosen as ideal increased and body

  16. The impact of exposure to images of ideally thin models in TV commercials on eating behavior: an experimental study with women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühl, Ilka; Legenbauer, Tanja; Hiller, Wolfgang

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates whether eating behavior in women with diagnosed bulimia nervosa is influenced by prior exposure to images of ideally thin models. Twenty-six participants diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (BN) and 30 normal controls (NC) were exposed to body-related and neutral TV commercials; then food that typically triggers binge eating was provided, and the amount of food eaten was measured. No significant difference for food intake between NC and BN could be found, but food intake for BN was predicted by the degree of thoughts related to eating behaviors during exposure to the thin ideal. No impact of general body image or eating pathology on food intake could be found. The results emphasize the importance of action-relevance of dysfunctional cognitions for the maintenance of eating-disordered behaviors in women with bulimia nervosa, when exposed to eating-disorder-specific triggers.

  17. The Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Based Training on the Maladaptive Schemas of Female Students with Bulimia Nervosa

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    Moslem Abbasia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Recently, a lot of discussions have been done about the third wave of behavioral and cognitive approaches, particularly in areas with eating disorders. The aim of current research is the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment based training on the maladaptive schemas of female students with bulimia nervosa. Materials & Methods: The design of current study is as quasi-experiment research with pre-test and post-test with control group. Statistical population consist of all high school female students of Arak city in the 2013-14 academic years. Samples were selected at first by multi stage cluster sampling method and after completing young schema questionnaire short form and Diagnostic Interview, were placement using random sampling method in two experimental and control groups (N=20 per group. The experimental group participated in 8 sessions of acceptance and commitment based training and control group received no intervention. The gathered data were analyzed using Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results show that there exist significant differences between the pre-test and post-test scores of the experimental group. This difference is significant at the level of 0.01. Therefore it seems that acceptance and commitment based training decreased maladaptive schemas of students with bulimia nervosa. Conclusions: The results of current research explain the importance of acceptance and commitment therapy in decreasing maladaptive schema of female students with bulimia nervosa. Thus, interventions based on this approach in schools for students lead to decreasing the psychological problems

  18. ACERCA DE LA ETIMOLOGÍA DE "NERVOSA" EN LA BULIMIA Y ANOREXIA: UNA HISTORIA DE NERVIOS

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    Alfredo Hernández Alcántara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pese a que el término nervosa se atribuye a Richard Morton (1689, se revisan en este artículo sus verdaderos orígenes, los que pueden remontarse a Empédocles de Agrigento, y más atrás a Alcmeón de Crotona, discípulo de Pitágoras. La revisión etimológica del mencionado término arroja luz sobre los fascinantes inicios de esta palabra, indefectiblemente ligada a la bulimia y la anorexia.

  19. The role of impulsivity, inattention and comorbid ADHD in patients with bulimia nervosa.

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    Jochen Seitz

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the contribution of impulsivity, inattention and comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in the development and maintenance of bulimia nervosa (BN. In particular, their specific contribution to disordered eating symptoms and whether they have additive effects to the general psychopathological burden remains unclear. METHODS: Fifty-seven female patients seeking treatment for BN and 40 healthy controls completed diagnostic questionnaires and interviews that investigated: a ADHD, b impulsivity, c eating disorders and d general psychopathology. Attentional processes and impulsivity were assessed by a comprehensive computer-based neuropsychological battery. RESULTS: Twenty-one percent of patients with BN met the clinical cut-off for previous childhood ADHD compared to 2.5% of healthy controls. Adult ADHD according to DSM IV was also more prevalent in patients with BN, with an odds ratio of 4.2. Patients with BN and previous childhood ADHD were more impulsive and inattentive than patients with BN alone. These patients also displayed more severely disordered eating patterns and more general psychopathological symptoms compared with those without ADHD. Severity of eating disorder symptoms was better explained by inattentiveness than by either impulsivity or hyperactivity. DISCUSSION: Our data suggest an elevated rate of former childhood and current ADHD-symptoms in treatment-seeking patients with BN. Stronger impulsivity and inattention associated with more severe neuropsychological deficits and eating disorder symptoms indicate an additive risk that is clinically relevant for these patients. Thus, clinicians should identify comorbid patients who might profit from additional ADHD-specific treatments.

  20. Attention Network Dysfunction in Bulimia Nervosa - An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Brigitte; Schulte-Rüther, Martin; Legenbauer, Tanja; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent evidence has suggested an increased rate of comorbid ADHD and subclinical attentional impairments in bulimia nervosa (BN) patients. However, little is known regarding the underlying neural mechanisms of attentional functions in BN. Method Twenty BN patients and twenty age- and weight-matched healthy controls (HC) were investigated using a modified version of the Attention Network Task (ANT) in an fMRI study. This design enabled an investigation of the neural mechanisms associated with the three attention networks involved in alerting, reorienting and executive attention. Results The BN patients showed hyperactivation in parieto-occipital regions and reduced deactivation of default-mode-network (DMN) areas during alerting compared with HCs. Posterior cingulate activation during alerting correlated with the severity of eating-disorder symptoms within the patient group. Conversely, BN patients showed hypoactivation during reorienting and executive attention in anterior cingulate regions, the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and parahippocampus compared with HCs, which was negatively associated with global ADHD symptoms and impulsivity, respectively. Discussion Our findings demonstrate altered brain mechanisms in BN associated with all three attentional networks. Failure to deactivate the DMN and increased parieto-occipital activation required for alerting might be associated with a constant preoccupation with food or body image-related thoughts. Hypoactivation of executive control networks and TPJ might increase the likelihood of inattentive and impulsive behaviors and poor emotion regulation. Thus, dysfunction in the attentional network in BN goes beyond an altered executive attentional domain and needs to be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of BN. PMID:27607439

  1. "Diagnostic shift" from eating disorder not otherwise specified to bulimia nervosa using DSM-5 criteria: a clinical comparison with DSM-IV bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Danielle E; McFarlane, Traci L; Olmsted, Marion P

    2014-01-01

    In the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the diagnostic threshold for binging and compensation in bulimia nervosa (BN) decreased from twice to once weekly for 3 months. This study investigates the validity of this change by examining whether BN patients and those whose diagnoses "shift" to BN with DSM-5 are similar in their psychological functioning. EDNOS patients whose symptoms met DSM-5 BN criteria (n=25) were compared to DSM-IV BN patients (n=146) on clinically relevant variables. No differences were found on: BMI; weight-based self-evaluation; perfectionism; depression and anxiety symptoms; or readiness for change. Differences were found on one Eating Disorder Inventory subscale (i.e., bulimia), with the BN group reporting higher scores, consistent with group definitions. These findings support the modified criteria, suggesting that psychopathology both directly and indirectly related to eating disorders is comparable between those with once weekly versus more frequent bulimic episodes.

  2. Can an intervention based on a serious videogame prior to cognitive behavioral therapy be helpful in bulimia nervosa? A clinical case study.

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    Cristina eGiner-Bartolomé

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have highlighted the implications of impulsivity and novelty seeking for both the maintenance and the process of recovery from bulimia nervosa. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT is the treatment of choice for bulimia nervosa, but for some cases, this treatment alone might not be sufficient for reducing the high levels of impulsivity. The paper presents a case report of a patient with bulimia nervosa, examining the effectiveness of using a videogame (Playmancer as an additional intervention designed to address impulsivity. Design: Psychometric and neuropsychological measures were collected at baseline. After this assessment, Playmancer was applied prior to CBT, following an A-B-A-C-A single case experimental design. Impulsivity levels were assessed with the Conners’ Continuous Performance Test II (CPT-II. After the Playmancer treatment, the patient started CBT, and the levels of impulsivity were recorded again. Finally, psychometric and neuropsychological measures were collected after treatment. Weekly frequency of binges and vomiting were also recorded during the entire procedure. Results: After the videogame intervention, psychometric measures such as anxiety levels, impulsivity and novelty seeking decreased. Regarding the neuropsychological measures, impulsivity levels (measured with the CPT-II progressively decreased throughout the intervention, and an improvement in decision making capacities was observed. Furthermore, the frequency of binges also decreased during and after the videogame intervention. Discussion: This case report suggests that using the Playmancer videogame to reduce impulsivity prior to CBT may enhance the final results of the treatment for bulimia nervosa.

  3. Association between A218C polymorphism of the tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 gene, harm avoidance and binge eating behavior in bulimia nervosa.

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    Monteleone, Palmiero; Tortorella, Alfonso; Martiadis, Vassilis; Serino, Ismene; Di Filippo, Carmela; Maj, Mario

    2007-06-21

    Genes involved in serotonin transmission are likely involved in the biological predisposition to bulimia nervosa. We investigated whether the A218C polymorphism of the tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 gene was associated to bulimia nervosa and/or to some phenotypic aspects of the disorder. One hundred eighty Caucasian women (91 patients with bulimia nervosa and 89 healthy controls) were enrolled into the study. They underwent a blood sample collection for A218C polymorphism of the tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 genotyping and a clinical evaluation assessing comorbidity for Axis I and II psychiatric disorders, harm avoidance personality dimension and bulimic symptoms. The distribution of both tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 A218C genotypes and alleles did not significantly differ between patients and controls. Bulimic women with the AA genotype exhibited a more severe binge eating behavior and higher harm avoidance scores than those with CC genotype. These findings support the idea that tryptophan-hydroxylase-1 A218C polymorphism does not play a part in the genetic susceptibility to bulimia nervosa, but it seems to be involved in predisposing bulimic patients to a more disturbed eating behavior and higher harm avoidance.

  4. Mental Health Literacy and Eating-Disordered Behavior: Beliefs of Adolescent Girls Concerning the Treatment of and Treatment-Seeking for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mond, J. M.; Marks, P.; Hay, P. J.; Rodgers, B.; Kelly, C.; Owen, C.; Paxton, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    This research examined the "mental health literacy" of adolescents concerning eating-disordered behavior. A vignette describing a fictional 16-year old female meeting diagnostic criteria for bulimia nervosa was presented to 522 female high school students, followed by a series of questions concerning treatment of and treatment-seeking…

  5. Daily and Momentary Mood and Stress Are Associated with Binge Eating and Vomiting in Bulimia Nervosa Patients in the Natural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Joshua M.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Heron, Kristin E.; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Crosby, Ross D.; Mitchell, James E.; Engel, Scott G.

    2007-01-01

    The relation of mood and stress to binge eating and vomiting in the natural environments of patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) was examined using real-time data collection. Women (n = 131; mean age = 25.3 years) with BN carried a palmtop computer for 2 weeks and completed ratings of positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), anger/hostility (AH),…

  6. Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa in Same-Sex and Opposite-Sex Twins : Lack of Association With Twin Type in a Nationwide Study of Finnish Twins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raevuori, Anu; Kaprio, Jaakko; Hoek, Hans W.; Sihvola, Elina; Rissanen, Aila; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors tested the hypothesis that either prenatal feminization or masculinization hormone influences in utero or later socialization affects the risk for anorexia and bulimia nervosa and disordered eating in members of opposite-sex twin pairs. Method: Finnish twins (N=2,426 women, N=

  7. Getting better byte by byte: a pilot randomised controlled trial of email therapy for bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul; Serfaty, Marc

    2008-03-01

    One hundred and ten people in an university population responded to emailed eating disorder questionnaires. Ninty-seven fulfilling criteria for eating disorders (bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), EDNOS) were randomised to therapist administered email bulimia therapy (eBT), unsupported Self directed writing (SDW) or Waiting list control (WLC). Measures were repeated at 3 months. Diagnosis, Beck depression inventory (BDI) and Bulimia investigatory test (BITE) scores were recorded. Follow-up rate was 63% and results must be interpreted cautiously. However significantly fewer participants who had received eBT or SDW fulfilled criteria for eating disorders at follow up compared to WLC. There was no significant difference between eBT and SDW in the analysis of variance (ANOVA), although in separate analyses, eBT was significantly superior to WLC (p < 0.02) and the difference for SDW approached significance (p = 0.06). BDI and BITE scores showed no significant change. For eBT participants there was a significant positive correlation between words written and improvement in BITE severity score. BN, BED and EDNOS can be treated via email.

  8. An empirical comparison of atypical bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder

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    L.F. Fontenelle

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition (ICD-10 defines atypical bulimia nervosa (ABN as an eating disorder that encompasses several different syndromes, including the DSM-IV binge eating disorder (BED. We investigated whether patients with BED can be differentiated clinically from patients with ABN who do not meet criteria for BED. Fifty-three obese patients were examined using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the ICD-10 criteria for eating disorders. All volunteers completed the Binge Eating Scale (BES, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90. Individuals fulfilling criteria for both ABN and BED (N = 18, ABN without BED (N = 16, and obese controls (N = 19 were compared and contrasted. Patients with ABN and BED and patients with ABN without BED displayed similar levels of binge eating severity according to the BES (31.05 ± 7.7 and 30.05 ± 5.5, respectively, which were significantly higher than those found in the obese controls (18.32 ± 8.7; P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively. When compared to patients with ABN and BED, patients with ABN without BED showed increased lifetime rates of agoraphobia (P = 0.02 and increased scores in the somatization (1.97 ± 0.85 vs 1.02 ± 0.68; P = 0.001, obsessive-compulsive (2.10 ± 1.03 vs 1.22 ± 0.88; P = 0.01, anxiety (1.70 ± 0.82 vs 1.02 ± 0.72; P = 0.02, anger (1.41 ± 1.03 vs 0.59 ± 0.54; P = 0.005 and psychoticism (1.49 ± 0.93 vs 0.75 ± 0.55; P = 0.01 dimensions of the SCL-90. The BED construct may represent a subgroup of ABN with less comorbities and associated symptoms.

  9. The Use of Videogames as Complementary Therapeutic Tool for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Bulimia Nervosa Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Santamaría, Juan J; Giner-Bartolomé, Cristina; Mestre-Bach, Gemma; Granero, Roser; Sánchez, Isabel; Agüera, Zaida; Moussa, Maher H; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Konstantas, Dimitri; Lam, Tony; Lucas, Mikkel; Nielsen, Jeppe; Lems, Peter; Tarrega, Salomé; Menchón, José Manuel

    2015-12-01

    Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been demonstrated to be the most effective approach for the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN), there is lack of studies showing whether a combination with a serious video game (SVG) might be useful to enhance patients' emotional regulation capacities and general outcome. The aims of this study were (a) to analyze whether outpatient CBT + SVG, when compared with outpatient CBT - SVG, shows better short-term outcome; (b) to examine whether the CBT + SVG group is more effective in reducing emotional expression and levels of anxiety than CBT - SVG. Thirty-eight patients diagnosed as having BN according to DSM-5 criteria were consecutively assigned to two outpatient group therapy conditions (that lasted for 16 weekly sessions): 20 CBT + SVG versus 18 CBT - SVG. Patients were assessed before and after treatment using not only a food and binging/purging diary and clinical questionnaires in the field of eating disorders but also additional indexes for measuring anger expression and anxiety. Regarding the post-treatment psychometric measures, most of the mean differences (Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Symptom Checklist-Revised, State-Trait Anxiety Index, and partially State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory) achieved moderate to high effect size (d > 0.5), in the sense that CBT + SVG obtained the best results compared with the CBT - SVG group. Regarding therapy outcome (dropout, partial remission, and total remission), CBT + SVG showed better results and a moderate effect size emerged for the comparison of the risk of dropout during the treatment, being higher for CBT - SVG compared with CBT + SVG (44.1 percent versus 20.0 percent, d = 0.54). Although the sample size in our study was low, and consequently results should be considered with caution, we have obtained promising findings suggesting that in the short-term CBT + SVG might be a good option not only for improving

  10. Teoria e eficácia da terapia comportamental dialética na bulimia nervosa e no transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica Theory and efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Alexandre Nunes-Costa; Diogo Jorge Pereira do Vale Lamela; Laura Gil-Costa

    2009-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: Procura-se analisar as atuais evidências empíricas e teóricas sobre o modo de operar nas intervenções comportamentais dialéticas. Procedeu-se igualmente à análise da eficácia dessa terapia no tratamento da bulimia nervosa e no transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica. MÉTODO: Realizou-se uma revisão agregativa da literatura, recorrendo às palavras-chave "dialectical behavior therapy", "bulimia nervosa" e "binge eating disorder" nas bases de dados PsycInfo e MedLine e em livros d...

  11. [Bulimia during adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tournemire, R

    2013-11-01

    Binge eating, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, anorexia-bulimia are terms often used without really knowing what precisely one is referring to. Otherwise, there are many articles concerning anorexia nervosa in medical literature, a disease, which can be seen and fascinates. These eating disorders are frequent in today's society; medical, psychological and social consequences are important.

  12. An attempt at distinguishing subgroups of women with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa by means of the Defense Mechanism Technique modified (DMTm) and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, M; Andersson, A L

    2005-09-01

    In an attempt to identify diagnostically meaningful subgroups in a group of sixty women 18-34 years of age, 19 of them having a DSM-IV diagnosis of anorexia nervosa and 41 of bulimia nervosa, a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on their data obtained from the Defense Mechanism Technique modified (DMTm) and the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI). Variables also taken into account in the cluster analysis were those of the main diagnosis, depression, personality disorder, binge eating, purging, Body Mass Index (BMI), and exercise. Five distinct clusters were found. Six of the eight EDI variables and fourteen of the twenty DMTm variables were represented in the description of the clusters. One anorexic and one bulimic cluster included DMTm signs previously found in patients with fibromyalgia. Two bulimic clusters included DMTm signs previously observed in patients with either distal or total ulcerative colitis. Hysteria was linked with the remaining anorexic cluster. On both EDI and DMTm the two main groups of anorexic and bulimic patients displayed few differences. It was mainly the various constellations of DMTm variables, interpreted in terms of the Andersson developmental and psychodynamic model of the mind, that were crucial for understanding the five clusters obtained.

  13. Altered processing of rewarding and aversive basic taste stimuli in symptomatic women with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Prinster, Anna; Volpe, Umberto; Cantone, Elena; Pellegrino, Francesca; Canna, Antonietta; Milano, Walter; Aiello, Marco; Di Salle, Francesco; Maj, Mario

    2017-02-21

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have displayed a dysregulation in the way in which the brain processes pleasant taste stimuli in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). However, exactly how the brain processes disgusting basic taste stimuli has never been investigated, even though disgust plays a role in food intake modulation and AN and BN patients exhibit high disgust sensitivity. Therefore, we investigated the activation of brain areas following the administration of pleasant and aversive basic taste stimuli in symptomatic AN and BN patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty underweight AN women, 20 symptomatic BN women and 20 healthy women underwent fMRI while tasting 0.292 M sucrose solution (sweet taste), 0.5 mM quinine hydrochloride solution (bitter taste) and water as a reference taste. In symptomatic AN and BN patients the pleasant sweet stimulus induced a higher activation in several brain areas than that induced by the aversive bitter taste. The opposite occurred in healthy controls. Moreover, compared to healthy controls, AN patients showed a decreased response to the bitter stimulus in the right amygdala and left anterior cingulate cortex, while BN patients showed a decreased response to the bitter stimulus in the right amygdala and left insula. These results show an altered processing of rewarding and aversive taste stimuli in ED patients, which may be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of AN and BN.

  14. Blood levels of the endocannabinoid anandamide are increased in anorexia nervosa and in binge-eating disorder, but not in bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Matias, Isabelle; Martiadis, Vassilis; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Maj, Mario; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2005-06-01

    The endocannabinoid system, consisting of two cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and the endogenous ligands anandamide (arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA)) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), has been shown to control food intake in both animals and humans, modulating either rewarding or quantitative aspects of the eating behavior. Moreover, hypothalamic endocannabinoids seem to be part of neural circuitry involved in the modulating effects of leptin on energy homeostasis. Therefore, alterations of the endocannabinoid system could be involved in the pathophysiology of eating disorders, where a deranged leptin signalling has been also reported. In order to verify this hypothesis, we measured plasma levels of AEA, 2-AG, and leptin in 15 women with anorexia nervosa (AN), 12 women with bulimia nervosa (BN), 11 women with binge-eating disorder (BED), and 15 healthy women. Plasma levels of AEA resulted significantly enhanced in both anorexic and BED women, but not in bulimic patients. No significant change occurred in the plasma levels of 2-AG in all the patients' groups. Moreover, circulating AEA levels were significantly and inversely correlated with plasma leptin concentrations in both healthy controls and anorexic women. These findings show for the first time a derangement in the production of the endogenous cannabinoid AEA in drug-free symptomatic women with AN or with BED. Although the pathophysiological significance of this alteration awaits further studies to be clarified, it suggests a possible involvement of AEA in the mediation of the rewarding aspects of the aberrant eating behaviors occurring in AN and BED.

  15. Loneliness mediates the relationship between emotion dysregulation and bulimia nervosa/binge eating disorder psychopathology in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southward, Matthew W; Christensen, Kara A; Fettich, Karla C; Weissman, Jessica; Berona, Johnny; Chen, Eunice Y

    2014-12-01

    Emotion dysregulation has been linked to binge eating disorder (BED) and bulimia nervosa (BN) although the mechanisms by which it affects BN/BED psychopathology are unclear. This study tested loneliness as a mediator between emotion dysregulation and BN/BED psychopathology. A treatment-seeking sample of 107 women with BN or BED was assessed for loneliness (UCLA Loneliness Scale), emotion dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale), and BN/BED psychopathology (Eating Disorder Examination) before treatment. Hierarchical linear regressions and bootstrapping mediation models were run. Greater overall emotion dysregulation was associated with greater BN/BED psychopathology, mediated by loneliness (95 % CI 0.03, 0.09). Emotion dysregulation, however, did not mediate between loneliness and BN/BED psychopathology (95 % CI −0.01, 0.01). Targeting loneliness may effectively treat emotional aspects of BN/BED in women.

  16. Remote treatment of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder: a randomized trial of Internet-assisted cognitive behavioural therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljotsson, B; Lundin, C; Mitsell, K; Carlbring, P; Ramklint, M; Ghaderi, A

    2007-04-01

    The present study investigated the efficacy of self-help based on cognitive behaviour therapy in combination with Internet support in the treatment of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. After confirming the diagnosis with an in-person interview, 73 patients were randomly allocated to treatment or a waiting list control group. Treated individuals showed marked improvement after 12 weeks of self-help compared to the control group on both primary and secondary outcome measures. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed that 37% (46% among completers) had no binge eating or purging at the end of the treatment and a considerable number of patients achieved clinically significant improvement on most of the other measures as well. The results were maintained at the 6-month follow-up, and provide evidence to support the continued use and development of self-help programmes.

  17. Clinical Utility of Subtyping Binge Eating Disorder by History of Anorexia or Bulimia Nervosa in a Treatment Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utzinger, Linsey M.; Mitchell, James E.; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D.; Crow, Scott J.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Peterson, Carol B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined whether having a history of anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) is associated with response to treatment in adults with binge eating disorder (BED). Method Data from 189 adults diagnosed with BED who were randomly assigned to one of three group cognitive-behavioral (CBT) treatments were analyzed to compare those with and without a history of AN/BN. Results A total of 16% of the sample had a history of AN/BN. The BED subgroup with a history of AN/BN presented with higher rates of mood disorders and greater eating-related symptom severity at baseline. Participants with a history of AN/BN also had higher global eating disorder (ED) symptoms at end of treatment (EOT), and more frequent objective binge-eating episodes at EOT and 12-month follow-up. Discussion These findings suggest that in adults with BED, a history of AN/BN is predictive of greater eating-related symptom severity following group-based CBT and poorer short- and long-term binge-eating outcomes. These findings suggest that considering ED history in the treatment of adults with BED may be clinically useful. PMID:25959549

  18. Enhanced serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels in bulimia nervosa: relationships to psychiatric comorbidity, psychopathology and hormonal variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Santonastaso, Paolo; Pannuto, Marilena; Favaro, Angela; Caregaro, Lorenza; Castaldo, Eloisa; Zanetti, Tatiana; Maj, Mario

    2005-04-30

    Increased levels of cholesterol have been reported in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN), but all but one of the published studies were performed on non-fasting subjects, which limits the interpretation of this finding. Moreover, the relationships between serum lipids and comorbid psychiatric disorders or bulimic psychopathology have scarcely been investigated. We measured serum levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, 17beta-estradiol and thyroid hormones in 75 bulimic women and 64 age-matched healthy females after an overnight fast. Compared with healthy women, bulimic patients exhibited significantly enhanced serum levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, but similar values of glucose, 17beta-estradiol, FT3 and FT4. No significant differences emerged in these variables between patients with or without comorbid depression, borderline personality disorder or lifetime anorexia nervosa. Circulating cholesterol was positively correlated to the patients' drive for thinness, ineffectiveness, enteroceptive awareness and impulse regulation sub-item scores of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2. These findings confirm that BN is associated with increased levels of serum lipids. This alteration may be involved in the pathophysiology of certain psychopathological characteristics of BN and cannot be explained by the co-occurrence of other psychiatric disorders.

  19. [Oral symptoms and signs in patients with bulimia and anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, René L

    2006-01-01

    There are numerous general clinical manifestations in eating disorders, such as anorexia and nervous bulimia, which are fully described in the reading material. The objective of this study is to demonstrate that patients suffering from anorexia and nervous bulimia present manifestations in the oral mucosa and a proper anamnesis can lead to an early disease diagnosis. The clinical cases presented show some of the oral manifestations in patients suffering from these disorders. Abrasion of teeth enamel is a typical sign of this disease, specially in patients with nervous bulimia, caused by self-induced vomit acids. However, this sign does not help to make an early disease diagnosis, since the acid takes a long time to produce demineralization.

  20. Unanticipated rapid remission of refractory bulimia nervosa, during high-dose repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex: a case report

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    Jonathan eDownar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A woman with severe, refractory bulimia nervosa underwent treatment for comorbid depression using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC using a novel technique. Unexpectedly, she showed a rapid, dramatic remission from bulimia nervosa. For 5 months pre-treatment, she had reported two 5-hour binge-purge episodes per day. After rTMS session 2 the episodes stopped entirely for 1 week; after session 10 there were no further recurrences. Depression scores improved more gradually to remission at session 10. Full remission from depression and binge-eating/purging episodes was sustained more than 2 months after treatment completion. In neuroimaging studies, the DMPFC is important in impulse control, and is underactive in bulimia nervosa. DMPFC-rTMS may have enhanced the patient’s ability to deploy previously acquired strategies to avoid binge-eating and purging via a reduction in her impulsivity. A larger sham-controlled trial of DMPFC-rTMS for binge-eating and purging behavior may be warranted.

  1. A bulimia nervosa como fator de risco para distúrbios da voz: artigo de revisão Bulimia nervosa as a risk factor for voice disorders: literature review

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    Patricia Balata

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A bulimia nervosa é um tipo de transtorno alimentar que tem início na adolescência e que apresenta uma variedade de sintomas, dentre estes, os episódios recorrentes de vômitos que acometem a cavidade oral, podendo alcançar a laringe de forma semelhante ao refluxo gastroesofágico, ocasionando alterações laríngeas e distúrbios na voz. OBJETIVO: Este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar através da revista da literatura os estudos que relacionassem a BN como fator de risco para os distúrbios da voz. RESULTADOS: Dos noventa e três artigos levantados, vinte e três foram usados como base para esta revisão, dentre os quais, apenas três referem-se à BN com fator etiológico de alterações na voz em mulheres adultas, não sendo encontrado nenhum trabalho referindo esta relação em adolescentes bulímicos. CONCLUSÃO: Faz-se necessária a observância de sinais e sintomas laríngeos e vocais que possam estar relacionados à BN, em especial nos adolescentes cuja voz passa por significativas mudanças quando do período da muda vocal.Bulimia nervosa (BN is a type of feeding disorder that starts in adolescence and presents a variety of symptoms, recurrent vomiting in the oral cavity that may reach down to the larynx - similarly to gastro-esophageal reflux, causing laryngeal and voice disorder alterations. AIM: These studies aimed at surveying the literature and investigate the studies that considered BN a risk factor for voice disorders. RESULTS: of the ninety three papers we found, twenty-three were used as a basis for this review, among them, only three discuss BN as an etiology factor associated with voice changes in adult women, and we did not find any paper associating this with bulimic teenagers. CONCLUSION: It is necessary to observe laryngeal and vocal signs and symptoms associated with BN, especially in teenagers whose voices are going through a period of change.

  2. Impulsividad y búsqueda de sensaciones: factores asociados a síntomas de anorexia y bulimia nerviosas en estudiantes de secundaria (Impulsiveness and sensation seeking: Factors associated with symptoms of anorexia and bulimia nervosa in high school students

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    Serafina Castro-Zamudio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential association of impulsiveness and sensation seeking and the attitudes and behaviour characteristic of anorexia and bulimia nervosa in male and female students (between 12 and 20 years. The study had an observational case-control design, in which the case group comprised symptomatic subjects who had scores above the cutoff point designated by the authors for several assessment instruments, and the control group, which comprised asymptomatic participants who had scores below the cutoff point. The study included 300 participants (136 men [45.33%] and 164 women [(54.66%] from Malaga (Spain. All participants received parental authorization to take part in the study. The participants anonymously completed the following self-administered tests: Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI-II, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, Bulimia Test Revised (BULIT-R, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11, and (SSS-V. The results suggest an association between impulsiveness and symptomatology associated with eating disorders, anorexia, and bulimia nervosa. In contrast, sensation seeking was only associated with bulimic symptoms. In summary, the variables impulsivity and sensation seeking appear to be closely associated with eating disorders. Thus, these aspects should be addressed in healthy lifestyle programs, because their inclusion may help to reduce or prevent the increase in eating disorders in the teenage population.

  3. Compulsão alimentar e bulimia nervosa em praticantes de exercício físico

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    Cláudia Raulino Tramontt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Estudos nacionais mostram variações na prevalência de compulsão alimentar entre 14,9 a 18,1%, enquanto a bulimia nervosa (BN apresenta-se em torno de 1 a 3,6%. Indivíduos que apresentam transtornos alimentares procuram espaços onde o exercício físico é estimulado e assim mascaram características da doença, exercitando-se compulsivamente após um episódio de compulsão alimentar. OBJETIVO: Identificar a prevalência de transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica (TCAP e bulimia nervosa em praticantes de exercício físico associando ao estado nutricional, modalidade, frequência, duração e objetivo da prática do exercício físico. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal composto por 103 indivíduos maiores de 18 anos com idade média de 37,7 (DP±15,6 anos, de ambos os sexos, praticantes de exercício físico há pelo menos três meses ininterruptos antes do início da pesquisa. Para análise da prevalência de TCAP e BN foi utilizado o Questionário sobre Alimentação e Peso (QEWP-R e um questionário específico sobre exercício físico. O estado nutricional foi classificado conforme o IMC. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de TCAP entre os indivíduos praticantes de exercício físico foi de 0,97%. Houve associação entre valores de IMC mais alto (p=0,026, idade menor (para TCAP p=0,036, BN p=0,01 e objetivo da prática de exercício físico declarado "estética" (para TCAP p=0,011 e BN p=0,043 com maiores pontuações nos escores de TCAP e BN. CONCLUSÃO: A prevalência de TCAP e BN encontrada neste estudo está de acordo com o referido na literatura internacional. Não foram encontradas associações entre compulsão alimentar e maior frequência de exercício físico.

  4. A review of the father-child relationship in the development and maintenance of adolescent anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Christopher J; Cluett, Elizabeth R; Laver-Bradbury, Cathy

    2013-01-01

    There are disproportionately fewer studies examining the role of the father in the development of child and adolescent psychopathology. This is pertinent in the field of eating disorders, where there is a wealth of research related to family influences and the value of family-based interventions. This article reviews the key themes within the literature around the potential impact of the father-child relationship on the development and maintenance of Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa in young people. The critical review searched relevant health and social care databases, as well as manually searching key journals in the eating disorder field. In these results, 13 studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were critiqued, with 8 being taken forward for discussion. The 8 studies identified key themes within the relationship of the father and child (particularly daughters) around conflict and communication, parental protection and psychological control, emotional regulation and self-esteem, and self-perfectionism. All of these factors appear to influence the child's level of self-determining autonomy, which in turn can impact maladaptive eating attitudes and psychopathology. Tentative recommendations are made around working with fathers to encourage free expression of ideas and foster a sense of autonomy through compromise and collaboration with their adolescent child. Further research around these themes in relation to other family members is also suggested.

  5. Reciprocal associations between negative affect, binge eating, and purging in the natural environment in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Jason M; Utzinger, Linsey M; Cao, Li; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Crosby, Ross D

    2016-04-01

    Although negative affect (NA) has been identified as a common trigger for bulimic behaviors, findings regarding NA following such behaviors have been mixed. This study examined reciprocal associations between NA and bulimic behaviors using real-time, naturalistic data. Participants were 133 women with bulimia nervosa (BN) according to the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders who completed a 2-week ecological momentary assessment protocol in which they recorded bulimic behaviors and provided multiple daily ratings of NA. A multilevel autoregressive cross-lagged analysis was conducted to examine concurrent, first-order autoregressive, and prospective associations between NA, binge eating, and purging across the day. Results revealed positive concurrent associations between all variables across all time points, as well as numerous autoregressive associations. For prospective associations, higher NA predicted subsequent bulimic symptoms at multiple time points; conversely, binge eating predicted lower NA at multiple time points, and purging predicted higher NA at 1 time point. Several autoregressive and prospective associations were also found between binge eating and purging. This study used a novel approach to examine NA in relation to bulimic symptoms, contributing to the existing literature by directly examining the magnitude of the associations, examining differences in the associations across the day, and controlling for other associations in testing each effect in the model. These findings may have relevance for understanding the etiology and/or maintenance of bulimic symptoms, as well as potentially informing psychological interventions for BN.

  6. Empirically defining rapid response to intensive treatment to maximize prognostic utility for bulimia nervosa and purging disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Danielle E; Trottier, Kathryn; McFarlane, Traci; Olmsted, Marion P

    2015-05-01

    Rapid response (RR) to eating disorder treatment has been reliably identified as a predictor of post-treatment and sustained remission, but its definition has varied widely. Although signal detection methods have been used to empirically define RR thresholds in outpatient settings, RR to intensive treatment has not been investigated. This study investigated the optimal definition of RR to day hospital treatment for bulimia nervosa and purging disorder. Participants were 158 patients who completed ≥6 weeks of day hospital treatment. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to create four definitions of RR that could differentiate between remission and nonremission at the end of treatment. Definitions were based on binge/vomit episode frequency or percent reduction from pre-treatment, during either the first four or first two weeks of treatment. All definitions were associated with higher remission rates in rapid compared to nonrapid responders. Only one definition (i.e., ≤3 episodes in the first four weeks of treatment) predicted sustained remission (versus relapse) at 6- and 12-month follow-up. These findings provide an empirically derived definition of RR to intensive eating disorder treatment, and provide further evidence that early change is an important prognostic indicator.

  7. An examination of affect prior to and following episodes of getting drunk in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, Emily M; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Mitchell, James E; Engel, Scott G; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-06-30

    The current study examined the association between affect and self-reported alcohol intoxication in women with bulimia nervosa (BN; N=133). Participants completed a two-week ecological momentary assessment protocol. Momentary global positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA), as well as the facets of NA (fear, guilt, hostility and sadness), were measured. Forty-five participants endorsed that they "got drunk" during the study period. Daily mean and variability of global PA and NA were compared between days with self-reported alcohol intoxication and days without self-reported alcohol intoxication. Trajectories of affect were modeled prior to and following episodes of self-reported alcohol intoxication. There were no differences in the mean or variability of PA or NA on days characterized by self-reported alcohol intoxication compared to days with no self-reported alcohol intoxication (ps>0.05). PA decreased significantly prior to self-reported alcohol intoxication and remained stable afterwards. There were no changes in global NA before or after self-reported alcohol intoxication, but an examination of the facets of NA showed that sadness increased following episodes of self-reported alcohol intoxication. These findings showed only partial support for a negative reinforcement model of alcohol use in women with BN.

  8. Preliminary Examination of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Levels in Women with Purging Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossat, Amanda M.; Bodell, Lindsay P.; Williams, Diana L.; Eckel, Lisa A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examined pre- and post-prandial glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels in women with bulimia nervosa (BN), purging disorder (PD), and non-eating disorder control women to better understand whether alterations in satiation-related hormones in BN may be linked to binge-eating episodes or other altered ingestive behaviors. Method Participants included women with BN (n = 19), PD (n = 14), or controls (n = 14). Participants provided subjective ratings for hunger and fullness and plasma samples before and after consumption of a standardized test meal. Results As expected, GLP-1 levels increased significantly following test meal consumption; however, participants with BN displayed significantly lower GLP-1 levels compared to PD and control participants both before and after consumption of the test meal. There were no significant differences between PD and control participants in GLP-1 levels, but individuals with PD displayed significantly higher levels of fullness throughout the test meal as compared to both control and BN participants. Discussion Our findings provide preliminary evidence that reduced GLP-1 levels in individuals with BN may be associated with binge-eating episodes. Additionally, increased fullness in individuals with PD does not appear to be accounted for by exaggerated post-prandial GLP-1 release. PMID:24590464

  9. Identificação de distúrbios da imagem corporal e comportamentos favoráveis ao desenvolvimento da bulimia nervosa em adolescentes de uma Escola Pública do Ensino Médio de Maringá, Estado do Paraná = Identifying body image disorders and behaviors leading to the development of bulimia nervosa in adolescents from a Public High School in Maringá, Paraná State

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    Alice Maria de Souza-Kaneshima

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Ciente da importância de estudos de transtornos alimentares em adolescentes, este trabalho identificou a ocorrência de distúrbios da imagem corporal e de bulimia nervosa, em 187 adolescentes. Pelo Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ, foi demonstrado que 48,13% dos adolescentes apresentaram distúrbios de imagem corporal. A aplicação do Teste de Investigação Bulímica de Edimburgo (BITE demonstrou que 3,74 e 39,04% dos adolescentes apresentaram alto e médio grau de desordem alimentar, respectivamente. Na subescala de gravidade do BITE, verificou-se que 2,67 e 7,49% dos adolescentes apresentaram gravidade alta e moderada de bulimia nervosa. Os resultados demonstram alguns adolescentes com atitudes e comportamentos que favorecem o desenvolvimento da bulimia nervosa, devido à percepção distorcida da própria imagem corporal. Portanto, são necessárias campanhas educacionais para esclarecer que o culto ao corpo está associado a graves transtornos alimentares.Conscious of the importance of studying eating disorders inadolescents, this work identified the onset of body image disorders and bulimia nervosa in 187 adolescents. Using the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ, it was shown that 48.13% of adolescents displayed body image disorders. The application of the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinbugh (BITE demonstrated that 3.74 and 39.04% of adolescents presented a high or medium level of eating disorder, respectively. In the subscale of BITE severity, it was detected that 2.67 and 7.49% of adolescents showed high and moderated gravity of bulimia nervosa. The results revealed some adolescents with attitudes and behaviors that favor the development of bulimia nervosa, due to a distorted perception of their body image. Therefore, educational campaigns are necessary to clarify that the cult of the body is associated with serious eating disorders.

  10. Atitudes em relação ao corpo e à alimentação de pacientes com anorexia e bulimia nervosa

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    Aline Cavalcante de Souza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Avaliar como se relacionam as atitudes alimentares e corporais de pacientes com anorexia ou bulimia nervosa. Métodos: Pacientes adultas de um ambulatório especializado, com diagnóstico de anorexia (n = 48 ou bulimia nervosa (n = 58, responderam à Disordered Eating Attitude Scale (DEAS para avaliação das atitudes alimentares e ao Body Attitude Questionnaire (BAQ para atitudes corporais – ambos traduzidos e validados para mulheres jovens do Brasil. A correlação entre os escores da DEAS e do BAQ foi avaliada utilizando o coeficiente de Pearson. Modelos de regressão linear testaram preditores para atitudes alimentares e corporais. Resultados: Pacientes com bulimia apresentam relação com o alimento mais disfuncional – subescala 1 da DEAS (p 0,6 para ambas apenas quando se analisou a relação com o alimento e o sentir-se gorda e entre atitudes corporais como um todo e a relação com o alimento. O escore total da DEAS foi preditor da BAQ total: cada um ponto na DEAS aumenta 0,788 na BAQ (R2 = 0,628. Conclusão: Pacientes com bulimia apresentam pior relação com o alimento e piores atitudes corporais. As atitudes corporais se correlacionaram com as atitudes alimentares, de maneira mais forte para pacientes com anorexia; atitudes alimentares mais disfuncionais predizem pior relação com o corpo para ambos os diagnósticos.

  11. [Review of certain conceptions on eating disorders. Suggestions on psychotherapy for women with anorexia and bulimia nervosa (the authors' own experience)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izydorczyk, Bernadetta; Czekaj, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The article is a review of the selected theoretical concepts of eating disorder etiological factors and the authors' experience in the field of psychotheraphy of women with anorexia and bulimia nervosa. The authors describe various psychological and psychoanalytical concepts, for instance the theory of object relations by R. Spitz, D. Winnicott and H. Bruch's the theory of development. They indicate the importance of primary mother-child relations in the genesis of eating disorders as well as the process of the child's separation, his becoming independent and the basis of forming the child's attitude towards eating. They also show the difficulties during the course of psychotherapy for women with eating disorders.

  12. The influence of cognitive-behavioural stress management therapy on self-concept personality trait and negative emotions in women with Bulimia nervosa disorder

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    Masiha Eskandari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of Bulimia nervosa disorder has not been determined yet. The somatic psychological problems need to be addressed in the treatment of these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of cognitive-behavioural stress management training on self-concept personality trait and negative emotions in women with Bulimia nervosa disorder. Methods: The subjects consisted of 50 patients with Bulimia nervosa disorder that were randomly assigned to experimental (25 and control (25 groups. The experimental group received group cognitive behavioural therapy. The BSCT and DASS tests were performed on both groups before and after treatment. The results were analysed by MANCOVA. Results: In terms of self-concept, the results of pre-test and post-test in experimental group were (M: 53.44 and SD: 12.62 and (M:10.48 and SD:14.21, respectively, but for control group, the results of pre-test and post-test were (M: 50.64 and SD: 13.72 and (M: 49.56 and SD:13.75, respectively. In the case of negative emotions; the findings of pre-test and post-test for experimental group were (M: 12.76 and SD: 4.06 and (M:12.08 and SD: 4.06, respectively. However, the results of pre-test and post-test for control group were (M: 27.24 and SD: 4.17, and (M: 26.36 and SD: 4.09, respectively. Within-group comparisons indicated, the pre-test results of self-concept (M: 53.44 and SD: 12.62 were higher than those of the post-test (M: 10.48 and SD:14.21, and the pre-test results of negative emotions in experimental group (M:12.76 and SD:4.06 indicated a little change in the post-test (M:12.08 and SD: 4.06. Conclusion: This study showed that cognitive-behavioural therapy is effective for increasing the self-concept and decreasing negative emotions in patients with Bulimia nervosa disorder (P<0.000.

  13. [Effects of inpatient treatment on eating disorder symptoms, health-related quality of life and personal resources in anorexia and bulimia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagay, Sefik; Düllmann, Sonja; Schlegl, Sandra; Nater-Mewes, Ricarda; Repic, Nevena; Hampke, Christian; Brähler, Elmar; Gerlach, Gabriele; Senf, Wolfgang

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present prospective-naturalistic study was the evaluation of psychosomatic inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). 128 patients with eating disorders (n=59 AN and n=69 BN) were investigated on admission and discharge using the following standardized questionnaires: eating disorder symptoms (EDI), general psychopathology (BSI), quality of life (SF-12), and personal resources (SOC-13, SWE). Moderate to large effect sizes were achieved for the eating disorder symptoms; in addition, general psychopathology was substantially reduced at the end of treatment, and quality of life as well as personal resources were enhanced. Personal resources were found to be the strongest predictors for therapy outcome. Based on our data, important insights and recommendations may be gained for the inpatient treatment of eating disorders, especially with regard to the potential influence of personal resources.

  14. Cardiac Risk and Disordered Eating: Decreased R Wave Amplitude in Women with Bulimia Nervosa and Women with Subclinical Binge/Purge Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Melinda; Rogers, Jennifer; Nguyen, Christine; Blasko, Katherine; Martin, Amanda; Hudson, Dominique; Fernandez-Kong, Kristen; Kaza-Amlak, Zauditu; Thimmesch, Brandon; Thorne, Tyler

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was threefold. First, we examined whether women with bulimia nervosa (n = 12) and women with subthreshold binge/purge symptoms (n = 20) showed decreased mean R wave amplitude, an indicator of cardiac risk, on electrocardiograph compared to asymptomatic women (n = 20). Second, we examined whether this marker was pervasive across experimental paradigms, including before and after sympathetic challenge tasks. Third, we investigated behavioural predictors of this marker, including binge frequency and purge frequency assessed by subtype (dietary restriction, excessive exercise, self-induced vomiting, and laxative abuse). Results of a 3 (ED symptom status) × 5 (experimental condition) mixed factorial ANCOVA (covariates: body mass index, age) indicated women with bulimia nervosa and women with subclinical binge/purge symptoms demonstrated significantly reduced mean R wave amplitude compared to asymptomatic women; this effect was pervasive across experimental conditions. Multiple regression analyses showed binge and purge behaviours, most notably laxative abuse as a purge method, predicted decreased R wave amplitude across all experimental conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  15. Teoria e eficácia da terapia comportamental dialética na bulimia nervosa e no transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica Theory and efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder

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    Rui Alexandre Nunes-Costa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Procura-se analisar as atuais evidências empíricas e teóricas sobre o modo de operar nas intervenções comportamentais dialéticas. Procedeu-se igualmente à análise da eficácia dessa terapia no tratamento da bulimia nervosa e no transtorno da compulsão alimentar periódica. MÉTODO: Realizou-se uma revisão agregativa da literatura, recorrendo às palavras-chave "dialectical behavior therapy", "bulimia nervosa" e "binge eating disorder" nas bases de dados PsycInfo e MedLine e em livros da especialidade, sob o critério da atualidade e premência das publicações levantadas. RESULTADOS: A terapia comportamental dialética, inicialmente desenhada para o transtorno de personalidade borderline, tem-se estendido a outros transtornos do eixo I. Sua aplicação às perturbações alimentares sustentase num paradigma dialético com o recurso das estratégias comportamentais e cognitivas. Esse modelo permite aos pacientes uma regulação mais efetiva dos estados afetivos negativos, reduzindo a probabilidade da ocorrência de comportamentos bulímicos e de compulsão alimentar periódica. CONCLUSÃO: Embora escasseiem estudos sobre a sua eficácia, os resultados existentes parecem comprovar a eficácia da terapia comportamental dialética nas populações descritas.OBJECTIVES: Current theoretical and empirical evidences on how to operate in dialectical behavioral interventions were examined. The effectiveness of these interventions in the treatment of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder were analyzed too. METHOD: An aggregative literature review was made, using the keywords "dialectical behavior therapy", "bulimia nervosa" and "binge eating disorder", from the database PsycInfo and MedLine and from reference books, selecting the most representative and recent scientific texts about this psychotherapy model. RESULTS: Dialectical behavior therapy, initially designed for borderline personality disorder, has been extended to other

  16. Subjective and objective binge eating in relation to eating disorder symptomatology, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem among treatment-seeking adolescents with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Ciao, Anna C; Accurso, Erin C; Pisetsky, Emily M; Peterson, Carol B; Byrne, Catherine E; Le Grange, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the importance of the distinction between objective (OBE) and subjective binge eating (SBE) among 80 treatment-seeking adolescents with bulimia nervosa. We explored relationships among OBEs, SBEs, eating disorder (ED) symptomatology, depression, and self-esteem using two approaches. Group comparisons showed that OBE and SBE groups did not differ on ED symptoms or self-esteem; however, the SBE group had significantly greater depression. Examining continuous variables, OBEs (not SBEs) accounted for significant unique variance in global ED pathology, vomiting, and self-esteem. SBEs (not OBEs) accounted for significant unique variance in restraint and depression. Both OBEs and SBEs accounted for significant unique variance in eating concern; neither accounted for unique variance in weight/shape concern, laxative use, diuretic use, or driven exercise. Loss of control, rather than amount of food, may be most important in defining binge eating. Additionally, OBEs may indicate broader ED pathology, while SBEs may indicate restrictive/depressive symptomatology.

  17. Does a shared neurobiology for foods and drugs of abuse contribute to extremes of food ingestion in anorexia and bulimia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Walter H; Wierenga, Christina E; Bailer, Ursula F; Simmons, Alan N; Wagner, Angela; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda

    2013-05-01

    Is starvation in anorexia nervosa (AN) or overeating in bulimia nervosa (BN) a form of addiction? Alternatively, why are individuals with BN more vulnerable and individuals with AN protected from substance abuse? Such questions have been generated by recent studies suggesting that there are overlapping neural circuits for foods and drugs of abuse. To determine whether a shared neurobiology contributes to eating disorders and substance abuse, this review focused on imaging studies that investigated response to tastes of food and tasks designed to characterize reward and behavioral inhibition in AN and BN. BN and those with substance abuse disorders may share dopamine D2 receptor-related vulnerabilities, and opposite findings may contribute to "protection" from substance abuse in AN. Moreover, imaging studies provide insights into executive corticostriatal processes related to extraordinary inhibition and self-control in AN and diminished inhibitory self-control in BN that may influence the rewarding aspect of palatable foods and likely other consummatory behaviors. AN and BN tend to have premorbid traits, such as perfectionism and anxiety that make them vulnerable to using extremes of food ingestion, which serve to reduce negative mood states. Dysregulation within and/or between limbic and executive corticostriatal circuits contributes to such symptoms. Limited data support the hypothesis that reward and inhibitory processes may contribute to symptoms in eating disorders and addictive disorders, but little is known about the molecular biology of such mechanisms in terms of shared or independent processes.

  18. Physiological Bases of Bulimia, and Antidepressant Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getzfeld, Andrew R.

    This paper reviews the literature on the physiological causes of bulimia and investigates the rationale behind the usage of antidepressant medication in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. No definite conclusions can be stated regarding the physiology of bulimia, but a number of hypotheses are suggested. It appears that the hypothalamus is involved…

  19. Experience of cognitive-behavior Therapy in Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa%神经性厌食症及神经性贪食症的认知行为治疗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁树明; 胡赤怡

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate suitable therapy for anorexia nervosa(AN)and bulimia nervosa(BN)and relation between the two kinds of disorders. Methods Using cognitive-behavior therapy(CBT)to treat the four cases. Clinical effects and relative factors were discussed. Results A patient with BN was cured. Another BN was significantly progressed. The symptoms of both patients with AN were improved. Conclusion CBT is surely effective to this two kinds of disorders. The effect of BN is better than AN with CBT.%目的探讨认知行为治疗对神经性厌食症及神经性贪食症的治疗效果及其有关影响因素。方法对符合CCMD-2-R诊断的2例神经性厌食症(AN)与2例神经性贪食症(BN)做认知行为治疗,对治疗效果及相关因素进行分析。结果1例神经性贪食症治愈.另1例显效;2例神经性厌食症好转。结论认知行为治疗对这两种疾患均有肯定的疗效,BN的疗效优于AN。

  20. The results of research aimed at identifying psychological predictors of impulsive and restrictive behaviours in a population of females suffering from anorexia or bulimia nervosa – the author’s own research report

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    Izydorczyk, Bernadetta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study. The results of research aimed at identifying psychological predictors of impulsive and restrictive behaviours in a population of females suffering from anorexia or bulimia. Subject or material and methods . Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI devised by D. Garner. Clinical group:90 Polish females with bulimia and anorexia, A control group: 121 women, who exhibited no eating disorders. Results . Analysis of the data gathered as a result of this research demonstrated that the females comprising the clinical sample, who exhibited symptoms of bulimia or anorexia displayed inappropriate levels of all emotional and cognitive characteristics. Statistically significant differences were observed between the clinical and control subjects in terms of the variables investigated in the study. Discussion. The data analysis revealed that low interoceptive awareness proved to be a significant predictor of impulsive and restrictive behaviors in anorexia and bulimia. Perfectionism and body dissatisfaction were found to be significant determinants of restrictive behaviors. Whereas, such variables as a tendency towards bulimia and body dissatisfaction emerged as predictive factors for the symptoms of bulimia and bulimia type anorexia. Conclusions . Possibility that a psychological diagnosis of the emotional and cognitive characteristics displayed by females diagnosed with anorexia or bulimia nervosa is likely to facilitate the process of detecting the symptoms which are typical of the particular types of eating disorders, and thus it is a tool that can be useful at the initial stage of treatment, which involves establishing appropriate psychological interventions aimed at eliminating impulsive and restrictive behaviors developed in patients diagnosed with the aforementioned eating disorders.

  1. Group Work for Bulimia: A Review of Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews descriptive and experimental research relating to the eating disorder known as bulimia nervosa. Reviews outcome studies of group treatment of bulimia to examine the effectiveness of group intervention. Provides recommendations for practice and future research. (Author/PVV)

  2. Identificação de distúrbios da imagem corporal e comportamentos favoráveis ao desenvolvimento da bulimia nervosa em adolescentes de uma Escola Pública do Ensino Médio de Maringá, Estado do Paraná - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i2.5986 Identifying body image disorders and behaviors leading to the development of bulimia nervosa in adolescents from a Public High School in Maringá, Paraná State - DOI: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v30i2.5986

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    Daniele de Pinto Freitas Kneube

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ciente da importância de estudos de transtornos alimentares em adolescentes, este trabalho identificou a ocorrência de distúrbios da imagem corporal e de bulimia nervosa, em 187 adolescentes. Pelo Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ, foi demonstrado que 48,13% dos adolescentes apresentaram distúrbios de imagem corporal. A aplicação do Teste de Investigação Bulímica de Edimburgo (BITE demonstrou que 3,74 e 39,04% dos adolescentes apresentaram alto e médio grau de desordem alimentar, respectivamente. Na subescala de gravidade do BITE, verificou-se que 2,67 e 7,49% dos adolescentes apresentaram gravidade alta e moderada de bulimia nervosa. Os resultados demonstram alguns adolescentes com atitudes e comportamentos que favorecem o desenvolvimento da bulimia nervosa, devido à percepção distorcida da própria imagem corporal. Portanto, são necessárias campanhas educacionais para esclarecer que o culto ao corpo está associado a graves transtornos alimentares.Conscious of the importance of studying eating disorders in adolescents, this work identified the onset of body image disorders and bulimia nervosa in 187 adolescents. Using the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ, it was shown that 48.13% of adolescents displayed body image disorders. The application of the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinbugh (BITE demonstrated that 3.74 and 39.04% of adolescents presented a high or medium level of eating disorder, respectively. In the subscale of BITE severity, it was detected that 2.67 and 7.49% of adolescents showed high and moderated gravity of bulimia nervosa. The results revealed some adolescents with attitudes and behaviors that favor the development of bulimia nervosa, due to a distorted perception of their body image. Therefore, educational campaigns are necessary to clarify that the cult of the body is associated with serious eating disorders.

  3. Bulimia: A Medical Portrait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santomango, Gloria Jean

    There are three known diseases of eating disorders: compulsive overeating, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia. All three affect various body systems, are pathological in nature, and are addictive behaviors that mainly affect females. All can be fatal if not treated or under-treated. Compulsive overeating is the most known of the three disorders. The…

  4. Interaction between serotonin transporter and dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand measures is associated with harm avoidant symptoms in anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer, Ursula F; Frank, Guido K; Price, Julie C; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Becker, Carl; Mathis, Chester A; Wagner, Angela; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Putnam, Karen; Schork, Nicholas J; Gamst, Anthony; Kaye, Walter H

    2013-02-28

    Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) have alterations of measures of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) function, which persist after long-term recovery and are associated with elevated harm avoidance (HA), a measure of anxiety and behavioral inhibition. Based on theories that 5-HT is an aversive motivational system that may oppose a DA-related appetitive system, we explored interactions of positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand measures that reflect portions of these systems. Twenty-seven individuals recovered (REC) from eating disorders (EDs) (7 AN-BN, 11 AN, 9 BN) and nine control women (CW) were analyzed for correlations between [(11)C]McN5652 and [(11)C]raclopride binding. There was a significant positive correlation between [(11)C]McN5652 binding potential (BP(non displaceable(ND))) and [(11)C]Raclopride BP(ND) for the dorsal caudate, antero-ventral striatum (AVS), middle caudate, and ventral and dorsal putamen. No significant correlations were found in CW. [(11)C]Raclopride BP(ND), but not [(11)C]McN5652 BP(ND), was significantly related to HA in REC EDs. A linear regression analysis showed that the interaction between [(11)C]McN5652 BP(ND) and [(11)C]raclopride BP(ND) in the dorsal putamen significantly predicted HA. This is the first study using PET and the radioligands [(11)C]McN5652 and [(11)C]raclopride to show a direct relationship between 5-HT transporter and striatal DA D2/D3 receptor binding in humans, supporting the possibility that 5-HT and DA interactions contribute to HA behaviors in EDs.

  5. Psychological and Social Mechanism and Intervention of Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa%神经性厌食症与贪食症心理社会机制及干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘光花

    2015-01-01

    神经性厌食症与贪食症是常见的进食障碍。为更好地了解其发病机制,从心理社会因素以及治疗预防等方面对这两类进食障碍进行了分析。研究内容包括心理社会因素以及预防干预分析。研究结果发现,病理性怕胖是两者发病的主要心理因素,追求苗条是其发病的主要社会文化因素,两者都可采用心理药物治疗相结合的方式进行干预,同时运用社会预防和健康教育。%Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are common eating disorders.To understand them better,this paper analyzed these two types of eating disorders from psychological and social factors and prevention and treat-ment.The research contents included the analysis of psychological and social factors and preventive intervention.We found that pathological fear of fat was the main psychological factors of the incidence of these two eating disorders, the pursuit of slim was a major social and cultural factor of the pathogenesis.The intervention measures of these both disorders were the combination of psychological therapy and drug therapy,meanwhile,social prevention and health education should be used.

  6. Facets of negative affect prior to and following binge-only, purge-only, and binge/purge events in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kelly C; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Peterson, Carol B; Engel, Scott G; Mitchell, James E; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) data suggest that global negative affect (NA) increases prior to and decreases following episodes of binge eating and purging, providing support for the affect regulation model of BN. The current study examined whether facets of NA are differentially related to bulimic behaviors. Women with bulimia nervosa (BN; n = 133) completed a 2-week EMA protocol. Momentary assessments of 4 facets of NA (Fear, Guilt, Hostility, and Sadness) were derived from the PANAS subscales. Trajectories of the NA facets were modeled prior to and following binge-only, purge-only, and binge/purge events. Fear, Guilt, Hostility, and Sadness increased prior to and decreased following binge-only and binge/purge events. The same results were found for purge-only events, with the exception that Hostility did not increase significantly prior to purging. Notably, ratings of Guilt were higher than those of Fear, Hostility, and Sadness at the time of binge-only and binge/purge events. Furthermore, post hoc analyses demonstrate that Guilt increased prior to and decreased following the 3 behavior types, even after controlling for Fear, Hostility, and Sadness. These results provide further support for the affect regulation model of BN and also suggest that guilt may be particularly important to the pathology of BN.

  7. Food for Thought: Change in Ego-Dystonicity and Fear of Self in Bulimia Nervosa Over the Course of Inference Based Treatment

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    Magali Purcell Lalonde

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Degree of ego-dystonicity in obsessions is clinically relevant to the conceptualization and treatment of eating disorders (EDs. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD research has suggested that the transformation of intrusive thoughts into obsessions is linked to the degree to which intrusive thoughts threaten core perceptions of the self. Given the recognized overlap between EDs, particularly anorexia and bulimia nervosa (BN, and OCD in phenomenology and psychological characteristics, a 24-week cognitive inference-based therapy (IBT program shown to be effective in treating OCD was adapted to treat EDs. This study explores the change in ED symptom severity, The degree of ego-dystonicity in obsessions, and Fear of self, motivational, mood and anxiety measures from pre-IBT to six-month follow-up. Changes in ego-dystonicity, fear of self, ED symptoms and motivational stage were assessed in 15 women with BN over the course of IBT and at follow-up. Clinical implications are discussed.

  8. Client attachment in a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa: Outcome moderation and change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Poulsen, Stig; Lunn, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    In the context of a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic psychotherapy (PPT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa (BN), this study performed secondary analyses of (a) the relation between attachment and pretreatment symptom levels, (b) whether client pretreatment attachment moderated treatment outcome, (c) whether change in client attachment was associated with symptomatic change, and (d) whether client attachment changed differently in the 2 treatments. Sixty-nine women and 1 man of a mean age of 25.8 years diagnosed with BN were randomly assigned to either 2 years of weekly PPT or 5 months of CBT. Assessments at intake, after 5 months, and after 2 years included the Eating Disorder Examination to assess eating disorder symptoms, the Adult Attachment Interview to assess client attachment, and the Symptom Checklist 90-R to assess general psychiatric distress. Repeated measures were analyzed using multilevel analysis. Higher scores on attachment insecurity and attachment preoccupation were associated with more frequent binging pretreatment. Pretreatment attachment did not predict treatment outcome. In PPT, but not in CBT, reduction of binging was associated with an increase in attachment security. The 2 treatment types were not associated with significantly different patterns of attachment-related change. Degree and type of attachment insecurity is related to the frequency of binging in BN. Increase in attachment security may be a treatment-specific mechanism of change in PPT for BN. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Changes Cerebral Oxygenation on the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Bulimia Nervosa: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutoh, Chihiro; Koga, Yasuko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Numata, Noriko; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Iyo, Masaomi; Nakazato, Michiko; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that food craving in eating disorders can be weakened with high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The aims of this study were to assess cerebral oxygenation change induced with rTMS and to assess the short-term impact of rTMS on food craving and other bulimic symptoms in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN). Eight women diagnosed with BN according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria participated in this study. We measured haemoglobin concentration changes in the DLPFC with near-infrared spectroscopy during cognitive tasks measuring self-regulatory control in response to food photo stimuli, both at baseline and after a single session of rTMS. Subjective ratings for food cravings demonstrated significant reduction. A significant decrease in cerebral oxygenation of the left DLPFC was also observed after a single session of rTMS. Measurement with NIRS after rTMS intervention may be applicable for discussing the mechanisms underlying rTMS modulation in patients with BN.

  10. Choosing Assessment Instruments for Bulimia Practice and Outcome Research

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    Sandberg, Katie; Erford, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    Six commonly used instruments for assessment of eating disorders were analyzed. Effect size results from Erford et al.'s (2013) meta-analysis for the treatment of bulimia nervosa were used to compare each scale's ability to measure treatment outcomes for bulimia nervosa. Effect size comparisons indicated higher overall effect sizes using the…

  11. Cognitive hypnotherapy with bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabasz, Marianne

    2012-04-01

    Research on the efficacy of hypnosis in the treatment of bulimia nervosa has produced mixed findings. This is due in part to the interplay between the characteristics of people with bulimia and the wide variety of hypnosis interventions that have been employed. Several authors have noted that methodological limitations in hypnosis research often make evaluation of treatment efficacy difficult. Many of the studies extant provide insufficient information regarding the specifics of participants' hypnotizability, the hypnotic induction, or the hypnotic suggestion(s) employed. Such limitations preclude replication and clinical implementation. This article reviews the literature with replicable methodologies and discusses the implications for evaluating treatment efficacy.

  12. Comparison of a high-carbohydrate and high-protein breakfast effect on plasma ghrelin, obestatin, NPY and PYY levels in women with anorexia and bulimia nervosa

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    Sedlackova Dana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study investigated plasma levels of gut-brain axis peptides ghrelin, obestatin, NPY and PYY after consumption of a high-carbohydrate (HC and high-protein (HP breakfast in patients with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and in healthy controls. These peptides play an important role in regulation of energy homeostasis and their secretion is disturbed under condition of eating disorders. As various types of consumed macronutrients may induce different plasma hormone responses, so we examined these responses in women patients with eating disorders and compared them with those of healthy controls. Methods We examined plasma hormone responses to HC and HP breakfast in patients with AN (n = 14; age: 24.6 ± 1.8 years, BMI: 15.3 ± 0.7, BN (n = 15; age: 23.2 ± 1.7 years, BMI: 20.5 ± 0.9 and healthy controls (n = 14; age: 24.9 ± 1.4 years, BMI: 21.1 ± 0.8. Blood samples were drawn from the cubital vein, the first blood drawn was collected before meal, and then 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 min after breakfast consumption. Plasma hormone levels were determined by commercially available RIA kits. Results Fasting and postprandial plasma obestatin levels were significantly increased in both AN and BN patients, while plasma ghrelin levels were significantly increased in AN patients only. After breakfast consumption, plasma levels of ghrelin and obestatin decreased, although they were still above the range of values of healthy controls. Fasting NPY plasma levels were significantly increased in AN and BN patients and did not change postprandially. Fasting PYY levels were comparable in AN, BN and healthy controls, but postprandially significantly increased after HP breakfast in AN and BN patients. Different reactions to breakfast consumption was found for ghrelin and PYY among investigated groups, while for obestatin and NPY these reactions were similar in all groups. Conclusions Significant

  13. Association of the promoter polymorphism -1438G/A of the 5-HT2A receptor gene with behavioral impulsiveness and serotonin function in women with bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kenneth R; Steiger, Howard; Joober, Ridha; Ng Ying Kin, N M K; Israel, Mimi; Young, Simon N

    2005-08-05

    Separate lines of research suggest that the functional alterations in the serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor are associated with 5-HT tone, behavioral impulsiveness, and bulimia nervosa (BN). We explored the effect of allelic variations within the 5-HT2A receptor gene promoter polymorphism -1438G/A on trait impulsiveness and serotonin function in women with BN. Participants included women with BN having the A allele (i.e., AA homozygotes and AG heterozygotes, BNA+, N = 21); women with BN but without the A allele (i.e., GG homozygotes, BNGG, N = 12), and normal eater control women having the A allele (NEA+, N = 19) or without the A allele (NEGG; N = 9). The women were assessed for psychopathological tendencies and eating disorder symptoms, and provided blood samples for measurement of serial prolactin responses following oral administration of the post-synaptic partial 5-HT agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP). The BNGG group had higher scores than the other groups on self-report measures of non-planning and overall impulsiveness and had blunted prolactin response following m-CPP. The bulimic groups did not differ from each other on current eating symptoms or on frequencies of other Axis I mental disorders. Findings indicate that women with BN who are GG homozygotes on the -1438G/A promoter polymorphism are characterized by increased impulsiveness and lower sensitivity to post-synaptic serotonin activation. These findings implicate the GG genotype in the co-aggregation of impulsive behaviors and alterations of post-synaptic 5-HT functioning in women with BN.

  14. Fearing Fat: A Literature Review of Family Systems Understandings and Treatments of Anorexia and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Kyle D.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews literature examining family variables associated with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa and family systems treatments for these eating disorders. Presents definitions of and diagnostic criteria for anorexia and bulimia, and discusses prevalence of these disorders. Reviews role played by psychopathological, sociological, and…

  15. Use of the MMPI and MMPI-2 with Persons with Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geslak, Lisa

    The use of the MMPI and MMPI-2 to assist in the understanding of individuals with bulimia nervosa is examined. DSM-IV criteria for diagnosis of bulimia nervosa are reviewed. It is also important to understand the personality variables or psychological correlates associated with this disorder. The structure and history of the MMPI and MMPI-2 are…

  16. SECCIÓN ABIERTA - 2. INFLUENCIA DE LA ESPIRITUALIDAD EN LOS ESTILOS DE AFRONTAMIENTO DE PACIENTES CON BULIMIA Y ANOREXIA NERVIOSA // INFLUENCE OF SPIRITUALITY IN COPING STYLES OF PATIENTS WITH BULIMIA AND ANOREXIA NERVOSA

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    Marisa Edith Oviedo Romero

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Basándose en el supuesto de que la espiritualidad es un factor que podría influir sobre los estilos de afrontamiento de las personas ante situaciones problemáticas, se analizó la influencia de la espiritualidad en el estilo de afrontamiento de pacientes diagnosticadas de anorexia y/o bulimia nerviosa.39 mujeres de Buenos Aires, Entre Ríos, San Luis y Mendoza (Argentina, fueron evaluadas mediante el Cuestionario de Modos de Afrontamiento (WCCL y el Inventario de Sistema de Creencias (SBI–15R.Los resultados mostraron una influencia moderada de la dimensión soporte social religioso (F(1;24= 2,094; p=0,054 en el uso y/o desarrollo del estilo de afrontamiento centrado en la evaluación, no así en los demás estilos, por parte de pacientes diagnosticadas de bulimia y/o anorexia nerviosa.

  17. Adolescent Eating Disorders: Anorexia and Bulimia. Publication 352-004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Alan E.; Baker, Daniel H.

    This document presents an overview of anorexia nervosa and bulimia in adolescents. A brief review of the historical background of these eating disorders is included. Causes of anorexia and bulimia are discussed and physical, behavioral, emotional, and perceptual characteristics of the disorders are listed in a section on symptoms. The need for a…

  18. [Bulimia, bulimia-anorexia and nocturnal secretion of melatonin and cortisol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parienti, V; Kennedy, S H; Brown, G M; Costa, D

    1988-01-01

    The authors compared nocturnal variations of melatonin (MT) and cortisol levels in subjects with bulimia (n = 12), 6 with a normal body weight and 6 with anorexia nervosa, as well as 6 control subjects. The hypothesis, formulated for anorexia nervosa, that a decrease of noradrenergic activity induces a decrease of pineal activity, therefore a decrease of melatonin secretion, was not confirmed by our study. Moreover, in subjects with bulimia in the absence of anorexia nervosa, no significant decrease of nocturnal melatonin secretion was reported. Significant differences were due to cortisol variations when comparing MTmax/Cmin ratios. Melatonin did not add any complementary biological cue for diagnostic assessment for subjects with eating disorder and depression. The results of this study suggest that melatonin does not appear to be a useful biological marker in bulimia.

  19. Risk for self-reported anorexia or bulimia nervosa based on drive for thinness and negative affect clusters/dimensions during adolescence: A three-year prospective study of the TChAD cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas-Lledó, Eva; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik; Baker, Jessica H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study explored the cross-sectional and predictive effect of drive for thinness and/or negative affect scores on the development of self-reported anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). Method K-means were used to cluster the Eating Disorder Inventory-Drive for Thinness (DT) and Child Behavior Checklist Anxious/Depressed (A/D) scores from 615 unrelated female twins at age 16–17. Logistic regressions were used to assess the effect of these clusters on self-reported eating disorder diagnosis at ages 16–17 (n=565) and 19–20 (n=451). Results DT and A/D scores were grouped into four clusters: Mild (scores lower than 90th percentile on both scales), DT (higher scores only on DT), A/D (higher scores only on A/D), and DT-A/D (higher scores on both the DT and A/D scales). DT and DT-A/D clusters at age 16–17 were associated cross-sectionally with AN and both cross-sectionally and longitudinally with BN. The DT-A/D cluster had the highest prevalence of AN at follow-up compared with all other clusters. Similarly, an interaction was observed between DT and A/D that predicted risk for AN. Discussion Having elevated DT and A/D scores may increase risk for eating disorder symptomatology above and beyond a high score on either alone. Findings suggest that cluster modeling based on DT and A/D may be useful to inform novel and useful intervention strategies for AN and BN in adolescents. PMID:26013185

  20. Dialectical behaviour therapy and an added cognitive behavioural treatment module for eating disorders in women with borderline personality disorder and anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa who failed to respond to previous treatments. An open trial with a 15-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Christoph; Schweiger, Ulrich; Sipos, Valerija; Kliem, Sören; Arnold, Ruediger; Schunert, Tanja; Reinecker, Hans

    2010-12-01

    There is evidence from case studies suggesting that adapted dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and eating disorders (ED) might improve disorder related complaints. Twenty-four women with BPD (9 with comorbid anorexia nervosa [AN] and 15 with bulimia nervosa [BN]), who already had failed to respond to previous eating-disorder related inpatient treatments were consecutively admitted to an adapted inpatient DBT program. Assessment points were at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 15-month follow-up. At follow-up, the remission rate was 54% for BN, and 33% for AN. Yet 44% of women with AN crossed over to BN and one woman additionally met the criteria of AN. For women with AN, the mean weight was not significantly increased at post-treatment, but had improved at follow-up. For women with BN, the frequency of binge-eating episodes was reduced at post-treatment as well as at follow-up. Self-rated eating-related complaints and general psychopathology, as well as ratings on global psychosocial functioning, were significantly improved at post-treatment and at follow-up. Although these findings support the assumption that the adapted DBT inpatient program is a potentially efficacious treatment for those who failed to respond to previous eating-disorder related inpatient treatments, remission rates and maintained eating-related psychopathology also suggest that this treatment needs further improvement.

  1. Interpersonal Group Therapy for Women Experiencing Bulimia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is a chronic disorder that results in a high degree of psychological impairment for many women. This article presents a description of Interpersonal Therapy for Group (IPT-G), an evidence-based approach for the treatment of BN. The author presents a rationale for the use of IPT-G, an outline of the group model, and provides…

  2. The Efficacy of Psychological Therapies in Reducing Weight and Binge Eating in People with Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder Who Are Overweight or Obese—A Critical Synthesis and Meta-Analyses

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    Marly Amorim Palavras

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent binge eating episodes, the core feature of Bulimia Nervosa (BN and Binge Eating Disorder (BED, are frequently comorbid with obesity. Psychological interventions, notably Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT, are effective for binge eating reduction in BED or BN but less so for weight loss. Behavioural Weight Loss Therapy (BWLT shows effectiveness for binge eating reduction and weight loss but the latter appears poorly sustained over time. Our aim was to review evidence for efficacy of psychological therapies for BN/BED associated with overweight or obesity in reducing binge frequency and weight. A systematic search for randomized controlled trials with adult samples who had BN or BED was conducted considering articles in English, French, Spanish and Portuguese with no restrictions for the timeline publication ending in March 2016. A quality appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses comparing BWLT to CBT were done. This review identified 2248 articles for screening and 19 published articles were selected. No trials of BN were identified. This review found CBT was favoured compared to BWLT with regard to short-term binge eating reduction. However, insufficient evidence was found for superiority for BWLT efficacy compared to CBT considering binge eating remission, reduction of binge eating frequency and weight loss. More research is needed to test the efficacy of psychological treatments for BED or BN with co-morbid overweight or obesity, including trials evaluating binge eating remission and weight loss in the long-term.

  3. Anorexia Nervosa and Bulima Nervosa Critical Analysis of It's Treatment: Implications and Interventions

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    Flourish Itulua-Abumere

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The diagnostic consideration of the eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa has been given much focus over the last two decades than previously, as clinicians have become more aware of the frequency of these disorders and the difficulties associated with their treatment. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa as known in the DSM-IV as eating disorders are characterized by physically and/or psychologically harmful eating patterns. Although the psychological explanation of what we now call anorexia nervosa have been known about for centuries, it has only recently attracted much interest, due to greater public knowledge and increased incidence (according to Gross and MclLveen 2006, the latter claim has been disputed. Most people suffering from anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa start by fasting. Anorexia nervosa is a deliberate self-starvation. A person whose body weight is less than expected for his or her body height and weight is considered to be anorexic. In contract, bulimia involves binge eating a large quantity of food followed by purging by self-induced vomiting, enemas, laxatives, or diuretics.

  4. Using latent growth curve modeling in clinical treatment research: An example comparing guided self-change and cognitive behavioral therapy treatments for bulimia nervosa

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    Sam A. Hardy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio experimental muestra la utilidad de los modelos multigrupo de curva de crecimiento latente por etapas en investigación clínica, concretamente en la evaluación y comparación de los efectos de tratamiento. Sesenta y dos pacientes femeninas (media de edad = 28,1; DT = 8 con bulimia nerviosa fueron asignadas al azar a: a un auto-tratamiento guiado compuesto por un manual de autocuidados más ocho sesiones quincenales de terapia cognitivo conductual (TCC, o b a 16 sesiones semanales de terapia cognitivo conductual (TCC. Ambos grupos mostraron mejorías significativas durante el tratamiento, aunque la TCC mostró mayor mejoría. Sin embargo, el tratamiento auto-guiado evidenció una mejoría más continuada después del tratamiento. Ambos programas mostraron variabilidad en la eficacia durante el tratamiento al menos en un resultado, mientras que el auto-tratamiento mostró una mayor variabilidad que la TCC durante el seguimiento en dos resultados. Los niveles de la línea de base estaban relacionados con los niveles en el seguimiento, particularmente en el tratamiento auto-guiado. Los modelos de curva latente ofrecen un análisis rico de estos datos y resuelven importantes cuestiones sobre las diferencias en la efectividad de los dos programas de tratamiento.

  5. The Role of “Mixed” Orexigenic and Anorexigenic Signals and Autoantibodies Reacting with Appetite-Regulating Neuropeptides and Peptides of the Adipose Tissue-Gut-Brain Axis: Relevance to Food Intake and Nutritional Status in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvido Smitka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorders such as anorexia (AN and bulimia nervosa (BN are characterized by abnormal eating behavior. The essential aspect of AN is that the individual refuses to maintain a minimal normal body weight. The main features of BN are binge eating and inappropriate compensatory methods to prevent weight gain. The gut-brain-adipose tissue (AT peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies play an important role in the regulation of eating behavior and growth hormone release. The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve an interplay between gut, brain, and AT. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and serotoninergic systems are required for communication between brain satiety centre, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include neuropeptides ghrelin, neuropeptide Y (NPY, peptide YY (PYY, cholecystokinin (CCK, leptin, putative anorexigen obestatin, monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine (NE, serotonin, and neutralizing autoantibodies. This extensive and detailed report reviews data that demonstrate that hunger-satiety signals play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating disorders. Neuroendocrine dysregulations of the AT-gut-brain axis peptides and neutralizing autoantibodies may result in AN and BN. The circulating autoantibodies can be purified and used as pharmacological tools in AN and BN. Further research is required to investigate the orexigenic/anorexigenic synthetic analogs and monoclonal antibodies for potential treatment of eating disorders in clinical practice.

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging research on bulimia nervosa with fluoxetine therapy%氟西汀治疗神经性贪食患者的功能磁共振成像初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹静; 吴宇洁; 王美娟; 石中永; 朱荣申; 申远

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨抗抑郁剂氟西汀对神经性贪食(bulimia nervosa,BN)患者脑功能的影响.方法 符合中国精神障碍分类和诊断标准第三版(CCMD-3) BN诊断标准的患者7例,分别于治疗开始前和氟西汀(20 mg/d)治疗3个月后进行功能磁共振成像(functional magnetic resonance imaging,fMRI)检查.正常对照7例,于人组时接受一次fMRI检查.功能成像为组块设计,包括食物图片序列和非食物图片序列,均来自国际情绪图片系统(international aective picture system,IAPS),由计算机自动呈现.所有受试者完成汉密尔顿焦虑量表(Hamilton anxiety scale,HAMA)、17项汉密尔顿抑郁量表(Hamilton depression scale,HAMD17)和对fMRI刺激图片的Likert Scale-likelihood态度评估.结果 BN患者治疗前脑激活强度和体积均较正常对照减小(P<0.05),在食物图片刺激下双侧前额叶及左侧杏仁核激活增强;经氟西汀治疗后脑激活强度和体积较治疗前显著增加(P<0.01),食物图片下激活最强的脑区为右侧颞叶、小脑坡、双侧前额叶,杏仁核未出现阈值以上激活.结论 氟西汀可改善BN患者贪食症状,同时使前额叶及边缘系统的异常激活减弱,其作用机制可能与前额叶及边缘系统的5-羟色胺能系统功能变化相关.%Objective To explore the effect of fluoxetine on the brain function of bulimia nervosa (BN) patients.Methods Seven female BN patients,who met criteria of the 3rd version Chinese Criteria of Mental Diseases (CCMD-3),accepted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examinations before and after the antidepressant treatment (fluoxetine (20 mg/day)) for three months.Seven normal controls accepted the same fMRI examination only at baseline.fMRI imaging was block-design.Blocks of food or non-food stimulus containing pictures selected from International Affective Picture System (IAPS) which were shown by computer automatically.All subjects were evaluated by Hamilton anxiety scale

  7. Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ePublications > Our ePublications > Anorexia nervosa fact sheet ePublications Anorexia nervosa fact sheet Print this fact sheet Anorexia nervosa fact sheet (PDF, 832 KB) Related information Binge ...

  8. A higher response of plasma neuropeptide Y, growth hormone, leptin levels and extracellular glycerol levels in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue to Acipimox during exercise in patients with bulimia nervosa: single-blind, randomized, microdialysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smitka Kvido

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropeptide Y (NPY is an important central orexigenic hormone predominantly produced by the hypothalamus, and recently found to be secreted in adipose tissue (AT. Acipimox (Aci inhibits lipolysis in AT and reduces plasma glycerol and free fatty acid (FFA levels. Exercise and Aci are enhancers of growth hormone (GH and NPY secretion and exercise may alter leptin levels. We expect to find abnormal neuropeptidergic response in plasma and AT in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN. We hypothesize that Aci influences these peptides via a FFA-independent mechanism and that Aci inhibits lipolysis through a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-dependent pathway. Dysregulations of the AT-brain axis peptides might be involved in binge eating as is the case in BN. Methods The objective of this study was to determine the responses of plasma NPY, GH, leptin, FFA and glycerol levels to exercise in BN patients and healthy women (C given the anti-lipolytic drug Aci or placebo. The secondary objective of this study was to compare the responses of extracellular glycerol levels and plasma glycerol levels to exercise alone or together with Aci administration in BN patients and C women. Extracellular glycerol was measured in vivo in subcutaneous (sc abdominal AT using microdialysis. Eight BN and eight C women were recruited for this single-blind, randomized study. Aci or placebo was given 1 hour before the exercise (45 min, 2 W/kg of lean body mass [LBM]. NPY, GH, leptin, FFA, glycerol plasma and AT glycerol levels were measured using commercial kits. Results The primary outcome of this study was that the exercise with Aci administration resulted in plasma NPY and GH increase (after a 45-minute exercise and leptin (after a 90-minute post-exercise recovering phase increased more in BN patients. The secondary outcomes of this study were that the exercise with Aci administration induced a higher decrease of extracellular glycerol in BN patients

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging research on bulimia nervosa during executing food pictures%神经性贪食患者食物图片刺激的功能磁共振对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申远; 李清伟; 王培军; 戴工华; 李春波; 吴文源

    2009-01-01

    目的 观察神经性贪食(BN)患者加工食物图片时的脑功能特点,探讨BN的精神病理机制.方法 BN患者7例,均为女性,符合中国精神障碍分类和诊断标准第三版(CCMD-3)神经性贪食诊断标准;健康对照7例.2组性别、年龄匹配.所有受试者完成汉密尔顿焦虑量表(HAMA)、17项汉密尔顿抑郁量表(HAMD-17)、视觉模拟量表(VAS)评估和fMRI检查.功能成像为组块设计,包括食物图片序列和非食物图片序列,均来自国际情绪图片系统(1APS),计算机自动呈现.结果 BN患者食物图片VAS评分高于对照组(P<0.05);BN患者食物图片平均脑激活强度(7.86±0.78)、平均激活体积(557 voxels),主要激活双侧前额叶、右尾状核、左杏仁核和小脑;对照组食物图片平均脑激活强度(9.89±1.03),平均激活体积均(1340 voxels),主要激活双侧舌回、楔前叶、右梭状回.2组食物图片下激活差异有显著性(P<0.05),非食物图片下激活差异无显著性.结论 前额叶-纹状体-杏仁核-中脑通路功能异常可能是BN的主要神经病理机制.%Objective To observe the brain activation performance of bulimia nervosa (BN) patients and to investigate the possible mental mechanisms of BN. Method Seven female BN cases which met criteria of the 3rd version Chinese Criteria of Mental Diseases (CCMD-3) and seven matched health girls were enrolled. All sub-jects were evaluated by Hamilton anxiety scale (HAMA), Hamilton depression scale (HAMD-17), and visual ana-logue scale (VAS). Then fulfill functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) examination. It was block-design. Food or non-food pictures selected from International Affective Picture System (IAPS) independently composed the food and non-food task run of fMRI and were showed by computer automatically. Result VAS-food score was higher in BN group than in control (P<0.05). The average intensity activated of BN under food pictures was 7.86 ±0.78 ,average volume activated was

  10. Bulimics with and without Prior Anorexia Nervosa: A Comparison of Personality Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Melanie A.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.

    A controversial issue in the literature on eating disorders is whether or not bulimia is a disorder distinct from anorexia nervosa. To compare the personality and behavioral characteristics of bulimic women with and without prior anorexia nervosa, 14 female college students (mean age 19.6 years, 86 percent white) were divided into two groups…

  11. Terapia nutricional na anorexia e bulimia nervosas Nutritional therapy in anorexia and bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marle Alvarenga

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A alimentação e a dieta têm um importante papel no desenvolvimento e manutenção dos transtornos alimentares. Portanto, devem ser levados em consideração nos programas de tratamento dessas condições clínicas. Pacientes com transtornos alimentares apresentam importantes restrições dietéticas, padrões alimentares inadequados e hábitos errôneos devido a uma série de falsos mitos e crenças e a uma sensação de incompetência para lidar com o alimento. Tais alterações podem levar a mudanças em seu estado nutricional, que necessita de cuidados dietéticos específicos, como reabilitação nutricional e orientação sobre dieta adequada. Além disto, o aconselhamento nutricional é necessário para esclarecer e desmistificar crenças inadequadas e para estabelecer uma adequada relação com o alimento.Food and diet have an important role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. Thus, they should be properly addressed in the treatment program for such disorders. Patients with eating disorders present dietary restrictions, unhealthy eating patterns, modified nutritional patterns, and unhealthy eating behaviors due to false myths and beliefs, and to a feeling of incompetence in dealing with food. Dietary restrictions, as well as the unhealthy eating patterns carried out by these patients may lead to changes in the nutritional status that require specific dietetic care in order to be corrected. Nutrition rehabilitation is required to restore the dietetic pattern, teaching the meaning of a normal and balanced diet. Furthermore, this unhealthy eating behavior requires nutritional counseling, aiming at clarifying doubts and demystifying wrong beliefs, discussing and readjusting patients´ relationship with food.

  12. Cigarette smoking is associated with body shape concerns and bulimia symptoms among young adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendzor, Darla E; Adams, Claire E; Stewart, Diana W; Baillie, Lauren E; Copeland, Amy L

    2009-01-01

    Elevated rates of cigarette smoking have been reported among individuals with Bulimia Nervosa. However, little is known about eating disorder symptoms within non-clinical samples of smokers. The purpose of the present study was to compare the eating disorder symptoms of young adult female smokers (n=184) and non-smokers (n=56), to determine whether smokers were more likely to endorse bulimic symptoms and report greater body shape concern than non-smokers. Analyses indicated that smokers scored significantly higher than non-smokers on the Body Shape Questionnaire, p=.03, and the Bulimia Test-Revised, p=.006. In addition, a higher proportion of smokers than non-smokers scored > or = 85 on the Bulimia Test-Revised, p=.05, suggesting the possibility that Bulimia Nervosa diagnoses were more prevalent among smokers. No differences were found between smokers and non-smokers on other measures of eating behavior. Overall, findings suggest that smoking is specifically associated with symptoms of Bulimia Nervosa and body shape concern among young adult females.

  13. Características morfofuncionais do trânsito orofaríngeo na bulimia: revisão de literatura Morphofunctional characteristics of the oropharyngeal tract in bulimia: review of literature

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    Catarina Matos Brito Santos

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: deglutição e bulimia. OBJETIVO: apresentar e discutir os achados científicos descritos na literatura quanto às características orofaríngeas relacionadas à deglutição em portadores de bulimia nervosa do tipo purgativa. CONCLUSÃO: a bulimia nervosa acarreta uma série de alterações em estruturas e funções que compõem o trânsito orofaríngeo, como erosão dentária, hipersensibilidade, enfraquecimento e fratura dos dentes, problemas de oclusão, cáries, doenças periodontais, dessensibilização intra-oral, hipogeusia, úlceras, granulomas, queilite angular, hipertrofia das glândulas parótidas, tosse e odinofagia. Existe um predomínio na literatura científica de relatos sobre alterações morfológicas em detrimento das funcionais. Poucos relatos abordaram diretamente a relação entre a bulimia e deglutição, apenas mencionando superficialmente as possibilidades de desencadeamento da disfagia orofaríngea.BACKGROUND: deglutition and bulimia. PURPOSE: to submit and discuss the scientific research concerning oropharyngeal characteristics related to deglutition in patients with purging type bulimia nervosa. CONCLUSIONS: bulimia nervosa entails a series of changes in structures and functions that compose the oropharyngeal tract, such as dental erosion, hypersensitivity, weakness and fracture of the teeth, occlusion problems, caries, periodontal diseases, intraoral desensitization, hypogeusia, ulceration, granulomas, angular cheilitis, enlargement of the parotid glands, coughs and odynophagia. There is a prevalence in the scientific literature of reports about morphologic alterations on the detriment of the functional ones. Few reports discussed the relationship between bulimia and deglutition, superficially mentioning the possibilities for triggering oropharyngeal dysphagia.

  14. La bulimia y la anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Bersh, Sonia; Fundación Valle de Lili

    2001-01-01

    Trastornos de la conducta alimentaria / El auge de la anorexia y la bulimia / Complicaciones médicas de los trastornos de la alimentación / Otros problemas emocionales / Tratamiento / Complicaciones de la anorexia y la bulimia nerviosa.

  15. The Group Treatment of Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Harvey M.; Richman, Ann

    1984-01-01

    Bulimia has become an increasing problem in the college population. This article describes a group psychotherapeutic treatment approach to the problem. A theoretical formulation of the psychodynamics that may underlie the development of bulimia is offered. (Author/DF)

  16. Bulimia: The Transgenerational View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, Laura Giat

    1986-01-01

    Within families with bulimia, certain interactional patterns enable and perpetuate the patient's binge-eating and purging symptoms. A transgenerational treatment method is proposed, which intervenes in ongoing dysfunctional patterns, and provides a frame for creating a therapeutic metaphor ("legacy") to direct the therapy. Rationale and stages of…

  17. The Clinical and Theoretical Impact of a Controlled Trial of Family Therapy in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Christopher; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Compared family therapy with individual, supportive psychotherapy for management of severe eating disorder. Findings showed family therapy more effective for patients with early onset, short duration disorder but not in other subgroups (early onset, duration more than 3 years; late onset, after age of 18 years; and those with bulimia nervosa).…

  18. Treating bulimia with hypnosis and low-level light therapy: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, Eleanor; Sassack, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This case report describes an effort to control bulimia nervosa by combining low-level laser therapy (LLLT)-the application of red and near-infrared light to specific body points-and hypnosis. A 29-year old female with a 14-year history of bulimia received one session of LLLT combined with hypnosis. Two weeks later, following a measurable decrease in bulimic episodes (purging), a session of psychotherapy and hypnosis was administered. Six months post-treatment, the patient has experienced a complete cessation of purging activities without recurrence. LLLT, when used in conjunction with hypnosis and psychotherapy, was effective in managing bulimia and may prove useful in treating other eating disorders.

  19. Greater left cerebral hemispheric metabolism in bulimia assessed by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.C.; Hagman, J.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Blinder, B.; Derrfler, M.; Tai, W.Y.; Hazlett, E.; Sicotte, N. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA))

    1990-03-01

    Eight women with bulimia and eight age- and sex-matched normal control subjects were studied with positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer of brain metabolic rate. Subjects performed a visual vigilance task during FDG uptake. In control subjects, the metabolic rate was higher in the right hemisphere than in the left, but patients with bulimia did not have this normal asymmetry. Lower metabolic rates in the basal ganglia, found in studies of depressed subjects, and higher rates in the basal ganglia, reported in a study of anorexia nervosa, were not found. This is consistent with the suggestion that bulimia is a diagnostic grouping distinct from these disorders.

  20. Relationship-focused therapy for bulimia and binge eating: Introduction to the special section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson-Brenner, Heather

    2016-06-01

    Individuals with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder commonly report co-occurring interpersonal problems, and treatment that focuses on relationships and relational functioning has shown benefit relative to other forms of treatment. Relational psychotherapy for eating disorders can vary on several important dimensions, such as how structured and symptom-focused versus exploratory and patient-directed it is, whether it focuses on past relationships and patterns in relationships over time versus focusing on current relationships, and whether it includes the relationship with the therapist as an explicit topic of conversation and mechanism for relational change. The cases in this special section provide the opportunity to closely compare 3 therapeutic approaches on each of these dimensions. Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy for Bulimia Nervosa, Integrative Dynamic Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa, and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for the Prevention of Weight Gain and Eating Disorders are each highly distinct approaches. The authors of each case explain the intended mechanisms of treatment response, the measures that assess changes in eating disorder symptoms as well as the mechanisms of change, and provide extensive excerpts from case material to demonstrate and illustrate the particular evidence-based treatment. Therapists and researchers may usefully consider the process and outcome variables described in these interpersonal approaches. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Ortorexia nervosa: reflexões sobre um novo conceito Orthorexia nervosa: reflections about a new concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Cristina Teixeira Martins

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Ortorexia nervosa é o termo descrito para o comportamento obsessivo patológico caracterizado pela fixação por saúde alimentar. O quadro ainda não foi oficialmente reconhecido como um transtorno alimentar, mas discute-se o conceito, suas características, interações e sintomas. No presente trabalho foi realizada uma revisão dos vinte e um artigos publicados desde 1997, quando o comportamento da ortorexia nervosa foi inicialmente descrito. Foram apontadas semelhanças e diferenças entre o comportamento alimentar observado na ortorexia nervosa e nos transtornos alimentares mais frequentes (anorexia e bulimia nervosa. Um instrumento foi desen-volvido e validado para detecção do quadro ortoréxico. Os estudos apontam alguns grupos vulneráveis à orto-rexia nervosa: estudantes de medicina, médicos, nutricionistas, pessoas com sintomas de ansiedade, obsessivo-compulsivos e aqueles que supervalorizam o corpo perfeito. A ortorexia nervosa é situada a partir de uma análise dos conceitos de atitude alimentar e alimentação saudável, procurando um foco biopsicossocial para a alimentação adequada e não apenas um foco fisiológico. Não existem estudos investigativos sobre a ortorexia nervosa no Brasil, mas o tema deve ser discutido para alertar os profissionais da área da saúde sobre a existência desse comportamento inadequado e suas possíveis consequências não só para a saúde física e emocional, mas também para a visão de alimentação saudável.Orthorexia nervosa is a new term described as an obsessive pathological behavior characterized by fixation on healthy eating. It has not yet been officially recognized as an eating disorder, but its concept, characteristics, interactions and symptoms have been discussed. This work presents a review of the articles published on the theme since 1997, when orthorexic behavior was first described. Similarities and differences between orthorexic behavior and the more common eating

  2. [Anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, W; Friederich, H C; Wild, B; Löwe, B; Zipfel, S

    2006-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa differs distinctly from other psychogenic eating disorders. Well known for the past 300 years, anorexia occurs consistently and is one of the most serious illnesses to be found for a certain age group. Three-quarters of the patients are healed or improve their condition long-term; one-quarter has a chronic course frequently including somatic complications and death. Because of the long healing process as well as the extensive chronification and complication rate, an individual treatment plan should be set up at the beginning of therapy to allow for a long-term structure of the course of therapy. Depending on the severity, phase and co-morbidity, inpatient and ambulant therapies are indicated. Depending on the duration of therapy, adequate weight (BMI > 15 kg/m2), good motivation, and lack of complications, an ambulant therapy is justified. Inpatient treatment is multimodal corresponding to the multifactorial etiology of anorexia nervosa. Weight gain is an important primary goal of therapy and a prerequisite for a conflict oriented, ambulant psychotherapy to be carried on after inpatient treatment. Ambivalent psychotherapy motivation and the necessity of symptom orientation demand technical modification both for inpatient as well as ambulant psychotherapy.

  3. Complicações clínicas da anorexia nervosa e bulimia nervosa Medical complications of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen Leal de Assumpção; Mônica D Cabral

    2002-01-01

    Os transtornos alimentares estão associados a diversas complicações clínicas graves. Distúrbios hidroeletrolíticos e metabólicos assim como várias alterações endócrinas podem estar presentes, muitas dessas decorrentes da perda de peso e dos métodos compensatórios utilizados pelos pacientes. São importantes a identificação precoce e o manuseio adequado dessas complicações para a redução dos riscos relacionados. O objetivo desse artigo é discutir as complicações clínicas associadas com a anorex...

  4. Severity of eating disorder symptoms related to oxytocin receptor polymorphisms in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Summer F; Valencia, Celeste; Lutter, Michael; McAdams, Carrie J

    2015-08-30

    Oxytocin is a peptide hormone important for social behavior and differences in psychological traits have been associated with variants of the oxytocin receptor gene in healthy people. We examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) correlated with clinical symptoms in women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and healthy comparison (HC) women. Subjects completed clinical assessments and provided DNA for analysis. Subjects were divided into four groups: HC, subjects currently with anorexia nervosa (AN-C), subjects with a history of anorexia nervosa but in long-term weight recovery (AN-WR), and subjects with bulimia nervosa (BN). Five SNPs of the oxytocin receptor were examined. Minor allele carriers showed greater severity in most of the psychiatric symptoms. Importantly, the combination of having had anorexia and carrying either of the A alleles for two SNPS in the OXTR gene (rs53576, rs2254298) was associated with increased severity specifically for ED symptoms including cognitions and behaviors associated both with eating and appearance. A review of psychosocial data related to the OXTR polymorphisms examined is included in the discussion. OXTR polymorphisms may be a useful intermediate endophenotype to consider in the treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa.

  5. Bulimia and Interpersonal Relationships: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Mark H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Assessed changes in bulimia in female college students (N=44) and in relation between bulimia and interpersonal relationships over time. Found (1) stable symptomology for normals and bulimics; (2) strong negative correlations between bulimia measures and interpersonal relationships with men; and (3) improvement in symptomology and relationships…

  6. Family perception of anorexia and bulimia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola, Cybele Ribeiro; Blay, Sérgio Luís

    2009-08-01

    A systematic literature review published between 1990 and 2006 using a qualitative approach was conducted to explore family members' perception of anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients. Articles were critically reviewed and a meta-synthesis analysis was carried out based on a meta-ethnographic method to analyze and summarize data. Of a total of 3,415 studies, nine met the study inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reciprocal translation was used for data interpretation allowing to identifying two concepts: disease awareness and disease impacts. Feelings of impotence were often described in family reorganization. The study results point to distortions in the concept of disease associated with family involvement, resulting in changes in communication, attitudes, and behaviors in a context of impotence.

  7. Anorexia nervosa and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, K J

    2002-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is currently considered a disorder confined to Western culture. Its recent identification in non-Western societies and different subcultures within the Western world has provoked a theory that Western cultural ideals of slimness and beauty have infiltrated these societies. The biomedical definition of anorexia nervosa emphasizes fat-phobia in the presentation of anorexia nervosa. However, evidence exists that suggests anorexia nevosa can exist without the Western fear of fatness and that this culturally biased view of anorexia nervosa may obscure health care professionals' understanding of a patient's own cultural reasons for self-starvation, and even hinder their recovery.

  8. Concurrent and prognostic utility of subtyping anorexia nervosa along dietary and negative affect dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbush, Kelsie T; Hagan, Kelsey E; Salk, Rachel H; Wildes, Jennifer E

    2017-03-01

    Bulimia nervosa can be reliably classified into subtypes based on dimensions of dietary restraint and negative affect. Community and clinical studies have shown that dietary-negative affect subtypes have greater test-retest reliability and concurrent and predictive validity compared to subtypes based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Although dietary-negative affect subtypes have shown utility for characterizing eating disorders that involve binge eating, this framework may have broader implications for understanding restrictive eating disorders.

  9. Complicações clínicas da anorexia nervosa e bulimia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Assumpção Carmen Leal de; Cabral Mônica D

    2002-01-01

    Os transtornos alimentares estão associados a diversas complicações clínicas graves. Distúrbios hidroeletrolíticos e metabólicos assim como várias alterações endócrinas podem estar presentes, muitas dessas decorrentes da perda de peso e dos métodos compensatórios utilizados pelos pacientes. São importantes a identificação precoce e o manuseio adequado dessas complicações para a redução dos riscos relacionados. O objetivo desse artigo é discutir as complicações clínicas associadas com a anorex...

  10. Efficacy of High-Dose Baclofen for Alcohol Use Disorder and Comorbid Bulimia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Sébastien; Lalanne, Laurence; Riegert, Myriam; Bertschy, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    High-dose baclofen is a promising treatment for alcohol use disorder, with a specific action on craving. A more general action on craving in other addictive disorders has been suggested based on the hypothesis of a common neurobiological pathway in addictions. We report the case of a woman with both alcohol use disorder and bulimia nervosa. There was a positive response to high-dose baclofen on alcohol craving, but no response on food craving. The case illustrates that craving could be differentially responsive to anti-craving drugs.

  11. Anorexia, bulimia, and obesity: shared decision making deficits on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Amy; Hevey, David; Pignatti, Riccardo

    2010-07-01

    The pathological eating behaviors in Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and obesity are characterized by a preference for high immediate reward, despite higher future losses in terms of both physical and psychological outcomes. The present study compared the decision making profile of females with a diagnosis of AN (n = 22), BN (n = 17), obesity (n = 18), and a healthy weight comparison group (n = 20) using a standardized neuropsychological test, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). The three clinical groups (AN, BN, obesity) were significantly impaired on the IGT compared with the comparison group on both overall task performance and task learning; however, the three clinical groups were not significantly different from each other. Sixty-one percent to 77% of the clinical groups reached the threshold for impairment on the IGT, compared with 15% of the comparison group. The potential basis for this shared decision making profile is discussed.

  12. La bulimia nerviosa y sus subtipos

    OpenAIRE

    Myriam Sierra Puentes

    2005-01-01

    En este artículo se realiza una reseña sobre los trastornos de la alimentación, anorexia y bulimia, la relación que hacen los individuos con este comportamiento y la prevalencia, características y tratamientos más efectivos empleados en la bulimia nerviosa. Además, algunas aproximaciones para establecer subtipos de bulimia diferentes a los del DSM-IV e investigaciones sobre este trastorno del comportamiento alimentario, como la bulimia nerviosa.

  13. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuttleworth, E; Sharma, S; Lal, S; Allan, P J

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder with potential life-threatening medical sequelae. This article reviews the principal medical complications associated with anorexia nervosa, highlights associated diagnostic pitfalls and emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to management.

  14. Anorexia nervosa en adolescenten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, A A; Danner, U N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa (AN), which is the most serious of the eating disorders, starts earlier in life and often continues into adulthood. AIM: To discuss the typical features of AN in adolescents. METHOD: We present an overview based on the literature about AN in adolescents and on analysis p

  15. Case 39: Anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anorexia nervosa is a disease affecting primarily young women who have distorted body images. Although their weight is less than 30 percent under ideal body weight, they see themselves as overweight. Anorectics often use diuretic and laxative agents to accomplish their weight loss. Patients with bul...

  16. Treating Women with Bulimia from a Sociocultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotelling, Kathy

    1986-01-01

    Outlines a sociocultural perspective of bulimia. Notes that since bulimia occurs in a sociocultural context, which includes a socialized developmental path with concomittant norms and values, effective treatment must address those norms and values. Recommends group therapy. (ABB)

  17. Fad Bulimia: A Serious and Separate Counseling Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, Joan P.

    1986-01-01

    Differences between fad bulimia and clinical bulimia are presented using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III) criteria, personality assessment measures, and responses to counseling. (Author)

  18. Bulimia: Estimate of Incidence and Relationship of Shyness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Shirley Ann; Figley, Charles R.

    1985-01-01

    Surveyed 160 college women to examine the incidence of bulimia and its relationship to shyness. Results indicated 23 percent of the participants were bulimic. A significant relationship was found between bulimia and fear of rejection (private shyness). (JAC)

  19. Body and Bulimia Revisited: Reflections on "A Secret Life"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    In 1996, the author published "A Secret Life in a Culture of Thinness: Reflections on Body, Food, and Bulimia" (Tillmann-Healy, 1996), an account of her struggle with binging and purging from ages 15 to 25. She came to understand bulimia as a communicative act, expressing fear, anxiety, and grief. From 25 to 35, her recovery from bulimia involved…

  20. Using the Health Belief Model for Bulimia Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodner, Michele

    1991-01-01

    Discusses application of the Health Belief Model to the prevention of bulimia, describing each model component. The article considers the individual's beliefs about bulimia and bulimic-like behaviors as a means of predicting the likelihood of behavior change to prevent clinically diagnosable bulimia. (SM)

  1. Plasma ghrelin in anorexia, bulimia, and binge-eating disorder: relations with eating patterns and circulating concentrations of cortisol and thyroid hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troisi, Alfonso; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Lega, Ilaria; Tesauro, Manfredi; Bertoli, Aldo; Leo, Roberto; Iantorno, Micaela; Pecchioli, Chiara; Rizza, Stefano; Turriziani, Mario; Lauro, Renato; Siracusano, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the relations between plasma ghrelin concentrations, eating patterns, and circulating concentrations of cortisol and thyroid hormones in women with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder. The patterns of disordered eating behavior were assessed using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and the Bulimia Test-Revised (BULIT-R). In women with eating disorders, but not in healthy control women, plasma ghrelin concentrations were negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI) and plasma concentrations of thyreotropin (TSH), free T3 and free T4, and positively correlated with plasma concentrations of cortisol. The ghrelin concentrations of women with binge-eating and purging behavior were significantly lower than those of women with anorexia nervosa, restricting type, and there was a negative relation between the frequency and severity of binge-eating and purging behavior, as measured by the BULIT-R total score, and ghrelin concentrations. In a multivariate regression model controlling for the confounding effects of body mass index (BMI) and age, higher ghrelin concentrations were correlated with lower BULIT-R total scores. The results of this study did not confirm the hypothesis advanced in previous studies that ghrelin concentrations are higher in patients with binge-eating/purging forms of eating disorders. Based on these data, we suggest that, in women with eating disorders, ghrelin concentrations best reflect nutritional status rather than specific patterns of disordered eating behavior.

  2. Psychobiology of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploog, D W; Pirke, K M

    1987-11-01

    The psychobiology of anorexia nervosa is described and explained under four headings; (1) the psychopathology as related to the motivation for fasting; (2) metabolic and somatic consequences of starvation, including brain morphology; (3) endocrine abnormalities in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and gonadal axis; and (4) the hunger drive and its possible perversions in terms of aspects of neuroethology and the reward system in the brain.

  3. Anorexia nervosa: treatment expectations – a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulson-Karlsson G

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Gunilla Paulson-Karlsson,1 Lauri Nevonen21Academy of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro and Anorexia-Bulimia Unit, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Centre, Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden; 2Academy of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, SwedenBackground: Anorexia nervosa is a serious illness with a high mortality rate, a poor outcome, and no empirically supported treatment of choice for adults. Patients with anorexia nervosa strive for thinness in order to obtain self-control and are ambivalent toward change and toward treatment. In order to achieve a greater understanding of patients' own understanding of their situation, the aim of this study was to examine the expectations of potential anorexic patients seeking treatment at a specialized eating-disorder unit.Methods: A qualitative study design was used. It comprised 15 women between 18 and 25 years of age waiting to be assessed before treatment. The initial question was, "What do you expect, now that you are on the waiting list for a specialized eating-disorder unit?" A content analysis was used, and the text was coded, categorized according to its content, and further interpreted into a theme.Results: From the results emerged three main categories of what participants expected: "treatment content," "treatment professionals," and "treatment focus." The overall theme, "receiving adequate therapy in a collaborative therapeutic relationship and recovering," described how the participants perceived that their expectations could be fulfilled.Discussion: Patients' expectations concerning distorted thoughts, eating behaviors, a normal, healthy life, and meeting with a professional with knowledge and experience of eating disorders should be discussed before treatment starts. In the process of the therapeutic relationship, it is essential to continually address patients' motivations, in order to understand their personal motives behind

  4. Bulimia: A Model for Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Barbara G.

    Bulimia, an eating disorder characterized by binge eating followed by purging and intense feelings of guilt and failure, is increasing among young women. The eating behavior is only a symptom of more complex underlying problems such as feelings of inadequacy, social isolation, depression, rigid thinking, self-defeating thoughts, and perfectionism.…

  5. Anorexia nervosa during pregnancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Ran D.; Koren, Gideon

    2003-01-01

    QUESTION: A 22-year-old patient in my clinic was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa (AN) 7 years ago. She is now married and planning her first pregnancy. She is still underweight. What should she expect during pregnancy, and are there any implications for her unborn baby? ANSWER: Women with AN are at higher risk of complications during pregnancy, mainly because of low body weight. Apgar scores and birth weights of infants born to mothers with AN have been found to be significantly lower than th...

  6. [Franz Kafka's anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, M M

    1988-07-01

    The evidence for the hypothesis that the poet Franz Kafka had suffered from an atypical anorexia nervosa is presented. Kafka was slim and underweight throughout his life and showed an ascetic attitude and abjuration of physical enjoyment and pleasure (fasting, vegetarianism, sexual abstinence, emphasis on physical fitness). The analysis is mainly based on Kafka's own descriptions in his letters, diaries, and literary work. Kafka was achievement oriented, reported many sadomasochistic fantasies, and had an anancastic (obsessive-compulsive) depressive personality. In addition there is evidence for a disturbed psychosexual and gender identity development. Our results concerning Kafka's psychopathology do not question his genius as a poet.

  7. Subclinical bulimia predicts conduct disorder in middle adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viinamäki, Anni; Marttunen, Mauri; Fröjd, Sari; Ruuska, Jaana; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the comorbidity and longitudinal associations between self-reported conduct disorder and subclinical bulimia in a community-based sample of Finnish adolescents in a 2-year prospective follow-up study. There are 2070 adolescents who participated in the survey as ninth graders (mean age 15.5) and followed-up 2 years later. The Youth Self-Report Externalizing scale was used to measure conduct disorder and DSM-IV-based questionnaire to measure bulimia. Co-occurrence of female conduct disorder and subclinical bulimia was found at ages 15 and 17. Subclinical bulimia among girls at age 15 was a risk factor for conduct disorder at age 17, but conduct disorder at age 15 was not predictive of subclinical bulimia at age 17. The pathway from bulimia to conduct disorder may be suggestive of an association with future borderline personality disorder among girls.

  8. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes.

  9. ["Pro Ana": Psychodynamic References for Anorexia Nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Linda

    2017-02-01

    "Pro Ana": Psychodynamic References for Anorexia Nervosa The internet-based phenomenon "Pro Ana" refers to the eating disorder anorexia nervosa in a positive way. To understand what the phenomenon "Pro Ana" represents, the websites are used as a starting point of the current analysis. Based on these results, similarities and differences between "Pro Ana" and the eating disorder anorexia nervosa are discussed. Furthermore psychodynamic references for anorexia nervosa are derived and finally their importance for treatment motivation will be considered.

  10. Seven years’ experience with etidronate in a woman with anorexia nervosa and vertebral fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwamoto J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Jun Iwamoto1, Yoshihiro Sato2, Mitsuyoshi Uzawa3, Tsuyoshi Takeda1, Hideo Matsumoto11Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Neurology, Mitate Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan; 3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keiyu Orthopaedic Hospital, Gunma, JapanAbstract: We report the case of a 30-year-old Japanese woman with anorexia nervosa and vertebral fractures who was treated with etidronate. She had a history of anorexia nervosa, chronic back pain, osteoporosis, and multiple vertebral fractures (morphometric fractures that responded poorly to treatment with alfacalcidol (1 µg daily for 1 year and was treated with cyclical etidronate (200 mg for 2 weeks every 3 months for 7 years. The lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD increased, and the serum alkaline phosphatase and urinary cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen levels and back pain decreased. During the 7-year period of treatment with etidronate, no osteoporotic fractures occurred. The patient experienced neither renal dysfunction nor hyperparathyroidism caused by osteomalacia. No gastrointestinal tract symptoms were observed. Thus, etidronate was effective for increasing the lumbar spine BMD and reducing back pain over a 7-year period without causing either osteoporotic fractures or adverse events.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, bulimia, etidronate, bone mineral density, osteoporosis, vertebral fracture

  11. Anorexia Nervosa: Sociocultural Factors and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer

    This paper examines how the epidemiological findings of anorexia nervosa lead theorists to speculate a correlation between sociocultural factors and the development of anorexia nervosa. A section on the essential features of anorexia nervosa identifies five primary characteristics of anorexia: (1) severe weight loss; (2) a disturbance of body…

  12. The incidence of anorexia nervosa on Curacao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, HW; van Harten, PN; Hermans, KME; Katzman, MA; Matroos, GE; Susser, ES

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Although anorexia nervosa was once thought to occur only in affluent societies, cases have now been documented across the globe. To examine whether anorexia nervosa emerges in societies undergoing socioeconomic transition, the authors studied the incidence of anorexia nervosa on the Carib

  13. Change in psychotherapy: a dialogical analysis single-case study of a patient with bulimia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eSalvini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the critical review of various motivational frameworks of change that have been applied to the study of eating disorders, the present paper provides an alternative conceptualization of the change in psychotherapy presenting a single case study. We analysed six psychotherapeutic conversations with a bulimic patient and found out narratives for and against change. We read them in terms of tension between dominance and exchange in I-positions, as described by Hermans. These results indicate that the dialogical analysis of clinical discourse may be a useful method to investigate change from the beginning to the end of therapy.

  14. Case Conceptualization and Treatment of Comorbid Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didie, Elizabeth R.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Phillips, Katharine A.

    2010-01-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) and eating disorders often co-occur and share some clinical features. In addition, the co-occurrence of BDD and an eating disorder may be associated with greater impairment in functioning. Furthermore, clinical impressions suggest that this comorbidity may be more treatment resistant than either disorder alone. The…

  15. Homeostasis in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per eSodersten

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brainstem and hypothalamic orexigenic/anorexigenic networks are thought to maintain body weight homeostasis in response to hormonal and metabolic feedback from peripheral sites. This approach has not been successful in managing over- and underweight patients. It is suggested that concept of homeostasis has been misinterpreted; rather than exerting control, the brain permits eating in proportion to the amount of physical activity necessary to obtain food. In support, animal experiments have shown that while a hypothalamic orexigen excites eating when food is abundant, it inhibits eating and stimulates foraging when food is in short supply. As the physical price of food approaches zero, eating and body weight increase without constraints. Conversely, in anorexia nervosa body weight is homeostatically regulated, the high level of physical activity in anorexia is displaced hoarding for food that keeps body weight constantly low. A treatment based on this point of view, providing patients with computerized mealtime support to re-establish normal eating behavior, has brought 75% of patients with eating disorders into remission, reduced the rate of relapse to 10%, and eliminated mortality.

  16. Orthorexia Nervosa in Turkish Dietitians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asil, Esma; Sürücüoğlu, Metin Saip

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa in dietitians, as assessed by administering ORTO-15, Eating Attitudes Test-40 (EAT-40) and Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (MOCI). Our study included 117 dietitians (Ankara). Orto-15 test scores below 40 points was considered indicative of orthorexia, while higher scores indicated a normal eating behavior. It was found that participants with ORTO-15 scores less than 40 had higher scores for EAT-40 and MOCI (p orthorexia nervosa is recommended.

  17. Adolescent Eating Disorder: Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muuss, Rolf E.

    1985-01-01

    Examines anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder seen with increasing frequency, especially among adolescent girls. Presents five theories about causation, discusses early characteristics, typical family patterns, physical and medical characteristics, social adjustment problems, and society's contribution to anorexia. Describes course of the…

  18. Disfonia e bulimia: avaliação dos sintomas e sinais vocais e laríngeos Dysphonia and bulimia: evaluation of vocal and laryngeal signs and symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Priscila Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever os sintomas e sinais vocais e laríngeos de pacientes com diagnóstico de bulimia. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, descritivo, randomizado, com experimento cego. Avaliou-se 11 indivíduos com diagnóstico de bulimia, com o subtipo purgativo, do sexo feminino e idade variando de 18 a 34 anos, que foram submetidas à avaliação fonoaudiológica e otorrinolaringológica. RESULTADOS: Os sintomas laríngeos e vocais mais relatados foram: o pigarro e a sensação de globus faríngeo relatados por dez sujeitos (90,9%. Na avaliação perceptivo-auditiva, os escores de maior ocorrência foram de grau leve em todos os parâmetros analisados. Os achados laríngeos de maior ocorrência foram os acúmulos de secreção espessa na laringe em cinco paciente (45,4%, seguido de fenda triangular médio-posterior e espessamento de mucosa na região interaritenoidea, ambos, ocorrendo em quatro sujeitos (36,3%. CONCLUSÃO: Os achados laringológicos e perceptivo-auditivos foram menos expressivos que os sintomas vocais e laríngeos relatados pelas pacientes.PURPOSE: To describe vocal and laryngeal signs and symptoms in patients with bulimia. METHODS: A blind, descriptive, randomized, transversal study was carried out. Eleven female subjects with the diagnosis of purgative bulimia nervosa and ages ranging from 18 to 34 years underwent otorhinolaryngological and vocal evaluations. RESULTS: The most common vocal and laryngeal symptoms were throat clearing and globus faringeus, related by 10 subjects (90.9%. In the auditory-perceptive evaluation, the most common scores were characterized as light in all analyzed parameters. The accumulation of thick mucus over the larynx occurred in five patients (45.4%, followed by median-posterior triangular glottic chink and mucosal thickening at the interaytenoid region, in four patients (36.3%. CONCLUSION: The laryngeal and perceptual findings were less expressive than vocal and laryngeal complaints.

  19. [ANOREXIA AND BULIMIA: IMPACT ON NETWORK SOCIETY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex Sánchez, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    The Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) have an increasing influence on the way we relate and in shaping personal identity. The phenomenon of online social networking emerges strongly and contributes to the development of new spaces breaking with the official discourse that marks the scientific evidence on health. This paper analyzes the impact of ICT in relation to the identity of the digital natives and eating disorders (ED). Particular attention to how the network society determines the response of young people in situations of social tension is dedicated. To do this, provides a perspective on the concept of interaction from the analysis of the discourse on anorexia and bulimia in the network, and how to care nurses should consider these factors to improve efficiency and quality in clinical care and patient care.

  20. The body in anorexia and bulimia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Fernandes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The psychoanalytic clinic for anorexia and bulimia puts us into immediate contact with the question of the body, as well as with aspects typical of adolescence. These aspects especially include difficulties in early relationships with the mother regarding the management of the drives, and relationships with primary identification. Consequently, we are dealing with ideals, differentiation, autonomy, time and death. Here hypotheses that were drawn up on the basis of metapsychology are discussed, with the objective of contributing to a broader understanding of the construction of the bodily image. This process includes the perception, representation and internal experience of the patients' own bodies. The impasses experienced in the analytic situation also indicate particularities in managing the transference in these cases.

  1. Assessing affective variability in eating disorders: affect spins less in anorexia nervosa of the restrictive type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteelandt, Kristof; Probst, Michel; Pieters, Guido

    2013-08-01

    Differences in affective variability in eating disorders are examined using an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) protocol. It is hypothesized that restriction serves to pre-empt the activation of affect whereas bulimic behavior serves to cope with overwhelming affect once activated. Therefore, we expect anorexia nervosa (AN) patients of the restricting type (AN-RT) to have lower mean levels of affect and less affective variability than Bulimia Nervosa (BN) patients. Patients' successive affective states over time are represented as different positions in a two-dimensional space defined by the orthogonal dimensions of valence and activation. Affective variability is measured by the within person variance and the new concepts of pulse and spin. Results of this exploratory study suggest that the diagnostic groups have the same mean levels of affect but affect spins less in patients with AN-RT. Using an EMA protocol and measures like pulse and spin may reveal insights in eating disorders that remain hidden with more traditional assessment methods.

  2. Behavioral, emotional, and situational context of purging episodes in anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B.; Accurso, Erin C.; Schreiber-Gregory, Deanna N.; Crosby, Ross D.; Cao, Li; Engel, Scott G.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Peterson, Carol B.; Le Grange, Daniel; Wonderlich, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The current study examined behavioral, emotional, and situational factors involved in purging among women with anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods Women with AN (n=118) completed a two-week ecological momentary assessment protocol involving daily reports of eating disorder behaviors, mood, and stressful events. Generalized estimating equations examined the likelihood and context of purging following eating episodes involving both overeating and loss of control (binge eating; BE); loss of control only (LOC); overeating only (OE); and neither loss of control nor overeating (non-pathological eating; NE). Results Relative to NE, purging was more likely to occur following BE, LOC, and OE (Wald chi-square=18.05; p<.001). BE was more strongly associated with subsequent purging than LOC but not OE; the latter two did not differ from one another. Negative affect predicted purging following NE (Wald chi-square=7.71; p=.005). Conclusion Binge eating involving large amounts of food was the strongest predictor of purging in AN, which challenges the notion that loss of control is the most salient aspect of experiencing distress in bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. Parallel to findings from the binge eating literature, negative affect strongly predicted purging following non-pathological eating. Further research should clarify the function and triggers of purging in AN. PMID:25643935

  3. Innovations in the Treatment of Bulimia: Transpersonal Psychology, Relaxation, Imagination, Hypnosis, Myth, and Ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    Written for counselors who must help clients deal with bulimia, this article reviews bulimia's most obvious physical signs and symptoms, etiology, and behavioral characteristics. Considers innovative counseling approaches including Transpersonal Psychology, relaxation training, imagination, fantasy, hypnosis, myths, and rituals. (Author)

  4. Action monitoring and perfectionism in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, G.L.M.; Bruijn, E.R.A. de; Maas, Y.J.; Hulstijn, W.; Eycken, W. van der; Peuskens, J.; Sabbe, B.G.C.C.

    2006-01-01

    To study action monitoring in anorexia nervosa, behavioral and EEG measures were obtained in underweight anorexia nervosa patients (n = 17) and matched healthy controls (n = 19) while performing a speeded choice-reaction task. Our main measures of interest were questionnaire outcomes, reaction times

  5. Anorexia Nervosa: Treatment in the Family Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Dana Heller

    2001-01-01

    One form of treatment for anorexia nervosa that continues to be developed is family therapy. In the following article, anorexia nervosa and its prevalence are defined, theories of its development are discussed, and family therapy interventions that have been applied to the treatment of the disorder are outlined. (Contains 15 references.) (GCP)

  6. Action Monitoring and Perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieters, Guido L. M.; de Bruijn, Ellen R. A.; Maas, Yvonne; Hulstijn, Wouter; Vandereycken, Walter; Peuskens, Joseph; Sabbe, Bernard G.

    2007-01-01

    To study action monitoring in anorexia nervosa, behavioral and EEG measures were obtained in underweight anorexia nervosa patients (n=17) and matched healthy controls (n=19) while performing a speeded choice-reaction task. Our main measures of interest were questionnaire outcomes, reaction times, error rates, and the error-related negativity ERP…

  7. Anorexia nervosa: un estudio de casos

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    Lillyana Zusman Tinman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La Anorexia Nervosa es un trastorno de alimentación que se define (etimológicamente como una "pérdida nerviosa del apetito". Se caracteriza por la actitud consciente, voluntaria y rotunda de los sujetos  de tener un exceso de peso que intentan modificar por vía de la inanición. A partir del estudio de casos, se propone la distinción entre una Anorexia Nervosa Estructural -aquella en la que predomina el conflicto intrapsíquico primario y arcaico, y que manifiesta una conducta aislada y retraída- y una Anorexia Nervosa Reactiva, aquella en la que predomina un conflicto intrafamiliar algo más posterior y, por lo tanto, una personalidad más abierta y compatible con el medio. Anorexia Nervosa is an Eating Disorder defined (etimoligacally as a "nervouse loss of apetite". It is characterized by a conscious, voluntary and categoric attitude of the sick patient to refrain from eating. He/she has a firm conviction of having excess weight which they try to modify by starvation. Through a case study, a distinction between two types of Anorexia Nervosa is proposed: a Structural Anorexia Nervosa -in which an intrapsyhic, primary, arcaic conflic prevails, leading to an isolated, withdrawal conduct- and a Reactive Anorexia Nervosa, in which a later intrafamilial conflict prevails leading, therefore, to a more open personality, compatible with the enviroment.

  8. Case report on anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by excessive restriction on food intake and irrational fear of gaining weight, often accompanied by a distorted body self-perception. It is clinically diagnosed more frequently in females, with type and severity varying with each case. The current report is a case of a 25-year-old female, married for 5 years, educated up to 10 th standard, a homemaker, hailing from an upper social class Hindu (Marvadi family, living with husband′s family in Urban Bangalore; presented to our tertiary care centre with complaints of gradual loss of weight, recurrent episodes of vomiting, from a period of two years, menstrual irregularities from 1 year and amenorrhea since 6 months, with a probable precipitating factor being husband′s critical comment on her weight. Diagnosis of atypical anorexia nervosa was made, with the body mass index (BMI being 15.6. A multidisciplinary therapeutic approach was employed to facilitate remission. Through this case report the authors call for the attention of general practitioners and other medical practitioners to be aware of the symptomatology of eating disorders as most patients would overtly express somatic conditions similar to the reported case so as to facilitate early psychiatric intervention.

  9. Anorexia Nervosa: Adolescent Starvation by Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Evelyn H.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses anorexia nervosa in terms of symptoms, characteristics of patients, family relationship, and modes of treatment. Suggests that a combination of psychological and medical treatment is more effective than behavior modification. (JAC)

  10. Jane: A Case Study in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    The article reports the case history of a 15-year-old Australian girl with anorexia nervosa. Information is also given on prevalence, causes, definitions, and treatments including hospitalization, co-therapy, psychotherapy, behavior modification, family therapy, and counseling. (DB)

  11. Treatment of Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dilip R.; Pratt, Helen D.; Greydanus, Donald E.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews research on the treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa, including the general approach, treatment setting, treatment of medical complications, nutritional management, psychopharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, treatment efficacy and outcome studies, comparison studies, and prevention programs. (EV)

  12. Update on endocrine disturbances in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Hangaard, J; Hagen, C

    2001-01-01

    The marked endocrine changes that occur in anorexia nervosa have aroused a great deal of interest, and over the last decade much research has been conducted in this field. The endocrine disturbances are not specific to this disorder, as they also occur in starvation states secondary to other causes...... of the large body of literature concerning endocrine aspects of anorexia nervosa with the main focus on the latest results, which provide leads for potential etiological theories....

  13. Understanding the 'Anorexic Voice' in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Matthew; Waller, Glenn

    2016-07-20

    In common with individuals experiencing a number of disorders, people with anorexia nervosa report experiencing an internal 'voice'. The anorexic voice comments on the individual's eating, weight and shape and instructs the individual to restrict or compensate. However, the core characteristics of the anorexic voice are not known. This study aimed to develop a parsimonious model of the voice characteristics that are related to key features of eating disorder pathology and to determine whether patients with anorexia nervosa fall into groups with different voice experiences. The participants were 49 women with full diagnoses of anorexia nervosa. Each completed validated measures of the power and nature of their voice experience and of their responses to the voice. Different voice characteristics were associated with current body mass index, duration of disorder and eating cognitions. Two subgroups emerged, with 'weaker' and 'stronger' voice experiences. Those with stronger voices were characterized by having more negative eating attitudes, more severe compensatory behaviours, a longer duration of illness and a greater likelihood of having the binge-purge subtype of anorexia nervosa. The findings indicate that the anorexic voice is an important element of the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa. Addressing the anorexic voice might be helpful in enhancing outcomes of treatments for anorexia nervosa, but that conclusion might apply only to patients with more severe eating psychopathology. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. New Insights in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorwood, Philip; Blanchet-Collet, Corinne; Chartrel, Nicolas; Duclos, Jeanne; Dechelotte, Pierre; Hanachi, Mouna; Fetissov, Serguei; Godart, Nathalie; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Ramoz, Nicolas; Rovere-Jovene, Carole; Tolle, Virginie; Viltart, Odile; Epelbaum, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is classically defined as a condition in which an abnormally low body weight is associated with an intense fear of gaining weight and distorted cognitions regarding weight, shape, and drive for thinness. This article reviews recent evidences from physiology, genetics, epigenetics, and brain imaging which allow to consider AN as an abnormality of reward pathways or an attempt to preserve mental homeostasis. Special emphasis is put on ghrelino-resistance and the importance of orexigenic peptides of the lateral hypothalamus, the gut microbiota and a dysimmune disorder of neuropeptide signaling. Physiological processes, secondary to underlying, and premorbid vulnerability factors—the “pondero-nutritional-feeding basements”- are also discussed. PMID:27445651

  15. Executive functions in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jauregui-Lobera

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The pathophysiologic mechanisms that account for the development and persistence of anorexia nervosa (AN remain unclear. With respect to the neuropsychological functioning, the executive functions have been reported to be altered, especially cognitive flexibility and decision-making processes. Objectives: The aim of this study was to review the current state of the neuropsychological studies focused on anorexia nervosa, especially those highlighting the executive functions. Methods: This was done by means of a searching process covering three relevant electronic databases, as well as an additional search on references included in the analysed papers. Eventually we have to mention other published reviews and a hand-search. Results and discussion: Comparing AN patients and healthy controls the results remain controversial and so remains the comparison of different eating disorders with respect to the neuropsychological dysfunction. The role of variables such as depression, anxiety and obsessionality needs to be clarified. There seems to be some base to state that some commonalities exist in the so-called extreme weight conditions (anorexia, obesity. The link between neuropsychological dysfunction in AN and biomarkers remains unclear. The role of neuropsychological deficits in AN, as initial factors or simply as mere consequences, remains unclear too. The link between the body image disturbances and the neuropsychological dysfunction needs to be clarified. The similarities between the AN neuropsychological dysfunction and that found in other mental disorders may be considered up to date as a mere approach. The same applies to the relationship between the AN patients´ neuropsychological performance and personality or gender.

  16. Percepção de familiares sobre a anorexia e bulimia: revisão sistemática Percepción de familiares sobre la anorexia y bulimia: revisión sistemática Family perception of anorexia and bulimia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cybele Ribeiro Espíndola

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se revisão sistemática da literatura publicada entre 1990 e 2006 com metodologia qualitativa sobre a perspectiva de familiares de pessoas com anorexia e bulimia nervosa. Após revisão crítica dos artigos e metassíntese, utilizou-se a abordagem meta-etnográfica para analisar e sintetizar os dados. O processo de interpretação empregado foi a reciprocal translation. Dentre 3.415 estudos, nove atenderam aos critérios de inclusão e exclusão. Dois conceitos emergiram: reconhecimento da doença e repercussões da doença. Na reorganização familiar, o sentimento de impotência foi predominante. Os resultados indicam a presença de distorções sobre os conceitos da doença associadas a um comprometimento familiar, que modifica a comunicação, atitudes e comportamentos dentro de um contexto de impotência.Se realizó revisión sistemática de la literatura publicada entre 1990 y 2006 con metodología cualitativa sobre la perspectiva de familiares de personas con anorexia y bulimia nerviosa. Posterior a la revisión crítica de los artículos y metasíntesis, se utilizó el abordaje meta-etnográfico para analizar y sintetizar los datos. El proceso de interpretación empleado fue el reciprocal translation. Entre 3.415 estudios, nueve atendieron a los criterios de inclusión y exclusión. Dos conceptos emergieron: reconocimiento de la enfermedad y repercusiones de la enfermedad. En la reorganización familiar, el sentimiento de impotencia fue predominante. Los resultados indican la presencia de distorsiones sobre los conceptos de la enfermedad asociados a un compromiso familiar, que modifica la comunicación, actitudes y comportamientos dentro de un contexto de impotencia.A systematic literature review published between 1990 and 2006 using a qualitative approach was conducted to explore family members' perception of anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients. Articles were critically reviewed and a meta-synthesis analysis was carried out

  17. Reduced platelet [3H]paroxetine binding in anorexia nervosa: relationship to eating symptoms and personality pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kenneth R; Steiger, Howard; Ng Ying Kin, N M K; Israel, Mimi

    2006-06-15

    Alterations in serotonin function have been implicated in both anorexia and bulimia nervosa, and previous studies suggest associations between serotonin function and variations in pathological personality traits. Women meeting DSM-IV criteria for anorexia nervosa (AN, 16 with the restricting subtype and 14 with the binge-purge subtype) and 49 healthy control women (CW) provided blood samples for analyses of platelet [(3)H]paroxetine binding. Participants also filled out questionnaires tapping eating disorder symptoms, depression, and personality pathology. Compared with CW, women with restricting and binge-purge AN had significantly lower levels of paroxetine binding (respectively: 1012 + 487 vs. 560 + 253 vs. 618 + 217 fmol/mg protein). Simple correlation analyses showed that, within AN but not within controls, paroxetine binding was inversely related to dieting preoccupations, affective instability, anxiousness, compulsivity, restricted expression and social avoidance but independent of age, body mass index, depression, and other eating symptoms. Findings suggest that reduced peripheral serotonin transporter density in AN relates to increased dieting preoccupations, affective instability and anxiousness-fearfulness.

  18. Antisocial Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  19. Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  20. Panic Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  1. Major Depression Among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  2. Any Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  3. Obsessive Compulsive Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ... Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating Disorders Among Adults - Bulimia Nervosa Eating Disorders ...

  4. Anorexia nervosa--diagnosis, aetiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, D

    1995-12-01

    The aetiology, assessment and treatment of anorexia nervosa are reviewed in the light of the classical accounts of Morton, Lasègue and Gull. The core symptoms are deliberate weight loss, disturbed body image and amenorrhoea, and complications may include cardiac failure, electrolyte disturbances, hypothermia and osteoporosis. Common clinical findings are described. Disturbed brain serotonin activity is implicated in the aetiology of anorexia nervosa, but there is little support for the use of pharmacological treatments. Psychological theories of aetiology are discussed with reference to Bruch, Crisp, Palazzoli and Minuchin: the common theme is the reaction of the patient and her family to the physical and social changes of puberty. Individual and/or family psychotherapy is seen as central to the treatment of anorexia nervosa, and the relevant clinical research is reviewed. The roles of general practitioners, general psychiatrists and eating disorder specialists are discussed in the light of recent consensus treatment guidelines.

  5. Peculiaridades do tratamento da anorexia e da bulimia nervosa na adolescência: a experiência do PROTAD Peculiarities in the treatment of anorexia and bulimia nervosa in adolescence: the PROTAD experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Pinzon

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Os transtornos alimentares são patologias severas, tendo aspectos especiais na adolescência. Este artigo objetiva apresentar a rotina de atendimento e as abordagens empregadas em um serviço de assistência brasileiro especializado no tratamento de transtornos alimentares nessa população.The particular aspects of eating disordes in adolescents are reviwed. This article presents the multidisciplinary approach used in this population.

  6. Orthorexia nervosa: reflections about a new concept

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia Cristina Teixeira Martins; Marle dos Santos Alvarenga; Sílvia Viviane Alves Vargas; Karen Sayuri Cabral de Jesus Sato; Fernanda Baeza Scagliusi

    2011-01-01

    Ortorexia nervosa é o termo descrito para o comportamento obsessivo patológico caracterizado pela fixação por saúde alimentar. O quadro ainda não foi oficialmente reconhecido como um transtorno alimentar, mas discute-se o conceito, suas características, interações e sintomas. No presente trabalho foi realizada uma revisão dos vinte e um artigos publicados desde 1997, quando o comportamento da ortorexia nervosa foi inicialmente descrito. Foram apontadas semelhanças e diferenças entre o comport...

  7. Intracranial germ cell tumor mimicking anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu Martínez, F J; Martínez Mateu, J M

    2006-12-01

    We report on a case of a 23 year-old female diagnosed as having a germ-cell tumour located in the sellar region. The patient referred anorexia, psychic disorders, weight loss of 15 kilograms and secondary amenorrhea during the previous three years. This is the reason why the patient was diagnosed as having anorexia nervosa. Subsequently, the patient presented some endocrine dysfunction. MRI revealed the existence of a lesion located in suprasellar and hypothalamic regions. This case shows that the presence of intracranial tumours next to the hypothalamus must be borne in mind as a rare but real possibility in cases of anorexia nervosa, specially in those non-typical cases.

  8. PHYTO-PHARMACOLOGICAL REVIEW OF ARGYREIA NERVOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Krishnaveni

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines are the significant and reliable sources for treating various diseases. Argyreia nervosa is traditionally used in wound healing, syphilius,diuretics,rheumatic affections, leucohorrhoea.,cerebral disorders, ulcers, as anti-tumour and to prevent contraception.Phytoconstituents such as flavanoids, steroids, ergoline alkaloids and triterpenoids were identified. Pharmacological studies proved its anticonvulsant, immunomodulatory, hypotensive, anti- inflammatory and nootropic effect.The present form of article highlights the phytochemical and pharmacological studies including traditional practice of Argyreia nervosa have been carried out so far.

  9. The Association Between Patient Characteristics and the Therapeutic Alliance in Cognitive-Behavioral and Interpersonal Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Michael J.; Arnow, Bruce A.; Blasey, Christine; Agras, W. Stewart

    2005-01-01

    The therapeutic alliance is an established predictor of psychotherapy outcome. However, alliance research in the treatment of eating disorders has been scant, with even less attention paid to correlates of alliance development. The goal of this study was to examine the relation between specific patient characteristics and the development of the…

  10. Psychosomatic syndromes and anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the role of some psychosomatic factors as alexithymia, mood intolerance, and somatization in both pathogenesis and maintenance of anorexia nervosa (AN, few studies have investigated the prevalence of psychosomatic syndromes in AN. The aim of this study was to use the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR to assess psychosomatic syndromes in AN and to evaluate if psychosomatic syndromes could identify subgroups of AN patients. Methods 108 AN inpatients (76 AN restricting subtype, AN-R, and 32 AN binge-purging subtype, AN-BP were consecutively recruited and psychosomatic syndromes were diagnosed with the Structured Interview for DCPR. Participants were asked to complete psychometric tests: Body Shape Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory–2, and Temperament and Character Inventory. Data were submitted to cluster analysis. Results Illness denial (63% and alexithymia (54.6% resulted to be the most common syndromes in our sample. Cluster analysis identified three groups: moderate psychosomatic group (49%, somatization group (26%, and severe psychosomatic group (25%. The first group was mainly represented by AN-R patients reporting often only illness denial and alexithymia as DCPR syndromes. The second group showed more severe eating and depressive symptomatology and frequently DCPR syndromes of the somatization cluster. Thanatophobia DCPR syndrome was also represented in this group. The third group reported longer duration of illness and DCPR syndromes were highly represented; in particular, all patients were found to show the alexithymia DCPR syndrome. Conclusions These results highlight the need of a deep assessment of psychosomatic syndromes in AN. Psychosomatic syndromes correlated differently with both severity of eating symptomatology and duration of illness: therefore, DCPR could be effective to achieve tailored treatments.

  11. Anorexia Nervosa: Its Symptoms and Possible Cures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingaman, David E.

    This document presents a definition and description of anorexia nervosa as a disorder that occurs predominantly in girls and that can affect 1 out of every 250 girls between the ages of 12 and 18 years. The existence of a distorted mental body image among anorexics is discussed and symptoms of the disorder are described, including amenorrhea…

  12. Body representation disturbances in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main symptoms of anorexia nervosa (AN) is a disturbed experience of body size and shape. Although patients are underweight, they experience their body as bigger than it in reality is. Previous studies were mainly conducted by (clinical) psychologists and psychiatrists, and almost exclusiv

  13. Compulsory Treatment in Anorexia Nervosa : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzakkers, Isis F. F. M.; Danner, Unna N.; Hoek, Hans W.; Schmidt, Ulrike; van Elburg, Annemarie A.

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveCompulsory in-patient refeeding of patients with severe anorexia nervosa (AN) has caused considerable controversy. The effects of such treatment on longer-term outcome are not well known. The objective of this article is to review the evidence on the outcome of compulsory treatment for AN.

  14. Male Anorexia Nervosa: A New Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosscope-Happel, Cindy; Hutchins, David E.; Getz, Hildy G.; Hayes, Gerald L.

    2000-01-01

    Although anorexia nervosa affects over one million males yearly, it is often misdiagnosed or overlooked by mental health and medical practitioners. This article brings the problem to the forefront and outlines features that are unique to these males. Greater recognition of the disorder can lead to more accurate diagnoses and, subsequently, better…

  15. Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: Family Therapy's Natural Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, H. Charles

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is a severe problem both in terms of presenting symptomatology and its tendency toward chronicity. Researchers have consistently shown that family-based approaches are superior to individual approaches for the treatment of juvenile AN. This article addresses the capacity deficit of trained family therapists to treat…

  16. [Masculine anorexia nervosa: realities and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambry, Jean; Corcos, Maurice; Guilbaud, Olivier; Jeammet, Phillipe

    2002-05-01

    Since its description by Morton in 1694, masculine anorexia nervosa has been the subject of much debate. For many, two questions remain unanswered: does anorexia nervosa, as described in girls, exist in boys? - if so, is it the same disease? We analyzed the data in the literature which demonstrate a lower incidence than in the female population, although estimates are probable low due to underdiagnosis. The behavioral aspects suggest a similarity between masculine and feminine anorexia nervosa although the pure restrictive forms of anorexia are more rare in boys. There are however a few differences. Affected boys, according to Crips and Burns (1990), are heavier than girls at onset of the disorder but present a lower body weight during certain periods of the disease. Excessive physical activity is more frequent as is excessive intellectual involvement (Margo, 1987). The problem of amenorrhea, on/off periods, is not present in the male form. Testosterone and sexual function decline gradually, in parallel with the state of malnutrition (Anersen, 1990). The patient does not have particular difficulty discussing sexual relations but does exhibit a poor level of experience and mental representations. Contact with the opposite sex is rare and the fantastic life is generally very limited. The frequency of homosexual behavior would lie between 25% (Herzog, 1984) and 58% (Schneider and Agras, 1987), which is higher than in the female anorexia population (Herzog, 1984). This observation raises the question concerning the relationship between masculine mental anorexia nervosa and fragile sexual identity.

  17. [Impaired theory of mind in anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gál, Zita; Egyed, Katalin; Pászthy, Bea; Németh, Dezsö

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental illness, which is characterized by a continuously growing occurrence in the population and by the shift of the onset for earlier ages. The understanding of factors playing role in AN and the importance of effective prevention is an essential issue in science as well as in the society. AN also affects the social domain of life, patients with AN may exhibit impaired social interaction, social isolation, difficulties in emotion recognition and egocentric thinking in cognitive processing. Therefore, the aim of present study was to investigate the theory of mind (ToM) deficits is anorexia nervosa. Although previous studies have reported ToM deficits in autism and in schizophrenia, the number of studies investigating ToM functioning in eating disorders are particularly low. Even though ToM difficulties, such as the affective ToM impairments were found in AN, however, the evidence of cognitive ToM deficits in anorexia patients is still lacking. Twenty anorexia nervosa patients and 20 healthy control adolescent girls participated in the experiment. EDI, BAT, Fallon-Rozin Test and Anamoprhic Micro Body Image Assesment Programme questionnaires and body-image tests were applied to discriminate anorexia nervosa group from healthy control group. The Hungarian version of Faux Pas Recognition Test was applied to evaluate ToM functioning. Compared to healthy control group, impairment in ToM functioning was found in AN group, especially in affective mental state attribution. Our results can raise new aspects for research, therapy and prevention of anorexia nervosa.

  18. Anorexia y Bulimia: problemas de la sociedad desarrollada

    OpenAIRE

    Asensio Aller, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Según el Instituto Nacional de la Salud de Estados Unidos un trastorno de la alimentación es una enfermedad que causa graves perturbaciones en la dieta diaria, tales como comer cantidades muy pequeñas o comer en exceso. Los trastornos de la alimentación generalmente aparecen durante la adolescencia o adultez temprana, pero también se pueden dar durante la niñez o la adultez avanzada. Los trastornos de la alimentación más comunes son la anorexia nerviosa, bulimia nerviosa y e...

  19. Tratamiento periodontal en un paciente con bulimia y anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Dolonguevich, Evelyn Ruth; Boero López, Edgardo

    2009-01-01

    En el caso clínico se trató periodontalmente a la paciente C. J., con diagnóstico de bulimia y anorexia nerviosa purgativa. Se destacó el importante trabajo de motivación, que dio como resultado una respuesta excelente en su salud bucal. Se contó con la posibilidad de colocar implantes dentales con buen resultado postoperatorio, lo cual es promisorio en cuanto a lograr rehabilitarla con una solución fija, que no sufrirán de patología...

  20. [Anorexia nervosa as differential diagnosis in underweight patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapps, Nora; Skoda, Eva; Zipfel, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a differential diagnosis in underweight patients, especially in young underweight women. Diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa are self-induced weight loss due to restrictive eating or purging behaviour, intense fear of gaining weight and disturbance in the way in which one`s shape is experienced, undue influence of body weight on self-evaluation and persistent lack of recognition of the seriousness of the current low body weight. Anorexia nervosa is associated with numerous medical complications.

  1. [Therapeutic itineraries of individuals with symptoms of anorexia and bulimia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Maria Bernadete de; Val, Alexandre Costa; Ribeiro, Maria Mônica Freitas; Santos, Lúcia Grossi Dos

    2016-08-01

    The scope of this study is to identify and contextualize aspects of the therapeutic itineraries of patients treated at a university medical clinic specialized in nervous anorexia and bulimia. For this purpose, an attempt was made to reconstitute the succession of events triggered in 20 respondents and their families with the classification of anorexia and bulimia as "health problems." The narratives were analyzed in order to link the individual experiences and the social context of their occurrence (organization of health services, characteristics of treatment and medical knowledge and characteristics of contemporary subjectivity), in light of the theoretical studies of Public Health and Psychoanalysis. Data analysis revealed that these itineraries arise from connections and disconnections between two distinct approaches: one that organizes the management of patients and the other governing the conduct of health institutions and families. If the latter presuppose a quest for health, this is not what primarily concerns the individuals in question. Their refusal to moderate their own eating disorders is notable on their itineraries, and indicates the functionality of those practices. Such practices play a part in the reconstruction of their self-images.

  2. Narrative art inquiry and anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jennifer

    Narrative art inquiry is a new qualitative research methodology. It is different from the narrative approaches used by some nurse investigators because the study's findings are presented in the form of creative writing. In this article the author describes narrative art inquiry using material from research that used this approach to study anorexia nervosa. The author believes that narrative art inquiry has a wider application and could be used to study other types of psychological illness and physiological distress.

  3. Involuntary admission: the case of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douzenis, Athanasios; Michopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Involuntary treatment of psychiatric disorders has always been controversial; this is especially true for eating disorders. Patients with anorexia nervosa of life threatening severity frequently refuse psychiatric hospitalization. Ambivalence toward treatment is characteristic of eating disorders and patients are often admitted to inpatient programs under pressure from family and doctors. In this article, we report research on the positive or negative impact of involuntary admission in the treatment of eating disorders, its application and effectiveness as well as the adverse consequences of coercive treatment in eating disorders. A literature review was done. From a total of 134 publications which were retrieved from the literature search, 50 studies were directly relevant to the scope of this review and fulfilled all inclusion criteria. There are trends and arguments for both sides; for and against involuntary treatment in anorexia nervosa. The scientific literature so far is inconclusive, although in the short term, involuntary hospitalization has benefits. This review has also shown that involuntary hospitalization can have adverse long-term consequences for the patient-therapist allegiance. We conclude that in some cases, involuntary treatment can save lives of young patients with anorexia nervosa; however, in other cases, it can break the psychotherapeutic relationship and make the patient abandon treatment. It is the clinician who has to decide for whom and when to approve involuntary treatment or not.

  4. Hematological abnormalities in severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Allison L; Gaudiani, Jennifer L; Statland, Barbara; Mehler, Philip S

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of hematologic abnormalities in adults with severe anorexia nervosa. We report the first major analysis of hematologic dysfunction in such patients. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 53 men and women with severe anorexia nervosa, admitted between October 2008 and December 2010 for medical stabilization to our center, which has a national referral base. Patients were predominantly female (89 %), with a median age of 28 years (range 17-65), and were hospitalized for a median duration of 15 days (I.Q.R. 9-29). Nadir body mass index during hospitalization was markedly low at 12.4 kg/m(2) (range 8.4-15.7), and the mean discharge BMI was 13.8 kg/m(2) (range 10.2-16.8). 83 % of patients were anemic (hematocrit  400 k/μL) during their hospitalization. Eighty-nine percent of patients had resolved their neutropenia by discharge. Marked hematologic deficiencies are often present in patients with severe anorexia nervosa, generally attributed to starvation-mediated gelatinous marrow transformation which resolves with proper nutritional rehabilitation. Improved provider awareness of this association may reduce unnecessary testing and costly treatment interventions.

  5. Refeeding Hypophosphatemia in Adolescents With Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Dasha

    2013-01-01

    The rate of adolescents presenting with anorexia nervosa (AN) is increasing. Medically unstable adolescents are admitted to the hospital for nutrition restoration. A lack of global consensus on appropriate refeeding practices of malnourished patients has resulted in inconsistent refeeding practices. Refeeding hypophosphatemia (RH) is the most common complication associated with refeeding the malnourished patient. This review sought to identify the range of refeeding rates adopted globally and the implication that total energy intake and malnutrition may have on RH while refeeding adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Studies were identified by a systematic electronic search of medical databases from 1980 to September 2012. Seventeen publications were identified, including 6 chart reviews, 1 observational study, and 10 case reports, with a total of 1039 subjects. The average refeeding energy intake was 1186 kcal/d, ranging from 125–1900 kcal/d, with a mean percentage median body mass index (% mBMI) of 78%. The average incidence rate of RH was 14%. A significant correlation between malnutrition (% mBMI) and post-refeeding phosphate was identified (R 2 = 0.6, P = .01). This review highlights the disparity in refeeding rates adopted internationally in treating malnourished adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Based on this review, the severity of malnutrition seems to be a marker for the development of RH more so than total energy intake. PMID:23459608

  6. The role of socialization in male anorexia nervosa: two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, E N

    1996-01-01

    Social isolation, competitiveness and self-defeating masochism are the major themes in male and female Anorexia Nervosa. A relationship is seen between Anorexia Nervosa and Perversions, where there is a preconscious reenactment of traumatic situations. This dynamic of competition and masochism is described in two cases of male anorexia and seen as part of many other cases.

  7. The paradoxical nature of sexuality in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuiten, A; Panhuysen, G; Everaerd, W; Koppeschaar, H; Krabbe, P; Zelissen, P

    1993-01-01

    Psychosexual dysfunctioning is often put forward as an etiological factor in anorexia nervosa. In contrast, we hypothesize that anorexia nervosa patients were in general psychosexually normal before their illness, and that the problems in their sexual life arise only after the emergence of hypogonad

  8. Multimodal Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Holistic Approach to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Edward J.; Castaldo, Christine

    1985-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa has received considerable attention lately because of its increased incidence, potential danger, and resistance to treatment. A review of the literature on anorexia nervosa suggests that, although it is characterized by complex interrelated psychological and physiological processes, it is often conceptualized and treated in…

  9. Anorexia Nervosa in Chinese Adolescents: Does Culture Make a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kelly Y. C.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on clinical and psychosocial characteristics of 16 Chinese adolescents from Hong Kong with anorexia nervosa. Over 80% of these patients expressed a fear of fatness. Against the background of increasing Westernization of Hong Kong society, anorexia is taking on a Western pattern, in congruence with the notion that anorexia nervosa is a…

  10. [Nurses and clientele with anorexia and bulimia: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Claudia Regina Carvalho; Caccavo, Paulo Vaccari

    2012-01-01

    The research aimed to identify the interaction of nurses and clients suffering from bulimia and anorexia. We use the case study as a resource in which we collect clinical data and did interviews with eight of fourteen nurses, who have been our subject-object. According to the nurses, clients are isolated from the world living in a world without hunger and mirrors reflecting a body always above the "ideal weight", they were lonely people, personnel who have lost their shine, sending signals that could extinguish their lives at any time. In the study, was possible to identify the manner in which nurses interacted and perceived customers and, as a result, we elucidate a peculiar practice in nursing.

  11. Anorexia nervosa e gravidez: relato de caso Anorexia nervosa and pregnancy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Gonçalves Nery

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se o caso de uma adolescente de 18 anos que desenvolveu quadro de hiperemese gravídica seguida de anorexia nervosa durante sua primeira gravidez, chegando a índice de massa corporal (IMC de 14,3 Kg/m². Os sintomas apresentados remitiram após o término prematuro da gestação. Apesar de a anorexia nervosa ser incomum na gravidez, seu diagnóstico é importante em virtude dos riscos para a saúde materna e fetal.The authors describe a case of an eighteen years-old adolescent who developed hyperemesis gravidarum followed by anorexia nervosa during her first pregnancy. Her body mass index (BMI achieved 14.3 Kg/m². The symptoms remitted after the premature delivery of the newborn. Although anorexia nervosa is uncommon in pregnancy, its diagnosis is important in view of the risks for the health of mother and fetus.

  12. Anorexia nervosa depends on adrenal sympathetic hyperactivity: opposite neuroautonomic profile of hyperinsulinism syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lechin F

    2010-09-01

    predominance of overwhelming adrenal sympathetic activity over neural sympathetic activity. This combined central and autonomic nervous system profile contrasts with that registered in patients affected by hyperinsulinism, hypoglycemia, and bulimia syndrome which depends on the absolute predominance of neural sympathetic activity.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, adrenal sympathetic activity, adrenaline, noradrenaline, eating disorders

  13. Resting tachycardia, a warning sign in anorexia nervosa: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krantz Mori J

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among psychiatric disorders, anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate. During an exacerbation of this illness, patients frequently present with nonspecific symptoms. Upon hospitalization, anorexia nervosa patients are often markedly bradycardic, which may be an adaptive response to progressive weight loss and negative energy balance. When anorexia nervosa patients manifest tachycardia, even heart rates in the 80–90 bpm range, a supervening acute illness should be suspected. Case presentation A 52-year old woman with longstanding anorexia nervosa was hospitalized due to progressive leg pain, weakness, and fatigue accompanied by marked weight loss. On physical examination she was cachectic but in no apparent distress. She had fine lanugo-type hair over her face and arms with an erythematous rash noted on her palms and left lower extremity. Her blood pressure was 96/50 mm Hg and resting heart rate was 106 bpm though she appeared euvolemic. Laboratory tests revealed anemia, mild leukocytosis, and hypoalbuminemia. She was initially treated with enteral feedings for an exacerbation of anorexia nervosa, but increasing leukocytosis without fever and worsening left leg pain prompted the diagnosis of an indolent left lower extremity cellulitis. With antibiotic therapy her heart rate decreased to 45 bpm despite minimal restoration of body weight. Conclusions Bradycardia is a characteristic feature of anorexia nervosa particularly with significant weight loss. When anorexia nervosa patients present with nonspecific symptoms, resting tachycardia should prompt a search for potentially life-threatening conditions.

  14. [Anorexia nervosa: study method and sleep analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, S; Zapata, R; Gual, P; Quintanilla, B

    1989-01-01

    By studying anorexia nervosa with an Integrated Inventory and the quality and the quantity of sleep applying Hauri's scale for the analysis of dream contents, the sleeping habits of 50 anorexic patients who were under treatment have been studied. The results show that sleep in these patients is similar and sometimes better in quantity and quality than those in the control group. Their dreams are characterized by an almost total absence of sexual, aggressive and alimentary contents, and that reality, active participation, unpleasant feelings and sensory-perceptive elements are predominant.

  15. Medical management of acute severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrington, Amy; Stanley, Ruth; Tremlett, Michael; Birrell, Ginny

    2012-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a common condition affecting young people. The medical management of AN on a general paediatric ward is challenging. It is important to identify young people who are at risk of medical complications, so early intervention can be instigated. This article aims to review the clinical practice and evidence supporting the current medical management of young people with AN. It provides a system-based approach to potential complications of the disease, guidance on feeding and the management of re-feeding syndrome. Approaches to legal and ethical challenges are also considered. While the importance of psychiatric treatment is recognised, the same is not discussed within this article.

  16. Diagnosed Anxiety Disorders and the Risk of Subsequent Anorexia Nervosa: A Danish Population Register Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sandra M; Bulik, Cynthia M; Thornton, Laura M; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mortensen, Preben B; Petersen, Liselotte

    2015-11-01

    Anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa are frequently acknowledged to be highly comorbid conditions, but still, little is known about the clinical and aetiological cohesion of specific anxiety diagnoses and anorexia nervosa. Using the comprehensive Danish population registers, we aimed to determine the risk of anorexia nervosa in patients with register-detected severe anxiety disorders. We also explored whether parental psychopathology was associated with offspring's anorexia nervosa. Anxiety disorders increased the risk of subsequent anorexia nervosa, with the highest risk observed in obsessive-compulsive disorder. Especially, male anxiety patients were at an increased risk for anorexia nervosa. Furthermore, an increased risk was observed in offspring of fathers with panic disorder. A diagnosis of an anxiety disorder, specifically obsessive-compulsive disorder, constitutes a risk factor for subsequent diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. These observations support the notion that anxiety disorders and anorexia nervosa share etiological mechanisms and/or that anxiety represents one developmental pathway to anorexia nervosa.

  17. Disordered Eating and Weight Changes after Deployment: Longitudinal Assessment of a Large US Military Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-04

    anorexia nervosa . Arch Intern Med. 2005; 165(5):561–566. 11. Hadley SJ, Walsh BT. Gastrointestinal disturbances in an- orexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa ...bulimia nervosa of 8% for women and 7% for men, rates that exceed population estimates (3, 4). The elevated prev- alence of eating disorders in military...survey was able to identify individuals with bulimia nervosa , subclinical bulimia nervosa , binge- eating disorder, and subclinical binge-eating

  18. Complications of pre-operative anorexia nervosa in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shear, Matthew; DeFilippis, Ersilia M

    2015-01-01

    It is important to recognise that patients who seek weight loss surgery may have a history of restrictive eating or anorexia nervosa. The following case report describes a woman with a history of anorexia nervosa who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Her eating disorder symptoms subsequently reappeared and were largely resistant to treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a bariatric surgery patient with a prior history of anorexia nervosa. Further research is required to determine how best to select patients for weight loss surgery.

  19. Carbohydrate metabolism and its regulatory hormones in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, R C

    1996-04-16

    Findings of studies of carbohydrate metabolism in anorexia nervosa are reviewed. Topics covered included fasting blood sugar concentrations; serum insulin concentrations, insulin receptor binding activity, insulin sensitivity, and insulin resistance; plasma ketone bodies and free fatty acids; glucose tolerance tests; growth hormone, cortisol, intestinal hormones, and norepinephrine. Metabolic changes reported in anorexia nervosa are similar to those found in human and animal studies of states of caloric and carbohydrate restriction. Restoration of normal body weight is associated with normalization of virtually all measures. It is concluded that published studies offer no conclusive evidence for a syndrome-specific impairment in carbohydrate metabolism in anorexia nervosa.

  20. Osteoporosis in women with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotti, N A; Nussbaum, S R; Herzog, D B; Neer, R M

    1984-12-20

    Because estrogen deficiency predisposes to osteoporosis, we assessed the skeletal mass of women with anorexia nervosa, using direct photon absorptiometry to measure radial bone density in 18 anorectic women and 28 normal controls. The patients with anorexia had significantly reduced mean bone density as compared with the controls (0.64 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.72 +/- 0.04 g per square centimeter, P less than 0.001). Vertebral compression fractures developed in two patients, and bone biopsy in one of them demonstrated osteoporosis. Bone density in the patients was not related to the estradiol level (r = 0.02). Levels of parathyroid hormone, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were normal despite low calcium intakes. The patients with anorexia who reported a high physical activity level had a greater bone density than the patients who were less active (P less than 0.001); this difference could not be accounted for by differences in age, relative weight, duration of illness, or serum estradiol levels. The bone density of physically active patients did not differ from that of active or sedentary controls. We conclude that women with anorexia nervosa have a reduced bone mass due to osteoporosis, but that a high level of physical activity may protect their skeletons.

  1. Self-focused Attention in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Nancy; Wagner, H. Ryan; Merwin, Rhonda; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Moskovich, Ashley; Keeling, Lori; Hoyle, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical presentation of anorexia nervosa (AN) is characterized by preoccupation with body experience, intrusive concerns regarding shape, and pathological fears of weight gain. These symptoms are suggestive of unrelenting self-focused attention. No research to date has characterized self-focused attention (SFA) in AN nor examined neurocognitive features that may facilitate an excessive, rigid, or sustained focus on one’s appearance. Method This study examined SFA, body image disturbance, and executive functioning in women with current anorexia nervosa (AN-C; n = 24), a history of AN who were weight-restored at the time of the study weight-restored (WR; n = 19), and healthy controls (n = 24). Results Private and public SFA were highest among WR and lowest among AN-C. Shape concerns were negatively correlated with SFA, especially among AN-C, after controlling for depression and social anxiety symptoms. Discussion Lower levels of SFA among AN-C were unexpected and suggest the acute state of AN may lessen pathological self-focus, negatively reinforcing symptoms. In addition, body image concerns may distract from general SFA. Deficits in executive attention may explain these findings, as each one unit increase in perseverative errors among AN-C participants was associated with an almost one-half unit decrease in public SFA. PMID:24899215

  2. Nutritional approach of inpatients with anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Marugán de Miguelsanz

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is the most prevalent of eating disorders in children and adolescents, and its treatment is long and complex, involving a multidisciplinary team. Nutritional rehabilitation and restoration of a healthy body weight is one of the central goals in the initial stages of inpatient treatment. However, current recommendations on initial energy requirements for these patients are inconsistent, with a clear lack of controlled studies, available scientific evidence and global consensus on the most effective and safe refeeding practices in hospitalized adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN. Conservative refeeding recommendations have been classically established in order to prevent the refeeding syndrome. Nevertheless, various works have recently appeared advocating a higher initial caloric intake, without observing more complications or refeeding syndrome, and allowing a shorter average stay. We present our experience in the treatment of restricting AN with a conservative progressive treatment. We have obtained good results with this approach, which was well tolerated by patients, with no observing complications. As a consequence, the medical team could establish a pact about the therapeutic goals with the patients in an easier way.

  3. Perioperative management of severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K; Hirose, M; Tanaka, K; Kawahito, S; Tamaki, T; Oshita, S

    2014-02-01

    As the prevalence of anorexia nervosa (AN) increased, surgery in severe AN patients also increased in the 2000s. We experienced a surgical case of a patient with severe AN, showing an extremely low BMI of 8.6 kg m(-2). We investigated the problems associated with this case and propose criteria to manage severe AN. We endeavour to report on the perioperative management of rare and severe symptoms and surgical indications of severely malnourished patients. All published reports were identified through comprehensive searches using PubMed, BioMedLib, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society with the following terms and keywords: 'anorexia nervosa', 'eating disorder', 'hypoglycaemia', 'leucocytopaenia', 'gelatinous bone marrow', 'surgery', and 'operation'. In cases of AN with a BMI under 13 kg m(-2), marked hypoglycaemia, leucocytopaenia feeding syndrome until surgery. During the course of anaesthesia, careless loading of glucose or catecholamine may lead to disturbance of electrolytes or fatal arrhythmia. Intensive care and early feeding as soon as possible after surgery are important to prevent surgical site infection. Although not many perioperative cases of AN have been reported, clinicians must be aware of the danger and the causes of mortality in critical cases. Thus, the decision to undertake surgery must be taken carefully and close perioperative coordination among physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, anaesthesiologists, and intensivists is essential.

  4. Anorexia nervosa: uma revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Schmidt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Os autores apresentam uma revisão de alguns pontos de vista com relação à anorexia nervosa. Alinham-se aspectos classificatórios, históricos, clínicos e terapêuticos. Reconhecida como a base para ocorrências místicas na Idade Média, foi entendida como uma apresentação histérica no século XVII, para tornar-se, logo em seguida, objeto das indagações freudianas. Discute-se a anorexia como uma apresentação da estrutura histérica, aqui abordada a partir dos conceitos freudianos sobre histeria, Édipo e feminino, e considerando-se o corpo físico como um mero suporte para articulações simbólicas. Para Freud, a anorexia nervosa seria um quadro pelo qual a histérica exprime sua aversão à sexualidade.

  5. Indirect evidence for decreased hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Andersen, M; Flyvbjerg, A

    2002-01-01

    in the central feeding mechanism in anorexia nervosa (AN). Peripheral administration of pyridostigmine (PD) minimizes the release of hypothalamic SRIH. DESIGN: To study the influence of hypothalamic somatostatinergic inhibition on the exaggerated somatotroph responsiveness to GHRH in patients with severe AN, two...... indirectly to greater SRIH withdrawal and greater GHRH release in anorexia nervosa. Moreover, hypothalamic SRIH activity seems to be inversely related to cortisol levels, indirectly supporting the hypothesis that SRIH and CRH neuronal activity are inversely related in anorexia nervosa. Leptin, which...... is believed to act on hypothalamic feeding mechanisms, seems to be positively related to SRIH activity. Finally, the present data demonstrate that the potentiating effect of pyridostigmine in anorexia nervosa is related to body mass index and increases upon weight gain, suggesting that the low...

  6. What People with Anorexia Nervosa Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People With Anorexia Nervosa Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: PDF (86 KB) Related Resources ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  7. Altered social reward and attention in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karli K Watson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunctional social reward and social orienting attend a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders including autism, schizophrenia, social anxiety, and psychopathy. Here we show that similar social reward and attention dysfunction attend anorexia nervosa, a disorder defined by avoidance of food and extreme weight loss. We measured the implicit reward value of social stimuli for female participants with (n=11 and without (n=11 anorexia nervosa using an econometric choice task and also tracked gaze patterns during free viewing of images of female faces and bodies. As predicted, the reward value of viewing bodies varied inversely with observed body weight for women with anorexia but not neurotypical women, in contrast with their explicit ratings of attractiveness. Surprisingly, women with anorexia nervosa, unlike neurotypical women, did not find female faces rewarding and avoided looking at both the face and eyes—independent of observed body weight. These findings demonstrate comorbid dysfunction in the neural circuits mediating gustatory and social reward in anorexia nervosa.

  8. Relacionamentos Afetivo-Familiares em Mulheres com Anorexia e Bulimia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Leonidas

    Full Text Available RESUMOEste estudo teve por objetivo investigar a rede social de apoio de mulheres com anorexia e bulimia, com ênfase em suas relações afetivo-familiares. A amostra foi composta por 12 participantes atendidas em hospital universitário. Os instrumentos utilizados foram: roteiro de entrevista semiestruturada, Mapa de Rede e Genograma. Os resultados indicaram que as redes sociais das participantes têm configuração restrita, com proeminência de membros da família em sua composição. Os relacionamentos familiares oscilam, contudo, entre turbulência e distanciamento afetivo. As relações de afeto mantidas com pais, cônjuges e namorados são marcadas por divergências e insatisfações. A baixa densidade da rede de amizades e o empobrecimento da vida social resultam em isolamento e dificuldades de dar início e/ou manter relacionamentos afetivos duradouros.

  9. Study Ties Girls’ Bulimia To Arrival Of TV In Fiji

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Leslie; Gevirtz; 张式昌

    1999-01-01

    斐济,南太平洋的一个美丽岛国,在1985年尚不通电。但是,随着通电而来的电视,给这个岛国带来了意料不到的变化!昔日,该国的少男少女均以强健和肌肉发达为美,为追求。而今,小小的电视荧屏让他们看到了外面的世界,知道了Western ideals of beauty。从此,少女们开始diet(节食减肥),孰料,少女减肥不当,减出了bulimia(易饿病)and anorexia(厌食)。电视的出现是祸是福?作者意味深长地“重温”了19世纪的历史:When the British came to Fiji andbrought the measles 【医】麻疹)with them.接着,作者写道:in the 20th century,television is another pathogen(病原体)exporting Western images and values.】

  10. Diminished creatinine clearance in anorexia nervosa: reversal with weight gain.

    OpenAIRE

    Boag, F; Weerakoon, J; Ginsburg, J.; Havard, C W; Dandona, P

    1985-01-01

    To assess whether patients with anorexia nervosa have abnormalities in creatinine clearance, we measured plasma creatinine concentration, urinary creatinine excretion, and creatinine clearance in 10 patients with anorexia nervosa before and during treatment. Urinary creatinine excretion and creatinine clearance were diminished in all patients. Nine patients had significant decreases in their plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance was increased even when corrected for body weight and body ...

  11. Could dopamine agonists aid in drug development for anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Guido K W

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage-years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight, and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological, and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction, and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction, and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways.

  12. The Disjointed Historical Trajectory of Anorexia Nervosa Before 1970

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Responses in pre-modern eras to anorexia nervosa (as now understood) varied widely, from religious piety and sanctity through fear and superstition. While noting briefly the limited conceptualizations from pre-modern history this article is primarily focused from the late 19th century, commencing with helpful but tentative formulations of anorexia nervosa for early-modern medicine that were laid out, consistently between themselves, by Lesègue, Gull and Osler. Yet that promising biomedical ad...

  13. Severe anorexia nervosa in males: clinical presentations and medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Allison L; Rosen, Elissa; Mehler, Philip S

    2014-01-01

    The clinical presentation and medical complications of severe anorexia nervosa among males were examined to further the understanding of this increasingly prevalent condition. Fourteen males were admitted to a medical stabilization unit over the study period. Males with severe anorexia nervosa were found to have a multitude of significant medical and laboratory abnormalities, which are in need of treatment via judicious, nutritional rehabilitation and weight restoration to prevent additional morbidity and to facilitate transfer and admission to traditional eating disorder programs.

  14. [Psychodiagnostic findings in anorexia nervosa and post-pill amenorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehle, G; Wahlstab, A; Ott, J

    1982-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa is originated from disturbances at various points of the cortico-hypothalamo-hypophyseal axis. 65 patients suffering from anorexia nervosa or post-pill-amenorrhea were classified by cluster-analysis with 174 marks of the social, psychodynamic and biological levels. The different psychodiagnostic characteristics (470-F-Test, Hamilton-Depression-Scale, Beck-Depression-Scale, Giessen-test) are discussed according to the 3 clusters.

  15. Could Dopamine Agonists Aid in Drug Development for Anorexia Nervosa?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eFrank

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is a severe psychiatric disorder most commonly starting during the teenage years and associated with food refusal and low body weight. Typically there is a loss of menses, intense fear of gaining weight and an often delusional quality of altered body perception. Anorexia nervosa is also associated with a pattern of high cognitive rigidity, which may contribute to treatment resistance and relapse. The complex interplay of state and trait biological, psychological and social factors has complicated identifying neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to the illness. The dopamine D1 and D2 neurotransmitter receptors are involved in motivational aspects of food approach, fear extinction and cognitive flexibility. They could therefore be important targets to improve core and associated behaviors in anorexia nervosa. Treatment with dopamine antagonists has shown little benefit, and it is possible that antagonists over time increase an already hypersensitive dopamine pathway activity in anorexia nervosa. On the contrary, application of dopamine receptor agonists could reduce circuit responsiveness, facilitate fear extinction and improve cognitive flexibility in anorexia nervosa, as they may be particularly effective during underweight and low gonadal hormone states. This article provides evidence that the dopamine receptor system could be a key factor in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa and dopamine agonists could be helpful in reducing core symptoms of the disorder. This review is a theoretical approach that primarily focuses on dopamine receptor function as this system has been mechanistically better described than other neurotransmitters that are altered in anorexia nervosa. However, those proposed dopamine mechanisms in anorexia nervosa also warrant further study with respect to their interaction with other neurotransmitter systems, such as serotonin pathways.

  16. Social Cognition in Child and Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ipek Percinel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Social cognition represents the mental processes of social interaction between oneself and others. In recent years, the interest in social cognition skills has increased in cases with eating disorders. Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that is associated with the multiple factors in etiology. Treatment of anorexia nervosa is still controversial. The youths diagnosed with anorexia nervosa are known to be as the most difficult group in eating disorders for building therapeutic relations. Studies, mostly suggests that there are difficulties in social cognitive functions in patients with anorexia nervosa. However, there are studies that reported different results. It seems that, the majority of studies which evaluate the social cognitive functions in patients with anorexia nervosa, are carried out with the adult age group. There are limited number of studies in child and adolescent age group. The purpose of this paper was to examinate the studies of social cognitive skills in children and adolescents diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and present the general characteristics. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(2: 178-189

  17. Transtornos alimentares: classificação e diagnóstico Classification and diagnosis of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Táki Athanássios Cordás

    2004-01-01

    O presente artigo apresenta os critérios diagnósticos atuais dos transtornos alimentares: anorexia nervosa e bulimia nervosa. Os aspectos controversos da anorexia nervosa são discutidos.This article presents the current diagnostic criteria for eating disorders: anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. The controversial aspects of anorexia nervosa are discussed.

  18. Stressful task increases drive for thinness and bulimia: a laboratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eSassaroli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The scientific literature has suggested that stress undergirds the development of eating disorders (ED. Therefore, this study explored whether laboratory induced stress increases self-reported drive for thinness and bulimic symptoms measured via self-report. The relationship between control, perfectionism, stress, and cognition related to ED was examined using correlational methodology. 86 participants completed an experimental task using a personal computer. All individuals completed a battery of tests before and after the stressful task. Analyses showed a significant statistical increase in average scores on the drive for thinness and bulimia measured before and after a stressful task, and path analysis revealed two different cognitive models for the mechanism leading to drive for thinness and bulimia. These findings suggest that stress is an important factor in the development of the drive for thinness and bulimia.

  19. Stressful task increases drive for thinness and bulimia: a laboratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassaroli, Sandra; Fiore, Francesca; Mezzaluna, Clarice; Ruggiero, Giovanni Maria

    2015-01-01

    The scientific literature has suggested that stress undergirds the development of eating disorders (ED). Therefore, this study explored whether laboratory induced stress increases self-reported drive for thinness and bulimic symptoms measured via self-report. The relationship between control, perfectionism, stress, and cognition related to ED was examined using correlational methodology. Eighty-six participants completed an experimental task using a personal computer (PC). All individuals completed a battery of tests before and after the stressful task. Analyses showed a significant statistical increase in average scores on the drive for thinness and bulimia measured before and after a stressful task, and path analysis revealed two different cognitive models for the mechanism leading to drive for thinness and bulimia. These findings suggest that stress is an important factor in the development of the drive for thinness and bulimia. PMID:25999901

  20. Emotion recognition and regulation in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Amy; Sullivan, Sarah; Tchanturia, Kate; Treasure, Janet

    2009-01-01

    It is recognized that emotional problems lie at the core of eating disorders (EDs) but scant attention has been paid to specific aspects such as emotional recognition, regulation and expression. This study aimed to investigate emotion recognition using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (RME) task and emotion regulation using the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS) in 20 women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and 20 female healthy controls (HCs). Women with AN had significantly lower scores on RME and reported significantly more difficulties with emotion regulation than HCs. There was a significant negative correlation between total DERS score and correct answers from the RME. These results suggest that women with AN have difficulties with emotional recognition and regulation. It is uncertain whether these deficits result from starvation and to what extent they might be reversed by weight gain alone. These deficits may need to be targeted in treatment.

  1. [Orthorexia nervosa and it's background factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Márta; Dukay-Szabo, Szilvia; Túry, Ferenc

    2013-07-30

    The place of orthorexia nervosa (ON)--described by Bratman in 1997--is not clearly defined in the diagnostic systems. However, the increasing number of clinical experiences and research data gives us more and more information about the epidemiology, and the social and individual characteristics of ON. The general population shows a 6.9% prevalence of ON; healthcare professionals are at high risk of ON with the prevalence rate of 35-57.6%. Education, the choice of profession, socioeconomic status and the internalization of the ideals of society are significant factors in the development of ON, while sex, age and body mass index do not seem to be determining variables in this respect. The lack of common criteria and proper research results on ON makes it impossible to generalize data on the general population. Further studies with larger representative samples and assessment instruments with good psychometric properties are necessary to make research data on ON comparable.

  2. Extreme Achalasia Presenting as Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Goldsmith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Achalasia may lead to cachexia if not diagnosed in an early stage. Surgery in cachectic patients is hazardous and complications may result in a protracted recovery or even death. Different treatment options have been described. In this paper, we report a stepwise surgical laparoscopic approach which appears to be safe and effective. Methods. Over a one-year period, a patient with a body mass index (BMI below 17 being treated for anorexia nervosa was referred with dysphagia. Because of the extreme cachexia, a laparoscopic feeding jejunostomy (LFJ was fashioned to enable long-term home enteral feeding. The patient underwent a laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM when the BMI was normal. Results. The patient recovered well following this stepwise approach. Conclusion. Patients with advanced achalasia usually present with extreme weight loss. In this small group of patients, a period of home enteral nutrition (HEN via a laparoscopically placed feeding jejunostomy allows weight gain prior to safe definitive surgery.

  3. Propuesta de atención grupal para adolescentes: bulimia como síntoma

    OpenAIRE

    Villalobos Pérez, Fabiola

    2013-01-01

    En este informe final de investigación aplicada se realizó una psicoterapia grupal de 16 sesiones para mujeres adolescentes con bulimia en el hospital San Rafael de Alajuela. El marco teórico y metodológico, a partir del cual se conceptualizó este trabajo, es el Psicoanálisis, por lo que la adolescencia es considerada como un momento de reestructuración subjetiva; la bulimia, de forma contraria a la posición médico-psiquiátrica, se considera como un síntoma, es decir, como una manifestación d...

  4. Anorexia Nervosa: Analysis of Trabecular Texture with CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari, Azadeh; Torriani, Martin; Miller, Karen K; Klibanski, Anne; Kalra, Mannudeep K; Bredella, Miriam A

    2016-10-31

    Purpose To determine indexes of skeletal integrity by using computed tomographic (CT) trabecular texture analysis of the lumbar spine in patients with anorexia nervosa and normal-weight control subjects and to determine body composition predictors of trabecular texture. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. Written informed consent was obtained. The study included 30 women with anorexia nervosa (mean age ± standard deviation, 26 years ± 6) and 30 normal-weight age-matched women (control group). All participants underwent low-dose single-section quantitative CT of the L4 vertebral body with use of a calibration phantom. Trabecular texture analysis was performed by using software. Skewness (asymmetry of gray-level pixel distribution), kurtosis (pointiness of pixel distribution), entropy (inhomogeneity of pixel distribution), and mean value of positive pixels (MPP) were assessed. Bone mineral density and abdominal fat and paraspinal muscle areas were quantified with quantitative CT. Women with anorexia nervosa and normal-weight control subjects were compared by using the Student t test. Linear regression analyses were performed to determine associations between trabecular texture and body composition. Results Women with anorexia nervosa had higher skewness and kurtosis, lower MPP (P anorexia nervosa. Conclusion Patients with anorexia nervosa had increased skewness and kurtosis and decreased entropy and MPP compared with normal-weight control subjects. These parameters were associated with lowest lifetime weight and duration of amenorrhea, but there were no such associations with bone mineral density. These findings suggest that trabecular texture analysis might contribute information about bone health in anorexia nervosa that is independent of that provided with bone mineral density. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  5. The endocrine manifestations of anorexia nervosa: mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorr, Melanie; Miller, Karen K

    2017-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a psychiatric disorder characterized by altered body image, persistent food restriction and low body weight, and is associated with global endocrine dysregulation in both adolescent girls and women. Dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis includes hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with relative oestrogen and androgen deficiency, growth hormone resistance, hypercortisolaemia, non-thyroidal illness syndrome, hyponatraemia and hypooxytocinaemia. Serum levels of leptin, an anorexigenic adipokine, are suppressed and levels of ghrelin, an orexigenic gut peptide, are elevated in women with anorexia nervosa; however, levels of peptide YY, an anorexigenic gut peptide, are paradoxically elevated. Although most, but not all, of these endocrine disturbances are adaptive to the low energy state of chronic starvation and reverse with treatment of the eating disorder, many contribute to impaired skeletal integrity, as well as neuropsychiatric comorbidities, in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Although 5-15% of patients with anorexia nervosa are men, only limited data exist regarding the endocrine impact of the disease in adolescent boys and men. Further research is needed to understand the endocrine determinants of bone loss and neuropsychiatric comorbidities in anorexia nervosa in both women and men, as well as to formulate optimal treatment strategies.

  6. Neurofunctional areas related to food appetency in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juán José Cervantes-Navarrete

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In Anorexia Nervosa the observable phenomenon is the suppression of appetite. Little is known about the biological and psychological (top-down bases that maintain this pathological state. However, Anorexia Nervosa is a biological, psychological and social model where the main behavioral characteristic is the inhibition of eating behavior; not by bottom-up but top-down regulation. Objective: To explore the areas of the brain associated with food appetency through functional magnetic resonance in women with anorexia nervosa. Methods: The subjects include 5 female with Restrictive type of Anorexia Nervosa and five controls female with similar in age and low weigh. The subjects were within the MRI scanner and while took fMRI they saw food images that would generate appetite. The subjects were in fasting state and mentally prepare by instruction “imagine you are eating the food presented in the following images”. Results: Compared differences in the activation between subjects four regions were found significant: the anterior cingulate, left front medial region and the left and right midbrain. Conclusions: The patients with Anorexia Nervosa present different activated cerebral areas to those of the controls during the visual exposition to food in hungry state and with evoke cognitions associated with eat food; those regions may be implicated in reward and self-control.

  7. Total body water and total body potassium in anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dempsey, D.T.; Crosby, L.O.; Lusk, E.; Oberlander, J.L.; Pertschuk, M.J.; Mullen, J.L.

    1984-08-01

    In the ill hospitalized patient with clinically relevant malnutrition, there is a measurable decrease in the ratio of the total body potassium to total body water (TBK/TBW) and a detectable increase in the ratio of total exchangeable sodium to total exchangeable potassium (Nae/Ke). To evaluate body composition analyses in anorexia nervosa patients with chronic uncomplicated semistarvation, TBK and TBW were measured by whole body K40 counting and deuterium oxide dilution in 10 females with stable anorexia nervosa and 10 age-matched female controls. The ratio of TBK/TBW was significantly (p less than 0.05) higher in anorexia nervosa patients than controls. The close inverse correlation found in published studies between TBK/TBW and Nae/Ke together with our results suggest that in anorexia nervosa, Nae/Ke may be low or normal. A decreased TBK/TBW is not a good indicator of malnutrition in the anorexia nervosa patient. The use of a decreased TBK/TBW ratio or an elevated Nae/Ke ratio as a definition of malnutrition may result in inappropriate nutritional management in the patient with severe nonstressed chronic semistarvation.

  8. Eating Disorders. What Parents Need to Know About Anorexia and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Children, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Examines facts about eating disorders, which typically affect females in their teens, discussing the causes of anorexia and bulimia, describing their effects on the body, and explaining available treatment. Though eating disorders are very serious and potentially fatal, they are treatable. Treatment includes physician evaluation, possible…

  9. Anorexia and Bulimia: An Inventory of Public Awareness and Popular Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Marc A.

    Prevention and early intervention in cases of anorexia and bulimia require that both professionals and the general public have knowledge about these eating disorders. A study was conducted to identify the questions about these disorders most often asked by the general public and to develop a guide to answer those questions for individuals of…

  10. Client Pretreatment Characteristics as Predictors of Outcome in Brief Therapy for Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiffrida, Douglas A.; Barnes, Kristin L.; Hoskins, Christine M.; Roman, Lisa L.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an overview for college counselors of the literature on bulimia treatment outcomes for purposes of screening, treatment, and referral. Outlines pretreatment characteristics that seem amenable to success in brief therapy, as well as those that do not lead to a positive outcome. (Contains 37 references and 2 tables.) (Author/GCP)

  11. When Dieting Becomes Dangerous: A Guide to Understanding and Treating Anorexia and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Deborah Marcontell; Willard, Susan G.

    This book about anorexia and bulimia is written for patients and the people who care about them. It describes the symptoms and warning signs of eating disorders, explains their presumed causes and complexities, and suggests effective treatments. The book emphasizes the critical role of psychotherapy and family therapy in recovery, explains how…

  12. Low Self-Esteem as a Treatment Issue in the Psychotherapy of Anorexia and Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Pryor; Sights, Judith R.

    1986-01-01

    Observation has indicated that low self-esteem is pervasive in clients with anorexia and bulimia. Possible origins of the self-esteem deficit, its relationship to eating problems, and psychotherapeutic strategies to counteract the deficits are explored. (Author/BL)

  13. Remission of anorexia nervosa after thyroidectomy: A report of two cases with Graves' disease and anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguchi Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report two patients with anorexia nervosa and Graves' disease who received subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease and concomitantly experienced remission from anorexia nervosa. Both were young women (aged 20 and 26 at the time of surgery. Both had well controlled thyroid function and eating behavior at the time of surgery. Both were followed for over five years without relapse of anorexia nervosa or hyperthyroidism. These cases suggest the existence of an endocrine factor originating from the thyroid gland that is involved in the pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa. Since patients of thyroidectomy can remain in good health with supplement of thyroxine alone, it can be hypothesized that this anorexigenic endocrine factor is an evolutionary relic not necessary for the normal function of humans and does not have physiological effects unless secreted beyond normal levels. Given that, it implies the existence of a creature in the animal kingdom for which such an anorexigenic hormone is essential for survival. Migrating birds eat beyond their caloric expenditure before migration and become anorexic for the duration of their flight. It is also known that their thyroid function is elevated during migration. The normal physiology of migration is a complex mechanism involving the hypothalamic, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal and reproductive hormones. The mechanism of disease, however, can be simpler. A review of the literature is presented that suggest a heretofore unreported thyroid hormone, which is involved in the regulation of migration behavior, may be the responsible factor behind anorexia nervosa.

  14. Therapist adherence in the strong without anorexia nervosa (SWAN) study:A randomized controlled trial of three treatments for adults with anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a psychotherapy rating scale to measure therapist adherence in the Strong Without Anorexia Nervosa (SWAN) study, a multi-center randomized controlled trial comparing three different psychological treatments for adults with anorexia nervosa. The three treatments under investigation were Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT-E), the Maudsley Anorexia Nervosa Treatment for Adults (MANTRA), and Specialist Supportive Clinical Management (SSCM). Method The SWAN Psychother...

  15. Biased Interpretation of Ambiguous Social Scenarios in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardi, Valentina; Turton, Robert; Schifano, Sylvia; Leppanen, Jenni; Hirsch, Colette R; Treasure, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa experience increased sensitivity to the risk of social rejection. The aims of this study were to assess the interpretation of ambiguous social scenarios depicting the risk of rejection and to examine the relationship between interpretation biases and clinical symptoms. Thirty-five women with anorexia nervosa and 30 healthy eaters completed clinical questionnaires, alongside a sentence completion task. This task required participants to generate completions to ambiguous social scenarios and to endorse their best completion. Responses were rated as being negative, neutral or positive. Patients endorsed more negative interpretations and fewer neutral and positive interpretations compared with healthy eaters. The frequency of endorsed negative interpretations correlated with depression, anxiety and fear of weight gain and body disturbance. A negative interpretation bias towards social stimuli is present in women with anorexia nervosa and correlates with clinical symptoms. Interventions aimed at reducing this bias could improve illness prognosis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. Neuroendokrine forstyrrelser ved anorexia nervosa - primoere eller sekundoere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Hansen-Nord, M; Hangaard, J

    1996-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and monoamines are involved in the regulation of human appetite, and they are changed in several ways in anorexia nervosa. But it remains to be clarified whether these alterations are secondary...... or etiologic. Feeding behaviour in anorexia nervosa is characterised by a strong ambivalence and not by loss of appetite. Hypothalamic amenorrhea is a diagnostic criterion, and is not only secondary as it often precedes the weight loss and persists for a long time after weight and motor activity have returned...... to normal. Hypersecretion of corticotropin releasing hormone seems to be secondary to starvation, but at the same time it may keep up and intensify the anorexia, physical hyperactivity and amenorrhea. Low production of insulinlike growth factor-I and high growth hormone secretion reflects the nutritional...

  17. A review of endocrine changes in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Hangaard, J; Hansen-Nord, M

    1999-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a syndrome of unknown etiology. It is associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. Hypothalamic monoamines (especially serotonin), neuropeptides (especially neuropeptide Y and cholecystokinin) and leptin are involved in the regulation of human appetite, and in several ways...... they are changed in anorexia nervosa. However, it remains to be clarified whether the altered appetite regulation is secondary or etiologic. Increased secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone and proopiomelanocortin seems to be secondary to starvation, however, there is evidence that it may maintain...... and intensify anorexia, excessive physical activity and amenorrhea. Hypothalamic amenorrhea, which is a diagnostic criterion in anorexia nervosa, is not solely related to the low body weight and exercise. Growth hormone resistance with low production of insulin-like growth factor I and high growth hormone...

  18. [Are there specific factors in the psychotherapy of anorexia nervosa?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipfel, Stephan; Resmark, Gaby

    2015-01-01

    The present literature review examines the question of how general and specific factors can be differentiated in the psychotherapy of anorexia nervosa. Over the past 10 years different research trends have appeared. On the one hand subclassifications of new therapy approaches from several schools of therapy have been propagated (e.g. CBT-E, FPT), on the other hand generic treatment manuals have been published that are rather adapted to patients needs (e.g. SSCM, TTM). On a third way, currently therapy manuals for special subgroups have been developed, e.g. for chronic patients with anorexia nervosa or family-based manuals for adolescents. A completely different direction follows those approaches that are based on neuropsychological models and deficits in anorexia nervosa. Overall, the results of current studies have been promising, however, there has not been a winner yet, the race is still open!

  19. The occupational roles of women with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles-Cestari, Leila Maria; Ribeiro, Rosane Pilot Pessa

    2012-01-01

    This study's objective was to understand how occupational roles of individuals with anorexia nervosa are configured. The sample was composed of a control group and 11 adult women with anorexia nervosa being cared for by the Eating Disorders Care Group in a hospital in Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. Socio-demographic and anthropometric data were collected and the Role Checklist was applied. The results revealed a significant loss of roles for women with anorexia nervosa in relation to the performance of the roles worker, friend, and amateur/hobbyist, supporting the idea that psychosocial harm may arise from this eating disorder. The evaluation of occupational roles in the treatment of eating disorders is an important strategy for planning Occupational Therapy activities and supporting the creation of healthier spaces to enable individuals to resume occupational roles, and acquire independence and autonomy.

  20. Compulsivity in anorexia nervosa: a transdiagnostic concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, Lauren R; Park, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    The compulsive nature of weight loss behaviors central to anorexia nervosa (AN), such as relentless self-starvation and over-exercise, has led to the suggestion of parallels between AN and other compulsive disorders such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and addictions. There is a huge unmet need for effective treatments in AN, which has high rates of morbidity and the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder, yet a grave paucity of effective treatments. Viewing compulsivity as a transdiagnostic concept, seen in various manifestations across disorders, may help delineate the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of AN, and aid treatment development. We explore models of compulsivity that suggest dysfunction in cortico-striatal circuitry underpins compulsive behavior, and consider evidence of aberrancies in this circuitry across disorders. Excessive habit formation is considered as a mechanism by which initially rewarding weight loss behavior in AN may become compulsive over time, and the complex balance between positive and negative reinforcement in this process is considered. The physiological effects of starvation in promoting compulsivity, positive reinforcement, and habit formation are also discussed. Further research in AN may benefit from a focus on processes potentially underlying the development of compulsivity, such as aberrant reward processing and habit formation. We discuss the implications of a transdiagnostic perspective on compulsivity, and how it may contribute to the development of novel treatments for AN.

  1. [Orthorexia nervosa. A new eating behavior disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina Zamora, M L; Bote Bonaechea, B; García Sánchez, F; Ríos Rial, B

    2005-01-01

    New eating behavior disorders such as bigorexia (muscle dysmorphia) and orthorexia are appearing in developed countries. These disorders have not been officially recognized so that they are not classified as independent entities. The term orthorexia comes from the Greek word orthos (straight, proper) and orexia (appetite). It is characterized by the pathological obsession for biologically pure food, which leads to important dietary restrictions. Orthorexic patients exclude foods from their diets that they consider to be impure because they have herbicides, pesticides or artificial substances and they worry in excess about the techniques and materials used in the food elaboration. This obsession leads to loss of social relationships and affective dissatisfactions which, in turn, favors obsessive concern about food. In orthorexia, that patient initially wants to improve his/her health, treat a disease or lose weight. Finally, the diet becomes the most important part of their lives. We present a clinical case that responds to the characteristics of orthorexia. The differential diagnosis with chronic delusional disorder, anorexia nervosa and obsessive-compulsive disorder is carried out.

  2. Compulsivity in Anorexia Nervosa: a transdiagnostic concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Rose Godier

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The compulsive nature of weight loss behaviours central to Anorexia Nervosa (AN, such as relentless self-starvation and over-exercise, has led to the suggestion of parallels between AN and other compulsive disorders such as Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD and addictions. There is a huge unmet need for effective treatments in AN, which has high rates of morbidity and the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder, yet a grave paucity of effective treatments. Viewing compulsivity as a transdiagnostic concept, seen in various manifestations across disorders, may help delineate the mechanisms responsible for the persistence of AN, and aid treatment development. We explore models of compulsivity that suggest dysfunction in cortico-striatal circuitry underpins compulsive behaviour, and consider evidence of aberrances in this circuitry across disorders. Excessive habit formation is considered as a mechanism by which initially rewarding weight loss behaviour in AN may become compulsive over time, and the complex balance between positive and negative reinforcement in this process is considered. The physiological effects of starvation in promoting compulsivity, positive reinforcement and habit formation are also discussed. Further research in AN may benefit from a focus on processes potentially underlying the development of compulsivity, such as aberrant reward processing and habit formation. We discuss the implications of a transdiagnostic perspective on compulsivity, and how it may contribute to the development of novel treatments for AN.

  3. Physical activity in patients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achamrah, Najate; Coëffier, Moïse; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is often associated with physical hyperactivity. Recent studies have established links between anorexia and hyperactivity, suggesting the existence of commonalities in neural pathways. How physical activity should be managed during the clinical care of patients with anorexia remains controversial. This review first focuses on the implication of hyperactivity in the pathophysiology of AN. Hyperactivity during refeeding of patients with AN has been associated with increased energy needs to achieve weight gain, poorer clinical outcome, longer hospitalization, and increased psychiatric comorbidity. This typically leads to the prescription of bed rest. However, current knowledge suggests that preserving some kind of physical activity during refeeding of patients with AN should be safe and beneficial for the restoration of body composition, the preservation of bone mineral density, and the management of mood and anxiety. In the absence of standardized guidelines, it is suggested here that physical activity during refeeding of patients with AN should be personalized according to the physical and mental status of each patient. More research is needed to assess whether programmed physical activity may be a beneficial part of the treatment of AN.

  4. [Anorexia nervosa - from a neuroscience perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Viola; van Noort, Betteke; Ritschel, Franziska; Seidel, Maria; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a frequent disorder especially among adolescent girls and young women, with high morbidity, mortality, and relapse rates. To date, no single therapeutic approach has proved to be superior to others (Herpertz et al., 2011). It remains unclear how its etiology and pathology are encoded within cognitive, neural, and endocrinological processes that modulate important mechanisms in appetitive processing and weight regulation. Yet, several trait characteristics have been identified in AN which might reflect predisposing factors. Further, altered levels of neuropeptides and hormones that regulate appetite and feeding behavior have been found during both the acute and the recovered state, pointing to dysfunctional mechanisms in AN that persist even after malnutrition has ceased. Researchers are also hoping that brain imaging techniques will allow for a more detailed investigation of the neural basis of reward and punishment sensitivity that appears to be altered in AN. The integration and extension of recent findings in these areas will hopefully provide a more comprehensive understanding of the disorder and hence enable the development of more effective treatments.

  5. Set Shifting Among Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Darcy, Alison; Colborn, Danielle; Gudorf, Caroline; Lock, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective Set shifting difficulties are documented for adults with anorexia nervosa (AN). However, AN typically onsets in adolescents and it is unclear if set-shifting difficulties are a result of chronic AN or present earlier in its course. This study examined whether adolescents with short duration AN demonstrated set shifting difficulties compared to healthy controls (HC). Method Data on set shifting collected from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning System (DKEFS) and Wisconsin Card Sort Task (WCST) as well as eating psychopathology were collected from 32 adolescent inpatients with AN and compared to those from 22 HCs. Results There were no differences in set-shifting in adolescents with AN compared to HCs on most measures. Conclusion The findings suggest that set-shifting difficulties in AN may be a consequence of AN. Future studies should explore set-shifting difficulties in a larger sample of adolescents with the AN to determine if there is sub-set of adolescents with these difficulties and determine any relationship of set-shifting to the development of a chronic from of AN. PMID:22692985

  6. Fibras nervosas retinianas mielinizadas associadas a miopia e ambliopia

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Bárbara; Cabugueira, Ana; Anjos, Rita; Paixão, Ana; Marques, Margarida; Toscano,Alcina

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A presença de fibras nervosas mielinizadas na retina está descrita em cerca de 1% da população. Os doentes são habitualmente assintomáticos, embora possam coexistir outras alterações oculares como miopia e ambliopia.  Material e Métodos: Descrevem-se 3 casos de crianças com fibras nervosas retinianas mielinizadas unilaterais, associadas a miopia e ambliopia.  Resultados: A idade das crianças variou entre 1 e 7 anos. O olho afectado foi o olho direito. A melhor acuidade visual corr...

  7. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudova I

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Iva Dudova, Jana Kocourkova, Jiri Koutek Department of Child Psychiatry, Charles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases of an eleven-year-old girl and a five-and-a-half-year-old girl with comorbid eating disorders and Asperger syndrome. Keywords: eating disorders, early-onset anorexia nervosa, autism spectrum disorders, Asperger syndrome, diagnostics, therapy

  8. Ortorexia nervosa: reflexões sobre um novo conceito

    OpenAIRE

    MARTINS, Márcia Cristina Teixeira; ALVARENGA, Marle dos Santos; VARGAS, Sílvia Viviane Alves; Sato, Karen Sayuri Cabral De Jesus; SCAGLIUSI, Fernanda Baeza

    2011-01-01

    Ortorexia nervosa é o termo descrito para o comportamento obsessivo patológico caracterizado pela fixação por saúde alimentar. O quadro ainda não foi oficialmente reconhecido como um transtorno alimentar, mas discute-se o conceito, suas características, interações e sintomas. No presente trabalho foi realizada uma revisão dos vinte e um artigos publicados desde 1997, quando o comportamento da ortorexia nervosa foi inicialmente descrito. Foram apontadas semelhanças e diferenças entre o comport...

  9. Understanding the working alliance with clients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyer, Laura; O'Halloran, Mary Sean; Christoe-Frazier, Liesel

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic working alliance is a vital ingredient of psychotherapy, specifically for clients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, as progress is often slow and treatment difficult. This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the experiences of eight clients with anorexia nervosa and seven therapists who work with this population, regarding which therapist factors aided in and challenged the working alliance formation in individual psychotherapy. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews. Some helpful therapist factors included collaboration, appropriate self-disclosure, providing a warm and safe environment, and willingness to be contacted outside of a session. Unhelpful factors included lack of attunement and objectivity and failure to individualize treatment.

  10. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Chihiro; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Hata, Tomokazu; Gondo, Motoharu; Takakura, Shu; Kawai, Keisuke; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Ogata, Kiyohito; Nomoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Kouji; Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25), including restrictive (ANR, n = 14) and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11) subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21) using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  11. Gut Dysbiosis in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Morita

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is a psychological illness with devastating physical consequences; however, its pathophysiological mechanism remains unclear. Because numerous reports have indicated the importance of gut microbiota in the regulation of weight gain, it is reasonable to speculate that AN patients might have a microbial imbalance, i.e. dysbiosis, in their gut. In this study, we compared the fecal microbiota of female patients with AN (n = 25, including restrictive (ANR, n = 14 and binge-eating (ANBP, n = 11 subtypes, with those of age-matched healthy female controls (n = 21 using the Yakult Intestinal Flora-SCAN based on 16S or 23S rRNA-targeted RT-quantitative PCR technology. AN patients had significantly lower amounts of total bacteria and obligate anaerobes including those from the Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, and Bacteroides fragilis group than the age-matched healthy women. Lower numbers of Streptococcus were also found in the AN group than in the control group. In the analysis based on AN subtypes, the counts of the Bacteroides fragilis group in the ANR and ANBP groups and the counts of the Clostridium coccoides group in the ANR group were significantly lower than those in the control group. The detection rate of the Lactobacillus plantarum subgroup was significantly lower in the AN group than in the control group. The AN group had significantly lower acetic and propionic acid concentrations in the feces than the control group. Moreover, the subtype analysis showed that the fecal concentrations of acetic acid were lower in the ANR group than in the control group. Principal component analysis confirmed a clear difference in the bacterial components between the AN patients and healthy women. Collectively, these results clearly indicate the existence of dysbiosis in the gut of AN patients.

  12. A Psychoeducational Group Approach for Individuals Recovering from Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Lisa

    Although in-depth, long-term group psychotherapy is a beneficial therapeutic experience for adolescent females suffering from anorexia nervosa, these clients are notoriously resistant to treatment and to long-term, open-ended group settings. This dissidence may stem from a motivational deficiency toward changing their eating patterns and…

  13. [Neurofeedback in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: a Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, N; Unterrainer, H F; Skliris, D; Wood, G; Dunitz-Scheer, M; Wallner-Liebmann, S J; Scheer, P J Z; Neuper, C

    2016-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa has been related to alterations in brain activity in terms of hyperactive EEG patterns. This case report illustrates the principles and results of a five-week neurofeedback treatment in a 29-year-old woman suffering from anorexia nervosa. A neurofeedback protocol to enhance alpha activity (8 - 12 Hz) was developed and conducted additionally to the standardized treatment for eating disorders in training sessions twice a week. Pre- and post-test measurements included resting state EEG measurements and a psychological test battery. The results show improvements from pre- to post-test in eating disorder psychopathology including psychological wellbeing, emotional competence, and eating behavior traits. In addition, a decrease in theta power (4 - 7 Hz), a well-known trait marker of anorexia nervosa, was measured. However, our data should be interpreted with caution because this is a single case study. Nevertheless, this report documents the practicability and method of neurofeedback as treatment adjunct in eating disorders from the clinical perspective. Although the use of neurofeedback in the treatment of anorexia nervosa is recommended in literature, empirical studies are still lacking. Randomized controlled trials to evaluate short- and long-term effects of neurofeedback are needed.

  14. ["Family groups" for relatives of patients with anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunswick, Astrid; Guy-Rubin, Aurore; Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa affects mainly young adults. During care, caregivers seek alliance with patients' friends and family to be able to relate to the patients' symptoms and also their environment. Collaborative work with families helps build confidence. The "family group" is an example of well-intended partnership.

  15. Prevalence of orthorexia nervosa among Turkish performance artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoydan, E; Camci, N

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa among the performance artists in the State Opera and Ballet and in the Bilkent University Symphony Orchestra. The study population consisted of 39 men and 55 women for a total of 94 artists with mean age of 33 years. The ORTO-15 test was used to determine the prevalence of orthorexia nervosa. Those subjects who scored below 40 in the ORTO-15 test were classified as having orthorexia nervosa. Mean score of the participants in the ORTO-15 test was 37.9+/-4.46. A total of 56.4% of the artists involved in the research scored below 40 in the ORTO-15 test. While the highest prevalence of orthorexia nervosa was recorded among opera singers (81.8%), it was 32.1% among ballet dancers and 36.4% among symphony orchestra musicians. The differences between the three groups were statistically significant. No difference was noted between mean ORTO-15 score by baseline characteristics as gender, age, educational level, work experience, body mass index, smoking and alcohol consumption. The research group have a higher socio-economic and education level than the majority of the general public in Turkey. Additionally, being an artist in Turkey means being a role model for the general public both in terms one's physical appearance and lifestyle. These may be the reason why artists are more sensitive to this issue.

  16. Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescence and Maudsley Family-Based Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Kim; Read, Shelly; Wallis, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychiatric disorder that usually occurs in adolescence. The course of the illness can be protracted. Current empirical evidence suggests that the Maudsley Family-Based Treatment (MFBT) is efficacious for adolescents. MFBT empowers parents as a crucial treatment resource to assist in their child's recovery. The…

  17. Cognitive Profile of Children and Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaersdam Telléus, Gry; Jepsen, Jens Richardt; Bentz, Mette

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Few studies of cognitive functioning in children and adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) have been conducted. The aim of this study was to examine the neurocognitive and intelligence profile of this clinical group. METHOD: The study was a matched case-control (N = 188), multi...

  18. Psychiatric Comorbidities among Female Adolescents with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salbach-Andrae, Harriet; Lenz, Klaus; Simmendinger, Nicole; Klinkowski, Nora; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Pfeiffer, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated current comorbid Axis I diagnoses associated with Anorexia Nervosa (AN) in adolescents. The sample included 101 female adolescents treated at a psychiatric unit for primary DSM-IV diagnoses of AN. 73.3% of the AN patients were diagnosed as having a current comorbidity of at least one comorbid Axis I diagnosis, with no…

  19. Nutritional adequacy of dietary intake in women with anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Understanding nutrient intake of anorexia nervosa (AN) patients is essential for the establishment of dietary treatment. Design: Women, aged 19 to 30 years, with both restricting and binge purge types of AN, participating in an ecological momentary assessment study, completed three nonc...

  20. Dronabinol in severe, enduring anorexia nervosa: A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andries, Alin; Frystyk, Jan; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    The evidence for pharmacological treatment of severe, longstanding anorexia nervosa (AN) is sparse and the few controlled pharmacologic studies have focused on a narrow range of drugs. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of treatment with a synthetic cannabinoid agonist...

  1. Perceived Personality Traits of Individuals with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Jessica E.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prior research has found evidence of a general negative personality stereotype for individuals who have anorexia nervosa (AN). Methods: This study examined the expected personality characteristics of individuals with AN using the Five-Factor Model of personality to allow identification of specific personality traits that are part of…

  2. [New aspects in the treatment of adolescent anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent anorexia nervosa often takes a chronic and disabling course associated with reduced health-related quality of life in adulthood. The aim of this short review is to introduce new aspects on the somatic and psychotherapeutic treatment of AN, such as nutritional rehabilitation, prophylaxis of osteoporosis as well as new findings on the effect of treatment settings and new psychotherapeutic methods.

  3. Reduced Automatic Motivational Orientation Towards Food in Restricting Anorexia Nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Esther M.; de Jong, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    A striking and characteristic feature of the restricting subtype of anorexia nervosa (AN) is that they are extremely successful in regulating their food intake in a destructive manner. A possible explanation for the persistent character of their restricted food intake could be a loss of the motivati

  4. Outpatient Treatment of Primary Anorexia Nervosa in Adult Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesat, Harold A., Jr.; Ferguson, James M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes three cases of adult-onset primary anorexia nervosa in males. For each case, the history and diagnostic patterns are considered, followed by a discussion of the course of outpatient treatment. The therapy was multimodal and included elements of behavioral contingency management, cognitive therapy, and dynamic psychotherapy. (JAC)

  5. Epidemiology and course of anorexia nervosa in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Hoek, Hans W.; Susser, Ezra S.; Linna, Milla S.; Sihvola, Elina; Raevuori, Anu; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Most previous studies of the prevalence, incidence, and outcome of anorexia nervosa have been limited to cases detected through the health care system, which may bias our understanding of the disorder's incidence and natural course. The authors sought to describe the onset and outcomes of

  6. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, Annemarie; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countri

  7. The Impact of Childhood Sexual Abuse in Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jacqueline C.; Bewell, Carmen; Blackmore, Elizabeth; Woodside, D. Blake

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the impact of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) on clinical characteristics and premature termination of treatment in anorexia nervosa (AN). Method: The participants were 77 consecutive patients with AN admitted to an inpatient eating disorders unit. The patients were assessed in terms of eating disorder…

  8. Nurse evaluation of hyperactivity in anorexia nervosa : A comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Annemarie A.; Hoek, Hans W.; Kas, Martien J.H.; van Engeland, Herman

    2007-01-01

    Up to 80% of patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) manifest elevated levels of physical activity or hyperactivity. A variety of methods have been used to evaluate activity levels, mostly questionnaires but also expensive and invasive methods such as actometry or other measurements of energy expenditur

  9. Long-term outcome in anorexia nervosa in the community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mustelin, Linda; Raevuori, Anu; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Rissanen, Aila; Hoek, Hans W.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveFew studies have assessed outcomes of anorexia nervosa (AN) outside clinical settings. We aimed to assess mortality, recovery, and socio-demographic outcomes of AN in a community sample. MethodWomen in the nationwide FinnTwin16 cohort (born 1975-1979) were followed for 10 years after baseli

  10. Heightened sensitivity to punishment and reward in anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glashouwer, Klaske A; Bloot, Lotte; Veenstra, Esther M; Franken, Ingmar H A; de Jong, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate reinforcement sensitivity in anorexia nervosa (AN). It was tested whether self-reported punishment (PS) and reward sensitivity (RS) differed between adolescents with AN and healthy controls, and/or between AN-subtypes. In addition, the predictive v

  11. Neurobiology of hyperactivity and reward : Agreeable restlessness in Anorexia Nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheurink, Anton J. W.; Boersma, Gretha J.; Nergardh, Ricard; Sodersten, Per; Nergårdh, Ricard; Södersten, Per

    2010-01-01

    Restricted food intake is associated with increased physical activity, very likely an evolutionary advantage, initially both functional and rewarding. The hyperactivity of patients with Anorexia Nervosa, however, is a main problem for recovery. This seemingly paradoxical reward of hyperactivity in A

  12. Abdominal aortic occlusion and vascular compromise secondary to acute gastric dilatation in a patient with bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsharif, M; Doulias, T; Aljundi, W; Balchandra, S

    2014-11-01

    Acute gastric dilation is a rare but recognised complication in patients with bulimia and anorexia following binge episodes owing to decreased bowel motility. We present a rare case of acute gastric dilation secondary to bulimia in an otherwise healthy 18-year-old female patient that resulted in compression and complete occlusion of the abdominal aorta, leading to acute mesenteric and bilateral lower limb ischaemia. This resolved immediately following a laparotomy and gastric decompression. Management of these patients is very challenging owing to the lack of a successful precedent. To our knowledge, such a catastrophic complication has only ever been reported once in the literature and the outcome was fatal. Our case is of additional importance as it offers a successful management strategy for these patients.

  13. Just Desserts? Exploring Constructions of Food in Women's Experiences of Bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, Kate; Ussher, Jane M; Perz, Janette

    2016-10-13

    Bulimia, an eating disorder that affects more women than men, involves binging and compensatory behaviors. Given the importance of food in experiences of these behaviors, in this article, we examine constructions of food in accounts of bulimic behavior: how these constructions relate to cultural discourses, and their implications for subjectivity. Fifteen women who engaged in bulimic behaviors were interviewed. Through a thematic decomposition of their accounts, we identified six discursive constructions of food: "good/healthy" or "bad/unhealthy," "contaminating body and soul," "collapsed into fat," "pleasurable reward," "comfort," and "fuel for the body." Many constructions were consolidated through participants' embodied experiences, but made available through discourses in public health, biomedicine, and femininity, and had implications for subjectivity in terms of morality, spirituality, and self-worth. Thus, despite women deploying these constructions to make sense of their bulimic behaviors, they are culturally normative; this point has implications for therapeutic and preventive strategies for bulimia.

  14. Bulimia as a disturbance of narcissism: self-esteem and the capacity to self-soothe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, B E; Shaw, R J

    1997-01-01

    A review of the literature on eating disorders reveals that, although psychodynamic formulations linking narcissistic dynamics--particularly difficulties with self-soothing--and eating disorders are common in the theoretical and clinical literature, little empirical work has attempted to substantiate this claim. In this study, 117 women completed the Eating Disorder Inventory and the Bulimia Test Revised and four scales that measure different components of narcissism (the Multidimensional Self-Esteem Inventory, measuring self-esteem, the Self-Care Questionnaire, and two subscales of the Ego Functioning Assessment Questionnaire, measuring self-soothing). The four scales used to assess narcissism were all highly correlated with each other, indicating that they measure a similar construct. In addition, the eating-disorder measures were correlated with the measures of narcissism, suggesting that a relationship exists between bulimia and narcissism, as assessed using self-report instruments.

  15. [Self-treament for bulimia on the Internet: first results in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouget, P; Carrard, I; Archinard, M

    2005-02-02

    Adolescents with bulimia have become a major clinical problem with increasing health concern. A self-help guide, inspired by the cognitive and behavioral therapy, was developed in response to the growing demand for treatment. On the behalf European research fund "SALUT", the guide was implemented on the Internet. The first swiss results are very encouraging; particularly concerning symptoms and the questionnaires (SCL-90 and EDI-2).

  16. A Proposal for a Study of Bulimia Among Women in the United States Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    impressive results, but can result in serious medical complications if certain foods and drugs are used containing tyramine or dopamine, which... foods , such as breads, sweets, pasta and potatoes (16). DISEASE DEFINITION AND CLASSIFICATION Bulimia is one of the four eating disorders defined in...is a chronic regurgitation of food usually seen in infancy. Both are rare and will not be discussed further (1,42,43). Although the focus of this

  17. Increased P-wave dispersion a risk for atrial fibrillation in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertuğrul, İlker; Akgül, Sinem; Derman, Orhan; Karagöz, Tevfik; Kanbur, Nuray

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that a prolonged P-wave dispersion is a risk factor for the development of atrial fibrillation. The aim of this study was to evaluate P-wave dispersion in adolescents with anorexia nervosa at diagnosis. We evaluated electrocardiographic findings, particularly the P-wave dispersion, at initial assessment in 47 adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Comparison of P-wave dispersion between adolescents with anorexia nervosa and controls showed a statistically significant higher P-wave dispersion in patients with anorexia nervosa (72 ± 16.3 msec) when compared to the control group (43.8 ± 9.5 msec). Percent of body weight lost, lower body mass index, and higher weight loss rate in the patients with anorexia nervosa had no effect on P-wave dispersion. Due to the fact that anorexia nervosa has a high mortality rate we believe that cardiac pathologies such as atrial fibrillation must also be considered in the medical evaluation.

  18. Ato e deriva pulsional na clínica da anorexia-bulimia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Moreira Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Los síntomas contemporáneos parecen sostenerse en un rechazo del inconsciente y resisten a entrar en el discurso. En lugar de resaltar el aspecto simbólico del síntoma, la anorexia-bulimia revela el síntoma como la fijación de goce, lo que indica un rechazo del inconsciente. Este aspecto se evidencia en la práctica clínica de la anorexia y bulimia, en los que se ha hallado un intercambio del significante para el goce, que apunta a una patología del acto y no de las manifestaciones clínicas del inconsciente. Esta cuestión se abordará a partir del testimonio de Fabiola De Clercq, publicado en Tutto il pane del mondo (Todo el pan del mundo. Su asociación con la anorexia y la bulimia revela la ausencia de la alteridad a través de la entrega a una deriva pulsional. A partir de este testimonio, se busca cuestionar el modo particular de presentación de esta clínica en la que la dimensión del acto es decisiva.

  19. Osteopenia and bone fractures in a man with anorexia nervosa and hypogonadism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigotti, N.A.; Neer, R.M.; Jameson, L.

    1986-07-18

    Women with anorexia nervosa have reduced skeletal mass. Both anorexia and osteopenia are less common in men. We describe a 22-year-old man with anorexia nervosa and severe osteopenia involving both cortical and trabecular bone who developed a pelvic fracture and multiple vertebral compression fractures. He was found to have secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism that was reversible with weight gain. This case illustrates the need to consider osteopenia as a potential complication of anorexia nervosa in males as well as females.

  20. Medical complications of anorexia nervosa and their treatments: an update on some critical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carrie; Mehler, Philip S

    2015-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. Many of the deaths are attributable to medical complications which arise as the malnutrition and weight loss worsens. Every body system may be adversely affected by anorexia nervosa. Yet, remarkably, most of the medical complications of anorexia nervosa are treatable and reversible with optimal medical care, as part of a multidisciplinary team who are often involved in the care of these patients. Herein, we will describe the medical complications of anorexia nervosa and their treatments.

  1. Anorexia nervosa versus hyperinsulinism: therapeutic effects of neuropharmacological manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Lechin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fuad Lechin1,2, Bertha van der Dijs1,2, Betty Pardey-Maldonado1, Scarlet Baez1, Marcel E Lechin31Sections of Neuroendocrinology, Neuropharmacology, and Neurochemistry, Department of Pathophysiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; 2Instituto de Vias Digestivas Caracas, Centro Clínico Profesional Caracas, Venezuela; 3Department of Internal Medicine, Texas A & M Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Texas, USABackground: We have demonstrated that anorexia nervosa is underpinned by overwhelming adrenal sympathetic activity which abolishes the neural sympathetic branch of the peripheral autonomic nervous system. This physiological disorder is responsible for gastrointestinal hypomotility, hyperglycemia, raised systolic blood pressure, raised heart rate, and other neuroendocrine disorders. Therefore, we prescribed neuropharmacological therapy to reverse this central and autonomic nervous system disorder, in order to normalize the clinical and neuroendocrine profile.Methods: The study included 22 female patients with anorexia nervosa (10 restricted type, 12 binge-eating type who received three months of treatment with amantadine 100 mg/day. We measured blood pressure, heart rate, and circulating neurotransmitters, (noradrenaline, adrenaline, dopamine, platelet serotonin, free plasma serotonin during supine resting, one minute of orthostasis, and a five-minute exercise test before and after one, two, and three months of treatment with amantadine, a drug which abrogates adrenal sympathetic activity by acting at the C1(Ad medullary nuclei responsible for this branch of the peripheral sympathetic activity.Results: We found the amantadine abolished symptoms of anorexia nervosa from the first oral dose onwards. Normalization of autonomic and cardiovascular parameters was demonstrated within the early days of therapy. Abrupt and sustained increases in the plasma noradrenaline

  2. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess;

    2014-01-01

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  3. Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Johan Petur; Birger Morillon, Melanie; Lambrechtsen, Jess

    Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa......Dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging of tophi and monosodium urate deposits in a patient with longstanding anorexia nervosa...

  4. The Disjointed Historical Trajectory of Anorexia Nervosa Before 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, John P M; Kaplan, Allan S

    2016-01-01

    Responses in pre-modern eras to anorexia nervosa (as now understood) varied widely, from religious piety and sanctity through fear and superstition. While noting briefly the limited conceptualizations from pre-modern history this article is primarily focused from the late 19th century, commencing with helpful but tentative formulations of anorexia nervosa for early-modern medicine that were laid out, consistently between themselves, by Lesègue, Gull and Osler. Yet that promising biomedical advent was superseded for more than a half-century by deep, internal divisions and bitter rifts that festered between three medical disciplines: neurology; Freudian psychotherapy; and Kraepelinian biological psychiatry. Mid-20th century developments preceded the 1960-1980s' improved understanding of suffering and movement toward effective remediation introduced by Dr. Hilde Bruch.

  5. Peculiar enlargement of the nasopharynx in patients with anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K. [Department of Radiology, School of Dentistry, Niigata Univ. (Japan); Ito, J. [Department of Radiology, School of Dentistry, Niigata Univ. (Japan); Tokiguchi, S. [Department of Radiology, School of Dentistry, Niigata Univ. (Japan); Kuwabara, G. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Nishihara, M. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata (Japan)

    1995-11-01

    We examined the nasopharynx and brain in 17 patients with anorexia nervosa by CT and compared the findings with those of 44 normal subjects and of 5 patients of the same age with marked emaciation caused by various psychiatric disorders. An enlarged nasopharyngeal space with a flattened posterior wall and enlarged lateral pharyngeal recesses were demonstrated in all patients with anorexia nervosa whose weight was lowest at the time of the CT examination, and these CT features regressed or became normal quickly after they had gained some weight. This characteristic enlargement of the nasopharynx and lateral pharyngeal recesses was observed neither in the markedly emaciated patients (2 with schizophrenia, 1 with major depression, 1 with stupor and the other with an extremely unbalanced diet) nor in 44 normal subjects without emaciation. These features were therefore thought to be characteristic and of diagnostic significance. (orig.). With 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. MRI demonstration of orbital lipolysis in anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, Philippe; Dekimpe, Piet; Wilms, Guy [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Muls, Erik [Department of Endocrinology, University Hospitals, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the orbital changes due to lipolysis in anorexia nervosa. We examined a cachectic patient with MR imaging using T1-weighted images before and after contrast enhancement. Orbital fat edema has been observed in extreme forms of cachexia and the CT and MR findings have recently been reported. The imaging appearances have been explained by the disappearance of the fat tissue and the appearance of edema due to a disturbance in the electrolyte fluid balance. In the recent literature particular attention has been paid to the increased lipid peroxidation and lipolysis in anorexia nervosa. These metabolic processes result in an increased permeability of the vessel wall endothelium, which can explain the extravasation of the contrast agent in the orbital fat on MR imaging. (orig.)

  7. Prolonged QT interval in a man with anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Robles, María Dolores; Perez-Clemente, Ana María; Maciá-Bobes, Carmen; Alvarez-Rueda, María Asunción; Pozo-Nuevo, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by the avoidance of food intake, which usually leads to a weight loss. Cardiac co-morbility is common and we can find sometimes a mass loss from the left ventricle, which can be seen by echocardiography. But the commonest complications are rhythm variations, typically bradycardia with a prolonged QT interval in up to a 40% of the cases, which altogether elevates ventricular tachycardia and sudden death risk. We present the case of a male who was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa and developed asthenia, a long QT interval and also a severe both hypokalaemia and hypomagnesaemia. We intend to discuss the pathogenic paths as well as prophylactic and therapeutic measures to this potentially-lethal pathology. PMID:19646241

  8. Nutritional rehabilitation of anorexia nervosa. Goals and dangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Neville H; Meyer, Wendy

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional rehabilitation of adolescents with anorexia nervosa is both a science and an art. The goals are to promote metabolic recovery; restore a healthy body weight; reverse the medical complications of the disorder and to improve eating behaviors and psychological functioning. Most, but not all of the medical complications are reversible with nutritional rehabilitation. Refeeding patients with anorexia nervosa results in deposition of lean body mass initially, followed by restoration of adipose tissue as treatment goal weight is approached. The major danger of nutritional rehabilitation is the refeeding syndrome, characterized by fluid and electrolyte, cardiac, hematological and neurological complications, the most serious of which is sudden unexpected death. The refeeding syndrome is most likely to occur in those who are severely malnourished. In such patients, this complication can be avoided by slow refeeding with careful monitoring of body weight, heart rate and rhythm and serum electrolytes, especially serum phosphorus. This paper reviews our clinical experience.

  9. Anorexia Nervosa: A Unified Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem Fatema Hasan, Hunaid Hasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The roles of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF, opioid peptides, leptin and ghrelin in anorexia nervosa (AN were discussed in this paper. CRF is the key mediator of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and also acts at various other parts of the brain, such as the limbic system and the peripheral nervous system. CRF action is mediated through the CRF1 and CRF2 receptors, with both HPA axis-dependent and HPA axis-independent actions, where the latter shows nil involvement of the autonomic nervous system. CRF1 receptors mediate both the HPA axis-dependent and independent pathways through CRF, while the CRF2 receptors exclusively mediate the HPA axis-independent pathways through urocortin. Opioid peptides are involved in the adaptation and regulation of energy intake and utilization through reward-related behavior. Opioids play a role in the addictive component of AN, as described by the “auto-addiction opioids theory”. Their interactions have demonstrated the psychological aspect of AN and have shown to prevent the functioning of the physiological homeostasis. Important opioids involved are β-lipotropin, β-endorphin and dynorphin, which interact with both µ and κ opioids receptors to regulate reward-mediated behavior and describe the higher incidence of AN seen in females. Moreover, ghrelin is known as the “hunger” hormone and helps stimulate growth hormone (GH and hepatic insulin-like-growth-factor-1(IGF-1, maintaining anabolism and preserving a lean body mass. In AN, high levels of GH due to GH resistance along with low levels of IGF-1 are observed. Leptin plays a role in suppressing appetite through the inhibition of neuropeptide Y gene. Moreover, the CRF, opioid, leptin and ghrelin mechanisms operate collectively at the HPA axis and express the physiological and psychological components of AN. Fear conditioning is an intricate learning process occurring at the level of the hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septum and the

  10. Unusual Presentation of Uncommon Disease: Anorexia Nervosa Presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome—A Case Report from Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Raheel Mushtaq; Sheikh Shoib; Tabindah Shah; Mudasir Bhat; Randhir Singh; Sahil Mushtaq

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa...

  11. The occupational roles of women with anorexia nervosa Los papeles ocupacionales de mujeres con anorexia nervosa Os papéis ocupacionais de mulheres com anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Maria Quiles-Cestari

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study’s objective was to understand how occupational roles of individuals with anorexia nervosa are configured. The sample was composed of a control group and 11 adult women with anorexia nervosa being cared for by the Eating Disorders Care Group in a hospital in Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. Socio-demographic and anthropometric data were collected and the Role Checklist was applied. The results revealed a significant loss of roles for women with anorexia nervosa in relation to the performance of the roles worker, friend, and amateur/hobbyist, supporting the idea that psychosocial harm may arise from this eating disorder. The evaluation of occupational roles in the treatment of eating disorders is an important strategy for planning Occupational Therapy activities and supporting the creation of healthier spaces to enable individuals to resume occupational roles, and acquire independence and autonomy.El objetivo es entender como figuran los papeles ocupacionales de las personas con anorexia nervosa. La casuística fue compuesta por 11 personas diagnosticadas en tratamiento en el Grupo de Asistencia en Trastornos Alimentares de un Hospital de Ribeirão Preto-Brasil y un grupo control. Se recogieron variables sociodemográficas, antropométricas y por la “Lista de Identificación de Papeles Ocupacionales”. Los resultados muestran hubo cambio, con pérdida de papeles debido a la anorexia nerviosa, con pérdida de los papeles de trabajador, voluntario, amigo y pasatiempo amador, corroborando los perjuicios psicosociales derivados de este trastorno. La evaluación de los papeles ocupacionales en el tratamiento de los trastornos alimentares es una estrategia importante para la planificación de la terapia ocupacional por la concesión de subvenciones para crear ambientes más saludables, donde las posibilidades de crear el rescate de los papeles ocupacionales, la independencia y autonomía.O objetivo desta pesquisa foi compreender como se

  12. The clinical basis of orthorexia nervosa: emerging perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Koven NS; Abry AW

    2015-01-01

    Nancy S Koven, Alexandra W Abry Department of Psychology, Bates College, Lewiston, ME, USA Abstract: Orthorexia nervosa describes a pathological obsession with proper nutrition that is characterized by a restrictive diet, ritualized patterns of eating, and rigid avoidance of foods believed to be unhealthy or impure. Although prompted by a desire to achieve optimum health, orthorexia may lead to nutritional deficiencies, medical complications, and poor quality of life. Despite its being a di...

  13. Anorexia nervosa - fenomen ponowoczesnej kultury i choroba systemu rodzinnego

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present anorexia nervosa as a complex phenomenon which ought to be analyzed in macro-, mezzo- and microstructural context. Anorexia is defined in terms of “self destructive adaptation strategy” which is considered to be a reaction to specific configuration of cultural patterns and family system. The most significant factors affecting the process of forming the identity based on being an anorectic are: perfectionism and contemporary standards of bea...

  14. Early-onset anorexia nervosa in girls with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudova, Iva; Kocourkova, Jana; Koutek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorders frequently occur in conjunction with autism spectrum disorders, posing diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. The comorbidity of anorexia nervosa and Asperger syndrome is a significant clinical complication and has been associated with a poorer prognosis. The authors are presenting the cases of an eleven-year-old girl and a five-and-a-half-year-old girl with comorbid eating disorders and Asperger syndrome.

  15. Impact of exercise on energy metabolism in anorexia nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    Zipfel, Stephan; Mack, Isabelle; Baur, Louise A; Hebebrand, Johannes; Touyz, Stephen; Herzog, Wolfgang; Abraham, Suzanne; Davies, Peter SW; Russell, Janice

    2013-01-01

    Background Excessive physical activity is one of the most paradoxical features of anorexia nervosa (AN). However, there is individual variation in the degree of physical activity found in AN-patients. As a result, marked differences in energy expenditure may be expected. Furthermore, exercise has a positive impact on a variety of psychological disorders and the psychopathology may be different in AN displaying high exercise levels versus AN displaying low exercise levels. We analyzed the ener...

  16. Orthorexia nervosa: An integrative literature review of a lifestyle syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Håman, Linn; Barker-Ruchti, Natalie; Patriksson, Göran; Lindgren, Eva-Carin

    2015-01-01

    Bratman first proposed orthorexia nervosa in the late 1990s, defining it an obsession with eating healthy food to achieve, for instance, improved health. Today, in the Swedish media, excessive exercising plays a central role in relation to orthorexia. A few review articles on orthorexia have been conducted; however, these have not focused on aspects of food and eating, sport, exercise, or a societal perspective. The overall aim of this study was to provide an overview and synthesis of what ph...

  17. Amenorrhea as a Diagnostic Criterion for Anorexia Nervosa

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Amenorrhea is a current criterion for the diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (AN) according to the DSM-IV-TR. Nevertheless, when comparing groups of patients who fulfill all the criteria of this manual for AN and groups of women who show them all but amenorrhea, some studies did not find significant differences in the psychopathology typically associated with AN. The purpose of our study was to compare both groups in demographic, anthropometric, psychological and psychopathological variables. Ther...

  18. Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan El Ghoch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to conduct a systematic review of body fat distribution before and after partial and complete weight restoration in individuals with anorexia nervosa. Literature searches, study selection, method development and quality appraisal were performed independently by two authors, and data was synthesized using a narrative approach. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria and were consequently analyzed. The review had five main findings. First, during anorexia nervosa adolescent females lose more central body fat, while adult females more peripheral fat. Second, partial weight restoration leads to greater fat mass deposition in the trunk region than other body regions in adolescent females. Third, after short-term weight restoration, whether partial or complete, adults show a central adiposity phenotype with respect to healthy age-matched controls. Fourth, central fat distribution is associated with increased insulin resistance, but does not adversely affect eating disorder psychopathology or cause psychological distress in female adults. Fifth, the abnormal central fat distribution seems to normalize after long-term maintenance of complete weight restoration, indicating that preferential central distribution of body fat is a transitory phenomenon. However, a discrepancy in the findings has been noted, especially between adolescents and adults; besides age and gender, these appear to be related to differences in the methodology and time of body composition assessments. The PROSPERO Registry—Anorexia Nervosa and Body Fat Distribution: A Systematic Review (CRD42014008738.

  19. Recurrent aborted sudden cardiac death with seizures and rhabdomyolysis due to bulimia-induced hypokalemia: report of one case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Stöllberger, Claudia

    2014-06-01

    Recurrent vomiting due to bulimia associated with abuse of furosemide and laxatives causing severe hypokalemia may result in recurrent aborted sudden cardiac death (SCD) and seizures. We report a 25-year-old female with a history of bulimia associated with abuse of furosemide and laxatives since the age of 15 years, migraine since puberty, renal abscesses at age 20 y, and rhabdomyolysis of unknown cause at age 24 y. She experienced aborted SCD due to severe hypokalemia with symptomatic seizures at 21 and 25 years of age. Bulimia patients additionally taking laxatives or furosemide are at particular risk of SCD and rhabdomyolysis and require periodic determination of electrolytes, potassium substitution, and adequate psychiatric therapy and surveillance.

  20. Coming Together to Calm the Hunger: Group Therapy Program for Adults Diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponech, Heather; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on anorexia nervosa in female adults and concludes by offering 14 group therapy lesson plans for anorexia nervosa that therapists may use in their practice. There is a remarkable lack of research on the efficacy of treatment designed for individuals diagnosed with anorexia…

  1. A Comparison of Short- And Long-Term Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan; Kraemer, Helena C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Research suggests that family treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa may be effective. This study was designed to determine the optimal length of such family therapy. Method: Eighty-six adolescents (12-18 years of age) diagnosed with anorexia nervosa were allocated at random to either a short-term (10 sessions over 6 months) or…

  2. Readiness to Recover in Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: Prediction of Hospital Admission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ametller, L.; Castro, J.; Serrano, E.; Martinez, E.; Toro, J.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if motivation to change in anorexia nervosa during treatment is a predictor of hospitalisation in adolescent patients. Method: The Anorexia Nervosa Stages of Change Questionnaire (ANSOCQ), the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were administered to a group of 70 anorexia nervosa…

  3. Manualized Family-Based Treatment for Anorexia Nervosa: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, Daniel; Binford, Roslyn; Loeb, Katharine L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe a case series of children and adolescents (mean age = 14.5 years, SD = 2.3; range 9-18) with anorexia nervosa who received manualized family-based treatment for their eating disorder. Method: Forty-five patients with anorexia nervosa were compared pre- and post-treatment on weight and menstrual…

  4. Factors Associated with Recovery from Anorexia Nervosa : A Population-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Bulik, Cynthia M.; Hoek, Hans W.; Rissanen, Aila; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Background: To examine factors associated with the outcome of anorexia nervosa among women from the general population. Method: Women (N = 2,881) from the 1975-1979 birth cohorts of Finnish twins were screened for lifetime DSM-IV anorexia nervosa (N = 55 cases) using questionnaires and the SCID inte

  5. A new rust disease on wild coffee (Psychotria nervosa) caused by Puccinia mysuruensis sp. nov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psychotria nervosa, commonly called wild coffee (Rubiaceae) is an important ethno-medicinal plant in India. In 2010 a new rust disease of P. nervosa was observed in three regions of Mysore District, Karnataka (India) with disease incidence ranging from 58% to 63%. Typical symptoms of rust disease we...

  6. Historical evolution of the concept of anorexia nervosa and relationships with orthorexia nervosa, autism, and obsessive-compulsive spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell'Osso L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liliana Dell’Osso,1 Marianna Abelli,1 Barbara Carpita,1 Stefano Pini,1 Giovanni Castellini,2 Claudia Carmassi,1 Valdo Ricca2 1Psychiatry Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, 2Department of Neuroscience, Psychology, Drug Research and Child Health (NEUROFARBA, University of Florence, Florence, Italy Abstract: Eating disorders have been defined as “characterized by persistence disturbance of eating or eating-related behavior that results in the altered consumption or absorption of food and that significantly impairs health or psychosocial functioning”. The psychopathology of eating disorders changed across time under the influence of environmental factors, determining the emergence of new phenotypes. Some of these conditions are still under investigation and are not clearly identified as independent diagnostic entities. In this review, the historic evolution of the eating disorder concept up to the recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, has been evaluated. We also examined literature supporting the inclusion of new emergent eating behaviors within the eating disorder spectrum, and their relationship with anorexia, autism, and obsessive–compulsive disorder. In particular, we focused on what is known about the symptoms, epidemiology, assessment, and diagnostic boundaries of a new problematic eating pattern called orthorexia nervosa that could be accepted as a new psychological syndrome, as emphasized by an increasing number of scientific articles in the last few years. Keywords: anorexia nervosa, autism spectrum disorders, eating disorders spectrum, obsessive–compulsive spectrum, orthorexia nervosa, DSM-5

  7. Bulimia y estrategias de afrontamiento en adolescentes escolarizadas de la ciudad de Pereira, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly Johana Bahamón Muñetón

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta resultados de la investigación dirigida a identificar y relacionar la presencia de síntomas bulímicos con el uso de estrategias de afrontamiento y variables socio-demográficas en mujeres entre los 10 y 17 años de edad. Se utilizó un diseño correlacional y se aplicó el BITEpara la medición de síntomas bulímicos y el ACS para la identificación de las estrategias de afrontamiento. Se identificó que el 59% de las 278 participantes no presenta comportamientos alterados frente a la comida y 41% presenta síntomas de bulimia. Se identificaron correlaciones entre la gravedad y el estrato socio-económico. Se hallaron correlaciones positivas entre síntomas de bulimia y las estrategias de autoinculparse y búsqueda de apoyo espiritual. También se encontró correlación positiva entre gravedad y las estrategias de búsqueda de apoyo espiritual y distracción física. Los resultados coinciden parcialmente con estudios previos sobre el tema puesto que las estrategias que se relacionan con los síntomas y gravedad de la bulimia son evitativas y centradas en la emoción. Finalmente, se expone la necesidad de realizar más estudios comparando muestras clínicas y no clínicas.

  8. The clinical basis of orthorexia nervosa: emerging perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koven NS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nancy S Koven, Alexandra W Abry Department of Psychology, Bates College, Lewiston, ME, USA Abstract: Orthorexia nervosa describes a pathological obsession with proper nutrition that is characterized by a restrictive diet, ritualized patterns of eating, and rigid avoidance of foods believed to be unhealthy or impure. Although prompted by a desire to achieve optimum health, orthorexia may lead to nutritional deficiencies, medical complications, and poor quality of life. Despite its being a distinct behavioral pattern that is frequently observed by clinicians, orthorexia has received very little empirical attention and is not yet formally recognized as a psychiatric disorder. In this review, we synthesize existing research to identify what is known about the symptoms, prevalence, neuropsychological profile, and treatment of orthorexia. An examination of diagnostic boundaries reveals important points of symptom overlap between orthorexia and anorexia nervosa, obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD, obsessive–compulsive personality disorder (OCPD, somatic symptom disorder, illness anxiety disorder, and psychotic spectrum disorders. Neuropsychological data suggest that orthorexic symptoms are independently associated with key facets of executive dysfunction for which some of these conditions already overlap. Discussion of cognitive weaknesses in set-shifting, external attention, and working memory highlights the value of continued research to identify intermediate, transdiagnostic endophenotypes for insight into the neuropathogenesis of orthorexia. An evaluation of current orthorexia measures indicates a need for further psychometric development to ensure that subsequent research has access to reliable and valid assessment tools. Optimized assessment will not only permit a clearer understanding of prevalence rates, psychosocial risk factors, and comorbid psychopathology but will also be needed to index intervention effectiveness. Though the field

  9. The Production of "Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Anorexia and Bulimia, but Were Afraid to Ask".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Marc A.

    This report describes the research study involved in developing a document on anorexia and bulimia for the lay population. Chapter I focuses on the basic areas that provided the foundation for the study: (1) the definitions of specific eating disorders; (2) the role of the mass media in affecting anorexics and bulimics, and in educating the public…

  10. How much should I eat? Estimation of meal portions in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milos, Gabriella; Kuenzli, Cornelia; Soelch, Chantal Martin; Schumacher, Sonja; Moergeli, Hanspeter; Mueller-Pfeiffer, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    Pathological concern regarding one's weight and weight gain is a crucial feature of anorexia nervosa. Consequently, anorexia nervosa patients often claim that they are uncertain regarding the amount of food they should eat. The present study investigated whether individuals with anorexia nervosa show an altered estimation of meal portion sizes and whether this estimation is modulated by an intent-to-eat instruction (where patients are asked to imagine having to eat the presented meal), meal type and meal portion size. Twenty-four women with anorexia nervosa and 27 healthy women estimated, using a visual analogue scale, the size of six different portions of three different meals, with and without intent-to-eat instructions. Subjects with anorexia nervosa estimated the size of small and medium meal portions (but not large meal servings) as being significantly larger, compared to estimates of healthy controls. The overestimation of small meal portions by anorexia nervosa subjects was significantly greater in the intent-to-eat, compared to general, condition. These findings suggest that disturbed perceptions associated with anorexia nervosa not only include interoceptive awareness (i.e., body weight and shape), but also extend to external disorder-related objects such as meal portion size. Specific therapeutic interventions, such as training regarding meal portion evaluation, could address these difficulties.

  11. Orthorexia nervosa with hyponatremia, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastimum, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung; Kwon, Young Joo

    2011-06-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients.

  12. Anorexia nervosa e família : estudo de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Marques Borges

    2009-01-01

    Os transtornos alimentares têm despertado interesse entre os profissionais de saúde em decorrência do crescente aumento de casos, alguns deles veiculados na mídia. Apesar disso, muitas dúvidas ainda cercam essas patologias. O funcionamento do sistema familiar de adolescentes com diagnóstico de anorexia nervosa tem sido tema de investigação por autores da terapia familiar sistêmica e os estudos têm relacionado o transtorno a algumas características da dinâmica conjugal e familiar. Esta pesquis...

  13. Dying To Be Thin: Attachment to Death in Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Latzer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia Nervosa (AN usually follows a prolonged course accompanied by significant morbidity and high mortality. AN patients have been found to have elevated and attempted suicide rates, with suicide being the second most common cause of death in AN after the complications of the disorder itself. The suicide risk in AN is similar to that in major depression or conduct disorder and linked mainly to longer duration of illness, lower weight, bingeing and purging, impulsivity-related manifestations, comorbid substance abuse, and affective disorder. This paper reviews suicidal tendency and disturbed body image, death and eating disorders, and attachment and death with clinical implications related to AN.

  14. Literature Review of Cognitive Neuroscience and Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reville, Marie-Claire; O'Connor, Lorna; Frampton, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Studies published between the beginning of 2013 and May 2015 on the neuropsychological functioning of patients with anorexia nervosa compared with healthy participants framed in the context of the Research Domain Criteria matrix identifies evidence for functional differences in three domains: Negative Valance Systems-negative attentional biases and lack of neural responsivity to hunger; Cognitive Systems-limited congruence between clinical and cognitive performance, poorer non-verbal than verbal performance, altered attentional styles to disorder related stimuli, perceptual processing impairment in discriminating body images, weaknesses in central coherence, set shifting weaknesses at low weight status, decision-making weaknesses, and greater neural resources required for working memory; Systems for Social Processes-patients appear to have a different attentional response to faces, and perception and understanding of self and others. Hence, there is evidence to suggest that patients with anorexia nervosa have a specific neuropsychological performance style across tasks in three domains of functioning. Some current controversies and areas for future development are identified.

  15. The socio-emotional processing stream in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldershaw, A; Hambrook, D; Stahl, D; Tchanturia, K; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U

    2011-01-01

    The significance of socio-emotional factors in development and maintenance of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) has been noted, but the literature is poorly integrated without clear models guiding research or treatment. This systematic review retrieved experimental studies of social-cognitive or affective processing in AN and categorised them using Ochsner's "Social-Emotional Processing Stream." Ochsner's "Processing Stream", based on healthy data, comprises five constructs: (1) acquisition of and (2) recognition and response to social-affective stimuli, (3) low-level and (4) high-level mental state inference and (5) context-sensitive emotion regulation. Thirty-seven experimental studies in Anorexia Nervosa were identified, mapping on to four of the five constructs (not Construct 3). A meta-analysis of nine affect recognition studies was conducted. AN patients demonstrated impairments in each of the four domains with preliminary reports that some difficulties are trait-like, and others ameliorate following recovery. Socio-emotional data was integrated with previous reports of neural abnormalities to generate an AN specific model of socio-emotional processing. Additional research is required for further definition and to translate experimental findings into clinical practice.

  16. An Integrative Bio-Psycho-Social Theory of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Calum; Randell, Louise; Lawrie, Stephen M

    2017-01-01

    The need for novel approaches to understanding and treating anorexia nervosa (AN) is well recognized. The aim of this paper is to describe an integrative bio-psycho-social theory of maintaining factors in AN. We took a triangulation approach to develop a clinically relevant theory with face validity and internal consistency. We developed theoretical ideas from our clinical practice and reviewed theoretical ideas within the eating disorders and wider bio-psycho-social literature. The synthesis of these ideas and concepts into a clinically meaningful framework is described here. We suggest eight key factors central to understanding the maintenance and treatment resistance of anorexia nervosa: genetic or experiential predisposing factors; dysfunctional feelings processing and regulation systems; excessive vulnerable feelings; 'feared self' beliefs; starvation as a maladaptive physiological feelings regulation mechanism; maladaptive psychological coping modes; maladaptive social behaviour; and unmet physical and psychological core needs. Each of these factors serves to maintain the disorder. The concept of universal physical and psychological core needs can provide an underpinning integrative framework for working with this distinctly physical and psychological disorder. This framework could be used within any treatment model. We suggest that treatments which help address the profound lack of trust, emotional security and self-acceptance in this patient group will in turn address unmet needs and improve well-being. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Current treatment for anorexia nervosa: efficacy, safety, and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay P Bodell

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay P Bodell, Pamela K KeelDepartment of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USAAbstract: Anorexia nervosa (AN is a serious psychiatric illness associated with significant medical and psychiatric morbidity, psychosocial impairment, increased risk of death, and chronicity. Given the severity of the disorder, the establishment of safe and effective treatments is necessary. Several treatments have been tried in AN, but few favorable results have emerged. This paper reviews randomized controlled trials in AN, and provides a synthesis of existing data regarding the efficacy, safety, and adherence associated with pharmacologic and psychological interventions. Randomized controlled trials for the treatment of AN published in peer-reviewed journals were identified by electronic and manual searches. Overall, pharmacotherapy has limited benefits in the treatment of AN, with some promising preliminary findings associated with olanzapine, an antipsychotic agent. No single psychological intervention has demonstrated clear superiority in treating adults with AN. In adolescents with AN, the evidence base is strongest for the use of family therapy over alternative individual psychotherapies. Results highlight challenges in both treating individuals with AN and in studying the effects of those treatments, and further emphasize the importance of continued efforts to develop novel interventions. Treatment trials currently underway and areas for future research are discussed.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, treatment, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, randomized controlled trials

  18. A LITERATURE REVIEW ON ARGYREIA NERVOSA (BURM. F. BOJER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meher Ashutosh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Various herbal drugs individually or in combination have been recommended for the treatment of different diseases. Argyreia nervosa Burm. F. (Syn. Argyreia speciosa commonly known as ‘Vridha daraka’ in Sanskrit belongs to family Convolvulaceae has been used in different system of traditional medication for the treatment of diseases and ailments of human beings. It is reported to contain several phytochemical constituents like Alkaloids, Carbohydrate, Tannins, amber-colored resin, Sterols, Saponin. Economically it is used as folklore medicine as well as for ornamental purpose. Argyreia nervosa is an important source of compounds like 1-triacontanol, ß-sitosterol, epifriedeline, Kaemperol-3-o-l-rhamnopyranoside, agroclavine, ergine, isoergine, isolysergic acid amide, pennidavine, caffeic acid, Et-caffeate, chanoclavine-I, chanoclavine-II, racemic chanoclavine-I, festuclavine, lysergine, lysergol, isolysergol, molliclavine, penniclavine, steoclavine, isosetoclavine, tetradecanyl palminate, 5,8-oxidotetraco san-10-one, stigmasteryl p-hydroxycinnamate, n-tricontanol, β-sitosterol and p-hydroxy innamoyloctadecanolate which are useful as Aphrodisiac, Immunomodulators, Hepatoprotective, Hypoglycemic, Anti Inflammatory, Anticonvulsant and Nootropic etc.

  19. Anorexia Nervosa Presented with Fever and Pancytopenia Due to Severe Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senay Akbay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of eating disorders is on the increase in adolescence and childhood. The peak age of onset occurs between 14 and 19 years. Anorexia nervosa is diagnosed approximately nine times more often in females than in males. Anorexia nervosa is a eating disorder that occurs mainly in female adolescents and young women. Eating disorders are associated with severe and sometimes life-threatening medical and psychiatric comorbidities. Hematological abnormalities are common in anorexia nervosa. But severe bone marrow supression has rarely been reported. To our knowledge, there is not any publication in the literature about bone marrow supression due to constipation.We reported here a 17 years old girl diagnosed as anorexia nervosa who was not wasted yet, presented with constipation and developed fever and pancytopenia.

  20. Preliminar pytochemical study on leaves and stems of brachylepis nervosa wight & arnot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, M D; Reddy, Y S; Sarma, G V; Swamy, M M; Suresh, B

    1998-10-01

    Brachylepis nervosa, Wight and Arnot, belongs to the family asclepiadaceae is indigenous to ills of the Nilgiris and distribution of which is restricted to Wellington and kothagiri. The present work summarises preliminary phytochemical characters of this plant.

  1. Anorexia nervosa complicated by diabetes mellitus: the case for permissive hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carrie; Mehler, Philip S

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and anorexia nervosa results in an increased incidence of known diabetic complications such as retinopathy and nephropathy, presumably because blood glucose is difficult to control within the throes of comorbid anorexia nervosa. In addition, even when a diabetic patient with anorexia nervosa has committed to resolving his or her eating disorder, glucose control is again difficult and fraught with complexity and peril as will be highlighted in the following case report. Prudence dictates that strict glucose control is not indicated for the relatively short period of time that constitutes the early stage of refeeding in a patient with severe anorexia nervosa. Rather, "permissive hyperglycemia" may be the more optimal course to pursue, as a clinical strategy which is considerate of both the criticality of the refeeding treatment plan and of the long-term nature of the diabetic illness.

  2. Heightened Olfactory Sensitivity in Young Females with Recent-Onset Anorexia Nervosa and Recovered Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Mette; Guldberg, Johanne; Vangkilde, Signe

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Olfaction may be related to food restriction and weight loss. However, reports regarding olfactory function in individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) have been inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: Characterize olfactory sensitivity and identification in female adolescents and young adults...

  3. Diurnal variation of the serum leptin concentration in patients with anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Vinten, J; Handberg, A

    1998-01-01

    , however, this has been reported to be absent in normal weighted amenorrheic athletes. Anorexia nervosa is associated with multiple endocrine abnormalities. Hypothalamic amenorrhoea often precedes the weight loss and may persist after weight recovery. We hypothesized that leptin could be involved...... in the regulation of eating behaviour and gonadal function in anorexia nervosa. DESIGN: We measured the concentration of leptin in serum samples taken after an overnight fast in 18 female anorexia nervosa patients and 11 controls. To study diurnal variation, eight patients and 11 controls were hospitalized for 24 h...... and had a standardized diet at regular times. Seven blood samples were obtained at 4 h intervals from each subject. PATIENTS: The patients fulfilled the DSM-IV criteria for anorexia nervosa. The mean body mass index for the patients was 14.2 +/- 2.3 kg/m2 and for controls 20.3 +/- 1.7 kg/m2. RESULTS...

  4. Autism spectrum disorder in individuals with anorexia nervosa and in their first- and second-degree relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Susanne V; Tidselbak Larsen, Janne; Mouridsen, Svend E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical and population-based studies report increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in individuals with anorexia nervosa and in their relatives. No nationwide study has yet been published on co-occurrence of these disorders. AIMS: To investigate comorbidity of ASD...... in individuals with anorexia nervosa, and aggregation of ASD and anorexia nervosa in their relatives. METHOD: In Danish registers we identified all individuals born in 1981-2008, their parents, and full and half siblings, and linked them to data on hospital admissions for psychiatric disorders. RESULTS: Risk...... of comorbidity of ASD in probands with anorexia nervosa and aggregation of ASD in families of anorexia nervosa probands were increased. However, the risk of comorbid and familial ASD did not differ significantly from comorbid and familial major depression or any psychiatric disorder in anorexia nervosa probands...

  5. Diseño y Validación de una Tarea Computarizada Tipo Stroop para Evaluar Sesgos de la Atención en Bulimia Nerviosa

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban Jaime Camacho-Ruíz; Juan Manuel Mancilla-Díaz; María Del Consuelo Escoto-Ponce De León; María Guillermina Yáñez-Tellez

    2009-01-01

    Objetivo: Desarrollar una tarea computarizada tipo Stroop para evaluar sesgos en la atención hacia palabras relacionadas con la comida y la figura, en pacientes con bulimia nerviosa. Se desarrollaron cuatro listas de palabras con valencia positiva y negativa, relacionadas con la comida y la figura corporal. Método: treinta y dos mujeres con bulimia nerviosa emparejadas con 32 mujeres sin trastorno, respondieron la versión original y una modificada de la Prueba de Stroop computarizada. Resulta...

  6. Review of Liebman et al.'s 'An integrated treatment program for anorexia nervosa'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Shelagh

    2006-07-01

    This article reviews the paper by Liebman, Minuchin, and Baker (1974) describing the use of a family meal as part of an integrated treatment approach for anorexia nervosa. The ideas laid out in the paper are described and discussed in terms of the understanding of anorexia nervosa at the time as well as placed in a current clinical and theoretical context. A comment is made on whether or not, in this author's opinion, the paper stands 'the test of time'.

  7. Hepatic glycogen deposition in a patient with anorexia nervosa and persistently abnormal transaminase levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kransdorf, Lisa N; Millstine, Denise; Smith, Maxwell L; Aqel, Bashar A

    2016-04-01

    Anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders characterized by calorie restriction have been associated with a variety of hepatic abnormalities. Fatty steatosis has been described in eating disorder patients. We report the rare finding of glycogen accumulation in the liver in a patient with anorexia nervosa, which to our knowledge is only the second such case reported in the literature. This case highlights the importance of monitoring for liver abnormalities in patients with restrictive eating disorders.

  8. Unusual presentation of uncommon disease: anorexia nervosa presenting as wernicke-korsakoff syndrome-a case report from southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Raheel; Shoib, Sheikh; Shah, Tabindah; Bhat, Mudasir; Singh, Randhir; Mushtaq, Sahil

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa by mental health professionals can prevent development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  9. Unusual Presentation of Uncommon Disease: Anorexia Nervosa Presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome—A Case Report from Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheel Mushtaq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is rare. The causes of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome are multiple like alcohol abuse, thyrotoxicosis, haemodialysis, severe malnutrition because of gastric carcinoma and pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged parenteral feeding. We report a case of anorexia nervosa, who presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy and progressed to Korsakoff's syndrome. Knowledge, awareness, and early intervention of anorexia nervosa by mental health professionals can prevent development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  10. Practice guidelines for acupuncturists using acupuncture as an adjunctive treatment for anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Sarah; Ramjan, Lucie Michelle

    2015-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a potentially life-threatening eating disorder where people intentionally refuse to eat sufficient amounts to maintain a healthy body-weight for fear of becoming fat. The intense preoccupation with restriction of food and control of body weight makes this one of the most complex and confusing conditions for practitioners to treat. While no single treatment has been found to be superior to another in the treatment of anorexia nervosa, general practice guidelines are available to guide mainstream treatment, however there are no guidelines for practitioners of complementary therapies. Complementary therapies such as acupuncture show promise as an adjunctive therapy in improving co-morbidities such as depression and anxiety levels among people with anorexia nervosa, by strengthening mind, body and overall well-being. The aim of this guideline is to assist and support acupuncture practitioners to deliver effective and safe adjunctive acupuncture treatments to people with anorexia nervosa, by providing a practice guideline that is underpinned by an ethical and evidence-based framework. The use of complementary therapies and specifically acupuncture in the treatment of anorexia nervosa may provide important adjunctive care to allow a comprehensive treatment approach that potentially improves quality of life, reduces anxiety and instils hope for recovery. It is hoped that acupuncture practitioners treating patients with anorexia nervosa will refer to these guidelines and apply the guidance (as deemed appropriate).

  11. Interleukin-7 Plasma Levels in Human Differentiate Anorexia Nervosa, Constitutional Thinness and Healthy Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Natacha; Viltart, Odile; Loyens, Anne; Bruchet, Céline; Nadin, Katia; Wolowczuk, Isabelle; Estour, Bruno; Galusca, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine involved in energy homeostasis as demonstrated in rodents. Anorexia nervosa is characterized by restrained eating behavior despite adaptive orexigenic regulation profile including high ghrelin plasma levels. Constitutional thinness is a physiological condition of resistance to weight gain with physiological anorexigenic profile including high Peptide YY plasma level. Healthy obesity can be considered as a physiological state of resistance to weight loss with opposite appetite regulating profile to constitutional thinness including low Peptide YY plasma level. No studies in IL-7 are yet available in those populations. Therefore we evaluated circadian plasma levels of IL-7 in anorexia nervosa compared to constitutional thinness, healthy obese and control females. Materials and Methods 10 restrictive-type anorexia nervosa women, 5 bingeing/purging anorexia nervosa woman, 5 recovered restrictive anorexia nervosa women, 4 bulimic females, 10 constitutional thinness women, 7 healthy obese females, and 10 normal weight women controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study, performed in endocrinology unit and academic laboratory. Twelve-point circadian profiles of plasma IL-7 levels were measured in each subject. Results 24h mean IL-7 plasma levels (pg/ml, mean±SEM) were decreased in restrictive-type anorexia nervosa (123.4±14.4, pobese patients (51±3.2, pobesity, with low IL-7, is once again in mirror image of constitutional thinness with normal high IL-7. PMID:27611669

  12. An Adolescent Boy with Comorbid Anorexia Nervosa and Hashimoto Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pehlivantürk Kızılkan, Melis; Kanbur, Nuray; Akgül, Sinem; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer

    2016-03-05

    Low triiodothyronine syndrome is a physiological adaptation encountered in anorexia nervosa (AN) and generally improves with sufficient weight gain. However, when a primary thyroid pathology accompanies AN, both the evaluation of thyroid hormone levels and the management of the co-morbid disease become more challenging. Hashimoto thyroiditis could complicate the management of AN by causing hyper- or hypothyroidism. AN could also negatively affect the treatment of Hashimoto thyroiditis by altering body weight and metabolic rate, as well as by causing drug non-compliance. We present the case of a 15-year-old boy with comorbid AN restrictive sub-type and Hashimoto thyroiditis. In this case report, we aimed to draw attention to the challenges that could be encountered in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with AN when accompanied by Hashimoto thyroiditis.

  13. Perfectionism in anorexia nervosa: novel performance based evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Samantha; Yiend, Jenny; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tchanturia, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Existing research into perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is limited by a reliance upon self-report measures. This study used novel performance based measures to investigate whether there is behavioural evidence for elevated perfectionism in AN. 153 participants took part in the study--81 with a diagnosis of AN and 72 healthy controls (HCs). Participants completed two performance based tasks assessing perfectionism--a text replication task and a bead sorting task--along with self-report measures of perfectionism. Significant group differences were observed on both tasks. In the text replication task the AN group took significantly longer compared with healthy controls (p = 0.03, d = 0.36) and produced significantly higher quality copies (p = perfectionism. This study provides empirically tested evidence of elevated performance based perfectionism in AN compared with a healthy control group.

  14. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; El Ghoch, Marwan; Sartirana, Massimiliano; Calugi, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anorexia nervosa (AN), based on Beck's cognitive theory, was developed in a "generic" form in the early eighties. In recent years, however, improved knowledge of the mechanisms involved in maintaining eating disorder psychopathology has led to the development of a "specific" form of CBT, termed CBT-E (E = enhanced), designed to treat all forms of eating disorders, including AN, from outpatient to inpatient settings. Although more studies are required to assess the relative effectiveness of CBT-E with respect to other available treatments, the data indicate that in outpatient settings it is both viable and promising for adults and adolescents with AN. Encouraging results are also emerging from inpatient CBT-E, particularly in adolescents, and clinical services offering CBT-E at different levels of care are now offered in several countries around the world. However, CBT-E requires dissemination in order to become widely available to patients.

  15. Purtscher-Like Retinopathy Associated with Anorexia Nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugra Karasu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old girl presented with acute painless vision loss in her right eye. There was no remarkable ocular history and she had a history of anorexia nervosa. At presentation best-corrected visual acuities were counting fingers from 2 meters and 20/20, in the right and left eyes, respectively. Slit lamp examination result was normal. Fundus examination revealed multiple cotton wool spots and intraretinal hemorrhages surrounding the optic disc and macula in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed capillary filling defect and leakage from optic disc in the late phase of the angiogram. One week later best-corrected visual acuities remained the same in both eyes with similar fundus appearance. One month after initial presentation visual acuity was 20/20 in both eyes with no abnormality in fundus appearance.

  16. [Pathogenesis of anorexia nervosa. Neurobiological risk factors and possible endophenotypes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pászthy, Bea; Törzsök-Sonnevend, Mária

    2014-01-26

    Anorexia nervosa is a serious, chronical state of illness which often starts in childhood or adolescence and has serious consequences on the quality of life. This review focuses on the heterogenity of the disease with emphasis on special diagnostic implications in case of childhood onset. Research findings of the last decade showed that genetic and neurobiological vulnerabilities are at least as potent risk factors as psychological, family constellations and sociocultural preferences. The heritability of eating disorders levels those of diseases predominantly influenced by biological factors. The authors give a summary of the most investigated neurobiologic and neurocognitive factors which could be the fundaments of a biological vulnerablilty. To date, no common risk factor could be identified, but some existing adversities can clearly be related to distinct subgroups with the disorder. The concept of endo- and subphenotypes leads to more specific and more efficient methods of therapy in other somatic and psychiatric diseases.

  17. A Brief Review of the Biology of Anorexia Nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjögren, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Background: The etiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is unknown. A stress model for AN and other Eating Disorders, has been proposed by Connan and depicts risk factors and precipitating events, including biological, but several steps in this have yet to be evidenced. In order to elucidate the biology...... PUBMED and the following search terms: “Anorexia Nervosa” and “biomarker” revealed 180 articles (8th of May 2015). Additional searches included the search terms “gene”, “genetic”, “epigenetic”, “appetite”, “hormone”, and a specific search on “biology” and “review”. Furthermore, articles of interest were...... retrieved from the reference lists of the identified articles of the first PUBMED search. Results: In general, there is a shortage of studies on biomarkers and the biology of AN, at least when you compare to similar fields of research in Affective disorders and Schizophrenia. The studies performed reveals...

  18. Hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis masked by anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalls-Mantey, Adjoa; Steinglass, Joanna; Primack, Marshall; Clark-Hamilton, Jill; Bongiovi, Mary

    2015-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is typically associated with altered thyroid function tests, notably a low total and free T3 , and lower, but within normal range, free T4 and TSH. A 16-year-old girl with a four-year history of AN presented with elevated TSH that fluctuated with changes in weight. TSH was within normal limits (1.7-3.64 mIU/L) following periods of weight loss and elevated with weight gain (5.9-21.66 mIU/L). Antithyroperoxidase antibodies were markedly elevated, suggesting chronic Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Of note, the elevated TSH that would be expected in Hashimoto's thyroiditis was blunted by weight loss associated with AN. Physicians should be aware that AN may contribute to masking thyroid abnormalities in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  19. Anorexia Nervosa and Refeeding Syndrome. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohji Azumagawa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case story of a 14-year-old girl with severe anorexia nervosa (AN (158 cm, 28 kg, –44.1% ideal body mass index, admitted with purpura, edema, and general fatigue. We treated her carefully and paid particular attention to prevent development of refeeding syndrome (RS, and her body weight increased satisfactorily. However, RS (edema, hypoalbuminemia, and heart failure occurred despite careful treatment. We used albumin and diuretics for treatment of RS, but severe liver damage resulted. RS was aggravated by the medical treatment. More attention should have been paid to her weight gain and medical treatment should have been initiated more slowly to prevent dramatic changes in the patient's fluid and electrolyte status.

  20. Constitutional thinness and anorexia nervosa: a possible misdiagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estour, Bruno; Galusca, Bogdan; Germain, Natacha

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and biological aspects of restrictive anorexia nervosa (R-AN) are well documented. More than 10,000 articles since 1911 and more than 600 in 2013 have addressed R-AN psychiatric, somatic, and biological aspects. Genetic background, ineffectiveness of appetite regulating hormones on refeeding process, bone loss, and place of amenorrhea in the definition are widely discussed and reviewed. Oppositely, constitutional thinness (CT) is an almost unknown entity. Only 32 articles have been published on this topic since 1953. Similar symptoms associating low body mass index, low fat, and bone mass are reported in both CT and R-AN subjects. Conversely, menses are preserved in CT women and almost the entire hormonal profile is normal, except for leptin and PYY. The aim of the present review is to alert the clinician on the confusing clinical presentation of these two situations, a potential source of misdiagnosis, especially since R-AN definition has changed in DSM5.

  1. Constitutional thinness and anorexia nervosa: a possible misdiagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eEstour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and biological aspects of restrictive anorexia nervosa (R-AN are well documented. More than ten thousand articles since 1911 and more than six hundred in 2013 have addressed R-AN psychiatric, somatic and biological aspects. Genetic background, ineffectiveness of appetite regulating hormones on refeeding process, bone loss and place of amenorrhea in the definition are widely discussed and reviewed. Oppositely, constitutional thinness (CT is an almost unknown entity. Only 32 articles have been published on this topic since 1953. Similar symptoms associating low BMI, low fat and bone mass are reported in both CT and R-AN subjects. Conversely, menses are preserved in CT women and almost the entire hormonal profile is normal, except for leptin and PYY. The aim of the present review is to alert the clinician on the confusing clinical presentation of these two situations, a potential source of misdiagnosis, especially since R-AN definition has changed in DSM-5.

  2. The clinical basis of orthorexia nervosa: emerging perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koven, Nancy S; Abry, Alexandra W

    2015-01-01

    Orthorexia nervosa describes a pathological obsession with proper nutrition that is characterized by a restrictive diet, ritualized patterns of eating, and rigid avoidance of foods believed to be unhealthy or impure. Although prompted by a desire to achieve optimum health, orthorexia may lead to nutritional deficiencies, medical complications, and poor quality of life. Despite its being a distinct behavioral pattern that is frequently observed by clinicians, orthorexia has received very little empirical attention and is not yet formally recognized as a psychiatric disorder. In this review, we synthesize existing research to identify what is known about the symptoms, prevalence, neuropsychological profile, and treatment of orthorexia. An examination of diagnostic boundaries reveals important points of symptom overlap between orthorexia and anorexia nervosa, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), somatic symptom disorder, illness anxiety disorder, and psychotic spectrum disorders. Neuropsychological data suggest that orthorexic symptoms are independently associated with key facets of executive dysfunction for which some of these conditions already overlap. Discussion of cognitive weaknesses in set-shifting, external attention, and working memory highlights the value of continued research to identify intermediate, transdiagnostic endophenotypes for insight into the neuropathogenesis of orthorexia. An evaluation of current orthorexia measures indicates a need for further psychometric development to ensure that subsequent research has access to reliable and valid assessment tools. Optimized assessment will not only permit a clearer understanding of prevalence rates, psychosocial risk factors, and comorbid psychopathology but will also be needed to index intervention effectiveness. Though the field lacks data on therapeutic outcomes, current best practices suggest that orthorexia can successfully be treated with a

  3. Repercusiones de la anorexia y la bulimia en la salud oral, prevención y tratamiento

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez Jiménez, Antonio; Casals Peidró, Elías; Boj Quesada, Juan Ramón

    2000-01-01

    El presente artículo trata de aportar una puesta al día de los problemas que presentan los pacientes afectados de anorexia y de bulimia nerviosa. Se expone la información que el odontólogo debe tener en cuenta respecto al conocimiento de la enfermedad, sus manifestaciones orales, los criterios diagnósticos y los enfoques preventivos y terapéuticos necesarios.

  4. Severe and enduring anorexia nervosa (SEED-AN): a qualitative study of patients with 20+ years of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul H; Kukucska, Roza; Guidetti, Giulia; Leavey, Gerard

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about how patients with long-term eating disorders manage their clinical problems. We carried out a preliminary qualitative study (using Thematic Analysis) of patients with severe and enduring anorexia nervosa (SEED-AN) in which we undertook recorded interviews in eight participants whose conditions had lasted 20-40 years. We found 15 principle features in physical, psychological, social, family, occupational and treatment realms. Psychological and social realms were most affected. Severe physical problems were reported. They described feelings of unworthiness, frugality regarding money and obsessive time-keeping. Persisting with negligible social networks, participants described depression and hopelessness, while somehow achieving a sense of pride at their endurance and survival in spite of the eating disorder. They emphasized the importance of professional help in managing their care. The severe and enduring description, often reserved for people with psychotic illness, is appropriately applied to SEED-AN, which has major impacts in all realms.

  5. Partially restored resting-state functional connectivity in women recovered from anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Ilka; Geisler, Daniel; Tam, Friederike; King, Joseph A.; Ritschel, Franziska; Seidel, Maria; Bernardoni, Fabio; Murr, Julia; Goschke, Thomas; Calhoun, Vince D.; Roessner, Veit; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background We have previously shown increased resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) in the frontoparietal network (FPN) and the default mode network (DMN) in patients with acute anorexia nervosa. Based on these findings we investigated within-network rsFC in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa to examine whether these abnormalities are a state or trait marker of the disease. To extend the understanding of functional connectivity in patients with anorexia nervosa, we also estimated rsFC between large-scale networks. Methods Girls and women recovered from anorexia nervosa and pair-wise, age- and sex-matched healthy controls underwent a resting-state fMRI scan. Using independent component analyses (ICA), we isolated the FPN, DMN and salience network. We used standard comparisons as well as a hypothesis-based approach to test the findings of our previous rsFC study in this recovered cohort. Temporal correlations between network time-course pairs were computed to investigate functional network connectivity (FNC). Results Thirty-one patients recovered from anorexia nervosa and 31 controls participated in our study. Standard group comparisons revealed reduced rsFC between the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and the FPN in the recovered group. Using a hypothesis-based approach we extended the previous finding of increased rsFC between the angular gyrus and the FPN in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa. No group differences in FNC were revealed. Limitations The study design did not allow us to conclude that the difference found in rsFC constitutes a scar effect of the disease. Conclusion This study suggests that some abnormal rsFC patterns found in patients recovered from anorexia nervosa normalize after long-term weight restoration, while distorted rsFC in the FPN, a network that has been associated with cognitive control, may constitute a trait marker of the disorder. PMID:27045551

  6. The CT appearance of ``reversible`` cerebral pseudoatrophy in anorexia nervosa; Obraz KT ``odwracalnego`` rzekomego zaniku mozgu w jadlowstrecie nerwowym

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boron, Z.; Kozlowska, R.; Grzegorzewski, M.; Nawrot, M.; Bulawska, I. [Katedra i Zaklad Radiologii i Diagnostyki Narzadowej, Akademia Medyczna, Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The CT appearance of ``reversible`` cerebral pseudoatrophy resulting from anorexia nervosa was demonstrated. The CT studies were performed in 3 young women with typical clinical course of anorexia nervosa. In all of them computed tomography revealed dilatation of the subarachnoid fluid space. After 5 months of therapy the follow-up scans have reverted to normal in all cases. (author) 5 refs, 2 figs

  7. Treatment of chronic anorexia nervosa: a 4-year follow-up of adult patients treated in an acute inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Clive G; Fitzgerald, Kirsty-Anne; Hollin, Clive R

    2012-01-01

    Despite evidence from a number of long-term follow-up studies of anorexia nervosa that nearly 50% of patients eventually make a full recovery, controlled trials of psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa are lacking. Those with severe and enduring problems represent a considerable therapeutic challenge. Thirty-four consecutive adult referrals to the inpatient treatment unit who fulfilled Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa were examined pre-admission, post-discharge and 4 years after admission. Characteristics of remitted and non-remitted patients were examined. Secondary analyses considered the differences between patients with anorexia nervosa, restricting type and anorexia nervosa binging/purging type. The findings highlight a number of differences between patients with anorexia nervosa (restricting type) versus anorexia nervosa (binging/purging type) as well as remitted versus non-remitted patients. The use of a comprehensive battery of assessments found that resolution of eating disorder symptomatology was paralleled by improvements in emotional and psychological distress and improvement in body image perception and coping skills. Better results were obtained for those who had continuity of care on an outpatient basis. This pattern is particularly significant given the more 'chronic' nature of the sample that were older, with a higher incidence of binge-eating and purging than previous samples. Results provide some encouragement for the treatment of those adults with anorexia nervosa who typically have less favourable outcomes. 

  8. [An anorexia nervosa case and an approach to this case with pharmacotherapy and psychodrama techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdel, Osman; Ateşci, Figen; Oğuzhanoğlu, Nalan K

    2003-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa in an eating disorder that primarily affects female adolescents and is more commonly seen in westernized countries. Although it is a sociocultural problem of developed societies, nowadays it is also increasing rapidly in developing cultures such as Turkey. Difficulties in the treatment of anorexia nervosa have directed clinicians to understand the disorder better. Although it is well known that various factors play a role in the etiology of anorexia nervosa, psychodynamic factors also have considerable importance. In addition, social and familial interactions contribute to the development of anorexia nervosa. In the light of these facts, treatment with psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy might be used to cure this disorder. In this article, the definitive features and process of anorexia nervosa along with its psychodynamics were discussed on the basis of a case. In the treatment of the patient, psychodrama techniques with drugs were thought to be useful. The patient became aware of the unfavourable relationship and improved by the use of this method. Thus she gained emotional-cognitive insight.

  9. Two diagnoses become one? Rare case report of anorexia nervosa and Cushing’s syndrome

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    Sawicka N

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nadia Sawicka,* Maria Gryczyńska,* Jerzy Sowiński, Monika Tamborska-Zedlewska, Marek Ruchała Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal Medicine, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis impairment in anorexia nervosa is marked by hypercortisolemia, and psychiatric disorders occur in the majority of patients with Cushing’s syndrome. Here we report a patient diagnosed with anorexia nervosa who also developed Cushing’s syndrome. A 26-year-old female had been treated for anorexia nervosa since she was 17 years old, and also developed depression and paranoid schizophrenia. She was admitted to the Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Internal Medicine with a preliminary diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome. Computed tomography revealed a 27 mm left adrenal tumor, and she underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy. She was admitted to hospital 6 months after this procedure, at which time she did not report any eating or mood disorder. This is a rare case report of a patient with anorexia nervosa in whom Cushing’s syndrome was subsequently diagnosed. Diagnostic difficulties were caused by the signs and symptoms presenting in the course of both disorders, ie, hypercortisolemia, osteoporosis, secondary amenorrhea, striae, hypokalemia, muscle weakness, and depression.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, Cushing’s syndrome, adrenalectomy, osteoporosis

  10. What can we learn from the history of male anorexia nervosa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengyuan

    2014-01-01

    The eating disorders literature has focussed on females and little is known of the male experience. The overall image this has generated suggests a young woman in conflict with socio-cultural pressures which associate thinness with beauty. Historical studies have examined anorexia nervosa from an entirely female focus while ignoring how diagnostic categories have shaped approaches to the male body. This paper will track the case of the male with anorexia nervosa through changing theories of causation and treatment approaches, from when the condition first emerged in 1873 to the present. In doing so, we gain a valuable new insight into how anorexia nervosa has been historically gendered and the far-reaching implications this has had for diagnosis and treatment of the male sufferer. Similarities between the sexes helped to establish male anorexia as a distinct category. However, this shifted focus away from important differences, which have yet unexplored implications in the assessment, diagnosis and management of disordered eating. Throughout history, there has been constant pressure to give a precise definition to anorexia nervosa, despite being fraught with medical uncertainties. This has resulted in inevitably harmful generalisations rooted in the dominant epidemiology. This paper reveals that anorexia nervosa is a truly global phenomenon which cannot be adequately constructed through exclusive studies of the female. There is consequently a pressing need to address the dearth of research examining eating disorders in males.

  11. Increased resting state functional connectivity in the default mode network in recovered anorexia nervosa.

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    Cowdrey, Felicity A; Filippini, Nicola; Park, Rebecca J; Smith, Stephen M; McCabe, Ciara

    2014-02-01

    Functional brain imaging studies have shown abnormal neural activity in individuals recovered from anorexia nervosa (AN) during both cognitive and emotional task paradigms. It has been suggested that this abnormal activity which persists into recovery might underpin the neurobiology of the disorder and constitute a neural biomarker for AN. However, no study to date has assessed functional changes in neural networks in the absence of task-induced activity in those recovered from AN. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whole brain resting state functional connectivity in nonmedicated women recovered from anorexia nervosa. Functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained from 16 nonmedicated participants recovered from anorexia nervosa and 15 healthy control participants. Independent component analysis revealed functionally relevant resting state networks. Dual regression analysis revealed increased temporal correlation (coherence) in the default mode network (DMN) which is thought to be involved in self-referential processing. Specifically, compared to healthy control participants the recovered anorexia nervosa participants showed increased temporal coherence between the DMN and the precuneus and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex/inferior frontal gyrus. The findings support the view that dysfunction in resting state functional connectivity in regions involved in self-referential processing and cognitive control might be a vulnerability marker for the development of anorexia nervosa.

  12. Tc-99m labeled triethelene tetraamine polysterene resin gastric emptying studies in bulimia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih Weijen; Castellanos, F.X.; Domstad, P.A.; DeLand, F.H.; Humphries, L.; Digenis, G.A.

    1987-07-01

    To evaluate gastric emptying in patients with bulimia, 20 patients (all women, ranging in age from 12 to 49 years) with upper gastrointestinal symptoms ingested 150-200 ..mu..Ci/sup 99m/ Tc-triethelene tetraamine polysterene resin in cereal and had scintigraphy in the supine position. Data were accumulated at 5 min intervals to determine the gastric emptying time (GET). The results showed that the gastric emptying time was prolonged in 12 patients and decreased in 8. All 12 patients with prolonged emptying time were given 10 mg metoclopramide intravenously; 9 of these had a good response and 3 had no response. Although all patients had subjective symptoms of gastric dysfunction, the results indicate that about 60% had delayed and 40% had rapid gastric emptying. The findings of two extremes of gastric emptying time remain to be explained, however, this enables (Albibi and McCullum 1983) objective documentation of gastric emptying as this technique (American Psychiatric Association 1980) can separate those patients with rapid GET from those with prolonged GET, who might benefit from metoclopramide.

  13. O corpo feminino na adolescência: os saberes de estudantes sobre anorexia e bulimia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Silva Cardoso

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A tendência ao aumento dos transtornos alimentares vem preocupando cada vez mais. Adolescentes e jovens estão privando-se dos princípios básicos da alimentação saudável em busca do corpo perfeito. Padrões de beleza impostos pela sociedade influenciam determinantemente na imagem corporal desses indivíduos e a necessidade de aceitação pela sociedade faz com que atitudes de risco a saúde sejam tomadas pelos adolescentes e jovens. O desenvolvimento de transtornos alimentares nessa etapa da vida é preocupante, pois é nesse momento que os adolescentes e os jovens começam a conhecer e desenvolver seu corpo. Faz-se necessário, cada vez mais, a presença de um profissional que possa fazer um contraponto a esta cultura e não apenas continuar reproduzindo o ideal de corpo perfeito. O objetivo desse estudo foi verificar quais os saberes de estudantes do gênero feminino sobre anorexia e bulimia, investigar qual a influência que a mídia exerce na concepção de corpo em adolescentes e analisar os riscos dessas adolescentes em desenvolver algum tipo de transtorno alimentar com base na satisfação com sua imagem corporal.

  14. Demographic, Psychological, and Weight-Related Correlates of Weight Control Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Anorexia Nervosa (AN), 1-3% for Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and 0.7-4.0% for Binge Eating Disorder (BED; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The gender...the female to male ratio for bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa is 10:1, the female to male ratio for binge eating disorder is only 2.5:1 (Jacobi...Disorders Inventory (Garner, 1991) is a 64-item self-report measure used to assess cognitive and behavioral symptoms of anorexia nervosa and

  15. Inpatient cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: immediate and longer-term effects

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    Riccardo eDalle Grave

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa is often successful in restoring body weight, but a high percentage of patients relapse following discharge. The aim of the present study was to establish the immediate and longer-term effects of a novel inpatient program for adolescents that was designed to produce enduring change. Method: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with severe anorexia nervosa were admitted to a 20-week inpatient treatment program based upon enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E. The patients were assessed before and after hospitalization, and six and 12 months later. Results: Twenty-six patients (96% completed the program. In these patients there was a substantial improvement in weight, eating disorder features and general psychopathology that was well maintained at 12-month follow-up. Conclusions: These findings suggest that inpatient CBT-E is a promising approach to the treatment of adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa.

  16. Increased reverse T/sub 3/ concentration in patients with anorexia nervosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowska, B.; Kaniewski, M.; Zgliczynski, S. (Centrum Medyczne Ksztalcenia Podyplomowego, Warsaw (Poland))

    1980-01-01

    In 20 female patients with anorexia nervosa, aging 16 - 26 years, the thyroid function was estimated by +- determining TSH secretion in response to TRH, and serum thyroxine (T/sub 4/), 3,5,3'L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) and 3,3',5'L-triiodothyronine (reverse T/sub 3/) concentrations. 14 healthy women of the same age were included into the control group. If compared with control group, a marked supression of TRH stimulated TSH secretion and a lowering of serum T/sub 3/ concentration was found in patients with anorexia nervosa. On the other hand, serum reverse T/sub 3/ concentration was markedly higher in patients with anorexia nervosa than in control ones. Gain of body weight leads to normalization of thyroid hormones level in the serum. Obtained results show for peripheral mechanism of described hormonal disorders.

  17. Phobic memory and somatic vulnerabilities in anorexia nervosa: a necessary unity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myslobodsky Michael

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Anorexia nervosa is a clinically significant illness that may be associated with permanent medical complications involving almost every organ system. The paper raises a question whether some of them are associated with premorbid vulnerability such as subcellular ion channel abnormalities ('channelopathy' that determines the clinical expression of the bodily response to self-imposed malnutrition. Aberrant channels emerge as a tempting, if rather speculative alternative to the notion of cognitively-driven neurotransmitter modulation deficit in anorexia nervosa. The concept of channelopathies is in keeping with some characteristics of anorexia nervosa, such as a genetically-based predisposition to hypophagia, early onset, cardiac abnormalities, an appetite-enhancing efficacy of some antiepileptic drugs, and others. The purpose of this article is to stimulate further basic research of ion channel biophysics in relation to restrictive anorexia.

  18. Psychopathology of EDNOS Patients: To Whom Do They Compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, Sasha; Vartanian, Lenny R.; Touyz, Stephen W.; Beumont, P. J. V.

    2004-01-01

    Do the levels of psychopathology displayed by patients with an eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) more closely resemble those displayed by full-criteria anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients than they do those of non-eating-disorder controls? Three groups of eating disorder patients (anorexia nervosa, n = 27; bulimia nervosa, n = 23;…

  19. Cancer Incidence among Patients with Anorexia Nervosa from Sweden, Denmark and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellemkjaer, Lene; Papadopoulos, Fotios C; Pukkala, Eero; Ekbom, Anders; Gissler, Mika; Christensen, Jane; Olsen, Jørgen H

    2015-01-01

    A diet with restricted energy content reduces the occurrence of cancer in animal experiments. It is not known if the underlying mechanism also exists in human beings. To determine whether cancer incidence is reduced among patients with anorexia nervosa who tend to have a low intake of energy, we carried out a retrospective cohort study of 22 654 women and 1678 men diagnosed with anorexia nervosa at ages 10-50 years during 1968-2010 according to National Hospital Registers in Sweden, Denmark and Finland. The comparison group consisted of randomly selected persons from population registers who were similar to the anorexia nervosa patients in respect to sex, year of birth and place of residence. Patients and population comparisons were followed for cancer by linkage to Cancer Registries. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) were estimated using Poisson models. In total, 366 cases of cancer (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) were seen among women with anorexia nervosa, and the IRR for all cancer sites was 0.97 (95% CI = 0.87-1.08) adjusted for age, parity and age at first child. There were 76 breast cancers corresponding to an adjusted IRR of 0.61 (95% CI = 0.49-0.77). Significantly increased IRRs were observed for esophageal, lung, and liver cancer. Among men with anorexia nervosa, there were 23 cases of cancer (age-adjusted IRR = 1.08; 95% CI = 0.71-1.66). There seems to be no general reduction in cancer occurrence among patients with anorexia nervosa, giving little support to the energy restriction hypothesis.

  20. Health status, physical activity, and orthorexia nervosa: A comparison between exercise science students and business students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmborg, Julia; Bremander, Ann; Olsson, M Charlotte; Bergman, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Orthorexia nervosa is described as an exaggerated fixation on healthy food. It is unclear whether students in health-oriented academic programs, highly focused on physical exercise, are more prone to develop orthorexia nervosa than students in other educational areas. The aim was to compare health status, physical activity, and frequency of orthorexia nervosa between university students enrolled in an exercise science program (n = 118) or a business program (n = 89). The students completed the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), and ORTO-15, which defines orthorexia nervosa as a sensitive and obsessive behavior towards healthy nutrition. The SF-36 showed that exercise science students scored worse than business students regarding bodily pain (72.8 vs. 82.5; p = 0.001), but better regarding general health (83.1 vs. 77.1; p = 0.006). Of 188 students, 144 (76.6%) had an ORTO-15 score indicating orthorexia nervosa, with a higher proportion in exercise science students than in business students (84.5% vs. 65.4%; p = 0.002). Orthorexia nervosa in combination with a high level of physical activity was most often seen in men in exercise science studies and less often in women in business studies (45.1% vs. 8.3%; p students may cause problems in the future, since they are expected to coach others in healthy living. Our findings may be valuable in the development of health-oriented academic programs and within student healthcare services.